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Sample records for addition molecular modeling

  1. Synthesis, Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and DNA Interaction Studies of Copper Complex Containing Food Additive Carmoisine Dye.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Akbari, Alireza; Jamshidbeigi, Mina; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-06-01

    A copper complex of carmoisine dye; [Cu(carmoisine)2(H2O)2]; was synthesized and characterized by using physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding of this complex with calf thymus (ct) DNA was investigated by circular dichroism, absorption studies, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. UV-vis results confirmed that the Cu complex interacted with DNA to form a ground-state complex and the observed binding constant (2× 10(4) M(-1)) is more in keeping with the groove bindings with DNA. Furthermore, the viscosity measurement result showed that the addition of complex causes no significant change on DNA viscosity and it indicated that the intercalation mode is ruled out. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played major roles in the reaction. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that the complex can change the conformation of DNA from B-like form toward A-like conformation. The cytotoxicity studies of the carmoisine dye and its copper complex indicated that both of them had anticancer effects on HT-29 (colon cancer) cell line and they may be new candidates for treatment of the colon cancer. PMID:27152751

  2. Manipulating crystallization with molecular additives.

    PubMed

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Lee, Stephanie S; Kahr, Bart; Ward, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of organic crystals in a wide range of industrial applications, the chemistry, biology, materials science, and chemical engineering communities have focused considerable attention on developing methods to control crystal structure, size, shape, and orientation. Tailored additives have been used to control crystallization to great effect, presumably by selectively binding to particular crystallographic surfaces and sites. However, substantial knowledge gaps still exist in the fundamental mechanisms that govern the formation and growth of organic crystals in both the absence and presence of additives. In this review, we highlight research discoveries that reveal the role of additives, either introduced by design or present adventitiously, on various stages of formation and growth of organic crystals, including nucleation, dislocation spiral growth mechanisms, growth inhibition, and nonclassical crystal morphologies. The insights from these investigations and others of their kind are likely to guide the development of innovative methods to manipulate crystallization for a wide range of materials and applications. PMID:24579880

  3. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online. PMID:24729671

  4. Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-06-01

    Molecular modeling has trickled down from the realm of pharmaceutical and research laboratories into the realm of undergraduate chemistry instruction. It has opened avenues for the visualization of chemical concepts that previously were difficult or impossible to convey. I am sure that many of you have developed exercises using the various molecular modeling tools. It is the desire of this Journal to become an avenue for you to share these exercises among your colleagues. It is to this end that Ron Starkey has agreed to edit such a column and to publish not only the description of such exercises, but also the software documents they use. The WWW is the obvious medium to distribute this combination and so accepted submissions will appear online as a feature of JCE Internet. Typical molecular modeling exercise: finding conformation energies. Molecular Modeling Exercises and Experiments is the latest feature column of JCE Internet, joining Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Hal's Picks, and Mathcad in the Chemistry Curriculum. JCE Internet continues to seek submissions in these areas of interest and submissions of general interest. If you have developed materials and would like to submit them, please see our Guide to Submissions for more information. The Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Equipment Buyers Guide, and WWW Site Review would also like to hear about chemistry textbooks and software, equipment, and WWW sites, respectively. Please consult JCE Internet Features to learn more about these resources at JCE Online. Email Announcements Would you like to be informed by email when the latest issue of the Journal is available online? when a new JCE Software title is shipping? when a new JCE Internet article has been published or is available for Open Review? when your subscription is about to expire? A new feature of JCE Online makes this possible. Visit our Guestbook to learn how. When

  5. An Additive Definition of Molecular Complexity.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Thomas

    2016-03-28

    A framework for molecular complexity is established that is based on information theory and consistent with chemical knowledge. The resulting complexity index Cm is derived from abstracting the information content of a molecule by the degrees of freedom in the microenvironments on a per-atom basis, allowing the molecular complexity to be calculated in a simple and additive way. This index allows the complexity of any molecule to be universally assessed and is sensitive to stereochemistry, heteroatoms, and symmetry. The performance of this complexity index is evaluated and compared against the current state of the art. Its additive character gives consistent values also for very large molecules and supports direct comparisons of chemical reactions. Finally, this approach may provide a useful tool for medicinal chemistry in drug design and lead selection, as demonstrated by correlating molecular complexities of antibiotics with compound-specific parameters. PMID:26857537

  6. Theory of atomic additivity in molecular hyperpolizabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.

    1987-01-01

    Hyperpolarizability is a function of frequency. This is called dispersion. Because of the Kramers-Kronig relations, researchers expect that a material that is dispersing light is also absorbing it. Where there is both dispersion and absorption, the molecular polarizabilities are complex functions of the frequency. This led researchers to consider atomic additivity in both the real and imaginary parts of the ordinary and hyperpolarizabilities. This effort is desirable not only from a theoretical point of view, but also because of the existence of a large body of complex refractive index data, which may be used to test the additivity principle with the complex valued ordinary dipole polarizability.

  7. Mixed additive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carvalho, Francisco; Covas, Ricardo

    2016-06-01

    We consider mixed models y =∑i =0 w Xiβi with V (y )=∑i =1 w θiMi Where Mi=XiXi⊤ , i = 1, . . ., w, and µ = X0β0. For these we will estimate the variance components θ1, . . ., θw, aswell estimable vectors through the decomposition of the initial model into sub-models y(h), h ∈ Γ, with V (y (h ))=γ (h )Ig (h )h ∈Γ . Moreover we will consider L extensions of these models, i.e., y˚=Ly+ɛ, where L=D (1n1, . . ., 1nw) and ɛ, independent of y, has null mean vector and variance covariance matrix θw+1Iw, where w =∑i =1 n wi .

  8. Molecular Models in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Richard E.

    1970-01-01

    Describes types of molecular models (ball-and-stick, framework, and space-filling) and evaluates commercially available kits. Gives instructions for constructive models from polystyrene balls and pipe-cleaners. Models are useful for class demonstrations although not sufficiently accurate for research use. Illustrations show biologically important…

  9. Structural-functional characterization of the cathodic haemoglobin of the conger eel Conger conger: molecular modelling study of an additional phosphate-binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrini, Mariagiuseppina; Giardina, Bruno; Verde, Cinzia; Carratore, Vito; Olianas, Alessandra; Sollai, Luigi; Sanna, Maria T; Castagnola, Massimo; di Prisco, Guido

    2003-01-01

    The protein sequence data for the alpha- and beta-chains have been deposited in the SWISS-PROT and TrEMBL protein knowledgebase under the accession numbers P83479 and P83478 respectively. The Conger conger (conger eel) haemoglobin (Hb) system is made of three components, one of which, the so-called cathodic Hb, representing approx. 20% of the total pigment, has been purified and characterized from both a structural and functional point of view. Stripped Hb showed a reverse Bohr effect, high oxygen affinity and slightly low cooperativity in the absence of any effector. Addition of saturating GTP strongly influences the pH dependence of the oxygen affinity, since the reverse Bohr effect, observed under stripped conditions, is converted into a small normal Bohr effect. A further investigation of the GTP effect on oxygen affinity, carried out by fitting its titration curve, demonstrated the presence of two independent binding sites. Therefore, on the basis of the amino acid sequence of the alpha- and beta-chains, which have been determined, a computer modelling study has been performed. The data suggest that C. conger cathodic Hb may bind organic phosphates at two distinct binding sites located along the central cavity of the tetramer by hydrogen bonds and/or electrostatic interactions with amino acid residues of both chains, which have been identified. Among these residues, the two Lys-alpha(G6) (where the letter refers to the haemoglobin helix and the number to the amino acid position in the helix) appear to have a key role in the GTP movement from the external binding region to the internal central cavity of the tetrameric molecule. PMID:12646043

  10. Molecular Aluminum Additive for Burn Enhancement of Hydrocarbon Fuels.

    PubMed

    Guerieri, Philip M; DeCarlo, Samantha; Eichhorn, Bryan; Connell, Terrence; Yetter, Richard A; Tang, Xin; Hicks, Zachary; Bowen, Kit H; Zachariah, Michael R

    2015-11-12

    Additives to hydrocarbon fuels are commonly explored to change the combustion dynamics, chemical distribution, and/or product integrity. Here we employ a novel aluminum-based molecular additive, Al(I) tetrameric cluster [AlBrNEt3]4 (Et = C2H5), to a hydrocarbon fuel and evaluate the resultant single-droplet combustion properties. This Al4 cluster offers a soluble alternative to nanoscale particulate additives that have recently been explored and may mitigate the observed problems of particle aggregation. Results show the [AlBrNEt3]4 additive to increase the burn rate constant of a toluene-diethyl ether fuel mixture by ∼20% in a room temperature oxygen environment with only 39 mM of active aluminum additive (0.16 wt % limited by additive solubility). In comparison, a roughly similar addition of nano-aluminum particulate shows no discernible difference in burn properties of the hydrocarbon fuel. High speed video shows the [AlBrNEt3]4 to induce microexplosive gas release events during the last ∼30% of the droplet combustion time. We attribute this to HBr gas release based on results of temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments of the [AlBrNEt3]4 dosed with O2 and D2O. A possible mechanism of burn rate enhancement is presented that is consistent with microexplosion observations and TPR results. PMID:26488461

  11. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Computational Process and Material Modeling of Powder Bed additive manufacturing of IN 718. Optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling. Increase understanding of build properties. Increase reliability of builds. Decrease time to adoption of process for critical hardware. Potential to decrease post-build heat treatments. Conduct single-track and coupon builds at various build parameters. Record build parameter information and QM Meltpool data. Refine Applied Optimization powder bed AM process model using data. Report thermal modeling results. Conduct metallography of build samples. Calibrate STK models using metallography findings. Run STK models using AO thermal profiles and report STK modeling results. Validate modeling with additional build. Photodiode Intensity measurements highly linear with power input. Melt Pool Intensity highly correlated to Melt Pool Size. Melt Pool size and intensity increase with power. Applied Optimization will use data to develop powder bed additive manufacturing process model.

  12. Ubiquitin: molecular modeling and simulations.

    PubMed

    Ganoth, Assaf; Tsfadia, Yossi; Wiener, Reuven

    2013-11-01

    The synthesis and destruction of proteins are imperative for maintaining their cellular homeostasis. In the 1970s, Aaron Ciechanover, Avram Hershko, and Irwin Rose discovered that certain proteins are tagged by ubiquitin before degradation, a discovery that awarded them the 2004 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. Compelling data gathered during the last several decades show that ubiquitin plays a vital role not only in protein degradation but also in many cellular functions including DNA repair processes, cell cycle regulation, cell growth, immune system functionality, hormone-mediated signaling in plants, vesicular trafficking pathways, regulation of histone modification and viral budding. Due to the involvement of ubiquitin in such a large number of diverse cellular processes, flaws and impairments in the ubiquitin system were found to be linked to cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, genetic disorders, and immunological disorders. Hence, deciphering the dynamics and complexity of the ubiquitin system is of significant importance. In addition to experimental techniques, computational methodologies have been gaining increasing influence in protein research and are used to uncover the structure, stability, folding, mechanism of action and interactions of proteins. Notably, molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations have become powerful tools that bridge the gap between structure and function while providing dynamic insights and illustrating essential mechanistic characteristics. In this study, we present an overview of molecular modeling and simulations of ubiquitin and the ubiquitin system, evaluate the status of the field, and offer our perspective on future progress in this area of research. PMID:24113788

  13. Assessment of Molecular Modeling & Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    2002-01-03

    This report reviews the development and applications of molecular and materials modeling in Europe and Japan in comparison to those in the United States. Topics covered include computational quantum chemistry, molecular simulations by molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo methods, mesoscale modeling of material domains, molecular-structure/macroscale property correlations like QSARs and QSPRs, and related information technologies like informatics and special-purpose molecular-modeling computers. The panel's findings include the following: The United States leads this field in many scientific areas. However, Canada has particular strengths in DFT methods and homogeneous catalysis; Europe in heterogeneous catalysis, mesoscale, and materials modeling; and Japan in materials modeling and special-purpose computing. Major government-industry initiatives are underway in Europe and Japan, notably in multi-scale materials modeling and in development of chemistry-capable ab-initio molecular dynamics codes.

  14. Interactive Modelling of Molecular Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustad, J. R.; Kreylos, O.; Hamann, B.

    2004-12-01

    The "Nanotech Construction Kit" (NCK) [1] is a new project aimed at improving the understanding of molecular structures at a nanometer-scale level by visualization and interactive manipulation. Our very first prototype is a virtual-reality program allowing the construction of silica and carbon structures from scratch by assembling them one atom at a time. In silica crystals or glasses, the basic building block is an SiO4 unit, with the four oxygen atoms arranged around the central silicon atom in the shape of a regular tetrahedron. Two silicate units can connect to each other by their silicon atoms covalently bonding to one shared oxygen atom. Geometrically, this means that two tetrahedra can link at their vertices. Our program is based on geometric representations and uses simple force fields to simulate the interaction of building blocks, such as forming/breaking of bonds and repulsion. Together with stereoscopic visualization and direct manipulation of building blocks using wands or data gloves, this enables users to create realistic and complex molecular models in short amounts of time. The NCK can either be used as a standalone tool, to analyze or experiment with molecular structures, or it can be used in combination with "traditional" molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In a first step, the NCK can create initial configurations for subsequent MD simulation. In a more evolved setup, the NCK can serve as a visual front-end for an ongoing MD simulation, visualizing changes in simulation state in real time. Additionally, the NCK can be used to change simulation state on-the-fly, to experiment with different simulation conditions, or force certain events, e.g., the forming of a bond, and observe the simulation's reaction. [1] http://graphics.cs.ucdavis.edu/~okreylos/ResDev/NanoTech

  15. Network Reconstruction Using Nonparametric Additive ODE Models

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, James; Michailidis, George

    2014-01-01

    Network representations of biological systems are widespread and reconstructing unknown networks from data is a focal problem for computational biologists. For example, the series of biochemical reactions in a metabolic pathway can be represented as a network, with nodes corresponding to metabolites and edges linking reactants to products. In a different context, regulatory relationships among genes are commonly represented as directed networks with edges pointing from influential genes to their targets. Reconstructing such networks from data is a challenging problem receiving much attention in the literature. There is a particular need for approaches tailored to time-series data and not reliant on direct intervention experiments, as the former are often more readily available. In this paper, we introduce an approach to reconstructing directed networks based on dynamic systems models. Our approach generalizes commonly used ODE models based on linear or nonlinear dynamics by extending the functional class for the functions involved from parametric to nonparametric models. Concomitantly we limit the complexity by imposing an additive structure on the estimated slope functions. Thus the submodel associated with each node is a sum of univariate functions. These univariate component functions form the basis for a novel coupling metric that we define in order to quantify the strength of proposed relationships and hence rank potential edges. We show the utility of the method by reconstructing networks using simulated data from computational models for the glycolytic pathway of Lactocaccus Lactis and a gene network regulating the pluripotency of mouse embryonic stem cells. For purposes of comparison, we also assess reconstruction performance using gene networks from the DREAM challenges. We compare our method to those that similarly rely on dynamic systems models and use the results to attempt to disentangle the distinct roles of linearity, sparsity, and derivative

  16. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing (OSU)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Powder-Bed Additive Manufacturing (AM) through Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS) or Selective Laser Melting (SLM) is being used by NASA and the Aerospace industry to "print" parts that traditionally are very complex, high cost, or long schedule lead items. The process spreads a thin layer of metal powder over a build platform, then melts the powder in a series of welds in a desired shape. The next layer of powder is applied, and the process is repeated until layer-by-layer, a very complex part can be built. This reduces cost and schedule by eliminating very complex tooling and processes traditionally used in aerospace component manufacturing. To use the process to print end-use items, NASA seeks to understand SLM material well enough to develop a method of qualifying parts for space flight operation. Traditionally, a new material process takes many years and high investment to generate statistical databases and experiential knowledge, but computational modeling can truncate the schedule and cost -many experiments can be run quickly in a model, which would take years and a high material cost to run empirically. This project seeks to optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling.

  17. CREATION OF THE MODEL ADDITIONAL PROTOCOL

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, F.; Rosenthal, M.; Wulf, N.

    2010-05-25

    In 1991, the international nuclear nonproliferation community was dismayed to discover that the implementation of safeguards by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) under its NPT INFCIRC/153 safeguards agreement with Iraq had failed to detect Iraq's nuclear weapon program. It was now clear that ensuring that states were fulfilling their obligations under the NPT would require not just detecting diversion but also the ability to detect undeclared materials and activities. To achieve this, the IAEA initiated what would turn out to be a five-year effort to reappraise the NPT safeguards system. The effort engaged the IAEA and its Member States and led to agreement in 1997 on a new safeguards agreement, the Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between States and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards. The Model Protocol makes explicit that one IAEA goal is to provide assurance of the absence of undeclared nuclear material and activities. The Model Protocol requires an expanded declaration that identifies a State's nuclear potential, empowers the IAEA to raise questions about the correctness and completeness of the State's declaration, and, if needed, allows IAEA access to locations. The information required and the locations available for access are much broader than those provided for under INFCIRC/153. The negotiation was completed in quite a short time because it started with a relatively complete draft of an agreement prepared by the IAEA Secretariat. This paper describes how the Model Protocol was constructed and reviews key decisions that were made both during the five-year period and in the actual negotiation.

  18. Molecular model generator toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, R.D.

    1994-07-01

    This report is a user manual for an ASCII file of Fortran source code which must be compiled before use. The software will assist in creating plastic models of molecules whose specifications are described in the Brookhaven Protein Databank. Other data files can be used if they are in the same format as the files in the databank. The output file is a program for a 3-D Systems Stereolithography Apparatus and the program is run on a SGI Indigo workstation.

  19. Detecting contaminated birthdates using generalized additive models

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Erroneous patient birthdates are common in health databases. Detection of these errors usually involves manual verification, which can be resource intensive and impractical. By identifying a frequent manifestation of birthdate errors, this paper presents a principled and statistically driven procedure to identify erroneous patient birthdates. Results Generalized additive models (GAM) enabled explicit incorporation of known demographic trends and birth patterns. With false positive rates controlled, the method identified birthdate contamination with high accuracy. In the health data set used, of the 58 actual incorrect birthdates manually identified by the domain expert, the GAM-based method identified 51, with 8 false positives (resulting in a positive predictive value of 86.0% (51/59) and a false negative rate of 12.0% (7/58)). These results outperformed linear time-series models. Conclusions The GAM-based method is an effective approach to identify systemic birthdate errors, a common data quality issue in both clinical and administrative databases, with high accuracy. PMID:24923281

  20. Lightning Climatology with a Generalized Additive Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Thorsten; Mayr, Georg; Umlauf, Nikolaus; Zeileis, Achim

    2016-04-01

    This study present a lightning climatology on a 1km x 1km grid estimated via generalized additive models (GAM). GAMs provide a framework to account for non-linear effects in time and space and for non-linear spatial-temporal interaction terms simultaneously. The degrees of smoothness of the non-linear effects is selected automatically in our approach. Furthermore, the influence of topography is captured in the model by including a non-linear term. To illustrate our approach we use lightning data from the ALDIS networks and selected a region in Southeastern Austria, where complex terrain extends from 200 an 3800 m asl and summertime lightning activity is high compared to other parts of the Eastern Alps. The temporal effect in the GAM shows a rapid increase in lightning activity in early July and a slow decay in activity afterwards. The estimated spatial effect is not very smooth and requires approximately 225 effective degrees of freedom. It reveals that lightning is more likely in the Eastern and Southern part of the region of interest. This spatial effect only accounts for variability not already explained by the topography. The topography effect shows lightning to be more likely at higher altitudes. The effect describing the spatio-temporal interactions takes approximately 200 degrees of freedom, and reveals local deviations of the climatology.

  1. Trends in substitution models of molecular evolution

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Substitution models of evolution describe the process of genetic variation through fixed mutations and constitute the basis of the evolutionary analysis at the molecular level. Almost 40 years after the development of first substitution models, highly sophisticated, and data-specific substitution models continue emerging with the aim of better mimicking real evolutionary processes. Here I describe current trends in substitution models of DNA, codon and amino acid sequence evolution, including advantages and pitfalls of the most popular models. The perspective concludes that despite the large number of currently available substitution models, further research is required for more realistic modeling, especially for DNA coding and amino acid data. Additionally, the development of more accurate complex models should be coupled with new implementations and improvements of methods and frameworks for substitution model selection and downstream evolutionary analysis. PMID:26579193

  2. Trends in substitution models of molecular evolution.

    PubMed

    Arenas, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Substitution models of evolution describe the process of genetic variation through fixed mutations and constitute the basis of the evolutionary analysis at the molecular level. Almost 40 years after the development of first substitution models, highly sophisticated, and data-specific substitution models continue emerging with the aim of better mimicking real evolutionary processes. Here I describe current trends in substitution models of DNA, codon and amino acid sequence evolution, including advantages and pitfalls of the most popular models. The perspective concludes that despite the large number of currently available substitution models, further research is required for more realistic modeling, especially for DNA coding and amino acid data. Additionally, the development of more accurate complex models should be coupled with new implementations and improvements of methods and frameworks for substitution model selection and downstream evolutionary analysis. PMID:26579193

  3. Molecular simulation and modeling of complex I.

    PubMed

    Hummer, Gerhard; Wikström, Mårten

    2016-07-01

    Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations play an important role in the functional characterization of complex I. With its large size and complicated function, linking quinone reduction to proton pumping across a membrane, complex I poses unique modeling challenges. Nonetheless, simulations have already helped in the identification of possible proton transfer pathways. Simulations have also shed light on the coupling between electron and proton transfer, thus pointing the way in the search for the mechanistic principles underlying the proton pump. In addition to reviewing what has already been achieved in complex I modeling, we aim here to identify pressing issues and to provide guidance for future research to harness the power of modeling in the functional characterization of complex I. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Respiratory complex I, edited by Volker Zickermann and Ulrich Brandt. PMID:26780586

  4. Backbone additivity in the transfer model of protein solvation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Char Y; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, B Montgomery

    2010-01-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of −54 cal/mol/M compares quite favorably with −43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally. PMID:20306490

  5. Backbone Additivity in the Transfer Model of Protein Solvation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Char Y.; Kokubo, Hironori; Lynch, Gillian C.; Bolen, D Wayne; Pettitt, Bernard M.

    2010-05-01

    The transfer model implying additivity of the peptide backbone free energy of transfer is computationally tested. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine the extent of change in transfer free energy (ΔGtr) with increase in chain length of oligoglycine with capped end groups. Solvation free energies of oligoglycine models of varying lengths in pure water and in the osmolyte solutions, 2M urea and 2M trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), were calculated from simulations of all atom models, and ΔGtr values for peptide backbone transfer from water to the osmolyte solutions were determined. The results show that the transfer free energies change linearly with increasing chain length, demonstrating the principle of additivity, and provide values in reasonable agreement with experiment. The peptide backbone transfer free energy contributions arise from van der Waals interactions in the case of transfer to urea, but from electrostatics on transfer to TMAO solution. The simulations used here allow for the calculation of the solvation and transfer free energy of longer oligoglycine models to be evaluated than is currently possible through experiment. The peptide backbone unit computed transfer free energy of –54 cal/mol/Mcompares quite favorably with –43 cal/mol/M determined experimentally.

  6. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasesha, S.; Raghunathan, Rajamani

    2007-11-29

    Here, we present an overview of methods of modeling Molecular Magnets in different length scales. First, we discuss a microscopic model to understand the nature of superexchange interaction in binuclear transition metal complexes of different geometry viz. A-B, A-B-A, B-A-B, linear A-B-A-B, and cyclic A-B-A-B systems. We obtain the quantum phase diagrams along various planes in the parameter space and identify the various model parameters which control the nature of superexchange in these systems. We also obtain contours of effective superexchange constants. In the next section we discuss the method of full symmetry adaptation in Valence Bond method to obtain the low-lying eigenstates of the Heisenberg spin Hamiltonian of large systems. The third part of this article deals with the calculation of the magnetic anisotropy parameters (D{sub M} and E{sub M}) of Single Molecule Magnets (SMMs). We use the single ion anisotropy values to obtain D{sub M} and E{sub M} values of the SMM, using a perturbative approach. We first solve the unperturbed Hamiltonian which is a simple spin Heisenberg Hamiltonian. Then we introduce the perturbing term H{sub 1} consisting of the single ion anisotropy. We then solve for the molecular anisotropy parameters by equating two different ways for computing the matrix elements of the perturbation term, from knowledge of the spin-spin correlation functions and the direction of orientation of the single ion anisotropies.

  8. Modeling techniques for gaining additional urban space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thunig, Holger; Naumann, Simone; Siegmund, Alexander

    2009-09-01

    One of the major accompaniments of the globalization is the rapid growing of urban areas. Urban sprawl is the main environmental problem affecting those cities across different characteristics and continents. Various reasons for the increase in urban sprawl in the last 10 to 30 years have been proposed [1], and often depend on the socio-economic situation of cities. The quantitative reduction and the sustainable handling of land should be performed by inner urban development instead of expanding urban regions. Following the principal "spare the urban fringe, develop the inner suburbs first" requires differentiated tools allowing for quantitative and qualitative appraisals of current building potentials. Using spatial high resolution remote sensing data within an object-based approach enables the detection of potential areas while GIS-data provides information for the quantitative valuation. This paper presents techniques for modeling urban environment and opportunities of utilization of the retrieved information for urban planners and their special needs.

  9. The transport exponent in percolation models with additional loops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babalievski, F.

    1994-10-01

    Several percolation models with additional loops were studied. The transport exponents for these models were estimated numerically by means of a transfer-matrix approach. It was found that the transport exponent has a drastically changed value for some of the models. This result supports some previous numerical studies on the vibrational properties of similar models (with additional loops).

  10. Molecular modeling of fluoropropene refrigerants.

    PubMed

    Raabe, Gabriele

    2012-05-17

    Different fluoropropenes are currently considered as refrigerants, either as pure compounds or as components in low GWP (global warming potential) refrigerant mixtures. Due to their limited commercial production, experimental data for the thermophysical properties of fluoropropenes and their mixtures are in general rare, which hampers the exploration of their performance in technical applications. In principle, molecular simulation can be used to predict the relevant properties of refrigerants and refrigerant blends, provided that adequate intermolecular potential functions ("force fields") are available. In our earlier work (Raabe, G.; Maginn, E. J., J. Phys. Chem. B2010, 114, 10133-10142), we introduced a transferable force field for fluoropropenes comprising the compounds 3,3,3-trifluoro-1-propene (HFO-1243zf), 2,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1234yf), and hexafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1216). In this paper, we provide an extension of the force field model to the trans- and cis-1,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1234ze(E), HFO-1234ze) and the cis-1,2,3,3,3-pentafluoro-1-propene (HFO-1225ye(Z)) as well as revised simulation results for HFO-1216. We present Gibbs ensemble simulation results on the vapor pressures, saturated densities, and heats of vaporization of these compounds in comparison with experimental results. The simulation results show that the force field model enables reliable predictions of the properties of the different fluoropropenes and also reproduces well the differing vapor-liquid coexistence and vapor pressure curve of the cis- and trans-isomers of 1,3,3,3-tetrafluoro-1-propene, HFO-1234ze and HFO-1234ze(E). For these two isomers, we also present molecular dynamics simulation studies on their local structure. PMID:22519953

  11. A realistic molecular model of cement hydrates

    PubMed Central

    Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Kushima, Akihiro; Shahsavari, Rouzbeh; Van Vliet, Krystyn J.; Buehler, Markus J.; Yip, Sidney; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2009-01-01

    Despite decades of studies of calcium-silicate-hydrate (C-S-H), the structurally complex binder phase of concrete, the interplay between chemical composition and density remains essentially unexplored. Together these characteristics of C-S-H define and modulate the physical and mechanical properties of this “liquid stone” gel phase. With the recent determination of the calcium/silicon (C/S = 1.7) ratio and the density of the C-S-H particle (2.6 g/cm3) by neutron scattering measurements, there is new urgency to the challenge of explaining these essential properties. Here we propose a molecular model of C-S-H based on a bottom-up atomistic simulation approach that considers only the chemical specificity of the system as the overriding constraint. By allowing for short silica chains distributed as monomers, dimers, and pentamers, this C-S-H archetype of a molecular description of interacting CaO, SiO2, and H2O units provides not only realistic values of the C/S ratio and the density computed by grand canonical Monte Carlo simulation of water adsorption at 300 K. The model, with a chemical composition of (CaO)1.65(SiO2)(H2O)1.75, also predicts other essential structural features and fundamental physical properties amenable to experimental validation, which suggest that the C-S-H gel structure includes both glass-like short-range order and crystalline features of the mineral tobermorite. Additionally, we probe the mechanical stiffness, strength, and hydrolytic shear response of our molecular model, as compared to experimentally measured properties of C-S-H. The latter results illustrate the prospect of treating cement on equal footing with metals and ceramics in the current application of mechanism-based models and multiscale simulations to study inelastic deformation and cracking. PMID:19805265

  12. Ratchet models of molecular motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaster, Nicole

    2003-09-01

    Transport processes in and of cells are of major importance for the survival of the organism. Muscles have to be able to contract, chromosomes have to be moved to opposing ends of the cell during mitosis, and organelles, which are compartments enclosed by membranes, have to be transported along molecular tracks. Molecular motors are proteins whose main task is moving other molecules.For that purpose they transform the chemical energy released in the hydrolysis of ATP into mechanical work. The motors of the cytoskeleton belong to the three super families myosin, kinesin and dynein. Their tracks are filaments of the cytoskeleton, namely actin and the microtubuli. Here, we examine stochastic models which are used for describing the movements of these linear molecular motors. The scale of the movements comprises the regime of single steps of a motor protein up to the directed walk along a filament. A single step bridges around 10 nm, depending on the protein, and takes about 10 ms, if there is enough ATP available. Our models comprise M states or conformations the motor can attain during its movement along a one-dimensional track. At K locations along the track transitions between the states are possible. The velocity of the protein depending on the transition rates between the single states can be determined analytically. We calculate this velocity for systems of up to four states and locations and are able to derive a number of rules which are helpful in estimating the behaviour of an arbitrary given system. Beyond that we have a look at decoupled subsystems, i.e., one or a couple of states which have no connection to the remaining system. With a certain probability a motor undergoes a cycle of conformational changes, with another probability an independent other cycle. Active elements in real transport processes by molecular motors will not be limited to the transitions between the states. In distorted networks or starting from the discrete Master equation of the

  13. Criteria for deviation from predictions by the concentration addition model.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Jun-Ichi; Seki, Masanori; Kamo, Masashi

    2016-07-01

    Loewe's additivity (concentration addition) is a well-known model for predicting the toxic effects of chemical mixtures under the additivity assumption of toxicity. However, from the perspective of chemical risk assessment and/or management, it is important to identify chemicals whose toxicities are additive when present concurrently, that is, it should be established whether there are chemical mixtures to which the concentration addition predictive model can be applied. The objective of the present study was to develop criteria for judging test results that deviated from the predictions by the concentration addition chemical mixture model. These criteria were based on the confidence interval of the concentration addition model's prediction and on estimation of errors of the predicted concentration-effect curves by toxicity tests after exposure to single chemicals. A log-logit model with 2 parameters was assumed for the concentration-effect curve of each individual chemical. These parameters were determined by the maximum-likelihood method, and the criteria were defined using the variances and the covariance of the parameters. In addition, the criteria were applied to a toxicity test of a binary mixture of p-n-nonylphenol and p-n-octylphenol using the Japanese killifish, medaka (Oryzias latipes). Consequently, the concentration addition model using confidence interval was capable of predicting the test results at any level, and no reason for rejecting the concentration addition was found. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:1806-1814. © 2015 SETAC. PMID:26660330

  14. Molecular Modeling of Cardiac Troponin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Edward P.

    The cardiac thin filament regulates interactions of actin and myosin, the force-generating elements of muscular contraction. Over the past several decades many details have been discovered regarding the structure and function of the cardiac thin filament and its components, including cardiac troponin (cTn). My hypothesis is that signal propagation occurs between distant ends of the cardiac troponin complex through calcium-dependent alterations in the dynamics of cTn and tropomyosin (Tm). I propose a model of the thin filament that encompasses known structures of cTn, Tm and actin to gain insight into cardiac troponin's allosteric regulation of thin filament dynamics. By performing molecular dynamics simulations of cTn in conjunction with overlapping Tm in two conditions, with and without calcium bound to site II of cardiac troponin C (cTnC), I found a combination of calcium-dependent changes in secondary structure and dynamics throughout the cTn-Tm complex. I then applied this model to investigate familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC), a disease of the sarcomere that is one of the most commonly occurring genetic causes of heart disease. Approximately 15% of known FHC-related mutations are found in cardiac troponin T (cTnT), most of which are in or flank the alpha-helical N-tail domain TNT1. TNT1 directly interacts with overlapping Tm coiled coils. Using this model I identified effects of TNT1 mutations that propagate to the cTn core where site II of cTnC, the regulatory site of calcium binding in the thin filament, is located. Specifically, I found that mutations in TNT1 alter the flexibility of TNT1 and that the flexibility of TNT1 is inversely proportional to the cooperativity of calcium activation of the thin filament. Further, I identified a pathway of propagation of structural and dynamic changes linking TNT1 to site II of cTnC. Mutation-induced changes at site II cTnC alter calcium coordination which corresponds to biophysical measurements of calcium

  15. Teaching Molecular Geometry with the VSEPR Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Ronald J.

    2004-01-01

    The first introduction to molecular geometry should be through the simple and easily understood VSEPR model, as the Valence Bond Theory and MO Theory suffer from limitations as far as understanding molecular geometry is concerned. The VSEPR model gives a perfectly satisfactory description of the bonding that follows directly from the Lewis model…

  16. Computerized molecular modeling of carbohydrates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Computerized molecular modleing continues to increase in capability and applicability to carbohydrates. This chapter covers nomenclature and conformational aspects of carbohydrates, perhaps of greater use to carbohydrate-inexperienced computational chemists. Its comments on various methods and studi...

  17. Modeling the Molecular Gas in NGC 6240

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tunnard, R.; Greve, T. R.; Garcia-Burillo, S.; Graciá Carpio, J.; Fuente, A.; Tacconi, L.; Neri, R.; Usero, A.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first observations of H13CN (1-0), H13CO+(1-0), and SiO (2-1)in NGC 6240, obtained with the IRAM Plateau de Bure Interferometer. Combining a Markov Chain Monte Carlo code with Large Velocity Gradient (LVG) modeling, and with additional data from the literature, we simultaneously fit three gas phases and six molecular species to constrain the physical condition of the molecular gas, including mass-luminosity conversion factors. We find ˜ {10}10{M}⊙ of dense molecular gas in cold, dense clouds ({T}{{k}}˜ 10 K, {n}{{{H}}2}˜ {10}6 cm-3) with a volume filling factor \\lt 0.002, embedded in a shock heated molecular medium ({T}{{k}}˜ 2000 K, {n}{{{H}}2}˜ {10}3.6 cm-3), both surrounded by an extended diffuse phase ({T}{{k}}˜ 200 K, {n}{{{H}}2}˜ {10}2.5 cm-3). We derive a global {α }{{CO}}={1.5}1.17.1 with gas masses {{log}}10≤ft(M/[{M}⊙ ]\\right)={10.1}10.010.8, dominated by the dense gas. We also find {α }{{HCN}}={32}1389, which traces the cold, dense gas. The [12C]/[13C] ratio is only slightly elevated ({98}65230), contrary to the very high [CO]/[13CO] ratio (300-500) reported in the literature. However, we find very high [HCN]/[H13CN] and [HCO+]/[H13CO+] abundance ratios ({300}200500) which we attribute to isotope fractionation in the cold, dense clouds.

  18. Modeling ion sensing in molecular electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Caroline J.; Smeu, Manuel; Ratner, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    We examine the ability of molecules to sense ions by measuring the change in molecular conductance in the presence of such charged species. The detection of protons (H+), alkali metal cations (M+), calcium ions (Ca2+), and hydronium ions (H3O+) is considered. Density functional theory (DFT) is used within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function framework (NEGF) to model electron transport properties of quinolinedithiol (QDT, C9H7NS2), bridging Al electrodes. The geometry of the transport region is relaxed with DFT. The transport properties of the device are modeled with NEGF-DFT to determine if this device can distinguish among the M+ + QDT species containing monovalent cations, where M+ = H+, Li+, Na+, or K+. Because of the asymmetry of QDT in between the two electrodes, both positive and negative biases are considered. The electron transmission function and conductance properties are simulated for electrode biases in the range from -0.5 V to 0.5 V at increments of 0.1 V. Scattering state analysis is used to determine the molecular orbitals that are the main contributors to the peaks in the transmission function near the Fermi level of the electrodes, and current-voltage relationships are obtained. The results show that QDT can be used as a proton detector by measuring transport through it and can conceivably act as a pH sensor in solutions. In addition, QDT may be able to distinguish among different monovalent species. This work suggests an approach to design modern molecular electronic conductance sensors with high sensitivity and specificity using well-established quantum chemistry.

  19. Modeling ion sensing in molecular electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Caroline J.; Smeu, Manuel Ratner, Mark A.

    2014-02-07

    We examine the ability of molecules to sense ions by measuring the change in molecular conductance in the presence of such charged species. The detection of protons (H{sup +}), alkali metal cations (M{sup +}), calcium ions (Ca{sup 2+}), and hydronium ions (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) is considered. Density functional theory (DFT) is used within the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function framework (NEGF) to model electron transport properties of quinolinedithiol (QDT, C{sub 9}H{sub 7}NS{sub 2}), bridging Al electrodes. The geometry of the transport region is relaxed with DFT. The transport properties of the device are modeled with NEGF-DFT to determine if this device can distinguish among the M{sup +} + QDT species containing monovalent cations, where M{sup +} = H{sup +}, Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, or K{sup +}. Because of the asymmetry of QDT in between the two electrodes, both positive and negative biases are considered. The electron transmission function and conductance properties are simulated for electrode biases in the range from −0.5 V to 0.5 V at increments of 0.1 V. Scattering state analysis is used to determine the molecular orbitals that are the main contributors to the peaks in the transmission function near the Fermi level of the electrodes, and current-voltage relationships are obtained. The results show that QDT can be used as a proton detector by measuring transport through it and can conceivably act as a pH sensor in solutions. In addition, QDT may be able to distinguish among different monovalent species. This work suggests an approach to design modern molecular electronic conductance sensors with high sensitivity and specificity using well-established quantum chemistry.

  20. Molecular Modeling of Estrogen Receptor Using Molecular Operating Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Urmi; Luck, Linda A.

    2007-01-01

    Molecular modeling is pervasive in the pharmaceutical industry that employs many of our students from Biology, Chemistry and the interdisciplinary majors. To expose our students to this important aspect of their education we have incorporated a set of tutorials in our Biochemistry class. The present article describes one of our tutorials where…

  1. The cognitive life of mechanical molecular models.

    PubMed

    Charbonneau, Mathieu

    2013-12-01

    The use of physical models of molecular structures as research tools has been central to the development of biochemistry and molecular biology. Intriguingly, it has received little attention from scholars of science. In this paper, I argue that these physical models are not mere three-dimensional representations but that they are in fact very special research tools: they are cognitive augmentations. Despite the fact that they are external props, these models serve as cognitive tools that augment and extend the modeler's cognitive capacities and performance in molecular modeling tasks. This cognitive enhancement is obtained because of the way the modeler interacts with these models, the models' materiality contributing to the solving of the molecule's structure. Furthermore, I argue that these material models and their component parts were designed, built and used specifically to serve as cognitive facilitators and cognitive augmentations. PMID:23910718

  2. Properties and Microstructural Characteristic of Kaolin Geopolymer Ceramics with Addition of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Romisuhani; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Hussin, Kamarudin; Sandu, Andrei Victor; Binhussain, Mohammed; Ain Jaya, Nur

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the mechanical properties and microstructure of kaolin geopolymer ceramics with addition of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene were studied. Inorganic polymers based on alumina and silica polysialate units were synthesized at room temperature from kaolin and sodium silicate in a highly alkaline medium, followed by curing and drying at 80 °C. Alkaline activator was formed by mixing the 12 M NaOH solution with sodium silicate at a ratio of 0.24. Addition of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene to the kaolin geopolymer are fabricated with Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene content of 2, 4, 6 and 8 (wt. %) by using powder metallurgy method. The samples were heated at 1200 °C and the strength and morphological were tested. It was found that the flexural strength for the kaolin geopolymer ceramics with addition of UHMWPE were improved and generally increased with the increasing of UHMWPE loading. The result revealed that the optimum flexural strength was obtained at UHMWPE loading of 4 wt. % (92.1 MPa) and the flexural strength started to decrease. Microstructural analysis showed the samples appeared to have more number of pores and connected of pores increased with the increasing of UHMWPE content.

  3. Molecular modeling of nucleic acid structure

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This unit is the first in a series of four units covering the analysis of nucleic acid structure by molecular modeling. This unit provides an overview of computer simulation of nucleic acids. Topics include the static structure model, computational graphics and energy models, generation of an initial model, and characterization of the overall three-dimensional structure. PMID:18428873

  4. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  5. Informing Mechanistic Toxicology with Computational Molecular Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Computational molecular models of chemicals interacting with biomolecular targets provides toxicologists a valuable, affordable, and sustainable source of in silico molecular level information that augments, enriches, and complements in vitro and in vivo effo...

  6. Complex Modelling Scheme Of An Additive Manufacturing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Liliana Georgeta

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a modelling scheme sustaining the development of an additive manufacturing research centre model and its processes. This modelling is performed using IDEF0, the resulting model process representing the basic processes required in developing such a centre in any university. While the activities presented in this study are those recommended in general, changes may occur in specific existing situations in a research centre.

  7. Comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) for food additives.

    PubMed

    Tennant, David R

    2016-05-01

    European methods for assessing dietary exposures to nutrients, additives and other substances in food are limited by the availability of detailed food consumption data for all member states. A proposed comprehensive European dietary exposure model (CEDEM) applies summary data published by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) in a deterministic model based on an algorithm from the EFSA intake method for food additives. The proposed approach can predict estimates of food additive exposure provided in previous EFSA scientific opinions that were based on the full European food consumption database. PMID:26987377

  8. Additive-multiplicative rates model for recurrent events.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanyan; Wu, Yuanshan; Cai, Jianwen; Zhou, Haibo

    2010-07-01

    Recurrent events are frequently encountered in biomedical studies. Evaluating the covariates effects on the marginal recurrent event rate is of practical interest. There are mainly two types of rate models for the recurrent event data: the multiplicative rates model and the additive rates model. We consider a more flexible additive-multiplicative rates model for analysis of recurrent event data, wherein some covariate effects are additive while others are multiplicative. We formulate estimating equations for estimating the regression parameters. The estimators for these regression parameters are shown to be consistent and asymptotically normally distributed under appropriate regularity conditions. Moreover, the estimator of the baseline mean function is proposed and its large sample properties are investigated. We also conduct simulation studies to evaluate the finite sample behavior of the proposed estimators. A medical study of patients with cystic fibrosis suffered from recurrent pulmonary exacerbations is provided for illustration of the proposed method. PMID:20229314

  9. Molecular Modeling of Fluorescent SERCA Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Bengt; Autry, Joseph M; Thomas, David D

    2016-01-01

    Molecular modeling and simulation are useful tools in structural biology, allowing the formulation of functional hypotheses and interpretation of spectroscopy experiments. Here, we describe a method to construct in silico models of a fluorescent fusion protein construct, where a cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) is linked to the actuator domain of the Sarco/Endoplasmic Reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA). This CFP-SERCA construct is a biosensor that can report on structural dynamics in the cytosolic headpiece of SERCA. Molecular modeling and FRET experiments allow us to generate new structural and mechanistic models that better describe the conformational landscape and regulation of SERCA. The methods described here can be applied to the creation of models for any fusion protein constructs and also describe the steps needed to simulate FRET results using molecular models. PMID:26695057

  10. Accelerated Nucleation Due to Trace Additives: A Fluctuating Coverage Model.

    PubMed

    Poon, Geoffrey G; Peters, Baron

    2016-03-01

    We develop a theory to account for variable coverage of trace additives that lower the interfacial free energy for nucleation. The free energy landscape is based on classical nucleation theory and a statistical mechanical model for Langmuir adsorption. Dynamics are modeled by diffusion-controlled attachment and detachment of solutes and adsorbing additives. We compare the mechanism and kinetics from a mean-field model, a projection of the dynamics and free energy surface onto nucleus size, and a full two-dimensional calculation using Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory. The fluctuating coverage model predicts rates more accurately than mean-field models of the same process primarily because it more accurately estimates the potential of mean force along the size coordinate. PMID:26485064

  11. Molecular-orbital coefficients for dinuclear polymethyne dyes in the effective additive parameter method

    SciTech Connect

    Dyadyusha, G.G.; Ushomirskii, M.M.

    1986-09-01

    A method previously proposed for determining the energy structure of a polymethyne dye with any terminal groups is used in considering formulas for the molecularorbital coefficients and the differences in the distribution on the atoms in the polymethyne chain for localized and delocalized energy levels, as well as the accuracy in calculating the molecular-orbital coefficients by means of a finite number of effective additive parameters. It is found that the localized states are important to the electron-density distribution on the chain atoms characteristic of the polymethyne dyes.

  12. Structures in Molecular Clouds: Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Kane, J O; Mizuta, A; Pound, M W; Remington, B A; Ryutov, D D

    2006-04-20

    We attempt to predict the observed morphology, column density and velocity gradient of Pillar II of the Eagle Nebula, using Rayleigh Taylor (RT) models in which growth is seeded by an initial perturbation in density or in shape of the illuminated surface, and cometary models in which structure is arises from a initially spherical cloud with a dense core. Attempting to mitigate suppression of RT growth by recombination, we use a large cylindrical model volume containing the illuminating source and the self-consistently evolving ablated outflow and the photon flux field, and use initial clouds with finite lateral extent. An RT model shows no growth, while a cometary model appears to be more successful at reproducing observations.

  13. High-Flow, High-Molecular-Weight, Addition-Curing Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1993-01-01

    In developed series of high-flow PMR-type polyimide resins, 2, 2'-bis(trifluoromethyl)-4, 4'-diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) substituted for 1, 4-pheylenediamine in PMR-II formulation. Polyimides designated either as PMR-12F when nadic ester (NE) end caps used, or as V-CAP-12F when p-aminostyrene end caps used. High-molecular-weight, addition-curing polyimides based on BTBD and HFDE highly processable high-temperature matrix resins used to make composite materials with excellent retention of properties during long-term exposure to air at 650 degrees F or higher temperature. Furthermore, 12F addition-curing polyimides useful for electronic applications; fluorinated rigid-rod polyimides known to exhibit low thermal expansion coefficients as well as low absorption of moisture.

  14. Modeling Errors in Daily Precipitation Measurements: Additive or Multiplicative?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Tang, Ling; Sapiano, Matthew; Maggioni, Viviana; Wu, Huan

    2013-01-01

    The definition and quantification of uncertainty depend on the error model used. For uncertainties in precipitation measurements, two types of error models have been widely adopted: the additive error model and the multiplicative error model. This leads to incompatible specifications of uncertainties and impedes intercomparison and application.In this letter, we assess the suitability of both models for satellite-based daily precipitation measurements in an effort to clarify the uncertainty representation. Three criteria were employed to evaluate the applicability of either model: (1) better separation of the systematic and random errors; (2) applicability to the large range of variability in daily precipitation; and (3) better predictive skills. It is found that the multiplicative error model is a much better choice under all three criteria. It extracted the systematic errors more cleanly, was more consistent with the large variability of precipitation measurements, and produced superior predictions of the error characteristics. The additive error model had several weaknesses, such as non constant variance resulting from systematic errors leaking into random errors, and the lack of prediction capability. Therefore, the multiplicative error model is a better choice.

  15. Modelling the behaviour of additives in gun barrels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, N.; Ludwig, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical model which predicts the flow and heat transfer in a gun barrel is described. The model is transient, two-dimensional and equations are solved for velocities and enthalpies of a gas phase, which arises from the combustion of propellant and cartridge case, for particle additives which are released from the case; volume fractions of the gas and particles. Closure of the equations is obtained using a two-equation turbulence model. Preliminary calculations are described in which the proportions of particle additives in the cartridge case was altered. The model gives a good prediction of the ballistic performance and the gas to wall heat transfer. However, the expected magnitude of reduction in heat transfer when particles are present is not predicted. The predictions of gas flow invalidate some of the assumptions made regarding case and propellant behavior during combustion and further work is required to investigate these effects and other possible interactions, both chemical and physical, between gas and particles.

  16. Markov state models and molecular alchemy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schütte, Christof; Nielsen, Adam; Weber, Marcus

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, Markov state models (MSMs) have attracted a considerable amount of attention with regard to modelling conformation changes and associated function of biomolecular systems. They have been used successfully, e.g. for peptides including time-resolved spectroscopic experiments, protein function and protein folding , DNA and RNA, and ligand-receptor interaction in drug design and more complicated multivalent scenarios. In this article, a novel reweighting scheme is introduced that allows to construct an MSM for certain molecular system out of an MSM for a similar system. This permits studying how molecular properties on long timescales differ between similar molecular systems without performing full molecular dynamics simulations for each system under consideration. The performance of the reweighting scheme is illustrated for simple test cases, including one where the main wells of the respective energy landscapes are located differently and an alchemical transformation of butane to pentane where the dimension of the state space is changed.

  17. An Additional Symmetry in the Weinberg-Salam Model

    SciTech Connect

    Bakker, B.L.G.; Veselov, A.I.; Zubkov, M.A.

    2005-06-01

    An additional Z{sub 6} symmetry hidden in the fermion and Higgs sectors of the Standard Model has been found recently. It has a singular nature and is connected to the centers of the SU(3) and SU(2) subgroups of the gauge group. A lattice regularization of the Standard Model was constructed that possesses this symmetry. In this paper, we report our results on the numerical simulation of its electroweak sector.

  18. Ionic imbalance, in addition to molecular crowding, abates cytoskeletal dynamics and vesicle motility during hypertonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula; Roth, Isabelle; Meda, Paolo; Féraille, Eric; Brown, Dennis; Hasler, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Cell volume homeostasis is vital for the maintenance of optimal protein density and cellular function. Numerous mammalian cell types are routinely exposed to acute hypertonic challenge and shrink. Molecular crowding modifies biochemical reaction rates and decreases macromolecule diffusion. Cell volume is restored rapidly by ion influx but at the expense of elevated intracellular sodium and chloride levels that persist long after challenge. Although recent studies have highlighted the role of molecular crowding on the effects of hypertonicity, the effects of ionic imbalance on cellular trafficking dynamics in living cells are largely unexplored. By tracking distinct fluorescently labeled endosome/vesicle populations by live-cell imaging, we show that vesicle motility is reduced dramatically in a variety of cell types at the onset of hypertonic challenge. Live-cell imaging of actin and tubulin revealed similar arrested microfilament motility upon challenge. Vesicle motility recovered long after cell volume, a process that required functional regulatory volume increase and was accelerated by a return of extracellular osmolality to isosmotic levels. This delay suggests that, although volume-induced molecular crowding contributes to trafficking defects, it alone cannot explain the observed effects. Using fluorescent indicators and FRET-based probes, we found that intracellular ATP abundance and mitochondrial potential were reduced by hypertonicity and recovered after longer periods of time. Similar to the effects of osmotic challenge, isovolumetric elevation of intracellular chloride concentration by ionophores transiently decreased ATP production by mitochondria and abated microfilament and vesicle motility. These data illustrate how perturbed ionic balance, in addition to molecular crowding, affects membrane trafficking. PMID:26045497

  19. Growth control of nonionic reverse micelles by surfactant and solvent molecular architecture and water addition.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Shrestha, Rekha Goswami; Aramaki, Kenji

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a facile route to the shape, size, and structure control of reversed micelles by surfactant and solvent molecular architecture and water addition. Nonionic reverse micellar size is found to increase with increase in hydrophilic headgroup size of surfactant, whose scheme is understood in terms of decrease in the critical packing parameter (cpp). On the other hand, an opposite trend is observed with increase in lipophilicity of the surfactant. This is caused by the repulsive excluded volume interactions, which increases with the volume of lipophilic moiety of surfactant; as a result, the micelle interface tends to become more curved and micelles shrink. Solvent molecular structure has played a crucial role; increasing hydrocarbon chain length of alkanes favored one dimensional micellar growth. We note that long chain oil has a poor penetration tendency to lipophilic tail of surfactant and decreases the cpp. Solvent polarity is also crucial; globular micelles are formed in short chain oil cyclohexane. We note that decreasing chain length of oil mimic the decrease in the headgroup size of surfactant; rod-to-sphere type transition in the micellar structure. Addition of trace water favors micellar growth; maximum dimension and micellar cross section increases with increase in water concentration. The sizes of the water incorporated reverse micelles (or w/o microemulsion) are much bigger than the empty micelles. Micellar structure was confirmed by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and supported by rheology. PMID:21770115

  20. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip; Gu, Baohua

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  1. Exploring Organic Mechanistic Puzzles with Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horowitz, Gail; Schwartz, Gary

    2004-01-01

    The molecular modeling was used to reinforce more general skills such as deducing and drawing reaction mechanisms, analyzing reaction kinetics and thermodynamics and drawing reaction coordinate energy diagrams. This modeling was done through the design of mechanistic puzzles, involving reactions not familiar to the students.

  2. Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Weinan E

    2012-03-29

    The main bottleneck in modeling transport in molecular devices is to develop the correct formulation of the problem and efficient algorithms for analyzing the electronic structure and dynamics using, for example, the time-dependent density functional theory. We have divided this task into several steps. The first step is to developing the right mathematical formulation and numerical algorithms for analyzing the electronic structure using density functional theory. The second step is to study time-dependent density functional theory, particularly the far-field boundary conditions. The third step is to study electronic transport in molecular devices. We are now at the end of the first step. Under DOE support, we have made subtantial progress in developing linear scaling and sub-linear scaling algorithms for electronic structure analysis. Although there has been a huge amount of effort in the past on developing linear scaling algorithms, most of the algorithms developed suffer from the lack of robustness and controllable accuracy. We have made the following progress: (1) We have analyzed thoroughly the localization properties of the wave-functions. We have developed a clear understanding of the physical as well as mathematical origin of the decay properties. One important conclusion is that even for metals, one can choose wavefunctions that decay faster than any algebraic power. (2) We have developed algorithms that make use of these localization properties. Our algorithms are based on non-orthogonal formulations of the density functional theory. Our key contribution is to add a localization step into the algorithm. The addition of this localization step makes the algorithm quite robust and much more accurate. Moreover, we can control the accuracy of these algorithms by changing the numerical parameters. (3) We have considerably improved the Fermi operator expansion (FOE) approach. Through pole expansion, we have developed the optimal scaling FOE algorithm.

  3. Animal Models of Depression: Molecular Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Vaishnav; Nestler, Eric J.

    2012-01-01

    Much of the current understanding about the pathogenesis of altered mood, impaired concentration and neurovegetative symptoms in major depression has come from animal models. However, because of the unique and complex features of human depression, the generation of valid and insightful depression models has been less straightforward than modeling other disabling diseases like cancer or autoimmune conditions. Today’s popular depression models creatively merge ethologically valid behavioral assays with the latest technological advances in molecular biology and automated video-tracking. This chapter reviews depression assays involving acute stress (e.g., forced swim test), models consisting of prolonged physical or social stress (e.g., social defeat), models of secondary depression, genetic models, and experiments designed to elucidate the mechanisms of antidepressant action. These paradigms are critically evaluated in relation to their ease, validity and replicability, the molecular insights that they have provided, and their capacity to offer the next generation of therapeutics for depression. PMID:21225412

  4. Using Set Model for Learning Addition of Integers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lestari, Umi Puji; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; Hartono, Yusuf

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to investigate how set model can help students' understanding of addition of integers in fourth grade. The study has been carried out to 23 students and a teacher of IVC SD Iba Palembang in January 2015. This study is a design research that also promotes PMRI as the underlying design context and activity. Results showed that the…

  5. Genetic Rearrangements of Six Wheat–Agropyron cristatum 6P Addition Lines Revealed by Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Su, Junji; Zhang, Jinpeng; Song, Liqiang; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2014-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 4x = 28, PPPP) not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat–A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat–A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering. PMID:24595330

  6. Hierarchical Molecular Modelling with Ellipsoids

    SciTech Connect

    Max, N

    2004-03-29

    Protein and DNA structures are represented at varying levels of details using ellipsoidal RGBA textured splats. The splat texture at each level is generated by rendering its children in a hierarchical model, from a distribution of viewing directions, and averaging the result. For rendering, the ellipsoids to be used are chosen adaptively, depending on the distance to the viewpoint. This technique is applied to visualize DNA coiling around nucleosomes in chromosomes.

  7. MODELING MOLECULAR HYPERFINE LINE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Keto, Eric; Rybicki, George

    2010-06-20

    In this paper, we discuss two approximate methods previously suggested for modeling hyperfine spectral line emission for molecules whose collisional transition rates between hyperfine levels are unknown. Hyperfine structure is seen in the rotational spectra of many commonly observed molecules such as HCN, HNC, NH{sub 3}, N{sub 2}H{sup +}, and C{sup 17}O. The intensities of these spectral lines can be modeled by numerical techniques such as {Lambda}-iteration that alternately solve the equations of statistical equilibrium and the equation of radiative transfer. However, these calculations require knowledge of both the radiative and collisional rates for all transitions. For most commonly observed radio frequency spectral lines, only the net collisional rates between rotational levels are known. For such cases, two approximate methods have been suggested. The first method, hyperfine statistical equilibrium, distributes the hyperfine level populations according to their statistical weight, but allows the population of the rotational states to depart from local thermal equilibrium (LTE). The second method, the proportional method, approximates the collision rates between the hyperfine levels as fractions of the net rotational rates apportioned according to the statistical degeneracy of the final hyperfine levels. The second method is able to model non-LTE hyperfine emission. We compare simulations of N{sub 2}H{sup +} hyperfine lines made with approximate and more exact rates and find that satisfactory results are obtained.

  8. Molecular Modeling of Water Interfaces: From Molecular Spectroscopy to Thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Yuki; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Backus, Ellen H G; Bonn, Mischa

    2016-04-28

    Understanding aqueous interfaces at the molecular level is not only fundamentally important, but also highly relevant for a variety of disciplines. For instance, electrode-water interfaces are relevant for electrochemistry, as are mineral-water interfaces for geochemistry and air-water interfaces for environmental chemistry; water-lipid interfaces constitute the boundaries of the cell membrane, and are thus relevant for biochemistry. One of the major challenges in these fields is to link macroscopic properties such as interfacial reactivity, solubility, and permeability as well as macroscopic thermodynamic and spectroscopic observables to the structure, structural changes, and dynamics of molecules at these interfaces. Simulations, by themselves, or in conjunction with appropriate experiments, can provide such molecular-level insights into aqueous interfaces. In this contribution, we review the current state-of-the-art of three levels of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation: ab initio, force field, and coarse-grained. We discuss the advantages, the potential, and the limitations of each approach for studying aqueous interfaces, by assessing computations of the sum-frequency generation spectra and surface tension. The comparison of experimental and simulation data provides information on the challenges of future MD simulations, such as improving the force field models and the van der Waals corrections in ab initio MD simulations. Once good agreement between experimental observables and simulation can be established, the simulation can be used to provide insights into the processes at a level of detail that is generally inaccessible to experiments. As an example we discuss the mechanism of the evaporation of water. We finish by presenting an outlook outlining four future challenges for molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous interfacial systems. PMID:27010817

  9. Estimating soil water retention using soil component additivity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiliger, A.; Ermolaeva, O.; Semenov, V.

    2009-04-01

    Soil water retention is a major soil hydraulic property that governs soil functioning in ecosystems and greatly affects soil management. Data on soil water retention are used in research and applications in hydrology, agronomy, meteorology, ecology, environmental protection, and many other soil-related fields. Soil organic matter content and composition affect both soil structure and adsorption properties; therefore water retention may be affected by changes in soil organic matter that occur because of both climate change and modifications of management practices. Thus, effects of organic matter on soil water retention should be understood and quantified. Measurement of soil water retention is relatively time-consuming, and become impractical when soil hydrologic estimates are needed for large areas. One approach to soil water retention estimation from readily available data is based on the hypothesis that soil water retention may be estimated as an additive function obtained by summing up water retention of pore subspaces associated with soil textural and/or structural components and organic matter. The additivity model and was tested with 550 soil samples from the international database UNSODA and 2667 soil samples from the European database HYPRES containing all textural soil classes after USDA soil texture classification. The root mean square errors (RMSEs) of the volumetric water content estimates for UNSODA vary from 0.021 m3m-3 for coarse sandy loam to 0.075 m3m-3 for sandy clay. Obtained RMSEs are at the lower end of the RMSE range for regression-based water retention estimates found in literature. Including retention estimates of organic matter significantly improved RMSEs. The attained accuracy warrants testing the 'additivity' model with additional soil data and improving this model to accommodate various types of soil structure. Keywords: soil water retention, soil components, additive model, soil texture, organic matter.

  10. Mathematical modeling of molecular diffusion through mucus

    PubMed Central

    Cu, Yen; Saltzman, W. Mark

    2008-01-01

    The rate of molecular transport through the mucus gel can be an important determinant of efficacy for therapeutic agents delivered by oral, intranasal, intravaginal/rectal, and intraocular routes. Transport through mucus can be described by mathematical models based on principles of physical chemistry and known characteristics of the mucus gel, its constituents, and of the drug itself. In this paper, we review mathematical models of molecular diffusion in mucus, as well as the techniques commonly used to measure diffusion of solutes in the mucus gel, mucus gel mimics, and mucosal epithelia. PMID:19135488

  11. Molecular Modeling on the PC (by Matthew F. Schlecht)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rioux, Reviewed Frank

    2000-06-01

    plenty of graphical support. The reader is now ready to move to Chapter 6 on applications and work through the 32 exercises (Chapters 3 and 4 have an additional 11 exercises) designed to illustrate the current uses of molecular modeling in academic and industrial research. Chapter 3 (Input and Output), Chapter 4 (File Formats), and the balance of Chapter 5 can be consulted as needed. For example, Chapter 5 contains 160 pages on the evolution of the various empirical force fields in use today and important information in each case on parameterization and implementation. Besides finding a clearly written, wellorganized, thorough presentation, the reader will appreciate a number of other important features. There are numerous references (993) to the primary literature covering the field of molecular mechanics from its beginnings to mid1997, when the book went to press. There is a complete glossary of PCMODEL commands, and a comprehensive and valuable glossary (77 pages) of frequently used computer terms. There are 392 figures (many of them screen captures) providing illustrations of the PCMODEL interface in use and examples of input and output files. To aid the reader/user in obtaining expertise as a modeler, a diskette containing all the structure files for all the exercises accompanies the text. In addition, the author provides, on the same diskette, a browserreadable HTML file that contains links to a large number of pertinent resources on the World Wide Web. In summary, Molecular Modeling on the PC, by Matthew Schlecht, is a very impressive contribution to the molecular modeling literature. Schlecht's book should be in every college and university library and in the personal libraries of those who want to learn more about molecular mechanics or who anticipate its use in their teaching or research.

  12. Molecular Imprinting of Silica Nanoparticle Surfaces via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Polymerization for Optical Biosensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluz, Zehra; Nayab, Sana; Kursun, Talya Tugana; Caykara, Tuncer; Yameen, Basit; Duran, Hatice

    Azo initiator modified surface of silica nanoparticles were coated via reversible addition-fragmentation polymerization (RAFT) of methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate using 2-phenylprop 2-yl dithobenzoate as chain transfer agent. Using L-phenylalanine anilide as template during polymerization led molecularly imprinted nanoparticles. RAFT polymerization offers an efficient control of grafting process, while molecularly imprinted polymers shows enhanced capacity as sensor. L-phenylalanine anilide imprinted silica particles were characterized by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM). Performances of the particles were followed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) after coating the final product on gold deposited glass substrate against four different analogous of analyte molecules: D-henylalanine anilide, L-tyrosine, L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine. Characterizations indicated that silica particles coated with polymer layer do contain binding sites for L-phenylalanine anilide, and are highly selective for the molecule of interest. This project was supported by TUBITAK (Project No:112M804).

  13. Additions to Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.

    1991-01-01

    Three major additions or modifications were made to the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM): (1) in addition to the interactive version, a new batch version is available, which uses NAMELIST input, and is completely modular, so that the main driver program can easily be replaced by any calling program, such as a trajectory simulation program; (2) both the interactive and batch versions now have an option for treating local-scale dust storm effects, rather than just the global-scale dust storms in the original Mars-GRAM; and (3) the Zurek wave perturbation model was added, to simulate the effects of tidal perturbations, in addition to the random (mountain wave) perturbation model of the original Mars-GRAM. A minor modification has also been made which allows heights to go below local terrain height and return realistic pressure, density, and temperature (not the surface values) as returned by the original Mars-GRAM. This feature will allow simulations of Mars rover paths which might go into local valley areas which lie below the average height of the present, rather coarse-resolution, terrain height data used by Mars-GRAM. Sample input and output of both the interactive and batch version of Mars-GRAM are presented.

  14. Additions to Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (MARS-GRAM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justus, C. G.; James, Bonnie

    1992-01-01

    Three major additions or modifications were made to the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM): (1) in addition to the interactive version, a new batch version is available, which uses NAMELIST input, and is completely modular, so that the main driver program can easily be replaced by any calling program, such as a trajectory simulation program; (2) both the interactive and batch versions now have an option for treating local-scale dust storm effects, rather than just the global-scale dust storms in the original Mars-GRAM; and (3) the Zurek wave perturbation model was added, to simulate the effects of tidal perturbations, in addition to the random (mountain wave) perturbation model of the original Mars-GRAM. A minor modification was also made which allows heights to go 'below' local terrain height and return 'realistic' pressure, density, and temperature, and not the surface values, as returned by the original Mars-GRAM. This feature will allow simulations of Mars rover paths which might go into local 'valley' areas which lie below the average height of the present, rather coarse-resolution, terrain height data used by Mars-GRAM. Sample input and output of both the interactive and batch versions of Mars-GRAM are presented.

  15. Mobile modeling in the molecular sciences

    EPA Science Inventory

    The art of modeling in the molecular sciences is highly dependent on both the available computational technology, underlying data, and ability to collaborate. With the ever increasing market share of mobile devices, it is assumed by many that tablets will overtake laptops as the...

  16. Understanding Rasch Measurement: The Rasch Model, Additive Conjoint Measurement, and New Models of Probabilistic Measurement Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karabatsos, George

    2001-01-01

    Describes similarities and differences between additive conjoint measurement and the Rasch model, and formalizes some new nonparametric item response models that are, in a sense, probabilistic measurement theory models. Applies these new models to published and simulated data. (SLD)

  17. Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Jerzy Bernholc

    2011-02-03

    will some day reach a miniaturization limit, forcing designers of Si-based electronics to pursue increased performance by other means. Any other alternative approach would have the unenviable task of matching the ability of Si technology to pack more than a billion interconnected and addressable devices on a chip the size of a thumbnail. Nevertheless, the prospects of developing alternative approaches to fabricate electronic devices have spurred an ever-increasing pace of fundamental research. One of the promising possibilities is molecular electronics (ME), self-assembled molecular-based electronic systems composed of single-molecule devices in ultra dense, ultra fast molecular-sized components. This project focused on developing accurate, reliable theoretical modeling capabilities for describing molecular electronics devices. The participants in the project are given in Table 1. The primary outcomes of this fundamental computational science grant are publications in the open scientific literature. As listed below, 62 papers have been published from this project. In addition, the research has also been the subject of more than 100 invited talks at conferences, including several plenary or keynote lectures. Many of the goals of the original proposal were completed. Specifically, the multi-disciplinary group developed a unique set of capabilities and tools for investigating electron transport in fabricated and self-assembled nanostructures at multiple length and time scales.

  18. The role of molecular modeling in bionanotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Deyu; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Shih, Amy Y.; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo; Freddolino, Peter L.; Arkhipov, Anton; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    Molecular modeling is advocated here as a key methodology for research and development in bionanotechnology. Molecular modeling provides nanoscale images at atomic and even electronic resolution, predicts the nanoscale interaction of yet unfamiliar combinations of biological and inorganic materials, and can evaluate strategies for redesigning biopolymers for nanotechnological uses. The methodology is illustrated in this paper through three case studies. The first involves the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes as biomedical sensors where a computationally efficient, yet accurate description of the influence of biomolecules on nanotube electronic properties and a description of nanotube - biomolecule interactions were developed; this development furnishes the ability to test nanotube electronic properties in realistic biological environments. The second case study involves the use of nanopores manufactured into electronic nanodevices based on silicon compounds for single molecule electrical recording, in particular, for DNA sequencing. Here, modeling combining classical molecular dynamics, material science, and device physics, describes the interaction of biopolymers, e.g., DNA, with silicon nitrate and silicon oxide pores, furnishes accurate dynamic images of pore translocation processes, and predicts signals. The third case study involves the development of nanoscale lipid bilayers for the study of embedded membrane proteins and cholesterol. Molecular modeling tested scaffold proteins, redesigned lipoproteins found in mammalian plasma that hold the discoidal membranes in shape, and predicted the assembly as well as final structure of the nanodiscs. In entirely new technological areas like bionanotechnology qualitative concepts, pictures, and suggestions are sorely needed; these three case studies document that molecular modeling can serve a critical role in this respect, even though it may still fall short on quantitative precision. PMID:16582464

  19. The role of molecular modeling in bionanotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Deyu; Aksimentiev, Aleksei; Shih, Amy Y.; Cruz-Chu, Eduardo; Freddolino, Peter L.; Arkhipov, Anton; Schulten, Klaus

    2006-03-01

    Molecular modeling is advocated here as a key methodology for research and development in bionanotechnology. Molecular modeling provides nanoscale images at atomic and even electronic resolution, predicts the nanoscale interaction of unfamiliar combinations of biological and inorganic materials, and evaluates strategies for redesigning biopolymers for nanotechnological uses. The methodology is illustrated in this paper through reviewing three case studies. The first one involves the use of single-walled carbon nanotubes as biomedical sensors where a computationally efficient, yet accurate, description of the influence of biomolecules on nanotube electronic properties through nanotube-biomolecule interactions was developed; this development furnishes the ability to test nanotube electronic properties in realistic biological environments. The second case study involves the use of nanopores manufactured into electronic nanodevices based on silicon compounds for single molecule electrical recording, in particular, for DNA sequencing. Here, modeling combining classical molecular dynamics, material science and device physics, described the interaction of biopolymers, e.g., DNA, with silicon nitrate and silicon oxide pores, furnished accurate dynamic images of pore translocation processes, and predicted signals. The third case study involves the development of nanoscale lipid bilayers for the study of embedded membrane proteins and cholesterol. Molecular modeling tested scaffold proteins, redesigned apolipoproteins found in mammalian plasma that hold the discoidal membranes in the proper shape, and predicted the assembly as well as final structure of the nanodiscs. In entirely new technological areas such as bionanotechnology, qualitative concepts, pictures and suggestions are sorely needed; these three case studies document that molecular modeling can serve a critical role in this respect, even though it may still fall short on quantitative precision.

  20. SPECTRAFACTORY.NET: A DATABASE OF MOLECULAR MODEL SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Cami, J.; Van Malderen, R.; Markwick, A. J. E-mail: Andrew.Markwick@manchester.ac.uk

    2010-04-01

    We present a homogeneous database of synthetic molecular absorption and emission spectra from the optical to mm wavelengths for a large range of temperatures and column densities relevant for various astrophysical purposes, but in particular for the analysis, identification, and first-order analysis of molecular bands in spectroscopic observations. All spectra are calculated in the LTE limit from several molecular line lists, and are presented at various spectral resolving powers corresponding to several specific instrument simulations. The database is available online at http://www.spectrafactory.net, where users can freely browse, search, display, and download the spectra. We describe how additional model spectra can be requested for (automatic) calculation and inclusion. The database already contains over half a million model spectra for 39 molecules (96 different isotopologues) over the wavelength range 350 nm-3 mm ({approx}3-30000 cm{sup -1})

  1. Multiscale and Multiphysics Modeling of Additive Manufacturing of Advanced Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liou, Frank; Newkirk, Joseph; Fan, Zhiqiang; Sparks, Todd; Chen, Xueyang; Fletcher, Kenneth; Zhang, Jingwei; Zhang, Yunlu; Kumar, Kannan Suresh; Karnati, Sreekar

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this proposed project is to research and develop a prediction tool for advanced additive manufacturing (AAM) processes for advanced materials and develop experimental methods to provide fundamental properties and establish validation data. Aircraft structures and engines demand materials that are stronger, useable at much higher temperatures, provide less acoustic transmission, and enable more aeroelastic tailoring than those currently used. Significant improvements in properties can only be achieved by processing the materials under nonequilibrium conditions, such as AAM processes. AAM processes encompass a class of processes that use a focused heat source to create a melt pool on a substrate. Examples include Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication and Direct Metal Deposition. These types of additive processes enable fabrication of parts directly from CAD drawings. To achieve the desired material properties and geometries of the final structure, assessing the impact of process parameters and predicting optimized conditions with numerical modeling as an effective prediction tool is necessary. The targets for the processing are multiple and at different spatial scales, and the physical phenomena associated occur in multiphysics and multiscale. In this project, the research work has been developed to model AAM processes in a multiscale and multiphysics approach. A macroscale model was developed to investigate the residual stresses and distortion in AAM processes. A sequentially coupled, thermomechanical, finite element model was developed and validated experimentally. The results showed the temperature distribution, residual stress, and deformation within the formed deposits and substrates. A mesoscale model was developed to include heat transfer, phase change with mushy zone, incompressible free surface flow, solute redistribution, and surface tension. Because of excessive computing time needed, a parallel computing approach was also tested. In addition

  2. Molecular Modeling of Solid Fluid Phase Behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Peter A. Monson

    2007-12-20

    This report gives a summary of the achievements under DOE contract No. DOE/ER/14150 during the period September 1, 1990 to December 31, 2007. This project was concerned with the molecular modeling of solid-fluid equilibrium. The focus was on understanding how solid-fluid and solid-solid phase behavior are related to molecular structure, and the research program made a seminal contribution in this area. The project led to 34 journal articles, including a comprehensive review article published in Advances in Chemical Physics. The DOE funding supported the work of 5 Ph.D. students, 2 M.S. students and 5 postdoctoral researchers.

  3. Simple model of a coherent molecular photocell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ernzerhof, Matthias; Bélanger, Marc-André; Mayou, Didier; Nemati Aram, Tahereh

    2016-04-01

    Electron transport in molecular electronic devices is often dominated by a coherent mechanism in which the wave function extends from the left contact over the molecule to the right contact. If the device is exposed to light, photon absorption in the molecule might occur, turning the device into a molecular photocell. The photon absorption promotes an electron to higher energy levels and thus modifies the electron transmission probability through the device. A model for such a molecular photocell is presented that minimizes the complexity of the problem while providing a non-trivial description of the device mechanism. In particular, the role of the molecule in the photocell is investigated. It is described within the Hückel method and the source-sink potential approach [F. Goyer, M. Ernzerhof, and M. Zhuang, J. Chem. Phys. 126, 144104 (2007)] is used to eliminate the contacts in favor of complex-valued potentials. Furthermore, the photons are explicitly incorporated into the model through a second-quantized field. This facilitates the description of the photon absorption process with a stationary state calculation, where eigenvalues and eigenvectors are determined. The model developed is applied to various generic molecular photocells.

  4. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E.; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J.-M.; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp2/sp3 hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms.

  5. Realistic molecular model of kerogen's nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Bousige, Colin; Ghimbeu, Camélia Matei; Vix-Guterl, Cathie; Pomerantz, Andrew E; Suleimenova, Assiya; Vaughan, Gavin; Garbarino, Gaston; Feygenson, Mikhail; Wildgruber, Christoph; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Pellenq, Roland J-M; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-05-01

    Despite kerogen's importance as the organic backbone for hydrocarbon production from source rocks such as gas shale, the interplay between kerogen's chemistry, morphology and mechanics remains unexplored. As the environmental impact of shale gas rises, identifying functional relations between its geochemical, transport, elastic and fracture properties from realistic molecular models of kerogens becomes all the more important. Here, by using a hybrid experimental-simulation method, we propose a panel of realistic molecular models of mature and immature kerogens that provide a detailed picture of kerogen's nanostructure without considering the presence of clays and other minerals in shales. We probe the models' strengths and limitations, and show that they predict essential features amenable to experimental validation, including pore distribution, vibrational density of states and stiffness. We also show that kerogen's maturation, which manifests itself as an increase in the sp(2)/sp(3) hybridization ratio, entails a crossover from plastic-to-brittle rupture mechanisms. PMID:26828313

  6. Addition Table of Colours: Additive and Subtractive Mixtures Described Using a Single Reasoning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mota, A. R.; Lopes dos Santos, J. M. B.

    2014-01-01

    Students' misconceptions concerning colour phenomena and the apparent complexity of the underlying concepts--due to the different domains of knowledge involved--make its teaching very difficult. We have developed and tested a teaching device, the addition table of colours (ATC), that encompasses additive and subtractive mixtures in a single…

  7. Sensitivity analysis of geometric errors in additive manufacturing medical models.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jose Miguel; Arrieta, Cristobal; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Ramos-Grez, Jorge; Vargas, Alex; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Tejos, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) models are used in medical applications for surgical planning, prosthesis design and teaching. For these applications, the accuracy of the AM models is essential. Unfortunately, this accuracy is compromised due to errors introduced by each of the building steps: image acquisition, segmentation, triangulation, printing and infiltration. However, the contribution of each step to the final error remains unclear. We performed a sensitivity analysis comparing errors obtained from a reference with those obtained modifying parameters of each building step. Our analysis considered global indexes to evaluate the overall error, and local indexes to show how this error is distributed along the surface of the AM models. Our results show that the standard building process tends to overestimate the AM models, i.e. models are larger than the original structures. They also show that the triangulation resolution and the segmentation threshold are critical factors, and that the errors are concentrated at regions with high curvatures. Errors could be reduced choosing better triangulation and printing resolutions, but there is an important need for modifying some of the standard building processes, particularly the segmentation algorithms. PMID:25649961

  8. Additive Manufacturing of Medical Models--Applications in Rhinology.

    PubMed

    Raos, Pero; Klapan, Ivica; Galeta, Tomislav

    2015-09-01

    In the paper we are introducing guidelines and suggestions for use of 3D image processing SW in head pathology diagnostic and procedures for obtaining physical medical model by additive manufacturing/rapid prototyping techniques, bearing in mind the improvement of surgery performance, its maximum security and faster postoperative recovery of patients. This approach has been verified in two case reports. In the treatment we used intelligent classifier-schemes for abnormal patterns using computer-based system for 3D-virtual and endoscopic assistance in rhinology, with appropriate visualization of anatomy and pathology within the nose, paranasal sinuses, and scull base area. PMID:26898064

  9. Multiscale Modeling of Powder Bed–Based Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markl, Matthias; Körner, Carolin

    2016-07-01

    Powder bed fusion processes are additive manufacturing technologies that are expected to induce the third industrial revolution. Components are built up layer by layer in a powder bed by selectively melting confined areas, according to sliced 3D model data. This technique allows for manufacturing of highly complex geometries hardly machinable with conventional technologies. However, the underlying physical phenomena are sparsely understood and difficult to observe during processing. Therefore, an intensive and expensive trial-and-error principle is applied to produce components with the desired dimensional accuracy, material characteristics, and mechanical properties. This review presents numerical modeling approaches on multiple length scales and timescales to describe different aspects of powder bed fusion processes. In combination with tailored experiments, the numerical results enlarge the process understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms and support the development of suitable process strategies and component topologies.

  10. Optical models of the molecular atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuev, V. E.; Makushkin, Y. S.; Mitsel, A. A.; Ponomarev, Y. N.; Rudenko, V. P.; Firsov, K. M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of optical and laser methods for performing atmospheric investigations has stimulated the development of the optical models of the atmosphere. The principles of constructing the optical models of molecular atmosphere for radiation with different spectral composition (wideband, narrowband, and monochromatic) are considered in the case of linear and nonlinear absorptions. The example of the development of a system which provides for the modeling of the processes of optical-wave energy transfer in the atmosphere is presented. Its physical foundations, structure, programming software, and functioning were considered.

  11. Molecular models and simulations of layered materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinichev, Andrey G.; Cygan, Randall Timothy; Heinz, Hendrik; Greathouse, Jeffery A.

    2008-11-01

    The micro- to nano-sized nature of layered materials, particularly characteristic of naturally occurring clay minerals, limits our ability to fully interrogate their atomic dispositions and crystal structures. The low symmetry, multicomponent compositions, defects, and disorder phenomena of clays and related phases necessitate the use of molecular models and modern simulation methods. Computational chemistry tools based on classical force fields and quantum-chemical methods of electronic structure calculations provide a practical approach to evaluate structure and dynamics of the materials on an atomic scale. Combined with classical energy minimization, molecular dynamics, and Monte Carlo techniques, quantum methods provide accurate models of layered materials such as clay minerals, layered double hydroxides, and clay-polymer nanocomposites.

  12. Molecular dynamics modelling of solidification in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Boercker, D.B.; Belak, J.; Glosli, J.

    1997-12-31

    Molecular dynamics modeling is used to study the solidification of metals at high pressure and temperature. Constant pressure MD is applied to a simulation cell initially filled with both solid and molten metal. The solid/liquid interface is tracked as a function of time, and the data are used to estimate growth rates of crystallites at high pressure and temperature in Ta and Mg.

  13. Applications of molecular modeling in coal research

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.A.; Faulon, J.L.

    1994-01-01

    Over the past several years, molecular modeling has been applied to study various characteristics of coal molecular structures. Powerful workstations coupled with molecular force-field-based software packages have been used to study coal and coal-related molecules. Early work involved determination of the minimum-energy three-dimensional conformations of various published coal structures (Given, Wiser, Solomon and Shinn), and the dominant role of van der Waals and hydrogen bonding forces in defining the energy-minimized structures. These studies have been extended to explore various physical properties of coal structures, including density, microporosity, surface area, and fractal dimension. Other studies have related structural characteristics to cross-link density and have explored small molecule interactions with coal. Finally, recent studies using a structural elucidation (molecular builder) technique have constructed statistically diverse coal structures based on quantitative and qualitative data on coal and its decomposition products. This technique is also being applied to study coalification processes based on postulated coalification chemistry.

  14. Molecular model for hydrated biological tissues.

    PubMed

    Sato, Erika Tiemi; Rocha, Alexandre Reily; de Carvalho, Luis Felipe das Chagas e Silva; Almeida, Janete Dias; Martinho, Herculano

    2015-06-01

    A density-functional microscopic model for soft tissues (STmod) is presented. The model was based on a prototype molecular structure from experimentally resolved type I collagen peptide residues and water clusters treated in periodic boundary conditions. We obtained the optimized geometry, binding and coupling energies, dipole moments, and vibrational frequencies. The results concerning the stability of the confined water clusters, the water-water, and water-collagen interactions were successfully correlated to some important experimental trends of normal and inflammatory tissues. PMID:26172825

  15. [Critical of the additive model of the randomized controlled trial].

    PubMed

    Boussageon, Rémy; Gueyffier, François; Bejan-Angoulvant, Theodora; Felden-Dominiak, Géraldine

    2008-01-01

    Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials are currently the best way to demonstrate the clinical effectiveness of drugs. Its methodology relies on the method of difference (John Stuart Mill), through which the observed difference between two groups (drug vs placebo) can be attributed to the pharmacological effect of the drug being tested. However, this additive model can be questioned in the event of statistical interactions between the pharmacological and the placebo effects. Evidence in different domains has shown that the placebo effect can influence the effect of the active principle. This article evaluates the methodological, clinical and epistemological consequences of this phenomenon. Topics treated include extrapolating results, accounting for heterogeneous results, demonstrating the existence of several factors in the placebo effect, the necessity to take these factors into account for given symptoms or pathologies, as well as the problem of the "specific" effect. PMID:18387273

  16. Electronic continuum model for molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Leontyev, I V; Stuchebrukhov, A A

    2009-02-28

    A simple model for accounting for electronic polarization in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is discussed. In this model, called molecular dynamics electronic continuum (MDEC), the electronic polarization is treated explicitly in terms of the electronic continuum (EC) approximation, while the nuclear dynamics is described with a fixed-charge force field. In such a force-field all atomic charges are scaled to reflect the screening effect by the electronic continuum. The MDEC model is rather similar but not equivalent to the standard nonpolarizable force-fields; the differences are discussed. Of our particular interest is the calculation of the electrostatic part of solvation energy using standard nonpolarizable MD simulations. In a low-dielectric environment, such as protein, the standard MD approach produces qualitatively wrong results. The difficulty is in mistreatment of the electronic polarizability. We show how the results can be much improved using the MDEC approach. We also show how the dielectric constant of the medium obtained in a MD simulation with nonpolarizable force-field is related to the static (total) dielectric constant, which includes both the nuclear and electronic relaxation effects. Using the MDEC model, we discuss recent calculations of dielectric constants of alcohols and alkanes, and show that the MDEC results are comparable with those obtained with the polarizable Drude oscillator model. The applicability of the method to calculations of dielectric properties of proteins is discussed. PMID:19256627

  17. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Lee-Ping; Wang, Qiantao; Pande, Vijay S.; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-07-01

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3-5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water.

  18. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Lee-Ping; Wang, Qiantao; Pande, Vijay S.; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-01-01

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3–5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water. PMID:26156485

  19. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation.

    PubMed

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Lee-Ping; Wang, Qiantao; Pande, Vijay S; Ren, Pengyu

    2015-07-01

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3-5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water. PMID:26156485

  20. United polarizable multipole water model for molecular mechanics simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Qi, Rui; Wang, Qiantao; Ren, Pengyu; Wang, Lee-Ping; Pande, Vijay S.

    2015-07-07

    We report the development of a united AMOEBA (uAMOEBA) polarizable water model, which is computationally 3–5 times more efficient than the three-site AMOEBA03 model in molecular dynamics simulations while providing comparable accuracy for gas-phase and liquid properties. In this coarse-grained polarizable water model, both electrostatic (permanent and induced) and van der Waals representations have been reduced to a single site located at the oxygen atom. The permanent charge distribution is described via the molecular dipole and quadrupole moments and the many-body polarization via an isotropic molecular polarizability, all located at the oxygen center. Similarly, a single van der Waals interaction site is used for each water molecule. Hydrogen atoms are retained only for the purpose of defining local frames for the molecular multipole moments and intramolecular vibrational modes. The parameters have been derived based on a combination of ab initio quantum mechanical and experimental data set containing gas-phase cluster structures and energies, and liquid thermodynamic properties. For validation, additional properties including dimer interaction energy, liquid structures, self-diffusion coefficient, and shear viscosity have been evaluated. The results demonstrate good transferability from the gas to the liquid phase over a wide range of temperatures, and from nonpolar to polar environments, due to the presence of molecular polarizability. The water coordination, hydrogen-bonding structure, and dynamic properties given by uAMOEBA are similar to those derived from the all-atom AMOEBA03 model and experiments. Thus, the current model is an accurate and efficient alternative for modeling water.

  1. Gradient models in molecular biophysics: progress, challenges, opportunities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.

    2013-12-01

    In the interest of developing a bridge between researchers modeling materials and those modeling biological molecules, we survey recent progress in developing nonlocal-dielectric continuum models for studying the behavior of proteins and nucleic acids. As in other areas of science, continuum models are essential tools when atomistic simulations (e.g., molecular dynamics) are too expensive. Because biological molecules are essentially all nanoscale systems, the standard continuum model, involving local dielectric response, has basically always been dubious at best. The advanced continuum theories discussed here aim to remedy these shortcomings by adding nonlocal dielectric response. We begin by describing the central role of electrostatic interactions in biology at the molecular scale, and motivate the development of computationally tractable continuum models using applications in science and engineering. For context, we highlight some of the most important challenges that remain, and survey the diverse theoretical formalisms for their treatment, highlighting the rigorous statistical mechanics that support the use and improvement of continuum models. We then address the development and implementation of nonlocal dielectric models, an approach pioneered by Dogonadze, Kornyshev, and their collaborators almost 40 years ago. The simplest of these models is just a scalar form of gradient elasticity, and here we use ideas from gradient-based modeling to extend the electrostatic model to include additional length scales. The review concludes with a discussion of open questions for model development, highlighting the many opportunities for the materials community to leverage its physical, mathematical, and computational expertise to help solve one of the most challenging questions in molecular biology and biophysics.

  2. Gradient Models in Molecular Biophysics: Progress, Challenges, Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Bardhan, Jaydeep P.

    2014-01-01

    In the interest of developing a bridge between researchers modeling materials and those modeling biological molecules, we survey recent progress in developing nonlocal-dielectric continuum models for studying the behavior of proteins and nucleic acids. As in other areas of science, continuum models are essential tools when atomistic simulations (e.g. molecular dynamics) are too expensive. Because biological molecules are essentially all nanoscale systems, the standard continuum model, involving local dielectric response, has basically always been dubious at best. The advanced continuum theories discussed here aim to remedy these shortcomings by adding features such as nonlocal dielectric response, and nonlinearities resulting from dielectric saturation. We begin by describing the central role of electrostatic interactions in biology at the molecular scale, and motivate the development of computationally tractable continuum models using applications in science and engineering. For context, we highlight some of the most important challenges that remain and survey the diverse theoretical formalisms for their treatment, highlighting the rigorous statistical mechanics that support the use and improvement of continuum models. We then address the development and implementation of nonlocal dielectric models, an approach pioneered by Dogonadze, Kornyshev, and their collaborators almost forty years ago. The simplest of these models is just a scalar form of gradient elasticity, and here we use ideas from gradient-based modeling to extend the electrostatic model to include additional length scales. The paper concludes with a discussion of open questions for model development, highlighting the many opportunities for the materials community to leverage its physical, mathematical, and computational expertise to help solve one of the most challenging questions in molecular biology and biophysics. PMID:25505358

  3. A Series of Molecular Dynamics and Homology Modeling Computer Labs for an Undergraduate Molecular Modeling Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elmore, Donald E.; Guayasamin, Ryann C.; Kieffer, Madeleine E.

    2010-01-01

    As computational modeling plays an increasingly central role in biochemical research, it is important to provide students with exposure to common modeling methods in their undergraduate curriculum. This article describes a series of computer labs designed to introduce undergraduate students to energy minimization, molecular dynamics simulations,…

  4. Molecular Models of Liquid Crystal Elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajshekhar

    Liquid crystal elastomers combine the elastic properties of conventional rubbers with the optical properties of liquid crystals. This dual nature gives rise to unusual physical properties, including the stress induced transition from a polydomain state, consisting of multiple nematic regions with independent orientations, to a monodomain state consisting of a single nematic region with a uniform director. We propose several molecular-scale coarse-grained models of liquid crystal elastomers with varying degrees of resolution. The models employ the Gay-Berne soft potential, and exhibit the chain connectivity of a diamond network. Simulation results show that these models are able to capture the polydomain state exhibited by liquid crystal elastomers in the absence of any external stress. When subjected to uniaxial stress, our models exhibit a polydomain to monodomain transition. We explain that the polydomain state occurs through the aggregation of liquid crystal molecules assisted by crosslinking sites, and conclude that the transition mechanism to the monodomain state is based on the reorientation of nematic domains along the direction of applied stress. Our modeling efforts are primarily focused on three models. The first two models consider the effects of rigid and flexible crosslinkers in liquid crystal elastomers with a diamond topology for chain connectivity. The third model deviates from the diamond network topology and adopts a random network topology.

  5. Molecular Sieve Bench Testing and Computer Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohamadinejad, Habib; DaLee, Robert C.; Blackmon, James B.

    1995-01-01

    The design of an efficient four-bed molecular sieve (4BMS) CO2 removal system for the International Space Station depends on many mission parameters, such as duration, crew size, cost of power, volume, fluid interface properties, etc. A need for space vehicle CO2 removal system models capable of accurately performing extrapolated hardware predictions is inevitable due to the change of the parameters which influences the CO2 removal system capacity. The purpose is to investigate the mathematical techniques required for a model capable of accurate extrapolated performance predictions and to obtain test data required to estimate mass transfer coefficients and verify the computer model. Models have been developed to demonstrate that the finite difference technique can be successfully applied to sorbents and conditions used in spacecraft CO2 removal systems. The nonisothermal, axially dispersed, plug flow model with linear driving force for 5X sorbent and pore diffusion for silica gel are then applied to test data. A more complex model, a non-darcian model (two dimensional), has also been developed for simulation of the test data. This model takes into account the channeling effect on column breakthrough. Four FORTRAN computer programs are presented: a two-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a one-dimensional model of flow adsorption/desorption in a packed bed; a model of thermal vacuum desorption; and a model of a tri-sectional packed bed with two different sorbent materials. The programs are capable of simulating up to four gas constituents for each process, which can be increased with a few minor changes.

  6. Molecular modeling of auxin transport inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, G.; Black-Schaefer, C.; Bures, M.G. )

    1990-05-01

    Molecular modeling techniques have been used to study the chemical and steric properties of auxin transport inhibitors. These bind to a specific site on the plant plasma membrane characterized by its affinity for N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA). A three-dimensional model was derived from critical features of ligands for the NPA receptor, and a suggested binding conformation is proposed. This model, along with three-dimensional structural searching techniques, was then used to search the Abbott corporate database of chemical structures. Of the 467 compounds that satisfied the search criteria, 77 representative molecules were evaluated for their ability to compete for ({sup 3}H)NPA binding to corn microsomal membranes. Nineteen showed activity that ranged from 16 to 85% of the maximum NPA binding. Four of the most active of these, from chemical classes not included in the original compound set, also inhibited polar auxin transport through corn coleoptile sections.

  7. Modelling Molecular Emission from Young Embedded Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harsono, D.; Visser, R.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kristensen, L.; Bruderer, S.; Brinch, C. Hogerheijde, M.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar disks play an important role in the formation of stars and planets. Recent observations and models have placed strong constraints on the later stages of their evolution (the T Tauri or Herbig Ae/Be phase), when an envelope is no longer present. However, little is known of the disk structure and evolution during the embedded phase of star formation. With Herschel and the VLT, and soon ALMA, we will be able to detect and characterize the early stages of disk formation. Sophisticated modeling including both physical and chemical structure of the system would be needed to interpret the high quality of data. We present a two-dimensional, semi-analytical model of disk formation as also used in Visser et al. (2009) and Visser and Dullemond (2010). The dust temperature is determined using a three-dimensional dust continuum radiative transfer code (RADMC-3D). Molecular abundances are calculated by following freeze-out and evaporation from the pre-stellar core up to the formation of the circumstellar disk. Synthetic spectra of CO and H2O within the wavelength ranges observable with Herschel and VLT-CRIRES are then produced at a series of time steps, tracing the different stages of disk formation. We also present simulated ALMA images. We discuss the evolution of the molecular emission and the possibility of identifying the presence of embedded disks.

  8. Hydrophobic interactions in model enclosures from small to large length scales: non-additivity in explicit and implicit solvent models

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingle; Friesner, Richard A.; Berne, B. J.

    2011-01-01

    The binding affinities between a united-atom methane and various model hydrophobic enclosures were studied through high accuracy free energy perturbation methods (FEP). We investigated the non-additivity of the hydrophobic interaction in these systems, measured by the deviation of its binding affinity from that predicted by the pairwise additivity approximation. While only small non-additivity effects were previously reported in the interactions in methane trimers, we found large cooperative effects (as large as −1.14 kcal mol−1 or approximately a 25% increase in the binding affinity) and anti-cooperative effects (as large as 0.45 kcal mol−1) for these model enclosed systems. Decomposition of the total potential of mean force (PMF) into increasing orders of multi-body interactions indicates that the contributions of the higher order multi-body interactions can be either positive or negative in different systems, and increasing the order of multi-body interactions considered did not necessarily improve the accuracy. A general correlation between the sign of the non-additivity effect and the curvature of the solute molecular surface was observed. We found that implicit solvent models based on the molecular surface area (MSA) performed much better, not only in predicting binding affinities, but also in predicting the non-additivity effects, compared with models based on the solvent accessible surface area (SASA), suggesting that MSA is a better descriptor of the curvature of the solutes. We also show how the non-additivity contribution changes as the hydrophobicity of the plate is decreased from the dewetting regime to the wetting regime. PMID:21043426

  9. Many-Body Models for Molecular Nanomagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, A.; Carretta, S.; Santini, P.; Amoretti, G.; Pavarini, E.

    2013-04-01

    We present a flexible and effective ab initio scheme to build many-body models for molecular nanomagnets, and to calculate magnetic exchange couplings and zero-field splittings. It is based on using localized Foster-Boys orbitals as a one-electron basis. We apply this scheme to three paradigmatic systems, the antiferromagnetic rings Cr8 and Cr7Ni, and the single-molecule magnet Fe4. In all cases we identify the essential magnetic interactions and find excellent agreement with experiments.

  10. Synthesis, molecular structure, spectroscopic analysis, thermodynamic parameters and molecular modeling studies of (2-methoxyphenyl)oxalate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Şahin, Zarife Sibel; Kantar, Günay Kaya; Şaşmaz, Selami; Büyükgüngör, Orhan

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study is to find out the molecular characteristic and structural parameters that govern the chemical behavior of a new (2-methoxyphenyl)oxalate compound and to compare predictions made from theory with experimental observations. The title compound, (2-methoxyphenyl)oxalate, (I), (C16H14O6), has been synthesized. The compound has been characterized by elemental analysis, IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR spectroscopies and single crystal X-ray diffraction techniques. Optimized molecular structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies, 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts have been investigated by B3LYP/6-31G(d,p) method using density functional theory (DFT). The calculated results show that the predicted geometry can well reproduce structural parameters. In addition, global chemical reactivity descriptors, molecular electrostatic potential map (MEP), frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs), Mulliken population method and natural population analysis (NPA) and thermodynamic properties have also been studied. The energetic behavior of title compound has been examined in solvent media using polarizable continuum model (PCM).

  11. A Molecular Communications Model for Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Femminella, Mauro; Reali, Gianluca; Vasilakos, Athanasios V

    2015-12-01

    This paper considers the scenario of a targeted drug delivery system, which consists of deploying a number of biological nanomachines close to a biological target (e.g., a tumor), able to deliver drug molecules in the diseased area. Suitably located transmitters are designed to release a continuous flow of drug molecules in the surrounding environment, where they diffuse and reach the target. These molecules are received when they chemically react with compliant receptors deployed on the receiver surface. In these conditions, if the release rate is relatively high and the drug absorption time is significant, congestion may happen, essentially at the receiver site. This phenomenon limits the drug absorption rate and makes the signal transmission ineffective, with an undesired diffusion of drug molecules elsewhere in the body. The original contribution of this paper consists of a theoretical analysis of the causes of congestion in diffusion-based molecular communications. For this purpose, it is proposed a reception model consisting of a set of pure loss queuing systems. The proposed model exhibits an excellent agreement with the results of a simulation campaign made by using the Biological and Nano-Scale communication simulator version 2 (BiNS2), a well-known simulator for molecular communications, whose reliability has been assessed through in vitro experiments. The obtained results can be used in rate control algorithms to optimally determine the optimal release rate of molecules in drug delivery applications. PMID:26529770

  12. Percolation model with an additional source of disorder.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Sumanta; Manna, S S

    2016-06-01

    The ranges of transmission of the mobiles in a mobile ad hoc network are not uniform in reality. They are affected by the temperature fluctuation in air, obstruction due to the solid objects, even the humidity difference in the environment, etc. How the varying range of transmission of the individual active elements affects the global connectivity in the network may be an important practical question to ask. Here a model of percolation phenomena, with an additional source of disorder, is introduced for a theoretical understanding of this problem. As in ordinary percolation, sites of a square lattice are occupied randomly with probability p. Each occupied site is then assigned a circular disk of random value R for its radius. A bond is defined to be occupied if and only if the radii R_{1} and R_{2} of the disks centered at the ends satisfy a certain predefined condition. In a very general formulation, one divides the R_{1}-R_{2} plane into two regions by an arbitrary closed curve. One defines a point within one region as representing an occupied bond; otherwise it is a vacant bond. The study of three different rules under this general formulation indicates that the percolation threshold always varies continuously. This threshold has two limiting values, one is p_{c}(sq), the percolation threshold for the ordinary site percolation on the square lattice, and the other is unity. The approach of the percolation threshold to its limiting values are characterized by two exponents. In a special case, all lattice sites are occupied by disks of random radii R∈{0,R_{0}} and a percolation transition is observed with R_{0} as the control variable, similar to the site occupation probability. PMID:27415234

  13. Percolation model with an additional source of disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sumanta; Manna, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    The ranges of transmission of the mobiles in a mobile ad hoc network are not uniform in reality. They are affected by the temperature fluctuation in air, obstruction due to the solid objects, even the humidity difference in the environment, etc. How the varying range of transmission of the individual active elements affects the global connectivity in the network may be an important practical question to ask. Here a model of percolation phenomena, with an additional source of disorder, is introduced for a theoretical understanding of this problem. As in ordinary percolation, sites of a square lattice are occupied randomly with probability p . Each occupied site is then assigned a circular disk of random value R for its radius. A bond is defined to be occupied if and only if the radii R1 and R2 of the disks centered at the ends satisfy a certain predefined condition. In a very general formulation, one divides the R1-R2 plane into two regions by an arbitrary closed curve. One defines a point within one region as representing an occupied bond; otherwise it is a vacant bond. The study of three different rules under this general formulation indicates that the percolation threshold always varies continuously. This threshold has two limiting values, one is pc(sq) , the percolation threshold for the ordinary site percolation on the square lattice, and the other is unity. The approach of the percolation threshold to its limiting values are characterized by two exponents. In a special case, all lattice sites are occupied by disks of random radii R ∈{0 ,R0} and a percolation transition is observed with R0 as the control variable, similar to the site occupation probability.

  14. Molecular modeling of human alkaline sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Suresh, Panneer Selvam; Olubiyi, Olujide; Thirunavukkarasu, Chinnasamy; Strodel, Birgit; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2011-01-01

    Alkaline sphingomyelinase, which is expressed in the human intestine and hydrolyses sphingomyelin, is a component of the plasma and the lysosomal membranes. Hydrolase of sphingomyelin generates ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine 1-phosphate that have regulatory effects on vital cellular functions such as proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The enzyme belongs to the Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase family and it differs in structural similarity with acidic and neutral sphingomyelinase. In the present study we modeled alkaline sphingomyelinase using homology modeling based on the structure of Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase from Xanthomonas axonopodis with which it shares 34% identity. Homology modeling was performed using Modeller9v7. We found that Cys78 and Cys394 form a disulphide bond. Further analysis shows that Ser76 may be important for the function of this enzyme, which is supported by the findings of Wu et al. (2005), that S76F abolishes the activity completely. We found that the residues bound to Zn(2+) are conserved and geometrically similar with the template. Molecular Dynamics simulations were carried out for the modeled protein to observe the effect of Zinc metal ions. It was observed that the metal ion has little effect with regard to the stability but induces increased fluctuations in the protein. These analyses showed that Zinc ions play an important role in stabilizing the secondary structure and in maintaining the compactness of the active site. PMID:21544170

  15. A Molecular Model for Chiral Symmetry Breaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latinwo, Folarin; Stillinger, Frank; Debenedetti, Pablo

    In this work, we present a new class of molecular models for chiral phenomena in condensed matter systems. A key feature of these models is the ability of the four-site (tetramer) ``molecules'' to inter-convert between two distinct chiral forms (enantiomers). Given this feature, we use analytical theory and computer simulations to investigate the emergent chiral properties (including symmetry breaking) over a range of conditions. In particular, we consider the single-molecule level and condensed-phase behavior of our model system. Interestingly, we find that our liquid-phase predictions are in excellent agreement with recent experimental reports on chiral self-sorting in isotropic liquids. From this perspective, our model demonstrates accurate predictive capabilities, as well as a platform for understanding the microscopic origins of a variety of chiral phenomena. In a broader context, we anticipate that this class of models will be relevant to chirality-dominated areas such as the pharmaceutical industry and pre-biotic geochemistry.

  16. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  17. Design rules for rational control of polymer glass formation behavior and mechanical properties with small molecular additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangalara, Jayachandra Hari; Simmons, David

    Small molecule additives have long been employed to tune polymers' glass formation, mechanical and transport properties. For example, plasticizers are commonly employed to suppress polymer Tg and soften the glassy state, while antiplasticizers, which stiffen the glassy state of a polymer while suppressing its Tg, are employed to enhance protein and tissue preservation in sugar glasses. Recent literature indicates that additives can have a wide range of possible effects, but all of these have not been clearly understood and well appreciated. Here we employ molecular dynamics simulations to establish design rules for the selection of small molecule additives with size, molecular stiffness, and interaction energy chosen to achieve targeted effects on polymer properties. We furthermore find that a given additive's effect on a polymer's Tg can be predicted from its Debye-Waller factor via a function previously found to describe nanoconfinement effects on the glass transition. These results emphasize the potential for a new generation of targeted molecular additives to contribute to more targeted rational design of polymers. We acknowledge the Keck Foundation and the Ohio Supercomputing Center for financial and computational support of this effort, respectively.

  18. Molecular modeling of conformational properties of oligodepsipeptides.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiajing; King, Michael; Suggs, Laura; Ren, Pengyu

    2007-10-01

    A depsipeptide is a chemical structure consisting of both ester and amide bonds. Quantum mechanics calculations have been performed to investigate the conformational properties of a depsidipeptide in the gas and solution phases. Similar to an alanine dipeptide, the depsidipeptide exhibits a strong preference for the polyproline II (PPII) helical conformation. Meanwhile, due to the changes in the intramolecular interaction, the propensity for beta-sheets and alpha-helices diminishes while an unusual inclination for the (phi,psi) = (-150 degrees ,0 degrees ) conformation was observed. A molecular mechanics model has been developed for polydepsipeptides based on the quantum mechanical study. Both simulated annealing and replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out on oligodepsipeptide sequences with alternating depsi and natural residues in solution. Novel helical structures have been indicated from the simulations. When glycine is used as the alternating natural amino acid residue, the PPII conformation of a depsi residue stabilizes the peptide into a right-handed helical structure while the alpha-helical conformation of the depsi residue favors an overall left-handed helical structure. The free energy analysis indicates that both the left- and the right-handed helices are equally likely to exist. When charged lysine is introduced as the alternating natural residue, however, it is found that the depsipeptide sequence prefers an extended conformation as in PPII. Our results indicate that the depsipeptide is potentially useful in designing protein mimetics with controllable structure, function, and chemistry. PMID:17877396

  19. Molecular dynamics modeling and characterization of graphene/polymer nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Rezwanur

    The current work focuses on the characterization of graphene based nanocomposites using molecular dynamic simulation and multiscale modeling approaches. Both graphene-epoxy and graphene-cellulose nanocomposites were considered in this study. A hierarchical multiscale modeling approach has been proposed using peridynamics and molecular dynamics simulation. Firstly, the mechanical properties of crosslinked graphene/epoxy (G-Ep) nanocomposites were investigated by molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The influence of graphene's weight concentration, aspect ratio and dispersion on stress-strain response and elastic properties were studied. The results show significant improvement in Young's modulus and shear modulus for the G-Ep system in comparison to the neat epoxy resin. It appears that the RDF, molecular energy and aspect ratios are influenced by both graphene concentrations and aspect ratios. The graphene concentrations in the range of 1-3% are seen to improve Young's modulus and shorter graphenes are observed to be more effective than larger ones. In addition, the dispersed graphene system is more promising in enhancing in-plane elastic modulus than the agglomerated graphene system. The cohesive and pullout forces versus displacements data were plotted under normal and shear modes in order to characterize interfacial properties. The cohesive force is significantly improved by attaching the graphene with a chemical bond at the graphene-epoxy interface. In the second part of the work, cellulose was considered to study the mechanical properties of graphene-cellulose bionanocomposite. Similar to graphene-epoxy systems, the effect of graphene dispersion and agglomeration were studied in the stress-strain plots of graphene-cellulose system. A pcff forcefield was used to define intermolecular and intramolecular interactions. The effect of graphene's aspect ratio and weight concentration on the structural property of each unitcell was

  20. Some Reflections on the Use and Abuse of Molecular Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Quentin R.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the historical applications of molecular models and the controversies which they produced. The author discusses types of molecular models from the van't Hoff and Kekule models to the more recently developed ones. He presents a new model which was constructed to overcome the disadvantages of (1) falling apart, (2) inaccurate angles, (3)…

  1. Kinetic modelling of molecular hydrogen transport in microporous carbon materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Hankel, M.; Zhang, H.; Nguyen, T. X.; Bhatia, S. K.; Gray, S. K.; Smith, S. C.

    2011-01-01

    The proposal of kinetic molecular sieving of hydrogen isotopes is explored by employing statistical rate theory methods to describe the kinetics of molecular hydrogen transport in model microporous carbon structures. A Lennard-Jones atom-atom interaction potential is utilized for the description of the interactions between H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} and the carbon framework, while the requisite partition functions describing the thermal flux of molecules through the transition state are calculated quantum mechanically in view of the low temperatures involved in the proposed kinetic molecular sieving application. Predicted kinetic isotope effects for initial passage from the gas phase into the first pore mouth are consistent with expectations from previous modeling studies, namely, that at sufficiently low temperatures and for sufficiently narrow pore mouths D{sub 2} transport is dramatically favored over H{sub 2}. However, in contrast to expectations from previous modeling, the absence of any potential barrier along the minimum energy pathway from the gas phase into the first pore mouth yields a negative temperature dependence in the predicted absolute rate coefficients - implying a negative activation energy. In pursuit of the effective activation barrier, we find that the minimum potential in the cavity is significantly higher than in the pore mouth for nanotube-shaped models, throwing into question the common assumption that passage through the pore mouths should be the rate-determining step. Our results suggest a new mechanism that, depending on the size and shape of the cavity, the thermal activation barrier may lie in the cavity rather than at the pore mouth. As a consequence, design strategies for achieving quantum-mediated kinetic molecular sieving of H{sub 2}/D{sub 2} in a microporous membrane will need, at the very least, to take careful account of cavity shape and size in addition to pore-mouth size in order to ensure that the selective step, namely passage

  2. Assessing Molecular Dynamics Simulations with Solvatochromism Modeling.

    PubMed

    Schwabe, Tobias

    2015-08-20

    For the modeling of solvatochromism with an explicit representation of the solvent molecules, the quality of preceding molecular dynamics simulations is crucial. Therefore, the possibility to apply force fields which are derived with as little empiricism as possible seems desirable. Such an approach is tested here by exploiting the sensitive solvatochromism of p-nitroaniline, and the use of reliable excitation energies based on approximate second-order coupled cluster results within a polarizable embedding scheme. The quality of the various MD settings for four different solvents, water, methanol, ethanol, and dichloromethane, is assessed. In general, good agreement with the experiment is observed when polarizable force fields and special treatment of hydrogen bonding are applied. PMID:26220273

  3. Ab Initio Modeling of Molecular Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Schwenke, David

    2014-01-01

    Radiative emission from excited states of atoms and molecules can comprise a significant fraction of the total heat flux experienced by spacecraft during atmospheric entry at hypersonic speeds. For spacecraft with ablating heat shields, some of this radiative flux can be absorbed by molecular constituents in the boundary layer that are formed by the ablation process. Ab initio quantum mechanical calculations are carried out to predict the strengths of these emission and absorption processes. This talk will describe the methods used in these calculations using, as examples, the 4th positive emission bands of CO and the 1g+ 1u+ absorption in C3. The results of these calculations are being used as input to NASA radiation modeling codes like NeqAir, HARA and HyperRad.

  4. Bioinformatics and molecular modeling in glycobiology

    PubMed Central

    Schloissnig, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    The field of glycobiology is concerned with the study of the structure, properties, and biological functions of the family of biomolecules called carbohydrates. Bioinformatics for glycobiology is a particularly challenging field, because carbohydrates exhibit a high structural diversity and their chains are often branched. Significant improvements in experimental analytical methods over recent years have led to a tremendous increase in the amount of carbohydrate structure data generated. Consequently, the availability of databases and tools to store, retrieve and analyze these data in an efficient way is of fundamental importance to progress in glycobiology. In this review, the various graphical representations and sequence formats of carbohydrates are introduced, and an overview of newly developed databases, the latest developments in sequence alignment and data mining, and tools to support experimental glycan analysis are presented. Finally, the field of structural glycoinformatics and molecular modeling of carbohydrates, glycoproteins, and protein–carbohydrate interaction are reviewed. PMID:20364395

  5. First Principles Quantitative Modeling of Molecular Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Zhanyu

    In this thesis, we report theoretical investigations of nonlinear and nonequilibrium quantum electronic transport properties of molecular transport junctions from atomistic first principles. The aim is to seek not only qualitative but also quantitative understanding of the corresponding experimental data. At present, the challenges to quantitative theoretical work in molecular electronics include two most important questions: (i) what is the proper atomic model for the experimental devices? (ii) how to accurately determine quantum transport properties without any phenomenological parameters? Our research is centered on these questions. We have systematically calculated atomic structures of the molecular transport junctions by performing total energy structural relaxation using density functional theory (DFT). Our quantum transport calculations were carried out by implementing DFT within the framework of Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's functions (NEGF). The calculated data are directly compared with the corresponding experimental measurements. Our general conclusion is that quantitative comparison with experimental data can be made if the device contacts are correctly determined. We calculated properties of nonequilibrium spin injection from Ni contacts to octane-thiolate films which form a molecular spintronic system. The first principles results allow us to establish a clear physical picture of how spins are injected from the Ni contacts through the Ni-molecule linkage to the molecule, why tunnel magnetoresistance is rapidly reduced by the applied bias in an asymmetric manner, and to what extent ab initio transport theory can make quantitative comparisons to the corresponding experimental data. We found that extremely careful sampling of the two-dimensional Brillouin zone of the Ni surface is crucial for accurate results in such a spintronic system. We investigated the role of contact formation and its resulting structures to quantum transport in several molecular

  6. Molecular Modeling on Berberine Derivatives toward BuChE: An Integrated Study with Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships Models, Molecular Docking, and Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Fang, Jiansong; Pang, Xiaocong; Wu, Ping; Yan, Rong; Gao, Li; Li, Chao; Lian, Wenwen; Wang, Qi; Liu, Ai-Lin; Du, Guan-Hua

    2016-05-01

    A dataset of 67 berberine derivatives for the inhibition of butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) was studied based on the combination of quantitative structure-activity relationships models, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics methods. First, a series of berberine derivatives were reported, and their inhibitory activities toward butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) were evaluated. By 2D- quantitative structure-activity relationships studies, the best model built by partial least-square had a conventional correlation coefficient of the training set (R(2) ) of 0.883, a cross-validation correlation coefficient (Qcv2) of 0.777, and a conventional correlation coefficient of the test set (Rpred2) of 0.775. The model was also confirmed by Y-randomization examination. In addition, the molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation were performed to better elucidate the inhibitory mechanism of three typical berberine derivatives (berberine, C2, and C55) toward BuChE. The predicted binding free energy results were consistent with the experimental data and showed that the van der Waals energy term (ΔEvdw ) difference played the most important role in differentiating the activity among the three inhibitors (berberine, C2, and C55). The developed quantitative structure-activity relationships models provide details on the fine relationship linking structure and activity and offer clues for structural modifications, and the molecular simulation helps to understand the inhibitory mechanism of the three typical inhibitors. In conclusion, the results of this study provide useful clues for new drug design and discovery of BuChE inhibitors from berberine derivatives. PMID:26648584

  7. Modelling of Cosmic Molecular Masers: Introduction to a Computation Cookbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, Andrej M.; Gray, Malcolm D.

    2012-07-01

    Numerical modeling of molecular masers is necessary in order to understand their nature and diagnostic capabilities. Model construction requires elaboration of a basic description which allows computation, that is a definition of the parameter space and basic physical relations. Usually, this requires additional thorough studies that can consist of the following stages/parts: relevant molecular spectroscopy and collisional rate coefficients; conditions in and around the masing region (that part of space where population inversion is realized); geometry and size of the masing region (including the question of whether maser spots are discrete clumps or line-of-sight correlations in a much bigger region) and propagation of maser radiation. Output of the maser computer modeling can have the following forms: exploration of parameter space (where do inversions appear in particular maser transitions and their combinations, which parameter values describe a `typical' source, and so on); modeling of individual sources (line flux ratios, spectra, images and their variability); analysis of the pumping mechanism; predictions (new maser transitions, correlations in variability of different maser transitions, and the like). Described schemes (constituents and hierarchy) of the model input and output are based mainly on the experience of the authors and make no claim to be dogmatic.

  8. Using Generalized Additive Models to Analyze Single-Case Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shadish, William; Sullivan, Kristynn

    2013-01-01

    Many analyses for single-case designs (SCDs)--including nearly all the effect size indicators-- currently assume no trend in the data. Regression and multilevel models allow for trend, but usually test only linear trend and have no principled way of knowing if higher order trends should be represented in the model. This paper shows how Generalized…

  9. How much additional model complexity do the use of catchment hydrological signatures, additional data and expert knowledge warrant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrachowitz, M.; Fovet, O.; RUIZ, L.; Gascuel-odoux, C.; Savenije, H.

    2013-12-01

    In the frequent absence of sufficient suitable data to constrain hydrological models, it is not uncommon to represent catchments at a range of scales by lumped model set-ups. Although process heterogeneity can average out on the catchment scale to generate simple catchment integrated responses whose general flow features can frequently be reproduced by lumped models, these models often fail to get details of the flow pattern as well as catchment internal dynamics, such as groundwater level changes, right to a sufficient degree, resulting in considerable predictive uncertainty. Traditionally, models are constrained by only one or two objectives functions, which does not warrant more than a handful of parameters to avoid elevated predictive uncertainty, thereby preventing more complex model set-ups accounting for increased process heterogeneity. In this study it was tested how much additional process heterogeneity is warranted in models when optimizing the model calibration strategy, using additional data and expert knowledge. Long-term timeseries of flow and groundwater levels for small nested experimental catchments in French Brittany with considerable differences in geology, topography and flow regime were used in this study to test which degree of model process heterogeneity is warranted with increased availability of information. In a first step, as a benchmark, the system was treated as one lumped entity and the model was trained based only on its ability to reproduce the hydrograph. Although it was found that the overall modelled flow generally reflects the observed flow response quite well, the internal system dynamics could not be reproduced. In further steps the complexity of this model was gradually increased, first by adding a separate riparian reservoir to the lumped set-up and then by a semi-distributed set-up, allowing for independent, parallel model structures, representing the contrasting nested catchments. Although calibration performance increased

  10. Additive Manufacturing of Anatomical Models from Computed Tomography Scan Data.

    PubMed

    Gür, Y

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of the study presented here was to investigate the manufacturability of human anatomical models from Computed Tomography (CT) scan data via a 3D desktop printer which uses fused deposition modelling (FDM) technology. First, Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) CT scan data were converted to 3D Standard Triangle Language (STL) format by using In Vaselius digital imaging program. Once this STL file is obtained, a 3D physical version of the anatomical model can be fabricated by a desktop 3D FDM printer. As a case study, a patient's skull CT scan data was considered, and a tangible version of the skull was manufactured by a 3D FDM desktop printer. During the 3D printing process, the skull was built using acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) co-polymer plastic. The printed model showed that the 3D FDM printing technology is able to fabricate anatomical models with high accuracy. As a result, the skull model can be used for preoperative surgical planning, medical training activities, implant design and simulation to show the potential of the FDM technology in medical field. It will also improve communication between medical stuff and patients. Current result indicates that a 3D desktop printer which uses FDM technology can be used to obtain accurate anatomical models. PMID:26336695

  11. Generalized Mixture Models for Molecular Phylogenetic Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Jason; Sullivan, Jack

    2012-01-01

    The rapidly growing availability of multigene sequence data during the past decade has enabled phylogeny estimation at phylogenomic scales. However, dealing with evolutionary process heterogeneity across the genome becomes increasingly challenging. Here we develop a mixture model approach that uses reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) estimation to permit as many distinct models as the data require. Each additional model considered may be a fully parametrized general time-reversible model or any of its special cases. Furthermore, we expand the usual proposal mechanisms for topology changes to permit hard polytomies (i.e., zero-length internal branches). This new approach is implemented in the Crux software toolkit. We demonstrate the feasibility of using reversible jump MCMC on mixture models by reexamining a well-known 44-taxon mammalian data set comprising 22 concatenated genes. We are able to reproduce the results of the original analysis (with respect to bipartition support) when we make identical assumptions, but when we allow for polytomies and/or use data-driven mixture model estimation, we infer much lower bipartition support values for several key bipartitions. PMID:21873377

  12. Combined ab initio molecular dynamics and experimental studies of carbon atom addition to benzene.

    PubMed

    McKee, Michael L; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Schreiner, Peter R

    2014-04-17

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics was used to explore the reactions between triplet and singlet carbon atoms with benzene. The computations reveal that, in the singlet C atom reaction, products are very exothermic where nearly every collision yields a product that is determined by the initial encounter geometry. The singlet C atom reaction does not follow the minimum energy path because the bimolecular reaction is controlled by dynamics (i.e., initial orientation of encounter). On the other hand, in a 10 K solid Ar matrix, ground state C((3)P) atoms do tend to follow RRKM kinetics. Thus, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) results indicate that a significant fraction of C-H insertion occurs to form phenylcarbene whereas, in marked contrast to previous theoretical and experimental conclusions, the Ar matrix isolation studies indicate a large fraction of direct cycloheptatetraene formation, without the intermediacy of phenylcarbene. The AIMD calculations are more consistent with vaporized carbon atom experiments where labeling studies indicate the initial formation of phenylcarbene. This underlines that the availability of thermodynamic sinks can completely alter the observed reaction dynamics. PMID:24661002

  13. Addition of Diffusion Model to MELCOR and Comparison with Data

    SciTech Connect

    Brad Merrill; Richard Moore; Chang Oh

    2004-06-01

    A chemical diffusion model was incorporated into the thermal-hydraulics package of the MELCOR Severe Accident code (Reference 1) for analyzing air ingress events for a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor.

  14. Modelling dissimilarity: generalizing ultrametric and additive tree representations.

    PubMed

    Hubert, L; Arabie, P; Meulman, J

    2001-05-01

    Methods for the hierarchical clustering of an object set produce a sequence of nested partitions such that object classes within each successive partition are constructed from the union of object classes present at the previous level. Any such sequence of nested partitions can in turn be characterized by an ultrametric. An approach to generalizing an (ultrametric) representation is proposed in which the nested character of the partition sequence is relaxed and replaced by the weaker requirement that the classes within each partition contain objects consecutive with respect to a fixed ordering of the objects. A method for fitting such a structure to a given proximity matrix is discussed, along with several alternative strategies for graphical representation. Using this same ultrametric extension, additive tree representations can also be generalized by replacing the ultrametric component in the decomposition of an additive tree (into an ultrametric and a centroid metric). A common numerical illustration is developed and maintained throughout the paper. PMID:11393895

  15. Model For Dense Molecular Cloud Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, Steven D.; Neufeld, David A.

    1997-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical model for the thermal balance, chemistry, and radiative transfer within quiescent dense molecular cloud cores that contain a central protostar. In the interior of such cores, we expect the dust and gas temperatures to be well coupled, while in the outer regions CO rotational emissions dominate the gas cooling and the predicted gas temperature lies significantly below the dust temperature. Large spatial variations in the gas temperature are expected to affect the gas phase chemistry dramatically; in particular, the predicted water abundance varies by more than a factor of 1000 within cloud cores that contain luminous protostars. Based upon our predictions for the thermal and chemical structure of cloud cores, we have constructed self-consistent radiative transfer models to compute the line strengths and line profiles for transitions of (12)CO, (13)CO, C(18)O, ortho- and para-H2(16)O, ortho- and para-H2(18)O, and O I. We carried out a general parameter study to determine the dependence of the model predictions upon the parameters assumed for the source. We expect many of the far-infrared and submillimeter rotational transitions of water to be detectable either in emission or absorption with the use of the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) and the Submillimeter Wave Astronomy Satellite. Quiescent, radiatively heated hot cores are expected to show low-gain maser emission in the 183 GHz 3(sub 13)-2(sub 20) water line, such as has been observed toward several hot core regions using ground-based telescopes. We predict the (3)P(sub l) - (3)P(sub 2) fine-structure transition of atomic oxygen near 63 micron to be in strong absorption against the continuum for many sources. Our model can also account successfully for recent ISO observations of absorption in rovibrational transitions of water toward the source AFGL 2591.

  16. New models and molecular markers in evaluation of developmental toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Huuskonen, Hannele . E-mail: hannele.huuskonen@sttv.fi

    2005-09-01

    Mammalian and non-mammalian embryos and embryonic stem cells may be used as models in mechanistic studies and in testing embryotoxicity of compounds. In addition to conventional culture methods, genetic modifications and use of molecular markers offer significant advantages in mechanistic studies as well as in developing new test methods for embryotoxicity. Zebrafish model has been used for a long time and at present several applications are available. It is an easy vertebral non-mammalian model, whose genome is largely known and several genetic modifications are easily constructed to study gene expression or knocked down genes. Fluorescent marker proteins can be used also in zebrafish to indicate gene activation in transgenic models. Chemical genetics approach has been developed using zebrafish model. This is a new approach to screen small molecules that regulate signaling pathways. Embryonic stem cells have been used in mechanistic studies and mouse embryonic stem cell test has been validated to study embryotoxicity in vitro. This method has been improved using quantitative measurements of molecular endpoints by real-time RT-PCR or fluorescent activated cell sorting methods (FACS). Methods facilitating differentiation to several different cell types are available. We have studied preimplantation mouse embryos as a possible model for in vitro testing. In this method, superovulated and in vivo fertilized preimplantation embryos were collected at morula stage and cultured up to blastocysts. The mouse preimplantation culture test was improved by quantitative gene expression measurement using two-step real-time RT-PCR methods. New endpoints improve the tests of in vitro embryotoxicity because subjective assessments are replaced by objective measurements. In addition, automation is possible and less time is needed for analysis. Thus, high throughput screening will come possible to test large numbers of compounds.

  17. Additional Research Needs to Support the GENII Biosphere Models

    SciTech Connect

    Napier, Bruce A.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Arimescu, Carmen

    2013-11-30

    In the course of evaluating the current parameter needs for the GENII Version 2 code (Snyder et al. 2013), areas of possible improvement for both the data and the underlying models have been identified. As the data review was implemented, PNNL staff identified areas where the models can be improved both to accommodate the locally significant pathways identified and also to incorporate newer models. The areas are general data needs for the existing models and improved formulations for the pathway models. It is recommended that priorities be set by NRC staff to guide selection of the most useful improvements in a cost-effective manner. Suggestions are made based on relatively easy and inexpensive changes, and longer-term more costly studies. In the short term, there are several improved model formulations that could be applied to the GENII suite of codes to make them more generally useful. • Implementation of the separation of the translocation and weathering processes • Implementation of an improved model for carbon-14 from non-atmospheric sources • Implementation of radon exposure pathways models • Development of a KML processor for the output report generator module data that are calculated on a grid that could be superimposed upon digital maps for easier presentation and display • Implementation of marine mammal models (manatees, seals, walrus, whales, etc.). Data needs in the longer term require extensive (and potentially expensive) research. Before picking any one radionuclide or food type, NRC staff should perform an in-house review of current and anticipated environmental analyses to select “dominant” radionuclides of interest to allow setting of cost-effective priorities for radionuclide- and pathway-specific research. These include • soil-to-plant uptake studies for oranges and other citrus fruits, and • Development of models for evaluation of radionuclide concentration in highly-processed foods such as oils and sugars. Finally, renewed

  18. Modelling spin Hamiltonian parameters of molecular nanomagnets.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Tulika; Rajaraman, Gopalan

    2016-07-12

    Molecular nanomagnets encompass a wide range of coordination complexes possessing several potential applications. A formidable challenge in realizing these potential applications lies in controlling the magnetic properties of these clusters. Microscopic spin Hamiltonian (SH) parameters describe the magnetic properties of these clusters, and viable ways to control these SH parameters are highly desirable. Computational tools play a proactive role in this area, where SH parameters such as isotropic exchange interaction (J), anisotropic exchange interaction (Jx, Jy, Jz), double exchange interaction (B), zero-field splitting parameters (D, E) and g-tensors can be computed reliably using X-ray structures. In this feature article, we have attempted to provide a holistic view of the modelling of these SH parameters of molecular magnets. The determination of J includes various class of molecules, from di- and polynuclear Mn complexes to the {3d-Gd}, {Gd-Gd} and {Gd-2p} class of complexes. The estimation of anisotropic exchange coupling includes the exchange between an isotropic metal ion and an orbitally degenerate 3d/4d/5d metal ion. The double-exchange section contains some illustrative examples of mixed valance systems, and the section on the estimation of zfs parameters covers some mononuclear transition metal complexes possessing very large axial zfs parameters. The section on the computation of g-anisotropy exclusively covers studies on mononuclear Dy(III) and Er(III) single-ion magnets. The examples depicted in this article clearly illustrate that computational tools not only aid in interpreting and rationalizing the observed magnetic properties but possess the potential to predict new generation MNMs. PMID:27366794

  19. Nitrogen and phosphorus additions impact arbuscular mycorrhizal abundance and molecular diversity in a tropical montane forest.

    PubMed

    Camenzind, Tessa; Hempel, Stefan; Homeier, Jürgen; Horn, Sebastian; Velescu, Andre; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Rillig, Matthias C

    2014-12-01

    Increased nitrogen (N) depositions expected in the future endanger the diversity and stability of ecosystems primarily limited by N, but also often co-limited by other nutrients like phosphorus (P). In this context a nutrient manipulation experiment (NUMEX) was set up in a tropical montane rainforest in southern Ecuador, an area identified as biodiversity hotspot. We examined impacts of elevated N and P availability on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), a group of obligate biotrophic plant symbionts with an important role in soil nutrient cycles. We tested the hypothesis that increased nutrient availability will reduce AMF abundance, reduce species richness and shift the AMF community toward lineages previously shown to be favored by fertilized conditions. NUMEX was designed as a full factorial randomized block design. Soil cores were taken after 2 years of nutrient additions in plots located at 2000 m above sea level. Roots were extracted and intraradical AMF abundance determined microscopically; the AMF community was analyzed by 454-pyrosequencing targeting the large subunit rDNA. We identified 74 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with a large proportion of Diversisporales. N additions provoked a significant decrease in intraradical abundance, whereas AMF richness was reduced significantly by N and P additions, with the strongest effect in the combined treatment (39% fewer OTUs), mainly influencing rare species. We identified a differential effect on phylogenetic groups, with Diversisporales richness mainly reduced by N additions in contrast to Glomerales highly significantly affected solely by P. Regarding AMF community structure, we observed a compositional shift when analyzing presence/absence data following P additions. In conclusion, N and P additions in this ecosystem affect AMF abundance, but especially AMF species richness; these changes might influence plant community composition and productivity and by that various ecosystem processes. PMID:24764217

  20. Final Report for Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Glotzer, Sharon C.

    2013-08-28

    In collaboration with researchers at Vanderbilt University, North Carolina State University, Princeton and Oakridge National Laboratory we developed multiscale modeling and simulation methods capable of modeling the synthesis, assembly, and operation of molecular electronics devices. Our role in this project included the development of coarse-grained molecular and mesoscale models and simulation methods capable of simulating the assembly of millions of organic conducting molecules and other molecular components into nanowires, crossbars, and other organized patterns.

  1. Molecular aspects of aromatic C additions to soils: Implications of biochar quality for ecosystem functionality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solid residues of incomplete combustion (biochar or char) are continuously being added to soils due to natural vegetation fires in many ecosystems. However, new strategies for carbon sequestration in soils are likely to include the active addition of biochar to soils. Since bioc...

  2. Cytogenetic and molecular identification of three Triticum aestivum-Leymus racemosus translocation addition lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Yuan, Jianhua; Bie, Tongde; Zhou, Bo; Chen, Peidu

    2009-06-01

    Chromosome 2C from Aegilops cylindrica has the ability to induce chromosome breakage in common wheat (Tritivum aestivum). In the BC(1)F(3) generation of the T. aestivum cv. Chinese Spring and a hybrid between T. aestivum-Leymus racemosus Lr.7 addition line and T. aestivum-Ae. cylindrica 2C addition line, three disomic translocation addition lines (2n = 44) were selected by mitotic chromosome C-banding and genomic in situ hybridization. We further characterized these T. aestivum-L. racemosus translocation addition lines, NAU636, NAU637 and NAU638, by chromosome C-banding, in situ hybridization using the A- and D-genome-specific bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones 676D4 and 9M13; plasmids pAs1 and pSc119.2, and 45S rDNA; as well as genomic DNA of L. racemosus as probes, in combination with double ditelosomic test cross and SSR marker analysis. The translocation chromosomes were designated as T3AS-Lr7S, T6BS-Lr7S, and T5DS-Lr7L. The translocation line T3AS-Lr7S was highly resistant to Fusarium head blight and will be useful germplasm for resistance breeding. PMID:19539248

  3. Concentration Addition, Independent Action and Generalized Concentration Addition Models for Mixture Effect Prediction of Sex Hormone Synthesis In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hadrup, Niels; Taxvig, Camilla; Pedersen, Mikael; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    Humans are concomitantly exposed to numerous chemicals. An infinite number of combinations and doses thereof can be imagined. For toxicological risk assessment the mathematical prediction of mixture effects, using knowledge on single chemicals, is therefore desirable. We investigated pros and cons of the concentration addition (CA), independent action (IA) and generalized concentration addition (GCA) models. First we measured effects of single chemicals and mixtures thereof on steroid synthesis in H295R cells. Then single chemical data were applied to the models; predictions of mixture effects were calculated and compared to the experimental mixture data. Mixture 1 contained environmental chemicals adjusted in ratio according to human exposure levels. Mixture 2 was a potency adjusted mixture containing five pesticides. Prediction of testosterone effects coincided with the experimental Mixture 1 data. In contrast, antagonism was observed for effects of Mixture 2 on this hormone. The mixtures contained chemicals exerting only limited maximal effects. This hampered prediction by the CA and IA models, whereas the GCA model could be used to predict a full dose response curve. Regarding effects on progesterone and estradiol, some chemicals were having stimulatory effects whereas others had inhibitory effects. The three models were not applicable in this situation and no predictions could be performed. Finally, the expected contributions of single chemicals to the mixture effects were calculated. Prochloraz was the predominant but not sole driver of the mixtures, suggesting that one chemical alone was not responsible for the mixture effects. In conclusion, the GCA model seemed to be superior to the CA and IA models for the prediction of testosterone effects. A situation with chemicals exerting opposing effects, for which the models could not be applied, was identified. In addition, the data indicate that in non-potency adjusted mixtures the effects cannot always be

  4. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: setup and analysis.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Bergonzo, Christina; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    The last in a set of units by the same authors, this unit addresses some important remaining questions about molecular modeling of nucleic acids. The unit describes how to choose an appropriate molecular mechanics force field; how to set up and equilibrate the system for accurate simulation of a nucleic acid in an explicit solvent by molecular dynamics or Monte Carlo simulation; and how to analyze molecular dynamics trajectories. PMID:25606980

  5. The addition of algebraic turbulence modeling to program LAURA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheatwood, F. Mcneil; Thompson, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Langley Aerothermodynamic Upwind Relaxation Algorithm (LAURA) is modified to allow the calculation of turbulent flows. This is accomplished using the Cebeci-Smith and Baldwin-Lomax eddy-viscosity models in conjunction with the thin-layer Navier-Stokes options of the program. Turbulent calculations can be performed for both perfect-gas and equilibrium flows. However, a requirement of the models is that the flow be attached. It is seen that for slender bodies, adequate resolution of the boundary-layer gradients may require more cells in the normal direction than a laminar solution, even when grid stretching is employed. Results for axisymmetric and three-dimensional flows are presented. Comparison with experimental data and other numerical results reveal generally good agreement, except in the regions of detached flow.

  6. Physics Beyond the Standard Model from Molecular Hydrogen Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubachs, Wim; Salumbides, Edcel John; Bagdonaite, Julija

    2015-06-01

    The spectrum of molecular hydrogen can be measured in the laboratory to very high precision using advanced laser and molecular beam techniques, as well as frequency-comb based calibration [1,2]. The quantum level structure of this smallest neutral molecule can now be calculated to very high precision, based on a very accurate (10-15 precision) Born-Oppenheimer potential [3] and including subtle non-adiabatic, relativistic and quantum electrodynamic effects [4]. Comparison between theory and experiment yields a test of QED, and in fact of the Standard Model of Physics, since the weak, strong and gravitational forces have a negligible effect. Even fifth forces beyond the Standard Model can be searched for [5]. Astronomical observation of molecular hydrogen spectra, using the largest telescopes on Earth and in space, may reveal possible variations of fundamental constants on a cosmological time scale [6]. A study has been performed at a 'look-back' time of 12.5 billion years [7]. In addition the possible dependence of a fundamental constant on a gravitational field has been investigated from observation of molecular hydrogen in the photospheres of white dwarfs [8]. The latter involves a test of the Einsteins equivalence principle. [1] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 143005 (2011). [2] G. Dickenson et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 193601 (2013). [3] K. Pachucki, Phys. Rev. A82, 032509 (2010). [4] J. Komasa et al., J. Chem. Theory Comp. 7, 3105 (2011). [5] E.J. Salumbides et al., Phys. Rev. D87, 112008 (2013). [6] F. van Weerdenburg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 180802 (2011). [7] J. Badonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 114, 071301 (2015). [8] J. Bagdonaite et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 123002 (2014).

  7. Model calculations for diffuse molecular clouds. [interstellar hydrogen cloud model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, A. E.; Langer, W. D.

    1974-01-01

    A steady state isobaric cloud model is developed. The pressure, thermal, electrical, and chemical balance equations are solved simultaneously with a simple one dimensional approximation to the equation of radiative transfer appropriate to diffuse clouds. Cooling is mainly by CII fine structure transitions, and a variety of heating mechanisms are considered. Particular attention is given to the abundance variation of H2. Inhomogeneous density distributions are obtained because of the attenuation of the interstellar UV field and the conversion from atomic to molecular hyrodgen. The effects of changing the model parameters are described and the applicability of the model to OAO-3 observations is discussed. Good qualitative agreement with the fractional H2 abundance determinations has been obtained. The observed kinetic temperatures near 80 K can also be achieved by grain photoelectron heating. The problem of the electron density is solved taking special account of the various hydrogen ions as well as heavier ones.

  8. A comparative molecular field analysis and molecular modelling studies on pyridylimidazole type of angiotensin II antagonists.

    PubMed

    Yoo, S E; Kim, S K; Lee, S H; Yi, K Y; Lee, D W

    1999-12-01

    A large number of compounds known as "AII (Angiotensin II) antagonists" have been developed for the treatment of various heart diseases such as hypertension, congestive heart failure, and chronic renal failure. Most of the currently known AII receptor antagonists share a similar chemical structure, consisting of nitrogen atoms, a lipophilic alkyl side chain and an acidic group. As a new series, we have designed and synthesized various pyridylimidazole derivatives. In this report we would like to discuss the structure-activity relationship of these series of compounds using the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) methods. We could come up with a good CoMFA model (cross-validated and conventional r2 values equal to 0.702 and 0.991, respectively) and the validity of the model was confirmed by synthesizing and measuring their biological activity of additional 6 compounds suggested by the model. This result provides additional information on the structural requirement for structurally diverse group of AII receptor antagonists. PMID:10658603

  9. Multiensemble Markov models of molecular thermodynamics and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Wehmeyer, Christoph; Noé, Frank

    2016-06-01

    We introduce the general transition-based reweighting analysis method (TRAM), a statistically optimal approach to integrate both unbiased and biased molecular dynamics simulations, such as umbrella sampling or replica exchange. TRAM estimates a multiensemble Markov model (MEMM) with full thermodynamic and kinetic information at all ensembles. The approach combines the benefits of Markov state models-clustering of high-dimensional spaces and modeling of complex many-state systems-with those of the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio of exploiting biased or high-temperature ensembles to accelerate rare-event sampling. TRAM does not depend on any rate model in addition to the widely used Markov state model approximation, but uses only fundamental relations such as detailed balance and binless reweighting of configurations between ensembles. Previous methods, including the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio, discrete TRAM, and Markov state models are special cases and can be derived from the TRAM equations. TRAM is demonstrated by efficiently computing MEMMs in cases where other estimators break down, including the full thermodynamics and rare-event kinetics from high-dimensional simulation data of an all-atom protein-ligand binding model. PMID:27226302

  10. Software reliability: Additional investigations into modeling with replicated experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagel, P. M.; Schotz, F. M.; Skirvan, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of programmer experience level, different program usage distributions, and programming languages are explored. All these factors affect performance, and some tentative relational hypotheses are presented. An analytic framework for replicated and non-replicated (traditional) software experiments is presented. A method of obtaining an upper bound on the error rate of the next error is proposed. The method was validated empirically by comparing forecasts with actual data. In all 14 cases the bound exceeded the observed parameter, albeit somewhat conservatively. Two other forecasting methods are proposed and compared to observed results. Although demonstrated relative to this framework that stages are neither independent nor exponentially distributed, empirical estimates show that the exponential assumption is nearly valid for all but the extreme tails of the distribution. Except for the dependence in the stage probabilities, Cox's model approximates to a degree what is being observed.

  11. A model of the holographic principle: Randomness and additional dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyarsky, Abraham; Góra, Paweł; Proppe, Harald

    2010-01-01

    In recent years an idea has emerged that a system in a 3-dimensional space can be described from an information point of view by a system on its 2-dimensional boundary. This mysterious correspondence is called the Holographic Principle and has had profound effects in string theory and our perception of space-time. In this note we describe a purely mathematical model of the Holographic Principle using ideas from nonlinear dynamical systems theory. We show that a random map on the surface S of a 3-dimensional open ball B has a natural counterpart in B, and the two maps acting in different dimensional spaces have the same entropy. We can reverse this construction if we start with a special 3-dimensional map in B called a skew product. The key idea is to use the randomness, as imbedded in the parameter of the 2-dimensional random map, to define a third dimension. The main result shows that if we start with an arbitrary dynamical system in B with entropy E we can construct a random map on S whose entropy is arbitrarily close to E.

  12. Additional Developments in Atmosphere Revitalization Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert F.; Knox, James C.; Cummings, Ramona; Brooks, Thomas; Schunk, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by evaluating structured sorbents, seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach. This paper describes the continuing development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM)

  13. Additional Developments in Atmosphere Revitalization Modeling and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, Robert F.; Knox, James C.; Cummings, Ramona; Brooks, Thomas; Schunk, Richard G.; Gomez, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) program is developing prototype systems, demonstrating key capabilities, and validating operational concepts for future human missions beyond Earth orbit. These forays beyond the confines of earth's gravity will place unprecedented demands on launch systems. They must launch the supplies needed to sustain a crew over longer periods for exploration missions beyond earth's moon. Thus all spacecraft systems, including those for the separation of metabolic carbon dioxide and water from a crewed vehicle, must be minimized with respect to mass, power, and volume. Emphasis is also placed on system robustness both to minimize replacement parts and ensure crew safety when a quick return to earth is not possible. Current efforts are focused on improving the current state-of-the-art systems utilizing fixed beds of sorbent pellets by evaluating structured sorbents, seeking more robust pelletized sorbents, and examining alternate bed configurations to improve system efficiency and reliability. These development efforts combine testing of sub-scale systems and multi-physics computer simulations to evaluate candidate approaches, select the best performing options, and optimize the configuration of the selected approach. This paper describes the continuing development of atmosphere revitalization models and simulations in support of the Atmosphere Revitalization Recovery and Environmental Monitoring (ARREM) project within the AES program.

  14. Digital Learning Material for Model Building in Molecular Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Janssen, Fred; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton

    2005-01-01

    Building models to describe processes forms an essential part of molecular biology research. However, in molecular biology curricula little attention is generally being paid to the development of this skill. In order to provide students the opportunity to improve their model building skills, we decided to develop a number of digital cases about…

  15. Model of turbulent destruction of molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybakin, B. P.; Betelin, V. B.; Dushin, V. R.; Mikhalchenko, E. V.; Moiseenko, S. G.; Stamov, L. I.; Tyurenkova, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    We represent numerical simulation results of interaction process of supernova strong shock with interstellar molecular cloud in 3D. In the paper we neglect gravitation, heat conductivity and radiative losses. We analyze in detail processes of deformation and fragmentation of molecular cloud (MC). Formation of passed by and reflected shocks system, contraction and ablation of the matter is investigated in detail. The post-processor treatment and the results of calculations made it possible to find the following features of the molecular cloud matter - the vortexes formation, erosion and ablation.

  16. Construction, molecular modeling, and simulation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell walls.

    PubMed

    Hong, Xuan; Hopfinger, A J

    2004-01-01

    The mycobacterial cell wall is extraordinarily thick and tight consisting mainly of (1). long chain fatty acids, the mycolic acids, and (2). a unique polysaccharide, arabinogalactan (AG). These two chemical constituents are covalently linked through ester bonds. Minnikin (The Biology of the Mycobacteria; Academic: London, 1982) proposed that the mycobacterial cell wall is composed of an asymmetric lipid bilayer. The inner leaflet of the cell wall contains mycolic acids covalently linked to AG. This inner leaflet is believed to have the lowest permeability to organic compounds of the overall cell wall. Conformational search and molecular dynamics simulation were used to explore the conformational profile of AG and the conformations and structural organization of the mycolic acid-AG complex, and overall, an inner leaflet molecular model of the cell wall was constructed. The terminal arabinose residues of AG that serve as linkers between AG and mycolic acids were found to exist in four major chemical configurations. The mycolate hydrocarbon chains were determined to be tightly packed and perpendicular to the "plane" formed by the oxygen atoms of the 5-hydroxyl groups of the terminal arabinose residues. For Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the average packing distance between mycolic acids is estimated to be approximately 7.3 A. Thus, Minnikin's model is supported by this computational study. Overall, this modeling and simulation approach provides a way to probe the mechanism of low permeability of the cell wall and the intrinsic drug resistance of M. tuberculosis. In addition, monolayer models were built for both dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine, two common phospholipids in bacterial and animal membranes, respectively. Structural comparisons of these cell wall phospholipid membrane models were made to the M. tuberculosis cell wall model. PMID:15132700

  17. Modeling propagation of coherent optical pulses through molecular vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Eberly, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Results of modeling the mutual coupling of coherent molecular response and coherent optical pulses during propagation are described. The propagation is treated numerically, with particular emphasis on both continuum and discrete behavior associated with the quasicontinuum model.

  18. An Integrated Biochemistry Laboratory, Including Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adele J. Wolfson Mona L.; Branham, Thomas R.

    1996-11-01

    ) experience with methods of protein purification; (iii) incorporation of appropriate controls into experiments; (iv) use of basic statistics in data analysis; (v) writing papers and grant proposals in accepted scientific style; (vi) peer review; (vii) oral presentation of results and proposals; and (viii) introduction to molecular modeling. Figure 1 illustrates the modular nature of the lab curriculum. Elements from each of the exercises can be separated and treated as stand-alone exercises, or combined into short or long projects. We have been able to offer the opportunity to use sophisticated molecular modeling in the final module through funding from an NSF-ILI grant. However, many of the benefits of the research proposal can be achieved with other computer programs, or even by literature survey alone. Figure 1.Design of project-based biochemistry laboratory. Modules (projects, or portions of projects) are indicated as boxes. Each of these can be treated independently, or used as part of a larger project. Solid lines indicate some suggested paths from one module to the next. The skills and knowledge required for protein purification and design are developed in three units: (i) an introduction to critical assays needed to monitor degree of purification, including an evaluation of assay parameters; (ii) partial purification by ion-exchange techniques; and (iii) preparation of a grant proposal on protein design by mutagenesis. Brief descriptions of each of these units follow, with experimental details of each project at the end of this paper. Assays for Lysozyme Activity and Protein Concentration (4 weeks) The assays mastered during the first unit are a necessary tool for determining the purity of the enzyme during the second unit on purification by ion exchange. These assays allow an introduction to the concept of specific activity (units of enzyme activity per milligram of total protein) as a measure of purity. In this first sequence, students learn a turbidimetric assay

  19. Multiensemble Markov models of molecular thermodynamics and kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the general transition-based reweighting analysis method (TRAM), a statistically optimal approach to integrate both unbiased and biased molecular dynamics simulations, such as umbrella sampling or replica exchange. TRAM estimates a multiensemble Markov model (MEMM) with full thermodynamic and kinetic information at all ensembles. The approach combines the benefits of Markov state models—clustering of high-dimensional spaces and modeling of complex many-state systems—with those of the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio of exploiting biased or high-temperature ensembles to accelerate rare-event sampling. TRAM does not depend on any rate model in addition to the widely used Markov state model approximation, but uses only fundamental relations such as detailed balance and binless reweighting of configurations between ensembles. Previous methods, including the multistate Bennett acceptance ratio, discrete TRAM, and Markov state models are special cases and can be derived from the TRAM equations. TRAM is demonstrated by efficiently computing MEMMs in cases where other estimators break down, including the full thermodynamics and rare-event kinetics from high-dimensional simulation data of an all-atom protein–ligand binding model. PMID:27226302

  20. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Heat Transport in Metals and Semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Narumanchi, S.; Kim, K.

    2010-01-01

    Interfacial thermal transport is of great importance in a number of practical applications where interfacial resistance between layers is frequently a major bottleneck to effective heat dissipation. For example, efficient heat transfer at silicon/aluminum and silicon/copper interfaces is very critical in power electronics packages used in hybrid electric vehicle applications. It is therefore important to understand the factors that govern and impact thermal transport at semiconductor/metal interfaces. Hence, in this study, we use classical molecular dynamics modeling to understand and study thermal transport in silicon and aluminum, and some preliminary modeling to study thermal transport at the interface between silicon and aluminum. A good match is shown between our modeling results for thermal conductivity in silicon and aluminum and the experimental data. The modeling results from this study also match well with relevant numerical studies in the literature for thermal conductivity. In addition, preliminary modeling results indicate that the interfacial thermal conductance for a perfect silicon/aluminum interface is of the same order as experimental data in the literature as well as diffuse mismatch model results accounting for realistic phonon dispersion curves.

  1. Model morphing and sequence assignment after molecular replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Read, Randy J.; Adams, Paul D.; Brunger, Axel T.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Hung, Li-Wei

    2013-11-01

    A procedure for model building is described that combines morphing a model to match a density map, trimming the morphed model and aligning the model to a sequence. A procedure termed ‘morphing’ for improving a model after it has been placed in the crystallographic cell by molecular replacement has recently been developed. Morphing consists of applying a smooth deformation to a model to make it match an electron-density map more closely. Morphing does not change the identities of the residues in the chain, only their coordinates. Consequently, if the true structure differs from the working model by containing different residues, these differences cannot be corrected by morphing. Here, a procedure that helps to address this limitation is described. The goal of the procedure is to obtain a relatively complete model that has accurate main-chain atomic positions and residues that are correctly assigned to the sequence. Residues in a morphed model that do not match the electron-density map are removed. Each segment of the resulting trimmed morphed model is then assigned to the sequence of the molecule using information about the connectivity of the chains from the working model and from connections that can be identified from the electron-density map. The procedure was tested by application to a recently determined structure at a resolution of 3.2 Å and was found to increase the number of correctly identified residues in this structure from the 88 obtained using phenix.resolve sequence assignment alone (Terwilliger, 2003 ▶) to 247 of a possible 359. Additionally, the procedure was tested by application to a series of templates with sequence identities to a target structure ranging between 7 and 36%. The mean fraction of correctly identified residues in these cases was increased from 33% using phenix.resolve sequence assignment to 47% using the current procedure. The procedure is simple to apply and is available in the Phenix software package.

  2. Transferability of regional permafrost disturbance susceptibility modelling using generalized linear and generalized additive models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudy, Ashley C. A.; Lamoureux, Scott F.; Treitz, Paul; van Ewijk, Karin Y.

    2016-07-01

    To effectively assess and mitigate risk of permafrost disturbance, disturbance-prone areas can be predicted through the application of susceptibility models. In this study we developed regional susceptibility models for permafrost disturbances using a field disturbance inventory to test the transferability of the model to a broader region in the Canadian High Arctic. Resulting maps of susceptibility were then used to explore the effect of terrain variables on the occurrence of disturbances within this region. To account for a large range of landscape characteristics, the model was calibrated using two locations: Sabine Peninsula, Melville Island, NU, and Fosheim Peninsula, Ellesmere Island, NU. Spatial patterns of disturbance were predicted with a generalized linear model (GLM) and generalized additive model (GAM), each calibrated using disturbed and randomized undisturbed locations from both locations and GIS-derived terrain predictor variables including slope, potential incoming solar radiation, wetness index, topographic position index, elevation, and distance to water. Each model was validated for the Sabine and Fosheim Peninsulas using independent data sets while the transferability of the model to an independent site was assessed at Cape Bounty, Melville Island, NU. The regional GLM and GAM validated well for both calibration sites (Sabine and Fosheim) with the area under the receiver operating curves (AUROC) > 0.79. Both models were applied directly to Cape Bounty without calibration and validated equally with AUROC's of 0.76; however, each model predicted disturbed and undisturbed samples differently. Additionally, the sensitivity of the transferred model was assessed using data sets with different sample sizes. Results indicated that models based on larger sample sizes transferred more consistently and captured the variability within the terrain attributes in the respective study areas. Terrain attributes associated with the initiation of disturbances were

  3. Modeling Complex Workflow in Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Gomah, Mohamed E.; Turley, James P.; Lu, Huimin; Jones, Dan

    2010-01-01

    One of the hurdles to achieving personalized medicine has been implementing the laboratory processes for performing and reporting complex molecular tests. The rapidly changing test rosters and complex analysis platforms in molecular diagnostics have meant that many clinical laboratories still use labor-intensive manual processing and testing without the level of automation seen in high-volume chemistry and hematology testing. We provide here a discussion of design requirements and the results of implementation of a suite of lab management tools that incorporate the many elements required for use of molecular diagnostics in personalized medicine, particularly in cancer. These applications provide the functionality required for sample accessioning and tracking, material generation, and testing that are particular to the evolving needs of individualized molecular diagnostics. On implementation, the applications described here resulted in improvements in the turn-around time for reporting of more complex molecular test sets, and significant changes in the workflow. Therefore, careful mapping of workflow can permit design of software applications that simplify even the complex demands of specialized molecular testing. By incorporating design features for order review, software tools can permit a more personalized approach to sample handling and test selection without compromising efficiency. PMID:20007844

  4. Molecular Cage Impregnated Palladium Nanoparticles: Efficient, Additive-Free Heterogeneous Catalysts for Cyanation of Aryl Halides.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Bijnaneswar; Acharyya, Koushik; Howlader, Prodip; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2016-02-10

    Two shape-persistent covalent cages (CC1(r) and CC2(r)) have been devised from triphenyl amine-based trialdehydes and cyclohexane diamine building blocks utilizing the dynamic imine chemistry followed by imine bond reduction. The cage compounds have been characterized by several spectroscopic techniques which suggest that CC1(r) and CC2(r) are [2+3] and [8+12] self-assembled architectures, respectively. These state-of-the-art molecules have a porous interior and stable aromatic backbone with multiple palladium binding sites to engineer the controlled synthesis and stabilization of ultrafine palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs). As-synthesized cage-embedded PdNPs have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry reveals that Pd@CC1(r) and Pd@CC2(r) have 40 and 25 wt% palladium loading, respectively. On the basis of TEM analysis, it has been estimated that as small as ∼1.8 nm PdNPs could be stabilized inside the CC1(r), while larger CC2(r) could stabilize ∼3.7 nm NPs. In contrast, reduction of palladium salts in the absence of the cages form structure less agglomerates. The well-dispersed cage-embedded NPs exhibit efficient catalytic performance in the cyanation of aryl halides under heterogeneous, additive-free condition. Moreover, these materials have excellent stability and recyclability without any agglomeration of PdNPs after several cycles. PMID:26771385

  5. Molecular and cytogenetic identification of new wheat-Dasypyrum breviaristatum additions conferring resistance to stem rust and powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Li, Guangrong; Yan, Hongfei; Zhou, Jianping; Hu, Lijun; Lei, Mengping; Ran, Ling; Yang, Zujun

    2011-12-01

    Two cytologically stable wheat-Dasypyrum breviarisatatum addition lines, Y93-1-6-6 and Y93-1-A6-4, were identified by integrated molecular and cytogenetic techniques. C-banding and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) showed that Y93-1-6-6 and Y93-1-A6-4 were different wheat-D. breviaristatum additions. A total of 51 markers (primer/enzyme combinations), including 6 PCR-based Landmark Unique Gene (PLUG) markers and 45 Sequence-Tagged-Site (STS) markers, were selected from 3,774 primer/enzyme combinations to further characterize these two additions. Marker haploytpes suggested that both D. breviaristatum chromosomes in Y93-1-6-6 and Y93-1-A6-4 were rearranged. Stem rust resistance screening indicated that both additions were highly resistant to race RKQQC, whereas only Y93-1-6-6 was resistant to race TTKSK (Ug99). Powdery mildew resistance screening showed that only Y93-1-6-6 was resistant. Pedigree analysis suggested that the stem rust and powdery mildew resistance of Y93-1-6-6 was derived from D. breviaristatum, indicating that the D. breviaristatum chromosomes in Y93-1-6-6 possess a new powdery mildew resistance gene(s), and new stem rust resistance gene(s). These two additions could be used as stem rust or powdery mildew resistance sources in wheat breeding programs. PMID:23136473

  6. Modeling the cardiovascular system using a nonlinear additive autoregressive model with exogenous input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedl, M.; Suhrbier, A.; Malberg, H.; Penzel, T.; Bretthauer, G.; Kurths, J.; Wessel, N.

    2008-07-01

    The parameters of heart rate variability and blood pressure variability have proved to be useful analytical tools in cardiovascular physics and medicine. Model-based analysis of these variabilities additionally leads to new prognostic information about mechanisms behind regulations in the cardiovascular system. In this paper, we analyze the complex interaction between heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration by nonparametric fitted nonlinear additive autoregressive models with external inputs. Therefore, we consider measurements of healthy persons and patients suffering from obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), with and without hypertension. It is shown that the proposed nonlinear models are capable of describing short-term fluctuations in heart rate as well as systolic blood pressure significantly better than similar linear ones, which confirms the assumption of nonlinear controlled heart rate and blood pressure. Furthermore, the comparison of the nonlinear and linear approaches reveals that the heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects is caused by a higher level of noise as well as nonlinearity than in patients suffering from OSAS. The residue analysis points at a further source of heart rate and blood pressure variability in healthy subjects, in addition to heart rate, systolic blood pressure, and respiration. Comparison of the nonlinear models within and among the different groups of subjects suggests the ability to discriminate the cohorts that could lead to a stratification of hypertension risk in OSAS patients.

  7. Molecular Limits to the Quantum Confinement Model in Diamond Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; van Buuren, T; Dahl, J E; Liu, S E; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Moller, T

    2005-04-07

    The electronic structure of monodisperse, hydrogen-passivated diamond clusters in the gas phase has been studied with x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the bulk-related unoccupied states do not exhibit any quantum confinement. Additionally, density of states below the bulk absorption edge appears, consisting of features correlated to CH and CH{sub 2} hydrogen surface termination, resulting in an effective red shift of the lowest unoccupied states. The results contradict the commonly used and very successful quantum confinement model for semiconductors which predicts increasing band edge blue shifts with decreasing particle size. Our findings indicate that in the ultimate size limit for nanocrystals a more molecular description is necessary.

  8. Molecular cytogenetic identification of a wheat-rye 1R addition line with multiple spikelets and resistance to powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wujuan; Wang, Changyou; Chen, Chunhuan; Wang, Yajuan; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Xinlun; Ji, Wanquan

    2016-04-01

    Alien addition lines are important for transferring useful genes from alien species into common wheat. Rye is an important and valuable gene resource for improving wheat disease resistance, yield, and environment adaptation. A new wheat-rye addition line, N9436B, was developed from the progeny of the cross of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBDD) cultivar Shaanmai 611 and rye (Secale cereal L., 2n = 2x = 14, RR) accession Austrian rye. We characterized this new line by cytology, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), molecular markers, and disease resistance screening. N9436B was stable in morphology and cytology, with a chromosome composition of 2n = 42 + 2t = 22II. GISH investigations showed that this line contained two rye chromosomes. GISH, FISH, and molecular maker identification suggested that the introduced R chromosome and the missing wheat chromosome arms were 1R chromosome and 2DL chromosome arm, respectively. N9436B exhibited 30-37 spikelets per spike and a high level of resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt) isolate E09 at the seedling stage. N9436B was cytologically stable, had the trait of multiple spikelets, and was resistant to powdery mildew; this line should thus be useful in wheat improvement. PMID:27021228

  9. Network-Based Models in Molecular Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Andreas

    Biological systems are characterized by a large number of diverse interactions. Interaction maps have been used to abstract those interactions at all biological scales ranging from food webs at the ecosystem level down to protein interaction networks at the molecular scale.

  10. GPU-Accelerated Molecular Modeling Coming Of Age

    PubMed Central

    Stone, John E.; Hardy, David J.; Ufimtsev, Ivan S.

    2010-01-01

    Graphics processing units (GPUs) have traditionally been used in molecular modeling solely for visualization of molecular structures and animation of trajectories resulting from molecular dynamics simulations. Modern GPUs have evolved into fully programmable, massively parallel co-processors that can now be exploited to accelerate many scientific computations, typically providing about one order of magnitude speedup over CPU code and in special cases providing speedups of two orders of magnitude. This paper surveys the development of molecular modeling algorithms that leverage GPU computing, the advances already made and remaining issues to be resolved, and the continuing evolution of GPU technology that promises to become even more useful to molecular modeling. Hardware acceleration with commodity GPUs is expected to benefit the overall computational biology community by bringing teraflops performance to desktop workstations and in some cases potentially changing what were formerly batch-mode computational jobs into interactive tasks. PMID:20675161

  11. Molecular Modeling and Computational Chemistry at Humboldt State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paselk, Richard A.; Zoellner, Robert W.

    2002-01-01

    Describes a molecular modeling and computational chemistry (MM&CC) facility for undergraduate instruction and research at Humboldt State University. This facility complex allows the introduction of MM&CC throughout the chemistry curriculum with tailored experiments in general, organic, and inorganic courses as well as a new molecular modeling…

  12. Nanoindentation of virus capsids in a molecular model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Robbins, Mark O.

    2010-01-01

    A molecular-level model is used to study the mechanical response of empty cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) and cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsids. The model is based on the native structure of the proteins that constitute the capsids and is described in terms of the Cα atoms. Nanoindentation by a large tip is modeled as compression between parallel plates. Plots of the compressive force versus plate separation for CCMV are qualitatively consistent with continuum models and experiments, showing an elastic region followed by an irreversible drop in force. The mechanical response of CPMV has not been studied, but the molecular model predicts an order of magnitude higher stiffness and a much shorter elastic region than for CCMV. These large changes result from small structural changes that increase the number of bonds by only 30% and would be difficult to capture in continuum models. Direct comparison of local deformations in continuum and molecular models of CCMV shows that the molecular model undergoes a gradual symmetry breaking rotation and accommodates more strain near the walls than the continuum model. The irreversible drop in force at small separations is associated with rupturing nearly all of the bonds between capsid proteins in the molecular model, while a buckling transition is observed in continuum models.

  13. Nanoindentation of virus capsids in a molecular model.

    PubMed

    Cieplak, Marek; Robbins, Mark O

    2010-01-01

    A molecular-level model is used to study the mechanical response of empty cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) and cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsids. The model is based on the native structure of the proteins that constitute the capsids and is described in terms of the C(alpha) atoms. Nanoindentation by a large tip is modeled as compression between parallel plates. Plots of the compressive force versus plate separation for CCMV are qualitatively consistent with continuum models and experiments, showing an elastic region followed by an irreversible drop in force. The mechanical response of CPMV has not been studied, but the molecular model predicts an order of magnitude higher stiffness and a much shorter elastic region than for CCMV. These large changes result from small structural changes that increase the number of bonds by only 30% and would be difficult to capture in continuum models. Direct comparison of local deformations in continuum and molecular models of CCMV shows that the molecular model undergoes a gradual symmetry breaking rotation and accommodates more strain near the walls than the continuum model. The irreversible drop in force at small separations is associated with rupturing nearly all of the bonds between capsid proteins in the molecular model, while a buckling transition is observed in continuum models. PMID:20078182

  14. Protein flexibility and ligand recognition: challenges for molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Spyrakis, Francesca; BidonChanal, Axel; Barril, Xavier; Luque, F Javier

    2011-01-01

    The intrinsic dynamics of macromolecules is an essential property to relate the structure of biomolecular systems with their function in the cell. In the field of ligand-receptor recognition, numerous evidences have revealed the limitations of the lock-and-key theory, and the need to elaborate models that take into account the inherent plasticity of biomolecules, such as the induced-fit model or the existence of an ensemble of pre-equilibrated conformations. Depending on the nature of the target system, ligand binding can be associated with small local adjustments in side chains or even the backbone to large-scale motions of structural fragments, domains or even subunits. Reproducing the inherent flexibility of biomolecules has thus become one of the most challenging issues in molecular modeling and simulation studies, as it has direct implications in our understanding of the structure-function relationships, but even in areas such as virtual screening and structure-based drug discovery. Given the intrinsic limitation of conventional simulation tools, only events occurring in short time scales can be reproduced at a high accuracy level through all-atom techniques such as Molecular Dynamics simulations. However, larger structural rearrangements demand the use of enhanced sampling methods relying on modified descriptions of the biomolecular system or the potential surface. This review illustrates the crucial role that structural plasticity plays in mediating ligand recognition through representative examples. In addition, it discusses some of the most powerful computational tools developed to characterize the conformational flexibility in ligand-receptor complexes. PMID:20939788

  15. Modeling and Bio molecular Self-assembly via Molecular Dynamics and Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakesh, L.

    2009-09-01

    Surfactants like materials can be used to increase the solubility of poorly soluble drugs in water and to increase drug bioavailability. A typical case study will be demonstrated using DPD simulation to model the distribution of anti-inflammatory drug molecules. Computer simulation is a convenient approach to understand drug distribution and solubility concepts without much wastage and costly experiments in the laboratory. Often in molecular dynamics (MD) the atoms are represented explicitly and the equation of motion as described by Newtonian dynamics is integrated explicitly. MD has been used to study spontaneous formation of micelles by hydrophobic molecules with amphiphilic head groups in bulk water, as well as stability of pre-configured micelles and membranes. DPD is a state-of the- art mesoscale simulation, it is a more recent molecular dynamics technique, originally developed for simulating complex fluids but lately also applied to membrane dynamics, hemodynamic in biomedical applications. Such fluids pervade industrial research from paints to pharmaceuticals and from cosmetics to the controlled release of drugs. Dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) can provide structural and dynamic properties of fluids in equilibrium, under shear or confined to narrow cavities, at length- and time-scales beyond the scope of traditional atomistic molecular dynamics simulation methods. Mesoscopic particles are used to represent clusters of molecules. The interaction conserves mass and momentum and as a consequence the dynamics is consistent with Navier-Stokes equations. In addition to the conservative forces, stochastic drive and dissipation is introduced to represent internal degrees of freedom in the mesoscopic particles. In this research, an initial study is being conducted using the aqueous solubilization of the nonsteroidal, anti-inflammatory drug is studied theoretically in micellar solution of nonionic (dodecyl hexa(ethylene oxide), C12E6) surfactants possessing the

  16. The display of molecular models with the Ames Interactive Modeling System (AIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, J. T.; Hart, J.; Burt, S. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A visualization of molecular models can lead to a clearer understanding of the models. Sophisticated graphics devices supported by minicomputers make it possible for the chemist to interact with the display of a very large model, altering its structure. In addition to user interaction, the need arises also for other ways of displaying information. These include the production of viewgraphs, film presentation, as well as publication quality prints of various models. To satisfy these needs, the display capability of the Ames Interactive Modeling System (AIMS) has been enhanced to provide a wide range of graphics and plotting capabilities. Attention is given to an overview of the AIMS system, graphics hardware used by the AIMS display subsystem, a comparison of graphics hardware, the representation of molecular models, graphics software used by the AIMS display subsystem, the display of a model obtained from data stored in molecule data base, a graphics feature for obtaining single frame permanent copy displays, and a feature for producing multiple frame displays.

  17. Determination of structure parameters in molecular tunnelling ionisation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jun-Ping; Zhao, Song-Feng; Zhang, Cai-Rong; Li, Wei; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2014-04-01

    We extracted the accurate structure parameters in a molecular tunnelling ionisation model (the so-called MO-ADK model) for 23 selected linear molecules including some inner orbitals. The molecular wave functions with the correct asymptotic behaviour are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials numerically constructed using the modified Leeuwen-Baerends (LBα) model. We show that the orientation-dependent ionisation rate reflects the shape of the ionising orbitals in general. The influences of the Stark shifts of the energy levels on the orientation-dependent ionisation rates of the polar molecules are studied. We also examine the angle-dependent ionisation rates (or probabilities) based on the MO-ADK model by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation calculations and with recent experimental measurements.

  18. Rational molecular dynamics scheme for predicting optimum concentration loading of nano-additive in phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul; Madhar, Niyaz Ahamad; Shaikh, Hamid; Al-Zahrani, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    The present study deals with the diffusion and phase transition behaviour of paraffin reinforced with carbon nano-additives namely graphene oxide (GO) and surface functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). Bulk disordered systems of paraffin hydrocarbons impregnated with carbon nano-additives have been generated in realistic equilibrium conformations for potential application as latent heat storage systems. Ab initio molecular dynamics(MD) in conjugation with COMPASS forcefield has been implemented using periodic boundary conditions. The proposed scheme allows determination of optimum nano-additive loading for improving thermo-physical properties through analysis of mass, thermal and transport properties; and assists in determination of composite behaviour and related performance from microscopic point of view. It was observed that nanocomposites containing 7.8 % surface functionalised SWCNT and 55% GO loading corresponds to best latent heat storage system. The propounded methodology could serve as a by-pass route for economically taxing and iterative experimental procedures required to attain the optimum composition for best performance. The results also hint at the large unexplored potential of ab-initio classical MD techniques for predicting performance of new nanocomposites for potential phase change material applications.

  19. Molecular modeling studies, synthesis and biological evaluation of dabigatran analogues as thrombin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ming-Hui; Chen, Hai-Feng; Ren, Yu-Jie; Shao, Fang-Ming

    2016-01-15

    In this work, 48 thrombin inhibitors based on the structural scaffold of dabigatran were analyzed using a combination of molecular modeling techniques. We generated three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) models based on three alignments for both comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity index analysis (CoMSIA) to highlight the structural requirements for thrombin protein inhibition. In addition to the 3D-QSAR study, Topomer CoMFA model also was established with a higher leave-one-out cross-validation q(2) and a non-cross-validation r(2), which suggest that the three models have good predictive ability. The results indicated that the steric, hydrophobic and electrostatic fields play key roles in QSAR model. Furthermore, we employed molecular docking and re-docking simulation explored the binding relationship of the ligand and the receptor protein in detail. Molecular docking simulations identified several key interactions that were also indicated through 3D-QSAR analysis. On the basis of the obtained results, two compounds were designed and predicted by three models, the biological evaluation in vitro (IC50) demonstrated that these molecular models were effective for the development of novel potent thrombin inhibitors. PMID:26690913

  20. A dynamic styrofoam-ball model for simulating molecular motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mak, Se-yuen; Cheung, Derek

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a simple styrofoam-ball model that can be used for simulating molecular motion in all three states. As the foam balls are driven by a vibrator that is in turn driven by a signal generator, the frequency and the amplitude of vibration can be adjusted independently. Thus, the model is appropriate for simulating molecular motion in the liquid state, which is a combination of vibration and meandering motion.

  1. Constructing Molecular Models with Low-Cost Toy Beads

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Pun-hon; Wong, Siu-ling; Mak, Se-yuen

    2012-01-01

    In teaching the science of the nano world, ball-and-stick molecular models are frequently used as 3D representations of molecules. Unlike a chemical formula, a molecular model allows us to visualise the 3D shape of the molecule and the relative positions of its atoms, the bonds between atoms and why a pair of mirror isomers with the same atoms,…

  2. Molecular Modeling and Design of Arylthioindole Derivatives as Tubulin Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Si-yan; Miao, Ti-fang; Chen, Jin-can; Lu, Hai-liang; Zheng, Kang-cheng

    2009-10-01

    Three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D-QSAR) and docking studies of a series of arylthioindole derivatives as tubulin inhibitors against human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 have been carried out. An optimal 3D-QSAR model from the comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) for training set with significant statistical quality (R2 = 0.898) and predictive ability (q2 = 0.654) was established. The same model was further applied to predict pIC50 values of the compounds in test set, and the resulting predictive correlation coefficient R2(pred) reaches 0.816, further showing that this CoMFA model has high predictive ability. Moreover, the appropriate binding orientations and conformations of these compounds interacting with tubulin are located by docking study, and it is very interesting to find the consistency between the CoMFA field distribution and the 3D topology structure of active site of tubulin. Based on CoMFA along with docking results, some important factors improving the activities of these compounds were discussed in detail and were summarized as follows: the substituents R3-R5 (on the phenyl ring) with higher electronegativity, the substituent R6 with higher electropositivity and bigger bulk, the substituent R7 with smaller bulk, and so on. In addition, five new compounds with higher activities have been designed. Such results can offer useful theoretical references for experimental works.

  3. Linearity and additivity in cluster-induced sputtering: A molecular-dynamics study of van der Waals bonded systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Johnson, Robert E.

    2004-10-15

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study sputtering of a condensed-gas solid induced by the impact of atomic clusters with sizes 1{<=}n{<=}10{sup 4}. Above a nonlinear onset regime, we find a linear increase of the sputter yield Y with the total energy E of the bombarding cluster. The fitting coefficients in the linear regime depend only on the cluster size n such that for fixed bombardment energy, sputtering decreases with increasing cluster size n. We find that to a good approximation the sputter yield in this regime obeys an additivity rule in cluster size n such that doubling the cluster size at the same cluster velocity amounts to doubling the sputter yield. The sputter-limiting energy {epsilon}{sub s} is introduced which separates erosion ({epsilon}>{epsilon}{sub s}) from growth ({epsilon}<{epsilon}{sub s}) under cluster impact.

  4. A Cooperative Molecular Modeling Exercise--The Hypersurface as Classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, Christopher J.; Kormos, Bethany L.; Winget, Paul; Audette, Vanessa M.; Beebe, Jeremy M.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Burdick, W. Russ; Cochran, Eric W.; Eklov, Brian L.; Giese, Timothy J.; Jun, Yongseok; Kesavan, Lakshmi S. D.; Kinsinger, Christopher R.; Minyaev, Mickail E.; Rajamani, Ramkumar; Salsbury, Jonathon S.; Stubbs, John M.; Surek, Jack T.; Thompson, Jason D.; Voelz, Vincent A.; Wick, Collin D.; Zhang, Ling

    2001-09-01

    A molecular modeling exercise and an associated exam that have both competitive and cooperative learning aspects are described. Collaborative efforts are facilitated by Web-based information management. The exercise/exam is appropriate for use in undergraduate or graduate quantum chemistry or molecular modeling courses that have access to modest computational resources. Students develop a molecular potential energy surface, identify multiple minima and transition-state structures, repeat the process at two or more levels of theory, and then analyze the data looking for interesting chemical or computational phenomena.

  5. Free volume model for molecular weights of polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Eftekhari, A.

    1992-01-01

    A free volume model has been developed for determining molecular weights of linear polymers. It is based on the size of free volume cells in two geometries of poly(arylene ether ketone)s. Free volume cell sizes in test samples were measured using positron lifetime spectroscopy. The molecular weights computed from free volume cell sizes are in good agreement with the values measured by gel permeation chromatography, with a low angle laser light scattering photometer as the detector. The model has been further tested on two atactic polystyrene samples, where it predicted the ratio of their molecular weights with reasonable accuracy.

  6. Molecular modeling of responsive polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Calvo, Ernesto J; Szleifer, Igal

    2010-06-29

    In this perspective, we have shown three different cases of responsive polymers at surfaces where the properties of the surface can be varied in response to cues from the bulk solution or in the presence of an external field. The most important conclusion in all three cases is that the chemical reaction equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization are strongly coupled, and it is imperative to consider the global and local changes that occur to the surface structure and properties due to this coupling. In particular acid-base and redox equilibrium are very different in polymer-modified surfaces than in the corresponding bulk solutions. Moreover, the definition of ‘‘apparent redox potentials’’ and ‘‘apparent pKa’’results from the averaging over highly inhomogeneous values,and, therefore, they do not necessarily represent the state of the layer and the local values and their variation are very important for the design of functional surfaces. The very large variation on chemical equilibrium results from the optimization of all the interactions. The picture that emerges is that trying to deduce what the final state of the system is by looking at the individual optimization of each contribution leads to qualitative incorrect assumptions and only the minimization of the complete free energy leads to the proper behavior in these complex systems.In the cases where domain formation is possible in grafted weak polyacid layers charge regulation may lead to regimes of coexistence between aggregates with relatively low fraction of charged polymer segments surrounded by highly stretched chains that have a relatively high fraction of charged groups.Therefore, one can control the state of charge, local electrostatic potential and local pH in all three dimensions with im-portant gradients on length scales of nanometers. For hydrophobic redox polymers we show how the application of an electrode potential can lead to changes in the structure

  7. Quantitative and logic modelling of gene and molecular networks

    PubMed Central

    Le Novère, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Behaviours of complex biomolecular systems are often irreducible to the elementary properties of their individual components. Explanatory and predictive mathematical models are therefore useful for fully understanding and precisely engineering cellular functions. The development and analyses of these models require their adaptation to the problems that need to be solved and the type and amount of available genetic or molecular data. Quantitative and logic modelling are among the main methods currently used to model molecular and gene networks. Each approach comes with inherent advantages and weaknesses. Recent developments show that hybrid approaches will become essential for further progress in synthetic biology and in the development of virtual organisms. PMID:25645874

  8. Coupling Molecular Modeling to the Traditional "IR-ID" Exercise in the Introductory Organic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stokes-Huby, Heather; Vitale, Dale E.

    2007-01-01

    This exercise integrates the infrared unknown identification ("IR-ID") experiment common to most organic laboratory syllabi with computer molecular modeling. In this modification students are still required to identify unknown compounds from their IR spectra, but must additionally match some of the absorptions with computed frequencies they…

  9. A Novel Network Model for Molecular Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Ying-Wooi; Bose, Swetha; Denvir, James; Guo, Nancy Lan

    2015-01-01

    Network-based genome-wide association studies (NWAS) utilize the molecular interactions between genes and functional pathways in biomarker identification. This study presents a novel network-based methodology for identifying prognostic gene signatures to predict cancer recurrence. The methodology contains the following steps: 1) Constructing genome-wide coexpression networks for different disease states (metastatic vs. non-metastatic). Prediction logic is used to induct valid implication relations between each pair of gene expression profiles in terms of formal logic rules. 2) Identifying differential components associated with specific disease states from the genome-wide coexpression networks. 3) Dissecting network modules that are tightly connected with major disease signal hallmarks from the disease specific differential components. 4) Identifying most significant genes/probes associated with clinical outcome from the pathway connected network modules. Using this methodology, a 14-gene prognostic signature was identified for accurate patient stratification in early stage lung cancer. PMID:26005718

  10. Comparative molecular modelling of biologically active sterols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Mariusz; Mazerski, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Membrane sterols are targets for a clinically important antifungal agent - amphotericin B. The relatively specific antifungal action of the drug is based on a stronger interaction of amphotericin B with fungal ergosterol than with mammalian cholesterol. Conformational space occupied by six sterols has been defined using the molecular dynamics method to establish if the conformational features correspond to the preferential interaction of amphotericin B with ergosterol as compared with cholesterol. The compounds studied were chosen on the basis of structural features characteristic for cholesterol and ergosterol and on available experimental data on the ability to form complexes with the antibiotic. Statistical analysis of the data obtained has been performed. The results show similarity of the conformational spaces occupied by all the sterols tested. This suggests that the conformational differences of sterol molecules are not the major feature responsible for the differential sterol - drug affinity.

  11. Additive Manufacturing Modeling and Simulation A Literature Review for Electron Beam Free Form Fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seufzer, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is coming into industrial use and has several desirable attributes. Control of the deposition remains a complex challenge, and so this literature review was initiated to capture current modeling efforts in the field of additive manufacturing. This paper summarizes about 10 years of modeling and simulation related to both welding and additive manufacturing. The goals were to learn who is doing what in modeling and simulation, to summarize various approaches taken to create models, and to identify research gaps. Later sections in the report summarize implications for closed-loop-control of the process, implications for local research efforts, and implications for local modeling efforts.

  12. The Impact of Molecular Gas on Mass Models of Nearby Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, B. S.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Walter, F.; Leroy, A.; Carignan, C.

    2016-04-01

    We present CO velocity fields and rotation curves for a sample of nearby galaxies, based on data from HERACLES. We combine our data with THINGS, SINGS, and KINGFISH results to provide a comprehensive sample of mass models of disk galaxies inclusive of molecular gas. We compare the kinematics of the molecular (CO from HERACLES) and atomic (H i from THINGS) gas distributions to determine the extent to which CO may be used to probe the dynamics in the inner part of galaxies. In general, we find good agreement between the CO and H i kinematics, with small differences in the inner part of some galaxies. We add the contribution of the molecular gas to the mass models in our galaxies by using two different conversion factors αCO to convert CO luminosity to molecular gas mass surface density—the constant Milky Way value and the radially varying profiles determined in recent work based on THINGS, HERACLES, and KINGFISH data. We study the relative effect that the addition of the molecular gas has on the halo rotation curves for Navarro-Frenk-White and the observationally motivated pseudo-isothermal halos. The contribution of the molecular gas varies for galaxies in our sample—for those galaxies where there is a substantial molecular gas content, using different values of αCO can result in significant differences to the relative contribution of the molecular gas and hence the shape of the dark matter halo rotation curves in the central regions of galaxies.

  13. Molecular Models for Conductance in Junctions and Electrochemical Electron Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazinani, Shobeir Khezr Seddigh

    This thesis develops molecular models for electron transport in molecular junctions and intra-molecular electron transfer. The goal is to identify molecular descriptors that afford a substantial simplification of these electronic processes. First, the connection between static molecular polarizability and the molecular conductance is examined. A correlation emerges whereby the measured conductance of a tunneling junction decreases as a function of the calculated molecular polarizability for several systems, a result consistent with the idea of a molecule as a polarizable dielectric. A model based on a macroscopic extension of the Clausius-Mossotti equation to the molecular domain and Simmon's tunneling model is developed to explain this correlation. Despite the simplicity of the theory, it paves the way for further experimental, conceptual and theoretical developments in the use of molecular descriptors to describe both conductance and electron transfer. Second, the conductance of several biologically relevant, weakly bonded, hydrogen-bonded systems is systematically investigated. While there is no correlation between hydrogen bond strength and conductance, the results indicate a relation between the conductance and atomic polarizability of the hydrogen bond acceptor atom. The relevance of these results to electron transfer in biological systems is discussed. Hydrogen production and oxidation using catalysts inspired by hydrogenases provides a more sustainable alternative to the use of precious metals. To understand electrochemical and spectroscopic properties of a collection of Fe and Ni mimics of hydrogenases, high-level density functional theory calculations are described. The results, based on a detailed analysis of the energies, charges and molecular orbitals of these metal complexes, indicate the importance of geometric constraints imposed by the ligand on molecular properties such as acidity and electrocatalytic activity. Based on model calculations of

  14. Methanol Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Oxide Catalysts: Molecular and Dissociative Routes and Hydrogen Addition Energies as Descriptors of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-11-13

    The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of alkanols on oxide catalysts is generally described as involving H-abstraction from alkoxy species formed via O–H dissociation. Kinetic and isotopic data cannot discern between such routes and those involving kinetically-relevant H-abstraction from undissociated alkanols. Here, we combine such experiments with theoretical estimates of activation energies and entropies to show that the latter molecular routes prevail over dissociative routes for methanol reactions on polyoxometalate (POM) clusters at all practical reaction temperatures. The stability of the late transition states that mediate H-abstraction depend predominantly on the stability of the O–H bond formed, making H-addition energies (HAE) accurate and single-valued descriptors of reactivity. Density functional theory-derived activation energies depend linearly on HAE values at each O-atom location on clusters with a range of composition (H3PMo12, H4SiMo12, H3PW12, H4PV1Mo11, and H4PV1W11); both barriers and HAE values reflect the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy of metal centers that accept the electron and the protonation energy of O-atoms that accept the proton involved in the H-atom transfer. Bridging O-atoms form O–H bonds that are stronger than those of terminal atoms and therefore exhibit more negative HAE values and higher ODH reactivity on all POM clusters. For each cluster composition, ODH turnover rates reflect the reactivity-averaged HAE of all accessible O-atoms, which can be evaluated for each cluster composition to provide a rigorous and accurate predictor of ODH reactivity for catalysts with known structure. These relations together with oxidation reactivity measurements can then be used to estimate HAE values and to infer plausible structures for catalysts with uncertain active site structures.

  15. Multiprocessing and Correction Algorithm of 3D-models for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anamova, R. R.; Zelenov, S. V.; Kuprikov, M. U.; Ripetskiy, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    This article addresses matters related to additive manufacturing preparation. A layer-by-layer model presentation was developed on the basis of a routing method. Methods for correction of errors in the layer-by-layer model presentation were developed. A multiprocessing algorithm for forming an additive manufacturing batch file was realized.

  16. Validation analysis of probabilistic models of dietary exposure to food additives.

    PubMed

    Gilsenan, M B; Thompson, R L; Lambe, J; Gibney, M J

    2003-10-01

    The validity of a range of simple conceptual models designed specifically for the estimation of food additive intakes using probabilistic analysis was assessed. Modelled intake estimates that fell below traditional conservative point estimates of intake and above 'true' additive intakes (calculated from a reference database at brand level) were considered to be in a valid region. Models were developed for 10 food additives by combining food intake data, the probability of an additive being present in a food group and additive concentration data. Food intake and additive concentration data were entered as raw data or as a lognormal distribution, and the probability of an additive being present was entered based on the per cent brands or the per cent eating occasions within a food group that contained an additive. Since the three model components assumed two possible modes of input, the validity of eight (2(3)) model combinations was assessed. All model inputs were derived from the reference database. An iterative approach was employed in which the validity of individual model components was assessed first, followed by validation of full conceptual models. While the distribution of intake estimates from models fell below conservative intakes, which assume that the additive is present at maximum permitted levels (MPLs) in all foods in which it is permitted, intake estimates were not consistently above 'true' intakes. These analyses indicate the need for more complex models for the estimation of food additive intakes using probabilistic analysis. Such models should incorporate information on market share and/or brand loyalty. PMID:14555358

  17. A Molecular Model for Lithium's Bioactive Form.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Katharine T; Giulian, Gary G; Li, Gong; Kao, Joseph P Y; Marino, John P

    2016-07-26

    Lithium carbonate, a drug for the treatment of bipolar disorder, provides mood stability to mitigate recurrent episodes of mania and/or depression. Despite its long-term and widespread use, the mechanism by which lithium acts to elicit these psychological changes has remained unknown. Using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods, in this study we characterized the association of lithium with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and identified a bimetallic (Mg·Li) ATP complex. Lithium's affinity to form this complex was found to be relatively high (Kd ∼1.6 mM) compared with other monovalent cations and relevant, considering lithium dosing and physiological concentrations of Mg(2+) and ATP. The ATP·Mg·Li complex reveals, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that lithium can associate with magnesium-bound phosphate sites and then act to modulate purine receptor activity in neuronal cells, suggesting a molecular mode for in vivo lithium action. PMID:27463132

  18. Adaptive modelling of structured molecular representations for toxicity prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertinetto, Carlo; Duce, Celia; Micheli, Alessio; Solaro, Roberto; Tiné, Maria Rosaria

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of modelling structure-toxicity relationships by direct treatment of the molecular structure (without using descriptors) through an adaptive model able to retain the appropriate structural information. With respect to traditional descriptor-based approaches, this provides a more general and flexible way to tackle prediction problems that is particularly suitable when little or no background knowledge is available. Our method employs a tree-structured molecular representation, which is processed by a recursive neural network (RNN). To explore the realization of RNN modelling in toxicological problems, we employed a data set containing growth impairment concentrations (IGC50) for Tetrahymena pyriformis.

  19. Molecular Modeling of Lipid Membrane Curvature Induction by a Peptide: More than Simply Shape

    PubMed Central

    Sodt, Alexander J.; Pastor, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of an amphipathic helix embedded in a lipid bilayer indicate that it will induce substantial positive curvature (e.g., a tube of diameter 20 nm at 16% surface coverage). The induction is twice that of a continuum model prediction that only considers the shape of the inclusion. The discrepancy is explained in terms of the additional presence of specific interactions described only by the molecular model. The conclusion that molecular shape alone is insufficient to quantitatively model curvature is supported by contrasting molecular and continuum models of lipids with large and small headgroups (choline and ethanolamine, respectively), and of the removal of a lipid tail (modeling a lyso-lipid). For the molecular model, curvature propensity is analyzed by computing the derivative of the free energy with respect to bending. The continuum model predicts that the inclusion will soften the bilayer near the headgroup region, an effect that may weaken curvature induction. The all-atom predictions are consistent with experimental observations of the degree of tubulation by amphipathic helices and variation of the free energy of binding to liposomes. PMID:24806928

  20. Molecular Modeling of Nucleic Acid Structure: Electrostatics and Solvation

    PubMed Central

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand the structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as means to sample conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. From this discussion, the major limitations with modeling, in general, were highlighted. These are the difficult issues in sampling conformational space effectively—the multiple minima or conformational sampling problems—and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:18428877

  1. Molecular modeling of nucleic Acid structure: electrostatics and solvation.

    PubMed

    Bergonzo, Christina; Galindo-Murillo, Rodrigo; Cheatham, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    This unit presents an overview of computer simulation techniques as applied to nucleic acid systems, ranging from simple in vacuo molecular modeling techniques to more complete all-atom molecular dynamics treatments that include an explicit representation of the environment. The third in a series of four units, this unit focuses on critical issues in solvation and the treatment of electrostatics. UNITS 7.5 & 7.8 introduced the modeling of nucleic acid structure at the molecular level. This included a discussion of how to generate an initial model, how to evaluate the utility or reliability of a given model, and ultimately how to manipulate this model to better understand its structure, dynamics, and interactions. Subject to an appropriate representation of the energy, such as a specifically parameterized empirical force field, the techniques of minimization and Monte Carlo simulation, as well as molecular dynamics (MD) methods, were introduced as a way of sampling conformational space for a better understanding of the relevance of a given model. This discussion highlighted the major limitations with modeling in general. When sampling conformational space effectively, difficult issues are encountered, such as multiple minima or conformational sampling problems, and accurately representing the underlying energy of interaction. In order to provide a realistic model of the underlying energetics for nucleic acids in their native environments, it is crucial to include some representation of solvation (by water) and also to properly treat the electrostatic interactions. These subjects are discussed in detail in this unit. PMID:25631536

  2. Reasoning with Atomic-Scale Molecular Dynamic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pallant, Amy; Tinker, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    The studies reported in this paper are an initial effort to explore the applicability of computational models in introductory science learning. Two instructional interventions are described that use a molecular dynamics model embedded in a set of online learning activities with middle and high school students in 10 classrooms. The studies indicate…

  3. The Electron-Pair Repulsion Model for Molecular Geometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, R. J.

    1970-01-01

    Describes how the electron-pair repulsion model qualitatively explains the size and shape of molecular orbitals. Briefly discusses trigonal bipyramidal molecules, three-center bonds, and transition elements. Describes cluster compounds and finishes with a discussion of the exceptions to the model and effects of ligand-ligand repulsions. (RR)

  4. Modelling refractive index changes due to molecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varma, Manoj

    2016-03-01

    There are a large number of sensing techniques which use optical changes to monitor interactions between molecules. In the absence of fluorophores or other labels, the basic signal transduction mechanism relies on refractive index changes arising from the interactions of the molecules involved. A quantitative model incorporating molecular transport, reaction kinetics and optical mixing is presented which reveals important insights concerning the optimal detection of molecular interactions optically. Although conceptually simple, a comprehensive model such as this has not been reported anywhere. Specifically, we investigate the pros and cons of detecting molecular interactions in free solution relative to detecting molecular interactions on surfaces using surface bound receptor molecules such as antibodies. The model reveals that the refractive index change produced in surface based sensors is 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than that from interactions in free solution. On the other hand, the model also reveals that it is indeed possible to distinguish specific molecular interactions from non-specific ones based on free-solution bulk refractometry without any washing step necessary in surface based sensors. However, the refractive index change for free solution interactions predicted by the model is smaller than 10-7 RIU, even for large proteins such as IgG in sufficiently high concentrations. This value is smaller than the typical 10-6 RIU detection limit of most state of the art optical sensing techniques therefore requiring techniques with substantially higher index sensitivity such as Back Scattering Interferometry.

  5. Extracting Structure Parameters of Dimers for Molecular Tunneling Ionization Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song-Feng, Zhao; Fang, Huang; Guo-Li, Wang; Xiao-Xin, Zhou

    2016-03-01

    We determine structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 27 dimers for the molecular tunneling ionization (so called MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402]. The molecular wave functions with correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are numerically created using the density functional theory. We examine the alignment-dependent tunneling ionization probabilities from MO-ADK model for several molecules by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation (MO-SFA) calculations. We show the molecular Perelomov–Popov–Terent'ev (MO-PPT) can successfully give the laser wavelength dependence of ionization rates (or probabilities). Based on the MO-PPT model, two diatomic molecules having valence orbital with antibonding systems (i.e., Cl2, Ne2) show strong ionization suppression when compared with their corresponding closest companion atoms. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11164025, 11264036, 11465016, 11364038, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001, and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  6. Extracting Structure Parameters of Dimers for Molecular Tunneling Ionization Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Song-Feng; Huang, Fang; Wang, Guo-Li; Zhou, Xiao-Xin

    2016-03-01

    We determine structure parameters of the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of 27 dimers for the molecular tunneling ionization (so called MO-ADK) model of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. A 66 (2002) 033402]. The molecular wave functions with correct asymptotic behavior are obtained by solving the time-independent Schrödinger equation with B-spline functions and molecular potentials which are numerically created using the density functional theory. We examine the alignment-dependent tunneling ionization probabilities from MO-ADK model for several molecules by comparing with the molecular strong-field approximation (MO-SFA) calculations. We show the molecular Perelomov-Popov-Terent'ev (MO-PPT) can successfully give the laser wavelength dependence of ionization rates (or probabilities). Based on the MO-PPT model, two diatomic molecules having valence orbital with antibonding systems (i.e., Cl2, Ne2) show strong ionization suppression when compared with their corresponding closest companion atoms. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11164025, 11264036, 11465016, 11364038, the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China under Grant No. 20116203120001, and the Basic Scientific Research Foundation for Institution of Higher Learning of Gansu Province

  7. Corn Storage Protein - A Molecular Genetic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Messing, Joachim

    2013-05-31

    Corn is the highest yielding crop on earth and probably the most valuable agricultural product of the United States. Because it converts sun energy through photosynthesis into starch and proteins, we addressed energy savings by focusing on protein quality. People and animals require essential amino acids derived from the digestion of proteins. If proteins are relatively low in certain essential amino acids, the crop becomes nutritionally defective and has to be supplemented. Such deficiency affects meat and fish production and countries where corn is a staple. Because corn seed proteins have relatively low levels of lysine and methionine, a diet has to be supplemented with soybeans for the missing lysine and with chemically synthesized methionine. We therefore have studied genes expressed during maize seed development and their chromosomal organization. A critical technical requirement for the understanding of the molecular structure of genes and their positional information was DNA sequencing. Because of the length of sequences, DNA sequencing methods themselves were insufficient for this type of analysis. We therefore developed the so-called “DNA shotgun sequencing” strategy, where overlapping DNA fragments were sequenced in parallel and used to reconstruct large DNA molecules via overlaps. Our publications became the most frequently cited ones during the decade of 1981-1990 and former Associate Director of Science for the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Patricia M. Dehmer presented our work as one of the great successes of this program. A major component of the sequencing strategy was the development of bacterial strains and vectors, which were also used to develop the first biotechnology crops. These crops possessed new traits thanks to the expression of foreign genes in plants. To enable such expression, chimeric genes had to be constructed using our materials and methods by the industry. Because we made our materials and methods freely available to

  8. An introduction to modeling longitudinal data with generalized additive models: applications to single-case designs.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kristynn J; Shadish, William R; Steiner, Peter M

    2015-03-01

    Single-case designs (SCDs) are short time series that assess intervention effects by measuring units repeatedly over time in both the presence and absence of treatment. This article introduces a statistical technique for analyzing SCD data that has not been much used in psychological and educational research: generalized additive models (GAMs). In parametric regression, the researcher must choose a functional form to impose on the data, for example, that trend over time is linear. GAMs reverse this process by letting the data inform the choice of functional form. In this article we review the problem that trend poses in SCDs, discuss how current SCD analytic methods approach trend, describe GAMs as a possible solution, suggest a GAM model testing procedure for examining the presence of trend in SCDs, present a small simulation to show the statistical properties of GAMs, and illustrate the procedure on 3 examples of different lengths. Results suggest that GAMs may be very useful both as a form of sensitivity analysis for checking the plausibility of assumptions about trend and as a primary data analysis strategy for testing treatment effects. We conclude with a discussion of some problems with GAMs and some future directions for research on the application of GAMs to SCDs. PMID:24885341

  9. Energetics of molecular-beam epitaxy models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnamurthy, Srinivasan; Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A.-B.

    1990-01-01

    The removal energies of constituent atoms from various unreconstructed semiconductor surfaces are calculated using a Green function method. An efficient difference-equation approach within the second-neighbor tight-binding model is employed. For a compound AB, binding energies for the A and B atoms on the (111), (-1 -1 -1), (100), and (110) surfaces are calculated. Analyses are made of the energy to remove an atom from the nearly full surface and from the nearly empty surface. Results are presented for Si, GaAs, CdTe, and HgTe; and the surface sublimation energies are found to depend on surface coverage and do not display a simple linear relationship to the number of bonds broken, as is often assumed in modeling growth by MBE.

  10. Energetics of molecular-beam epitaxy models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamurthy, Srinivasan; Berding, M. A.; Sher, A.; Chen, A.-B.

    1990-10-01

    The removal energies of constituent atoms from various unreconstructed semiconductor surfaces are calculated using a Green function method. An efficient difference-equation approach within the second-neighbor tight-binding model is employed. For a compound AB, binding energies for the A and B atoms on the (111), (-1 -1 -1), (100), and (110) surfaces are calculated. Analyses are made of the energy to remove an atom from the nearly full surface and from the nearly empty surface. Results are presented for Si, GaAs, CdTe, and HgTe; and the surface sublimation energies are found to depend on surface coverage and do not display a simple linear relationship to the number of bonds broken, as is often assumed in modeling growth by MBE.

  11. Predictive Bioinformatic Assignment of Methyl-Bearing Stereocenters, Total Synthesis, and an Additional Molecular Target of Ajudazol B.

    PubMed

    Essig, Sebastian; Schmalzbauer, Björn; Bretzke, Sebastian; Scherer, Olga; Koeberle, Andreas; Werz, Oliver; Müller, Rolf; Menche, Dirk

    2016-02-19

    Full details on the evaluation and application of an easily feasible and generally useful method for configurational assignments of isolated methyl-bearing stereocenters are reported. The analytical tool relies on a bioinformatic gene cluster analysis and utilizes a predictive enoylreductase alignment, and its feasibility was demonstrated by the full stereochemical determination of the ajudazols, highly potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Furthermore, a full account of our strategies and tactics that culminated in the total synthesis of ajudazol B, the most potent and least abundant of these structurally unique class of myxobacterial natural products, is presented. Key features include an application of an asymmetric ortholithiation strategy for synthesis of the characteristic anti-configured hydroxyisochromanone core bearing three contiguous stereocenters, a modular oxazole formation, a flexible cross-metathesis approach for terminal allyl amide synthesis, and a late-stage Z,Z-selective Suzuki coupling. This total synthesis unambiguously proves the correct stereochemistry, which was further corroborated by comparison with reisolated natural material. Finally, 5-lipoxygenase was discovered as an additional molecular target of ajudazol B. Activities against this clinically validated key enzyme of the biosynthesis of proinflammatory leukotrienes were in the range of the approved drug zileuton, which further underlines the biological importance of this unique natural product. PMID:26796481

  12. Modeling Polymorphic Molecular Crystals with Electronic Structure Theory.

    PubMed

    Beran, Gregory J O

    2016-05-11

    Interest in molecular crystals has grown thanks to their relevance to pharmaceuticals, organic semiconductor materials, foods, and many other applications. Electronic structure methods have become an increasingly important tool for modeling molecular crystals and polymorphism. This article reviews electronic structure techniques used to model molecular crystals, including periodic density functional theory, periodic second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory, fragment-based electronic structure methods, and diffusion Monte Carlo. It also discusses the use of these models for predicting a variety of crystal properties that are relevant to the study of polymorphism, including lattice energies, structures, crystal structure prediction, polymorphism, phase diagrams, vibrational spectroscopies, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Finally, tools for analyzing crystal structures and intermolecular interactions are briefly discussed. PMID:27008426

  13. How Cells Feel: Stochastic Model for a Molecular Mechanosensor

    PubMed Central

    Escudé, Matteo; Rigozzi, Michelle K.; Terentjev, Eugene M.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding mechanosensitivity (i.e., how cells sense the stiffness of their environment) is very important, yet there is a fundamental difficulty in understanding its mechanism: to measure an elastic modulus one requires two points of application of force—a measuring and a reference point. The cell in contact with substrate has only one (adhesion) point to work with, and thus a new method of measurement needs to be invented. The aim of this theoretical work is to develop a self-consistent physical model for mechanosensitivity, a process by which a cell detects the mechanical stiffness of its environment (e.g., a substrate it is attached to via adhesion points) and generates an appropriate chemical signaling to remodel itself in response to this environment. The model uses the molecular mechanosensing complex of latent TGF-β attached to the adhesion point as the biomarker. We show that the underlying Brownian motion in the substrate is the reference element in the measuring process. The model produces a closed expression for the rate of release of active TGF-β, which depends on the substrate stiffness and the pulling force coming from the cell in a subtle and nontrivial way. It is consistent with basic experimental data showing an increase in signal for stiffer substrates and higher pulling forces. In addition, we find that for each cell there is a range of stiffness where a homeostatic configuration of the cell can be achieved, outside of which the cell either relaxes its cytoskeletal forces and detaches from the very weak substrate, or generates an increasingly strong pulling force through stress fibers with a positive feedback loop on very stiff substrates. In this way, the theory offers the underlying mechanism for the myofibroblast conversion in wound healing and smooth muscle cell dysfunction in cardiac disease. PMID:24411244

  14. How cells feel: stochastic model for a molecular mechanosensor.

    PubMed

    Escudé, Matteo; Rigozzi, Michelle K; Terentjev, Eugene M

    2014-01-01

    Understanding mechanosensitivity (i.e., how cells sense the stiffness of their environment) is very important, yet there is a fundamental difficulty in understanding its mechanism: to measure an elastic modulus one requires two points of application of force-a measuring and a reference point. The cell in contact with substrate has only one (adhesion) point to work with, and thus a new method of measurement needs to be invented. The aim of this theoretical work is to develop a self-consistent physical model for mechanosensitivity, a process by which a cell detects the mechanical stiffness of its environment (e.g., a substrate it is attached to via adhesion points) and generates an appropriate chemical signaling to remodel itself in response to this environment. The model uses the molecular mechanosensing complex of latent TGF-β attached to the adhesion point as the biomarker. We show that the underlying Brownian motion in the substrate is the reference element in the measuring process. The model produces a closed expression for the rate of release of active TGF-β, which depends on the substrate stiffness and the pulling force coming from the cell in a subtle and nontrivial way. It is consistent with basic experimental data showing an increase in signal for stiffer substrates and higher pulling forces. In addition, we find that for each cell there is a range of stiffness where a homeostatic configuration of the cell can be achieved, outside of which the cell either relaxes its cytoskeletal forces and detaches from the very weak substrate, or generates an increasingly strong pulling force through stress fibers with a positive feedback loop on very stiff substrates. In this way, the theory offers the underlying mechanism for the myofibroblast conversion in wound healing and smooth muscle cell dysfunction in cardiac disease. PMID:24411244

  15. Nondynamical correlation energy in model molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chojnacki, Henryk

    The hypersurfaces for the deprotonation processes have been studied at the nonempirical level for H3O+, NH+4, PH+4, and H3S+ cations within their correlation consistent basis set. The potential energy curves were calculated and nondynamical correlation energies analyzed. We have found that the restricted Hartree-Fock wavefunction leads to the improper dissociation limit and, in the three latest cases requires multireference description. We conclude that these systems may be treated as a good models for interpretation of the proton transfer mechanism as well as for testing one-determinantal or multireference cases.

  16. Thermodiffusion in model nanofluids by molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galliero, G.; Volz, S.

    2008-02-01

    In this work, a new algorithm is proposed to compute single particle (infinite dilution) thermodiffusion using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations through the estimation of the thermophoretic force that applies on a solute particle. This scheme is shown to provide consistent results for model nanofluids in the liquid state (spherical nonmetallic nanoparticles+Lennard-Jones fluid) where it appears that thermodiffusion amplitude, as well as thermal conductivity, decreases with nanoparticle concentration. Then, by changing the nature of the nanoparticle (size, mass, and internal stiffness) and that of the solvent (quality and viscosity), various trends are exhibited. In all cases, the single particle thermodiffusion is positive, i.e., the nanoparticle tends to migrate toward the cold area. The single particle thermal diffusion coefficient is shown to be independent of the size of the nanoparticle (diameter of 0.8-4nm), whereas it increases with the quality of the solvent and is inversely proportional to the viscosity of the fluid. In addition, this coefficient is shown to be independent of the mass of the nanoparticle and to increase with the stiffness of the nanoparticle internal bonds. Besides, for these configurations, the mass diffusion coefficient behavior appears to be consistent with a Stokes-Einstein-like law.

  17. Molecular Modeling of Prion Transmission to Humans

    PubMed Central

    Levavasseur, Etienne; Privat, Nicolas; Martin, Juan-Carlos Espinosa; Simoneau, Steve; Baron, Thierry; Flan, Benoit; Torres, Juan-Maria; Haïk, Stéphane

    2014-01-01

    Using different prion strains, such as the variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease agent and the atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy agents, and using transgenic mice expressing human or bovine prion protein, we assessed the reliability of protein misfolding cyclic amplification (PMCA) to model interspecies and genetic barriers to prion transmission. We compared our PMCA results with in vivo transmission data characterized by attack rates, i.e., the percentage of inoculated mice that developed the disease. Using 19 seed/substrate combinations, we observed that a significant PMCA amplification was only obtained when the mouse line used as substrate is susceptible to the corresponding strain. Our results suggest that PMCA provides a useful tool to study genetic barriers to transmission and to study the zoonotic potential of emerging prion strains. PMID:25279820

  18. A molecular model for neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gigek, C O; Chen, E S; Ota, V K; Maussion, G; Peng, H; Vaillancourt, K; Diallo, A B; Lopez, J P; Crapper, L; Vasuta, C; Chen, G G; Ernst, C

    2015-01-01

    Genes implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs) important in cognition and behavior may have convergent function and several cellular pathways have been implicated, including protein translational control, chromatin modification, and synapse assembly and maintenance. Here, we test the convergent effects of methyl-CpG binding domain 5 (MBD5) and special AT-rich binding protein 2 (SATB2) reduced dosage in human neural stem cells (NSCs), two genes implicated in 2q23.1 and 2q33.1 deletion syndromes, respectively, to develop a generalized model for NDDs. We used short hairpin RNA stably incorporated into healthy neural stem cells to supress MBD5 and SATB2 expression, and massively parallel RNA sequencing, DNA methylation sequencing and microRNA arrays to test the hypothesis that a primary etiology of NDDs is the disruption of the balance of NSC proliferation and differentiation. We show that reduced dosage of either gene leads to significant overlap of gene-expression patterns, microRNA patterns and DNA methylation states with control NSCs in a differentiating state, suggesting that a unifying feature of 2q23.1 and 2q33.1 deletion syndrome may be a lack of regulation between proliferation and differentiation in NSCs, as we observed previously for TCF4 and EHMT1 suppression following a similar experimental paradigm. We propose a model of NDDs whereby the balance of NSC proliferation and differentiation is affected, but where the molecules that drive this effect are largely specific to disease-causing genetic variation. NDDs are diverse, complex and unique, but the optimal balance of factors that determine when and where neural stem cells differentiate may be a major feature underlying the diverse phenotypic spectrum of NDDs. PMID:25966365

  19. Quantum interference in thermoelectric molecular junctions: A toy model perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Nozaki, Daijiro E-mail: research@nano.tu-dresden.de; Avdoshenko, Stas M.; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-08-21

    Quantum interference (QI) phenomena between electronic states in molecular circuits offer a new opportunity to design new types of molecular devices such as molecular sensors, interferometers, and thermoelectric devices. Controlling the QI effect is a key challenge for such applications. For the development of single molecular devices employing QI effects, a systematic study of the relationship between electronic structure and the quantum interference is needed. In order to uncover the essential topological requirements for the appearance of QI effects and the relationship between the QI-affected line shape of the transmission spectra and the electronic structures, we consider a homogeneous toy model where all on-site energies are identical and model four types of molecular junctions due to their topological connectivities. We systematically analyze their transmission spectra, density of states, and thermoelectric properties. Even without the degree of freedom for on-site energies an asymmetric Fano peak could be realized in the homogeneous systems with the cyclic configuration. We also calculate the thermoelectric properties of the model systems with and without fluctuation of on-site energies. Even under the fluctuation of the on-site energies, the finite thermoelectrics are preserved for the Fano resonance, thus cyclic configuration is promising for thermoelectric applications. This result also suggests the possibility to detect the cyclic configuration in the homogeneous systems and the presence of the QI features from thermoelectric measurements.

  20. Quantum interference in thermoelectric molecular junctions: A toy model perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Daijiro; Avdoshenko, Stas M.; Sevinçli, Hâldun; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2014-08-01

    Quantum interference (QI) phenomena between electronic states in molecular circuits offer a new opportunity to design new types of molecular devices such as molecular sensors, interferometers, and thermoelectric devices. Controlling the QI effect is a key challenge for such applications. For the development of single molecular devices employing QI effects, a systematic study of the relationship between electronic structure and the quantum interference is needed. In order to uncover the essential topological requirements for the appearance of QI effects and the relationship between the QI-affected line shape of the transmission spectra and the electronic structures, we consider a homogeneous toy model where all on-site energies are identical and model four types of molecular junctions due to their topological connectivities. We systematically analyze their transmission spectra, density of states, and thermoelectric properties. Even without the degree of freedom for on-site energies an asymmetric Fano peak could be realized in the homogeneous systems with the cyclic configuration. We also calculate the thermoelectric properties of the model systems with and without fluctuation of on-site energies. Even under the fluctuation of the on-site energies, the finite thermoelectrics are preserved for the Fano resonance, thus cyclic configuration is promising for thermoelectric applications. This result also suggests the possibility to detect the cyclic configuration in the homogeneous systems and the presence of the QI features from thermoelectric measurements.

  1. Fitting additive hazards models for case-cohort studies: a multiple imputation approach.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinhyouk; Harel, Ofer; Kang, Sangwook

    2016-07-30

    In this paper, we consider fitting semiparametric additive hazards models for case-cohort studies using a multiple imputation approach. In a case-cohort study, main exposure variables are measured only on some selected subjects, but other covariates are often available for the whole cohort. We consider this as a special case of a missing covariate by design. We propose to employ a popular incomplete data method, multiple imputation, for estimation of the regression parameters in additive hazards models. For imputation models, an imputation modeling procedure based on a rejection sampling is developed. A simple imputation modeling that can naturally be applied to a general missing-at-random situation is also considered and compared with the rejection sampling method via extensive simulation studies. In addition, a misspecification aspect in imputation modeling is investigated. The proposed procedures are illustrated using a cancer data example. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26194861

  2. Chemical insight from density functional modeling of molecular adsorption: Tracking the bonding and diffusion of anthracene derivatives on Cu(111) with molecular orbitals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyrick, Jonathan; Einstein, T. L.; Bartels, Ludwig

    2015-03-01

    We present a method of analyzing the results of density functional modeling of molecular adsorption in terms of an analogue of molecular orbitals. This approach permits intuitive chemical insight into the adsorption process. Applied to a set of anthracene derivates (anthracene, 9,10-anthraquinone, 9,10-dithioanthracene, and 9,10-diselenonanthracene), we follow the electronic states of the molecules that are involved in the bonding process and correlate them to both the molecular adsorption geometry and the species' diffusive behavior. We additionally provide computational code to easily repeat this analysis on any system.

  3. Chemical insight from density functional modeling of molecular adsorption: Tracking the bonding and diffusion of anthracene derivatives on Cu(111) with molecular orbitals

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrick, Jonathan; Bartels, Ludwig; Einstein, T. L.

    2015-03-14

    We present a method of analyzing the results of density functional modeling of molecular adsorption in terms of an analogue of molecular orbitals. This approach permits intuitive chemical insight into the adsorption process. Applied to a set of anthracene derivates (anthracene, 9,10-anthraquinone, 9,10-dithioanthracene, and 9,10-diselenonanthracene), we follow the electronic states of the molecules that are involved in the bonding process and correlate them to both the molecular adsorption geometry and the species’ diffusive behavior. We additionally provide computational code to easily repeat this analysis on any system.

  4. The Use of Molecular Modeling Programs in Medicinal Chemistry Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrold, Marc W.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes and evaluates the use of a molecular modeling computer program (Alchemy II) in a pharmaceutical education program. Provided are the hardware requirements and basic program features as well as several examples of how this program and its features have been applied in the classroom. (GLR)

  5. Fischer and Schrock Carbene Complexes: A Molecular Modeling Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    An exercise in molecular modeling that demonstrates the distinctive features of Fischer and Schrock carbene complexes is presented. Semi-empirical calculations (PM3) demonstrate the singlet ground electronic state, restricted rotation about the C-Y bond, the positive charge on the carbon atom, and hence, the electrophilic nature of the Fischer…

  6. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers synthesized by surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization for the enrichment and determination of synthetic estrogens in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Zhang, Jingjing; Wang, Minjun; Kong, Jie

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers have attracted significant interest because of their multifunctionality of selective recognition of target molecules and rapid magnetic response. In this contribution, magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized via surface-initiated reversible addition addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization using diethylstilbestrol as the template for the enrichment of synthetic estrogens. The uniform imprinted surface layer and the magnetic property of the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers favored a fast binding kinetics and rapid analysis of target molecules. The static and selective binding experiments demonstrated a desirable adsorption capacity and good selectivity of the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers in comparison to magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers. Accordingly, a corresponding analytical method was developed in which magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were employed as magnetic solid-phase extraction materials for the concentration and determination of four synthetic estrogens (diethylstilbestrol, hexestrol, dienestrol, and bisphenol A) in fish pond water. The recoveries of these synthetic estrogens in spiked fish pond water samples ranged from 61.2 to 99.1% with a relative standard deviation of lower than 6.3%. This study provides a versatile approach to prepare well-defined magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers sorbents for the analysis of synthetic estrogens in water solution. PMID:25989155

  7. Molecular model and ReaxFF molecular dynamics simulation of coal vitrinite pyrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Wu; Zhu, Yan-ming; Wang, Geoff; Wang, Yang; Liu, Yu

    2015-08-01

    Vitrinite in coal, the mainly generating methane maceral, plays an important role in hydrocarbon generation of coal. This study aims at obtaining products formation mechanism of vitrinite pyrolysis, and hence determining the chemical bond, molecular liquefaction activity, and reactions mechanism of methane and C2-4 during pyrolysis. The ReaxFF molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was carried out at temperature of 1500 K in order to investigate the mechanism of vitrinite pyrolysis. Initially, a minimum energy conformational structure model was constrained by a combination of elemental and carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance ((13)C NMR) literature data. The model analysis shows the chemical and physical parameters of vitrinite pyrolysis are broadly consistent with the experimental data. Based on the molecular model, ReaxFF MD simulations further provide information of unimolecule such as bond length, and chemical shift, and hence the total population and energy of main products. Molecules bond and pyrolysis fragments, based on active bond analyzed, revealed pyrolysis products of single vitrinite molecule with aliphatic C-C bond, especially ring and chain aliphatic as liquefaction activity. The molecular cell whose density is 0.9 g/cm(3) with lowest energy accords with the experimental density 1.33 g/cm(3). The content of main products after pyrolysis, classifying as CH4, H2O, and H2, was changed along with the increasing temperature. The gas molecule, fragments and generation pathways of CO2, H2, CH4, and C2H6 were also elucidated. These results show agreement with experimental observations, implying that MD simulation can provide reasonable explanation for the reaction processes involved in coal vitrinite pyrolysis. Thus the mechanism of coal hydrocarbon generation was revealed at the molecular level. PMID:26149754

  8. Kinetic modeling of molecular motors: pause model and parameter determination from single-molecule experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, José A.; Ibarra, Borja; Cao, Francisco J.

    2016-05-01

    Single-molecule manipulation experiments of molecular motors provide essential information about the rate and conformational changes of the steps of the reaction located along the manipulation coordinate. This information is not always sufficient to define a particular kinetic cycle. Recent single-molecule experiments with optical tweezers showed that the DNA unwinding activity of a Phi29 DNA polymerase mutant presents a complex pause behavior, which includes short and long pauses. Here we show that different kinetic models, considering different connections between the active and the pause states, can explain the experimental pause behavior. Both the two independent pause model and the two connected pause model are able to describe the pause behavior of a mutated Phi29 DNA polymerase observed in an optical tweezers single-molecule experiment. For the two independent pause model all parameters are fixed by the observed data, while for the more general two connected pause model there is a range of values of the parameters compatible with the observed data (which can be expressed in terms of two of the rates and their force dependencies). This general model includes models with indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state, and also models with cycling in both directions. Additionally, assuming that detailed balance is verified, which forbids cycling, this reduces the ranges of the values of the parameters (which can then be expressed in terms of one rate and its force dependency). The resulting model interpolates between the independent pause model and the indirect entry and exit to the long-pause state model

  9. Molecular-dynamics simulations of void collapse in shocked model-molecular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintmire, J. W.; Robertson, D. H.; White, C. T.

    1994-06-01

    We have carried out a series of molecular-dynamics simulations on a model three-dimensional molecular solid to study the dynamics of shock-induced collapse of void defects. Molecular-dynamics methods were used for a model system of identical particles arranged as diatomic molecules aligned with the center of mass of each molecule at fcc lattice sites, using a \\{111\\} layering for the two-dimensional boundary conditions. The diatoms were internally coupled via a harmonic potential; all other interactions were modeled with Morse potentials between all particles other than the immediate diatomic partner. Using this model, we have investigated the effect of a cylindrical void at right angles to the direction of layering (and impact). Depending on the strength of the incident shock wave, the void is found to collapse either smoothly and symmetrically (like a balloon gradually losing air), or asymmetrically and turbulently. In the latter case, we note the transient formation (for periods of several hundreds of femtoseconds) of ``hot spots'' at the void location both in terms of the local effective temperature and the vibrational energies of the diatoms.

  10. Direct calculation of ice homogeneous nucleation rate for a molecular model of water

    PubMed Central

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Debenedetti, Pablo G.

    2015-01-01

    Ice formation is ubiquitous in nature, with important consequences in a variety of environments, including biological cells, soil, aircraft, transportation infrastructure, and atmospheric clouds. However, its intrinsic kinetics and microscopic mechanism are difficult to discern with current experiments. Molecular simulations of ice nucleation are also challenging, and direct rate calculations have only been performed for coarse-grained models of water. For molecular models, only indirect estimates have been obtained, e.g., by assuming the validity of classical nucleation theory. We use a path sampling approach to perform, to our knowledge, the first direct rate calculation of homogeneous nucleation of ice in a molecular model of water. We use TIP4P/Ice, the most accurate among existing molecular models for studying ice polymorphs. By using a novel topological approach to distinguish different polymorphs, we are able to identify a freezing mechanism that involves a competition between cubic and hexagonal ice in the early stages of nucleation. In this competition, the cubic polymorph takes over because the addition of new topological structural motifs consistent with cubic ice leads to the formation of more compact crystallites. This is not true for topological hexagonal motifs, which give rise to elongated crystallites that are not able to grow. This leads to transition states that are rich in cubic ice, and not the thermodynamically stable hexagonal polymorph. This mechanism provides a molecular explanation for the earlier experimental and computational observations of the preference for cubic ice in the literature. PMID:26240318

  11. Direct calculation of ice homogeneous nucleation rate for a molecular model of water.

    PubMed

    Haji-Akbari, Amir; Debenedetti, Pablo G

    2015-08-25

    Ice formation is ubiquitous in nature, with important consequences in a variety of environments, including biological cells, soil, aircraft, transportation infrastructure, and atmospheric clouds. However, its intrinsic kinetics and microscopic mechanism are difficult to discern with current experiments. Molecular simulations of ice nucleation are also challenging, and direct rate calculations have only been performed for coarse-grained models of water. For molecular models, only indirect estimates have been obtained, e.g., by assuming the validity of classical nucleation theory. We use a path sampling approach to perform, to our knowledge, the first direct rate calculation of homogeneous nucleation of ice in a molecular model of water. We use TIP4P/Ice, the most accurate among existing molecular models for studying ice polymorphs. By using a novel topological approach to distinguish different polymorphs, we are able to identify a freezing mechanism that involves a competition between cubic and hexagonal ice in the early stages of nucleation. In this competition, the cubic polymorph takes over because the addition of new topological structural motifs consistent with cubic ice leads to the formation of more compact crystallites. This is not true for topological hexagonal motifs, which give rise to elongated crystallites that are not able to grow. This leads to transition states that are rich in cubic ice, and not the thermodynamically stable hexagonal polymorph. This mechanism provides a molecular explanation for the earlier experimental and computational observations of the preference for cubic ice in the literature. PMID:26240318

  12. Molecular dynamics modeling of a nanomaterials-water surface interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejat Pishkenari, Hossein; Keramati, Ramtin; Abdi, Ahmad; Minary-Jolandan, Majid

    2016-04-01

    In this article, we study the formation of nanomeniscus around a nanoneedle using molecular dynamics simulation approach. The results reveal three distinct phases in the time-evolution of meniscus before equilibrium according to the contact angle, meniscus height, and potential energy. In addition, we investigated the correlation between the nanoneedle diameter and nanomeniscus characteristics. The results have applications in various fields such as scanning probe microscopy and rheological measurements.

  13. On an Additive Semigraphoid Model for Statistical Networks With Application to Pathway Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bing; Chun, Hyonho; Zhao, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a nonparametric method for estimating non-gaussian graphical models based on a new statistical relation called additive conditional independence, which is a three-way relation among random vectors that resembles the logical structure of conditional independence. Additive conditional independence allows us to use one-dimensional kernel regardless of the dimension of the graph, which not only avoids the curse of dimensionality but also simplifies computation. It also gives rise to a parallel structure to the gaussian graphical model that replaces the precision matrix by an additive precision operator. The estimators derived from additive conditional independence cover the recently introduced nonparanormal graphical model as a special case, but outperform it when the gaussian copula assumption is violated. We compare the new method with existing ones by simulations and in genetic pathway analysis. PMID:26401064

  14. Effect of molecular models on viscosity and thermal conductivity calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, Andrew B.; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of molecular models on viscosity and thermal conductivity calculations is investigated. The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method for rarefied gas flows is used to simulate Couette and Fourier flows as a means of obtaining the transport coefficients. Experimental measurements for argon (Ar) provide a baseline for comparison over a wide temperature range of 100-1,500 K. The variable hard sphere (VHS), variable soft sphere (VSS), and Lennard-Jones (L-J) molecular models have been implemented into a parallel version of Bird's one-dimensional DSMC code, DSMC1, and the model parameters have been recalibrated to the current experimental data set. While the VHS and VSS models only consider the short-range, repulsive forces, the L-J model also includes constributions from the long-range, dispersion forces. Theoretical results for viscosity and thermal conductivity indicate the L-J model is more accurate than the VSS model; with maximum errors of 1.4% and 3.0% in the range 300-1,500 K for L-J and VSS models, respectively. The range of validity of the VSS model is extended to 1,650 K through appropriate choices for the model parameters.

  15. Testing a Gender Additive Model: The Role of Body Image in Adolescent Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearman, Sarah Kate; Stice, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Despite consistent evidence that adolescent girls are at greater risk of developing depression than adolescent boys, risk factor models that account for this difference have been elusive. The objective of this research was to examine risk factors proposed by the "gender additive" model of depression that attempts to partially explain the increased…

  16. Molecular-orbital model for metal-sapphire interfacial strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, K. H.; Pepper, S. V.

    1982-01-01

    Self-consistent-field X-Alpha scattered-wave cluster molecular-orbital models have been constructed for transition and noble metals (Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag) in contact with a sapphire (Al2O3) surface. It is found that a chemical bond is established between the metal d-orbital electrons and the nonbonding 2p-orbital electrons of the oxygen anions on the Al2O3 surface. An increasing number of occupied metal-sapphire antibonding molecular orbitals explains qualitatively the observed decrease of contact shear strength through the series Fe, Ni, Cu, and Ag.

  17. Using Molecular Simulation to Model High-Resolution Cryo-EM Reconstructions.

    PubMed

    Kirmizialtin, Serdal; Loerke, Justus; Behrmann, Elmar; Spahn, Christian M T; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2015-01-01

    An explosion of new data from high-resolution cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) studies has produced a large number of data sets for many species of ribosomes in various functional states over the past few years. While many methods exist to produce structural models for lower resolution cryo-EM reconstructions, high-resolution reconstructions are often modeled using crystallographic techniques and extensive manual intervention. Here, we present an automated fitting technique for high-resolution cryo-EM data sets that produces all-atom models highly consistent with the EM density. Using a molecular dynamics approach, atomic positions are optimized with a potential that includes the cross-correlation coefficient between the structural model and the cryo-EM electron density, as well as a biasing potential preserving the stereochemistry and secondary structure of the biomolecule. Specifically, we use a hybrid structure-based/ab initio molecular dynamics potential to extend molecular dynamics fitting. In addition, we find that simulated annealing integration, as opposed to straightforward molecular dynamics integration, significantly improves performance. We obtain atomistic models of the human ribosome consistent with high-resolution cryo-EM reconstructions of the human ribosome. Automated methods such as these have the potential to produce atomistic models for a large number of ribosome complexes simultaneously that can be subsequently refined manually. PMID:26068751

  18. Multi-level molecular modelling for plasma medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogaerts, Annemie; Khosravian, Narjes; Van der Paal, Jonas; Verlackt, Christof C. W.; Yusupov, Maksudbek; Kamaraj, Balu; Neyts, Erik C.

    2016-02-01

    Modelling at the molecular or atomic scale can be very useful for obtaining a better insight in plasma medicine. This paper gives an overview of different atomic/molecular scale modelling approaches that can be used to study the direct interaction of plasma species with biomolecules or the consequences of these interactions for the biomolecules on a somewhat longer time-scale. These approaches include density functional theory (DFT), density functional based tight binding (DFTB), classical reactive and non-reactive molecular dynamics (MD) and united-atom or coarse-grained MD, as well as hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods. Specific examples will be given for three important types of biomolecules, present in human cells, i.e. proteins, DNA and phospholipids found in the cell membrane. The results show that each of these modelling approaches has its specific strengths and limitations, and is particularly useful for certain applications. A multi-level approach is therefore most suitable for obtaining a global picture of the plasma-biomolecule interactions.

  19. Homology modeling, molecular docking, and molecular dynamics simulations elucidated α-fetoprotein binding modes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background An important mechanism of endocrine activity is chemicals entering target cells via transport proteins and then interacting with hormone receptors such as the estrogen receptor (ER). α-Fetoprotein (AFP) is a major transport protein in rodent serum that can bind and sequester estrogens, thus preventing entry to the target cell and where they could otherwise induce ER-mediated endocrine activity. Recently, we reported rat AFP binding affinities for a large set of structurally diverse chemicals, including 53 binders and 72 non-binders. However, the lack of three-dimensional (3D) structures of rat AFP hinders further understanding of the structural dependence for binding. Therefore, a 3D structure of rat AFP was built using homology modeling in order to elucidate rat AFP-ligand binding modes through docking analyses and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Methods Homology modeling was first applied to build a 3D structure of rat AFP. Molecular docking and Molecular Mechanics-Generalized Born Surface Area (MM-GBSA) scoring were then used to examine potential rat AFP ligand binding modes. MD simulations and free energy calculations were performed to refine models of binding modes. Results A rat AFP tertiary structure was first obtained using homology modeling and MD simulations. The rat AFP-ligand binding modes of 13 structurally diverse, representative binders were calculated using molecular docking, (MM-GBSA) ranking and MD simulations. The key residues for rat AFP-ligand binding were postulated through analyzing the binding modes. Conclusion The optimized 3D rat AFP structure and associated ligand binding modes shed light on rat AFP-ligand binding interactions that, in turn, provide a means to estimate binding affinity of unknown chemicals. Our results will assist in the evaluation of the endocrine disruption potential of chemicals. PMID:24266910

  20. An Algebraic Spline Model of Molecular Surfaces for Energetic Computations

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wenqi; Bajaj, Chandrajit; Xu, Guoliang

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a new method to generate a smooth algebraic spline (AS) approximation of the molecular surface (MS) based on an initial coarse triangulation derived from the atomic coordinate information of the biomolecule, resident in the PDB (Protein data bank). Our method first constructs a triangular prism scaffold covering the PDB structure, and then generates a piecewise polynomial F on the Bernstein-Bezier (BB) basis within the scaffold. An ASMS model of the molecular surface is extracted as the zero contours of F which is nearly C1 and has dual implicit and parametric representations. The dual representations allow us easily do the point sampling on the ASMS model and apply it to the accurate estimation of the integrals involved in the electrostatic solvation energy computations. Meanwhile comparing with the trivial piecewise linear surface model, fewer number of sampling points are needed for the ASMS, which effectively reduces the complexity of the energy estimation. PMID:21519111

  1. Genomic prediction of growth in pigs based on a model including additive and dominance effects.

    PubMed

    Lopes, M S; Bastiaansen, J W M; Janss, L; Knol, E F; Bovenhuis, H

    2016-06-01

    Independent of whether prediction is based on pedigree or genomic information, the focus of animal breeders has been on additive genetic effects or 'breeding values'. However, when predicting phenotypes rather than breeding values of an animal, models that account for both additive and dominance effects might be more accurate. Our aim with this study was to compare the accuracy of predicting phenotypes using a model that accounts for only additive effects (MA) and a model that accounts for both additive and dominance effects simultaneously (MAD). Lifetime daily gain (DG) was evaluated in three pig populations (1424 Pietrain, 2023 Landrace, and 2157 Large White). Animals were genotyped using the Illumina SNP60K Beadchip and assigned to either a training data set to estimate the genetic parameters and SNP effects, or to a validation data set to assess the prediction accuracy. Models MA and MAD applied random regression on SNP genotypes and were implemented in the program Bayz. The additive heritability of DG across the three populations and the two models was very similar at approximately 0.26. The proportion of phenotypic variance explained by dominance effects ranged from 0.04 (Large White) to 0.11 (Pietrain), indicating that importance of dominance might be breed-specific. Prediction accuracies were higher when predicting phenotypes using total genetic values (sum of breeding values and dominance deviations) from the MAD model compared to using breeding values from both MA and MAD models. The highest increase in accuracy (from 0.195 to 0.222) was observed in the Pietrain, and the lowest in Large White (from 0.354 to 0.359). Predicting phenotypes using total genetic values instead of breeding values in purebred data improved prediction accuracy and reduced the bias of genomic predictions. Additional benefit of the method is expected when applied to predict crossbred phenotypes, where dominance levels are expected to be higher. PMID:26676611

  2. Molecular interactions of UvrB protein and DNA from Helicobacter pylori: Insight into a molecular modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Bavi, Rohit; Kumar, Raj; Rampogu, Shailima; Son, Minky; Park, Chanin; Baek, Ayoung; Kim, Hyong-Ha; Suh, Jung-Keun; Park, Seok Ju; Lee, Keun Woo

    2016-08-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) persevere in the human stomach, an environment in which they encounter many DNA-damaging conditions, including gastric acidity. The pathogenicity of H. pylori is enhanced by its well-developed DNA repair mechanism, thought of as 'machinery,' such as nucleotide excision repair (NER). NER involves multi-enzymatic excinuclease proteins (UvrABC endonuclease), which repair damaged DNA in a sequential manner. UvrB is the central component in prokaryotic NER, essential for damage recognition. Therefore, molecular modeling studies of UvrB protein from H. pylori are carried out with homology modeling and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results reveal that the predicted structure is bound to a DNA hairpin with 3-bp stem, an 11-nucleotide loop, and 3-nt 3' overhang. In addition, a mutation of the Y96A variant indicates reduction in the binding affinity for DNA. Free-energy calculations demonstrate the stability of the complex and help identify key residues in various interactions based on residue decomposition analysis. Stability comparative studies between wild type and mutant protein-DNA complexes indicate that the former is relatively more stable than the mutant form. This predicted model could also be useful in designing new inhibitors for UvrB protein, as well as preventing the pathogenesis of H. pylori. PMID:27315565

  3. Modeling of Switching and Hysteresis in Molecular Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, Manoj P.; Partridge, Harry (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The conventional way of modeling current transport in two and three terminal molecular devices could be inadequate for certain cases involving switching and hysteresis. Here we present an alternate approach. Contrary to the regular way where applied bias directly modulates the conducting energy levels of the molecule, our method introduces a nonlinear potential energy surface varying with the applied bias as a control parameter. A time-dynamics is also introduced properly accounting for switching and hysteresis behavior. Although the model is phenomenological at this stage, we believe any detailed model would contain similar descriptions at its core.

  4. Molecular Models for DSMC Simulations of Metal Vapor Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Venkattraman, A.; Alexeenko, A. A.

    2011-05-20

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is applied here to model the electron-beam (e-beam) physical vapor deposition of copper thin films. A suitable molecular model for copper-copper interactions have been determined based on comparisons with experiments for a 2D slit source. The model for atomic copper vapor is then used in axi-symmetric DSMC simulations for analysis of a typical e-beam metal deposition system with a cup crucible. The dimensional and non-dimensional mass fluxes obtained are compared for two different deposition configurations with non-uniformity as high as 40% predicted from the simulations.

  5. Graph model for calculating the properties of saturated monoalcohols based on the additivity of energy terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebeshkov, V. V.; Smolyakov, V. M.

    2012-05-01

    A 16-constant additive scheme was derived for calculating the physicochemical properties of saturated monoalcohols CH4O-C9H20O and decomposing the triangular numbers of the Pascal triangle based on the similarity of subgraphs in the molecular graphs (MGs) of the homologous series of these alcohols. It was shown, using this scheme for calculation of properties of saturated monoalcohols as an example, that each coefficient of the scheme (in other words, the number of methods to impose a chain of a definite length i 1, i 2, … on a molecular graph) is the result of the decomposition of the triangular numbers of the Pascal triangle. A linear dependence was found within the adopted classification of structural elements. Sixteen parameters of the schemes were recorded as linear combinations of 17 parameters. The enthalpies of vaporization L {298/K 0} of the saturated monoalcohols CH4O-C9H20O, for which there were no experimental data, were calculated. It was shown that the parameters are not chosen randomly when using the given procedure for constructing an additive scheme by decomposing the triangular numbers of the Pascal triangle.

  6. The activation strain model and molecular orbital theory

    PubMed Central

    Wolters, Lando P; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The activation strain model is a powerful tool for understanding reactivity, or inertness, of molecular species. This is done by relating the relative energy of a molecular complex along the reaction energy profile to the structural rigidity of the reactants and the strength of their mutual interactions: ΔE(ζ) = ΔEstrain(ζ) + ΔEint(ζ). We provide a detailed discussion of the model, and elaborate on its strong connection with molecular orbital theory. Using these approaches, a causal relationship is revealed between the properties of the reactants and their reactivity, e.g., reaction barriers and plausible reaction mechanisms. This methodology may reveal intriguing parallels between completely different types of chemical transformations. Thus, the activation strain model constitutes a unifying framework that furthers the development of cross-disciplinary concepts throughout various fields of chemistry. We illustrate the activation strain model in action with selected examples from literature. These examples demonstrate how the methodology is applied to different research questions, how results are interpreted, and how insights into one chemical phenomenon can lead to an improved understanding of another, seemingly completely different chemical process. WIREs Comput Mol Sci 2015, 5:324–343. doi: 10.1002/wcms.1221 PMID:26753009

  7. On the coalescence-dispersion modeling of turbulent molecular mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Givi, Peyman; Kosaly, George

    1987-01-01

    The general coalescence-dispersion (C/D) closure provides phenomenological modeling of turbulent molecular mixing. The models of Curl and Dopazo and O'Brien appear as two limiting C/D models that bracket the range of results one can obtain by various models. This finding is used to investigate the sensitivtiy of the results to the choice of the model. Inert scalar mixing is found to be less model-sensitive than mixing accompanied by chemical reaction. Infinitely fast chemistry approximation is used to relate the C/D approach to Toor's earlier results. Pure mixing and infinite rate chemistry calculations are compared to study further a recent result of Hsieh and O'Brien who found that higher concentration moments are not sensitive to chemistry.

  8. Molecular modeling study of dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors. Molecular dynamics simulations, quantum mechanical calculations, and experimental corroboration.

    PubMed

    Tosso, Rodrigo D; Andujar, Sebastian A; Gutierrez, Lucas; Angelina, Emilio; Rodríguez, Ricaurte; Nogueras, Manuel; Baldoni, Héctor; Suvire, Fernando D; Cobo, Justo; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2013-08-26

    A molecular modeling study on dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) inhibitors was carried out. By combining molecular dynamics simulations with semiempirical (PM6), ab initio, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, a simple and generally applicable procedure to evaluate the binding energies of DHFR inhibitors interacting with the human enzyme is reported here, providing a clear picture of the binding interactions of these ligands from both structural and energetic viewpoints. A reduced model for the binding pocket was used. This approach allows us to perform more accurate quantum mechanical calculations as well as to obtain a detailed electronic analysis using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) technique. Thus, molecular aspects of the binding interactions between inhibitors and the DHFR are discussed in detail. A significant correlation between binding energies obtained from DFT calculations and experimental IC₅₀ values was obtained, predicting with an acceptable qualitative accuracy the potential inhibitor effect of nonsynthesized compounds. Such correlation was experimentally corroborated synthesizing and testing two new inhibitors reported in this paper. PMID:23834278

  9. Modeling oxygen dissolution and biological uptake during pulse oxygen additions in oenological fermentations.

    PubMed

    Saa, Pedro A; Moenne, M Isabel; Pérez-Correa, J Ricardo; Agosin, Eduardo

    2012-09-01

    Discrete oxygen additions during oenological fermentations can have beneficial effects both on yeast performance and on the resulting wine quality. However, the amount and time of the additions must be carefully chosen to avoid detrimental effects. So far, most oxygen additions are carried out empirically, since the oxygen dynamics in the fermenting must are not completely understood. To efficiently manage oxygen dosage, we developed a mass balance model of the kinetics of oxygen dissolution and biological uptake during wine fermentation on a laboratory scale. Model calibration was carried out employing a novel dynamic desorption-absorption cycle based on two optical sensors able to generate enough experimental data for the precise determination of oxygen uptake and volumetric mass transfer coefficients. A useful system for estimating the oxygen solubility in defined medium and musts was also developed and incorporated into the mass balance model. Results indicated that several factors, such as the fermentation phase, wine composition, mixing and carbon dioxide concentration, must be considered when performing oxygen addition during oenological fermentations. The present model will help develop better oxygen addition policies in wine fermentations on an industrial scale. PMID:22349928

  10. Model-free simulation approach to molecular diffusion tensors.

    PubMed

    Chevrot, Guillaume; Hinsen, Konrad; Kneller, Gerald R

    2013-10-21

    In the present work, we propose a simple model-free approach for the computation of molecular diffusion tensors from molecular dynamics trajectories. The method uses a rigid body trajectory of the molecule under consideration, which is constructed a posteriori by an accumulation of quaternion-based superposition fits of consecutive conformations. From the rigid body trajectory, we compute the translational and angular velocities of the molecule and by integration of the latter also the corresponding angular trajectory. All quantities can be referred to the laboratory frame and a molecule-fixed frame. The 6 × 6 diffusion tensor is computed from the asymptotic slope of the tensorial mean square displacement and, for comparison, also from the Kubo integral of the velocity correlation tensor. The method is illustrated for two simple model systems - a water molecule and a lysozyme molecule in bulk water. We give estimations of the statistical accuracy of the calculations. PMID:24160503

  11. Model-free simulation approach to molecular diffusion tensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevrot, Guillaume; Hinsen, Konrad; Kneller, Gerald R.

    2013-10-01

    In the present work, we propose a simple model-free approach for the computation of molecular diffusion tensors from molecular dynamics trajectories. The method uses a rigid body trajectory of the molecule under consideration, which is constructed a posteriori by an accumulation of quaternion-based superposition fits of consecutive conformations. From the rigid body trajectory, we compute the translational and angular velocities of the molecule and by integration of the latter also the corresponding angular trajectory. All quantities can be referred to the laboratory frame and a molecule-fixed frame. The 6 × 6 diffusion tensor is computed from the asymptotic slope of the tensorial mean square displacement and, for comparison, also from the Kubo integral of the velocity correlation tensor. The method is illustrated for two simple model systems - a water molecule and a lysozyme molecule in bulk water. We give estimations of the statistical accuracy of the calculations.

  12. Molecular modeling of the affinity chromatography of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Paloni, Matteo; Cavallotti, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a methodology that offers the possibility of studying complex systems such as protein-ligand complexes from an atomistic point of view, making available information that can be difficultly obtained from experimental studies. Here, a protocol for the construction of molecular models of the interaction between antibodies and ligands that can be used for an affinity chromatography process is presented. The outlined methodology focuses mostly on the description of a procedure that may be adopted to determine the structure and free energy of interaction between the antibody and the affinity ligand. A procedure to extend the proposed methodology to include the effect of the environment (buffer solution, spacer, support matrix) is also briefly outlined. PMID:25749965

  13. Assessing High School Chemistry Students' Modeling Sub-Skills in a Computerized Molecular Modeling Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, Yehudit Judy; Kaberman, Zvia

    2012-01-01

    Much knowledge in chemistry exists at a molecular level, inaccessible to direct perception. Chemistry instruction should therefore include multiple visual representations, such as molecular models and symbols. This study describes the implementation and assessment of a learning unit designed for 12th grade chemistry honors students. The organic…

  14. Vector generalized additive models for extreme rainfall data analysis (study case rainfall data in Indramayu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Eka Putri Nur; Wigena, Aji Hamim; Djuraidah, Anik

    2016-02-01

    Rainfall pattern are good indicators for potential disasters. Global Circulation Model (GCM) contains global scale information that can be used to predict the rainfall data. Statistical downscaling (SD) utilizes the global scale information to make inferences in the local scale. Essentially, SD can be used to predict local scale variables based on global scale variables. SD requires a method to accommodate non linear effects and extreme values. Extreme value Theory (EVT) can be used to analyze the extreme value. One of methods to identify the extreme events is peak over threshold that follows Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD). The vector generalized additive model (VGAM) is an extension of the generalized additive model. It is able to accommodate linear or nonlinear effects by involving more than one additive predictors. The advantage of VGAM is to handle multi response models. The key idea of VGAM are iteratively reweighted least square for maximum likelihood estimation, penalized smoothing, fisher scoring and additive models. This works aims to analyze extreme rainfall data in Indramayu using VGAM. The results show that the VGAM with GPD is able to predict extreme rainfall data accurately. The prediction in February is very close to the actual value at quantile 75.

  15. Integrated reservoir characterization: Improvement in heterogeneities stochastic modelling by integration of additional external constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Doligez, B.; Eschard, R.; Geffroy, F.

    1997-08-01

    The classical approach to construct reservoir models is to start with a fine scale geological model which is informed with petrophysical properties. Then scaling-up techniques allow to obtain a reservoir model which is compatible with the fluid flow simulators. Geostatistical modelling techniques are widely used to build the geological models before scaling-up. These methods provide equiprobable images of the area under investigation, which honor the well data, and which variability is the same than the variability computed from the data. At an appraisal phase, when few data are available, or when the wells are insufficient to describe all the heterogeneities and the behavior of the field, additional constraints are needed to obtain a more realistic geological model. For example, seismic data or stratigraphic models can provide average reservoir information with an excellent areal coverage, but with a poor vertical resolution. New advances in modelisation techniques allow now to integrate this type of additional external information in order to constrain the simulations. In particular, 2D or 3D seismic derived information grids, or sand-shale ratios maps coming from stratigraphic models can be used as external drifts to compute the geological image of the reservoir at the fine scale. Examples are presented to illustrate the use of these new tools, their impact on the final reservoir model, and their sensitivity to some key parameters.

  16. Analysis of error-prone survival data under additive hazards models: measurement error effects and adjustments.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Yi, Grace Y

    2016-07-01

    Covariate measurement error occurs commonly in survival analysis. Under the proportional hazards model, measurement error effects have been well studied, and various inference methods have been developed to correct for error effects under such a model. In contrast, error-contaminated survival data under the additive hazards model have received relatively less attention. In this paper, we investigate this problem by exploring measurement error effects on parameter estimation and the change of the hazard function. New insights of measurement error effects are revealed, as opposed to well-documented results for the Cox proportional hazards model. We propose a class of bias correction estimators that embraces certain existing estimators as special cases. In addition, we exploit the regression calibration method to reduce measurement error effects. Theoretical results for the developed methods are established, and numerical assessments are conducted to illustrate the finite sample performance of our methods. PMID:26328545

  17. A Model of How Different Biology Experts Explain Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Trujillo, Caleb M.; Anderson, Trevor R.; Pelaez, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Constructing explanations is an essential skill for all science learners. The goal of this project was to model the key components of expert explanation of molecular and cellular mechanisms. As such, we asked: What is an appropriate model of the components of explanation used by biology experts to explain molecular and cellular mechanisms? Do explanations made by experts from different biology subdisciplines at a university support the validity of this model? Guided by the modeling framework of R. S. Justi and J. K. Gilbert, the validity of an initial model was tested by asking seven biologists to explain a molecular mechanism of their choice. Data were collected from interviews, artifacts, and drawings, and then subjected to thematic analysis. We found that biologists explained the specific activities and organization of entities of the mechanism. In addition, they contextualized explanations according to their biological and social significance; integrated explanations with methods, instruments, and measurements; and used analogies and narrated stories. The derived methods, analogies, context, and how themes informed the development of our final MACH model of mechanistic explanations. Future research will test the potential of the MACH model as a guiding framework for instruction to enhance the quality of student explanations. PMID:25999313

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation study on the molecular structures of the amylin fibril models.

    PubMed

    Xu, Weixin; Su, Haibin; Zhang, John Z H; Mu, Yuguang

    2012-12-01

    The structural characterization of amyloid fibers is one of the most investigated areas in structural biology. Recently, protofibril models for amylin, i.e., the 37-residue human islet amyloid polypeptide or hIAPP were suggested by two groups based on NMR (Biochemistry 2007, 46, 13505-13522) and X-ray (Protein Sci. 2008, 17, 1467-1474) techniques. However, there are significant differences in the two models which maybe originate from the polymorphic nature of amylin fibrils. To obtain further insights into the packing and stability features of the different models, we performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations on them. Our analysis showed that even pairs of β-sheets composed of a limited number of β-strands are stable in the 100-ns simulations, which suggests that steric zipper interactions at a β-sheet-β-sheet interface strongly contribute to the stability of these amyloid aggregates. For both models, outer strands are more flexible, which might coincide with the dynamical requirement that outer strands act as growing sites facilitating conformational changes of new incoming chains. Moreover, simulation results showed that the X-ray models are structurally more compact than the NMR models and have more intimate patterns, which lead to more rigid amyloid models. As a result, the X-ray models are energetically more stable than the NMR models. Further modeling analyses verify the most likely amylin fibril model among both NMR and X-ray models. Upon further study of the force-induced dissociation of a single chain from the protofibrils, the binding energy and the mechanical stability of the fibril models are revealed. On these bases, it is possible to reconcile the crystallographic and the NMR data on the basic amylin fiber unit. PMID:23145779

  19. Elucidation of Drug Metabolite Structural Isomers Using Molecular Modeling Coupled with Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reading, Eamonn; Munoz-Muriedas, Jordi; Roberts, Andrew D; Dear, Gordon J; Robinson, Carol V; Beaumont, Claire

    2016-02-16

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) in combination with molecular modeling offers the potential for small molecule structural isomer identification by measurement of their gas phase collision cross sections (CCSs). Successful application of this approach to drug metabolite identification would facilitate resource reduction, including animal usage, and may benefit other areas of pharmaceutical structural characterization including impurity profiling and degradation chemistry. However, the conformational behavior of drug molecules and their metabolites in the gas phase is poorly understood. Here the gas phase conformational space of drug and drug-like molecules has been investigated as well as the influence of protonation and adduct formation on the conformations of drug metabolite structural isomers. The use of CCSs, measured from IM-MS and molecular modeling information, for the structural identification of drug metabolites has also been critically assessed. Detection of structural isomers of drug metabolites using IM-MS is demonstrated and, in addition, a molecular modeling approach has been developed offering rapid conformational searching and energy assessment of candidate structures which agree with experimental CCSs. Here it is illustrated that isomers must possess markedly dissimilar CCS values for structural differentiation, the existence and extent of CCS differences being ionization state and molecule dependent. The results present that IM-MS and molecular modeling can inform on the identity of drug metabolites and highlight the limitations of this approach in differentiating structural isomers. PMID:26752623

  20. Two Models of Magnetic Support for Photoevaporated Molecular Clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Ryutov, D; Kane, J; Mizuta, A; Pound, M; Remington, B

    2004-05-05

    The thermal pressure inside molecular clouds is insufficient for maintaining the pressure balance at an ablation front at the cloud surface illuminated by nearby UV stars. Most probably, the required stiffness is provided by the magnetic pressure. After surveying existing models of this type, we concentrate on two of them: the model of a quasi-homogeneous magnetic field and the recently proposed model of a ''magnetostatic turbulence''. We discuss observational consequences of the two models, in particular, the structure and the strength of the magnetic field inside the cloud and in the ionized outflow. We comment on the possible role of reconnection events and their observational signatures. We mention laboratory experiments where the most significant features of the models can be tested.

  1. Mechanistic modeling confronts the complexity of molecular cell biology.

    PubMed

    Phair, Robert D

    2014-11-01

    Mechanistic modeling has the potential to transform how cell biologists contend with the inescapable complexity of modern biology. I am a physiologist-electrical engineer-systems biologist who has been working at the level of cell biology for the past 24 years. This perspective aims 1) to convey why we build models, 2) to enumerate the major approaches to modeling and their philosophical differences, 3) to address some recurrent concerns raised by experimentalists, and then 4) to imagine a future in which teams of experimentalists and modelers build-and subject to exhaustive experimental tests-models covering the entire spectrum from molecular cell biology to human pathophysiology. There is, in my view, no technical obstacle to this future, but it will require some plasticity in the biological research mind-set. PMID:25368428

  2. Experimental model and analytic solution for real-time observation of vehicle's additional steer angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Liang; Pan, Deng; Cao, Chengmao; Song, Jian

    2014-03-01

    The current research of real-time observation for vehicle roll steer angle and compliance steer angle(both of them comprehensively referred as the additional steer angle in this paper) mainly employs the linear vehicle dynamic model, in which only the lateral acceleration of vehicle body is considered. The observation accuracy resorting to this method cannot meet the requirements of vehicle real-time stability control, especially under extreme driving conditions. The paper explores the solution resorting to experimental method. Firstly, a multi-body dynamic model of a passenger car is built based on the ADAMS/Car software, whose dynamic accuracy is verified by the same vehicle's roadway test data of steady static circular test. Based on this simulation platform, several influencing factors of additional steer angle under different driving conditions are quantitatively analyzed. Then ɛ-SVR algorithm is employed to build the additional steer angle prediction model, whose input vectors mainly include the sensor information of standard electronic stability control system(ESC). The method of typical slalom tests and FMVSS 126 tests are adopted to make simulation, train model and test model's generalization performance. The test result shows that the influence of lateral acceleration on additional steer angle is maximal (the magnitude up to 1°), followed by the longitudinal acceleration-deceleration and the road wave amplitude (the magnitude up to 0.3°). Moreover, both the prediction accuracy and the calculation real-time of the model can meet the control requirements of ESC. This research expands the accurate observation methods of the additional steer angle under extreme driving conditions.

  3. Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of the central force model of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bresme, Fernando

    2001-10-01

    Equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations of the central force model of water (CFM) [Lemberg and Stillinger, J. Chem. Phys. 62, 1677 (1975)] are presented. We consider a model based on a functional form introduced in theoretical studies of associating systems employing integral equations [F. Bresme, J. Chem. Phys. 108, 4505 (1998)]. Results on thermodynamic, dynamic, dielectric, and coexistence properties are presented. The central force model shows satisfactory agreement with the experimental results in all these cases. In addition, nonequilibrium molecular-dynamics simulations show that the CFM predicts a decrease of the thermal conductivity with temperature, as observed in the experiment, but this dependence is reproduced qualitatively at temperatures characteristic of supercooled states. These results emphasize the need for further studies of the heat conduction and properties of water in these conditions. Overall the present potential should provide a basis for further theoretical and simulation studies of complex systems where water is present.

  4. Antimicrobial combinations: Bliss independence and Loewe additivity derived from mechanistic multi-hit models.

    PubMed

    Baeder, Desiree Y; Yu, Guozhi; Hozé, Nathanaël; Rolff, Jens; Regoes, Roland R

    2016-05-26

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and antibiotics reduce the net growth rate of bacterial populations they target. It is relevant to understand if effects of multiple antimicrobials are synergistic or antagonistic, in particular for AMP responses, because naturally occurring responses involve multiple AMPs. There are several competing proposals describing how multiple types of antimicrobials add up when applied in combination, such as Loewe additivity or Bliss independence. These additivity terms are defined ad hoc from abstract principles explaining the supposed interaction between the antimicrobials. Here, we link these ad hoc combination terms to a mathematical model that represents the dynamics of antimicrobial molecules hitting targets on bacterial cells. In this multi-hit model, bacteria are killed when a certain number of targets are hit by antimicrobials. Using this bottom-up approach reveals that Bliss independence should be the model of choice if no interaction between antimicrobial molecules is expected. Loewe additivity, on the other hand, describes scenarios in which antimicrobials affect the same components of the cell, i.e. are not acting independently. While our approach idealizes the dynamics of antimicrobials, it provides a conceptual underpinning of the additivity terms. The choice of the additivity term is essential to determine synergy or antagonism of antimicrobials.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160596

  5. Importance of molecular computer modeling in anticancer drug development.

    PubMed

    Geromichalos, George D

    2007-09-01

    Increasing insight into the genetics and molecular biology of cancer has resulted in the identification of an increasing number of potential molecular targets for anticancer drug discovery and development. These targets can be approached through exploitation of emerging structural biology, "rational" drug design, screening of chemical libraries, or a combination of these methods. The result is the rapid discovery of new anticancer drugs. The processes used by academic and industrial scientists to discover new drugs has recently experienced a true renaissance with many new and exciting techniques being developed in the past 5-10 years. In this review, we will attempt to outline these latest protocols that chemists and biomedical scientists are currently employing to rapidly bring new drugs to the clinic. Structure-based drug design is perhaps the most elegant approach for discovering compounds exhibiting high specificity and efficacy. Nowadays, a number of recent successful drugs have in part or in whole emerged from a structure-based research approach. Many advances including crystallography and informatics are behind these successes. Of great importance is also the impact these advances in structure-based drug design are likely to have on the economics of drug discovery. As the structures of more and more proteins and nucleic acids become available, molecular docking is increasingly considered for lead discovery. Recent studies consider the hit-rate enhancement of docking screens and the accuracy of docking structure predictions. As more structures are determined experimentally, docking against homology-modeled targets also becomes possible for more proteins. With more docking studies being undertaken, the "drug-likeness" and specificity of docking hits is also being examined. In this article we discuss the application of molecular modeling, molecular docking and virtual molecular high-throughput, targeted drug screening to anticancer drug discovery. Currently

  6. Molecular Docking Screens Using Comparative Models of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Hao; Irwin, John J.; Webb, Benjamin M.; Klebe, Gerhard; Shoichet, Brian K.; Sali, Andrej

    2009-01-01

    Two orders of magnitude more protein sequences can be modeled by comparative modeling than have been determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy. Investigators have nevertheless been cautious about using comparative models for ligand discovery because of concerns about model errors. We suggest how to exploit comparative models for molecular screens, based on docking against a wide range of crystallographic structures and comparative models with known ligands. To account for the variation in the ligand-binding pocket as it binds different ligands, we calculate “consensus” enrichment by ranking each library compound by its best docking score against all available comparative models and/or modeling templates. For the majority of the targets, the consensus enrichment for multiple models was better or comparable to that of the holo and apo X-ray structures. Even for single models, the models are significantly more enriching than the template structure if the template is paralogous and shares more than 25% sequence identity with the target. PMID:19845314

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Fracture of Model Epoxies

    SciTech Connect

    STEVENS,MARK J.

    2000-01-18

    The failure of thermosetting polymer adhesives is an important problem which particularly lacks understanding from the molecular viewpoint. While linear elastic fracture mechanics works well for such polymers far from the crack tip, the method breaks down near the crack tip where large plastic deformation occurs and the molecular details become important [1]. Results of molecular dynamics simulations of highly crosslinked polymer networks bonded to a solid surface are presented here. Epoxies are used as the guide for modeling. The focus of the simulations is the network connectivity and the interfacial strength. In a random network, the bond stress is expected to vary, and the most stressed bonds will break first [2]. Crack initiation should occur where a cluster of highly constrained bonds exists. There is no reason to expect crack initiation to occur at the interface. The results to be presented show that the solid surface limits the interfacial bonding resulting in stressed interfacial bonds and interfacial fracture. The bonds in highly-crosslinked random networks do not become stressed as expected. The sequence of molecular structural deformations that lead to failure has been determined and found to be strongly dependent upon the network connectivity. The structure of these networks and its influence on the stress-strain behavior will be discussed in general. A set of ideal, ordered networks have been constructed to manipulate the deformation sequence to achieve different fracture modes (i.e. cohesive vs. adhesive).

  8. Cognitive vulnerability to depression: A comparison of the weakest link, keystone and additive models

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Laura C.; Ciesla, Jeffrey A.; Felton, Julia W.; Weitlauf, Amy S.; Anderson, Nicholas L.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple theories of cognitive vulnerability to depression have been proposed, each focusing on different aspects of negative cognition and utilising different measures of risk. Various methods of integrating such multiple indices of risk have been examined in the literature, and each demonstrates some promise. Yet little is known about the interrelations among these methods, or their incremental validity in predicting changes in depression. The present study compared three integrative models of cognitive vulnerability: the additive, weakest link, and keystone models. Support was found for each model as predictive of depression over time, but only the weakest link model demonstrated incremental utility in predicting changes in depression over the other models. We also explore the correlation between these models and each model’s unique contribution to predicting onset of depressive symptoms. PMID:21851251

  9. Sparse Additive Ordinary Differential Equations for Dynamic Gene Regulatory Network Modeling.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hulin; Lu, Tao; Xue, Hongqi; Liang, Hua

    2014-04-01

    The gene regulation network (GRN) is a high-dimensional complex system, which can be represented by various mathematical or statistical models. The ordinary differential equation (ODE) model is one of the popular dynamic GRN models. High-dimensional linear ODE models have been proposed to identify GRNs, but with a limitation of the linear regulation effect assumption. In this article, we propose a sparse additive ODE (SA-ODE) model, coupled with ODE estimation methods and adaptive group LASSO techniques, to model dynamic GRNs that could flexibly deal with nonlinear regulation effects. The asymptotic properties of the proposed method are established and simulation studies are performed to validate the proposed approach. An application example for identifying the nonlinear dynamic GRN of T-cell activation is used to illustrate the usefulness of the proposed method. PMID:25061254

  10. Parametrically Guided Generalized Additive Models with Application to Mergers and Acquisitions Data

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Jianqing; Maity, Arnab; Wang, Yihui; Wu, Yichao

    2012-01-01

    Generalized nonparametric additive models present a flexible way to evaluate the effects of several covariates on a general outcome of interest via a link function. In this modeling framework, one assumes that the effect of each of the covariates is nonparametric and additive. However, in practice, often there is prior information available about the shape of the regression functions, possibly from pilot studies or exploratory analysis. In this paper, we consider such situations and propose an estimation procedure where the prior information is used as a parametric guide to fit the additive model. Specifically, we first posit a parametric family for each of the regression functions using the prior information (parametric guides). After removing these parametric trends, we then estimate the remainder of the nonparametric functions using a nonparametric generalized additive model, and form the final estimates by adding back the parametric trend. We investigate the asymptotic properties of the estimates and show that when a good guide is chosen, the asymptotic variance of the estimates can be reduced significantly while keeping the asymptotic variance same as the unguided estimator. We observe the performance of our method via a simulation study and demonstrate our method by applying to a real data set on mergers and acquisitions. PMID:23645976

  11. Towards synthetic molecular motors: a model elastic-network study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Amartya; Flechsig, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2016-04-01

    Protein molecular motors play a fundamental role in biological cells and development of their synthetic counterparts is a major challenge. Here, we show how a model motor system with the operation mechanism resembling that of muscle myosin can be designed at the concept level, without addressing the implementation aspects. The model is constructed as an elastic network, similar to the coarse-grained descriptions used for real proteins. We show by numerical simulations that the designed synthetic motor can operate as a deterministic or Brownian ratchet and that there is a continuous transition between such two regimes. The motor operation under external load, approaching the stall condition, is also analysed.

  12. Trigonal pyramidal carbon geometry as model for electrophilic addition-substitution and elimination reactions and its significance in enzymatic processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, Henk M.

    Various examples are given in which compounds are characterized as products or intermediates in a (distorted) trigonal pyramidal (TP) geometry. These observations have taken place mainly in the field of carbocation chemistry. Special attention is given to carbenium ions formed by halogen addition to 1,1-diarylsubstituted ethylenes focused on the electronic effects of the C-halogen bond as axial bond in a TP geometry with regard to the ?-distribution in the rest of the molecular system. The experimental verification is accompanied by quantum chemical calculations. We also used the TP structure as a reactive model for specific enzymatic reactions. The relevance of this geometry is shown for the dehalogenation reaction of the nucleophilic displacement in dichloroethane catalyzed by haloalkane dehalogenase and for the decarboxylation of L-ornithine with ornithine decarboxylase under loss of carbon dioxide.

  13. Libraries of Extremely Localized Molecular Orbitals. 1. Model Molecules Approximation and Molecular Orbitals Transferability.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Benjamin; Guillot, Benoît; Ruiz-Lopez, Manuel F; Genoni, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    Despite more and more remarkable computational ab initio results are nowadays continuously obtained for large macromolecular systems, the development of new linear-scaling techniques is still an open and stimulating field of research in theoretical chemistry. In this family of methods, an important role is occupied by those strategies based on the observation that molecules are generally constituted by recurrent functional units with well-defined intrinsic features. In this context, we propose to exploit the notion of extremely localized molecular orbitals (ELMOs) that, due to their strict localization on small molecular fragments (e.g., atoms, bonds, or functional groups), are in principle transferable from one molecule to another. Accordingly, the construction of orbital libraries to almost instantaneously build up approximate wave functions and electron densities of very large systems becomes conceivable. In this work, the ELMOs transferability is further investigated in detail and, furthermore, suitable rules to construct model molecules for the computation of ELMOs to be stored in future databanks are also defined. The obtained results confirm the reliable transferability of the ELMOs and show that electron densities obtained from the transfer of extremely localized molecular orbitals are very close to the corresponding Hartree-Fock ones. These observations prompt us to construct new ELMOs databases that could represent an alternative/complement to the already popular pseudoatoms databanks both for determining electron densities and for refining crystallographic structures of very large molecules. PMID:26799516

  14. Molecular models need to be tested: the case of a solar flares discoidal HDL model.

    PubMed

    Shih, Amy Y; Sligar, Stephen G; Schulten, Klaus

    2008-06-01

    In the absence of atomic structures of high-density lipoproteins in their lipid-bound states, many molecular models have been produced based on experimental data. Using molecular dynamics, we show that a recently proposed "solar-flares" model of discoidal high-density lipoprotein is implausible. Our simulations show a collapse of the protruding solar-flare loops and a notable protein rearrangement due to an energetically unfavorable orientation of the hydrophobic protein surface toward the aqueous solvent. PMID:18375520

  15. Quantum ring-polymer contraction method: Including nuclear quantum effects at no additional computational cost in comparison to ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Christopher; Spura, Thomas; Habershon, Scott; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple and accurate computational method which facilitates ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, where the quantum-mechanical nature of the nuclei is explicitly taken into account, at essentially no additional computational cost in comparison to the corresponding calculation using classical nuclei. The predictive power of the proposed quantum ring-polymer contraction method is demonstrated by computing various static and dynamic properties of liquid water at ambient conditions using density functional theory. This development will enable routine inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of condensed-phase systems.

  16. Formation and reduction of carcinogenic furan in various model systems containing food additives.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Sil; Her, Jae-Young; Lee, Kwang-Geun

    2015-12-15

    The aim of this study was to analyse and reduce furan in various model systems. Furan model systems consisting of monosaccharides (0.5M glucose and ribose), amino acids (0.5M alanine and serine) and/or 1.0M ascorbic acid were heated at 121°C for 25 min. The effects of food additives (each 0.1M) such as metal ions (iron sulphate, magnesium sulphate, zinc sulphate and calcium sulphate), antioxidants (BHT and BHA), and sodium sulphite on the formation of furan were measured. The level of furan formed in the model systems was 6.8-527.3 ng/ml. The level of furan in the model systems of glucose/serine and glucose/alanine increased 7-674% when food additives were added. In contrast, the level of furan decreased by 18-51% in the Maillard reaction model systems that included ribose and alanine/serine with food additives except zinc sulphate. PMID:26190608

  17. Modeling Longitudinal Data with Generalized Additive Models: Applications to Single-Case Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Kristynn J.; Shadish, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Single case designs (SCDs) are short time series that assess intervention effects by measuring units repeatedly over time both in the presence and absence of treatment. For a variety of reasons, interest in the statistical analysis and meta-analysis of these designs has been growing in recent years. This paper proposes modeling SCD data with…

  18. NB-PLC channel modelling with cyclostationary noise addition & OFDM implementation for smart grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Togis; Gupta, K. K.

    2016-03-01

    Power line communication (PLC) technology can be a viable solution for the future ubiquitous networks because it provides a cheaper alternative to other wired technology currently being used for communication. In smart grid Power Line Communication (PLC) is used to support communication with low rate on low voltage (LV) distribution network. In this paper, we propose the channel modelling of narrowband (NB) PLC in the frequency range 5 KHz to 500 KHz by using ABCD parameter with cyclostationary noise addition. Behaviour of the channel was studied by the addition of 11KV/230V transformer, by varying load location and load. Bit error rate (BER) Vs signal to noise ratio SNR) was plotted for the proposed model by employing OFDM. Our simulation results based on the proposed channel model show an acceptable performance in terms of bit error rate versus signal to noise ratio, which enables communication required for smart grid applications.

  19. Molecular Imaging of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques in Animal Models.

    PubMed

    Gargiulo, Sara; Gramanzini, Matteo; Mancini, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterized by intimal plaques of the arterial vessels that develop slowly and, in some cases, may undergo spontaneous rupture with subsequent heart attack or stroke. Currently, noninvasive diagnostic tools are inadequate to screen atherosclerotic lesions at high risk of acute complications. Therefore, the attention of the scientific community has been focused on the use of molecular imaging for identifying vulnerable plaques. Genetically engineered murine models such as ApoE(-/-) and ApoE(-/-)Fbn1C1039G(+/-) mice have been shown to be useful for testing new probes targeting biomarkers of relevant molecular processes for the characterization of vulnerable plaques, such as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1, VEGFR-2, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, P-selectin, and integrins, and for the potential development of translational tools to identify high-risk patients who could benefit from early therapeutic interventions. This review summarizes the main animal models of vulnerable plaques, with an emphasis on genetically altered mice, and the state-of-the-art preclinical molecular imaging strategies. PMID:27618031

  20. Molecular modelling on small molecular CDK2 inhibitors: an integrated approach using a combination of molecular docking, 3D-QSAR and pharmacophore modelling.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Liu, H; Tai, W; Wang, F; Zhang, Y; Yao, S; Ran, T; Lu, S; Ke, Z; Xiong, X; Xu, J; Chen, Y; Lu, T

    2013-10-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) has been identified as an important target for developing novel anticancer agents. Molecular docking, three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) and pharmacophore modelling were combined with the ultimate goal of studying the structure-activity relationship of CDK2 inhibitors. The comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) model constructed based on a set of 3-aminopyrazole derivatives as CDK2 inhibitors gave statistically significant results (q (2) = 0.700; r (2) = 0.982). A HypoGen pharmacophore model, constructed using diverse CDK2 inhibitors, also showed significant statistics ([Formula: see text]Cost = 61.483; RMSD = 0.53; Correlation coefficient = 0.98). The small residues and error values between the estimated and experimental activities of the training and test set compounds proved their strong capability of activity prediction. The structural insights obtained from these two models were consistent with each other. The pharmacophore model summarized the important pharmacophoric features required for protein-ligand binding. The 3D contour maps in combination with the comprehensive pharmacophoric features helped to better interpret the structure-activity relationship. The results will be beneficial for the discovery and design of novel CDK2 inhibitors. The simplicity of this approach provides expansion to its applicability in optimizing other classes of small molecular CDK2 inhibitors. PMID:23941641

  1. Molecular modelling of miraculin: Structural analyses and functional hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Paladino, Antonella; Costantini, Susan; Colonna, Giovanni; Facchiano, Angelo M

    2008-02-29

    Miraculin is a plant protein that displays the peculiar property of modifying taste by swiching sour into a sweet taste. Its monomer is flavourless at all pH as well as at high concentration; the dimer form elicits its taste-modifying activity at acidic pH; a tetrameric form is also reported as active. Two histidine residues, located in exposed regions, are the main responsible of miraculin activity, as demonstrated by mutagenesis studies. Since structural data of miraculin are not available, we have predicted its three-dimensional structure and simulated both its dimer and tetramer forms by comparative modelling and molecular docking techniques. Finally, molecular dynamics simulations at different pH conditions have indicated that at acidic pH the dimer assumes a widely open conformation, in agreement with the hypotheses coming from other studies. PMID:18158914

  2. Molecular modeling of organophosphorous agents and their aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Vishnyakov, Aleksey; Gor, Gennady Yu; Lee, Ming-Tsung; Neimark, Alexander V

    2011-05-26

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we modeled solvation and diffusion in aqueous solutions of organophosphorous compounds, including nerve G-agents sarin and soman (methylphosphonofluoridates) and their common simulants DMMP (dimethyl methylphosphonate) and DIFP (diisopropyl fluorophosphate). The aqueous solutions of the organophosphorous compounds were found to display complex molecular scale structures and dynamic properties due to competing interactions between strongly hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups. The mixing of agents with water was proved to be exothermic with negative excess mixing volume, indicating a strongly hydrophilic solvation. This effect was confirmed in a specially performed experiment. We discuss to what extent DMMP and DIFP are suitable simulants for G-agents in experimental studies, as far as their interactions with water are concerned. We also focus on the relevance of the structural features and mobilities of agents in water to their interactions with permselective polyelectrolyte membranes that may be employed as protective barriers against chemical warfare agents. PMID:21542641

  3. A computational kinetic model of diffusion for molecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Ivan; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Regulation of biomolecular transport in cells involves intra-protein steps like gating and passage through channels, but these steps are preceded by extra-protein steps, namely, diffusive approach and admittance of solutes. The extra-protein steps develop over a 10–100 nm length scale typically in a highly particular environment, characterized through the protein's geometry, surrounding electrostatic field, and location. In order to account for solute energetics and mobility of solutes in this environment at a relevant resolution, we propose a particle-based kinetic model of diffusion based on a Markov State Model framework. Prerequisite input data consist of diffusion coefficient and potential of mean force maps generated from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and their environment that sample multi-nanosecond durations. The suggested diffusion model can describe transport processes beyond microsecond duration, relevant for biological function and beyond the realm of molecular dynamics simulation. For this purpose the systems are represented by a discrete set of states specified by the positions, volumes, and surface elements of Voronoi grid cells distributed according to a density function resolving the often intricate relevant diffusion space. Validation tests carried out for generic diffusion spaces show that the model and the associated Brownian motion algorithm are viable over a large range of parameter values such as time step, diffusion coefficient, and grid density. A concrete application of the method is demonstrated for ion diffusion around and through the Eschericia coli mechanosensitive channel of small conductance ecMscS. PMID:24089741

  4. A computational kinetic model of diffusion for molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Ivan; Schulten, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    Regulation of biomolecular transport in cells involves intra-protein steps like gating and passage through channels, but these steps are preceded by extra-protein steps, namely, diffusive approach and admittance of solutes. The extra-protein steps develop over a 10-100 nm length scale typically in a highly particular environment, characterized through the protein's geometry, surrounding electrostatic field, and location. In order to account for solute energetics and mobility of solutes in this environment at a relevant resolution, we propose a particle-based kinetic model of diffusion based on a Markov State Model framework. Prerequisite input data consist of diffusion coefficient and potential of mean force maps generated from extensive molecular dynamics simulations of proteins and their environment that sample multi-nanosecond durations. The suggested diffusion model can describe transport processes beyond microsecond duration, relevant for biological function and beyond the realm of molecular dynamics simulation. For this purpose the systems are represented by a discrete set of states specified by the positions, volumes, and surface elements of Voronoi grid cells distributed according to a density function resolving the often intricate relevant diffusion space. Validation tests carried out for generic diffusion spaces show that the model and the associated Brownian motion algorithm are viable over a large range of parameter values such as time step, diffusion coefficient, and grid density. A concrete application of the method is demonstrated for ion diffusion around and through the Eschericia coli mechanosensitive channel of small conductance ecMscS.

  5. A new parametrizable model of molecular electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laikov, Dimitri N.

    2011-10-01

    A new electronic structure model is developed in which the ground state energy of a molecular system is given by a Hartree-Fock-like expression with parametrized one- and two-electron integrals over an extended (minimal + polarization) set of orthogonalized atom-centered basis functions, the variational equations being solved formally within the minimal basis but the effect of polarization functions being included in the spirit of second-order perturbation theory. It is designed to yield good dipole polarizabilities and improved intermolecular potentials with dispersion terms. The molecular integrals include up to three-center one-electron and two-center two-electron terms, all in simple analytical forms. A method to extract the effective one-electron Hamiltonian of nonlocal-exchange Kohn-Sham theory from the coupled-cluster one-electron density matrix is designed and used to get its matrix representation in a molecule-intrinsic minimal basis as an input to the parametrization procedure - making a direct link to the correlated wavefunction theory. The model has been trained for 15 elements (H, Li-F, Na-Cl, 720 parameters) on a set of 5581 molecules (including ions, transition states, and weakly bound complexes) whose first- and second-order properties were computed by the coupled-cluster theory as a reference, and a good agreement is seen. The model looks promising for the study of large molecular systems, it is believed to be an important step forward from the traditional semiempirical models towards higher accuracy at nearly as low a computational cost.

  6. A new parametrizable model of molecular electronic structure.

    PubMed

    Laikov, Dimitri N

    2011-10-01

    A new electronic structure model is developed in which the ground state energy of a molecular system is given by a Hartree-Fock-like expression with parametrized one- and two-electron integrals over an extended (minimal + polarization) set of orthogonalized atom-centered basis functions, the variational equations being solved formally within the minimal basis but the effect of polarization functions being included in the spirit of second-order perturbation theory. It is designed to yield good dipole polarizabilities and improved intermolecular potentials with dispersion terms. The molecular integrals include up to three-center one-electron and two-center two-electron terms, all in simple analytical forms. A method to extract the effective one-electron Hamiltonian of nonlocal-exchange Kohn-Sham theory from the coupled-cluster one-electron density matrix is designed and used to get its matrix representation in a molecule-intrinsic minimal basis as an input to the parametrization procedure--making a direct link to the correlated wavefunction theory. The model has been trained for 15 elements (H, Li-F, Na-Cl, 720 parameters) on a set of 5581 molecules (including ions, transition states, and weakly bound complexes) whose first- and second-order properties were computed by the coupled-cluster theory as a reference, and a good agreement is seen. The model looks promising for the study of large molecular systems, it is believed to be an important step forward from the traditional semiempirical models towards higher accuracy at nearly as low a computational cost. PMID:21992295

  7. A Model of In vitro Plasticity at the Parallel Fiber—Molecular Layer Interneuron Synapses

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, William; Yamazaki, Tadashi; Hecht-Nielsen, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical and computational models of the cerebellum typically focus on the role of parallel fiber (PF)—Purkinje cell (PKJ) synapses for learned behavior, but few emphasize the role of the molecular layer interneurons (MLIs)—the stellate and basket cells. A number of recent experimental results suggest the role of MLIs is more important than previous models put forth. We investigate learning at PF—MLI synapses and propose a mathematical model to describe plasticity at this synapse. We perform computer simulations with this form of learning using a spiking neuron model of the MLI and show that it reproduces six in vitro experimental results in addition to simulating four novel protocols. Further, we show how this plasticity model can predict the results of other experimental protocols that are not simulated. Finally, we hypothesize what the biological mechanisms are for changes in synaptic efficacy that embody the phenomenological model proposed here. PMID:26733856

  8. Validating clustering of molecular dynamics simulations using polymer models

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a powerful technique for sampling the meta-stable and transitional conformations of proteins and other biomolecules. Computational data clustering has emerged as a useful, automated technique for extracting conformational states from MD simulation data. Despite extensive application, relatively little work has been done to determine if the clustering algorithms are actually extracting useful information. A primary goal of this paper therefore is to provide such an understanding through a detailed analysis of data clustering applied to a series of increasingly complex biopolymer models. Results We develop a novel series of models using basic polymer theory that have intuitive, clearly-defined dynamics and exhibit the essential properties that we are seeking to identify in MD simulations of real biomolecules. We then apply spectral clustering, an algorithm particularly well-suited for clustering polymer structures, to our models and MD simulations of several intrinsically disordered proteins. Clustering results for the polymer models provide clear evidence that the meta-stable and transitional conformations are detected by the algorithm. The results for the polymer models also help guide the analysis of the disordered protein simulations by comparing and contrasting the statistical properties of the extracted clusters. Conclusions We have developed a framework for validating the performance and utility of clustering algorithms for studying molecular biopolymer simulations that utilizes several analytic and dynamic polymer models which exhibit well-behaved dynamics including: meta-stable states, transition states, helical structures, and stochastic dynamics. We show that spectral clustering is robust to anomalies introduced by structural alignment and that different structural classes of intrinsically disordered proteins can be reliably discriminated from the clustering results. To our knowledge, our framework is the

  9. Improved molecular collision models for nonequilibrium rarefied gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, Neal

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used to model thermochemical nonequilibrium rarefied gases requires accurate total collision cross sections, reaction probabilities, and molecular internal energy exchange models. However, the baseline total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, reaction probabilities are defined such that experimentally determined equilibrium reaction rates are replicated, and internal energy relaxation models are phenomenological in nature. Therefore, these models have questionable validity in modeling strongly nonequilibrium gases with temperatures greater than those possible in experimental test facilities. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method can be used to accurately compute total collision cross sections, reaction probabilities, and internal energy exchange models based on first principles for hypervelocity collision conditions. In this thesis, MD/QCT-based models were used to improve simulations of two unique nonequilibrium rarefied gas systems: the Ionian atmosphere and hypersonic shocks in Earth's atmosphere. The Jovian plasma torus flows over Io at ≈ 57 km/s, inducing high-speed collisions between atmospheric SO2 and the hypervelocity plasma's O atoms and ions. The DSMC method is well-suited to model the rarefied atmosphere, so MD/QCT studies are therefore conducted to improve DSMC collision models of the critical SO2-O collision pair. The MD/QCT trajectory simulations employed a new potential energy surface that was developed using a ReaxFF fit to a set of ab initio calculations. Compared to the MD/QCT results, the baseline DSMC models are found to significantly under-predict total cross sections, use reaction probabilities that are unrealistically high, and give unphysical internal energies above the dissociation energy for non-reacting inelastic collisions and under-predicts post

  10. Effect of minimizing amount of template by addition of macromolecular crowding agent on preparation of molecularly imprinted monolith.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Ying; Zhong, Dan-Dan; Li, Xiang-Jie; Luo, Yu-Qing; Ba, Hang; Liu, Zhao-Sheng; Aisa, Haji Akber

    2015-09-01

    One of the main challenges in the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) is the substantial initial amount of template needed because of the requirement of high load capacities for most applications. A new strategy of macromolecular crowding was suggested to solve this problem by reducing the amount of template in the polymerization recipe. In a ternary porogenic system of polystyrene (PS) (crowding agent), tetrahydrofuran, and toluene, an imprinted monolithic column with high porosity and good permeability was synthesized using a mixture of ellagic acid (template), acrylamide, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The effect of polymerization factors, including monomer-template molar ratio and the molecular weight and concentration of PS, on the imprinting effect of the resulting MIP monoliths was systematically investigated. At a high ratio of monomer-template (120:1), the greatest imprinting factor of 32.4 was obtained on the MIP monolith with the aid of macromolecular crowding agent. The PS-based imprinted monolith had imprinting even at the extremely high ratio of functional monomer to template of 1510:1. Furthermore, an off-line solid-phase extraction based on the ground MIP was conducted, and the purification recovery of ellagic acid from pomegranate-rind extract was up to 80 %. In conclusion, this approach based on macromolecular crowding is simple, and is especially valuable for those applications of MIP preparation for which a rare template is used. PMID:26210545

  11. Theoretical study of the molecular force field and vibration analysis of the hydrogen cyanide addition compound with boron tribromide.

    PubMed

    Hase, Y

    2010-01-01

    An extensive HF, MP2, B3LYP and CCSD study of the molecular structure, force field and normal vibrations has been carried out for the hydrogen cyanide compound with boron tribromide. Most of the calculations agree that the HCN-BBr(3) molecule belongs to C(3v) point group and has a N-B length of 1.55-1.70 A and a N-B-Br angle of 103-105 degrees. These calculations also have estimated the missing low-wavenumber fundamentals in the 190 (nu(5)), 150 (nu(9)) and 105 cm(-1) (nu(10)) regions, instead of the supposed fundamentals at 207, 188 and 150 cm(-1), respectively, based on the combination bands. The quantum chemical force constants, by the B3LYP/6-31G and CCSD/3-21G calculations, have been adjusted by the scaling factors to reproduce the fundamentals in the literature [3] to include the bands below 200 cm(-1) proposed in this study. Normal coordinate analysis using the scaled force constants has been performed to interpret the molecular vibrations of four isotopic molecules, HCN-(10)BBr(3), HCN-(11)BBr(3), DCN-(10)BBr(3) and DCN-(11)BBr(3). PMID:19955013

  12. Theoretical study of the molecular force field and vibration analysis of the hydrogen cyanide addition compound with boron tribromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Y.

    2010-01-01

    An extensive HF, MP2, B3LYP and CCSD study of the molecular structure, force field and normal vibrations has been carried out for the hydrogen cyanide compound with boron tribromide. Most of the calculations agree that the HCN-BBr 3 molecule belongs to C3v point group and has a N-B length of 1.55-1.70 Å and a N-B-Br angle of 103-105°. These calculations also have estimated the missing low-wavenumber fundamentals in the 190 ( ν5), 150 ( ν9) and 105 cm -1 ( ν10) regions, instead of the supposed fundamentals at 207, 188 and 150 cm -1, respectively, based on the combination bands. The quantum chemical force constants, by the B3LYP/6-31G and CCSD/3-21G calculations, have been adjusted by the scaling factors to reproduce the fundamentals in the literature [3] to include the bands below 200 cm -1 proposed in this study. Normal coordinate analysis using the scaled force constants has been performed to interpret the molecular vibrations of four isotopic molecules, HCN- 10BBr 3, HCN- 11BBr 3, DCN- 10BBr 3 and DCN- 11BBr 3.

  13. Model of molecular structure of the insoluble organic matter isolated from Murchison meteorite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derenne, Sylvie; Robert, François

    2010-09-01

    The molecular structure of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) from Murchison meteorite has been investigated by our group for several years using a large set of analytical methods including various spectroscopies (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, nuclear magnetic resonance, electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy), high resolution electron microscopy, and thermal (pyrolyses in the presence or not of tetramethylammonium hydroxide) and chemical (RuO4 oxidation) degradations. Taken together, these techniques provided a wealth of qualitative and quantitative information, from which we derived 11 elemental and molecular parameters on the same IOM residue. In addition to the basic elemental composition, these parameters describe the distribution of the different types of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur atoms as well as the size of the polyaromatic units. For this molecular structure, we therefore propose a model which fits with these 11 molecular quantitative parameters. Several cosmochemical implications are derived from this structure. Based on the fact that aromatic moieties are highly substituted and aliphatic chains highly branched, it can be anticipated that the synthesis of this IOM occurred through successive additions of single carbon units in the gas-phase ending by a spontaneous cyclization for chain length ≥7 C. As a whole, these observations favor an organosynthesis in the solar T-Tauri disk.

  14. A molecular-thermodynamic model for polyelectrolyte solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.; Liu, H.; Hu, Y.; Prausnitz, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Polyelectrolyte solutions are modeled as freely tangent-jointed, charged hard-sphere chains and corresponding counterions in a continuum medium with permitivity {var_epsilon}. By adopting the sticky-point model, the Helmholtz function for polyelectrolyte solutions is derived through the r-particle cavity-correlation function (CCF) for chains of sticky, charged hard spheres. The r-CCF is approximated by a product of effective nearest-neighbor two-particle CCFs; these are determined from the hypernetted-chain and mean-spherical closures (HNC/MSA) inside and outside the hard core, respectively, for the integral equation theory for electrolytes. The colligative properties are given as explicit functions of a scaling parameter {Gamma} that can be estimated by a simple iteration procedure. Osmotic pressures, osmotic coefficients, and activity coefficients are calculated for model solutions with various chain lengths. They are in good agreement with molecular simulation and experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Structural and Molecular Modeling Features of P2X Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Luiz Anastacio; da Silva, João Herminio Martins; Ferreira, Dinarte Neto Moreira; Fidalgo-Neto, Antonio Augusto; Teixeira, Pedro Celso Nogueira; de Souza, Cristina Alves Magalhães; Caffarena, Ernesto Raúl; de Freitas, Mônica Santos

    2014-01-01

    Currently, adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) is recognized as the extracellular messenger that acts through P2 receptors. P2 receptors are divided into two subtypes: P2Y metabotropic receptors and P2X ionotropic receptors, both of which are found in virtually all mammalian cell types studied. Due to the difficulty in studying membrane protein structures by X-ray crystallography or NMR techniques, there is little information about these structures available in the literature. Two structures of the P2X4 receptor in truncated form have been solved by crystallography. Molecular modeling has proven to be an excellent tool for studying ionotropic receptors. Recently, modeling studies carried out on P2X receptors have advanced our knowledge of the P2X receptor structure-function relationships. This review presents a brief history of ion channel structural studies and shows how modeling approaches can be used to address relevant questions about P2X receptors. PMID:24637936

  16. Generalized Additive Mixed-Models for Pharmacology Using Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-Culture.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Thomas; Cole, Stephanie; Madren-Whalley, Janna; Booker, Lamont; Dorsey, Russell; Li, Albert; Salem, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-culture (IDMOC) is emerging as an in-vitro alternative to in-vivo animal models for pharmacology studies. IDMOC allows dose-response relationships to be investigated at the tissue and organoid levels, yet, these relationships often exhibit responses that are far more complex than the binary responses often measured in whole animals. To accommodate departure from binary endpoints, IDMOC requires an expansion of analytic techniques beyond simple linear probit and logistic models familiar in toxicology. IDMOC dose-responses may be measured at continuous scales, exhibit significant non-linearity such as local maxima or minima, and may include non-independent measures. Generalized additive mixed-modeling (GAMM) provides an alternative description of dose-response that relaxes assumptions of independence and linearity. We compared GAMMs to traditional linear models for describing dose-response in IDMOC pharmacology studies. PMID:27110941

  17. Generalized Additive Mixed-Models for Pharmacology Using Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Thomas; Cole, Stephanie; Madren-Whalley, Janna; Booker, Lamont; Dorsey, Russell; Li, Albert; Salem, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-culture (IDMOC) is emerging as an in-vitro alternative to in-vivo animal models for pharmacology studies. IDMOC allows dose-response relationships to be investigated at the tissue and organoid levels, yet, these relationships often exhibit responses that are far more complex than the binary responses often measured in whole animals. To accommodate departure from binary endpoints, IDMOC requires an expansion of analytic techniques beyond simple linear probit and logistic models familiar in toxicology. IDMOC dose-responses may be measured at continuous scales, exhibit significant non-linearity such as local maxima or minima, and may include non-independent measures. Generalized additive mixed-modeling (GAMM) provides an alternative description of dose-response that relaxes assumptions of independence and linearity. We compared GAMMs to traditional linear models for describing dose-response in IDMOC pharmacology studies. PMID:27110941

  18. Use of additive technologies for practical working with complex models for foundry technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhovik, E.; Butsanets, A. A.; Ageeva, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    The article presents the results of research of additive technology (3D printing) application for developing a geometrically complex model of castings parts. Investment casting is well known and widely used technology for the production of complex parts. The work proposes the use of a 3D printing technology for manufacturing models parts, which are removed by thermal destruction. Traditional methods of equipment production for investment casting involve the use of manual labor which has problems with dimensional accuracy, and CNC technology which is less used. Such scheme is low productive and demands considerable time. We have offered an alternative method which consists in printing the main knots using a 3D printer (PLA and ABS) with a subsequent production of castings models from them. In this article, the main technological methods are considered and their problems are discussed. The dimensional accuracy of models in comparison with investment casting technology is considered as the main aspect.

  19. State to State and Charged Particle Kinetic Modeling of Time Filtering and Cs Addition

    SciTech Connect

    Capitelli, M.; Gorse, C.; Longo, S.; Diomede, P.; Pagano, D.

    2007-08-10

    We present here an account on the progress of kinetic simulation of non equilibrium plasmas in conditions of interest for negative ion production by using the 1D Bari code for hydrogen plasma simulation. The model includes the state to state kinetics of the vibrational level population of hydrogen molecules, plus a PIC/MCC module for the multispecies dynamics of charged particles. In particular we present new results for the modeling of two issues of great interest: the time filtering and the Cs addition via surface coverage.

  20. Additional interfacial force in lattice Boltzmann models for incompressible multiphase flows.

    PubMed

    Li, Q; Luo, K H; Gao, Y J; He, Y L

    2012-02-01

    The existing lattice Boltzmann models for incompressible multiphase flows are mostly constructed with two distribution functions: one is the order parameter distribution function, which is used to track the interface between different phases, and the other is the pressure distribution function for solving the velocity field. In this paper, it is shown that in these models the recovered momentum equation is inconsistent with the target one: an additional force is included in the recovered momentum equation. The additional force has the following features. First, it is proportional to the macroscopic velocity. Second, it is zero in every single-phase region but is nonzero in the interface. Therefore it can be interpreted as an interfacial force. To investigate the effects of the additional interfacial force, numerical simulations are carried out for the problem of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, droplet splashing on a thin liquid film, and the evolution of a falling droplet under gravity. Numerical results demonstrate that, with the increase of the velocity or the Reynolds number, the additional interfacial force will gradually have an important influence on the interface and affect the numerical accuracy. PMID:22463354

  1. Model for Assembly Line Re-Balancing Considering Additional Capacity and Outsourcing to Face Demand Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samadhi, TMAA; Sumihartati, Atin

    2016-02-01

    The most critical stage in a garment industry is sewing process, because generally, it consists of a number of operations and a large number of sewing machines for each operation. Therefore, it requires a balancing method that can assign task to work station with balance workloads. Many studies on assembly line balancing assume a new assembly line, but in reality, due to demand fluctuation and demand increased a re-balancing is needed. To cope with those fluctuating demand changes, additional capacity can be carried out by investing in spare sewing machine and paying for sewing service through outsourcing. This study develops an assembly line balancing (ALB) model on existing line to cope with fluctuating demand change. Capacity redesign is decided if the fluctuation demand exceeds the available capacity through a combination of making investment on new machines and outsourcing while considering for minimizing the cost of idle capacity in the future. The objective of the model is to minimize the total cost of the line assembly that consists of operating costs, machine cost, adding capacity cost, losses cost due to idle capacity and outsourcing costs. The model develop is based on an integer programming model. The model is tested for a set of data of one year demand with the existing number of sewing machines of 41 units. The result shows that additional maximum capacity up to 76 units of machine required when there is an increase of 60% of the average demand, at the equal cost parameters..

  2. A source model for the L134N molecular cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swade, Daryl A.; Schloerb, F. P.

    1992-01-01

    The dark molecular cloud L134N is observed at millimeter wavelengths in the CS (J = 3-2), OCS (J = 7-6), and HDO (1 sub 11-1 sub 10) transitions. The CS (J = 3-2) transition was observed at four positions within the cloud, while the other two transitions were observed at one position each. Fractional abundances in the LTE approximation are calculated for each emission line detected. L134N appears to have a high-density core characterized by NH3, C3H2, and H(C-13)O(+) emission maps. A lower density envelope characterized by C(0-18), CS (J = 2-1), and SO emission surrounds the core. There appears to be a gas-phase oxygen abundance gradient in L134N with atomic oxygen depleted in the high-density core. Observed molecular distributions within L134N can be explained by a model in which chemical and physical processes in icy-dust-grain mantles influence the gas-phase molecular abundances.

  3. Application of Molecular Modeling to Urokinase Inhibitors Development

    PubMed Central

    Sulimov, V. B.; Katkova, E. V.; Oferkin, I. V.; Sulimov, A. V.; Romanov, A. N.; Roschin, A. I.; Beloglazova, I. B.; Plekhanova, O. S.; Tkachuk, V. A.; Sadovnichiy, V. A.

    2014-01-01

    Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) plays an important role in the regulation of diverse physiologic and pathologic processes. Experimental research has shown that elevated uPA expression is associated with cancer progression, metastasis, and shortened survival in patients, whereas suppression of proteolytic activity of uPA leads to evident decrease of metastasis. Therefore, uPA has been considered as a promising molecular target for development of anticancer drugs. The present study sets out to develop the new selective uPA inhibitors using computer-aided structural based drug design methods. Investigation involves the following stages: computer modeling of the protein active site, development and validation of computer molecular modeling methods: docking (SOL program), postprocessing (DISCORE program), direct generalized docking (FLM program), and the application of the quantum chemical calculations (MOPAC package), search of uPA inhibitors among molecules from databases of ready-made compounds to find new uPA inhibitors, and design of new chemical structures and their optimization and experimental examination. On the basis of known uPA inhibitors and modeling results, 18 new compounds have been designed, calculated using programs mentioned above, synthesized, and tested in vitro. Eight of them display inhibitory activity and two of them display activity about 10 μM. PMID:24967388

  4. Towards Accurate Molecular Modeling of Plastic Bonded Explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantawansri, T. L.; Andzelm, J.; Taylor, D.; Byrd, E.; Rice, B.

    2010-03-01

    There is substantial interest in identifying the controlling factors that influence the susceptibility of polymer bonded explosives (PBXs) to accidental initiation. Numerous Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of PBXs using the COMPASS force field have been reported in recent years, where the validity of the force field in modeling the solid EM fill has been judged solely on its ability to reproduce lattice parameters, which is an insufficient metric. Performance of the COMPASS force field in modeling EMs and the polymeric binder has been assessed by calculating structural, thermal, and mechanical properties, where only fair agreement with experimental data is obtained. We performed MD simulations using the COMPASS force field for the polymer binder hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene and five EMs: cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, 1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetra-azacyclo-octane, 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexantirohexaazazisowurzitane, 2,4,6-trinitro-1,3,5-benzenetriamine, and pentaerythritol tetranitate. Predicted EM crystallographic and molecular structural parameters, as well as calculated properties for the binder will be compared with experimental results for different simulation conditions. We also present novel simulation protocols, which improve agreement between experimental and computation results thus leading to the accurate modeling of PBXs.

  5. Modeling Natural Anti-Inflammatory Compounds by Molecular Topology

    PubMed Central

    Galvez-Llompart, María; Zanni, Riccardo; García-Domenech, Ramón

    2011-01-01

    One of the main pharmacological problems today in the treatment of chronic inflammation diseases consists of the fact that anti-inflammatory drugs usually exhibit side effects. The natural products offer a great hope in the identification of bioactive lead compounds and their development into drugs for treating inflammatory diseases. Computer-aided drug design has proved to be a very useful tool for discovering new drugs and, specifically, Molecular Topology has become a good technique for such a goal. A topological-mathematical model, obtained by linear discriminant analysis, has been developed for the search of new anti-inflammatory natural compounds. An external validation obtained with the remaining compounds (those not used in building up the model), has been carried out. Finally, a virtual screening on natural products was performed and 74 compounds showed actual anti-inflammatory activity. From them, 54 had been previously described as anti-inflammatory in the literature. This can be seen as a plus in the model validation and as a reinforcement of the role of Molecular Topology as an efficient tool for the discovery of new anti-inflammatory natural compounds. PMID:22272145

  6. Molecular Dynamics Trajectory Compression with a Coarse-Grained Model

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi-Ming; Gopal, Srinivasa Murthy; Law, Sean M.; Feig, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Molecular dynamics trajectories are very data-intensive thereby limiting sharing and archival of such data. One possible solution is compression of trajectory data. Here, trajectory compression based on conversion to the coarse-grained model PRIMO is proposed. The compressed data is about one third of the original data and fast decompression is possible with an analytical reconstruction procedure from PRIMO to all-atom representations. This protocol largely preserves structural features and to a more limited extent also energetic features of the original trajectory. PMID:22025759

  7. Large scale molecular dynamics modeling of materials fabrication processes

    SciTech Connect

    Belak, J.; Glosli, J.N.; Boercker, D.B.; Stowers, I.F.

    1994-02-01

    An atomistic molecular dynamics model of materials fabrication processes is presented. Several material removal processes are shown to be within the domain of this simulation method. Results are presented for orthogonal cutting of copper and silicon and for crack propagation in silica glass. Both copper and silicon show ductile behavior, but the atomistic mechanisms that allow this behavior are significantly different in the two cases. The copper chip remains crystalline while the silicon chip transforms into an amorphous state. The critical stress for crack propagation in silica glass was found to be in reasonable agreement with experiment and a novel stick-slip phenomenon was observed.

  8. Modeling anti-allergic natural compounds by molecular topology.

    PubMed

    García-Domenech, Ramón; Zanni, Riccardo; Galvez-Llompart, María; de Julián-Ortiz, J Vicente

    2013-09-01

    Molecular topology has been applied to the search of QSAR models able to identify the anti-allergic activity of a wide group of heterogeneous compounds. Through the linear discriminant analysis and artificial neural networks, correct classification percentages above 85% for both the training set and the test set have been obtained. After carrying out a virtual screening with a natural product library, about thirty compounds with theoretical anti-allergic activity have been selected. Among them, hesperidin, naringin, salinomycin, sorbitol, curcumol, myricitrin, diosmin and kinetin stand out. Some of these compounds have already been referenced as having anti-allergic activity. PMID:23597273

  9. Molecular Communication Modeling of Antibody-Mediated Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Chahibi, Youssef; Akyildiz, Ian F; Balasubramaniam, Sasitharan; Koucheryavy, Yevgeni

    2015-07-01

    Antibody-mediated Drug Delivery Systems (ADDS) are emerging as one of the most encouraging therapeutic solutions for treating several diseases such as human cancers. ADDS use small molecules (antibodies) that propagate in the body and bind selectively to their corresponding receptors (antigens) expressed at the surface of the diseased cells. In this paper, the Molecular Communication (MC) paradigm, where information is conveyed through the concentration of molecules, is advocated for the engineering of ADDS and modeling their complex behavior, to provide a realistic model without the over-complication of system biology models, and the limitations of experimental approaches. The peculiarities of antibodies, including their anisotropic transport and complex electrochemical structure, are taken into account to develop an analytical model of the ADDS transport and antigen-binding kinetics. The end-to-end response of ADDS, from the drug injection to the drug absorption, is mathematically derived based on the geometry of the antibody molecule, the electrochemical structure of the antibody-antigen complex, and the physiology of the patient. The accuracy of the MC model is validated by finite-element (COMSOL) simulations. The implications of the complex interplay between the transport and kinetics parameters on the performance of ADDS are effectively captured by the proposed MC model. The MC model of ADDS will enable the discovery and optimization of drugs in a versatile, cost-efficient, and reliable manner. PMID:25675450

  10. Cytological and Molecular Characterization of Homoeologous Group-1 Chromosomes in Hybrid Derivatives of a Durum Disomic Alien Addition Line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a devastating disease of durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L., 2n = 4x = 28; AABB). To incorporate FHB resistance from diploid wheatgrass (Lophopyrum elongatum (Host) Á. Löve, 2n = 2x = 14; EE) we produced earlier a stable alien disomic addition line, DGE-1, incorporating...

  11. Generalized linear and generalized additive models in studies of species distributions: Setting the scene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guisan, A.; Edwards, T.C., Jr.; Hastie, T.

    2002-01-01

    An important statistical development of the last 30 years has been the advance in regression analysis provided by generalized linear models (GLMs) and generalized additive models (GAMs). Here we introduce a series of papers prepared within the framework of an international workshop entitled: Advances in GLMs/GAMs modeling: from species distribution to environmental management, held in Riederalp, Switzerland, 6-11 August 2001. We first discuss some general uses of statistical models in ecology, as well as provide a short review of several key examples of the use of GLMs and GAMs in ecological modeling efforts. We next present an overview of GLMs and GAMs, and discuss some of their related statistics used for predictor selection, model diagnostics, and evaluation. Included is a discussion of several new approaches applicable to GLMs and GAMs, such as ridge regression, an alternative to stepwise selection of predictors, and methods for the identification of interactions by a combined use of regression trees and several other approaches. We close with an overview of the papers and how we feel they advance our understanding of their application to ecological modeling. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A patch-based cross masking model for natural images with detail loss and additive defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yucheng; Allebach, Jan P.

    2015-03-01

    Visual masking is an effect that contents of the image reduce the detectability of a given target signal hidden in the image. The effect of visual masking has found its application in numerous image processing and vision tasks. In the past few decades, numerous research has been conducted on visual masking based on models optimized for artificial targets placed upon unnatural masks. Over the years, there is a tendency to apply masking model to predict natural image quality and detection threshold of distortion presented in natural images. However, to our knowledge few studies have been conducted to understand the generalizability of masking model to different types of distortion presented in natural images. In this work, we measure the ability of natural image patches in masking three different types of distortion, and analyse the performance of conventional gain control model in predicting the distortion detection threshold. We then propose a new masking model, where detail loss and additive defects are modeled in two parallel vision channels and interact with each other via a cross masking mechanism. We show that the proposed cross masking model has better adaptability to various image structures and distortions in natural scenes.

  13. Tubulin inhibitors: pharmacophore modeling, virtual screening and molecular docking

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Miao-miao; Qin, Jing-yi; Tian, Cai-ping; Yan, Xia-fei; Dong, Feng-gong; Cheng, Zheng-qi; Fida, Guissi; Yang, Man; Chen, Haiyan; Gu, Yue-qing

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To construct a quantitative pharmacophore model of tubulin inhibitors and to discovery new leads with potent antitumor activities. Methods: Ligand-based pharmacophore modeling was used to identify the chemical features responsible for inhibiting tubulin polymerization. A set of 26 training compounds was used to generate hypothetical pharmacophores using the HypoGen algorithm. The structures were further validated using the test set, Fischer randomization method, leave-one-out method and a decoy set, and the best model was chosen to screen the Specs database. Hit compounds were subjected to molecular docking study using a Molecular Operating Environment (MOE) software and to biological evaluation in vitro. Results: Hypo1 was demonstrated to be the best pharmacophore model that exhibited the highest correlation coefficient (0.9582), largest cost difference (70.905) and lowest RMSD value (0.6977). Hypo1 consisted of one hydrogen-bond acceptor, a hydrogen-bond donor, a hydrophobic feature, a ring aromatic feature and three excluded volumes. Hypo1 was validated with four different methods and had a goodness-of-hit score of 0.81. When Hypo1 was used in virtual screening of the Specs database, 952 drug-like compounds were revealed. After docking into the colchicine-binding site of tubulin, 5 drug-like compounds with the required interaction with the critical amino acid residues and the binding free energies <-4 kcal/mol were selected as representative leads. Compounds 1 and 3 exhibited inhibitory activity against MCF-7 human breast cancer cells in vitro. Conclusion: Hypo1 is a quantitative pharmacophore model for tubulin inhibitors, which not only provides a better understanding of their interaction with tubulin, but also assists in discovering new potential leads with antitumor activities. PMID:24909516

  14. Resources allocation in healthcare for cancer: a case study using generalised additive mixed models.

    PubMed

    Musio, Monica; Sauleau, Erik A; Augustin, Nicole H

    2012-11-01

    Our aim is to develop a method for helping resources re-allocation in healthcare linked to cancer, in order to replan the allocation of providers. Ageing of the population has a considerable impact on the use of health resources because aged people require more specialised medical care due notably to cancer. We propose a method useful to monitor changes of cancer incidence in space and time taking into account two age categories, according to healthcar general organisation. We use generalised additive mixed models with a Poisson response, according to the methodology presented in Wood, Generalised additive models: an introduction with R. Chapman and Hall/CRC, 2006. Besides one-dimensional smooth functions accounting for non-linear effects of covariates, the space-time interaction can be modelled using scale invariant smoothers. Incidence data collected by a general cancer registry between 1992 and 2007 in a specific area of France is studied. Our best model exhibits a strong increase of the incidence of cancer along time and an obvious spatial pattern for people more than 70 years with a higher incidence in the central band of the region. This is a strong argument for re-allocating resources for old people cancer care in this sub-region. PMID:23242683

  15. Coarse-graining molecular dynamics models using an extended Galerkin method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiantao

    2013-03-01

    I will present a systematic approach to coarse-grain molecular dynamics models for solids. The coarse-grained models are derived by Galerkin projection to a sequence of Krylov subspaces. On the coarsest space, the model corresponds to a finite element discretization of the continuum elasto-dynamics model. On the other hand, the projection to the finest space yields the full molecular dynamics description. The models in between serve as a smooth transition between the two scales. We start with a molecular dynamics (MD) model, mix¨i = -∂V/∂xi . First, let Y0 be the approximation space for the continuum model. By projecting the MD model onto the subspace, we obtain a coarse-grained model, M q ¨ = F (q) . Using the Cauchy-Born approximation, this model can be shown to coincide with the finite element representation of the continuum elastodynamics model. This model has limited accuracy near lattice defects. One natural idea is to switch to the MD model in regions surround local defect. As a result, one creates an interface between the continuum and atomistic description, where coupling conditions are needed. Direct coupling methods may involve enforcing constraints or mixing the energy or forces. Such an approach may suffer from large phonon reflections at the interface, and introduce large modeling error. In order to seamlessly couple this model to MD, we successively expand the approximation space to the Krylov spaces, Kl =Y0 + AY0 + ⋯ +AlY0 . Here A is the force constant matrix, computed from the atomistic model. Due to the translational invariance, only a smaller number of such matrices need to be computed. By projecting the MD model onto this new subspace, we obtain an extended system, M q .. =F0 (q ,ξ1 , ... ,ξl) ,ξ̈1 =F1 (q ,ξ1 , ... ,ξl) , ... ... ,ξ̈l =Fl (q ,ξ1 , ... ,ξl) . The additional variables ξj represent the coefficients in the extended approximation space. Using this systematic approach, one can build a hierarchy of models with

  16. Molecular dynamics in polymers, polymer networks, and model compounds by dielectric relaxation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitz, Benjamin David

    Segmental dynamics are investigated in model compounds, polymers, and network-forming polymers. Two aspects of these materials are investigated: (1) the role of molecular structure and connectivity on determining the characteristics of the segmental relaxation, and (2) monitoring the variations in the segmental dynamics during network-forming chemical reactions. We quantify the most important aspects of the dynamics: the relaxation shape, the relaxation strength, the relaxation time, and the temperature dependencies of these properties. Additionally, two general segmental dynamics issues of interest are the length-scale and the homogeneous/heterogeneous aspects. A judicious choice of network-forming polymer provides for the determination of an upper bound on the length-scale. A comparison of relaxation characteristics between dynamic light scattering (measuring density fluctuations) and dielectric relaxation spectroscopy (measuring segmental dipolar reorientation) provides one evaluation of the heterogeneity issue. Dipole dynamics in small molecule model compounds show the influence of molecular connectivity on the cooperative molecular response associated with the glass transition. A rigid, nonpolar, cyanate ester network is shown to develop an anomalous relaxation process during crosslinking. A specific local mode of motion is assigned. Additionally, the main relaxation becomes extraordinarily broad during the course of the network formation, due to markedly increased segmental rigidity and loss of configurational entropy.

  17. Evaporation model for beam based additive manufacturing using free surface lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Alexander; Scharowsky, Thorsten; Körner, Carolin

    2014-07-01

    Evaporation plays an important role in many technical applications including beam-based additive manufacturing processes, such as selective electron beam or selective laser melting (SEBM/SLM). In this paper, we describe an evaporation model which we employ within the framework of a two-dimensional free surface lattice Boltzmann method. With this method, we solve the hydrodynamics as well as thermodynamics of the molten material taking into account the mass and energy losses due to evaporation and the recoil pressure acting on the melt pool. Validation of the numerical model is performed by measuring maximum melt depths and evaporative losses in samples of pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V molten by an electron beam. Finally, the model is applied to create processing maps for an SEBM process. The results predict that the penetration depth of the electron beam, which is a function of the acceleration voltage, has a significant influence on evaporation effects.

  18. Parity Symmetry and Parity Breaking in the Quantum Rabi Model with Addition of Ising Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiong; He, Zhi; Yao, Chun-Mei

    2015-04-01

    We explore the possibility to generate new parity symmetry in the quantum Rabi model after a bias is introduced. In contrast to a mathematical treatment in a previous publication [J. Phys. A 46 (2013) 265302], we consider a physically realistic method by involving an additional spin into the quantum Rabi model to couple with the original spin by an Ising interaction, and then the parity symmetry is broken as well as the scaling behavior of the ground state by introducing a bias. The rule can be found that the parity symmetry is broken by introducing a bias and then restored by adding new degrees of freedom. Experimental feasibility of realizing the models under discussion is investigated. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 61475045 and 11347142, the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province, China under Grant No. 2015JJ3092

  19. Modeling and Computer Simulation: Molecular Dynamics and Kinetic Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Wirth, B.D.; Caturla, M.J.; Diaz de la Rubia, T.

    2000-10-10

    Recent years have witnessed tremendous advances in the realistic multiscale simulation of complex physical phenomena, such as irradiation and aging effects of materials, made possible by the enormous progress achieved in computational physics for calculating reliable, yet tractable interatomic potentials and the vast improvements in computational power and parallel computing. As a result, computational materials science is emerging as an important complement to theory and experiment to provide fundamental materials science insight. This article describes the atomistic modeling techniques of molecular dynamics (MD) and kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC), and an example of their application to radiation damage production and accumulation in metals. It is important to note at the outset that the primary objective of atomistic computer simulation should be obtaining physical insight into atomic-level processes. Classical molecular dynamics is a powerful method for obtaining insight about the dynamics of physical processes that occur on relatively short time scales. Current computational capability allows treatment of atomic systems containing as many as 10{sup 9} atoms for times on the order of 100 ns (10{sup -7}s). The main limitation of classical MD simulation is the relatively short times accessible. Kinetic Monte Carlo provides the ability to reach macroscopic times by modeling diffusional processes and time-scales rather than individual atomic vibrations. Coupling MD and KMC has developed into a powerful, multiscale tool for the simulation of radiation damage in metals.

  20. Assessment of a Molecular Diffusion Model in MELCOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chang OH; Richard Moore

    2005-06-01

    The MELCOR (version 1.8.5) [1] computer code with INEEL revisions is being improved for the analysis of very high temperature gas-cooled reactors [2]. Following a loss-of-coolant accident, flow through the reactor vessel may initially stagnate due to a non-uniform concentration of helium and air. However, molecular diffusion will eventually result in a uniform concentration of air and helium. The differences in fluid temperatures within the reactor vessel will then result in the establishment of a natural circulation flow that can supply significant amounts of air to the reactor core. The heat released by the resulting oxidation of graphite in the reactor core has the potential to increase the peak fuel temperature. In order to analyze the effects of oxidation on the response of the reactor during accidents, a molecular diffusion model was added to MELCOR. The model is based on Fick's Second Law for spatially uniform pressure and temperature. This paper describes equimolal counter diffusion experiments in a two bulb diffusion cell and the results of the assessment calculations.

  1. A molecular mechanical model for N-heterocyclic carbenes.

    PubMed

    Gehrke, Sascha; Hollóczki, Oldamur

    2016-08-10

    In this work we present a set of force fields for nine synthetically relevant and/or structurally interesting N-heterocyclic carbenes, including imidazol-, thiazol-, triazol-, imidazolidin-, and pyridine-ylidenes. The bonding parameters were calculated by using a series of geometry optimizations by ab initio methods. For fitting the non-bonding interactions, a water molecule was employed as a probe. The interaction energy between the carbene and the probe molecule was sampled along two coordinates for each carbene, representing the interaction through the lone pair, or the π system of the molecule. The corresponding reference interaction energies were obtained by CCSD(T)/CBS calculations. To describe the direction dependence of the intermolecular potential energy, an extra, massless Coulombic interaction site was included for all carbenes, which represents the lone pair of the divalent carbon atom. The resulting fitted carbene force field (CaFF) showed a robust behavior regarding probe molecule, as changing the molecular mechanical water model, or employing, instead, an OPLS methanol molecule did not introduce significant deviations in the potential energies. The obtained CaFF models are easy to merge with standard OPLS or AMBER force fields, therefore the molecular simulations of a large number of N-heterocyclic carbenes becomes available. PMID:27426687

  2. Excited states of ribosome translocation revealed through integrative molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Whitford, Paul C.; Ahmed, Aqeel; Yu, Yanan; Hennelly, Scott P.; Tama, Florence; Spahn, Christian M. T.; Onuchic, José N.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2011-01-01

    The dynamic nature of biomolecules leads to significant challenges when characterizing the structural properties associated with function. While X-ray crystallography and imaging techniques (such as cryo-electron microscopy) can reveal the structural details of stable molecular complexes, strategies must be developed to characterize configurations that exhibit only marginal stability (such as intermediates) or configurations that do not correspond to minima on the energy landscape (such as transition-state ensembles). Here, we present a methodology (MDfit) that utilizes molecular dynamics simulations to generate configurations of excited states that are consistent with available biophysical and biochemical measurements. To demonstrate the approach, we present a sequence of configurations that are suggested to be associated with transfer RNA (tRNA) movement through the ribosome (translocation). The models were constructed by combining information from X-ray crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, and biochemical data. These models provide a structural framework for translocation that may be further investigated experimentally and theoretically to determine the precise energetic character of each configuration and the transition dynamics between them. PMID:22080606

  3. Excited states of ribosome translocation revealed through integrative molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Whitford, Paul C; Ahmed, Aqeel; Yu, Yanan; Hennelly, Scott P; Tama, Florence; Spahn, Christian M T; Onuchic, José N; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2011-11-22

    The dynamic nature of biomolecules leads to significant challenges when characterizing the structural properties associated with function. While X-ray crystallography and imaging techniques (such as cryo-electron microscopy) can reveal the structural details of stable molecular complexes, strategies must be developed to characterize configurations that exhibit only marginal stability (such as intermediates) or configurations that do not correspond to minima on the energy landscape (such as transition-state ensembles). Here, we present a methodology (MDfit) that utilizes molecular dynamics simulations to generate configurations of excited states that are consistent with available biophysical and biochemical measurements. To demonstrate the approach, we present a sequence of configurations that are suggested to be associated with transfer RNA (tRNA) movement through the ribosome (translocation). The models were constructed by combining information from X-ray crystallography, cryo-electron microscopy, and biochemical data. These models provide a structural framework for translocation that may be further investigated experimentally and theoretically to determine the precise energetic character of each configuration and the transition dynamics between them. PMID:22080606

  4. Aggregation of model asphaltenes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Costa, J L L F S; Simionesie, D; Zhang, Z J; Mulheran, P A

    2016-10-01

    Natural asphaltenes are defined as polyaromatic compounds whose chemical composition and structure are dependent on their geological origin and production history, hence are regarded as complex molecules with aromatic cores and aliphatic tails that occur in the heaviest fraction of crude oil. The aggregation of asphaltenes presents a range of technical challenges to the production and processing of oil. In this work we study the behaviour of the model asphaltene-like molecule hexa-tert-butylhexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (HTBHBC) using molecular dynamics simulation. It was found that the regular arrangement of the tert-butyl side chains prevents the formation of strongly-bound dimers by severely restricting the configurational space of the aggregation pathway. In contrast, a modified molecule with only 3 side chains is readily able to form dimers. This work therefore confirms the influence of the molecular structure of polyaromatic compounds on their aggregation mechanism, and reveals the unexpected design rules required for model systems that can mimic the behavior of asphaltenes. PMID:27465036

  5. Consistent flamelet modeling of differential molecular diffusion for turbulent non-premixed flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haifeng

    2016-03-01

    Treating differential molecular diffusion correctly and accurately remains as a great challenge to the modeling of turbulent non-premixed combustion. The aim of this paper is to develop consistent modeling strategies for differential molecular diffusion in flamelet models. Two types of differential molecular diffusion models are introduced, linear differential diffusion models and nonlinear differential diffusion models. A multi-component turbulent mixing layer problem is analyzed in detail to gain insights into differential molecular diffusion and its characteristics, particularly the dependence of differential molecular diffusion on the Reynolds number and the Lewis number. These characteristics are then used to validate the differential molecular diffusion models. Finally, the new models are applied to the modeling of a series of laboratory-scale turbulent non-premixed jet flames with different Reynolds number (Sandia Flames B, C, and D) to further assess the models' performance.

  6. Molecular modeling of high-pressure ramp waves in tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Lim, Hojun; Brown, Justin L.

    2015-03-01

    Ramp wave compression experiments of bcc metals under extreme conditions have produced differing measurements of material strength response. These variations are often attributed to differing experimental techniques, and varying material factors such as microstructure, and strain-rate. We present non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of tantalum for single crystal and two polycrystalline nanostructures out to 250 GPa, over strain states ranging from 108 to 1011 1/s. Results will be compared to recent Z-machine strength experiments, meso-scale crystal plasticity models and continuum-scale polycrystalline model. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. Model for the intense molecular line emission from OMC-1

    SciTech Connect

    Draine, B.T.; Roberge, W.G.

    1982-08-15

    We present a model which attributes the observed H/sub 2/ and CO line emission OMC-1 to a magnetohydrodynamic shock propagating into magnetized molecular gas. By requiring the shock to reporoduce the observed line intensities, we determine the shock speed to be v/sub s/roughly-equal38 km s/sup -1/ and the preshock density and (transverse) magnetic field to be n/sub H/roughly-equal7 x 10/sup 5/ cm/sup -3/, B/sub O/roughly-equal1.5 milligauss. The model is compared to observations of H/sub 2/, CO, OH, O I, and C I in emission and of CO in absorption. The shock gas may be detectible in H I 21 cm emission.

  8. Interactive display of molecular models using a microcomputer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, J. T.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    A simple, microcomputer-based, interactive graphics display system has been developed for the presentation of perspective views of wire frame molecular models. The display system is based on a TERAK 8510a graphics computer system with a display unit consisting of microprocessor, television display and keyboard subsystems. The operating system includes a screen editor, file manager, PASCAL and BASIC compilers and command options for linking and executing programs. The graphics program, written in USCD PASCAL, involves the centering of the coordinate system, the transformation of centered model coordinates into homogeneous coordinates, the construction of a viewing transformation matrix to operate on the coordinates, clipping invisible points, perspective transformation and scaling to screen coordinates; commands available include ZOOM, ROTATE, RESET, and CHANGEVIEW. Data file structure was chosen to minimize the amount of disk storage space. Despite the inherent slowness of the system, its low cost and flexibility suggests general applicability.

  9. Molecular modeling of enzyme attachment on AFM probes.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Guedmiller S; Leite, Fabio L; Amarante, Adriano M; Franca, Eduardo F; Cunha, Richard A; Briggs, James M; Freitas, Luiz C G

    2013-09-01

    The immobilization of enzymes on atomic force microscope tip (AFM tip) surface is a crucial step in the development of nanobiosensors to be used in detection process. In this work, an atomistic modeling of the attachment of the acetyl coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC enzyme) on a functionalized AFM tip surface is proposed. Using electrostatic considerations, suitable enzyme-surface orientations with the active sites of the ACC enzyme available for interactions with bulk molecules were found. A 50 ns molecular dynamics trajectory in aqueous solution was obtained and surface contact area, hydrogen bonding and protein stability were analyzed. The enzyme-surface model proposed here with minor adjustment can be applied to study antigen-antibody interactions as well as enzyme immobilization on silica for chromatography applications. PMID:24029365

  10. Testing Departure from Additivity in Tukey’s Model using Shrinkage: Application to a Longitudinal Setting

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Yi-An; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Smith, Jennifer A.; Park, Sung Kyun; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Allison, Matthew A.; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Chen, Jinbo; Diez-Roux, Ana V.

    2014-01-01

    While there has been extensive research developing gene-environment interaction (GEI) methods in case-control studies, little attention has been given to sparse and efficient modeling of GEI in longitudinal studies. In a two-way table for GEI with rows and columns as categorical variables, a conventional saturated interaction model involves estimation of a specific parameter for each cell, with constraints ensuring identifiability. The estimates are unbiased but are potentially inefficient because the number of parameters to be estimated can grow quickly with increasing categories of row/column factors. On the other hand, Tukey’s one degree of freedom (df) model for non-additivity treats the interaction term as a scaled product of row and column main effects. Due to the parsimonious form of interaction, the interaction estimate leads to enhanced efficiency and the corresponding test could lead to increased power. Unfortunately, Tukey’s model gives biased estimates and low power if the model is misspecified. When screening multiple GEIs where each genetic and environmental marker may exhibit a distinct interaction pattern, a robust estimator for interaction is important for GEI detection. We propose a shrinkage estimator for interaction effects that combines estimates from both Tukey’s and saturated interaction models and use the corresponding Wald test for testing interaction in a longitudinal setting. The proposed estimator is robust to misspecification of interaction structure. We illustrate the proposed methods using two longitudinal studies — the Normative Aging Study and the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. PMID:25112650

  11. Water models based on a single potential energy surface and different molecular degrees of freedom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Martin, Humberto; Hernández-Cobos, Jorge; Ortega-Blake, Iván

    2005-06-01

    Up to now it has not been possible to neatly assess whether a deficient performance of a model is due to poor parametrization of the force field or the lack of inclusion of enough molecular properties. This work compares several molecular models in the framework of the same force field, which was designed to include many-body nonadditive effects: (a) a polarizable and flexible molecule with constraints that account for the quantal nature of the vibration [B. Hess, H. Saint-Martin, and H. J. C. Berendsen, J. Chem. Phys. 116, 9602 (2002), H. Saint-Martin, B. Hess, and H. J. C. Berendsen, J. Chem. Phys. 120, 11133 (2004)], (b) a polarizable and classically flexible molecule [H. Saint-Martin, J. Hernández-Cobos, M. I. Bernal-Uruchurtu, I. Ortega-Blake, and H. J. C. Berendsen, J. Chem. Phys. 113, 10899 (2000)], (c) a polarizable and rigid molecule, and finally (d) a nonpolarizable and rigid molecule. The goal is to determine how significant the different molecular properties are. The results indicate that all factors—nonadditivity, polarizability, and intramolecular flexibility—are important. Still, approximations can be made in order to diminish the computational cost of the simulations with a small decrease in the accuracy of the predictions, provided that those approximations are counterbalanced by the proper inclusion of an effective molecular property, that is, an average molecular geometry or an average dipole. Hence instead of building an effective force field by parametrizing it in order to reproduce the properties of a specific phase, a building approach is proposed that is based on adequately restricting the molecular flexibility and/or polarizability of a model potential fitted to unimolecular properties, pair interactions, and many-body nonadditive contributions. In this manner, the same parental model can be used to simulate the same substance under a wide range of thermodynamic conditions. An additional advantage of this approach is that, as the force

  12. Wall-models for large eddy simulation based on a generic additive-filter formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Rocha, Martin

    Based on the philosophy of only resolving the large scales of turbulent motion, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) has demonstrated potential to provide high-fidelity turbulence simulations at low computational cost. However, when the scales that control the turbulence in a particular flow are not large, LES has to increase significantly its computational cost to provide accurate predictions. This is the case in wall-bounded flows, where the grid resolution required by LES to resolve the near-wall structures is close to the requirements to resolve the smallest dissipative scales in turbulence. Therefore, to reduce this demanding requirement, it has been proposed to model the near-wall region with Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, in what is known as hybrid RANS/LES approach. In this work, the mathematical implications of merging two different turbulence modeling approaches are addressed by deriving the exact hybrid RANS/LES Navier-Stokes equations. These equations are derived by introducing an additive-filter, which linearly combines the RANS and LES operators with a blending function. The equations derived with the additive-filter predict additional hybrid terms, which represent the interactions between RANS and LES formulations. Theoretically, the prediction of the hybrid terms demonstrates that the hybridization of the two approaches cannot be accomplished only by the turbulence model equations, as it is claimed in current hybrid RANS/LES models. The importance of the exact hybrid RANS/LES equations is demonstrated by conducting numerical calculations on a turbulent flat-plate boundary layer. Results indicate that the hybrid terms help to maintain an equilibrated model transition when the hybrid formulation switches from RANS to LES. Results also indicate, that when the hybrid terms are not included, the accuracy of the calculations strongly relies on the blending function implemented in the additive-filter. On the other hand, if the exact equations are

  13. A review of molecular modelling of electric double layer capacitors.

    PubMed

    Burt, Ryan; Birkett, Greg; Zhao, X S

    2014-04-14

    Electric double-layer capacitors are a family of electrochemical energy storage devices that offer a number of advantages, such as high power density and long cyclability. In recent years, research and development of electric double-layer capacitor technology has been growing rapidly, in response to the increasing demand for energy storage devices from emerging industries, such as hybrid and electric vehicles, renewable energy, and smart grid management. The past few years have witnessed a number of significant research breakthroughs in terms of novel electrodes, new electrolytes, and fabrication of devices, thanks to the discovery of innovative materials (e.g. graphene, carbide-derived carbon, and templated carbon) and the availability of advanced experimental and computational tools. However, some experimental observations could not be clearly understood and interpreted due to limitations of traditional theories, some of which were developed more than one hundred years ago. This has led to significant research efforts in computational simulation and modelling, aimed at developing new theories, or improving the existing ones to help interpret experimental results. This review article provides a summary of research progress in molecular modelling of the physical phenomena taking place in electric double-layer capacitors. An introduction to electric double-layer capacitors and their applications, alongside a brief description of electric double layer theories, is presented first. Second, molecular modelling of ion behaviours of various electrolytes interacting with electrodes under different conditions is reviewed. Finally, key conclusions and outlooks are given. Simulations on comparing electric double-layer structure at planar and porous electrode surfaces under equilibrium conditions have revealed significant structural differences between the two electrode types, and porous electrodes have been shown to store charge more efficiently. Accurate electrolyte and

  14. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulation studies of a marine alkaline protease.

    PubMed

    Ji, Xiaofeng; Wang, Wei; Zheng, Yuan; Hao, Jianhua; Sun, Mi

    2012-01-01

    A cold-adapted marine alkaline protease (MP, accession no. ACY25898) was produced by a marine bacterium strain, which was isolated from Yellow Sea sediment in China. Many previous researches showed that this protease had potential application as a detergent additive. It was therefore crucial to determine the tertiary structure of MP. In this study, a homology model of MP was constructed using the multiple templates alignment method. The tools PROCHECK, ERRAT, and Verify_3D were used to check the effectiveness of the model. The result showed that 94% of residues were found in the most favored allowed regions, 6% were in the additional allowed region, and 96.50% of the residues had average 3D-1D scores of no less than 0.2. Meanwhile, the overall quality factor (ERRAT) of our model was 80.657. In this study, we also focused on elucidating the molecular mechanism of the two "flap" motions. Based on the optimized model, molecular-dynamics simulations in explicit solvent environments were carried out by using the AMBER11 package, for the entire protein, in order to characterize the dynamical behavior of the two flaps. Our results showed an open motion of the two flaps in the water solvent. This research may facilitate inhibitor virtual screening for MP and may also lay the foundation knowledge of mechanism of the inhibitors. PMID:23226008

  15. Additive SMILES-Based Carcinogenicity Models: Probabilistic Principles in the Search for Robust Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Toropov, Andrey A.; Toropova, Alla P.; Benfenati, Emilio

    2009-01-01

    Optimal descriptors calculated with the simplified molecular input line entry system (SMILES) have been utilized in modeling of carcinogenicity as continuous values (logTD50). These descriptors can be calculated using correlation weights of SMILES attributes calculated by the Monte Carlo method. A considerable subset of these attributes includes rare attributes. The use of these rare attributes can lead to overtraining. One can avoid the influence of the rare attributes if their correlation weights are fixed to zero. A function, limS, has been defined to identify rare attributes. The limS defines the minimum number of occurrences in the set of structures of the training (subtraining) set, to accept attributes as usable. If an attribute is present less than limS, it is considered “rare”, and thus not used. Two systems of building up models were examined: 1. classic training-test system; 2. balance of correlations for the subtraining and calibration sets (together, they are the original training set: the function of the calibration set is imitation of a preliminary test set). Three random splits into subtraining, calibration, and test sets were analysed. Comparison of abovementioned systems has shown that balance of correlations gives more robust prediction of the carcinogenicity for all three splits (split 1: rtest2=0.7514, stest=0.684; split 2: rtest2=0.7998, stest=0.600; split 3: rtest2=0.7192, stest=0.728). PMID:19742127

  16. Analysis of Time to Event Outcomes in Randomized Controlled Trials by Generalized Additive Models

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Christos; Unruh, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Randomized Controlled Trials almost invariably utilize the hazard ratio calculated with a Cox proportional hazard model as a treatment efficacy measure. Despite the widespread adoption of HRs, these provide a limited understanding of the treatment effect and may even provide a biased estimate when the assumption of proportional hazards in the Cox model is not verified by the trial data. Additional treatment effect measures on the survival probability or the time scale may be used to supplement HRs but a framework for the simultaneous generation of these measures is lacking. Methods By splitting follow-up time at the nodes of a Gauss Lobatto numerical quadrature rule, techniques for Poisson Generalized Additive Models (PGAM) can be adopted for flexible hazard modeling. Straightforward simulation post-estimation transforms PGAM estimates for the log hazard into estimates of the survival function. These in turn were used to calculate relative and absolute risks or even differences in restricted mean survival time between treatment arms. We illustrate our approach with extensive simulations and in two trials: IPASS (in which the proportionality of hazards was violated) and HEMO a long duration study conducted under evolving standards of care on a heterogeneous patient population. Findings PGAM can generate estimates of the survival function and the hazard ratio that are essentially identical to those obtained by Kaplan Meier curve analysis and the Cox model. PGAMs can simultaneously provide multiple measures of treatment efficacy after a single data pass. Furthermore, supported unadjusted (overall treatment effect) but also subgroup and adjusted analyses, while incorporating multiple time scales and accounting for non-proportional hazards in survival data. Conclusions By augmenting the HR conventionally reported, PGAMs have the potential to support the inferential goals of multiple stakeholders involved in the evaluation and appraisal of clinical trial

  17. Topsoil organic carbon content of Europe, a new map based on a generalised additive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brogniez, Delphine; Ballabio, Cristiano; Stevens, Antoine; Jones, Robert J. A.; Montanarella, Luca; van Wesemael, Bas

    2014-05-01

    There is an increasing demand for up-to-date spatially continuous organic carbon (OC) data for global environment and climatic modeling. Whilst the current map of topsoil organic carbon content for Europe (Jones et al., 2005) was produced by applying expert-knowledge based pedo-transfer rules on large soil mapping units, the aim of this study was to replace it by applying digital soil mapping techniques on the first European harmonised geo-referenced topsoil (0-20 cm) database, which arises from the LUCAS (land use/cover area frame statistical survey) survey. A generalized additive model (GAM) was calibrated on 85% of the dataset (ca. 17 000 soil samples) and a backward stepwise approach selected slope, land cover, temperature, net primary productivity, latitude and longitude as environmental covariates (500 m resolution). The validation of the model (applied on 15% of the dataset), gave an R2 of 0.27. We observed that most organic soils were under-predicted by the model and that soils of Scandinavia were also poorly predicted. The model showed an RMSE of 42 g kg-1 for mineral soils and of 287 g kg-1 for organic soils. The map of predicted OC content showed the lowest values in Mediterranean countries and in croplands across Europe, whereas highest OC content were predicted in wetlands, woodlands and in mountainous areas. The map of standard error of the OC model predictions showed high values in northern latitudes, wetlands, moors and heathlands, whereas low uncertainty was mostly found in croplands. A comparison of our results with the map of Jones et al. (2005) showed a general agreement on the prediction of mineral soils' OC content, most probably because the models use some common covariates, namely land cover and temperature. Our model however failed to predict values of OC content greater than 200 g kg-1, which we explain by the imposed unimodal distribution of our model, whose mean is tilted towards the majority of soils, which are mineral. Finally, average

  18. Predicting the Survival Time for Bladder Cancer Using an Additive Hazards Model in Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    TAPAK, Leili; MAHJUB, Hossein; SADEGHIFAR, Majid; SAIDIJAM, Massoud; POOROLAJAL, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Background: One substantial part of microarray studies is to predict patients’ survival based on their gene expression profile. Variable selection techniques are powerful tools to handle high dimensionality in analysis of microarray data. However, these techniques have not been investigated in competing risks setting. This study aimed to investigate the performance of four sparse variable selection methods in estimating the survival time. Methods: The data included 1381 gene expression measurements and clinical information from 301 patients with bladder cancer operated in the years 1987 to 2000 in hospitals in Denmark, Sweden, Spain, France, and England. Four methods of the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, smoothly clipped absolute deviation, the smooth integration of counting and absolute deviation and elastic net were utilized for simultaneous variable selection and estimation under an additive hazards model. The criteria of area under ROC curve, Brier score and c-index were used to compare the methods. Results: The median follow-up time for all patients was 47 months. The elastic net approach was indicated to outperform other methods. The elastic net had the lowest integrated Brier score (0.137±0.07) and the greatest median of the over-time AUC and C-index (0.803±0.06 and 0.779±0.13, respectively). Five out of 19 selected genes by the elastic net were significant (P<0.05) under an additive hazards model. It was indicated that the expression of RTN4, SON, IGF1R and CDC20 decrease the survival time, while the expression of SMARCAD1 increase it. Conclusion: The elastic net had higher capability than the other methods for the prediction of survival time in patients with bladder cancer in the presence of competing risks base on additive hazards model. PMID:27114989

  19. Comparison of prosthetic models produced by traditional and additive manufacturing methods

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin-Young; Kim, Hae-Young; Kim, Ji-Hwan; Kim, Jae-Hong

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE The purpose of this study was to verify the clinical-feasibility of additive manufacturing by comparing the accuracy of four different manufacturing methods for metal coping: the conventional lost wax technique (CLWT); subtractive methods with wax blank milling (WBM); and two additive methods, multi jet modeling (MJM), and micro-stereolithography (Micro-SLA). MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty study models were created using an acrylic model with the maxillary upper right canine, first premolar, and first molar teeth. Based on the scan files from a non-contact blue light scanner (Identica; Medit Co. Ltd., Seoul, Korea), thirty cores were produced using the WBM, MJM, and Micro-SLA methods, respectively, and another thirty frameworks were produced using the CLWT method. To measure the marginal and internal gap, the silicone replica method was adopted, and the silicone images obtained were evaluated using a digital microscope (KH-7700; Hirox, Tokyo, Japan) at 140X magnification. Analyses were performed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey post hoc test (α=.05). RESULTS The mean marginal gaps and internal gaps showed significant differences according to tooth type (P<.001 and P<.001, respectively) and manufacturing method (P<.037 and P<.001, respectively). Micro-SLA did not show any significant difference from CLWT regarding mean marginal gap compared to the WBM and MJM methods. CONCLUSION The mean values of gaps resulting from the four different manufacturing methods were within a clinically allowable range, and, thus, the clinical use of additive manufacturing methods is acceptable as an alternative to the traditional lost wax-technique and subtractive manufacturing. PMID:26330976

  20. Thermodynamic network model for predicting effects of substrate addition and other perturbations on subsurface microbial communities

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Istok; Melora Park; James McKinley; Chongxuan Liu; Lee Krumholz; Anne Spain; Aaron Peacock; Brett Baldwin

    2007-04-19

    The overall goal of this project is to develop and test a thermodynamic network model for predicting the effects of substrate additions and environmental perturbations on microbial growth, community composition and system geochemistry. The hypothesis is that a thermodynamic analysis of the energy-yielding growth reactions performed by defined groups of microorganisms can be used to make quantitative and testable predictions of the change in microbial community composition that will occur when a substrate is added to the subsurface or when environmental conditions change.

  1. Molecular Cytogenetic Identification of a New Wheat-Rye 6R Chromosome Disomic Addition Line with Powdery Mildew Resistance.

    PubMed

    An, Diaoguo; Zheng, Qi; Luo, Qiaoling; Ma, Pengtao; Zhang, Hongxia; Li, Lihui; Han, Fangpu; Xu, Hongxing; Xu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhou, Yilin

    2015-01-01

    Rye (Secale cereale L.) possesses many valuable genes that can be used for improving disease resistance, yield and environment adaptation of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). However, the documented resistance stocks derived from rye is faced severe challenge due to the variation of virulent isolates in the pathogen populations. Therefore, it is necessary to develop desirable germplasm and search for novel resistance gene sources against constantly accumulated variation of the virulent isolates. In the present study, a new wheat-rye line designated as WR49-1 was produced through distant hybridization and chromosome engineering protocols between common wheat cultivar Xiaoyan 6 and rye cultivar German White. Using sequential GISH (genomic in situ hybridization), mc-FISH (multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization), mc-GISH (multicolor GISH) and EST (expressed sequence tag)-based marker analysis, WR49-1 was proved to be a new wheat-rye 6R disomic addition line. As expected, WR49-1 showed high levels of resistance to wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt) pathogens prevalent in China at the adult growth stage and 19 of 23 Bgt isolates tested at the seedling stage. According to its reaction pattern to different Bgt isolates, WR49-1 may possess new resistance gene(s) for powdery mildew, which differed from the documented powdery mildew gene, including Pm20 on chromosome arm 6RL of rye. Additionally, WR49-1 was cytologically stable, had improved agronomic characteristics and therefore could serve as an important bridge for wheat breeding and chromosome engineering. PMID:26237413

  2. Molecular Cytogenetic Identification of a New Wheat-Rye 6R Chromosome Disomic Addition Line with Powdery Mildew Resistance

    PubMed Central

    An, Diaoguo; Zheng, Qi; Luo, Qiaoling; Ma, Pengtao; Zhang, Hongxia; Li, Lihui; Han, Fangpu; Xu, Hongxing; Xu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhou, Yilin

    2015-01-01

    Rye (Secale cereale L.) possesses many valuable genes that can be used for improving disease resistance, yield and environment adaptation of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). However, the documented resistance stocks derived from rye is faced severe challenge due to the variation of virulent isolates in the pathogen populations. Therefore, it is necessary to develop desirable germplasm and search for novel resistance gene sources against constantly accumulated variation of the virulent isolates. In the present study, a new wheat-rye line designated as WR49-1 was produced through distant hybridization and chromosome engineering protocols between common wheat cultivar Xiaoyan 6 and rye cultivar German White. Using sequential GISH (genomic in situ hybridization), mc-FISH (multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization), mc-GISH (multicolor GISH) and EST (expressed sequence tag)-based marker analysis, WR49-1 was proved to be a new wheat-rye 6R disomic addition line. As expected, WR49-1 showed high levels of resistance to wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt) pathogens prevalent in China at the adult growth stage and 19 of 23 Bgt isolates tested at the seedling stage. According to its reaction pattern to different Bgt isolates, WR49-1 may possess new resistance gene(s) for powdery mildew, which differed from the documented powdery mildew gene, including Pm20 on chromosome arm 6RL of rye. Additionally, WR49-1 was cytologically stable, had improved agronomic characteristics and therefore could serve as an important bridge for wheat breeding and chromosome engineering. PMID:26237413

  3. Fracture of Carbon Nanotube - Amorphous Carbon Composites: Molecular Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising candidates for use as reinforcements in next generation structural composite materials because of their extremely high specific stiffness and strength. They cannot, however, be viewed as simple replacements for carbon fibers because there are key differences between these materials in areas such as handling, processing, and matrix design. It is impossible to know for certain that CNT composites will represent a significant advance over carbon fiber composites before these various factors have been optimized, which is an extremely costly and time intensive process. This work attempts to place an upper bound on CNT composite mechanical properties by performing molecular dynamics simulations on idealized model systems with a reactive forcefield that permits modeling of both elastic deformations and fracture. Amorphous carbon (AC) was chosen for the matrix material in this work because of its structural simplicity and physical compatibility with the CNT fillers. It is also much stiffer and stronger than typical engineering polymer matrices. Three different arrangements of CNTs in the simulation cell have been investigated: a single-wall nanotube (SWNT) array, a multi-wall nanotube (MWNT) array, and a SWNT bundle system. The SWNT and MWNT array systems are clearly idealizations, but the SWNT bundle system is a step closer to real systems in which individual tubes aggregate into large assemblies. The effect of chemical crosslinking on composite properties is modeled by adding bonds between the CNTs and AC. The balance between weakening the CNTs and improving fiber-matrix load transfer is explored by systematically varying the extent of crosslinking. It is, of course, impossible to capture the full range of deformation and fracture processes that occur in real materials with even the largest atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. With this limitation in mind, the simulation results reported here provide a plausible upper limit on

  4. A hybrid model of molecular regulation and population dynamics for yeast autophagy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Huiqin; Lei, Jinzhi

    2016-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved lysosome-based degradation process that is involved in maintaining cellular homeostasis and stress responses. Dysregulation of autophagy is known to associate with many diseases. In this paper, we establish a Hybrid model of Molecular regulation and Population dynamics (HMP model) for yeast autophagy to study how autophagy regulation at molecular level affects the cell population dynamics under the stress of starvation. The model includes interactions between amino acids, TORC1, Atg1 complex, and Atg8 lipidation at the molecular level, and cell death and division at the cell behavior level. Two feedback loops are involved in autophagy induction, in which the negative feedback of TORC1 activation has been known previously, and the positive feedback between TORC1 and Atg1 complex formation is introduced according to the similarity of Drosophila and mammalian cells. We demonstrate that the two feedback loops play distinct roles in autophagy regulation. The positive feedback is pro-survival, whereas the negative feedback has little effect on the survival of population during starvation. In addition, autophagy deficient cells can be rescued from starvation by amino acid exchanges from their neighboring wild type cells. PMID:27103581

  5. Multi-scale modelling of supercapacitors: From molecular simulations to a transmission line model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pean, C.; Rotenberg, B.; Simon, P.; Salanne, M.

    2016-09-01

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations of a typical nanoporous-carbon based supercapacitor. The organic electrolyte consists in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium and hexafluorophosphate ions dissolved in acetonitrile. We simulate systems at equilibrium, for various applied voltages. This allows us to determine the relevant thermodynamic (capacitance) and transport (in-pore resistivities) properties. These quantities are then injected in a transmission line model for testing its ability to predict the charging properties of the device. The results from this macroscopic model are in good agreement with non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations, which validates its use for interpreting electrochemical impedance experiments.

  6. Mechanical Properties of Nanostructured Materials Determined Through Molecular Modeling Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clancy, Thomas C.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2005-01-01

    The potential for gains in material properties over conventional materials has motivated an effort to develop novel nanostructured materials for aerospace applications. These novel materials typically consist of a polymer matrix reinforced with particles on the nanometer length scale. In this study, molecular modeling is used to construct fully atomistic models of a carbon nanotube embedded in an epoxy polymer matrix. Functionalization of the nanotube which consists of the introduction of direct chemical bonding between the polymer matrix and the nanotube, hence providing a load transfer mechanism, is systematically varied. The relative effectiveness of functionalization in a nanostructured material may depend on a variety of factors related to the details of the chemical bonding and the polymer structure at the nanotube-polymer interface. The objective of this modeling is to determine what influence the details of functionalization of the carbon nanotube with the polymer matrix has on the resulting mechanical properties. By considering a range of degree of functionalization, the structure-property relationships of these materials is examined and mechanical properties of these models are calculated using standard techniques.

  7. Stereoselective synthesis and molecular modeling of chiral cyclopentanes.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Jalil, Raid J; Steinbrecher, Thomas; Al-Harthy, Thuraya; Mahal, Ahmed; Abou-Zied, Osama K; Voelter, Wolfgang

    2015-10-13

    The reaction of 3-methyseleno-2-methylselenomethyl-propene with benzyl 2,3-anhydro-4-O-triflyl-β-L-ribopyranoside provides a major convenient enantiomeric product of 1-methylene-(benzyl3,4-dideoxy-α-D-arabinopyranoso)-[3,4-c]-cyclopentane, with benzyl-2,3-anhydro-4-deoxy-4-C-(2-methyl- propen-3-yl)-α-D-lyxopyranoside as a minor product. While the reaction of 3-methyseleno-2-[methylselenomethyl]-propene with benzyl 2,3-anhydro-4-O-triflyl-α-D-ribopyranoside produces a good yield of benzyl-2,3-anhydro-4-deoxy-4-C-(2-methylpropen-3-yl)-α-D-lyxo-pyranoside. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulations indicate that the intermediate in the reaction of the β-L sugar frequently occupies an optimal conformation that leads to the formation of cyclopentane, while the intermediate in the reaction of the α-D sugar has a very small probability. The results point to the dominant role of the β-L sugar intermediate in controlling the cyclopentane formation. PMID:26267888

  8. The molecular face of lipid rafts in model membranes

    PubMed Central

    Risselada, H. Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2008-01-01

    Cell membranes contain a large number of different lipid species. Such a multicomponent mixture exhibits a complex phase behavior with regions of structural and compositional heterogeneity. Especially domains formed in ternary mixtures, composed of saturated and unsaturated lipids together with cholesterol, have received a lot of attention as they may resemble raft formation in real cells. Here we apply a simulation model to assess the molecular nature of these domains at the nanoscale, information that has thus far eluded experimental determination. We are able to show the spontaneous separation of a saturated phosphatidylcholine (PC)/unsaturated PC/cholesterol mixture into a liquid-ordered and a liquid-disordered phase with structural and dynamic properties closely matching experimental data. The near-atomic resolution of the simulations reveals remarkable features of both domains and the boundary domain interface. Furthermore, we predict the existence of a small surface tension between the monolayer leaflets that drives registration of the domains. At the level of molecular detail, raft-like lipid mixtures show a surprising face with possible implications for many cell membrane processes. PMID:18987307

  9. Femtosecond molecular dynamics of tautomerization in model base pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douhal, A.; Kim, S. K.; Zewail, A. H.

    1995-11-01

    HYDROGEN bonds commonly lend robustness and directionality to molecular recognition processes and supramolecular structures1,2. In particular, the two or three hydrogen bonds in Watson-Crick base pairs bind the double-stranded DNA helix and determine the complementarity of the pairing. Watson and Crick pointed out3, however, that the possible tautomers of base pairs, in which hydrogen atoms become attached to the donor atom of the hydrogen bond, might disturb the genetic code, as the tautomer is capable of pairing with different partners. But the dynamics of hydrogen bonds in general, and of this tautomerization process in particular, are not well understood. Here we report observations of the femtosecond dynamics of tautomerization in model base pairs (7-azaindole dimers) containing two hydrogen bonds. Because of the femtosecond resolution of proton motions, we are able to examine the cooperativity of formation of the tautomer (in which the protons on each base are shifted sequentially to the other base), and to determine the characteristic timescales of the motions in a solvent-free environment. We find that the first step occurs on a timescale of a few hundred femtoseconds, whereas the second step, to form the full tautomer, is much slower, taking place within several picoseconds; the timescales are changed significantly by replacing hydrogen with deuterium. These results establish the molecular basis of the dynamics and the role of quantum tunnelling.

  10. Molecular model for force production and transmission during vertebrate gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Pfister, Katherine; Shook, David R; Chang, Chenbei; Keller, Ray; Skoglund, Paul

    2016-02-15

    Vertebrate embryos undergo dramatic shape changes at gastrulation that require locally produced and anisotropically applied forces, yet how these forces are produced and transmitted across tissues remains unclear. We show that depletion of myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) levels in the embryo blocks force generation at gastrulation through two distinct mechanisms: destabilizing the myosin II (MII) hexameric complex and inhibiting MII contractility. Molecular dissection of these two mechanisms demonstrates that normal convergence force generation requires MII contractility and we identify a set of molecular phenotypes correlated with both this failure of convergence force generation in explants and of blastopore closure in whole embryos. These include reduced rates of actin movement, alterations in C-cadherin dynamics and a reduction in the number of polarized lamellipodia on intercalating cells. By examining the spatial relationship between C-cadherin and actomyosin we also find evidence for formation of transcellular linear arrays incorporating these proteins that could transmit mediolaterally oriented tensional forces. These data combine to suggest a multistep model to explain how cell intercalation can occur against a force gradient to generate axial extension forces. First, polarized lamellipodia extend mediolaterally and make new C-cadherin-based contacts with neighboring mesodermal cell bodies. Second, lamellipodial flow of actin coalesces into a tension-bearing, MII-contractility-dependent node-and-cable actin network in the cell body cortex. And third, this actomyosin network contracts to generate mediolateral convergence forces in the context of these transcellular arrays. PMID:26884399

  11. Analysis and Modeling of soil hydrology under different soil additives in artificial runoff plots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruidisch, M.; Arnhold, S.; Kettering, J.; Huwe, B.; Kuzyakov, Y.; Ok, Y.; Tenhunen, J. D.

    2009-12-01

    The impact of monsoon events during June and July in the Korean project region Haean Basin, which is located in the northeastern part of South Korea plays a key role for erosion, leaching and groundwater pollution risk by agrochemicals. Therefore, the project investigates the main hydrological processes in agricultural soils under field and laboratory conditions on different scales (plot, hillslope and catchment). Soil hydrological parameters were analysed depending on different soil additives, which are known for prevention of soil erosion and nutrient loss as well as increasing of water infiltration, aggregate stability and soil fertility. Hence, synthetic water-soluble Polyacrylamides (PAM), Biochar (Black Carbon mixed with organic fertilizer), both PAM and Biochar were applied in runoff plots at three agricultural field sites. Additionally, as control a subplot was set up without any additives. The field sites were selected in areas with similar hillslope gradients and with emphasis on the dominant land management form of dryland farming in Haean, which is characterised by row planting and row covering by foil. Hydrological parameters like satured water conductivity, matrix potential and water content were analysed by infiltration experiments, continuous tensiometer measurements, time domain reflectometry as well as pressure plates to indentify characteristic water retention curves of each horizon. Weather data were observed by three weather stations next to the runoff plots. Measured data also provide the input data for modeling water transport in the unsatured zone in runoff plots with HYDRUS 1D/2D/3D and SWAT (Soil & Water Assessment Tool).

  12. Guarana provides additional stimulation over caffeine alone in the planarian model.

    PubMed

    Moustakas, Dimitrios; Mezzio, Michael; Rodriguez, Branden R; Constable, Mic Andre; Mulligan, Margaret E; Voura, Evelyn B

    2015-01-01

    The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of guarana over caffeine alone. Yet, despite the growing use of guarana as an additive in energy drinks, and a burgeoning market for it as a nutritional supplement, the science examining guarana and how it affects other dietary ingredients is lacking. To appreciate the stimulant effects of guarana and other natural products, a straightforward model to investigate their physiological properties is needed. The planarian provides such a system. The locomotor activity and convulsive response of planarians with substance exposure has been shown to provide an excellent system to measure the effects of drug stimulation, addiction and withdrawal. To gauge the stimulant effects of guarana we studied how it altered the locomotor activity of the planarian species Dugesia tigrina. We report evidence that guarana seeds provide additional stimulation over caffeine alone, and document the changes to this stimulation in the context of both caffeine and glucose. PMID:25880065

  13. Guarana Provides Additional Stimulation over Caffeine Alone in the Planarian Model

    PubMed Central

    Moustakas, Dimitrios; Mezzio, Michael; Rodriguez, Branden R.; Constable, Mic Andre; Mulligan, Margaret E.; Voura, Evelyn B.

    2015-01-01

    The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of guarana over caffeine alone. Yet, despite the growing use of guarana as an additive in energy drinks, and a burgeoning market for it as a nutritional supplement, the science examining guarana and how it affects other dietary ingredients is lacking. To appreciate the stimulant effects of guarana and other natural products, a straightforward model to investigate their physiological properties is needed. The planarian provides such a system. The locomotor activity and convulsive response of planarians with substance exposure has been shown to provide an excellent system to measure the effects of drug stimulation, addiction and withdrawal. To gauge the stimulant effects of guarana we studied how it altered the locomotor activity of the planarian species Dugesia tigrina. We report evidence that guarana seeds provide additional stimulation over caffeine alone, and document the changes to this stimulation in the context of both caffeine and glucose. PMID:25880065

  14. Molecular Modeling of Ammonium, Calcium, Sulfur, and Sodium Lignosulphonates in Acid and Basic Aqueous Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar Valencia, P. J.; Bolívar Marinez, L. E.; Pérez Merchancano, S. T.

    2015-12-01

    Lignosulphonates (LS), also known as lignin sulfonates or sulfite lignin, are lignins in sulfonated forms, obtained from the "sulfite liquors," a residue of the wood pulp extraction process. Their main utility lies in its wide range of properties, they can be used as additives, dispersants, binders, fluxing, binder agents, etc. in fields ranging from food to fertilizer manufacture and even as agents in the preparation of ion exchange membranes. Since they can be manufactured relatively easy and quickly, and that its molecular size can be manipulated to obtain fragments of very low molecular weight, they are used as transport agents in the food industry, cosmetics, pharmaceutical and drug development, and as molecular elements for the treatment of health problems. In this paper, we study the electronic structural and optical characteristics of LS incorporating ammonium, sulfur, calcium, and sodium ions in acidic and basic aqueous media in order to gain a better understanding of their behavior and the very interesting properties exhibit. The studies were performed using the molecular modeling program HyperChem 5 using the semiempirical method PM3 of the NDO Family (neglect of differential overlap), to calculate the structural properties. We calculated the electronic and optical properties using the semiempirical method ZINDO / CI.

  15. Nonparametric Independence Screening in Sparse Ultra-High Dimensional Additive Models.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jianqing; Feng, Yang; Song, Rui

    2011-06-01

    A variable screening procedure via correlation learning was proposed in Fan and Lv (2008) to reduce dimensionality in sparse ultra-high dimensional models. Even when the true model is linear, the marginal regression can be highly nonlinear. To address this issue, we further extend the correlation learning to marginal nonparametric learning. Our nonparametric independence screening is called NIS, a specific member of the sure independence screening. Several closely related variable screening procedures are proposed. Under general nonparametric models, it is shown that under some mild technical conditions, the proposed independence screening methods enjoy a sure screening property. The extent to which the dimensionality can be reduced by independence screening is also explicitly quantified. As a methodological extension, a data-driven thresholding and an iterative nonparametric independence screening (INIS) are also proposed to enhance the finite sample performance for fitting sparse additive models. The simulation results and a real data analysis demonstrate that the proposed procedure works well with moderate sample size and large dimension and performs better than competing methods. PMID:22279246

  16. Creep damage in a localized load sharing fibre bundle model with additional ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lennartz-Sassinek, Sabine; Danku, Zsuzsa; Main, Ian; Kun, Ferenc

    2013-04-01

    Many fields of science are interested in the damage growth in earth materials. Often the damage propagates not in big avalanches like the crack growth measured by acoustic emissions. Also "silent" damage may occur whose emissions are either to small to be detected or mix with back ground noise. These silent emissions may carry the majority of the over all damage in a system until failure. One famous model for damage growth is the fibre bundle model. Here we consider an extended version of a localized load sharing fibre bundle model which incorporates additional time dependent ageing of each fibre motivated by a chemically active environment. We present the non-trivial time dependent damage growth in this model in the low load limit representing creep damage far away from failure. We show both numerical simulations and analytical equations describing the damage rate of silent events and the corresponding amount of triggered "acoustic" damage. The analytical description is in agreement with the numerical results.

  17. Model Scramjet Inlet Unstart Induced by Mass Addition and Heat Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Seong-Kyun; Baccarella, Damiano; McGann, Brendan; Liu, Qili; Wermer, Lydiy; Do, Hyungrok

    2015-11-01

    The inlet unstart phenomena in a model scramjet are investigated at an arc-heated hypersonic wind tunnel. The unstart induced by nitrogen or ethylene jets at low or high enthalpy Mach 4.5 freestream flow conditions are compared. The jet injection pressurizes the downstream flow by mass addition and flow blockage. In case of the ethylene jet injection, heat release from combustion increases the backpressure further. Time-resolved schlieren imaging is performed at the jet and the lip of the model inlet to visualize the flow features during unstart. High frequency pressure measurements are used to provide information on pressure fluctuation at the scramjet wall. In both of the mass and heat release driven unstart cases, it is observed that there are similar flow transient and quasi-steady behaviors of unstart shockwave system during the unstart processes. Combustion driven unstart induces severe oscillatory flow motions of the jet and the unstart shock at the lip of the scramjet inlet after the completion of the unstart process, while the unstarted flow induced by solely mass addition remains relatively steady. The discrepancies between the processes of mass and heat release driven unstart are explained by flow choking mechanism.

  18. Determinants of Low Birth Weight in Malawi: Bayesian Geo-Additive Modelling.

    PubMed

    Ngwira, Alfred; Stanley, Christopher C

    2015-01-01

    Studies on factors of low birth weight in Malawi have neglected the flexible approach of using smooth functions for some covariates in models. Such flexible approach reveals detailed relationship of covariates with the response. The study aimed at investigating risk factors of low birth weight in Malawi by assuming a flexible approach for continuous covariates and geographical random effect. A Bayesian geo-additive model for birth weight in kilograms and size of the child at birth (less than average or average and higher) with district as a spatial effect using the 2010 Malawi demographic and health survey data was adopted. A Gaussian model for birth weight in kilograms and a binary logistic model for the binary outcome (size of child at birth) were fitted. Continuous covariates were modelled by the penalized (p) splines and spatial effects were smoothed by the two dimensional p-spline. The study found that child birth order, mother weight and height are significant predictors of birth weight. Secondary education for mother, birth order categories 2-3 and 4-5, wealth index of richer family and mother height were significant predictors of child size at birth. The area associated with low birth weight was Chitipa and areas with increased risk to less than average size at birth were Chitipa and Mchinji. The study found support for the flexible modelling of some covariates that clearly have nonlinear influences. Nevertheless there is no strong support for inclusion of geographical spatial analysis. The spatial patterns though point to the influence of omitted variables with some spatial structure or possibly epidemiological processes that account for this spatial structure and the maps generated could be used for targeting development efforts at a glance. PMID:26114866

  19. A model for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Yue; Friauf, Robert J.

    1989-01-01

    A technique is introduced for including thermal conduction in molecular dynamics simulations for solids. A model is developed to allow energy flow between the computational cell and the bulk of the solid when periodic boundary conditions cannot be used. Thermal conduction is achieved by scaling the velocities of atoms in a transitional boundary layer. The scaling factor is obtained from the thermal diffusivity, and the results show good agreement with the solution for a continuous medium at long times. The effects of different temperature and size of the system, and of variations in strength parameter, atomic mass, and thermal diffusivity were investigated. In all cases, no significant change in simulation results has been found.

  20. Modeling of ion complexation and extraction using substructural molecular fragments

    PubMed

    Solov'ev; Varnek; Wipff

    2000-05-01

    A substructural molecular fragment (SMF) method has been developed to model the relationships between the structure of organic molecules and their thermodynamic parameters of complexation or extraction. The method is based on the splitting of a molecule into fragments, and on calculations of their contributions to a given property. It uses two types of fragments: atom/bond sequences and "augmented atoms" (atoms with their nearest neighbors). The SMF approach is tested on physical properties of C2-C9 alkanes (boiling point, molar volume, molar refraction, heat of vaporization, surface tension, melting point, critical temperature, and critical pressures) and on octanol/water partition coefficients. Then, it is applied to the assessment of (i) complexation stability constants of alkali cations with crown ethers and phosphoryl-containing podands, and of beta-cyclodextrins with mono- and 1,4-disubstituted benzenes, and (ii) solvent extraction constants for the complexes of uranyl cation by phosphoryl-containing ligands. PMID:10850791

  1. Model results for graphene electrodes in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Carlo; Italo Trioni, Mario; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Lukose Sebastian, Kizhakeyil; Sánchez Portal, Daniel

    2012-02-01

    Graphene is a material with a high potential for nanoelectronic applications as transparent conductive electrode. In view of a graphene-based electronics, a possible way to bridge graphene electrodes is by molecular linkers either organic molecules or graphene-derived systems such as graphene nanoribbons (GNR). In the present work, we investigated the electronic and conductive properties of such junctions for two different devices. First we modeled a photochromic switch based on diarylethene molecules, which can be activated/deactivated by light. We found a large on/off current ratio, which can be improved by modifying the functional groups of the molecule. We then investigated the properties of graphene/GNR/graphene junctions, showing that their conductive properties can be tailored by changing the length and width of the GNR. The calculations have been carried out by using the non-equilibrium Green's function method combined with density functional theory.

  2. Scratch modeling of polymeric materials with molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilbig, Travis

    It is impossible to determine the amount of money that is spent every replacing products damaged from wear, but it is safe to assume that it is in the millions of dollars. With metallic materials, liquid lubricants are often used to prevent wear from materials rubbing against one another. However, with polymeric materials, liquid lubricants cause swelling, creating an increase in friction and therefore increasing the wear. Therefore, a different method or methods to mitigate wear in polymers should be developed. For better understanding of the phenomenon of wear, scratch resistance testing can be used. For this project, classic molecular dynamics is used to study the mechanics of nanometer scale scratching on amorphous polymeric materials. As a first approach, a model was created for polyethylene, considering intramolecular and intermolecular interactions as well as mass and volume of the CH 2 monomers in a polymer chain. The obtained results include analysis of penetration depth and recovery percentage related to indenter force and size.

  3. Molecular thermodynamic modeling of droplet-type microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Livia A; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2012-01-24

    Microemulsions are nanoheterogeneous, thermodynamically stable, spontaneously forming mixtures of oil and water by means of surfactants, with or without cosurfactants. The pledge to use small volumes of amphiphile molecules compared to large amounts of bulk phase modifiers in a variety of chemical and industrial processes, from enhanced oil recovery to biotechnology, fosters continuous investigation and an improved understanding of these systems. In this work, we develop a molecular thermodynamic theory for droplet-type microemulsions, both water-in-oil and oil-in-water, and provide the theoretical formulation for three-component microemulsions. Our thermodynamic model, which is based on a direct minimization of the Gibbs free energy of the total system, predicts the structural and compositional features of microemulsions. The predictions are compared with experimental data for droplet size in water-alkane-didodecyl dimethylammonium bromide systems. PMID:22149425

  4. Temperature Effect on Micelle Formation: Molecular Thermodynamic Model Revisited.

    PubMed

    Khoshnood, Atefeh; Lukanov, Boris; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Temperature affects the aggregation of macromolecules such as surfactants, polymers, and proteins in aqueous solutions. The effect on the critical micelle concentration (CMC) is often nonmonotonic. In this work, the effect of temperature on the micellization of ionic and nonionic surfactants in aqueous solutions is studied using a molecular thermodynamic model. Previous studies based on this technique have predicted monotonic behavior for ionic surfactants. Our investigation shows that the choice of tail transfer energy to describe the hydrophobic effect between the surfactant tails and the polar solvent molecules plays a key role in the predicted CMC. We modify the tail transfer energy by taking into account the effect of the surfactant head on the neighboring methylene group. The modification improves the description of the CMC and the predicted micellar size for aqueous solutions of sodium n-alkyl sulfate, dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), and n-alkyl polyoxyethylene. The new tail transfer energy describes the nonmonotonic behavior of CMC versus temperature. In the DTAB-water system, we redefine the head size by including the methylene group, next to the nitrogen, in the head. The change in the head size along with our modified tail transfer energy improves the CMC and aggregation size prediction significantly. Tail transfer is a dominant energy contribution in micellar and microemulsion systems. It also promotes the adsorption of surfactants at fluid-fluid interfaces and affects the formation of adsorbed layer at fluid-solid interfaces. Our proposed modifications have direct applications in the thermodynamic modeling of the effect of temperature on molecular aggregation, both in the bulk and at the interfaces. PMID:26854650

  5. Application of molecular modeling to polymer grafted nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adiga, Shashishekar P.

    Polymer chains undergo conformational transitions in response to a change in solvent quality of their environment, making them strong candidates to be used in smart nanometer-scale devices. In the present work molecular modeling is used to explore grafted polymer structures with various functionalities. The first part of this research focuses on two examples of selective transport through nanopores modified with polymer brush structures. The first is the investigation of solvent flow through nanopores grafted with linear chains. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to demonstrate how a stretch-collapse transition in grafted polymer chains can be used to control solvent flow rate through a nanopore in response to environmental stimuli. A continuum fluid dynamics method based on porous layer model for describing flow through the smart nanopore is described and its accuracy is analyzed by comparing with the results from MD simulations. The continuum method is then applied to determine regulation of water permeation in response to pH through a poly(L-glutamic acid) grafted nanoporous membrane. A second example is use of a rod-coil transition in "bottle brush" molecules that are grafted to the inside of a nanopore to size select macromolecules as they diffuse through the functionalized nanopores. These stimuli-responsive nanopores have a variety of potential applications including molecular sorting, smart drug delivery, and ultrafiltration, as well as controlled chemical release. Tethered polymers play an important role in biological structures as well. In the second part of the research, application of atomistic simulations to characterize the effect of phosphorylation on neurofilament structure is presented. Neurofilaments are intermediate filaments that regulate axonal diameter through their long, flexible side arms extending from the central core. Their functionality is imparted by polymer brush like structure that causes steric repulsion between the

  6. Modeling Carbon and Hydrocarbon Molecular Structures in EZTB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Seungwon; vonAllmen, Paul

    2007-01-01

    A software module that models the electronic and mechanical aspects of hydrocarbon molecules and carbon molecular structures on the basis of first principles has been written for incorporation into, and execution within, the Easy (Modular) Tight-Binding (EZTB) software infrastructure, which is summarized briefly in the immediately preceding article. Of particular interest, this module can model carbon crystals and nanotubes characterized by various coordinates and containing defects, without need to adjust parameters of the physical model. The module has been used to study the changes in electronic properties of carbon nanotubes, caused by bending of the nanotubes, for potential utility as the basis of a nonvolatile, electriccharge- free memory devices. For example, in one application of the module, it was found that an initially 50-nmlong carbon, (10,10)-chirality nanotube, which is a metallic conductor when straight, becomes a semiconductor with an energy gap of .3 meV when bent to a lateral displacement of 4 nm at the middle.

  7. Molecular Modeling and Structural Analysis of Arylesterase of Ancylostoma Duodenale

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Subhamay; Panda, Santamay; Kumari, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic worm infection of humans is one of the most commonly prevalent helminth infection that has imposed great impact on society and public health in the developing world. The two species of hookworm, namely Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus may be primarily responsible for causing parasitic infections in human beings. The highly prevalent areas for Ancylostoma duodenale infections are mainly India, Middle East, Australia, northern Africa and other parts of the world. The serum arylesterases/paraoxonases are family of enzymes that is involved in the hydrolysis of a number of organophosphorus insecticides to the nontoxic products. The participation of the enzymes in the breakdown of a variety of organophosphate substrates that is generally made up of paraoxon and numerous aromatic carboxylic acid esters (e.g., phenyl acetate), and hence combats the toxic effect of organophosphates. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate the arylesterases of Ancylostoma duodenale giving special importance to structure generation, validation of the generated models, distribution of secondary structural elements and positive charge distribution over the structure. By the implementation of comparative modeling approach we propose the first molecular model structure of arylesterases of Ancylostoma duodenale.

  8. A Novel Electrical Model for Advection-Diffusion-Based Molecular Communication in Nanonetworks.

    PubMed

    Azadi, Mehdi; Abouei, Jamshid

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we propose an end-to-end electrical model to characterize the communication between two nanomachines via advection-diffusion motion along the conventional pipe medium. For this modeling, we consider three modules consisting of transmitter, advection-diffusion propagation and receiver. The modulation scheme and releasing molecules through the conventional pipe medium from the transmitter nanomachine is represented in the transmitter module. The advection-diffusion propagation of molecules along the flow-induced path is shown in advection-diffusion propagation module, and the demodulation scheme of bounded particles at the receiver nanomachine is characterized in the receiver module. Our objective is to find an electrical model of each module under the zero initial condition which enables us to represent the electrical circuit related to each module. The transmitter and the signal propagation models are built on the basis of the molecular advection-diffusion physics, whereas the receiver model is interpreted by stemming from the theory of the ligand-receptor binding chemical process. In addition, we employ the transfer function of modules to derive the normalized gain and the delay of each module. Supported by numerical results, we analyze the effect of physical parameters of the pipe medium on the total normalized gain and delay of molecular communications. PMID:27046879

  9. Modeling particulate matter concentrations measured through mobile monitoring in a deletion/substitution/addition approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jason G.; Hopke, Philip K.; Tian, Yilin; Baldwin, Nichole; Thurston, Sally W.; Evans, Kristin; Rich, David Q.

    2015-12-01

    Land use regression modeling (LUR) through local scale circular modeling domains has been used to predict traffic-related air pollution such as nitrogen oxides (NOX). LUR modeling for fine particulate matters (PM), which generally have smaller spatial gradients than NOX, has been typically applied for studies involving multiple study regions. To increase the spatial coverage for fine PM and key constituent concentrations, we designed a mobile monitoring network in Monroe County, New York to measure pollutant concentrations of black carbon (BC, wavelength at 880 nm), ultraviolet black carbon (UVBC, wavelength at 3700 nm) and Delta-C (the difference between the UVBC and BC concentrations) using the Clarkson University Mobile Air Pollution Monitoring Laboratory (MAPL). A Deletion/Substitution/Addition (D/S/A) algorithm was conducted, which used circular buffers as a basis for statistics. The algorithm maximizes the prediction accuracy for locations without measurements using the V-fold cross-validation technique, and it reduces overfitting compared to other approaches. We found that the D/S/A LUR modeling approach could achieve good results, with prediction powers of 60%, 63%, and 61%, respectively, for BC, UVBC, and Delta-C. The advantage of mobile monitoring is that it can monitor pollutant concentrations at hundreds of spatial points in a region, rather than the typical less than 100 points from a fixed site saturation monitoring network. This research indicates that a mobile saturation sampling network, when combined with proper modeling techniques, can uncover small area variations (e.g., 10 m) in particulate matter concentrations.

  10. The biobehavioral family model: testing social support as an additional exogenous variable.

    PubMed

    Woods, Sarah B; Priest, Jacob B; Roush, Tara

    2014-12-01

    This study tests the inclusion of social support as a distinct exogenous variable in the Biobehavioral Family Model (BBFM). The BBFM is a biopsychosocial approach to health that proposes that biobehavioral reactivity (anxiety and depression) mediates the relationship between family emotional climate and disease activity. Data for this study included married, English-speaking adult participants (n = 1,321; 55% female; M age = 45.2 years) from the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, a nationally representative epidemiological study of the frequency of mental disorders in the United States. Participants reported their demographics, marital functioning, social support from friends and relatives, anxiety and depression (biobehavioral reactivity), number of chronic health conditions, and number of prescription medications. Confirmatory factor analyses supported the items used in the measures of negative marital interactions, social support, and biobehavioral reactivity, as well as the use of negative marital interactions, friends' social support, and relatives' social support as distinct factors in the model. Structural equation modeling indicated a good fit of the data to the hypothesized model (χ(2)  = 846.04, p = .000, SRMR = .039, CFI = .924, TLI = .914, RMSEA = .043). Negative marital interactions predicted biobehavioral reactivity (β = .38, p < .001), as did relatives' social support, inversely (β = -.16, p < .001). Biobehavioral reactivity predicted disease activity (β = .40, p < .001) and was demonstrated to be a significant mediator through tests of indirect effects. Findings are consistent with previous tests of the BBFM with adult samples, and suggest the important addition of family social support as a predicting factor in the model. PMID:24981970

  11. A habitat suitability model for Chinese sturgeon determined using the generalized additive method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yujun; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Shanghong

    2016-03-01

    The Chinese sturgeon is a type of large anadromous fish that migrates between the ocean and rivers. Because of the construction of dams, this sturgeon's migration path has been cut off, and this species currently is on the verge of extinction. Simulating suitable environmental conditions for spawning followed by repairing or rebuilding its spawning grounds are effective ways to protect this species. Various habitat suitability models based on expert knowledge have been used to evaluate the suitability of spawning habitat. In this study, a two-dimensional hydraulic simulation is used to inform a habitat suitability model based on the generalized additive method (GAM). The GAM is based on real data. The values of water depth and velocity are calculated first via the hydrodynamic model and later applied in the GAM. The final habitat suitability model is validated using the catch per unit effort (CPUEd) data of 1999 and 2003. The model results show that a velocity of 1.06-1.56 m/s and a depth of 13.33-20.33 m are highly suitable ranges for the Chinese sturgeon to spawn. The hydraulic habitat suitability indexes (HHSI) for seven discharges (4000; 9000; 12,000; 16,000; 20,000; 30,000; and 40,000 m3/s) are calculated to evaluate integrated habitat suitability. The results show that the integrated habitat suitability reaches its highest value at a discharge of 16,000 m3/s. This study is the first to apply a GAM to evaluate the suitability of spawning grounds for the Chinese sturgeon. The study provides a reference for the identification of potential spawning grounds in the entire basin.

  12. Dynamic, mechanistic, molecular-level modelling of cyanobacteria: Anabaena and nitrogen interaction.

    PubMed

    Hellweger, Ferdi L; Fredrick, Neil D; McCarthy, Mark J; Gardner, Wayne S; Wilhelm, Steven W; Paerl, Hans W

    2016-09-01

    Phytoplankton (eutrophication, biogeochemical) models are important tools for ecosystem research and management, but they generally have not been updated to include modern biology. Here, we present a dynamic, mechanistic, molecular-level (i.e. gene, transcript, protein, metabolite) model of Anabaena - nitrogen interaction. The model was developed using the pattern-oriented approach to model definition and parameterization of complex agent-based models. It simulates individual filaments, each with individual cells, each with genes that are expressed to yield transcripts and proteins. Cells metabolize various forms of N, grow and divide, and differentiate heterocysts when fixed N is depleted. The model is informed by observations from 269 laboratory experiments from 55 papers published from 1942 to 2014. Within this database, we identified 331 emerging patterns, and, excluding inconsistencies in observations, the model reproduces 94% of them. To explore a practical application, we used the model to simulate nutrient reduction scenarios for a hypothetical lake. For a 50% N only loading reduction, the model predicts that N fixation increases, but this fixed N does not compensate for the loading reduction, and the chlorophyll a concentration decreases substantially (by 33%). When N is reduced along with P, the model predicts an additional 8% reduction (compared to P only). PMID:27059435

  13. Generalized additive models used to predict species abundance in the Gulf of Mexico: an ecosystem modeling tool.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Michael; Ainsworth, Cameron H

    2013-01-01

    Spatially explicit ecosystem models of all types require an initial allocation of biomass, often in areas where fisheries independent abundance estimates do not exist. A generalized additive modelling (GAM) approach is used to describe the abundance of 40 species groups (i.e. functional groups) across the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using a large fisheries independent data set (SEAMAP) and climate scale oceanographic conditions. Predictor variables included in the model are chlorophyll a, sediment type, dissolved oxygen, temperature, and depth. Despite the presence of a large number of zeros in the data, a single GAM using a negative binomial distribution was suitable to make predictions of abundance for multiple functional groups. We present an example case study using pink shrimp (Farfantepenaeus duroarum) and compare the results to known distributions. The model successfully predicts the known areas of high abundance in the GoM, including those areas where no data was inputted into the model fitting. Overall, the model reliably captures areas of high and low abundance for the large majority of functional groups observed in SEAMAP. The result of this method allows for the objective setting of spatial distributions for numerous functional groups across a modeling domain, even where abundance data may not exist. PMID:23691223

  14. Generalized Additive Models Used to Predict Species Abundance in the Gulf of Mexico: An Ecosystem Modeling Tool

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Michael; Ainsworth, Cameron H.

    2013-01-01

    Spatially explicit ecosystem models of all types require an initial allocation of biomass, often in areas where fisheries independent abundance estimates do not exist. A generalized additive modelling (GAM) approach is used to describe the abundance of 40 species groups (i.e. functional groups) across the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using a large fisheries independent data set (SEAMAP) and climate scale oceanographic conditions. Predictor variables included in the model are chlorophyll a, sediment type, dissolved oxygen, temperature, and depth. Despite the presence of a large number of zeros in the data, a single GAM using a negative binomial distribution was suitable to make predictions of abundance for multiple functional groups. We present an example case study using pink shrimp (Farfantepenaeus duroarum) and compare the results to known distributions. The model successfully predicts the known areas of high abundance in the GoM, including those areas where no data was inputted into the model fitting. Overall, the model reliably captures areas of high and low abundance for the large majority of functional groups observed in SEAMAP. The result of this method allows for the objective setting of spatial distributions for numerous functional groups across a modeling domain, even where abundance data may not exist. PMID:23691223

  15. Nonlinear feedback in a six-dimensional Lorenz Model: impact of an additional heating term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, B.-W.

    2015-03-01

    In this study, a six-dimensional Lorenz model (6DLM) is derived, based on a recent study using a five-dimensional (5-D) Lorenz model (LM), in order to examine the impact of an additional mode and its accompanying heating term on solution stability. The new mode added to improve the representation of the steamfunction is referred to as a secondary streamfunction mode, while the two additional modes, that appear in both the 6DLM and 5DLM but not in the original LM, are referred to as secondary temperature modes. Two energy conservation relationships of the 6DLM are first derived in the dissipationless limit. The impact of three additional modes on solution stability is examined by comparing numerical solutions and ensemble Lyapunov exponents of the 6DLM and 5DLM as well as the original LM. For the onset of chaos, the critical value of the normalized Rayleigh number (rc) is determined to be 41.1. The critical value is larger than that in the 3DLM (rc ~ 24.74), but slightly smaller than the one in the 5DLM (rc ~ 42.9). A stability analysis and numerical experiments obtained using generalized LMs, with or without simplifications, suggest the following: (1) negative nonlinear feedback in association with the secondary temperature modes, as first identified using the 5DLM, plays a dominant role in providing feedback for improving the solution's stability of the 6DLM, (2) the additional heating term in association with the secondary streamfunction mode may destabilize the solution, and (3) overall feedback due to the secondary streamfunction mode is much smaller than the feedback due to the secondary temperature modes; therefore, the critical Rayleigh number of the 6DLM is comparable to that of the 5DLM. The 5DLM and 6DLM collectively suggest different roles for small-scale processes (i.e., stabilization vs. destabilization), consistent with the following statement by Lorenz (1972): If the flap of a butterfly's wings can be instrumental in generating a tornado, it can

  16. Nonlinear feedback in a six-dimensional Lorenz model: impact of an additional heating term

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, B.-W.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a six-dimensional Lorenz model (6DLM) is derived, based on a recent study using a five-dimensional (5-D) Lorenz model (LM), in order to examine the impact of an additional mode and its accompanying heating term on solution stability. The new mode added to improve the representation of the streamfunction is referred to as a secondary streamfunction mode, while the two additional modes, which appear in both the 6DLM and 5DLM but not in the original LM, are referred to as secondary temperature modes. Two energy conservation relationships of the 6DLM are first derived in the dissipationless limit. The impact of three additional modes on solution stability is examined by comparing numerical solutions and ensemble Lyapunov exponents of the 6DLM and 5DLM as well as the original LM. For the onset of chaos, the critical value of the normalized Rayleigh number (rc) is determined to be 41.1. The critical value is larger than that in the 3DLM (rc ~ 24.74), but slightly smaller than the one in the 5DLM (rc ~ 42.9). A stability analysis and numerical experiments obtained using generalized LMs, with or without simplifications, suggest the following: (1) negative nonlinear feedback in association with the secondary temperature modes, as first identified using the 5DLM, plays a dominant role in providing feedback for improving the solution's stability of the 6DLM, (2) the additional heating term in association with the secondary streamfunction mode may destabilize the solution, and (3) overall feedback due to the secondary streamfunction mode is much smaller than the feedback due to the secondary temperature modes; therefore, the critical Rayleigh number of the 6DLM is comparable to that of the 5DLM. The 5DLM and 6DLM collectively suggest different roles for small-scale processes (i.e., stabilization vs. destabilization), consistent with the following statement by Lorenz (1972): "If the flap of a butterfly's wings can be instrumental in generating a tornado, it can

  17. Impact of an additional chronic BDNF reduction on learning performance in an Alzheimer mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Psotta, Laura; Rockahr, Carolin; Gruss, Michael; Kirches, Elmar; Braun, Katharina; Lessmann, Volkmar; Bock, Jörg; Endres, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a crucial role in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathology. A number of studies demonstrated that AD patients exhibit reduced BDNF levels in the brain and the blood serum, and in addition, several animal-based studies indicated a potential protective effect of BDNF against Aβ-induced neurotoxicity. In order to further investigate the role of BDNF in the etiology of AD, we created a novel mouse model by crossing a well-established AD mouse model (APP/PS1) with a mouse exhibiting a chronic BDNF deficiency (BDNF+/−). This new triple transgenic mouse model enabled us to further analyze the role of BDNF in AD in vivo. We reasoned that in case BDNF has a protective effect against AD pathology, an AD-like phenotype in our new mouse model should occur earlier and/or in more severity than in the APP/PS1-mice. Indeed, the behavioral analysis revealed that the APP/PS1-BDNF+/−-mice show an earlier onset of learning impairments in a two-way active avoidance task in comparison to APP/PS1- and BDNF+/−-mice. However in the Morris water maze (MWM) test, we could not observe an overall aggrevated impairment in spatial learning and also short-term memory in an object recognition task remained intact in all tested mouse lines. In addition to the behavioral experiments, we analyzed the amyloid plaque pathology in the APP/PS1 and APP/PS1-BDNF+/−-mice and observed a comparable plaque density in the two genotypes. Moreover, our results revealed a higher plaque density in prefrontal cortical compared to hippocampal brain regions. Our data reveal that higher cognitive tasks requiring the recruitment of cortical networks appear to be more severely affected in our new mouse model than learning tasks requiring mainly sub-cortical networks. Furthermore, our observations of an accelerated impairment in active avoidance learning in APP/PS1-BDNF+/−-mice further supports the hypothesis that BDNF deficiency

  18. Modelling the structure of molecular clouds - I. A multiscale energy equipartition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veltchev, Todor V.; Donkov, Sava; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2016-07-01

    We present a model for describing the general structure of molecular clouds (MCs) at early evolutionary stages in terms of their mass-size relationship. Sizes are defined through threshold levels at which equipartitions between gravitational, turbulent and thermal energy |W| ˜ f(Ekin + Eth) take place, adopting interdependent scaling relations of velocity dispersion and density and assuming a lognormal density distribution at each scale. Variations of the equipartition coefficient 1 ≤ f ≤ 4 allow for modelling of star-forming regions at scales within the size range of typical MCs (≳4 pc). Best fits are obtained for regions with low or no star formation (Pipe, Polaris) as well for such with star-forming activity but with nearly lognormal distribution of column density (Rosette). An additional numerical test of the model suggests its applicability to cloud evolutionary times prior to the formation of first stars.

  19. Thermal Stability of Nanocrystalline Alloys by Solute Additions and A Thermodynamic Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saber, Mostafa

    and alpha → gamma phase transformation in Fe-Ni-Zr alloys. In addition to the experimental study of thermal stabilization of nanocrystalline Fe-Cr-Zr or Fe-Ni-Zr alloys, the thesis presented here developed a new predictive model, applicable to strongly segregating solutes, for thermodynamic stabilization of binary alloys. This model can serve as a benchmark for selecting solute and evaluating the possible contribution of stabilization. Following a regular solution model, both the chemical and elastic strain energy contributions are combined to obtain the mixing enthalpy. The total Gibbs free energy of mixing is then minimized with respect to simultaneous variations in the grain boundary volume fraction and the solute concentration in the grain boundary and the grain interior. The Lagrange multiplier method was used to obtained numerical solutions. Application are given for the temperature dependence of the grain size and the grain boundary solute excess for selected binary system where experimental results imply that thermodynamic stabilization could be operative. This thesis also extends the binary model to a new model for thermodynamic stabilization of ternary nanocrystalline alloys. It is applicable to strongly segregating size-misfit solutes and uses input data available in the literature. In a same manner as the binary model, this model is based on a regular solution approach such that the chemical and elastic strain energy contributions are incorporated into the mixing enthalpy DeltaHmix, and the mixing entropy DeltaSmix is obtained using the ideal solution approximation. The Gibbs mixing free energy Delta Gmix is then minimized with respect to simultaneous variations in grain growth and solute segregation parameters. The Lagrange multiplier method is similarly used to obtain numerical solutions for the minimum Delta Gmix. The temperature dependence of the nanocrystalline grain size and interfacial solute excess can be obtained for selected ternary systems. As

  20. Unveiling the molecular mechanism of brassinosteroids: Insights from structure-based molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Lei, Beilei; Liu, Jiyuan; Yao, Xiaojun

    2015-12-01

    Brassinosteroid (BR) phytohormones play indispensable roles in plant growth and development. Brassinolide (BL) and 24-epibrassinolide (24-epiBL) are the most active ones among the BRs reported thus far. Unfortunately, the extremely low natural content and intricate synthesis process limit their popularization in agricultural production. Earlier reports to discover alternative compounds have resulted in molecules with nearly same scaffold structure and without diversity in chemical space. In the present study, receptors structure based BRs regulation mechanism was analyzed. First, we examined the detailed binding interactions and their dynamic stability between BL and its receptor BRI1 and co-receptor BAK1. Then, the binding modes and binding free energies for 24-epiBL and a series of representative BRs binding with BRI1 and BRI1-BAK1 were carried out by molecular docking, energy minimization and MM-PBSA free energy calculation. The obtained binding structures and energetic results provided vital insights into the structural factors affecting the activity from both receptors and BRs aspects. Subsequently, the obtained knowledge will serve as valuable guidance to build pharmacophore models for rational screening of new scaffold alternative BRs. PMID:26362600

  1. Growth of Thin, Anisotropic, π-Conjugated Molecular Films by Stepwise "Click" Assembly of Molecular Building Blocks: Characterizing Reaction Yield, Surface Coverage, and Film Thickness versus Addition Step Number.

    PubMed

    Demissie, Abel T; Haugstad, Greg; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2015-07-15

    We report the systematic characterization of anisotropic, π-conjugated oligophenyleneimine (OPI) films synthesized using stepwise imine condensation, or "click" chemistry. Film synthesis began with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-formylthiophenol or 4-aminothiophenol on Au, followed by repetitive, alternate addition of terephthalaldehyde (benzene-1,4-dicarbaldehyde) or 1,4-benzenediamine to form π-conjugated films ranging from 0.6-5.5 nm in thickness. By systematically capping the OPI films with a redox or halogen label, we were able to measure the relative surface coverage after each monomer addition via Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Nuclear reaction analysis was also employed for the first time on a SAM to calculate the surface coverage of carbon atoms after each stepwise addition. These six different analysis methods indicate that the average extent of reaction is 99% for each addition step. The high yield and molecular surface coverage confirm the efficacy of Schiff base chemistry, at least with the terephthalaldehyde and 1,4-benzenediamine monomers, for preparing high-quality molecular films with π conjugation normal to the substrate. PMID:26098519

  2. An Alkaline Protease from Bacillus pumilus MP 27: Functional Analysis of Its Binding Model toward Its Applications As Detergent Additive

    PubMed Central

    Baweja, Mehak; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Singh, Puneet K.; Nain, Lata; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-01-01

    A proteolytic strain of Bacillus pumilus MP 27 was isolated from water samples of Southern ocean produced alkaline protease. Since protease production need expensive ingredients, an economically viable process was developed by using low cost carbon source, wheat straw, supplemented with peptone. This protease was active within temperature ranges 10–70°C at pH 9. This process was optimized by response surface methodology using a Box Bekhman design by Design Expert 7.0 software that increased the protease activity to 776.5 U/ml. Moreover, the enzyme was extremely stable at a broad range of temperature and pH retaining 69% of its activity at 50°C and 70% at pH 11. The enzyme exhibited excellent compatibility with surfactants and commercial detergents, showing 87% stability with triton X-100 and 100% stability with Tide commercial detergent. The results of the wash performance analysis demonstrated considerably good de-staining at 50 and 4°C with low supplementation (109 U/ml). Molecular modeling of the protease revealed the presence of serine proteases, subtilase family and serine active site and further docking supported the association of catalytic site with the various substrates. Certainly, such protease can be considered as a good detergent additive in detergent industry with a possibility to remove the stains effectively even in a cold wash. PMID:27536284

  3. An Alkaline Protease from Bacillus pumilus MP 27: Functional Analysis of Its Binding Model toward Its Applications As Detergent Additive.

    PubMed

    Baweja, Mehak; Tiwari, Rameshwar; Singh, Puneet K; Nain, Lata; Shukla, Pratyoosh

    2016-01-01

    A proteolytic strain of Bacillus pumilus MP 27 was isolated from water samples of Southern ocean produced alkaline protease. Since protease production need expensive ingredients, an economically viable process was developed by using low cost carbon source, wheat straw, supplemented with peptone. This protease was active within temperature ranges 10-70°C at pH 9. This process was optimized by response surface methodology using a Box Bekhman design by Design Expert 7.0 software that increased the protease activity to 776.5 U/ml. Moreover, the enzyme was extremely stable at a broad range of temperature and pH retaining 69% of its activity at 50°C and 70% at pH 11. The enzyme exhibited excellent compatibility with surfactants and commercial detergents, showing 87% stability with triton X-100 and 100% stability with Tide commercial detergent. The results of the wash performance analysis demonstrated considerably good de-staining at 50 and 4°C with low supplementation (109 U/ml). Molecular modeling of the protease revealed the presence of serine proteases, subtilase family and serine active site and further docking supported the association of catalytic site with the various substrates. Certainly, such protease can be considered as a good detergent additive in detergent industry with a possibility to remove the stains effectively even in a cold wash. PMID:27536284

  4. Design and tuning of standard additive model based fuzzy PID controllers for multivariable process systems.

    PubMed

    Harinath, Eranda; Mann, George K I

    2008-06-01

    This paper describes a design and two-level tuning method for fuzzy proportional-integral derivative (FPID) controllers for a multivariable process where the fuzzy inference uses the inference of standard additive model. The proposed method can be used for any n x n multi-input-multi-output process and guarantees closed-loop stability. In the two-level tuning scheme, the tuning follows two steps: low-level tuning followed by high-level tuning. The low-level tuning adjusts apparent linear gains, whereas the high-level tuning changes the nonlinearity in the normalized fuzzy output. In this paper, two types of FPID configurations are considered, and their performances are evaluated by using a real-time multizone temperature control problem having a 3 x 3 process system. PMID:18558531

  5. Use of generalised additive models to categorise continuous variables in clinical prediction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In medical practice many, essentially continuous, clinical parameters tend to be categorised by physicians for ease of decision-making. Indeed, categorisation is a common practice both in medical research and in the development of clinical prediction rules, particularly where the ensuing models are to be applied in daily clinical practice to support clinicians in the decision-making process. Since the number of categories into which a continuous predictor must be categorised depends partly on the relationship between the predictor and the outcome, the need for more than two categories must be borne in mind. Methods We propose a categorisation methodology for clinical-prediction models, using Generalised Additive Models (GAMs) with P-spline smoothers to determine the relationship between the continuous predictor and the outcome. The proposed method consists of creating at least one average-risk category along with high- and low-risk categories based on the GAM smooth function. We applied this methodology to a prospective cohort of patients with exacerbated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The predictors selected were respiratory rate and partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the blood (PCO2), and the response variable was poor evolution. An additive logistic regression model was used to show the relationship between the covariates and the dichotomous response variable. The proposed categorisation was compared to the continuous predictor as the best option, using the AIC and AUC evaluation parameters. The sample was divided into a derivation (60%) and validation (40%) samples. The first was used to obtain the cut points while the second was used to validate the proposed methodology. Results The three-category proposal for the respiratory rate was ≤ 20;(20,24];> 24, for which the following values were obtained: AIC=314.5 and AUC=0.638. The respective values for the continuous predictor were AIC=317.1 and AUC=0.634, with no statistically

  6. Estimation of the lag time in a subsequent monomer addition model for fibril elongation.

    PubMed

    Shoffner, Suzanne K; Schnell, Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Fibrillogenesis, the production or development of protein fibers, has been linked to protein folding diseases. The progress curve of fibrils or aggregates typically takes on a sigmoidal shape with a lag phase, a rapid growth phase, and a final plateau regime. The study of the lag phase and the estimation of its critical timescale provide insight into the factors regulating the fibrillation process. However, methods to estimate a quantitative expression for the lag time rely on empirical expressions, which cannot connect the lag time to kinetic parameters associated with the reaction mechanisms of protein fibrillation. Here we introduce an approach for the estimation of the lag time using the governing rate equations of the elementary reactions of a subsequent monomer addition model for protein fibrillation as a case study. We show that the lag time is given by the sum of the critical timescales for each fibril intermediate in the subsequent monomer addition mechanism and therefore reveals causal connectivity between intermediate species. Furthermore, we find that single-molecule assays of protein fibrillation can exhibit a lag phase without a nucleation process, while dyes and extrinsic fluorescent probe bulk assays of protein fibrillation do not exhibit an observable lag phase during template-dependent elongation. Our approach could be valuable for investigating the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors to the protein fibrillation reaction mechanism and provides physicochemical insights into parameters regulating the lag phase. PMID:27250246

  7. Supra-additive effects of tramadol and acetaminophen in a human pain model.

    PubMed

    Filitz, Jörg; Ihmsen, Harald; Günther, Werner; Tröster, Andreas; Schwilden, Helmut; Schüttler, Jürgen; Koppert, Wolfgang

    2008-06-01

    The combination of analgesic drugs with different pharmacological properties may show better efficacy with less side effects. Aim of this study was to examine the analgesic and antihyperalgesic properties of the weak opioid tramadol and the non-opioid acetaminophen, alone as well as in combination, in an experimental pain model in humans. After approval of the local Ethics Committee, 17 healthy volunteers were enrolled in this double-blind and placebo-controlled study in a cross-over design. Transcutaneous electrical stimulation at high current densities (29.6+/-16.2 mA) induced spontaneous acute pain (NRS=6 of 10) and distinct areas of hyperalgesia for painful mechanical stimuli (pinprick-hyperalgesia). Pain intensities as well as the extent of the areas of hyperalgesia were assessed before, during and 150 min after a 15 min lasting intravenous infusion of acetaminophen (650 mg), tramadol (75 mg), a combination of both (325 mg acetaminophen and 37.5mg tramadol), or saline 0.9%. Tramadol led to a maximum pain reduction of 11.7+/-4.2% with negligible antihyperalgesic properties. In contrast, acetaminophen led to a similar pain reduction (9.8+/-4.4%), but a sustained antihyperalgesic effect (34.5+/-14.0% reduction of hyperalgesic area). The combination of both analgesics at half doses led to a supra-additive pain reduction of 15.2+/-5.7% and an enhanced antihyperalgesic effect (41.1+/-14.3% reduction of hyperalgesic areas) as compared to single administration of acetaminophen. Our study provides first results on interactions of tramadol and acetaminophen on experimental pain and hyperalgesia in humans. Pharmacodynamic modeling combined with the isobolographic technique showed supra-additive effects of the combination of acetaminophen and tramadol concerning both, analgesia and antihyperalgesia. The results might act as a rationale for combining both analgesics. PMID:17709207

  8. Molecular dynamics modelling of radiation damage in zircon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grechanovsky, A. E.

    2009-04-01

    Zircon (ZrSiO4) is among actinide-bearing phases which has been proposed as a crystalline confinement matrix for nuclear waste management, especially for weapon-grade plutonium and UO2 spent fuel in the USA. Zircon is also widely used in geochronology. But, with accumulating α-decay damage, zircon undergoes a radiation induced transition to an amorphous (or metamict) state. So, in the present work molecular dynamics simulations (MD simulations) of zircon structure have been performed to study radiation damage in zircon. In this technique, one simulates the propagation of an energetic particle in a system of atoms interacting via model potentials, by integrating the Newton equations of motion. Author has used version 3.09 of the DL_POLY molecular simulation package. Zircon structure containing 181944 atoms (19x19x21 unit cells) was equilibrated at 300 K for 10 ps, and one Zr atom (usually called the primary knock-on atom, PKA) was given a velocity corresponding to an implantation energy of about 20 keV. MD simulations were performed in the microcanonical ensemble that is under conditions of constant particle number, volume and energy. Results of the MD simulations show that the number of interstitials is equal to 840 atoms. This is very close (4000-5000 atoms for 70 keV recoil atom 234Th) to what is measured in the diffuse x-ray scattering and NMR experiments on amorphous metamict samples (damaged by natural irradiation) of geological age. It has been shown that the damaged structure contains several depleted regions with characteristic sized up to 2,5 nm after single event and up to 4,5 nm after three overlapping events. Furthermore, these events produce channels of depleted matter between the overlapping damaged regions. These channels provide a high-diffusivity path for radiogenic Pb (percolation effect). Loss of radiogenic Pb may result in to incorrect dating of rocks.

  9. TOPICAL REVIEW: Fracture in glassy polymers: a molecular modeling perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rottler, Jörg

    2009-11-01

    Over the past 25 years, molecular modeling and simulations have provided important insights into the physics of deformation and fracture of glassy polymers. This review presents an overview of key results discussed in the context of experimentally observed polymer behavior. Both atomistic and coarse-grained polymer models have been used in different deformation protocols to study elastic properties, shear yielding, creep, physical aging, strain hardening and crazing. Simulations reproduce most of the macroscopic features of plasticity in polymer glasses such as stress-strain relations and creep response, and reveal information about the underlying atomistic processes. Trends of the shear yield stress with loading conditions, temperature and strain rate, and the atomistic dynamics under load have been systematically explored. Most polymers undergo physical aging, which leads to a history-dependent mechanical response. Simulations of strain hardening and crazing demonstrate the nature of polymer entanglements in the glassy state and the role of local plasticity and provide insight into the origin of fracture toughness of amorphous polymers.

  10. Fracture in glassy polymers: a molecular modeling perspective.

    PubMed

    Rottler, Jörg

    2009-11-18

    Over the past 25 years, molecular modeling and simulations have provided important insights into the physics of deformation and fracture of glassy polymers. This review presents an overview of key results discussed in the context of experimentally observed polymer behavior. Both atomistic and coarse-grained polymer models have been used in different deformation protocols to study elastic properties, shear yielding, creep, physical aging, strain hardening and crazing. Simulations reproduce most of the macroscopic features of plasticity in polymer glasses such as stress-strain relations and creep response, and reveal information about the underlying atomistic processes. Trends of the shear yield stress with loading conditions, temperature and strain rate, and the atomistic dynamics under load have been systematically explored. Most polymers undergo physical aging, which leads to a history-dependent mechanical response. Simulations of strain hardening and crazing demonstrate the nature of polymer entanglements in the glassy state and the role of local plasticity and provide insight into the origin of fracture toughness of amorphous polymers. PMID:21715863

  11. Understanding DNA under oxidative stress and sensitization: the role of molecular modeling

    PubMed Central

    Dumont, Elise; Monari, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    DNA is constantly exposed to damaging threats coming from oxidative stress, i.e., from the presence of free radicals and reactive oxygen species. Sensitization from exogenous and endogenous compounds that strongly enhance the frequency of light-induced lesions also plays an important role. The experimental determination of DNA lesions, though a difficult subject, is somehow well established and allows to elucidate even extremely rare DNA lesions. In parallel, molecular modeling has become fundamental to clearly understand the fine mechanisms related to DNA defects induction. Indeed, it offers an unprecedented possibility to get access to an atomistic or even electronic resolution. Ab initio molecular dynamics may also describe the time-evolution of the molecular system and its reactivity. Yet the modeling of DNA (photo-)reactions does necessitate elaborate multi-scale methodologies to tackle a damage induction reactivity that takes place in a complex environment. The double-stranded DNA environment is first characterized by a very high flexibility, but also a strongly inhomogeneous electrostatic embedding. Additionally, one aims at capturing more subtle effects, such as the sequence selectivity which is of critical important for DNA damage. The structure and dynamics of the DNA/sensitizers complexes, as well as the photo-induced electron- and energy-transfer phenomena taking place upon sensitization, should be carefully modeled. Finally the factors inducing different repair ratios for different lesions should also be rationalized. In this review we will critically analyze the different computational strategies used to model DNA lesions. A clear picture of the complex interplay between reactivity and structural factors will be sketched. The use of proper multi-scale modeling leads to the in-depth comprehension of DNA lesions mechanisms and also to the rational design of new chemo-therapeutic agents. PMID:26236706

  12. Understanding DNA Under Oxidative Stress and Sensitization: The Role of Molecular Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monari, Antonio; Dumont, Elise

    2015-07-01

    DNA is constantly exposed to damaging threats coming from oxidative stress, i.e. from the presence of free radicals and reactive oxygen species. Sensitization from exogenous and endogenous compounds that strongly enhance the frequency of light-induced lesions also plays an important role. The experimental determination of DNA lesions, though a difficult subject, is somehow well established and allows to elucidate even extremely rare DNA lesions. In parallel, molecular modeling has become fundamental to clearly understand the fine mechanisms related to DNA defects induction. Indeed, it offers an unprecedented possibility to get access to an atomistic or even electronic resolution. Ab initio molecular dynamics may also describe the time-evolution of the molecular system and its reactivity. Yet the modeling of DNA (photo-)reactions does necessitate elaborate multi-scale methodologies to tackle a damage induction reactivity that takes place in a complex environment. The double-stranded DNA environment is first characterized by a very high flexibility, that dynamical effects are to be taken into account, but also a strongly inhomogeneous electrostatic embedding. Additionally, one aims at capturing more subtle effects, such as the sequence selectivity which is of critical important for DNA damage. The structure and dynamics of the DNA/sensitizers complexes, as well as the photo-induced electron- and energy-transfer phenomena taking place upon sensitization, should be carefully modeled. Finally the factors inducing different repair ratios for different lesions should also be rationalized. In this review we will critically analyze the different computational strategies used to model DNA lesions. A clear picture of the complex interplay between reactivity and structural factors will be sketched. The use of proper multi-scale modeling leads to the in-depth comprehension of DNA lesions mechanism and also to the rational design of new chemo-therapeutic agents.

  13. Precise control of polymer coated nanopores by nanoparticle additives: Insights from computational modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eskandari Nasrabad, Afshin; Jasnow, David; Zilman, Anton; Coalson, Rob D.

    2016-08-01

    Polymer-nanoparticle composites are a promising new class of materials for creation of controllable nano-patterned surfaces and nanopores. We use coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations augmented with analytical theory to study the structural transitions of surface grafted polymer layers (brushes) induced by infiltration of nanoparticles that are attracted to the polymers in the layer. We systematically compare two different polymer brush geometries: one where the polymer chains are grafted to a planar surface and the other where the chains are grafted to the inside of a cylindrical nanochannel. We perform a comprehensive study of the effects of the material parameters such as the polymer chain length, chain grafting density, nanoparticle size, strength of attraction between nanoparticles and polymer monomers, and, in the case of the cylindrically grafted brush, the radius of the cylinder. We find a very general behavioral motif for all geometries and parameter values: the height of the polymer brush is non-monotonic in the nanoparticle concentration in solution. As the nanoparticle concentration increases, the brush height first decreases and after passing through a minimum value begins to increase, resulting in the swelling of the nanoparticle infused brush. These morphological features may be useful for devising tunable "smart" nano-devices whose effective dimensions can be reversibly and precisely adjusted by changing the nanoparticle concentration in solution. The results of approximate Self-Consistent Field Theory (SCFT) calculations, applicable in the regime of strong brush stretching, are compared to the simulation results. The SCFT calculations are found to be qualitatively, even semi-quantitatively, accurate when applied within their intended regime of validity, and provide a useful and efficient tool for modeling such materials.

  14. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-21

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments. PMID:24952568

  15. Communication: Consistent interpretation of molecular simulation kinetics using Markov state models biased with external information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudzinski, Joseph F.; Kremer, Kurt; Bereau, Tristan

    2016-02-01

    Molecular simulations can provide microscopic insight into the physical and chemical driving forces of complex molecular processes. Despite continued advancement of simulation methodology, model errors may lead to inconsistencies between simulated and reference (e.g., from experiments or higher-level simulations) observables. To bound the microscopic information generated by computer simulations within reference measurements, we propose a method that reweights the microscopic transitions of the system to improve consistency with a set of coarse kinetic observables. The method employs the well-developed Markov state modeling framework to efficiently link microscopic dynamics with long-time scale constraints, thereby consistently addressing a wide range of time scales. To emphasize the robustness of the method, we consider two distinct coarse-grained models with significant kinetic inconsistencies. When applied to the simulated conformational dynamics of small peptides, the reweighting procedure systematically improves the time scale separation of the slowest processes. Additionally, constraining the forward and backward rates between metastable states leads to slight improvement of their relative stabilities and, thus, refined equilibrium properties of the resulting model. Finally, we find that difficulties in simultaneously describing both the simulated data and the provided constraints can help identify specific limitations of the underlying simulation approach.

  16. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-21

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  17. A molecular thermodynamic model for the stability of hepatitis B capsids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jehoon; Wu, Jianzhong

    2014-06-01

    Self-assembly of capsid proteins and genome encapsidation are two critical steps in the life cycle of most plant and animal viruses. A theoretical description of such processes from a physiochemical perspective may help better understand viral replication and morphogenesis thus provide fresh insights into the experimental studies of antiviral strategies. In this work, we propose a molecular thermodynamic model for predicting the stability of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) capsids either with or without loading nucleic materials. With the key components represented by coarse-grained thermodynamic models, the theoretical predictions are in excellent agreement with experimental data for the formation free energies of empty T4 capsids over a broad range of temperature and ion concentrations. The theoretical model predicts T3/T4 dimorphism also in good agreement with the capsid formation at in vivo and in vitro conditions. In addition, we have studied the stability of the viral particles in response to physiological cellular conditions with the explicit consideration of the hydrophobic association of capsid subunits, electrostatic interactions, molecular excluded volume effects, entropy of mixing, and conformational changes of the biomolecular species. The course-grained model captures the essential features of the HBV nucleocapsid stability revealed by recent experiments.

  18. Introducing Molecular Life Science Students to Model Building Using Computer Simulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, Tinri; Kettenis, Dik; Sessink, Olivier; Hartog, Rob; Bisseling, Ton; Janssen, Fred

    2006-01-01

    Computer simulations can facilitate the building of models of natural phenomena in research, such as in the molecular life sciences. In order to introduce molecular life science students to the use of computer simulations for model building, a digital case was developed in which students build a model of a pattern formation process in…

  19. Evaluation of the Performance of Smoothing Functions in Generalized Additive Models for Spatial Variation in Disease

    PubMed Central

    Siangphoe, Umaporn; Wheeler, David C.

    2015-01-01

    Generalized additive models (GAMs) with bivariate smoothing functions have been applied to estimate spatial variation in risk for many types of cancers. Only a handful of studies have evaluated the performance of smoothing functions applied in GAMs with regard to different geographical areas of elevated risk and different risk levels. This study evaluates the ability of different smoothing functions to detect overall spatial variation of risk and elevated risk in diverse geographical areas at various risk levels using a simulation study. We created five scenarios with different true risk area shapes (circle, triangle, linear) in a square study region. We applied four different smoothing functions in the GAMs, including two types of thin plate regression splines (TPRS) and two versions of locally weighted scatterplot smoothing (loess). We tested the null hypothesis of constant risk and detected areas of elevated risk using analysis of deviance with permutation methods and assessed the performance of the smoothing methods based on the spatial detection rate, sensitivity, accuracy, precision, power, and false-positive rate. The results showed that all methods had a higher sensitivity and a consistently moderate-to-high accuracy rate when the true disease risk was higher. The models generally performed better in detecting elevated risk areas than detecting overall spatial variation. One of the loess methods had the highest precision in detecting overall spatial variation across scenarios and outperformed the other methods in detecting a linear elevated risk area. The TPRS methods outperformed loess in detecting elevated risk in two circular areas. PMID:25983545

  20. Modeling and additive manufacturing of bio-inspired composites with tunable fracture mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Dimas, Leon S; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-07-01

    Flaws, imperfections and cracks are ubiquitous in material systems and are commonly the catalysts of catastrophic material failure. As stresses and strains tend to concentrate around cracks and imperfections, structures tend to fail far before large regions of material have ever been subjected to significant loading. Therefore, a major challenge in material design is to engineer systems that perform on par with pristine structures despite the presence of imperfections. In this work we integrate knowledge of biological systems with computational modeling and state of the art additive manufacturing to synthesize advanced composites with tunable fracture mechanical properties. Supported by extensive mesoscale computer simulations, we demonstrate the design and manufacturing of composites that exhibit deformation mechanisms characteristic of pristine systems, featuring flaw-tolerant properties. We analyze the results by directly comparing strain fields for the synthesized composites, obtained through digital image correlation (DIC), and the computationally tested composites. Moreover, we plot Ashby diagrams for the range of simulated and experimental composites. Our findings show good agreement between simulation and experiment, confirming that the proposed mechanisms have a significant potential for vastly improving the fracture response of composite materials. We elucidate the role of stiffness ratio variations of composite constituents as an important feature in determining the composite properties. Moreover, our work validates the predictive ability of our models, presenting them as useful tools for guiding further material design. This work enables the tailored design and manufacturing of composites assembled from inferior building blocks, that obtain optimal combinations of stiffness and toughness. PMID:24700202

  1. Effects of Mn addition on dislocation loop formation in A533B and model alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, H.; Masaki, S.; Masubuchi, S.; Yoshida, N.; Dohi, K.

    2013-08-01

    It is well known that the radiation hardening or embrittlement of pressure vessel steels is very sensitive to the contents of minor solutes. To study the effect of dislocation loop formation on radiation hardening in these steels, in situ observation using a high-voltage electron microscope was conducted for the reference pressure vessel steel JRQ and Fe-based model alloys containing Mn, Si, and Ni. In the Fe-based model alloys, the addition of Mn was most effective for increasing dislocation loop density at 290 °C. Based on the assumption that a di-interstitial was adopted as the nucleus for the formation of an interstitial loop, a binding energy of 0.22 eV was obtained for the interaction of a Mn atom and an interstitial. The formation of Mn clusters detected by three-dimensional atom probe and interstitial-type loops at room temperature clearly showed that the oversized Mn atoms migrate through an interstitial mechanism. The temperature and flux dependence of loop density in pressure vessel steels was very weak up to 290 °C. This suggests that interstitial atoms are deeply trapped by the radiation-induced solute clusters in pressure vessel steels.

  2. Applications of molecular modeling to the design and characterization of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, G. A.; Faulon, J. L.; Pohl, P. I.; Shelnutt, J. A.

    A variety of new molecular modeling tools are now available for studying molecular structures and molecular interactions, for building molecular structures from simple components using analytical data, and for studying the relationship of molecular structure to the energy of bonding and nonbonding interactions. These are proving quite valuable in characterizing molecular structures and intermolecular interactions and in designing new molecules. This paper describes the application of molecular modeling techniques to a variety of materials problems, including the probable molecular structures of coals, lignins, and hybrid inorganic-organic systems (silsesquioxanes), the intercalation of small gas molecules in fullerene crystals, the diffusion of gas molecules through membranes, and the design, structure, and function of biomimetic and nanocluster catalysts.

  3. Visual representation of carbon dioxide adsorption in a low-volatile bituminous coal molecular model

    SciTech Connect

    Marielle R. Narkiewicz; Jonathan P. Mathews

    2009-09-15

    Carbon dioxide can be sequestered in unmineable coal seams to aid in mitigating global climate change, while concurrently CH{sub 4} can be desorbed from the coal seam and used as a domestic energy source. In this work, a previously constructed molecular representation was used to simulate several processes that occur during sequestration, such as sorption capacities of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}-induced swelling, contraction because of CH{sub 4} and water loss, and the pore-blocking role of moisture. This is carried out by calculating the energy minima of the molecular model with different amounts of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}O. The model used is large (>2000 atoms) and contains a molecular-weight distribution, so that it has the flexibility to be used by other researchers and for other purposes in the future. In the low-level molecular modeling presented here, it was anticipated that CO{sub 2} would be adsorbed more readily than CH{sub 4}, that swelling would be anisotropic, greater perpendicular to the bedding plane because of the rank of this coal, and finally, that, with the addition of moisture, CO{sub 2} capacity in the coal would be reduced. As expected with this high-rank coal, there was swelling when CO{sub 2} perturbed the structure of approximately 5%. It was found that, on the basis of the interconnected pore structure and molecular sizes, CO{sub 2} was able to access 12.4% more of the pore volume (as defined by helium) than CH{sub 4}, in the rigid molecular representation. With water as stationary molecules, mostly hydrogen bound to the coal oxygen functionality, pore access decreased by 5.1% of the pore volume for CO{sub 2} accessibility and 4.7% of the pore volume for CH{sub 4} accessibility. 36 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Skeletal dosimetry models for alpha-particles for use in molecular radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watchman, Christopher J.

    Molecular radiotherapy is a cancer treatment methodology whereby a radionuclide is combined with a biologically active molecule to preferentially target cancer cells. Alpha-particle emitting radionuclides show significant potential for use in molecular radiotherapy due to the short range of the alpha-particles in tissue and their high rates of energy deposition. Current radiation dosimetry models used to assess alpha emitter dose in the skeleton were developed originally for occupational applications. In medical dosimetry, individual variability in uptake, translocation and other biological factors can result in poor correlation of clinical outcome with marrow dose estimates determined using existing skeletal models. Methods presented in this work were developed in response to the need for dosimetry models which account for these biological and patient-specific factors. Dosimetry models are presented for trabecular bone alpha particle dosimetry as well as a model for cortical bone dosimetry. These radiation transport models are the 3D chord-based infinite spongiosa transport model (3D-CBIST) and the chord-based infinite cortical transport model (CBICT), respectively. Absorbed fraction data for several skeletal tissues for several subjects are presented. Each modeling strategy accounts for biological parameters, such as bone marrow cellularity, not previously incorporated into alpha-particle skeletal dosimetry models used in radiation protection. Using these data a study investigating the variability in alpha-particle absorbed fractions in the human skeleton is also presented. Data is also offered relating skeletal tissue masses in individual bone sites for a range of ages. These data are necessary for dose calculations and have previously only been available as whole body tissue masses. A revised 3D-CBIST model is also presented which allows for changes in endosteum thickness to account for revised target cell location of tissues involved in the radiological

  5. Computer modeling of properties of complex molecular systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkova, E.Yu.; Khrenova, M.G.; Polyakov, I.V.

    2015-03-10

    Large molecular aggregates present important examples of strongly nonhomogeneous systems. We apply combined quantum mechanics / molecular mechanics approaches that assume treatment of a part of the system by quantum-based methods and the rest of the system with conventional force fields. Herein we illustrate these computational approaches by two different examples: (1) large-scale molecular systems mimicking natural photosynthetic centers, and (2) components of prospective solar cells containing titan dioxide and organic dye molecules. We demonstrate that modern computational tools are capable to predict structures and spectra of such complex molecular aggregates.

  6. Dust properties inside molecular clouds from coreshine modeling and observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefèvre, C.; Pagani, L.; Juvela, M.; Paladini, R.; Lallement, R.; Marshall, D. J.; Andersen, M.; Bacmann, A.; McGehee, P. M.; Montier, L.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Pelkonen, V.-M.; Ristorcelli, I.; Steinacker, J.

    2014-12-01

    Context. Using observations to deduce dust properties, grain-size distribution, and physical conditions in molecular clouds is a highly degenerate problem. Aims: The coreshine phenomenon, a scattering process at 3.6 and 4.5 μm that dominates absorption, has revealed its ability to explore the densest parts of clouds. We use this effect to constrain the dust parameters. The goal is to investigate to what extent grain growth (at constant dust mass) inside molecular clouds is able to explain the coreshine observations. We aim to find dust models that can explain a sample of Spitzer coreshine data. We also examine the consistency with near-infrared data we obtained for a few clouds. Methods: We selected four regions with a very high occurrence of coreshine cases: Taurus-Perseus, Cepheus, Chameleon, and L183/L134. We built a grid of dust models and investigated the key parameters to reproduce the general trend of surface brightnesses and intensity ratios of both coreshine and near-infrared observations with the help of a 3D Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. The grid parameters allowed us to investigate the effect of coagulation upon spherical grains up to 5 μm in size derived from the DustEm diffuse interstellar medium grains. Fluffiness (porosity or fractal degree), ices, and a handful of classical grain-size distributions were also tested. We used the near- and mostly mid-infrared intensity ratios as strong discriminants between dust models. Results: The determination of the background-field intensity at each wavelength is a key issue. In particular, an especially strong background field explains why we do not see coreshine in the Galactic plane at 3.6 and 4.5 μm. For starless cores, where detected, the observed 4.5 μm/3.6 μm coreshine intensity ratio is always lower than ~0.5, which is also what we find in the models for the Taurus-Perseus and L183 directions. Embedded sources can lead to higher fluxes (up to four times higher than the strongest starless core

  7. Insights from the Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Cellobiohydrolase Cel6A Molecular Structural Model from Aspergillus fumigatus NITDGPKA3.

    PubMed

    Dodda, Subba Reddy; Sarkar, Nibedita; Aikat, Kaustav; Krishnaraj, Navanietha R; Bhattacharjee, Sanchari; Bagchi, Angshuman; Mukhopadhyay, Sudit S

    2016-01-01

    Global demand for bioethanol is increasing tremendously as it could help to replace the conventional fossil fuel and at the same time supporting the bioremediation of huge volume of cellulosic wastes generated from different sources. Ideal genetic engineering approaches are essential to improve the efficacy of the bioethanol production processes for real time applications. A locally isolated fungal strain Aspergillus fumigatus NITDGPKA3 was used in our laboratory for the hydrolysis of lignocellulose with good cellulolytic activity when compared with other contemporary fungal strains. An attempt is made to sequence the cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) of A. fumigatus NITDGPKA3, model its structure to predict its catalytic activity towards improving the protein by genetic engineering approaches. Herein, the structure of the sequenced Cellobiohydrolases (CBHs) of A. fumigatus NITDGPKA3, modelled by homology modelling and its validation is reported. Further the catalytic activity of the modelled CBH enzyme was assessed by molecular docking analysis. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CBH from A. fumigatus NITDGPKA3 belongs to the Glycohydro 6 (Cel6A) super family. Molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation suggest the structural and functional mechanism of the enzyme. The structures of both the cellulose binding (CBD) and catalytic domain (CD) have been compared with most widely studied CBH of Trichoderma reesei. The molecular docking with cellulose suggests that Gln 248, Pro 287, Val236, Asn284, and Ala288 are the main amino acids involved in the hydrolysis of the β, 1-4, glycosidic bonds of cellulose. PMID:27109185

  8. Kirkwood-Buff analysis of aqueous N-methylacetamide and acetamide solutions modeled by the CHARMM additive and Drude polarizable force fields.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bin; Lopes, Pedro E M; Roux, Benoît; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2013-08-28

    Kirkwood-Buff analysis was performed on aqueous solutions of N-methylacetamide and acetamide using the Chemistry at HARvard Molecular Mechanics additive and Drude polarizable all-atom force fields. Comparison of a range of properties with experimental results, including Kirkwood-Buff integrals, excess coordination numbers, solution densities, partial molar values, molar enthalpy of mixing, showed both models to be well behaved at higher solute concentrations with the Drude model showing systematic improvement at lower solution concentrations. However, both models showed difficulties reproducing experimental activity derivatives and the excess Gibbs energy, with the Drude model performing slightly better. At the molecular level, the improved agreement of the Drude model at low solute concentrations is due to increased structure in the solute-solute and solute-solvent interactions. The present results indicate that the explicit inclusion of electronic polarization leads to improved modeling of dilute solutions even when those properties are not included as target data during force field optimization. PMID:24007020

  9. Molecular dynamics modeling using ab initio interatomic potentials for thermal properties of Ni-rich alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Mei, J.; Cooper, B.R.; Hao, Y.G.; Scoy, F.L. Van

    1994-12-31

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study thermal expansions of Ni-rich (fcc structure) Ni/Cr alloys (which serve as the basis for practical superalloy systems). This has been done using ab initio interatomic potentials with no experimental input. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) as a function of temperature has been calculated. By admixing Re and Me atoms into fee Ni and the fee alloy system Ni/Cr, additive effects on the thermal expansion have been predicted. While addition of Cr lowers the CTE of Ni, and moderate addition of Mo lowers the CTE of Ni over a wide temperature range, moderate addition of Re raises the CTE of both Ni and Ni/Cr alloys over a significant temperature range. An explanation for the contrasting effect of additive Re on the CTE, based on a one-dimensional atomic chain model, is that the trade-off, between atomic volume effects increasing the CTE over that of pure Ni and pair-potential effects (exemplified by the Grueneisen parameter) decreasing the CTE from that of pure nickel, changes for Re compared to Cr and Mo.

  10. First principles modelling of contact resistance in molecular electronic devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stokbro, Kurt; Taylor, Jeremy; Brandbyge, Mads

    2002-03-01

    We have used the TranSIESTA package[1,2] to investigate the contact resistance of gold-thiol bonds. The TranSIESTA package is a new density functional code employing local basis sets[3], combined with a non-equilibrium Greens function transport scheme. With this package we can calculate the selfconsistent electronic structure of a nanostructure coupled to 3-dimensional electrodes with different electrochemical potentials, using the same level of model chemistry for the electrodes as for the nanostructure. We have used the method to calculate the electron transport through DiThiol-Benzene (DTB) connected to gold electrodes. The transport properties have been calculated for a range of different molecule-electrode couplings, and I will discuss the influence of the coupling on the molecular conductance, and compare with experimental data. [1] M. Brandbyge, K. Stokbro, J. Taylor, J. L. Mozos, P. Ordejon, Material Research Society symposium proceedings volume 636, D9.25 (2000). [2] M. Brandbyge, K. Stokbro, J. Taylor, J. L. Mozos, P. Ordejon, Condmat 0110650 [3] SIESTA: D. Sanchez-Portal, P. Ordejon, E. Artacho and J. Soler, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 65, 453 (1997).

  11. Emerging Models for the Molecular Basis of Mammalian Circadian Timing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian circadian timekeeping arises from a transcription-based feedback loop driven by a set of dedicated clock proteins. At its core, the heterodimeric transcription factor CLOCK:BMAL1 activates expression of Period, Cryptochrome, and Rev-Erb genes, which feed back to repress transcription and create oscillations in gene expression that confer circadian timing cues to cellular processes. The formation of different clock protein complexes throughout this transcriptional cycle helps to establish the intrinsic ∼24 h periodicity of the clock; however, current models of circadian timekeeping lack the explanatory power to fully describe this process. Recent studies confirm the presence of at least three distinct regulatory complexes: a transcriptionally active state comprising the CLOCK:BMAL1 heterodimer with its coactivator CBP/p300, an early repressive state containing PER:CRY complexes, and a late repressive state marked by a poised but inactive, DNA-bound CLOCK:BMAL1:CRY1 complex. In this review, we analyze high-resolution structures of core circadian transcriptional regulators and integrate biochemical data to suggest how remodeling of clock protein complexes may be achieved throughout the 24 h cycle. Defining these detailed mechanisms will provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis of circadian timing and help to establish new platforms for the discovery of therapeutics to manipulate the clock. PMID:25303119

  12. Antibacterial kaolinite/urea/chlorhexidine nanocomposites: Experiment and molecular modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holešová, Sylva; Valášková, Marta; Hlaváč, Dominik; Madejová, Jana; Samlíková, Magda; Tokarský, Jonáš; Pazdziora, Erich

    2014-06-01

    Clay minerals are commonly used materials in pharmaceutical production both as inorganic carriers or active agents. The purpose of this study is the preparation and characterization of clay/antibacterial drug hybrids which can be further included in drug delivery systems for treatment oral infections. Novel nanocomposites with antibacterial properties were successfully prepared by ion exchange reaction from two types of kaolinite/urea intercalates and chlorhexidine diacetate. Intercalation compounds of kaolinite were prepared by reaction with solid urea in the absence of solvents (dry method) as well as with urea aqueous solution (wet method). The antibacterial activity of two prepared samples against Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa was evaluated by finding the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Antibacterial studies of both samples showed the lowest MIC values (0.01%, w/v) after 1 day against E. faecalis, E. coli and S. aureus. A slightly worse antibacterial activity was observed against P. aeruginosa (MIC 0.12%, w/v) after 1 day. Since samples showed very good antibacterial activity, especially after 1 day of action, this means that these samples can be used as long-acting antibacterial materials. Prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The experimental data are supported by results of molecular modelling.

  13. Antipyrine-gamma cyclodextrin inclusion complex: Molecular modeling, preparation, characterization and cytotoxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannimani, Ramesh; Perumal, Amanda; Ramesh, Muthusamy; Pillay, Karen; Soliman, Mahmoud E.; Govender, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Molecular docking, semi-empirical and molecular dynamics studies were conducted for α, β and γ-cyclodextrin-associated inclusion complexes of antipyrine. The results of molecular modeling were systematically analyzed to determine the stability of inclusion complexes. In preliminary computational screening, β and γ-cyclodextrin inclusion complexes of antipyrine were found to be more stable as compared to α-cyclodextrin based on docking score and binding free energies. Further, inclusion complex of antipyrine with γ-cyclodextrin was prepared by freeze drying method. Formation of the inclusion complex was investigated by solid state characterization techniques such as thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The changes observed in decomposition temperature, diffractogram, vibrational frequencies and morphological appearance confirmed the formation of inclusion complex. In addition, results from 1H NMR and 2D NOESY studies supported the inclusion phenomenon. The results obtained from computational studies were found to be in consistent with experimental data to ascertain the encapsulation of antipyrine into γ-cyclodextrin. The inclusion complex was found to be non-toxic toward MDCK-1 cell lines. Thus, this approach may be helpful in the formulation of drug molecules using cyclodextrins.

  14. Molecular adjuvant IL-33 enhances the potency of a DNA vaccine in a lethal challenge model.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Svoronos, Nikolaos; Wise, Megan C; Shedlock, Devon J; Morrow, Matthew P; Conejo-Garcia, Jose R; Weiner, David B

    2015-08-20

    Identifying new molecular adjuvants that elicit effective vaccine-induced CD8(+) T cell immunity may be critical for the elimination of many challenging diseases including Tuberculosis, HIV and cancer. Here, we report that co-administration of molecular adjuvant IL-33 during vaccination enhanced the magnitude and function of antigen (Ag)-specific CD8(+) T cells against a model Ag, LCMV NP target protein. These enhanced responses were characterized by higher frequencies of Ag-specific, polyfunctional CD8(+) T cells exhibiting cytotoxic characteristics. Importantly, these cells were capable of robust expansion upon Ag-specific restimulation in vivo and conferred remarkable protection against a high dose lethal LCMV challenge. In addition, we demonstrate the ability of IL-33 to amplifying the frequency of Ag-specific KLRG1(+) effector CD8(+) T cells. These data show that IL-33 is a promising immunoadjuvant at improving T cell immunity in a vaccine setting and suggest further development and understanding of this molecular adjuvant for strategies against many obstinate infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:25887087

  15. Molecular adjuvant IL-33 enhances the potency of a DNA vaccine in a lethal challenge model

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O.; Svoronos, Nikos; Wise, Megan C.; Shedlock, Devon J.; Morrow, Matthew P.; Garcia, Jose-Conejo; Weiner, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying new molecular adjuvants that elicit effective vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell immunity may be critical for the elimination of many challenging diseases including Tuberculosis, HIV and cancer. Here, we report that co-administration of molecular adjuvant IL-33 during vaccination enhanced the magnitude and function of antigen (Ag)-specific CD8+ T cells against a model Ag, LCMV NP target protein. These enhanced responses were characterized by higher frequencies of Ag-specific, polyfunctional CD8+ T cells exhibiting cytotoxic characteristics. Importantly, these cells were capable of robust expansion upon Ag-specific restimulation in vivo and conferred remarkable protection against a high dose lethal LCMV challenge. In addition, we demonstrate the ability of IL-33 to amplifying the frequency of Ag-specific KLRG1+ effector CD8+ T cells. These data show that IL-33 is a promising immunoadjuvant at improving T cell immunity in a vaccine setting and suggest further development and understanding of this molecular adjuvant for strategies against many obstinate infectious diseases and cancer. PMID:25887087

  16. Three-Gene Molecular Diagnostic Model for Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Jeanne; Tsai, Hua-Ling; Talbot, Kristin; Somervell, Helina; Kouniavsky, Guennadi; Wang, Yongchun; Dackiw, Alan P.B.; Westra, William H.; Clark, Douglas P.; Libutti, Steven K.; Umbricht, Christopher B.

    2012-01-01

    Background The preoperative diagnosis of thyroid nodules primarily depends upon fine needle aspiration (FNA) cytology. However, up to 25% of FNA samples have associated “suspicious or indeterminate”, but not diagnostic cytologic reports, resulting in difficulty deciding appropriate clinical management for these patients. We hypothesize that the use of molecular markers as an adjunct to FNA cytology can improve the distinction of benign from malignant nodules that have associated suspicious or indeterminate cytology. Methods Using microarray analysis, we previously identified and reported on 75 genes useful in the distinction of benign versus malignant thyroid nodules. In the present study, we have further validated the expression of 14 of these markers in a large number of thyroid samples by immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of 154 thyroid tumors and quantitative real-time RT-PCR (QRT-PCR) analysis of 95 FNA samples. Of the 154 tumors analyzed by IHC, 44 samples (29%) had associated suspicious or indeterminate FNA cytology. Results Receiver operating characteristic using three-gene model, (HMGA2, MRC2, and SFN) analysis for the detection of malignant nodules resulted in areas under the curve (AUCs) of≥0.95 (80% sensitivity; 100% specificity) and≥0.84 (71% sensitivity; 84% specificity) for the IHC data in tumors, and QRT-PCR data in FNA samples, respectively. Conclusions Our results suggest that a three-gene model for the cytological diagnosis of indeterminate thyroid nodules is both feasible and promising. Implementation of this as an adjunct to thyroid cytology may significantly impact the clinical management of patients with suspicious or indeterminate thyroid FNA nodules. PMID:22280184

  17. Thermal conductivity of model zeolites: molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murashov, Vladimir V.

    1999-02-01

    The thermal conductivity of model zeolites was investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics calculations. This type of calculation was found to overestimate the thermal conductivity of low-density silica polymorphs. A better reproduction of the experimental results was found for zeolites, and this was related to the lower phonon mean free path. The thermal conductivity of framework silicates was shown to be determined primarily by the vibrations of the continuous oxygen sublattice. Thus, the most drastic suppression of the heat transfer was related to alterations of the O-O distances; for example, a sixfold reduction in thermal conductivity compared to that of siliceous LTA zeolite was found for LTA-A1PO4. Framework cations were shown to affect the heat transfer by changing the vibrational modes of the structural building units of the framework and non-framework counter-cations, by disturbing the oxygen sublattice locally and acting as Rayleigh and resonant scatterers. A model assuming the heat transfer to be due only to non-dispersive acoustic phonons failed to reproduce the dependence of the thermal conductivity on the mass of the cations and the unit-cell dimension, thus suggesting a more sophisticated mechanism of heat transfer to be operative in framework materials. The effect of non-framework non-ionic species on the thermal conductivity was shown to be determined by their effect on the characteristics of the oxygen framework vibrations. Thus, repulsive interactions between the oxygen sublattice and Xe8 clusters, reducing the anisotropy and anharmonicity of the oxygen vibrations, give rise to enhanced heat transfer in LTA-SiO2 at ambient conditions.

  18. Decarboxylation of Δ 9-tetrahydrocannabinol: Kinetics and molecular modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrotin-Brunel, Helene; Buijs, Wim; van Spronsen, Jaap; van Roosmalen, Maaike J. E.; Peters, Cor J.; Verpoorte, Rob; Witkamp, Geert-Jan

    2011-02-01

    Efficient tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ 9-THC) production from cannabis is important for its medical application and as basis for the development of production routes of other drugs from plants. This work presents one of the steps of Δ 9-THC production from cannabis plant material, the decarboxylation reaction, transforming the Δ 9-THC-acid naturally present in the plant into the psychoactive Δ 9-THC. Results of experiments showed pseudo-first order reaction kinetics, with an activation barrier of 85 kJ mol -1 and a pre-exponential factor of 3.7 × 10 8 s -1. Using molecular modeling, two options were identified for an acid catalyzed β-keto acid type mechanism for the decarboxylation of Δ 9-THC-acid. Each of these mechanisms might play a role, depending on the actual process conditions. Formic acid proved to be a good model for a catalyst of such a reaction. Also, the computational idea of catalysis by water to catalysis by an acid, put forward by Li and Brill, and Churchev and Belbruno was extended, and a new direct keto-enol route was found. A direct keto-enol mechanism catalyzed by formic acid seems to be the best explanation for the observed activation barrier and the pre-exponential factor of the decarboxylation of Δ 9-THC-acid. Evidence for this was found by performing an extraction experiment with Cannabis Flos. It revealed the presence of short chain carboxylic acids supporting this hypothesis. The presented approach is important for the development of a sustainable production of Δ 9-THC from the plant.

  19. Human haptoglobin structure and function--a molecular modelling study.

    PubMed

    Polticelli, F; Bocedi, A; Minervini, G; Ascenzi, P

    2008-11-01

    Hemoglobin is the most prominent protein in blood, transporting O(2) and facilitating reactive oxygen and nitrogen species detoxification. Hemoglobin metabolism leads to the release of extra-erythrocytic hemoglobin, with potentially severe consequences for health. Extra-erythrocytic hemoglobin is complexed to haptoglobin for clearance by tissue macrophages. The human gene for haptoglobin consists of three structural alleles: Hp1F, Hp1S and Hp2. The products of the Hp1F and Hp1S alleles differ by only one amino acid, whereas the Hp2 allele is the result of a fusion of the Hp1F and Hp1S alleles, is present only in humans and gives rise to a longer alpha-chain. Haptoglobin consists of a dimer of alphabeta-chains covalently linked by a disulphide bond between the Cys15 residue of each alpha-chain. However, the presence of the Hp1 and Hp2 alleles in humans gives rise to HPT1-1 dimers (covalently linked by Cys15 residues), HPT1-2 hetero-oligomers and HPT2-2 oligomers. In fact, the HPT2 variant displays two free Cys residues (Cys15 and Cys74) whose participation in intermolecular disulphide bonds gives rise to higher-order covalent multimers. Here, the complete modelling of both haptoglobin variants, together with their basic quaternary structure arrangements (i.e. HPT1 dimer and HPT2 trimer), is reported. The structural details of the models, which represent the first complete view of the molecular details of human haptoglobin variants, are discussed in relation to the known haptoglobin function(s). PMID:18959750

  20. Generalized image charge solvation model for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Shaozhong; Xue, Changfeng; Baumketner, Andriy; Jacobs, Donald; Cai, Wei

    2013-07-01

    This paper extends the image charge solvation model (ICSM) [Y. Lin, A. Baumketner, S. Deng, Z. Xu, D. Jacobs, W. Cai, An image-based reaction field method for electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous solutions, J. Chem. Phys. 131 (2009) 154103], a hybrid explicit/implicit method to treat electrostatic interactions in computer simulations of biomolecules formulated for spherical cavities, to prolate spheroidal and triaxial ellipsoidal cavities, designed to better accommodate non-spherical solutes in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In addition to the utilization of a general truncated octahedron as the MD simulation box, central to the proposed extension is an image approximation method to compute the reaction field for a point charge placed inside such a non-spherical cavity by using a single image charge located outside the cavity. The resulting generalized image charge solvation model (GICSM) is tested in simulations of liquid water, and the results are analyzed in comparison with those obtained from the ICSM simulations as a reference. We find that, for improved computational efficiency due to smaller simulation cells and consequently a less number of explicit solvent molecules, the generalized model can still faithfully reproduce known static and dynamic properties of liquid water at least for systems considered in the present paper, indicating its great potential to become an accurate but more efficient alternative to the ICSM when bio-macromolecules of irregular shapes are to be simulated.

  1. Molecular Biomarker-Based Biokinetic Modeling of a PCE-Dechlorinating and Methanogenic Mixed Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Rowe, Annette R.; Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Pan, Ju Khuan; Gossett, James M.; Richardson, Ruth E.

    2013-04-16

    Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes via anaerobic reductive dechlorination relies upon the activity of specific microbial population-most notably Dehalococcoides (DHC) strains. In the lab and field Dehalococcoides grow most robustly in mixed communities which usually contain both fermenters and methanogens. Recently, researchers have been developing quantitative molecular biomarkers to aid in field site diagnostics and it is hoped that these biomarkers could aid in the modeling of anaerobic reductive dechlorination. A comprehensive biokinetic model of a community containing Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly D. ethenogenes) was updated to describe continuously fed reactors with specific biomass levels based on quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based population data (DNA and RNA). The model was calibrated and validated with subsets of chemical and molecular biological data from various continuous feed experiments (n = 24) with different loading rates of the electron acceptor (1.5 to 482 μeeq/L-h), types of electron acceptor (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE) and electron donor to electron acceptor ratios. The resulting model predicted the sum of dechlorination products vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) well. However, VC alone was under-predicted and ETH was over predicted. Consequently, competitive inhibition among chlorinated ethenes was examined and then added to the model. Additionally, as 16S rRNA gene copy numbers did not provide accurate model fits in all cases, we examined whether an improved fit could be obtained if mRNA levels for key functional enzymes could be used to infer respiration rates. The resulting empirically derived mRNA “adjustment factors” were added to the model for both DHC and the main methanogen in the culture (a Methanosaeta species) to provide a more nuanced prediction of activity. Results of this study suggest that at higher feeding rates competitive inhibition is important and mRNA provides a more accurate indicator of a population’s instantaneous

  2. Animal models and therapeutic molecular targets of cancer: utility and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Cekanova, Maria; Rathore, Kusum

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the term used to describe over 100 diseases that share several common hallmarks. Despite prevention, early detection, and novel therapies, cancer is still the second leading cause of death in the USA. Successful bench-to-bedside translation of basic scientific findings about cancer into therapeutic interventions for patients depends on the selection of appropriate animal experimental models. Cancer research uses animal and human cancer cell lines in vitro to study biochemical pathways in these cancer cells. In this review, we summarize the important animal models of cancer with focus on their advantages and limitations. Mouse cancer models are well known, and are frequently used for cancer research. Rodent models have revolutionized our ability to study gene and protein functions in vivo and to better understand their molecular pathways and mechanisms. Xenograft and chemically or genetically induced mouse cancers are the most commonly used rodent cancer models. Companion animals with spontaneous neoplasms are still an underexploited tool for making rapid advances in human and veterinary cancer therapies by testing new drugs and delivery systems that have shown promise in vitro and in vivo in mouse models. Companion animals have a relatively high incidence of cancers, with biological behavior, response to therapy, and response to cytotoxic agents similar to those in humans. Shorter overall lifespan and more rapid disease progression are factors contributing to the advantages of a companion animal model. In addition, the current focus is on discovering molecular targets for new therapeutic drugs to improve survival and quality of life in cancer patients. PMID:25342884

  3. Molecular biomarker-based biokinetic modeling of a PCE-dechlorinating and methanogenic mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Heavner, Gretchen L W; Rowe, Annette R; Mansfeldt, Cresten B; Pan, Ju Khuan; Gossett, James M; Richardson, Ruth E

    2013-04-16

    Bioremediation of chlorinated ethenes via anaerobic reductive dechlorination relies upon the activity of specific microbial populations--most notably Dehalococcoides (DHC) strains. In the lab and field Dehalococcoides grow most robustly in mixed communities which usually contain both fermenters and methanogens. Recently, researchers have been developing quantitative molecular biomarkers to aid in field site diagnostics and it is hoped that these biomarkers could aid in the modeling of anaerobic reductive dechlorination. A comprehensive biokinetic model of a community containing Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly D. ethenogenes) was updated to describe continuously fed reactors with specific biomass levels based on quantitative PCR (qPCR)-based population data (DNA and RNA). The model was calibrated and validated with subsets of chemical and molecular biological data from various continuous feed experiments (n = 24) with different loading rates of the electron acceptor (1.5 to 482 μeeq/L-h), types of electron acceptor (PCE, TCE, cis-DCE) and electron donor to electron acceptor ratios. The resulting model predicted the sum of dechlorination products vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene (ETH) well. However, VC alone was under-predicted and ETH was over predicted. Consequently, competitive inhibition among chlorinated ethenes was examined and then added to the model. Additionally, as 16S rRNA gene copy numbers did not provide accurate model fits in all cases, we examined whether an improved fit could be obtained if mRNA levels for key functional enzymes could be used to infer respiration rates. The resulting empirically derived mRNA "adjustment factors" were added to the model for both DHC and the main methanogen in the culture (a Methanosaeta species) to provide a more nuanced prediction of activity. Results of this study suggest that at higher feeding rates competitive inhibition is important and mRNA provides a more accurate indicator of a population's instantaneous

  4. Structured additive regression modeling of age of menarche and menopause in a breast cancer screening program.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Elisa; de Sousa, Bruno; Cadarso-Suarez, Carmen; Rodrigues, Vitor; Kneib, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Breast cancer risk is believed to be associated with several reproductive factors, such as early menarche and late menopause. This study is based on the registries of the first time a woman enters the screening program, and presents a spatio-temporal analysis of the variables age of menarche and age of menopause along with other reproductive and socioeconomic factors. The database was provided by the Portuguese Cancer League (LPCC), a private nonprofit organization dealing with multiple issues related to oncology of which the Breast Cancer Screening Program is one of its main activities. The registry consists of 259,652 records of women who entered the screening program for the first time between 1990 and 2007 (45-69-year age group). Structured Additive Regression (STAR) models were used to explore spatial and temporal correlations with a wide range of covariates. These models are flexible enough to deal with a variety of complex datasets, allowing us to reveal possible relationships among the variables considered in this study. The analysis shows that early menarche occurs in younger women and in municipalities located in the interior of central Portugal. Women living in inland municipalities register later ages for menopause, and those born in central Portugal after 1933 show a decreasing trend in the age of menopause. Younger ages of menarche and late menopause are observed in municipalities with a higher purchasing power index. The analysis performed in this study portrays the time evolution of the age of menarche and age of menopause and their spatial characterization, adding to the identification of factors that could be of the utmost importance in future breast cancer incidence research. PMID:24615881

  5. Effect of Ag addition to L1{sub 0} FePt and L1{sub 0} FePd films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuoka, Y.; Seto, Y.; Kato, T.; Iwata, S.

    2014-05-07

    L1{sub 0} ordered FePt-Ag (5 nm) and FePd-Ag (5 nm) films were grown on MgO (001) substrate at temperatures of 250–400 °C by using molecular beam epitaxy method, and their crystal and surface structures, perpendicular magnetic anisotropies and Curie temperatures were investigated. In the case of FePt-Ag, Ag addition with the amount of 10–20 at. % was effective to promote L1{sub 0} ordering and granular growth, resulting in the increase of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and coercivity of the FePt-Ag films. On the other hand, in the case of FePd-Ag, Ag addition changed the surface morphology from island to continuous film associated with the reductions of its coercivity and perpendicular anisotropy. The variations of lattice constants and Curie temperature with Ag addition were significantly different between FePt-Ag and FePd-Ag. For FePd-Ag, the c and a axes lattice spacings and Curie temperature gradually changed with increasing Ag content, while they unchanged for FePt-Ag. These results suggest the possibility of the formation of FePdAg alloy in FePd-Ag, while Ag segregation in FePt-Ag.

  6. Enhancement of colour stability of anthocyanins in model beverages by gum arabic addition.

    PubMed

    Chung, Cheryl; Rojanasasithara, Thananunt; Mutilangi, William; McClements, David Julian

    2016-06-15

    This study investigated the potential of gum arabic to improve the stability of anthocyanins that are used in commercial beverages as natural colourants. The degradation of purple carrot anthocyanin in model beverage systems (pH 3.0) containing L-ascorbic acid proceeded with a first-order reaction rate during storage (40 °C for 5 days in light). The addition of gum arabic (0.05-5.0%) significantly enhanced the colour stability of anthocyanin, with the most stable systems observed at intermediate levels (1.5%). A further increase in concentration (>1.5%) reduced its efficacy due to a change in the conformation of the gum arabic molecules that hindered their exposure to the anthocyanins. Fluorescence quenching measurements showed that the anthocyanin could have interacted with the glycoprotein fractions of the gum arabic through hydrogen bonding, resulting in enhanced stability. Overall, this study provides valuable information about enhancing the stability of anthocyanins in beverage systems using natural ingredients. PMID:26868542

  7. Statistical inference for the additive hazards model under outcome-dependent sampling

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Jichang; Liu, Yanyan; Sandler, Dale P.; Zhou, Haibo

    2015-01-01

    Cost-effective study design and proper inference procedures for data from such designs are always of particular interests to study investigators. In this article, we propose a biased sampling scheme, an outcome-dependent sampling (ODS) design for survival data with right censoring under the additive hazards model. We develop a weighted pseudo-score estimator for the regression parameters for the proposed design and derive the asymptotic properties of the proposed estimator. We also provide some suggestions for using the proposed method by evaluating the relative efficiency of the proposed method against simple random sampling design and derive the optimal allocation of the subsamples for the proposed design. Simulation studies show that the proposed ODS design is more powerful than other existing designs and the proposed estimator is more efficient than other estimators. We apply our method to analyze a cancer study conducted at NIEHS, the Cancer Incidence and Mortality of Uranium Miners Study, to study the risk of radon exposure to cancer. PMID:26379363

  8. Influence of the heterogeneous reaction HCL + HOCl on an ozone hole model with hydrocarbon additions

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.; Cicerone, R.J.; Turco, R.P.

    1994-02-20

    Injection of ethane or propane has been suggested as a means for reducing ozone loss within the Antarctic vortex because alkanes can convert active chlorine radicals into hydrochloric acid. In kinetic models of vortex chemistry including as heterogeneous processes only the hydrolysis and HCl reactions of ClONO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O{sub 5}, parts per billion by volume levels of the light alkanes counteract ozone depletion by sequestering chlorine atoms. Introduction of the surface reaction of HCl with HOCl causes ethane to deepen baseline ozone holes and generally works to impede any mitigation by hydrocarbons. The increased depletion occurs because HCl + HOCl can be driven by HO{sub x} radicals released during organic oxidation. Following initial hydrogen abstraction by chlorine, alkane breakdown leads to a net hydrochloric acid activation as the remaining hydrogen atoms enter the photochemical system. Lowering the rate constant for reactions of organic peroxy radicals with ClO to 10{sup {minus}13} cm{sup 3} molecule{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} does not alter results, and the major conclusions are insensitive to the timing of the ethane additions. Ignoring the organic peroxy radical plus ClO reactions entirely restores remediation capabilities by allowing HO{sub x} removal independent of HCl. Remediation also returns if early evaporation of polar stratospheric clouds leaves hydrogen atoms trapped in aldehyde intermediates, but real ozone losses are small in such cases. 95 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  9. In vivo characterization of two additional Leishmania donovani strains using the murine and hamster model.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, F; Dumetz, F; Hendrickx, S; Muraille, E; Dujardin, J-C; Maes, L; Magez, S; De Trez, C

    2016-05-01

    Leishmania donovani is a protozoan parasite causing the neglected tropical disease visceral leishmaniasis. One difficulty to study the immunopathology upon L. donovani infection is the limited adaptability of the strains to experimental mammalian hosts. Our knowledge about L. donovani infections relies on a restricted number of East African strains (LV9, 1S). Isolated from patients in the 1960s, these strains were described extensively in mice and Syrian hamsters and have consequently become 'reference' laboratory strains. L. donovani strains from the Indian continent display distinct clinical features compared to East African strains. Some reports describing the in vivo immunopathology of strains from the Indian continent exist. This study comprises a comprehensive immunopathological characterization upon infection with two additional strains, the Ethiopian L. donovani L82 strain and the Nepalese L. donovani BPK282 strain in both Syrian hamsters and C57BL/6 mice. Parameters that include parasitaemia levels, weight loss, hepatosplenomegaly and alterations in cellular composition of the spleen and liver, showed that the L82 strain generated an overall more virulent infection compared to the BPK282 strain. Altogether, both L. donovani strains are suitable and interesting for subsequent in vivo investigation of visceral leishmaniasis in the Syrian hamster and the C57BL/6 mouse model. PMID:27012562

  10. Rule-based classification models of molecular autofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Su, Bo-Han; Tu, Yi-Shu; Lin, Olivia A; Harn, Yeu-Chern; Shen, Meng-Yu; Tseng, Yufeng J

    2015-02-23

    Fluorescence-based detection has been commonly used in high-throughput screening (HTS) assays. Autofluorescent compounds, which can emit light in the absence of artificial fluorescent markers, often interfere with the detection of fluorophores and result in false positive signals in these assays. This interference presents a major issue in fluorescence-based screening techniques. In an effort to reduce the time and cost that will be spent on prescreening of autofluorescent compounds, in silico autofluorescence prediction models were developed for selected fluorescence-based assays in this study. Five prediction models were developed based on the respective fluorophores used in these HTS assays, which absorb and emit light at specific wavelengths (excitation/emission): Alexa Fluor 350 (A350) (340 nm/450 nm), 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin (AFC) (405 nm/520 nm), Alexa Fluor 488 (A488) (480 nm/540 nm), Rhodamine (547 nm/598 nm), and Texas Red (547 nm/618 nm). The C5.0 rule-based classification algorithm and PubChem 2D chemical structure fingerprints were used to develop prediction models. To optimize the accuracies of these prediction models despite the highly imbalanced ratio of fluorescent versus nonfluorescent compounds presented in the collected data sets, oversampling and undersampling strategies were applied. The average final accuracy achieved for the training set was 97%, and that for the testing set was 92%. In addition, five external data sets were used to further validate the models. Ultimately, 14 representative structural features (or rules) were determined to efficiently predict autofluorescence in data sets containing both fluorescent and nonfluorescent compounds. Several cases were illustrated in this study to demonstrate the applicability of these rules. PMID:25625768

  11. Applications of molecular modeling to the design and characterization of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.A.; Faulon, J.L.; Pohl, P.I.; Shelnutt, J.A.

    1994-06-01

    A variety of new molecular modeling tools are now available for studying molecular structures and molecular interactions, for building molecular structures from simple components using analytical data, and for studying the relationship of molecular structure to the energy of bonding and non-bonding interactions. These are proving quite valuable in characterizing molecular structures and intermolecular interactions and in designing new molecules. This paper describes the application of molecular modeling techniques to a variety of materials problems, including the probable modecular structures of coals, lignins, and hybrid inorganic-organic-organic systems (silsesquioxanes), the intercalation of small gas molecules in fullerene crystals, the diffusion of gas molecules through membranes, and the design, structure and function of biomimetic and nanocluster catalysts.

  12. A Comparative Study of Successful Central Nervous System Drugs Using Molecular Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Hyosub; Sulaimon, Segun; Menezes, Sandra; Son, Anne; Menezes, Warren J. C.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular modeling is a powerful tool used for three-dimensional visualization and for exploring electrostatic forces involved in drug transport. This tool enhances student understanding of structure-property relationships, as well as actively engaging them in class. Molecular modeling of several central nervous system (CNS) drugs is used to…

  13. Physical Models Enhance Molecular Three-Dimensional Literacy in an Introductory Biochemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jacqueline R.; Hagedorn, Eric; Dillenburg, Paul; Patrick, Michael; Herman, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    This article reports the results of a recent study to evaluate the usefulness of physical models of molecular structures as a new tool with which to teach concepts of molecular structure and function. Of seven different learning tools used by students in this introductory biochemistry class, the use of the physical models in a laboratory was rated…

  14. Computer-Based Molecular Modelling: Finnish School Teachers' Experiences and Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aksela, Maija; Lundell, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Modern computer-based molecular modelling opens up new possibilities for chemistry teaching at different levels. This article presents a case study seeking insight into Finnish school teachers' use of computer-based molecular modelling in teaching chemistry, into the different working and teaching methods used, and their opinions about necessary…

  15. A Model of How Different Biology Experts Explain Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujillo, Caleb M.; Anderson, Trevor R.; Pelaez, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Constructing explanations is an essential skill for all science learners. The goal of this project was to model the key components of expert explanation of molecular and cellular mechanisms. As such, we asked: What is an appropriate model of the components of explanation used by biology experts to explain molecular and cellular mechanisms? Do…

  16. Investigations on the interactions of diclofenac sodium with HSA and ctDNA using molecular modeling and multispectroscopic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yanrui; Hao, Erjun; Hui, Guangquan; Guo, Wei; Cui, Fengling

    2013-06-01

    A tentative study on interaction of diclofenac sodium (DF-Na) with human serum albumin (HSA) and calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) was conducted by using multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling techniques under simulative physiological conditions. The results of spectroscopic measurements suggested that the quenching mechanisms were static quenching. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy clearly demonstrated the occurrence of conformational changes of HSA with addition of DF-Na. In addition, competitive studies with ethidium bromide (EB) have shown that DF-Na can bind to ctDNA relatively strong via groove binding. Based on the values of thermodynamic parameters and the results of molecular modeling, it was confirmed that hydrophobic forces and hydrogen bond were the mainly binding forces in DF-Na-HSA and DF-Na-DNA systems. The binding distance between DF-Na and HSA was also determined using the theory of the Förster energy transference.

  17. Yeast-containing feed additive alters gene expression profiles associated with innate immunity in whole blood of a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Branson, Jennifer A; McLean, Derek J; Forsberg, Neil E; Bobe, Gerd

    2016-05-01

    Feeding a yeast-containing additive (YCA; OmniGen-AF) improves immune responses in ruminant livestock and reduces subsequent production losses. The objective was to identify molecular pathways by which dietary YCA may modify immune responses using a rodent model. Thirty-seven healthy, unchallenged CD rats received a diet containing 0 (control; n = 5, only 28 d), 0.5% (n = 15) or 1% (n = 17) YCA for 7 (n = 4/group), 14 (n = 3 or 4/group), 21 (n = 3 or 4/group) or 28 (n = 5/group) d. At the end of the feeding periods, whole blood was collected and the isolated RNA was analyzed for the expression of 84 genes involved in innate and cell-mediated adaptive immune responses. Three bacterial pattern recognition receptors TLR1 (0.5%: + 2.01; 1%: + 2.38), TLR6 (0.5%: + 2.11; 1%: + 2.34) and NOD2 (0.5%: + 2.32; 1%: + 2.23), two APC surface receptors CD1D1 (0.5%: + 1.75; 1%: + 2.33) and CD80 (0.5%: +2.45; 1%: +3.00), and the cell signaling molecule MAPK8 (0.5%: +1.87; 1%: +2.35) were significantly up-regulated by YCA at both inclusion rates. In conclusion, feeding YCA may potentially increase recognition and responses to bacterial pathogens and T-cell activation and differentiation and thereby maintain health and prevent production losses. PMID:27033362

  18. Coarse-Grained Structural Modeling of Molecular Motors Using Multibody Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Parker, David; Bryant, Zev; Delp, Scott L.

    2010-01-01

    Experimental and computational approaches are needed to uncover the mechanisms by which molecular motors convert chemical energy into mechanical work. In this article, we describe methods and software to generate structurally realistic models of molecular motor conformations compatible with experimental data from different sources. Coarse-grained models of molecular structures are constructed by combining groups of atoms into a system of rigid bodies connected by joints. Contacts between rigid bodies enforce excluded volume constraints, and spring potentials model system elasticity. This simplified representation allows the conformations of complex molecular motors to be simulated interactively, providing a tool for hypothesis building and quantitative comparisons between models and experiments. In an example calculation, we have used the software to construct atomically detailed models of the myosin V molecular motor bound to its actin track. The software is available at www.simtk.org. PMID:20428469

  19. Molecular Modeling of Myrosinase from Brassica oleracea: A Structural Investigation of Sinigrin Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Park, Jong-In; Chung, Mi-Young; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2015-01-01

    Myrosinase, which is present in cruciferous plant species, plays an important role in the hydrolysis of glycosides such as glucosinolates and is involved in plant defense. Brassicaceae myrosinases are diverse although they share common ancestry, and structural knowledge about myrosinases from cabbage (Brassica oleracea) was needed. To address this, we constructed a three-dimensional model structure of myrosinase based on Sinapis alba structures using Iterative Threading ASSEmbly Refinement server (I-TASSER) webserver, and refined model coordinates were evaluated with ProQ and Verify3D. The resulting model was predicted with β/α fold, ten conserved N-glycosylation sites, and three disulfide bridges. In addition, this model shared features with the known Sinapis alba myrosinase structure. To obtain a better understanding of myrosinase–sinigrin interaction, the refined model was docked using Autodock Vina with crucial key amino acids. The key nucleophile residues GLN207 and GLU427 were found to interact with sinigrin to form a hydrogen bond. Further, 20-ns molecular dynamics simulation was performed to examine myrosinase–sinigrin complex stability, revealing that residue GLU207 maintained its hydrogen bond stability throughout the entire simulation and structural orientation was similar to that of the docked state. This conceptual model should be useful for understanding the structural features of myrosinase and their binding orientation with sinigrin. PMID:26703735

  20. Thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures: Theoretical model supported by equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Gheribi, Aïmen E; Chartrand, Patrice

    2016-02-28

    A theoretical model for the description of thermal conductivity of molten salt mixtures as a function of composition and temperature is presented. The model is derived by considering the classical kinetic theory and requires, for its parametrization, only information on thermal conductivity of pure compounds. In this sense, the model is predictive. For most molten salt mixtures, no experimental data on thermal conductivity are available in the literature. This is a hindrance for many industrial applications (in particular for thermal energy storage technologies) as well as an obvious barrier for the validation of the theoretical model. To alleviate this lack of data, a series of equilibrium molecular dynamics (EMD) simulations has been performed on several molten chloride systems in order to determine their thermal conductivity in the entire range of composition at two different temperatures: 1200 K and 1300 K. The EMD simulations are first principles type, as the potentials used to describe the interactions have been parametrized on the basis of first principle electronic structure calculations. In addition to the molten chlorides system, the model predictions are also compared to a recent similar EMD study on molten fluorides and with the few reliable experimental data available in the literature. The accuracy of the proposed model is within the reported numerical and/or experimental errors. PMID:26931711

  1. Modeling of hydrophilic wafer bonding by molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Litton, David A.; Garofalini, Stephen H.

    2001-06-01

    The role of moisture in hydrophilic wafer bonding was modeled using molecular dynamics computer simulations of interface formation between amorphous silica surfaces. Three different surface treatments were used in order to determine the effect of moisture on the formation of siloxane (Si{endash}O{endash}Si) bridges across the interface at two temperatures. The three surface conditions that were studied were: (a) wet interfaces containing 1 monolayer of water adsorbed at the interface (based on the room temperature bulk density of water), (b) hydroxylated interfaces with concentrations of 3{endash}5 silanols/nm2 on each surface and no excess water molecules initially in the system, and (c) pristine interfaces that had only Si and O and no water or H present. The surfaces were slowly brought together and siloxane bond formation was monitored. In the pristine interfaces, siloxane bridges formed across the interface by the coalescence of various defect species in each surface. A bimodal distribution of siloxane bond angles formed during the first 2.5 Aa of approach after the first siloxane bond was formed. These bond angles were much lower than and higher than the bulk average, indicating the formation of less stable bonds. The hydroxylated (with no excess water) and wet surfaces showed a more uniform distribution of siloxane bond angles, with no highly reactive small bond angles forming. The presence of water molecules enhanced H-bond formation across the interface, but trapped water molecules inhibited formation of the strong siloxane bridges across the interface. In real systems, high temperatures are required to remove this trapped moisture. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  2. Tight-binding model for amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junctions formed with carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deok Hyeon; Kim, Taekyeong

    2015-05-01

    We measured the conductance of a series of amine-terminated oligophenyl molecular junction formed with carbon electrodes by using a scanning tunneling microscope based break-junction technique. The tight-binding model that includes the molecular backbone states accurately captured the experimentally measured the molecular conductance and the exponential decay trend of the conductance with the molecular backbone length. Furthermore, we found that this model tracked successfully the shift of the highest occupied molecular orbital toward the Fermi energy as increasing the molecular length. Finally, we found that the tight-binding model explaining more week coupling strength with the graphite electrode than that with the Au electrode is in quantitative agreement with the density functional theory calculations.

  3. VIBE: A virtual biomolecular environment for interactive molecular modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Neira, C.; Langley, R.; Bash, P.A.

    1996-12-31

    Virtual reality tightly coupled to high performance computing and communications ushers in a new era for the study of molecular recognition and the rational design of pharmaceutical compounds. We have created a Virtual Biomolecular Environment (VIBE), which consists of (1) massively parallel computing to simulate the physical and chemical properties of a molecular system, (2) the Cave Automatic Virtual Environment (CAVE) for immersive display and interaction with the molecular system, and (3) a high-speed network interface to exchange data between the simulation and the CAVE. VIBE enables molecular scientists to have a visual, auditory, and haptic experience with a chemical system, while simultaneously manipulating its physical properties by steering, in real-time, a simulation executed on a supercomputer. We demonstrate the characteristics of VIBE using an HIV protease-cyclic urea inhibitor complex. 22 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Molecular Modeling of Lipid Aggregates: Theory and Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenner, Joel Stewart

    The ability of cell membranes to perform a wide variety of biological functions stems from the organization and composition of its molecular constituents. There are many engineering applications, such as liposome drug delivery carriers, whose functionality takes advantage of the structure to function relationship of lipid membranes. The fundamental understanding of the relationship between the thermodynamic behavior and structure of lipid membranes and the molecular properties of their lipid constituents is crucial to the successful design of lipid related applications. However, information about how the local microscopic composition of lipid membranes responds to the presence of proteins and nanomaterials is challenging given the intrinsic experimental and theoretical difficulties of studying such small-scale systems. The present work generalizes a self consistent mean field theory for the study of the thermodynamic and structural behavior of lipid bilayers as a function of its molecular composition and physicochemical environments. This novel molecular theory provides with the ability of performing systematic thermodynamic calculations at relatively low computational costs while considering a detailed molecular description of the system under study. The competition of all relevant molecular interactions, such as electrostatics, vdW and chemical equilibria, in the membrane system is described. The developed molecular theory is applied to study how the protonation state of pH-sensitive amphiphiles in a membrane system affects the membrane's morphology. The molecular theory results demonstrate that the protonation state of ionizable groups within amphiphilic membranes shows a highly complex non-monotonic dependence on bulk salt concentration and pH strength. This result suggests that information about the pKa of the molecules is not sufficient to predict the protonation state of the ionizable groups in the membrane system. The molecular theory is also applied to

  5. Conformational Analysis in 18-Membered Macrolactones Based on Molecular Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Belaidi, Salah; Harkati, Dalal

    2011-01-01

    Conformational analysis of 18-ring membered macrolactones has been carried out using molecular mechanics calculations and molecular dynamics. A high conformational flexibility of macrolactones was obtained, and an important stereoselectivity was observed for the complexed macrolides. For 18d macrolactone, which was presented by a most favored conformer with 20.1% without complex, it was populated with 50.1% in presence of Fe(CO)3. PMID:24052826

  6. The molecular basis for the post-translational addition of amino acids by L/F transferase in the N-end rule pathway.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai S; Fahlman, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway is a conserved targeted proteolytic process observed in organisms ranging from eubacteria to mammals. The N-end rule relates the metabolic stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid residue. The identity of the N-terminal amino acid residue is a primary degradation signal, often referred to as an N-degron, which is recognized by the components of the N-end rule when it is a destabilizing N-terminus. N-degrons may be exposed by non-processive proteolytic cleavages or by post-translational modifications. One modification is the post-translational addition of amino acids to the N-termini of proteins, a reaction catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases. The aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase in eubacteria like Escherichia coli is L/F transferase. Recent investigations have reported unexpected observations regarding the L/F transferase catalytic mechanism and its mechanisms of substrate recognition. Additionally, recent proteome-wide identification of putative in vivo substrates facilitates hypothesis into the yet elusive biological functions of the prokaryotic N-end rule pathway. Here we summarize the recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of catalysis and substrate recognition by the E. coli L/F transferase in the prokaryotic N-end rule pathway. PMID:25692952

  7. "Rules of Engagement" of Protein-Glycoconjugate Interactions: A Molecular View Achievable by using NMR Spectroscopy and Molecular Modeling.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Roberta; Perez, Serge; Arda, Ana; Imberty, Anne; Jimenez-Barbero, Jesus; Silipo, Alba; Molinaro, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions, which lie at the heart of host-pathogen recognition, represents a crucial step to clarify the molecular determinants implicated in binding events, as well as to optimize the design of new molecules with therapeutic aims. Over the last decade, advances in complementary biophysical and spectroscopic methods permitted us to deeply dissect the fine structural details of biologically relevant molecular recognition processes with high resolution. This Review focuses on the development and use of modern nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to dissect binding events. These spectroscopic methods, complementing X-ray crystallography and molecular modeling methodologies, will be taken into account as indispensable tools to provide a complete picture of protein-glycoconjugate binding mechanisms related to biomedicine applications against infectious diseases. PMID:27547635

  8. Development of a model electronic Hamiltonian for understanding electronic relaxation dynamics of [Fe(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} through molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Iuchi, Satoru; Koga, Nobuaki

    2015-12-31

    A model electronic Hamiltonian of [Fe(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+}, which was recently refined for use in molecular dynamics simulations, is reviewed with some additional results. In particular, the quality of the refined model Hamiltonian is examined in terms of the vibrational frequencies and solvation structures of the lowest singlet and quintet states.

  9. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  10. Molecular thermodynamic modeling of ionic liquids using the perturbation-based linear Yukawa isotherm regularity.

    PubMed

    Sohrabi Mahboub, Mahdi; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, we present the results of an extensive study on a novel approach to the molecular modeling of pure ionic liquids (ILs) that incorporates the perturbed thermodynamic linear Yukawa isotherm regularity (LYIR), which is derived based on an effective nearest neighboring pair attractive interaction of the Yukawa potential. The LYIR was used to model the densities of ILs up to high pressures (35 MPa) and in the temperature range 293.15 to 393.15 K. To use the LYIR for ILs, a simple molecular model was proposed to describe their molecular structure, in which they were considered as a liquid consisting of the ion pairs moving together in the fluid, and each ion pair was assumed to be a one-center spherical united atom. The ILs under consideration contained one of the IL cations [C2mim](+), [C4mim](+), [C7mim](+), [C8mim](+), [C3mpy](+), [C3mpip](+), [C3mpyr](+) or [C4mpyr](+), and one of the IL anions [BF4](-), [C(CN)3](-), [CF3SO4](-) or [NTf2](-). The reliability and physical significance of the parameters as well as the proposed molecular model were tested by calculating the densities of pure imidazolium-, pyridinium-, piperidinium- and pyrrolidimium-based ILs. The results showed that the LYIR can be used to predict and reproduce the density of ILs in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the LYIR enabled us to determine the physical quantities, such as an effective Yukawa screening length, λ eff, the product of the effective energy well depth and the effective coordination number, (ε eff/k)z eff, the contribution of the non-reference thermal pressure and also the influence of the anionic and cationic structure on the λ eff parameter. The standard deviation of the IL densities predicted in this work is lower than those calculated by the one other important equation of state reported in the literature. PMID:27157142

  11. Molecular thermodynamic modeling of ionic liquids using the perturbation-based linear Yukawa isotherm regularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrabi Mahboub, Mahdi; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we present the results of an extensive study on a novel approach to the molecular modeling of pure ionic liquids (ILs) that incorporates the perturbed thermodynamic linear Yukawa isotherm regularity (LYIR), which is derived based on an effective nearest neighboring pair attractive interaction of the Yukawa potential. The LYIR was used to model the densities of ILs up to high pressures (35 MPa) and in the temperature range 293.15 to 393.15 K. To use the LYIR for ILs, a simple molecular model was proposed to describe their molecular structure, in which they were considered as a liquid consisting of the ion pairs moving together in the fluid, and each ion pair was assumed to be a one-center spherical united atom. The ILs under consideration contained one of the IL cations [C2mim]+, [C4mim]+, [C7mim]+, [C8mim]+, [C3mpy]+, [C3mpip]+, [C3mpyr]+ or [C4mpyr]+, and one of the IL anions [BF4]‑, [C(CN)3]‑, [CF3SO4]‑ or [NTf2]‑. The reliability and physical significance of the parameters as well as the proposed molecular model were tested by calculating the densities of pure imidazolium-, pyridinium-, piperidinium- and pyrrolidimium-based ILs. The results showed that the LYIR can be used to predict and reproduce the density of ILs in good agreement with the experimental data. In addition, the LYIR enabled us to determine the physical quantities, such as an effective Yukawa screening length, λ eff, the product of the effective energy well depth and the effective coordination number, (ε eff/k)z eff, the contribution of the non-reference thermal pressure and also the influence of the anionic and cationic structure on the λ eff parameter. The standard deviation of the IL densities predicted in this work is lower than those calculated by the one other important equation of state reported in the literature.

  12. Physical models enhance molecular three-dimensional literacy in an introductory biochemistry course*.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Jacqueline R; Hagedorn, Eric; Dillenburg, Paul; Patrick, Michael; Herman, Timothy

    2005-03-01

    This article reports the results of a recent study to evaluate the usefulness of physical models of molecular structures as a new tool with which to teach concepts of molecular structure and function. Of seven different learning tools used by students in this introductory biochemistry class, the use of the physical models in a laboratory was rated as most useful. These results suggest that physical models can play an important role in capturing the interest of students in the subject of molecular structure and function. These physical models often stimulate more sophisticated questions in the minds of students, which can then be more appropriately explored using computer visualization tools. PMID:21638554

  13. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrido, J. M.; Algaba, J.; Míguez, J. M.; Mendiboure, B.; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A. I.; Piñeiro, M. M.; Blas, F. J.

    2016-04-01

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  14. On interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran: Atomistic and coarse-grained models from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Garrido, J M; Algaba, J; Míguez, J M; Mendiboure, B; Moreno-Ventas Bravo, A I; Piñeiro, M M; Blas, F J

    2016-04-14

    We have determined the interfacial properties of tetrahydrofuran (THF) from direct simulation of the vapor-liquid interface. The molecules are modeled using six different molecular models, three of them based on the united-atom approach and the other three based on a coarse-grained (CG) approach. In the first case, THF is modeled using the transferable parameters potential functions approach proposed by Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen [J. Chem. Phys. 77, 5073 (1982)] and a new parametrization of the TraPPE force fields for cyclic alkanes and ethers [S. J. Keasler et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 115, 11234 (2012)]. In both cases, dispersive and coulombic intermolecular interactions are explicitly taken into account. In the second case, THF is modeled as a single sphere, a diatomic molecule, and a ring formed from three Mie monomers according to the SAFT-γ Mie top-down approach [V. Papaioannou et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 054107 (2014)]. Simulations were performed in the molecular dynamics canonical ensemble and the vapor-liquid surface tension is evaluated from the normal and tangential components of the pressure tensor along the simulation box. In addition to the surface tension, we have also obtained density profiles, coexistence densities, critical temperature, density, and pressure, and interfacial thickness as functions of temperature, paying special attention to the comparison between the estimations obtained from different models and literature experimental data. The simulation results obtained from the three CG models as described by the SAFT-γ Mie approach are able to predict accurately the vapor-liquid phase envelope of THF, in excellent agreement with estimations obtained from TraPPE model and experimental data in the whole range of coexistence. However, Chandrasekhar and Jorgensen model presents significant deviations from experimental results. We also compare the predictions for surface tension as obtained from simulation results for all the models with

  15. A solution algorithm for the fluid dynamic equations based on a stochastic model for molecular motion

    SciTech Connect

    Jenny, Patrick Torrilhon, Manuel; Heinz, Stefan

    2010-02-20

    In this paper, a stochastic model is presented to simulate the flow of gases, which are not in thermodynamic equilibrium, like in rarefied or micro situations. For the interaction of a particle with others, statistical moments of the local ensemble have to be evaluated, but unlike in molecular dynamics simulations or DSMC, no collisions between computational particles are considered. In addition, a novel integration technique allows for time steps independent of the stochastic time scale. The stochastic model represents a Fokker-Planck equation in the kinetic description, which can be viewed as an approximation to the Boltzmann equation. This allows for a rigorous investigation of the relation between the new model and classical fluid and kinetic equations. The fluid dynamic equations of Navier-Stokes and Fourier are fully recovered for small relaxation times, while for larger values the new model extents into the kinetic regime. Numerical studies demonstrate that the stochastic model is consistent with Navier-Stokes in that limit, but also that the results become significantly different, if the conditions for equilibrium are invalid. The application to the Knudsen paradox demonstrates the correctness and relevance of this development, and comparisons with existing kinetic equations and standard solution algorithms reveal its advantages. Moreover, results of a test case with geometrically complex boundaries are presented.

  16. Two-Component Coarse-Grained Molecular-Dynamics Model for the Human Erythrocyte Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Lykotrafitis, George

    2012-01-01

    We present a two-component coarse-grained molecular-dynamics model for simulating the erythrocyte membrane. The proposed model possesses the key feature of combing the lipid bilayer and the erythrocyte cytoskeleton, thus showing both the fluidic behavior of the lipid bilayer and the elastic properties of the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. In this model, three types of coarse-grained particles are introduced to represent clusters of lipid molecules, actin junctions, and band-3 complexes, respectively. The proposed model facilitates simulations that span large length scales (approximately micrometers) and timescales (approximately milliseconds). By tuning the interaction potential parameters, we were able to control the diffusivity and bending rigidity of the membrane model. We studied the membrane under shearing and found that at a low shear strain rate, the developed shear stress was due mainly to the spectrin network, whereas the viscosity of the lipid bilayer contributed to the resulting shear stress at higher strain rates. In addition, we investigated the effects of a reduced spectrin network connectivity on the shear modulus of the membrane. PMID:22225800

  17. Factor analysis models for structuring covariance matrices of additive genetic effects: a Bayesian implementation

    PubMed Central

    de los Campos, Gustavo; Gianola, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Multivariate linear models are increasingly important in quantitative genetics. In high dimensional specifications, factor analysis (FA) may provide an avenue for structuring (co)variance matrices, thus reducing the number of parameters needed for describing (co)dispersion. We describe how FA can be used to model genetic effects in the context of a multivariate linear mixed model. An orthogonal common factor structure is used to model genetic effects under Gaussian assumption, so that the marginal likelihood is multivariate normal with a structured genetic (co)variance matrix. Under standard prior assumptions, all fully conditional distributions have closed form, and samples from the joint posterior distribution can be obtained via Gibbs sampling. The model and the algorithm developed for its Bayesian implementation were used to describe five repeated records of milk yield in dairy cattle, and a one common FA model was compared with a standard multiple trait model. The Bayesian Information Criterion favored the FA model. PMID:17897592

  18. Accurate force fields and methods for modelling organic molecular crystals at finite temperatures.

    PubMed

    Nyman, Jonas; Pundyke, Orla Sheehan; Day, Graeme M

    2016-06-21

    We present an assessment of the performance of several force fields for modelling intermolecular interactions in organic molecular crystals using the X23 benchmark set. The performance of the force fields is compared to several popular dispersion corrected density functional methods. In addition, we present our implementation of lattice vibrational free energy calculations in the quasi-harmonic approximation, using several methods to account for phonon dispersion. This allows us to also benchmark the force fields' reproduction of finite temperature crystal structures. The results demonstrate that anisotropic atom-atom multipole-based force fields can be as accurate as several popular DFT-D methods, but have errors 2-3 times larger than the current best DFT-D methods. The largest error in the examined force fields is a systematic underestimation of the (absolute) lattice energy. PMID:27230942

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Models for Analysis of Resistance to Anticancer Molecular Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Roberta; Monteleone, Francesca; Zambrano, Nicola; Bianco, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of classical and molecular therapies in cancer is hampered by the occurrence of primary (intrinsic) and secondary (acquired) refractoriness of tumours to selected therapeutic regimens. Nevertheless, the increased knowledge of the genetic, molecular and metabolic mechanisms underlying cancer results in the generation of a correspondingly increasing number of druggable targets and molecular drugs. Thus, a current challenge in molecular oncology and medicinal chemistry is to cope with the increased need for modelling, both in cellular and animal systems, the genetic assets associated to cancer resistance to drugs. In this review, we summarize the current strategies for generation and analysis of in vitro and in vivo models, which may reveal useful to extract information on the molecular basis of intrinsic and acquired resistance to anticancer molecular agents. PMID:23992330

  20. Adaptation of the pore diffusion model to describe multi-addition batch uptake high-throughput screening experiments.

    PubMed

    Traylor, Steven J; Xu, Xuankuo; Li, Yi; Jin, Mi; Li, Zheng Jian

    2014-11-14

    Equilibrium isotherm and kinetic mass transfer measurements are critical to mechanistic modeling of binding and elution behavior within a chromatographic column. However, traditional methods of measuring these parameters are impractically time- and labor-intensive. While advances in high-throughput robotic liquid handling systems have created time and labor-saving methods of performing kinetic and equilibrium measurements of proteins on chromatographic resins in a 96-well plate format, these techniques continue to be limited by physical constraints on protein addition, incubation and separation times; the available concentration of protein stocks and process pools; and practical constraints on resin and fluid volumes in the 96-well format. In this study, a novel technique for measuring protein uptake kinetics (multi-addition batch uptake) has been developed to address some of these limitations during high-throughput batch uptake kinetic measurements. This technique uses sequential additions of protein stock to chromatographic resin in a 96-well plate and the subsequent removal of each addition by centrifugation or vacuum separation. The pore diffusion model was adapted here to model multi-addition batch uptake and was tested and compared with traditional batch uptake measurements of uptake of an Fc-fusion protein on an anion exchange resin. Acceptable agreement between the two techniques is achieved for the two solution conditions investigated here. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the model to the physical inputs is presented and the advantages and limitations of the multi-addition batch uptake technique are explored. PMID:25311484

  1. New QSAR prediction models derived from GPCR CB2-antagonistic triaryl bis-sulfone analogues by a combined molecular morphological and pharmacophoric approach.

    PubMed

    Chen, J-Z; Myint, K-Z; Xie, X-Q

    2011-01-01

    In order to build quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models for virtual screening of novel cannabinoid CB2 ligands and hit ranking selections, a new QSAR algorithm has been developed for the cannabinoid ligands, triaryl bis-sulfones, using a combined molecular morphological and pharmacophoric search approach. Both pharmacophore features and shape complementarity were considered using a number of molecular descriptors, including Surflex-Sim similarity and Unity Query fit, in addition to other molecular properties such as molecular weight, ClogP, molecular volume, molecular area, molecular polar volume, molecular polar surface area and dipole moment. Subsequently, partial least squares regression analyses were carried out to derive QSAR models linking bioactivity and the descriptors mentioned, using a training set of 25 triaryl bis-sulfones. Good prediction capability was confirmed for the best QSAR model by evaluation against a test set of a further 20 triaryl bis-sulfones. The pharmacophore and molecular shape-based QSAR scoring function now established can be used to predict the biological properties of virtual hits or untested compounds obtained from ligand-based virtual screenings. PMID:21714749

  2. Structural Biology and Molecular Modeling in the Design of Novel DPP-4 Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scapin, Giovanna

    Inhibition of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) is a promising new approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. DPP-4 is the enzyme responsible for inactivating the incretin hormones glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and glucose dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP), two hormones that play important roles in glucose homeostasis. The potent, orally bioavailable and highly selective small molecule DPP-4 inhibitor sitagliptin has been approved by the FDA as novel drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The comparison between the binding mode of sitagliptin (a β-amino acid) and that of a second class of inhibitors (α-amino acid-based) initially led to the successful identification and design of structurally diverse and highly potent DPP-4 inhibitors. Further analysis of the crystal structure of sitagliptin bound to DPP-4 suggested that the central β-amino butanoyl moiety could be replaced by a rigid group. This was confirmed by molecular modeling, and the resulting cyclohexylamine analogs were synthesized and found to be potent DPP-4 inhibitors. However, the triazolopyrazine was predicted to be distorted in order to fit in the binding pocket, and the crystal structure showed that multiple conformations exist for this moiety. Additional molecular modeling studies were then used to improve potency of the cyclohexylamine series. In addition, a 3-D QSAR method was used to gain insight for reducing off-target DPP-8/9 activities. Novel compounds were thus synthesized and found to be potent DPP-4 inhibitors. Two compounds in particular were designed to be highly selective against off-target "DPP-4 Activity- and/or Structure Homologues" (DASH) enzymes while maintaining potency against DPP-4.

  3. 78 FR 32224 - Availability of Version 3.1.2 of the Connect America Fund Phase II Cost Model; Additional...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... as part of the Model Design PN, 77 FR 38804, June 29, 2012, of the possible significant economic...). See Electronic Filing of Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121, May 1, 1998. Electronic...; Additional Discussion Topics in Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop AGENCY: Federal...

  4. NMR and molecular modeling: application to wine ageing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saucier, C.; Pianet, I.; Laguerre, M.; Glories, Y.

    1998-02-01

    Red wine contains polyphenols called tannins which are very important for its taste and longevity. These polymers consist in repeating units of catechin and its epimer epicatechin. During ageing, slow condensation reactions take place which lead to new chemical structures. Among the possible reactions, we have focused our attention on acetaldehyde cross-linking. Catechin was used as a model for the production of polymers with acetaldehyde. Two reaction product fractions have been isolated by liquid chromatography. Mass measurement indicated that these fractions contain dimers. NMR (1D and 2D) and molecular modelling were then used to study the structure and conformations of these products. The first product consist in a pure dimer with the two catechin moieties connected with an ethyl bridge on the carbon 6 and 8. The second fraction was a mixture of two dimers (50/50). NMR measurements showed that it could be two symmetrical dimers involving the same carbon for each catechin moiety (6 or8). Le vin rouge contient des polyphénols appelés tanins qui sont très importants pour son goût et sa longévité. Il s'agit principalement de polymères de catéchine et d'épicatéchine. Durant le vieillissement du vin, des réactions de condensation interviennent lentement et conduisent à de nouvelles structures. Parmi les réactions possibles, nous avons plus spécialement étudié la polymérisation par pontage avec l'éthanal. La catéchine a été utilisée comme modèle de tannin et mise en présence d'éthanal en milieu acide proche du vin. Deux fractions de produits de réaction ont été isolées par chromatographie liquide. La spectrométrie de masse a révélé la présence de dimères. La RMN (1D et 2D) et la modélisation moléculaire ont ensuite été utilisées pour déterminer la structure et la conformation de ces produits. La première fraction a été identifiée comme étant un dimère de deux unités catéchines reliées par un pont éthyle par leur

  5. Inclusion of Additional Plant Species and Trait Information in Dynamic Vegetation Modeling of Arctic Tundra and Boreal Forest Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euskirchen, E. S.; Patil, V.; Roach, J.; Griffith, B.; McGuire, A. D.

    2015-12-01

    Dynamic vegetation models (DVMs) have been developed to model the ecophysiological characteristics of plant functional types in terrestrial ecosystems. They have frequently been used to answer questions pertaining to processes such as disturbance, plant succession, and community composition under historical and future climate scenarios. While DVMs have proved useful in these types of applications, it has often been questioned if additional detail, such as including plant dynamics at the species-level and/or including species-specific traits would make these models more accurate and/or broadly applicable. A sub-question associated with this issue is, 'How many species, or what degree of functional diversity, should we incorporate to sustain ecosystem function in modeled ecosystems?' Here, we focus on how the inclusion of additional plant species and trait information may strengthen dynamic vegetation modeling in applications pertaining to: (1) forage for caribou in northern Alaska, (2) above- and belowground carbon storage in the boreal forest and lake margin wetlands of interior Alaska, and (3) arctic tundra and boreal forest leaf phenology. While the inclusion of additional information generally proved valuable in these three applications, this additional detail depends on field data that may not always be available and may also result in increased computational complexity. Therefore, it is important to assess these possible limitations against the perceived need for additional plant species and trait information in the development and application of dynamic vegetation models.

  6. Integrated Multiscale Modeling of Molecular Computing Devices. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Schulze

    2012-11-01

    The general theme of this research has been to expand the capabilities of a simulation technique, Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and apply it to study self-assembled nano-structures on epitaxial thin films. KMC simulates thin film growth and evolution by replacing the detailed dynamics of the system's evolution, which might otherwise be studied using molecular dynamics, with an appropriate stochastic process.

  7. The Jukes-Cantor Model of Molecular Evolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erickson, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The material in this module introduces students to some of the mathematical tools used to examine molecular evolution. This topic is standard fare in many mathematical biology or bioinformatics classes, but could also be suitable for classes in linear algebra or probability. While coursework in matrix algebra, Markov processes, Monte Carlo…

  8. Mechanisms and modeling of the effects of additives on the nitrogen oxides emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundu, Krishna P.; Nguyen, Hung Lee; Kang, M. Paul

    1991-01-01

    A theoretical study on the emission of the oxides of nitrogen in the combustion of hydrocarbons is presented. The current understanding of the mechanisms and the rate parameters for gas phase reactions were used to calculate the NO(x) emission. The possible effects of different chemical species on thermal NO(x), on a long time scale were discussed. The mixing of these additives at various stages of combustion were considered and NO(x) concentrations were calculated; effects of temperatures were also considered. The chemicals such as hydrocarbons, H2, CH3OH, NH3, and other nitrogen species were chosen as additives in this discussion. Results of these calculations can be used to evaluate the effects of these additives on the NO(x) emission in the industrial combustion system.

  9. Boolean Modeling of Cellular and Molecular Pathways Involved in Influenza Infection

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Christopher S.; DeDiego, Marta L.; Topham, David J.; Thakar, Juilee

    2016-01-01

    Systems virology integrates host-directed approaches with molecular profiling to understand viral pathogenesis. Self-contained statistical approaches that combine expression profiles of genes with the available databases defining the genes involved in the pathways (gene-sets) have allowed characterization of predictive gene-signatures associated with outcome of the influenza virus (IV) infection. However, such enrichment techniques do not take into account interactions among pathways that are responsible for the IV infection pathogenesis. We investigate dendritic cell response to seasonal H1N1 influenza A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (NC) infection and infer the Boolean logic rules underlying the interaction network of ligand induced signaling pathways and transcription factors. The model reveals several novel regulatory modes and provides insights into mechanism of cross talk between NFκB and IRF mediated signaling. Additionally, the logic rule underlying the regulation of IL2 pathway that was predicted by the Boolean model was experimentally validated. Thus, the model developed in this paper integrates pathway analysis tools with the dynamic modeling approaches to reveal the regulation between signaling pathways and transcription factors using genome-wide transcriptional profiles measured upon influenza infection. PMID:26981147

  10. Modeling of molecular nitrogen collisions and dissociation processes for direct simulation Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Neal; Levin, Deborah A; van Duin, Adri C T; Zhu, Tong

    2014-12-21

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used for simulating hypersonic Earth re-entry flows requires accurate total collision cross sections and reaction probabilities. However, total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, so their reliability is unknown for the high temperatures observed in hypersonic flows. Existing DSMC reaction models accurately reproduce experimental equilibrium reaction rates, but the applicability of these rates to the strong thermal nonequilibrium observed in hypersonic shocks is unknown. For hypersonic flows, these modeling issues are particularly relevant for nitrogen, the dominant species of air. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method is used to accurately compute collision and reaction cross sections for the N2(Σg+1)-N2(Σg+1) collision pair for conditions expected in hypersonic shocks using a new potential energy surface developed using a ReaxFF fit to recent advanced ab initio calculations. The MD/QCT-computed reaction probabilities were found to exhibit better physical behavior and predict less dissociation than the baseline total collision energy reaction model for strong nonequilibrium conditions expected in a shock. The MD/QCT reaction model compared well with computed equilibrium reaction rates and shock-tube data. In addition, the MD/QCT-computed total cross sections were found to agree well with established variable hard sphere total cross sections. PMID:25527935

  11. Modeling of molecular nitrogen collisions and dissociation processes for direct simulation Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Neal Levin, Deborah A.; Duin, Adri C. T. van; Zhu, Tong

    2014-12-21

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method typically used for simulating hypersonic Earth re-entry flows requires accurate total collision cross sections and reaction probabilities. However, total cross sections are often determined from extrapolations of relatively low-temperature viscosity data, so their reliability is unknown for the high temperatures observed in hypersonic flows. Existing DSMC reaction models accurately reproduce experimental equilibrium reaction rates, but the applicability of these rates to the strong thermal nonequilibrium observed in hypersonic shocks is unknown. For hypersonic flows, these modeling issues are particularly relevant for nitrogen, the dominant species of air. To rectify this deficiency, the Molecular Dynamics/Quasi-Classical Trajectories (MD/QCT) method is used to accurately compute collision and reaction cross sections for the N{sub 2}({sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +})-N{sub 2}({sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup +}) collision pair for conditions expected in hypersonic shocks using a new potential energy surface developed using a ReaxFF fit to recent advanced ab initio calculations. The MD/QCT-computed reaction probabilities were found to exhibit better physical behavior and predict less dissociation than the baseline total collision energy reaction model for strong nonequilibrium conditions expected in a shock. The MD/QCT reaction model compared well with computed equilibrium reaction rates and shock-tube data. In addition, the MD/QCT-computed total cross sections were found to agree well with established variable hard sphere total cross sections.

  12. Boolean Modeling of Cellular and Molecular Pathways Involved in Influenza Infection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Christopher S; DeDiego, Marta L; Topham, David J; Thakar, Juilee

    2016-01-01

    Systems virology integrates host-directed approaches with molecular profiling to understand viral pathogenesis. Self-contained statistical approaches that combine expression profiles of genes with the available databases defining the genes involved in the pathways (gene-sets) have allowed characterization of predictive gene-signatures associated with outcome of the influenza virus (IV) infection. However, such enrichment techniques do not take into account interactions among pathways that are responsible for the IV infection pathogenesis. We investigate dendritic cell response to seasonal H1N1 influenza A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (NC) infection and infer the Boolean logic rules underlying the interaction network of ligand induced signaling pathways and transcription factors. The model reveals several novel regulatory modes and provides insights into mechanism of cross talk between NFκB and IRF mediated signaling. Additionally, the logic rule underlying the regulation of IL2 pathway that was predicted by the Boolean model was experimentally validated. Thus, the model developed in this paper integrates pathway analysis tools with the dynamic modeling approaches to reveal the regulation between signaling pathways and transcription factors using genome-wide transcriptional profiles measured upon influenza infection. PMID:26981147

  13. Molecular Dynamics implementation of BN2D or 'Mercedes Benz' water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scukins, Arturs; Bardik, Vitaliy; Pavlov, Evgen; Nerukh, Dmitry

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional 'Mercedes Benz' (MB) or BN2D water model (Naim, 1971) is implemented in Molecular Dynamics. It is known that the MB model can capture abnormal properties of real water (high heat capacity, minima of pressure and isothermal compressibility, negative thermal expansion coefficient) (Silverstein et al., 1998). In this work formulas for calculating the thermodynamic, structural and dynamic properties in microcanonical (NVE) and isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensembles for the model from Molecular Dynamics simulation are derived and verified against known Monte Carlo results. The convergence of the thermodynamic properties and the system's numerical stability are investigated. The results qualitatively reproduce the peculiarities of real water making the model a visually convenient tool that also requires less computational resources, thus allowing simulations of large (hydrodynamic scale) molecular systems. We provide the open source code written in C/C++ for the BN2D water model implementation using Molecular Dynamics.

  14. Creating a Climate for Linguistically Responsive Instruction: The Case for Additive Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rao, Arthi B.; Morales, P. Zitlali

    2015-01-01

    As a state with a longstanding tradition of offering bilingual education, Illinois has a legislative requirement for native language instruction in earlier grades through a model called Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE). This model does not truly develop bilingualism, however, but rather offers native language instruction to English learners…

  15. Improving the mining soil quality for a vegetation cover after addition of sewage sludges: inorganic ions and low-molecular-weight organic acids in the soil solution.

    PubMed

    Peña, Aránzazu; Mingorance, Ma Dolores; Guzmán-Carrizosa, Ignacio; Fernández-Espinosa, Antonio J

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the effects of applying stabilized sewage sludge (SSL) and composted sewage sludge (CLV), at 5 and 10% to an acid mining soil. Limed soil (NCL) amended or not with SSL and CLV was incubated for 47 days. We studied the cations and organic and inorganic anions in the soil solution by means of ion chromatography. Liming led to big increases in Ca(2+) and SO4(2-) and to significant decreases in K(+), Mg(2+), NH4(+) and NO3(-). Addition of both organic amendments increased some cations (NH4(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Na(+)) and anions (Cl(-), NO3(-) only with CLV and PO4(3-) only with SSL) and provided a greater amount of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) (SSL more than CLV). Incubation led to decreases in all cations, particularly remarkable for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in SSL-10. A decrease in NH4(+) was associated with variations in NO2(-) and NO3(-) resulting from nitrification reactions. During incubation the LMWOAs content tended to decrease similarly to the cations, especially in SSL-10. Chemometric tools revealed a clear discrimination between SSL, CLV and NCL. Furthermore, treatment effects depended upon dose, mainly in SSL. Amendment nature and dose affect the quality of a mining soil and improve conditions for plant establishment. PMID:25506677

  16. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer strategy and its application in the Sudan dyes residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liang; Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Sicen

    2015-07-31

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have become a hotspot owing to the dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the MMIPs were obtained by the surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using Sudan I as the template. The resultant MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and X-ray diffraction. Benefiting from the controlled/living property of the RAFT strategy, the uniform MIP layer was successfully grafted on the surface of RAFT agent-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, favoring the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four Sudan dyes (Sudan I, II, III, and IV) from chili powder samples. The recoveries of the spiked samples in chili powder samples ranged from 74.1 to 93.3% with RSD lower than 6.4% and the relative standard uncertainty lower than 0.029. This work provided a good platform for the extraction and removal of Sudan dyes in complicated matrixes and demonstrated a bright future for the application of the well-constructed MMIPs in the field of solid-phase extraction. PMID:26077971

  17. Improvement in enzyme activity and stability by addition of low molecular weight polyethylene glycol to sodium bis(2-ethyl-L-hexyl)sulfosuccinate/isooctane reverse micellar system.

    PubMed

    Talukder, M M R; Takeyama, T; Hayashi, Y; Wu, J C; Kawanishi, T; Shimizu, N; Ogino, C

    2003-08-01

    The activity and stability of Chromobacterium viscosum lipase (glycerolester hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3)-catalyzed olive oil hydrolysis in sodium bis (2-ethyl-l-hexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT)/isooctane reverse micelles is increased appreciably when low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG 400) is added to the reverse micelles. To understand the effect of PEG 400 on the phase behavior of the reverse micellar system, the phase diagram of AOT/ PEG 400/water/isooctane system was studied. The influences of relevant parameters on the catalytic activity in AOT/PEG 400 reverse micelles were investigated and compared with the results in the simple AOT reverse micelles. In the presence of PEG 400, the linear decreasing trend of the lipase activity with AOT concentration, which is observed in the simple AOT reverse micelles, disappeared. Enzyme entrapped in AOT/PEG reverse micelles was very stable, retaining >75% of its initial activity after 60 d, whereas the half-life in simple AOT reverse micelles was 38 d. The kinetics parameter maximum velocity (Vmax) exhibiting the temperature dependence and the activation energy obtained by Arrhenius plot was suppressed significantly by the addition of PEG 400. PMID:14515025

  18. 78 FR 12271 - Wireline Competition Bureau Seeks Additional Comment In Connect America Cost Model Virtual Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Design PN, 77 FR 38804, June 29, 2012, of the possible significant economic impact on a substantial... Documents in Rulemaking Proceedings, 63 FR 24121, May 1, 1998. Electronic Filers: Comments may be filed... document, the Wireline Competition Bureau seeks public input on additional questions relating to...

  19. Modelling Cu(II) adsorption to ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite-bacteria composites: Deviation from additive adsorption in the composite sorption system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Ellen M.; Peacock, Caroline L.

    2013-03-01

    Bacterially associated iron (hydr)oxides are widespread in natural environments and are potent scavengers of dissolved metal ions. However, it is unclear whether metal sorption on these composites adheres to the additivity principle, and thus whether metal concentrations in environments where these composites comprise a significant proportion of the reactive iron phases can be modelled assuming component additivity. Here we address this issue for Cu adsorption on ferrihydrite-Bacillus subtilis composites. We precipitated pure ferrihydrite and ferrihydrite composites with different ferrihydrite:bacteria mass ratios, and measured Cu adsorption as a function of pH, Cu adsorbed concentration and composite mass ratio. We develop a molecular-level surface complexation model for Cu adsorption on pure ferrihydrite. We then combine our end-member models for Cu adsorption on B. subtilis (Moon and Peacock, 2011) and ferrihydrite to model the observed Cu adsorption on the composites, adopting a component linear additivity approach. By comparing observed Cu adsorption to that predicted by our composite model, constrained to the exact best fitting end-member stability constants, we find that Cu adsorption behaviour on ferrihydrite-B. subtilis composites deviates from additivity. Specifically, Cu adsorption on composites composed mainly of ferrihydrite is enhanced across the adsorption pH edge (pH ˜3-6), while on our composite composed mainly of bacteria adsorption is enhanced at mid-high pH (pH ˜5-6) but diminished at mid-low pH (pH ˜5-3), compared to additivity. In current surface complexation modelling constructs, Cu adsorption on composites composed mainly of ferrihydrite can be modelled in a component additivity approach, by optimising the stability constants for Cu adsorption on the ferrihydrite and bacteria fractions to values that are within the uncertainty on the end-member stability constant values. The deviation from additivity of these composites, apparent when

  20. Development of Polarizable Models for Molecular Mechanical Calculations II: Induced Dipole Models Significantly Improve Accuracy of Intermolecular Interaction Energies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junmei; Cieplak, Piotr; Li, Jie; Wang, Jun; Cai, Qin; Hsieh, MengJuei; Lei, Hongxing; Luo, Ray; Duan, Yong

    2011-01-01

    In the companion paper, we presented a set of induced dipole interaction models using four types of screening functions, which include the Applequist (no screening), the Thole linear, the Thole exponential model, and the Thole Tinker-like (another form of exponential screening function) functions. In this work, we evaluate the performance of polarizability models using large set of amino acid analog pairs that are frequently observed in protein structures as a benchmark. For each amino acid pair we calculated quantum mechanical interaction energies at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level with the basis set superposition error (BSSE) correction and compared them with molecular mechanics results. Encouragingly, all the polarizable models significantly outperform the additive F94 and F03 models (mimicking AMBER ff94/ff99 and ff03 force fields, respectively) in reproducing the BSSE-corrected quantum mechanical interaction energies. Particularly, the root-mean-square errors (RMSE) for three Thole models in Set A (where the 1–2 and 1–3 interactions are turned off and all 1–4 interactions are included) are 1.456, 1.417 and 1.406 kcal/mol for Model AL (Thole Linear), Model AE (Thole exponential) and Model AT (Thole Tinker-like), respectively. In contrast, the RMSE are 3.729 and 3.433 kcal/mol for F94 and F03 models, respectively. A similar trend was observed for the average unsigned errors (AUE), which are 1.057, 1.025, 1.011, 2.219 and 2.070 kcal/mol for AL, AE, AT, F94/ff99 and F03, respectively. Analyses based on the trend line slopes indicate that the two fixed charge models substantially underestimate the relative strengths of non-charge-charge interactions by 24% (F03) and 35% (F94), respectively, whereas the four polarizable models over-estimate the relative strengths by 5% (AT), 3% (AL, AE) and 13% (AA), respectively. Agreement was further improved by adjusting the van der Waals parameters. Judging from the notably improved accuracy in comparison to

  1. Development of polarizable models for molecular mechanical calculations II: induced dipole models significantly improve accuracy of intermolecular interaction energies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junmei; Cieplak, Piotr; Li, Jie; Wang, Jun; Cai, Qin; Hsieh, MengJuei; Lei, Hongxing; Luo, Ray; Duan, Yong

    2011-03-31

    In the companion paper, we presented a set of induced dipole interaction models using four types of screening functions, which include the Applequist (no screening), the Thole linear, the Thole exponential model, and the Thole Tinker-like (another form of exponential screening function) functions. In this work, we evaluate the performance of polarizability models using a large set of amino acid analog pairs in conformations that are frequently observed in protein structures as a benchmark. For each amino acid pair, we calculated quantum mechanical interaction energies at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-311++G(d,p) level with the basis set superposition error (BSSE) correction and compared them with molecular mechanics results. Encouragingly, all polarizable models significantly outperform the additive F94 and F03 models (mimicking AMBER ff94/ff99 and ff03 force fields, respectively) in reproducing the BSSE-corrected quantum mechanical interaction energies. In particular, the root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) for three Thole models in Set A (where the 1-2 and 1-3 interactions are turned off and all 1-4 interactions are included) are 1.456, 1.417, and 1.406 kcal/mol for model AL (Thole Linear), model AE (Thole exponential), and model AT (Thole Tinker-like), respectively. In contrast, the RMSEs are 3.729 and 3.433 kcal/mol for F94 and F03 models, respectively. A similar trend was observed for the average unsigned errors (AUEs), which are 1.057, 1.025, 1.011, 2.219, and 2.070 kcal/mol for AL, AE, AT, F94/ff99, and F03, respectively. Analyses based on the trend line slopes indicate that the two fixed charge models substantially underestimate the relative strengths of noncharge-charge interactions by 24 (F03) and 35% (F94), respectively, whereas the four polarizable models overestimate the relative strengths by 5 (AT), 3 (AL, AE), and 13% (AA), respectively. Agreement was further improved by adjusting the van der Waals parameters. Judging from the notably improved accuracy in

  2. Assessment of Chinese sturgeon habitat suitability in the Yangtze River (China): Comparison of generalized additive model, data-driven fuzzy logic model, and preference curve model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Yujun; Sun, Jie; Zhang, Shanghong; Yang, Zhifeng

    2016-05-01

    To date, a wide range of models have been applied to evaluate aquatic habitat suitability. In this study, three models, including the expert knowledge-based preference curve model (PCM), data-driven fuzzy logic model (DDFL), and generalized additive model (GAM), are used on a common data set to compare their effectiveness and accuracy. The true skill statistic (TSS) and the area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) are used to evaluate the accuracy of the three models. The results indicate that the two data-based methods (DDFL and GAM) yield better accuracy than the expert knowledge-based PCM, and the GAM yields the best accuracy. There are minor differences in the suitable ranges of the physical habitat variables obtained from the three models. The hydraulic habitat suitability index (HHSI) calculated by the PCM is the largest, followed by the DDFL and then the GAM. The results illustrate that data-based models can describe habitat suitability more objectively and accurately when there are sufficient data. When field data are lacking, combining expertise with data-based models is recommended. When field data are difficult to obtain, an expert knowledge-based model can be used as a replacement for the data-based methods.

  3. In silico predictive studies of mAHR congener binding using homology modelling and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Panda, Roshni; Cleave, A Suneetha Susan; Suresh, P K

    2014-09-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is one of the principal xenobiotic, nuclear receptor that is responsible for the early events involved in the transcription of a complex set of genes comprising the CYP450 gene family. In the present computational study, homology modelling and molecular docking were carried out with the objective of predicting the relationship between the binding efficiency and the lipophilicity of different polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners and the AHR in silico. Homology model of the murine AHR was constructed by several automated servers and assessed by PROCHECK, ERRAT, VERIFY3D and WHAT IF. The resulting model of the AHR by MODWEB was used to carry out molecular docking of 36 PCB congeners using PatchDock server. The lipophilicity of the congeners was predicted using the XLOGP3 tool. The results suggest that the lipophilicity influences binding energy scores and is positively correlated with the same. Score and Log P were correlated with r = +0.506 at p = 0.01 level. In addition, the number of chlorine (Cl) atoms and Log P were highly correlated with r = +0.900 at p = 0.01 level. The number of Cl atoms and scores also showed a moderate positive correlation of r = +0.481 at p = 0.01 level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study employing PatchDock in the docking of AHR to the environmentally deleterious congeners and attempting to correlate structural features of the AHR with its biochemical properties with regards to PCBs. The result of this study are consistent with those of other computational studies reported in the previous literature that suggests that a combination of docking, scoring and ranking organic pollutants could be a possible predictive tool for investigating ligand-mediated toxicity, for their subsequent validation using wet lab-based studies. PMID:23081860

  4. Constitutive modeling of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene under large-deformation and cyclic loading conditions.

    PubMed

    Bergström, J S; Kurtz, S M; Rimnac, C M; Edidin, A A

    2002-06-01

    When subjected to a monotonically increasing deformation state, the mechanical behavior of UHMWPE is characterized by a linear elastic response followed by distributed yielding and strain hardening at large deformations. During the unloading phases of an applied cyclic deformation process, the response is characterized by nonlinear recovery driven by the release of stored internal energy. A number of different constitutive theories can be used to model these experimentally observed events. We compare the ability of the J2-plasticity theory, the "Arruda-Boyce" model, the "Hasan-Boyce" model, and the "Bergström-Boyce" model to reproduce the observed mechanical behavior of ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). In addition a new hybrid model is proposed, which incorporates many features of the previous theories. This hybrid model is shown to most effectively predict the experimentally observed mechanical behavior of UHMWPE. PMID:12013180

  5. Mass accommodation of water: bridging the gap between molecular dynamics simulations and kinetic condensation models.

    PubMed

    Julin, Jan; Shiraiwa, Manabu; Miles, Rachael E H; Reid, Jonathan P; Pöschl, Ulrich; Riipinen, Ilona

    2013-01-17

    The condensational growth of submicrometer aerosol particles to climate relevant sizes is sensitive to their ability to accommodate vapor molecules, which is described by the mass accommodation coefficient. However, the underlying processes are not yet fully understood. We have simulated the mass accommodation and evaporation processes of water using molecular dynamics, and the results are compared to the condensation equations derived from the kinetic gas theory to shed light on the compatibility of the two. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a planar TIP4P-Ew water surface at four temperatures in the range 268-300 K as well as two droplets, with radii of 1.92 and 4.14 nm at T = 273.15 K. The evaporation flux from molecular dynamics was found to be in good qualitative agreement with that predicted by the simple kinetic condensation equations. Water droplet growth was also modeled with the kinetic multilayer model KM-GAP of Shiraiwa et al. [Atmos. Chem. Phys. 2012, 12, 2777]. It was found that, due to the fast transport across the interface, the growth of a pure water droplet is controlled by gas phase diffusion. These facts indicate that the simple kinetic treatment is sufficient in describing pure water condensation and evaporation. The droplet size was found to have minimal effect on the value of the mass accommodation coefficient. The mass accommodation coefficient was found to be unity (within 0.004) for all studied surfaces, which is in agreement with previous simulation work. Additionally, the simulated evaporation fluxes imply that the evaporation coefficient is also unity. Comparing the evaporation rates of the mass accommodation and evaporation simulations indicated that the high collision flux, corresponding to high supersaturation, present in typical molecular dynamics mass accommodation simulations can under certain conditions lead to an increase in the evaporation rate. Consequently, in such situations the mass accommodation coefficient

  6. Mass Accommodation of Water: Bridging the Gap Between Molecular Dynamics Simulations and Kinetic Condensation Models

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The condensational growth of submicrometer aerosol particles to climate relevant sizes is sensitive to their ability to accommodate vapor molecules, which is described by the mass accommodation coefficient. However, the underlying processes are not yet fully understood. We have simulated the mass accommodation and evaporation processes of water using molecular dynamics, and the results are compared to the condensation equations derived from the kinetic gas theory to shed light on the compatibility of the two. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed for a planar TIP4P-Ew water surface at four temperatures in the range 268–300 K as well as two droplets, with radii of 1.92 and 4.14 nm at T = 273.15 K. The evaporation flux from molecular dynamics was found to be in good qualitative agreement with that predicted by the simple kinetic condensation equations. Water droplet growth was also modeled with the kinetic multilayer model KM-GAP of Shiraiwa et al. [Atmos. Chem. Phys.2012, 117, 2777]. It was found that, due to the fast transport across the interface, the growth of a pure water droplet is controlled by gas phase diffusion. These facts indicate that the simple kinetic treatment is sufficient in describing pure water condensation and evaporation. The droplet size was found to have minimal effect on the value of the mass accommodation coefficient. The mass accommodation coefficient was found to be unity (within 0.004) for all studied surfaces, which is in agreement with previous simulation work. Additionally, the simulated evaporation fluxes imply that the evaporation coefficient is also unity. Comparing the evaporation rates of the mass accommodation and evaporation simulations indicated that the high collision flux, corresponding to high supersaturation, present in typical molecular dynamics mass accommodation simulations can under certain conditions lead to an increase in the evaporation rate. Consequently, in such situations the mass accommodation

  7. Possibilities of Preoperative Medical Models Made by 3D Printing or Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Most of the 3D printing applications of preoperative models have been focused on dental and craniomaxillofacial area. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the possibilities in other application areas and give examples of the current possibilities. The approach was to communicate with the surgeons with different fields about their needs related preoperative models and try to produce preoperative models that satisfy those needs. Ten different kinds of examples of possibilities were selected to be shown in this paper and aspects related imaging, 3D model reconstruction, 3D modeling, and 3D printing were presented. Examples were heart, ankle, backbone, knee, and pelvis with different processes and materials. Software types required were Osirix, 3Data Expert, and Rhinoceros. Different 3D printing processes were binder jetting and material extrusion. This paper presents a wide range of possibilities related to 3D printing of preoperative models. Surgeons should be aware of the new possibilities and in most cases help from mechanical engineering side is needed. PMID:27433470

  8. Possibilities of Preoperative Medical Models Made by 3D Printing or Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Mika

    2016-01-01

    Most of the 3D printing applications of preoperative models have been focused on dental and craniomaxillofacial area. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the possibilities in other application areas and give examples of the current possibilities. The approach was to communicate with the surgeons with different fields about their needs related preoperative models and try to produce preoperative models that satisfy those needs. Ten different kinds of examples of possibilities were selected to be shown in this paper and aspects related imaging, 3D model reconstruction, 3D modeling, and 3D printing were presented. Examples were heart, ankle, backbone, knee, and pelvis with different processes and materials. Software types required were Osirix, 3Data Expert, and Rhinoceros. Different 3D printing processes were binder jetting and material extrusion. This paper presents a wide range of possibilities related to 3D printing of preoperative models. Surgeons should be aware of the new possibilities and in most cases help from mechanical engineering side is needed. PMID:27433470

  9. Ten-year-old children strategies in mental addition: A counting model account.

    PubMed

    Thevenot, Catherine; Barrouillet, Pierre; Castel, Caroline; Uittenhove, Kim

    2016-01-01

    For more than 30 years, it has been admitted that individuals from the age of 10 mainly retrieve the answer of simple additions from long-term memory, at least when the sum does not exceed 10. Nevertheless, recent studies challenge this assumption and suggest that expert adults use fast, compacted and unconscious procedures in order to solve very simple problems such as 3+2. If this is true, automated procedures should be rooted in earlier strategies and therefore observable in their non-compacted form in children. Thus, contrary to the dominant theoretical position, children's behaviors should not reflect retrieval. This is precisely what we observed in analyzing the responses times of a sample of 42 10-year-old children who solved additions with operands from 1 to 9. Our results converge towards the conclusion that 10-year-old children still use counting procedures in order to solve non-tie problems involving operands from 2 to 4. Moreover, these counting procedures are revealed whatever the expertise of children, who differ only in their speed of execution. Therefore and contrary to the dominant position in the literature according to which children's strategies evolve from counting to retrieval, the key change in development of mental addition solving appears to be a shift from slow to quick counting procedures. PMID:26402647

  10. Modelling [C I] emission from turbulent molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Micic, Milica; Molina, Faviola

    2015-04-01

    We use detailed numerical simulations of a turbulent molecular cloud to study the usefulness of the [C I] 609 and 370 μm fine structure emission lines as tracers of cloud structure. Emission from these lines is observed throughout molecular clouds, and yet they have attracted relatively little theoretical attention. We show that the widespread [C I] emission results from the fact that the clouds are turbulent. Turbulence creates large density inhomogeneities, allowing radiation to penetrate deeply into the clouds. As a result, [C I] emitting gas is found throughout the cloud. We examine how well [C I] emission traces the cloud structure, and show that the 609 μm line traces column density accurately over a wide range of values. For visual extinctions greater than a few, [C I] and 13CO both perform well, but [C I] performs better at AV ≤ 3. We have also studied the distribution of [C I] excitation temperatures. We show that these are typically smaller than the kinetic temperature, indicating that the carbon is subthermally excited. We discuss how best to estimate the excitation temperature and the carbon column density, and show that the latter tends to be systematically underestimated. Consequently, estimates of the atomic carbon content of real giant molecular clouds could be wrong by up to a factor of 2.

  11. 3D Printing of Molecular Potential Energy Surface Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lolur, Phalgun; Dawes, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing, commonly known as 3D printing, is gaining popularity in a variety of applications and has recently become routinely available. Today, 3D printing services are not only found in engineering design labs and through online companies, but also in university libraries offering student access. In addition, affordable options for…

  12. Formation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears: Quantum Chemistry and Molecular Mechanics Study of the Electrophilic Addition of o-Benzyne to Fullerenes, Graphene, and Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in chemical functionalization of fullerene molecules. In some cases, the predominant reaction products are different from those obtained (using the same reactants) from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). One such example is the cycloaddition of o-benzyne to C60. It is well established that benzyne adds across one of the rings in naphthalene, anthracene and other PAHs forming the [2+4] cycloaddition product (benzobicyclo[2.2.2.]-octatriene with naphthalene and triptycene with anthracene). However, Hoke et al demonstrated that the only reaction path for o-benzyne with C60 leads to the [2+2] cycloaddition product in which benzyne adds across one of the interpentagonal bonds (forming a cyclobutene ring in the process). Either reaction product results in a loss of aromaticity and distortion of the PAH or fullerene substrate, and in a loss of strain in the benzyne. It is not clear, however, why different products are preferred in these cases. In the current paper, we consider the stability of benzyne-nanotube adducts and the ability of Brenner's potential energy model to describe the structure and stability of these adducts. The Brenner potential has been widely used for describing diamondoid and graphitic carbon. Recently it has also been used for molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations of fullerenes and nanotubes. However, it has not been tested for the case of functionalized fullerenes (especially with highly strained geometries). We use the Brenner potential for our companion nanogear simulations and believe that it should be calibrated to insure that those simulations are physically reasonable. In the present work, Density Functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to determine the preferred geometric structures and energetics for this calibration. The DFT method is a kind of ab initio quantum chemistry method for determining the electronic structure of molecules. For a given basis set

  13. Strengthen forensic entomology in court--the need for data exploration and the validation of a generalised additive mixed model.

    PubMed

    Baqué, Michèle; Amendt, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Developmental data of juvenile blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae) are typically used to calculate the age of immature stages found on or around a corpse and thus to estimate a minimum post-mortem interval (PMI(min)). However, many of those data sets don't take into account that immature blow flies grow in a non-linear fashion. Linear models do not supply a sufficient reliability on age estimates and may even lead to an erroneous determination of the PMI(min). According to the Daubert standard and the need for improvements in forensic science, new statistic tools like smoothing methods and mixed models allow the modelling of non-linear relationships and expand the field of statistical analyses. The present study introduces into the background and application of these statistical techniques by analysing a model which describes the development of the forensically important blow fly Calliphora vicina at different temperatures. The comparison of three statistical methods (linear regression, generalised additive modelling and generalised additive mixed modelling) clearly demonstrates that only the latter provided regression parameters that reflect the data adequately. We focus explicitly on both the exploration of the data--to assure their quality and to show the importance of checking it carefully prior to conducting the statistical tests--and the validation of the resulting models. Hence, we present a common method for evaluating and testing forensic entomological data sets by using for the first time generalised additive mixed models. PMID:22370995

  14. Modeling of coherent ultrafast magneto-optical experiments: Light-induced molecular mean-field model

    SciTech Connect

    Hinschberger, Y.; Hervieux, P.-A.

    2015-12-28

    We present calculations which aim to describe coherent ultrafast magneto-optical effects observed in time-resolved pump-probe experiments. Our approach is based on a nonlinear semi-classical Drude-Voigt model and is used to interpret experiments performed on nickel ferromagnetic thin film. Within this framework, a phenomenological light-induced coherent molecular mean-field depending on the polarizations of the pump and probe pulses is proposed whose microscopic origin is related to a spin-orbit coupling involving the electron spins of the material sample and the electric field of the laser pulses. Theoretical predictions are compared to available experimental data. The model successfully reproduces the observed experimental trends and gives meaningful insight into the understanding of magneto-optical rotation behavior in the ultrafast regime. Theoretical predictions for further experimental studies are also proposed.

  15. Experiments to Populate and Validate a Processing Model for Polyurethane Foam: Additional Data for Structural Foams.

    SciTec