Science.gov

Sample records for addition mounting evidence

  1. 3D-additive manufactured optical mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammini, Paul V.; Ciscel, David; Wooten, John

    2015-09-01

    The Area Defense Anti-Munitions (ADAM) is a low cost and effective high power laser weapon system. It's designed to address and negate important threats such as short-range rockets, UAVs, and small boats. Many critical optical components operate in the system. The optics and mounts must accommodate thermal and mechanical stresses, plus maintain an exceptional wave front during operation. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) developed, designed, and currently operates ADAM. This paper covers the design and development of a key monolithic, flexured, titanium mirror mount that was manufactured by CalRAM using additive processes.

  2. Gravitational Waves: The Evidence Mounts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wick, Gerald L.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the work of Weber and his colleagues in their attempts at detecting extraterrestial gravitational waves. Coincidence events recorded by special detectors provide the evidence for the existence of gravitational waves. Bibliography. (LC)

  3. Additional evidence of Mercurian volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trask, N.J.; Strom, R.G.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence concerned with (1) the character and distribution of terrain surrounding fresh basins, (2) albedo, color and temporal differences between a basin rim and smooth plains on its floor, and (3) the stratigraphic relations and local distribution of smooth plains in the hilly and lineated terrain are cited as additional evidence for an internal origin of much of the Mercurian smooth plains. Altough the question of Mercurian volcanism should be kept open, this evidence together with that presented in an earlier paper suggests that volcanism occurred on Mercury early in its history. ?? 1976.

  4. Observational evidence for aerosol invigoration in shallow cumulus downstream of Mount Kilauea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, G. G.; Abernathy, A. C.

    2016-03-01

    Knowledge of how marine boundary layer (MBL) shallow cumulus clouds respond to changes in aerosol is central to understanding how MBL clouds modulate the climate system. Mount Kilauea on the island of Hawaii began erupting in 2008 injecting substantial SO2 into the marine boundary layer creating a unique natural laboratory. Examining data from approximately 600 passes of the A-Train downstream of Mount Kilauea over a 3 year period and separating data into aerosol optical depth quartiles, we find an unambiguous increase in marine boundary cloud top height and an increase in surface wind speed as aerosol increases while the radar reflectivity does not change substantially. We conclude that increased aerosols may have caused invigoration of the MBL clouds. Additionally, we find that increases in sub 1 km cloud fraction combined with increasing aerosol explain the increased visible reflectance suggesting that evidence for the so-called first aerosol indirect effect should be reexamined.

  5. Dendrogeomorphic evidence of debris flow frequency and magnitude at Mount Shasta, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, C.R.

    1984-01-01

    Debris-flow deposits and woody vegetation adjacent to and growing within the channels of Whitney, Bolam, Mud, Ash, and Panthe creeks provide a 300-year record of debris-flow frequency at Mount Shasta Dendrochronologic (tree-ring) dating methods for the debris flows proved consistent with available documented records of debris flows Nine debris flows not reported in the historic record were documented and dated dendrochronologically. The oldest tree-ring date for a mudflow was about 1670 Combined geomorphic and botanical evidence shows that debris flows are a common occurrence at Mount Shasta Debris flows traveling at least 2 km have occurred at the rate of about 8 3 per century Smaller debris flows occur substantially more frequently and usually do not proceed as far downslope as larger debris flows. Cyclic scouring and filling by debris flows, in and adjacent to the stream channels, is suggested by dendrogeomorphic evidence and appears to be related to their magnitude and frequency Debris flows, small and large, may be the major surficial geomorphic agent in the vicinity of mount Shasta, sculpturing the channels and developing large alluvial fans ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  6. Lava channel formation during the 2001 eruption on Mount Etna: evidence for mechanical erosion.

    PubMed

    Ferlito, Carmelo; Siewert, Jens

    2006-01-20

    We report the direct observation of a peculiar lava channel that was formed near the base of a parasitic cone during the 2001 eruption on Mount Etna. Erosive processes by flowing lava are commonly attributed to thermal erosion. However, field evidence strongly suggests that models of thermal erosion cannot explain the formation of this channel. Here, we put forward the idea that the essential erosion mechanism was abrasive wear. By applying a simple model from tribology we demonstrate that the available data agree favorably with our hypothesis. Consequently, we propose that erosional processes resembling the wear phenomena in glacial erosion are possible in a volcanic environment. PMID:16486661

  7. In Situ Hybridization Methods for Mouse Whole Mounts and Tissue Sections with and Without Additional β-Galactosidase Staining

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Kishigami, Satoshi; Mishina, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    In situ hybridization is a powerful method for detecting endogenous mRNA sequences in morphologically preserved samples. We provide in situ hybridization methods, which are specifically optimized for mouse embryonic samples as whole mounts and section tissues. Additionally, β-Galactosidase (β-gal) is a popular reporter for detecting the expression of endogenous or exogenous genes. We reveal that 6-chloro-3-indoxyl-β-D-galactopyranoside (S-gal) is a more sensitive substrate for β-gal activity than 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-β-D-galactoside (X-gal). S-gal is advantageous where β-gal activity is limited including early stage mouse embryos. As a result of the increased sensitivity as well as the color compatibility of S-gal, we successfully combined β-gal staining using S-gal with in situ hybridization using DIG-labeled probes in both whole mounts and sections. PMID:24318810

  8. Comparing Mantle Xenoliths from Mount Taylor and Rio Puerco Necks, New Mexico: Evidence for Metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, A. E.; Schmidt, M. E.; Schrader, C. M.; Crumpler, L. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Mount Taylor Volcanic Field (MTVF) is located along the Jemez Lineament at the south eastern margin of the Colorado Plateau in north western New Mexico. To learn about its underlying lithospheric mantle, we conducted a survey of xenoliths from basaltic vents peripheral to the Mount Taylor edifice and the Rio Puerco Volcanic Necks. A total of 89 thin sections (32 from Mount Taylor and 57 from Rio Puerco) were examined. The population of thin sections from Mount Taylor and Rio Puerco listed respectively is: 18 and 20 lherzolites; 8 and 24 pyroxenites; 4 and 3 wehrlites; 1 and 6 dunites; and 1 and 4 harzburgites. Pyroxenite grain size ranged from 1 to 9 mm and lherzolite grains were typically 0.5 to 2 mm. Spinels ranged in colour from dark green, brown to black and they were generally <1 mm and interstitially concentrated. Spinel concentrations between the two suites were comparable, with an average of 2.6% for Mount Taylor and 2.0% for Rio Puerco. The largest concentration of spinels was in a pyroxenite at 12.5% from Mount Taylor. Up to 5% primary calcite is present in the Rio Puerco suite; in contrast calcite has not been identified in the Mount Taylor suite. Calcite grains were <0.5 mm in size and located at grain boundaries and as inclusions in clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene. Equilibrium textures include triple junction grain boundaries between olivines and clinopyroxenes in some lherzolites. Disequilibrium textures include rounded, optically continuous olivine and orthopyroxene in clinopyroxene, complex intergrowths between clinopyroxene and orthopyroxene, and sheared olivine. Electron microprobe analyses were performed on 9 representative thin sections with 5 pyroxenites, 4 lherzolites and 1 wehrlite; samples included green, brown, red and black spinels. Pyroxenes for the two suites decrease in Cr2O3 and increase in Al2O3 with decreasing Mg numbers, increase in CaO with decreasing MgO and increase in Na2O with increasing Al2O3. The presence of optically

  9. Evidence for Magmatic Intrusion at Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska, from GPS measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, P. F.; Coombs, M. L.; Freymueller, J. T.; McGee, K. A.

    2005-12-01

    Mount Spurr is a 3400-m high ice- and snow-covered andesitic stratovolcano located ~105 km east of Anchorage, Alaska, USA. Two historical eruptions (1953 and 1992) have occurred. Both were sub-Plinian (VEI 4), the eruption columns reaching ~20 km above sea level, and both deposited several mm of ash over south-central Alaska. In July, 2004, the micro-seismicity rate at Mount Spurr rose markedly. At about the same time, a melt pit appeared at Spurr's summit. Airborne gas measurements, begun in August 2004, showed abnormally high CO2 flux (~1000 tonnes/day). A plausible interpretation of this unrest is the intrusion of magma at some depth beneath Mount Spurr. As volatiles began to exsolve from the intrusion, they rose into the edifice, raising pore fluid pressure and triggering the increased seismicity. The rising volatiles carried heat convectively to the surface, melting the ice and snow at the summit. In an effort to image the hypothesized magmatic intrusion, three telemetered, continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers were deployed on the flanks of Mount Spurr in September, 2004. Four campaign monuments were also established and then re-occupied in June, 2005. For terrain and logistical reasons, the stations are located predominantly to the south of the summit, though one campaign station does lie slightly to the northwest. Benchmark instability is a concern in this region of alpine permafrost. One station in particular shows evidence of seasonal down-slope creep. We calculated station velocities from the GPS measurements, correcting for obvious benchmark instability where possible. The velocity field stands out prominently from the background regional signal. The southern stations, including all three continuous instruments, show a radial pattern of motion, with the center roughly coincident with Spurr's summit, with a maximum horizontal velocity of 3 to 4 cm/yr. However, the northwest campaign station shows little or no motion, making it inconsistent

  10. Magmatic vapor source for sulfur dioxide released during volcanic eruptions: Evidence from Mount Pinatubo

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, P.J. ); Gerlach, T.M. )

    1994-07-22

    Sulfur dioxide (SO[sub 2]) released by the explosive eruption of Mount Pinatubo of 15 June 1991 had an impact on climate and stratospheric ozone. The total mass of SO[sub 2] released was much greater than the amount dissolved in the magma before the eruption, and thus an additional source for the excess SO[sub 2] is required. Infrared spectroscopic analyses of dissolved water and carbon dioxide in glass inclusions from quartz phenocrysts demonstrate that before eruption the magma contained a separate, SO[sub 2]-bearing vapor phase. Data for gas emissions from other volcanoes in subduction-related arcs suggest that preeruptive magmatic vapor is a major source of the SO[sub 2] that is released during many volcanic eruptions.

  11. Magmatic vapor source for sulfur dioxide released during volcanic eruptions: Evidence from Mount Pinatubo

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, P.J.; Gerlach, T.M.

    1994-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) released by the explosive eruption of Mount Pinatubo on 15 June 1991 had an impact on climate and stratospheric ozone. The total mass of SO2 released was much greater than the amount dissolved in the magma before the eruption, and thus an additional source for the excess SO2 is required. Infrared spectroscopic analyses of dissolved water and carbon dioxide in glass inclusions from quartz phenocrysts demonstrate that before eruption the magma contained a separate, SO2-bearing vapor phase. Data for gas emissions from other volcanoes in subduction-related arcs suggest that preeruptive magmatic vapor is a major source of the SO2 that is released during many volcanic eruptions.

  12. Evidence for early postglacial warming in Mount Field National Park, Tasmania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Andrew B. H.; Cwynar, Les C.

    2010-02-01

    Situated between the Western Pacific Warm Pool to the north and Antarctica to the south, Tasmania is an ideal location to study both postglacial and Holocene paleoclimates. Few well-dated, quantitative temperature reconstructions exist for the region so that important questions about the occurrence and magnitude of events, such as the Antarctic Cold Reversal and Younger Dryas, in Tasmania remain unanswered. Here, we provide chironomid-based reconstructions of temperature of the warmest quarter (TWARM) for two small subalpine lakes, Eagle and Platypus Tarns, Mount Field National Park. Shortly after deglaciation, TWARM reached modern values by approximately 15 000 cal a BP and remained high until 13 000 cal a BP after which temperatures began to cool steadily, reaching a minimum by 11 100-10 000 cal a BP. These results are consistent with sea surface temperature (SST) reconstructions from south of Tasmania but are in stark contrast to temperature inferences drawn from vegetation reconstructions based on pollen data that indicate cool initial temperatures followed by a broad warm period between 11 600-6800 cal a BP (10 000-6000 14C a BP). The chironomid record broadly matches the summer insolation curve whereas the vegetation record and associated climate inferences mirror winter insolation. The Antarctic Cold Reversal and Younger Dryas cold events are not evident in the chironomid-inferred temperatures, but the Antarctic Cold Reversal is evident in the loss-on-ignition curves.

  13. Climate forcing of volcano lateral collapse: evidence from Mount Etna, Sicily.

    PubMed

    Deeming, K R; McGuire, B; Harrop, P

    2010-05-28

    In this study, we present evidence for early Holocene climatic conditions providing circumstances favourable to major lateral collapse at Mount Etna, Sicily. The volcano's most notable topographic feature is the Valle del Bove, a 5 x 8 km cliff-bounded amphitheatre excavated from the eastern flank of the volcano. Its origin due to prehistoric lateral collapse is corroborated by stürtzstrom deposits adjacent to the amphitheatre's downslope outlet, but the age, nature and cause of amphitheatre excavation remain matters for debate. Cosmogenic (3)He exposure ages determined for eroded surfaces within an abandoned watershed flanking the Valle del Bove support channel abandonment ca 7.5 ka BP, as a consequence of its excavation in a catastrophic collapse event. Watershed development was largely dictated by pluvial conditions during the early Holocene, which are also implicated in slope failure. A viable trigger is magma emplacement into rift zones in the eastern flank of a water-saturated edifice, leading to the development of excess pore pressures, consequent reduction in sliding resistance, detachment and collapse. Such a mechanism is presented as one potential driver of future lateral collapse in volcanic landscapes forecast to experience increased precipitation or melting of ice cover as a consequence of anthropogenic warming. PMID:20403842

  14. Erosion by flowing lava: Geochemical evidence in the Cave Basalt, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, D.A.; Kadel, S.D.; Greeley, R.; Lesher, C.M.; Clynne, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    We sampled basaltic lava flows and underlying dacitic tuff deposits in or near lava tubes of the Cave Basalt, Mount St. Helens, Washington to determine whether the Cave Basalt lavas contain geochemical evidence of substrate contamination by lava erosion. The samples were analyzed using a combination of wavelength-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry and inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The results indicate that the oldest, outer lava tube linings in direct contact with the dacitic substrate are contaminated, whereas the younger, inner lava tube linings are uncontaminated and apparently either more evolved or enriched in residual liquid. The most heavily contaminated lavas occur closer to the vent and in steeper parts of the tube system, and the amount of contamination decreases with increasing distance downstream. These results suggest that erosion by lava and contamination were limited to only the initially emplaced flows and that erosion was localized and enhanced by vigorous laminar flow over steeper slopes. After cooling, the initial Cave Basalt lava flows formed an insulating lining within the tubes that prevented further erosion by later flows. This interpretation is consistent with models of lava erosion that predict higher erosion rates closer to sources and over steeper slopes. A greater abundance of xenoliths and xenocrysts relative to xenomelts in hand samples indicates that mechanical erosion rather than thermal erosion was the dominant erosional process in the Cave Basalt, but further sampling and petrographic analyses must be performed to verify this hypothesis. ?? Springer-Verlag 2003.

  15. 20 CFR 725.410 - Submission of additional evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Submission of additional evidence. (a) After the district director completes the development of medical... the claim was filed by, or on behalf of, a miner, the schedule shall contain a summary of the complete... employer other than the employer who last employed the claimant as a miner, the district director...

  16. Is there evidence for additional neutrino species from cosmology?

    SciTech Connect

    Feeney, Stephen M.; Peiris, Hiranya V.; Verde, Licia E-mail: h.peiris@ucl.ac.uk

    2013-04-01

    It has been suggested that recent cosmological and flavor-oscillation data favor the existence of additional neutrino species beyond the three predicted by the Standard Model of particle physics. We apply Bayesian model selection to determine whether there is indeed any evidence from current cosmological datasets for the standard cosmological model to be extended to include additional neutrino flavors. The datasets employed include cosmic microwave background temperature, polarization and lensing power spectra, and measurements of the baryon acoustic oscillation scale and the Hubble constant. We also consider other extensions to the standard neutrino model, such as massive neutrinos, and possible degeneracies with other cosmological parameters. The Bayesian evidence indicates that current cosmological data do not require any non-standard neutrino properties.

  17. Changes in seismic anisotropy after volcanic eruptions: evidence from Mount Ruapehu.

    PubMed

    Miller, V; Savage, M

    2001-09-21

    The eruptions of andesite volcanoes are explosively catastrophic and notoriously difficult to predict. Yet changes in shear waveforms observed after an eruption of Mount Ruapehu, New Zealand, suggest that forces generated by such volcanoes are powerful and dynamic enough to locally overprint the regional stress regime, which suggests a new method of monitoring volcanoes for future eruptions. These results show a change in shear-wave polarization with time and are interpreted as being due to a localized stress regime caused by the volcano, with a release in pressure after the eruption. PMID:11567133

  18. iMUSH-aided fault-plane studies at Mount St. Helens, Washington: Evidence for magma recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. C.; Abers, G. A.; Creager, K. C.; Denlinger, R. P.; Ulberg, C. W.; Vidale, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    Background seismicity has been relatively low at Mount St. Helens (MSH) following its last eruption in 2004-2008, with an average of 95 located M > 0 events per year. This is in marked contrast to the five years immediately following the 1980-86 eruptive period, when the yearly average rate was about 400 events. During that time there was clear evidence, in the form of rotated fault-plane solutions (FPS), that magma recharge was occurring at depths > 2 km. Despite lower seismicity rates and generally smaller earthquakes, an improved seismic network recorded data sufficient to allow for computation of 88 FPS for the period 2008-2013. These FPS show that stress fields at depths > 2 km were rotated in a manner similar to that seen post-1980-86, providing evidence that magma recharge is again occurring at MSH. A subtle trend towards slightly deeper earthquakes since 2011 is consistent with this hypothesis, as is previously reported outward motion on GPS stations that has been modeled with an inflationary source beneath the volcano at ~8-9 km depth. In the summer of 2014, 70 broadband seismometers were installed within 50 km of MSH as part of the iMUSH experiment, greatly increasing the number of stations close enough to MSH to obtain good recordings of MSH-generated events. By the Fall AGU meeting we expect to have several months of data collected and processed from iMUSH stations. These data should greatly improve constraints on first-motion FPS and/or the number of events for which well-constrained FPS can be computed. In addition, the density of three-component stations may allow for computation of moment tensor solutions for larger events (M > 1), which typically occur ~20 times per year. This would allow us to assess whether recent MSH events have significant non-double-couple components, something that could indicate fluid involvement and that has previously only been seen during eruptive periods at MSH via short-term deployments of broadband stations.

  19. Life associated with a 2.76 Ga ephemeral pond?: evidence from Mount Roe #2 paleosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rye, R.; Holland, H. D.

    2000-01-01

    Dark sericitic material at and near the top of the 2.765 +/- 0.01 Ga Mount Roe #2 paleosol in Western Australia contains 0.05-0.10 wt% organic carbon with delta 13C values between -33% and -51% PDB (Peedee belemnite). Such negative isotopic values strongly indicate that methanotrophs once inhabited this material. The textures and the chemical composition of the dark sericitic material indicate that the methanotrophs lived in or at the edges of ephemeral ponds, that these ponds became desiccated, and that heavy rains transported the material to its present sites. The discovery of methanotrophs associated with the Mount Roe #2 paleosol may extend their geologic record on land by at least 1.5 b.y. Methanotrophy in this setting is consistent with the notion that atmospheric methane levels were > or = 20 (mu)atm during the Late Archean. The radiative forcing due to such high atmospheric methane levels could have compensated for the faint younger sun and helped to prevent massive glaciation during the Late Archean.

  20. Deep earthquakes beneath Mount St. Helens: Evidence for magmatic gas transport?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weaver, C.S.; Zollweg, J.E.; Malone, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    Small-magnitude earthquakes began beneath Mount St. Helens 40 days before the eruption of 20 March 1982. Unlike earlier preeruption seismicity for this volcano, which had been limited to shallow events (less than 3 kilometers), many of these earthquakes were deep (between 5 and 11 kilometers). The location of these preeruptive events at such depth indicates that a larger volume of the volcanic system was affected prior to the 20 March eruption than prior to any of the earlier dome-building eruptions. The depth-time relation between the deep earthquakes and the explosive onset of the eruption is compatible with the upward migration of magmatic gas released from a separate deep reservoir.

  1. Deep earthquakes beneath mount st. Helens: evidence for magmatic gas transport?

    PubMed

    Weaver, C S; Zollweg, J E; Malone, S D

    1983-09-30

    Small-magnitude earthquakes began beneath Mount St. Helens 40 days before the eruption of 20 March 1982. Unlike earlier preeruption seismicity for this volcano, which had been limited to shallow events (less than 3 kilometers), many of these earthquakes were deep (between 5 and 11 kilometers). The location of these preeruptive events at such depth indicates that a larger volume of the volcanic system was affected prior to the 20 March eruption than prior to any of the earlier dome-building eruptions. The depth-time relation between the deep earthquakes and the explosive onset of the eruption is compatible with the upward migration of magmatic gas released from a separate deep reservoir. PMID:17759013

  2. Hydrogen-isotope evidence for extrusion mechanisms of the Mount St Helens lava dome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Steven W.; Fink, Jonathan H.

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope analyses were used to determine water content and deuterium content for 18 samples of the Mount St Helens dome dacite in an attempt to identify the triggering mechanisms for periodic dome-building eruptions of lava. These isotope data, the first ever collected from an active lava dome, suggest a steady-state process of magma evolution combining crystallization-induced volatile production in the chamber with three different degassing mechanisms: closed-system volatile loss in the magma chamber, open-system volatile release during ascent, and kinetically controlled degassing upon eruption at the surface. The data suggest the future dome-building eruptions may require a new influx of volatile-rich magma into the chamber.

  3. Evidence that dorsally mounted satellite transmitters affect migration chronology of Northern Pintails

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, Jerry; Kharitonov, Sergei; Yamaguchi, Noriyuki M.; Ozaki, K.; Flint, Paul L.; Pearce, John M.; Tokita, Ken-ichi; Shimada, Tetsuo; Higuchi, Hiroyoshi

    2015-01-01

    We compared migration movements and chronology between Northern Pintails (Anas acuta) marked with dorsally mounted satellite transmitters and pintails marked only with tarsus rings. During weekly intervals of spring and autumn migration between their wintering area in Japan and nesting areas in Russia, the mean distance that ringed pintails had migrated was up to 1000 km farther than the mean distance radiomarked pintails migrated. Radiomarked pintails were detected at spring migration sites on average 9.9 days (90 % CI 8.0, 11.8) later than ringed pintails that were recovered within 50 km. Although ringed and radiomarked pintails departed from Japan on similar dates, the disparity in detection of radiomarked versus ringed pintails at shared sites increased 7.7 days (90 % CI 5.2, 10.2) for each 1000 km increase in distance from Japan. Thus, pintails marked with satellite transmitters arrived at nesting areas that were 2500 km from Japan on average 19 days later than ringed birds. Radiomarked pintails were detected at autumn migration stopovers on average 13.1 days (90 % CI 9.8, 16.4) later than ringed birds that were recovered within 50 km. We hypothesize that dorsal attachment of 12–20 g satellite transmitters to Northern Pintails increased the energetic cost of flight, which resulted in more rapid depletion of energetic reserves and shortened the distance pintails could fly without refueling. Radiomarked pintails may have used more stopovers or spent longer periods at stopovers. causing their migration schedule to diverge from ringed pintails. We urge further evaluation of the effects of dorsally mounted transmitters on migration chronology of waterfowl.

  4. Electromagnetic evidence for an ancient avelanche caldera rim onthe south flank of mount merapi, indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Kalscheuer, T.; Commer, M.; Helwig, S.L.; Hoerdt, A.; Tezkan, B.

    2006-02-28

    Long-Offset Transient Electromagnetic (LOTEM) data andVIBROTEM data from the south flank of Mount Merapi on Java island,Indonesia, are interpreted with one-dimensional (1D) inversions as wellas two-dimensional (2D) forward modelling. One-dimensional jointinversions of several components of the electromagnetic field withOccam's method reduce the number of equivalent models, which were derivedfrom inversions of single components and fit the data to a similarmisfit. The 1D results, together with results from other geophysicalmeasurements, serve as the basic model for further 2D forward modelling.The final model depicts a layering that follows the topography of thestrato-volcano. In the depth range of 500 m to 1000 m, the resistivity ofthe layers decreases rapidly downwards into a good conductor withresistivities below 10 OMEGAm. The deepest layer has a resistivity of 0.4OMEGAm which is quantitatively explained with a combination of salinefluids and hydrothermally altered minerals. Furthermore, the final modelsupports a hypothesis from the interpretation of central-loop TEM(Transient Electromagnetic) data that there is a fault structure belowthe southern flank, approximately 7.3 km south of the summit. To thenorth of the fault, the top of the good conductor is lowered from a depthof 500 m to 1000 m. We propose that the fault structure coincides with anancient avalanche caldera rim.

  5. Electromagnetic evidence for an ancient avalanche caldera rim on the south flank of Mount Merapi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalscheuer, T.; Commer, M.; Helwig, S. L.; Hördt, A.; Tezkan, B.

    2007-04-01

    Long-Offset Transient Electromagnetic (LOTEM) data and VIBROTEM data from the south flank of Mount Merapi on Java island, Indonesia, are interpreted with one-dimensional (1D) inversions as well as two-dimensional (2D) forward modelling. One-dimensional joint inversions of several components of the electromagnetic field with Occam's method reduce the number of equivalent models, which were derived from inversions of single components and fit the data to a similar misfit. The 1D results, together with results from other geophysical measurements, serve as the basic model for further 2D forward modelling. The final model depicts a layering that follows the topography of the strato-volcano. In the depth range of 500 m to 1000 m, the resistivity of the layers decreases rapidly downwards into a good conductor with resistivities below 10 Ωm. The deepest layer has a resistivity of 0.4 Ωm which is quantitatively explained with a combination of saline fluids and hydrothermally altered minerals. Furthermore, the final model supports a hypothesis from the interpretation of central-loop TEM (Transient Electromagnetic) data that there is a fault structure below the southern flank, approximately 7.3 km south of the summit. To the north of the fault, the top of the good conductor is lowered from a depth of 500 m to 1000 m. We propose that the fault structure coincides with an ancient avalanche caldera rim.

  6. An Aquatic Journey toward Aeolis Mons (Mount Sharp): Sedimentary Rock Evidence observed by Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanjeev; Edgar, Lauren; Williams, Rebecca; Rubin, David; Yingst, Aileen; Lewis, Kevin; Kocurek, Gary; Anderson, Ryan; Dromart, Gilles; Edgett, Ken; Hardgrove, Craig; Kah, Linda; Mangold, Nicolas; Milliken, Ralph; Minitti, Michelle; Palucis, Marisa; Rice, Melissa; Stack, Katie; Sumner, Dawn; Williford, Ken

    2014-05-01

    Since leaving Yellowknife Bay (summer 2013), Mars Science Laboratory Curiosity has investigated a number of key outcrops as it traverses along the Rapid Transit Route toward the entry point to begin its investigations of the extensive rock outcrops at the base of Mount Sharp. Rover observations are characterizing the variability of lithologies and sedimentary facies along the traverse and establishing stratigraphic relationships with the aim of reconstructing depositional processes and palaeoenvironments. Here, we report on sedimentological and stratigraphic observations based on images from the Mastcam and MAHLI instruments at Shaler and the Darwin waypoint. The informally named Shaler outcrop, which forms part of the Glenelg member of the Yellowknife Bay formation [1] is remarkable for the preservation of a rich suite of sedimentary structures and architecture, and was investigated on sols 120-121 and 309-324. The outcrop forms a pebbly sandstone body that is ~0.7 m thick and extends for up to 20 m. Shaler is largely characterized by pebbly sandstone facies showing well-developed decimeter-scale trough cross-stratification. Bedding geometries indicate sub-critical angles of climb, resulting in preservation of only the lee slope deposits. The grain size, and the presence and scale of cross-stratification imply sediment transport and deposition by unidirectional currents in a fluvial sedimentary environment. Curiosity investigated the informally named Darwin waypoint between sols 390 and 401, making detailed Mastcam and MAHLI observations at two separate locations. The Darwin outcrop comprises light-toned sandstone beds separated by darker pebbly sandstones. MAHLI observations permit differentiation of distinct sedimentary facies. The Altar Mountain facies is a poorly sorted pebbly sandstone that is rich in fine pebbles. Pebbles are sub-angular to sub-rounded in shape and show no preferred orientation or fabric. Pebbles and sand grains show clast-to-clast contacts

  7. Eating disorder diagnostic scale: additional evidence of reliability and validity.

    PubMed

    Stice, Eric; Fisher, Melissa; Martinez, Erin

    2004-03-01

    The authors conducted 4 studies investigating the reliability and validity of the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale (HDDS; E. Stice, C. F. Telch, & S. L. Rizvi, 2000), a brief self-report measure for diagnosing anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Study 1 found that the HDDS showed criterion validity with interview-based diagnoses, convergent validity with risk factors for eating pathology, and internal consistency. Studies 2 and 3 found that the EDDS was sufficiently sensitive to detect the effects of eating disorder prevention programs. Regarding predictive validity, Studies 3 and 4 found that the EDDS predicted response to a prevention program and future onset of eating pathology and depression. Results provide additional evidence of the reliability and validity of this scale and suggest it may be useful in clinical and research applications. PMID:15023093

  8. Evidence of Two-Component Iblean-Like Mantle From 2001-2006 Igneous Products of Mount Etna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vannucci, R.; Rosciglione, A.; Nuccio, P. M.; Paonita, A.; Ottolini, L.

    2008-12-01

    Mount Etna, the largest volcano in Europe, displays the peculiar condition of lying on continental crust and close to the subduction-related Aeolian volcanic arc, while its products shows typical affinities with ocean- island basalts (OIB). The finding of subduction-related geochemical tracers in the volcanic products of the last thousand years, along with an increased explosivity of eruptions, led to develop a model for Etnean magmas that states that the mantle source is progressively undergoing metasomatic influx by slab-derived fluids released from the Ionian slab[1]. We show that the trace element signatures of melt inclusions hosted in olivine phenocrysts erupted through the 2001-2006 period reveal the contemporaneous presence of two magma types in Mt. Etna's plumbing system. The two magma types are produced by partial melting of two distinct mantle sources respectively, which have amazing geochemical affinities with deeper and shallower mantle portions underlying the adjacent Iblean crust. This suggests that a layered, Iblean-like mantle is present beneath Mount Etna. Whereas the typical Etnean magma derives from sources located in the deeper layer, at depths of 50-90 km, the less common magma displays the signature of the shallower layer, coupled with a significant enrichment in fluid mobile elements. We provide evidence that an Iblean-like lithospheric peridotite mantle, re-fertilised by slab-derived fluids, represents the most plausible source for this magma and explains its enriched mantle (EM2) signature. Mingling of the two magma types is documented at melt inclusion scale, whereas complete mixing is usually observed at bulk rock scale. Our findings strongly support the view that the evolution of Etnean magmatism is ruled by the variable contribution of the two distinct mantle sources, rather than by the progressive transition towards an arc-type signature of the pristine mantle source[2]. Ref. 1. Tonarini et al., 2001 2. Schiano et al., 2001

  9. Evidence for Magma-Mixing and Disequilibrium in 'Primitive' Basaltic Andesites From Mount Shasta, Northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leeman, W. P.; Streck, M. J.; Chesley, J. T.; Tonarini, S.

    2005-12-01

    High-Mg basaltic andesites near Mt. Shasta volcano have been considered fundamental to establishing the existence of exceptionally water-rich primary magmas in this system, implying significant slab-derived fluid fluxes into the underlying mantle wedge (Grove et al., 2002). This notion was reinvestigated via new mineralogical and geochemical studies of fresh scoria blocks from the Whaleback volcano (loc. S17; Anderson,1979). These high-Mg andesites (58% SiO2, 8.5% MgO, Mg# = 76, 120 ppm Ni, 550 ppm Cr) carry small dunitic xenoliths and xeno/phenocrysts (ol+opx+cpx). Plagioclase is not a liquidus phase. Electron microprobe traverses and back-scattered images show that mafic silicates, particularly pyroxenes, have complex histories. Olivine compositions of larger crystals and interiors are often above Fo90 up to Fo94 whereas microphenocrysts and rims of larger crystals are ~Fo87. Complexities among pyroxenes include: (a) Cores of opx and cpx with low Mg# (~67) containing melt inclusions; this evidence indicates these pyroxenes crystallized from magma of roughly dacitic composition; (b) Virtually all low Mg# grains are resorbed and have overgrowths (~20 microns) of high Mg# (87-92) that may be internally zoned arriving at a Mg# near 80 at the outermost euhedral rim; (c) Another variant is orthopyroxene with 'wormy' texture and either a thin (~15 microns) euhedral overgrowth or anhedral outline; compositions of resorbed interiors and overgrowth are similar ( Mg# range: 80 to 90), but distribution of lower and higher Mg# in resorbed areas is patchy whereas any compositional zoning of overgrowth follows crystal shape and arrives again at a Mg# of ~80 at the outermost rim. These data record mixing of diverse magmas (dacite and one or more basaltic liquids) combined with entrainment of ultramafic crystal debris during wall rock contamination, and eventual cooling and equilibration. Low Al2O3 contents in the pyroxenes imply that these minerals grew at relatively low

  10. Mounting evidence for intense ocean interaction with the Pine Island Glacier Ice Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, R.; Holland, D.; Vaughan, D.; Vornberger, P.

    2008-12-01

    The spatial signature of thinning and acceleration of the Pine Island Glacier has led to the inference that these changes originate at the seaward end of the glacier, possibly within or under the ice shelf (Payne et al., 2004; Shepherd et al., 2004). We present new analyses resulting from both new and archived satellite imagery of the ice shelf that supports this inference and provides new insights into strong seasonal and intra- annual characters of ocean-ice shelf interaction. Strong longitudinal variations in both thickness and surface elevation measured by British Antarctic Survey airborne radars (Vaughan et al., 2006) have wavelengths that correspond roughly to the annual motion of the ice shelf. These could be caused by seasonal variations in flow speed, but such variations of flow speed have never been reported and are not seen in the most recent continuous GPS observations of the ice shelf. We suggest that these strong variations in ice thickness, as large as 200 meters in an average thickness of 600 meters, are caused by seasonal variations in the properties of the water circulating underneath the ice shelf. One likely explanation is that the dominant water mass reaching the deepest parts of the ice shelf alternates between cold High Salinity Shelf Water in the winter and warm Circumpolar Deep Water in the summer. Evidence for recent strengthening of the sub- shelf circulation is the sudden occurrence of three persistent polynyas immediately adjacent to the ice front. These are located in precisely the locations expected from modeled sub-shelf circulation (Payne et al., 2007). This mode was never observed in any satellite imagery prior to the 1999-2000 austral summer (data of 7 summers since 1973 were available), but has occurred in 7 of the 9 summers since and persists throughout the summer. Payne, A.J., A. Vieli, A.P. Shepherd, D.J. Wingham and E. Rignot, 2004. Recent dramatic thinning of largest West Antarctic ice stream triggered by oceans, Geophysical

  11. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, H.H.

    1987-11-10

    A mirror mount is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror while keeping the location of a point on the surface of the mirror fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount. Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders that are bearing mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell that is air bearing mounted to move between a clamp and an upper pedestal bearing. The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell lie upon the point. Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror by a pair of pitch paddles and a pair of roll paddles that are independently and separately moved by control rods driven by motors. 5 figs.

  12. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, H.H.

    1986-03-21

    A mirror mount is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror while keeping the location of a point on the surface of the mirror fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount. Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders that are bearing mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell that is air bearing mounted to move between a clamp and an upper pedestal bearing. The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell lie upon the point. Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror by a pair of pitch paddles and a pair of roll paddles that are independently and separately moved by control rods driven by motors.

  13. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Humpal, Harold H.

    1987-01-01

    A mirror mount (10) is provided that allows free pitch, yaw and roll motion of the mirror (28) while keeping the location of a point (56) on the surface of the mirror (28) fixed in the rest frame of reference of the mount (10). Yaw movement is provided by two yaw cylinders (30,32) that are bearing (52) mounted to provide rotation. Pitch and roll motion is provided by a spherically annular shell (42) that is air bearing (72,74) mounted to move between a clamp (60) and an upper pedestal bearing (44). The centers of curvature of the spherical surfaces of the shell (42) lie upon the point (56). Pitch motion and roll motion are separately and independently imparted to mirror (28) by a pair of pitch paddles (34) and a pair of roll paddles (36) that are independently and separately moved by control rods (76,80) driven by motors (78,82).

  14. Fragmentation and Cataclasis of Lava Domes: Field Evidence of Conduit-Margin Faulting and Cryptodome Unloading at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallister, J. S.; Hagstrum, J.; Cashman, K.; Tuffen, H.

    2007-12-01

    Structures and textures preserved in dome rocks reveal much about ascent history, seismicity, and dynamics of eruptions. The current eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) produced dacite spines mantled by fault gouge and breccia. Flow-banded spine interiors attest to early degassing and ductile deformation; micro-textures and structures in the spine margins indicate entirely brittle shear, rock breakage, grain-flow and gas-escape along fractures. Paleomagnetic pole positions and demagnetization data constrain cataclasis to the sub-vertical volcanic conduit at temperatures above 500°-570°C. Low water content of matrix glass and presence of tridymite require nearly complete decompression-driven solidification at depths <1 km, coincident with the eruption's seismogenic zone. 1-3 m thick cataclastic breccia of spine margins contains multiple Reidel shears in a conjugate set formed by shear between the vertically extruding spines and conduit walls. This breccia is overlain by a thin (<10 cm) outer mantle of finely comminuted gouge with 1-3 mm-thick, surface-parallel layers of slickenside-bearing ultracataclasite, forming through-going fault planes. Slickenside lineations and direction indicators are consistent with upward transport of the spines. These relations document two dominant modes of brittle failure in the spine margins, similar to the brittle S-C fabrics seen in tectonic fault zones. The Reidel shears represent limited-slip planes (S-shears), which are inclined relative to the primary bounding fault planes (C-surfaces). We infer that the Reidel shears formed as multiple, domino-like episodes of fracture, prior to transfer of slip to the bounding C-surfaces. Because the depth of deformation is the same as the depth of the seismogenic zone, and because there are two distinct modes of brittle fracture (S and C fabrics) as well as two distinct types of earthquakes (volcano-tectonic and longer-period hybrids) it is logical to infer that these structures are sources

  15. 20 CFR 416.805 - When additional evidence may be required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false When additional evidence may be required. 416.805 Section 416.805 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determination of Age § 416.805 When additional evidence may...

  16. Dry tilt network at Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dzurisin, Daniel; Johnson, Daniel J.; Symonds, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    In addition to its primary responsibility of monitoring active Mount St. Helens, the David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) has been charged with obtaining baseline geodetic and geochemical information at each of the other potentially active Cascade volcanoes. Dry tilt and/or trilateration networks were established during 1975-82 at Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, Mount Shasta, Lassen Peak, Crater Lake, and Long Valley caldera; coverage was extended during September 1982 to include Mount Rainier.

  17. High-heat geodynamic setting during the Palaeozoic evolution of the Mount Painter Province, SA, Australia: evidence from combined field structural geology and potential-field inversions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armit, R. J.; Ailleres, L.; Betts, P. G.; Schaefer, B. F.; Blaikie, T. N.

    2014-10-01

    A method for subsurface recognition of blind geological bodies is presented using combined surface constraints and 3-D structural modelling that incorporates constraints from detailed mapping, and potential-field inversion modelling. This method is applied to the Mount Painter Province and demonstrates that addition of low density material is required to reconcile the gravity signature of the region. This method may be an effective way to construct 3-D models in regions of excellent structural control, and can be used to assess the validity of surface structures with 3-D architecture. Combined geological and potential-field constrained inversion modelling of the Mount Painter Province was conducted to assess the validity of the geological models of the region. Magnetic susceptibility constrained stochastic property inversions indicates that the northeast to southwest structural trend of the relatively magnetic meta-sedimentary rocks of the Radium Creek Group in the Mount Painter Inlier is reconcilable with the similar, northeast to southwest trending positive magnetic anomalies in the region. Radium Creek Group packages are the major contributor of the total magnetic response of the region. However field mapping and the results of initial density constrained stochastic property inversion modelling do not correlate with a large residual negative gravity anomaly central to the region. Further density constrained inversion modelling indicates that an additional large body of relatively low density material is needed within the model space to account for this negative density anomaly. Through sensitivity analysis of multiple geometrical and varied potential-field property inversions, the best-fitting model records a reduction in gravity rms misfit from 21.9 to 1.69 mGal, representing a reduction from 56 to 4.5 per cent in respect to the total dynamic range of 37.5 mGal of the residual anomaly. This best-fitting model incorporates a volumetrically significant source

  18. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.; Bender, Donald A.

    1994-01-01

    A unique lens or mirror mount having adjustable constraints at two key locations to allow for "X" and "Y" tilts of the mirror only. The device uses two pair of flexures of a type such that the pivots of the mirror gimble are rigidly fixed in all planes allowing the device to have zero stacking tolerance and zero wear over time.

  19. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  20. Mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.; Bender, D.A.

    1994-10-04

    A unique lens or mirror mount having adjustable constraints at two key locations to allow for ''X'' and ''Y'' tilts of the mirror only is disclosed. The device uses two pair of flexures of a type such that the pivots of the mirror gimble are rigidly fixed in all planes allowing the device to have zero stacking tolerance and zero wear over time. 4 figs.

  1. Chlorine as a geobarometer for alkaline magmas: Evidence from a systematic study of the eruptions of Mount Somma-Vesuvius.

    PubMed

    Balcone-Boissard, H; Boudon, G; Cioni, R; Webster, J D; Zdanowicz, G; Orsi, G; Civetta, L

    2016-01-01

    Defining the magma storage conditions of a volcanic system is a major goal in modern volcanology due to its direct implications for the style of a possible eruption, and thus on the associated risk of any crisis and the necessary management and mitigation strategies. Below 200 MPa and at equivalent depths, the strongly non-ideal behaviour of the H-C-O-S-Cl-F system in the silicate melt causes unmixing of the fluid phase to form an H2O-rich vapour and a hydrosaline phase in equilibrium with the silicate melt, both responsible for buffering the chlorine (Cl) concentration. Following this equilibrium, the Cl concentration in melts may be used as a geobarometer for alkaline magmas. Systematic application of this method to the main explosive eruptions of Mount Somma-Vesuvius highlights two main magma ponding zones, at ~180-200 and ~100 MPa. At these pressures, the maximum pre-eruptive H2O contents for the different magma compositions can be estimated; the results obtained, largely in agreement with the current literature, therefore confirm the validity of the method. The Cl geobarometer may help scientists to define the variation of the magmatic reservoir location through time and thus provide strong constraints on pre-eruptive conditions, which are of utmost importance for volcanic crisis management. PMID:26888358

  2. Chlorine as a geobarometer for alkaline magmas: Evidence from a systematic study of the eruptions of Mount Somma-Vesuvius

    PubMed Central

    Balcone-Boissard, H.; Boudon, G.; Cioni, R.; Webster, J. D.; Zdanowicz, G.; Orsi, G.; Civetta, L.

    2016-01-01

    Defining the magma storage conditions of a volcanic system is a major goal in modern volcanology due to its direct implications for the style of a possible eruption, and thus on the associated risk of any crisis and the necessary management and mitigation strategies. Below 200 MPa and at equivalent depths, the strongly non-ideal behaviour of the H-C-O-S-Cl-F system in the silicate melt causes unmixing of the fluid phase to form an H2O-rich vapour and a hydrosaline phase in equilibrium with the silicate melt, both responsible for buffering the chlorine (Cl) concentration. Following this equilibrium, the Cl concentration in melts may be used as a geobarometer for alkaline magmas. Systematic application of this method to the main explosive eruptions of Mount Somma-Vesuvius highlights two main magma ponding zones, at ~180–200 and ~100 MPa. At these pressures, the maximum pre-eruptive H2O contents for the different magma compositions can be estimated; the results obtained, largely in agreement with the current literature, therefore confirm the validity of the method. The Cl geobarometer may help scientists to define the variation of the magmatic reservoir location through time and thus provide strong constraints on pre-eruptive conditions, which are of utmost importance for volcanic crisis management. PMID:26888358

  3. Chlorine as a geobarometer for alkaline magmas: Evidence from a systematic study of the eruptions of Mount Somma-Vesuvius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcone-Boissard, H.; Boudon, G.; Cioni, R.; Webster, J. D.; Zdanowicz, G.; Orsi, G.; Civetta, L.

    2016-02-01

    Defining the magma storage conditions of a volcanic system is a major goal in modern volcanology due to its direct implications for the style of a possible eruption, and thus on the associated risk of any crisis and the necessary management and mitigation strategies. Below 200 MPa and at equivalent depths, the strongly non-ideal behaviour of the H-C-O-S-Cl-F system in the silicate melt causes unmixing of the fluid phase to form an H2O-rich vapour and a hydrosaline phase in equilibrium with the silicate melt, both responsible for buffering the chlorine (Cl) concentration. Following this equilibrium, the Cl concentration in melts may be used as a geobarometer for alkaline magmas. Systematic application of this method to the main explosive eruptions of Mount Somma-Vesuvius highlights two main magma ponding zones, at ~180-200 and ~100 MPa. At these pressures, the maximum pre-eruptive H2O contents for the different magma compositions can be estimated; the results obtained, largely in agreement with the current literature, therefore confirm the validity of the method. The Cl geobarometer may help scientists to define the variation of the magmatic reservoir location through time and thus provide strong constraints on pre-eruptive conditions, which are of utmost importance for volcanic crisis management.

  4. Long-term changes in quiescent degassing at Mount Baker Volcano, Washington, USA; Evidence for a stalled intrusion in 1975 and connection to a deep magma source

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, C.; Evans, William C.; Poland, M.; Tucker, D.S.; Doukas, M.P.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term changes have occurred in the chemistry, isotopic ratios, and emission rates of gas at Mount Baker volcano following a major thermal perturbation in 1975. In mid-1975 a large pulse in sulfur and carbon dioxide output was observed both in emission rates and in fumarole samples. Emission rates of CO2 and H2S were ??? 950 and 112??t/d, respectively, in 1975; these decreased to ??? 150 and < 1??t/d by 2007. During the peak of the activity the C/S ratio was the lowest ever observed in the Cascade Range and similar to magmatic signatures observed at other basaltic-andesite volcanoes worldwide. Increases in the C/S ratio and decreases in the CO2/CH4 ratio since 1975 suggest a long steady trend back toward a more hydrothermal gas signature. The helium isotope ratio is very high (> 7??Rc/RA), but has declined slightly since the mid-1970s, and ??13C-CO2 has decreased by ??? 1??? over time. Both trends are expected from a gradually crystallizing magma. While other scenarios are investigated, we conclude that magma intruded the mid- to shallow-crust beneath Mount Baker during the thermal awakening of 1975. Since that time, evidence for fresh magma has waned, but the continued emission of CO2 and the presence of a long-term hydrothermal system leads us to suspect some continuing connection between the surface and deep convecting magma.

  5. 43 CFR 3741.3 - Additional evidence required with application for patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional evidence required with application for patent. 3741.3 Section 3741.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) PUBLIC LAW 585; MULTIPLE MINERAL DEVELOPMENT...

  6. 43 CFR 3741.3 - Additional evidence required with application for patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional evidence required with application for patent. 3741.3 Section 3741.3 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) PUBLIC LAW 585; MULTIPLE MINERAL DEVELOPMENT...

  7. 20 CFR 10.120 - May a claimant submit additional evidence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May a claimant submit additional evidence? 10.120 Section 10.120 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION...

  8. 20 CFR 10.120 - May a claimant submit additional evidence?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true May a claimant submit additional evidence? 10.120 Section 10.120 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION PROGRAMS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION ACT CLAIMS FOR COMPENSATION UNDER THE FEDERAL EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION...

  9. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  10. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  11. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  12. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  13. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  14. 30 CFR 1210.206 - Will I need to submit additional documents or evidence to ONRR?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Will I need to submit additional documents or evidence to ONRR? 1210.206 Section 1210.206 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue FORMS AND REPORTS Production and...

  15. 38 CFR 20.709 - Rule 709. Procurement of additional evidence following a hearing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rule 709. Procurement of additional evidence following a hearing. 20.709 Section 20.709 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) BOARD OF VETERANS' APPEALS: RULES OF PRACTICE Hearings on Appeal § 20.709 Rule 709. Procurement...

  16. Mutations in RIT1 cause Noonan syndrome - additional functional evidence and expanding the clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Koenighofer, M; Hung, C Y; McCauley, J L; Dallman, J; Back, E J; Mihalek, I; Gripp, K W; Sol-Church, K; Rusconi, P; Zhang, Z; Shi, G-X; Andres, D A; Bodamer, O A

    2016-03-01

    RASopathies are a clinically heterogeneous group of conditions caused by mutations in 1 of 16 proteins in the RAS-mitogen activated protein kinase (RAS-MAPK) pathway. Recently, mutations in RIT1 were identified as a novel cause for Noonan syndrome. Here we provide additional functional evidence for a causal role of RIT1 mutations and expand the associated phenotypic spectrum. We identified two de novo missense variants p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly. Both variants resulted in increased MEK-ERK signaling compared to wild-type, underscoring gain-of-function as the primary functional mechanism. Introduction of p.Met90Ile and p.Ala57Gly into zebrafish embryos reproduced not only aspects of the human phenotype but also revealed abnormalities of eye development, emphasizing the importance of RIT1 for spatial and temporal organization of the growing organism. In addition, we observed severe lymphedema of the lower extremity and genitalia in one patient. We provide additional evidence for a causal relationship between pathogenic mutations in RIT1, increased RAS-MAPK/MEK-ERK signaling and the clinical phenotype. The mutant RIT1 protein may possess reduced GTPase activity or a diminished ability to interact with cellular GTPase activating proteins; however the precise mechanism remains unknown. The phenotypic spectrum is likely to expand and includes lymphedema of the lower extremities in addition to nuchal hygroma. PMID:25959749

  17. The thermal evolution of a episodic, convergent-margin, magmatic center: Evidence from the Tatoosh Magmatic Complex, Mount Rainier National Park, southern Washington Cascades

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M.T. )

    1992-01-01

    Use of Mount Rainier as an IAVCEI Decade Volcano requires an assessment of long-term, magmatic activity cycles. Recent activity could represent either a waxing or waning step, relative to the main cone. The Tertiary record at Mount Rainier, represented by the Tatoosh complex, suggests evolution into larger and more energetic systems. This sequence included bimodal dikes and sills (Chinook Pass episode), through dacitic dome and pyroclastic eruptions (Sourdough Mountains episode), shallow monzonitic plutons, culminating in large granodiorite plutons (White River episode). Limited geochronology, geochemistry and field relations support this conceptual model. Simple thermal modeling of this hypothesis suggests that for the first two episodes, transport was insufficient to support a magma chamber. This is consistent with field relations. Repeated magmatism could have perturbed the geotherm, allowing a magma chamber during White River time. This suggests a potential 3 million-year-long, volcanic source for dacitic clasts of the Ellensburg Formation. Uplifts from such a thermal load would be consistent with independent estimates of Miocene deformation in the Washington Cascades. A 7 million year cycle for magmatism at Mount Rainier is consistent with the rock record and the cooling of a 0.5-km accumulation zone of melt at the mid crust. This suggests that any current activity at Mount Rainier could relate to the 0.7-Ma stratovolcano or the Lily Creek Formation (3 Ma). These results indicate the detailed petrologic and geochronological work in the Tatoosh complex necessary to Decade Volcano studies at Mount Rainier.

  18. Sensitivity to food additives, vaso-active amines and salicylates: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Skypala, Isabel J; Williams, M; Reeves, L; Meyer, R; Venter, C

    2015-01-01

    Although there is considerable literature pertaining to IgE and non IgE-mediated food allergy, there is a paucity of information on non-immune mediated reactions to foods, other than metabolic disorders such as lactose intolerance. Food additives and naturally occurring 'food chemicals' have long been reported as having the potential to provoke symptoms in those who are more sensitive to their effects. Diets low in 'food chemicals' gained prominence in the 1970s and 1980s, and their popularity remains, although the evidence of their efficacy is very limited. This review focuses on the available evidence for the role and likely adverse effects of both added and natural 'food chemicals' including benzoate, sulphite, monosodium glutamate, vaso-active or biogenic amines and salicylate. Studies assessing the efficacy of the restriction of these substances in the diet have mainly been undertaken in adults, but the paper will also touch on the use of such diets in children. The difficulty of reviewing the available evidence is that few of the studies have been controlled and, for many, considerable time has elapsed since their publication. Meanwhile dietary patterns and habits have changed hugely in the interim, so the conclusions may not be relevant for our current dietary norms. The conclusion of the review is that there may be some benefit in the removal of an additive or a group of foods high in natural food chemicals from the diet for a limited period for certain individuals, providing the diagnostic pathway is followed and the foods are reintroduced back into the diet to assess for the efficacy of removal. However diets involving the removal of multiple additives and food chemicals have the very great potential to lead to nutritional deficiency especially in the paediatric population. Any dietary intervention, whether for the purposes of diagnosis or management of food allergy or food intolerance, should be adapted to the individual's dietary habits and a suitably

  19. Compactional deformation bands in Wingate Sandstone; additional evidence of an impact origin for Upheaval Dome, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Chris H.; Schultz, Richard A.

    2007-04-01

    Field and microstructural observations from Upheaval Dome, in Canyonlands National Park, Utah, show that inelastic strain of the Wingate Sandstone is localized along compactional deformation bands. These bands are tabular discontinuities (< 0.5 cm thick) that accommodate inelastic shear and compaction of inter-granular volume. Measurements of porosity and grain size from non-deformed samples are used to define a set of capped strength envelopes for the Wingate Sandstone. These strength envelopes reveal that compactional deformation bands require at least ca. 0.7 GPa (and potentially more than 2.3 GPa) of effective mean stress in order to nucleate within this sandstone. We find that the most plausible geologic process capable of generating these required magnitudes of mean stress is a meteoritic impact. Therefore the compactional deformation bands observed within the Wingate Sandstone are additional evidence of an impact event at Upheaval Dome and support a post-Wingate (post-Early Jurassic) age for this impact.

  20. Warming and drying of the eastern Mediterranean: Additional evidence from trend analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shohami, David; Dayan, Uri; Morin, Efrat

    2011-11-01

    The climate of the eastern Mediterranean (EM), at the transition zone between the Mediterranean climate and the semi-arid/arid climate, has been studied for a 39-year period to determine whether climate changes have taken place. A thorough trend analysis using the nonparametric Mann-Kendall test with Sen's slope estimator has been applied to ground station measurements, atmospheric reanalysis data, synoptic classification data and global data sets for the years 1964-2003. In addition, changes in atmospheric regional patterns between the first and last twenty years were determined by visual comparisons of their composite mean. The main findings of the analysis are: 1) changes of atmospheric conditions during summer and the transitional seasons (mainly autumn) support a warmer climate over the EM and this change is already statistically evident in surface temperatures having exhibited positive trends of 0.2-1°C/decade; 2) changes of atmospheric conditions during winter and the transitional seasons support drier conditions due to reduction in cyclogenesis and specific humidity over the EM, but this change is not yet statistically evident in surface station rain data, presumably because of the high natural precipitation variance masking such a change. The overall conclusion of this study is that the EM region is under climate change leading to warmer and drier conditions.

  1. An Additional Baurusuchid from the Cretaceous of Brazil with Evidence of Interspecific Predation among Crocodyliformes

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Pedro L.; Montefeltro, Felipe C.; Norell, Mark A.; Langer, Max C.

    2014-01-01

    A new Baurusuchidae (Crocodyliformes, Mesoeucrocodylia), Aplestosuchus sordidus, is described based on a nearly complete skeleton collected in deposits of the Adamantina Formation (Bauru Group, Late Cretaceous) of Brazil. The nesting of the new taxon within Baurusuchidae can be ensured based on several exclusive skull features of this clade, such as the quadrate depression, medial approximation of the prefrontals, rostral extension of palatines (not reaching the level of the rostral margin of suborbital fenestrae), cylindrical dorsal portion of palatine bar, ridge on the ectopterygoid-jugal articulation, and supraoccipital with restricted thin transversal exposure in the caudalmost part of the skull roof. A newly proposed phylogeny of Baurusuchidae encompasses A. sordidus and recently described forms, suggesting its sixter-taxon relationship to Baurusuchus albertoi, within Baurusuchinae. Additionally, the remains of a sphagesaurid crocodyliform were preserved in the abdominal cavity of the new baurusuchid. Direct fossil evidence of behavioral interaction among fossil crocodyliforms is rare and mostly restricted to bite marks resulting from predation, as well as possible conspecific male-to-male aggression. This is the first time that a direct and unmistaken evidence of predation between different taxa of this group is recorded as fossils. This discovery confirms that baurusuchids were top predators of their time, with sphagesaurids occupying a lower trophic position, possibly with a more generalist diet. PMID:24809508

  2. PV module mounting method and mounting assembly

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl J.S.; Johnson, Kurt M.

    2013-04-23

    A method for mounting PV modules to a deck includes selecting PV module layout pattern so that adjacent PV module edges are spaced apart. PV mounting and support assemblies are secured to the deck according to the layout pattern using fasteners extending into the deck. The PV modules are placed on the PV mounting and support assemblies. Retaining elements are located over and secured against the upper peripheral edge surfaces of the PV modules so to secure them to the deck with the peripheral edges of the PV modules spaced apart from the deck. In some examples a PV module mounting assembly, for use on a shingled deck, comprises flashing, a base mountable on the flashing, a deck-penetrating fastener engageable with the base and securable to the deck so to secure the flashing and the base to the shingled deck, and PV module mounting hardware securable to the base.

  3. 78 FR 59954 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State Police, Mount Pleasant Post, Mount Pleasant, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Michigan State Police, Mount Pleasant Post, Mount Pleasant, MI AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Michigan State Police... the Michigan State Police, Mount Pleasant Post. If no additional requestors come forward, transfer...

  4. Dual resolution, vacuum compatible optical mount

    DOEpatents

    Halpin, John Michael

    2011-10-04

    An optical mount for an optical element includes a mounting plate, a lever arm pivot coupled to mounting plate, and an adjustment plate. The optical mount also includes a flexure pivot mechanically coupling the adjustment plate to the mounting plate and a lever arm. The optical mount further includes a first adjustment device extending from the adjustment plate to make contact with the lever arm at a first contact point. A projection of a line from the first contact point to a pivot point, measured along the lever arm, is a first predetermined distance. The optical mount additionally includes a second adjustment device extending from the adjustment plate to make contact with the lever arm at a second contact point. A projection of a line from the second contact point to the pivot point, measured along the lever arm, is a second predetermined distance greater than the first predetermined distance.

  5. Magnetic core mounting system

    SciTech Connect

    Ronning, Jeffrey J.

    2002-01-01

    A mounting apparatus for an electromagnetic device such as a transformer of inductor includes a generally planar metallic plate as a first heat sink, and a metallic mounting cup as a second heat sink. The mounting cup includes a cavity configured to receive the electromagnetic device, the cavity being defined by a base, and an axially-extending annular sidewall extending from the base to a flange portion of the mounting cup. The mounting cup includes first and second passages for allowing the leads of first and second windings of the electromagnetic device to be routed out of the cavity. The cavity is filled with a polyurethane potting resin, and the mounting cup, including the potted electromagnetic device, is mounted to the plate heat sink using fasteners. The mounting cup, which surrounds the electromagnetic device, in combination with the potting resin provides improved thermal transfer to the plate heat sink, as well as providing resistance to vibration and shocks.

  6. U-Pb ages of metarhyolites of the Catoctin and Mount Rogers formations, central and southern Appalachians: evidence for two pulses of Iapetan rifting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Zartman, R.E.; Walter, M.; Rankin, D.W.; Lyttle, P.T.; Burton, W.C.

    1995-01-01

    U-Pb ages of zircon from rhyolites of the Catoctin and Mount Rogers Formations demonstrate that rifting of the Laurentian continent to form the Iapetus Ocean was a prolonged event spanning 200 m.y. involving two important pulses of extrusive igneous activity. Rhyolitic flows of the non-fossiliferous Catoctin and Mount Rogers Formations, long correlated with one another on the basis of similar stratigraphic constraints, are dated at 564 ?? 9 Ma and 758 ?? 12 Ma, respectively. The data suggest a history of rifting in the central and southern Appalachians spanning 200 m.y. near the end of the Late Proterozoic. The earliest pulses did not proceed to continental separation and are not recorded north of the Potomac River. The later pulse or pulses affected the area from Newfoundland (ages of 617-590 Ma) to North Carolina and resulted in the opening of the Iapetus Ocean. -from Authors

  7. Aleutian lead isotopic data: additional evidence for the evolution of lithospheric plumbing systems

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, J.D.; Marsh, B.D.

    1987-07-01

    Lead isotopic ratios and concentrations have been measured in lavas from the Aleutian volcanic centers of Adak (12) and Atka (12). Lead contents in lavas from Atka increase four-fold over the compositional range of the volcanic suite. In contrast, Adak lavas have concentration levels of 0.6-13 ppm and display no simple correlation with SiO/sub 2/. The lead isotopic data alone can be explained by three different processes. Model 1 assigns lead isotopic differences to original magma source heterogeneity. According to Model 2, the isotopic ratios of a primary, non-radiogenic component from the mantle are elevated by the addition of an isotopically enriched slab-derived component. In contrast, Model 3 assumes a primary radiogenic magma produced by melting of the slab is contaminated by a non-radiogenic lithospheric component during conduit formation. Because these models all adequately explain the lead isotopic data, supplementary geologic, petrographic, geochemical and isotopic data must be used to select the most likely model. Careful consideration of the evidence suggests Model 3 best explains their extensive lead isotopic data as well as other characteristics of Aleutian lavas. The authors study suggests detailed isotopic studies of individual volcanic centers can be extremely useful in understanding the complex processes of magma generation, extraction, ascent and evolution.

  8. Additional evidence on the use of personal ornaments in the Middle Paleolithic of North Africa

    PubMed Central

    d'Errico, Francesco; Vanhaeren, Marian; Barton, Nick; Bouzouggar, Abdeljalil; Mienis, Henk; Richter, Daniel; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; McPherron, Shannon P.; Lozouet, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Recent investigations into the origins of symbolism indicate that personal ornaments in the form of perforated marine shell beads were used in the Near East, North Africa, and SubSaharan Africa at least 35 ka earlier than any personal ornaments in Europe. Together with instances of pigment use, engravings, and formal bone tools, personal ornaments are used to support an early emergence of behavioral modernity in Africa, associated with the origin of our species and significantly predating the timing for its dispersal out of Africa. Criticisms have been leveled at the low numbers of recovered shells, the lack of secure dating evidence, and the fact that documented examples were not deliberately shaped. In this paper, we report on 25 additional shell beads from four Moroccan Middle Paleolithic sites. We review their stratigraphic and chronological contexts and address the issue of these shells having been deliberately modified and used. We detail the results of comparative analyses of modern, fossil, and archaeological assemblages and microscopic examinations of the Moroccan material. We conclude that Nassarius shells were consistently used for personal ornamentation in this region at the end of the last interglacial. Absence of ornaments at Middle Paleolithic sites postdating Marine Isotope Stage 5 raises the question of the possible role of climatic changes in the disappearance of this hallmark of symbolic behavior before its reinvention 40 ka ago. Our results suggest that further inquiry is necessary into the mechanisms of cultural transmission within early Homo sapiens populations. PMID:19717433

  9. Additional evidence for bone technology in the southern African Middle Stone Age.

    PubMed

    d'Errico, Francesco; Henshilwood, Christopher S

    2007-02-01

    Few Middle Stone Age sites have yielded convincing evidence for a complex bone technology, a behavior often associated with the emergence of modern cultures. Here, we review the published evidence for Middle Stone Age bone tools from southern Africa, analyze an additional nine bone artifacts recently recovered from Middle Stone Age levels at Blombos Cave, describe an unpublished bone tool from probable Middle Stone Age levels at Peers Cave, examine a single bone awl found at Blombosch Sands (an open site near Blombos Cave), and reappraise marked bone artifacts and a bone point recovered from Klasies River. To determine the chronological and cultural attribution of these artifacts, document bone-manufacturing techniques associated with the southern African MSA, and discuss the symbolic significance of the markings present on some of these objects we use (1) available contextual information; (2) morphometric comparison of Later Stone Age, Modern San, and purported Middle Stone Age projectile points; (3) analysis of the carbon/nitrogen content of bone tools and faunal remains from Peers and Blombos caves; and (4) microscopic analysis of traces of manufacture and use. Previously undescribed bone artifacts from Blombos Cave include a massive point manufactured on weathered bone, two complete awls and two awl tips manufactured on small-sized mammal and bird bone, a probable projectile point with a tang manufactured by knapping and scraping, a shaft fragment modified by percussion, used as retoucher and bearing a set of incised lines on the middle of the periosteal surface, and two fragments with possible engravings. The point from Peers Cave can be assigned to the Middle Stone Age and bears tiny markings reminiscent of those recorded on projectile points from Blombos and used as marks of ownership on San arrow points. The awl from Blombosch Sands and the bone point from Klasies River can be attributed to the Later Stone Age. Two notched objects from Klasies are

  10. Photovoltaic module mounting system

    SciTech Connect

    Miros, Robert H. J.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Seery, Martin N.; Holland, Rodney H.

    2012-04-17

    A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

  11. Photovoltaic module mounting system

    SciTech Connect

    Miros, Robert H. J.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Seery, Martin N; Holland, Rodney H

    2012-09-18

    A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

  12. Relations among Parental Alcoholism, Eating Disorders, and Substance Abuse in Nonclinical College Women: Additional Evidence against the Uniformity Myth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mintz, Laurie B.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    The relationship of parental alcoholism to eating disorder symptomology and substance abuse in a nonclinical sample of college women was examined. In addition, differences among adult children of alcoholics (ACOAs) related to level of distress concerning parental alcohol use was examined. Results add additional evidence to the notion that not all…

  13. Cenozoic right-lateral slip on the Great Glen Fault, Scotland: Additional Evidence and Possible Causes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Breton, E.; Cobbold, P. R.; Zanella, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Great Glen Fault (GGF) trends NNE-SSW across all of Northern Scotland, separating two Neoproterozoic supergroups (Moine and Dalradian). The GGF developed as a left-lateral fault during the Caledonian Orogeny (Ordovician to Early Devonian). However, according to previous studies (involving seismic data from the Moray Firth and analyses of Tertiary dyke swarms in NW Scotland), the GGF reactivated right-laterally in the Tertiary. Here we present additional evidence for this later phase, from a study of Jurassic outcrops along the GGF and the nearby Helmsdale Fault. At Eathie and Shandwick, on the NE coast of Scotland, Jurassic strata of marine origin (mostly shale) crop out along the GGF, in contact with Neoproterozoic basement or Devonian Old Red Sandstone. Minor folds and faults in these outcrops indicate post-depositional right-lateral slip, under transpression. In the shale, we have also found bedding-parallel calcite veins ('beef' and 'cone-in-cone'). If these veins provide evidence for overpressure development and maturation of organic matter at significant depth (as they do in other basins), the host sediment must have accumulated deeper offshore in the Moray Firth. Therefore, the Jurassic strata at Eathie and Shandwick must have been subject to Cenozoic exhumation during right-lateral displacement along the GGF. At Helmsdale, according to previous studies, the Jurassic 'Boulder Beds' accumulated during a period of normal faulting on the Helmsdale Fault. There the sedimentary facies are more proximal than those at Eathie and Shandwick and abundant conglomerate contains Devonian clasts but no 'beef'. However we have found steep calcite veins, which cut the entire Jurassic sequence. Their sigmoidal shapes indicate left-lateral slip along the Helmsdale fault zone. Such a motion is compatible with right-lateral displacement on the GGF. Indeed, according to previous studies, folds between the Helmsdale Fault and the GGF may have developed as a result of opposing

  14. High bandwidth optical mount

    DOEpatents

    Bender, Donald A.; Kuklo, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage.

  15. High bandwidth optical mount

    DOEpatents

    Bender, D.A.; Kuklo, T.

    1994-11-08

    An optical mount, which directs a laser beam to a point by controlling the position of a light-transmitting optic, is stiffened so that a lowest resonant frequency of the mount is approximately one kilohertz. The optical mount, which is cylindrically-shaped, positions the optic by individually moving a plurality of carriages which are positioned longitudinally within a sidewall of the mount. The optical mount is stiffened by allowing each carriage, which is attached to the optic, to move only in a direction which is substantially parallel to a center axis of the optic. The carriage is limited to an axial movement by flexures or linear bearings which connect the carriage to the mount. The carriage is moved by a piezoelectric transducer. By limiting the carriage to axial movement, the optic can be kinematically clamped to a carriage. 5 figs.

  16. Kinks in subducted slabs: Petrological evidence points to additional hindrance to the exhumation of UHP rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, T.; Klemd, R.; Scherer, E. E.; Rondenay, S.; Gao, J.

    2012-12-01

    Sudden changes in the dip of subducted oceanic plates have been resolved by seismic imaging [1, 2]. Such kinking often coincides with the seismic disappearance of the low-velocity subducted oceanic crust, i.e., at a depth where eclogitization (dehydration) of the upper oceanic crust is nearly complete and the oceanic crust becomes almost seismically indistinguishable from mantle peridotite. We present petrological evidence for this phenomenon derived from oceanic blueschist- and eclogite-facies rocks from the Chinese Tianshan. The peak-metamorphic conditions of the samples range between 330 and 580°C at 1.5 to 2.3 GPa. Such a wide range of peak conditions for intercalated high- and ultrahigh-pressure rocks has also been reported from other Tianshan localities. These observations suggest that the rocks were derived from different depths within the subduction zone and later juxtaposed during exhumation within the subduction channel. Multi-point Lu-Hf isochrons from four high-pressure rocks yield consistent garnet-growth ages of around ~315 Ma, confirming that the eclogite-facies metamorphism of the Tianshan high-pressure rocks resulted from a single subduction event in the Late Carboniferous. These ages, in conjunction with the ~311 Ma cluster of 40Ar-39Ar and Rb-Sr white mica ages from the same localities imply rapid exhumation. Previously reported peak P-T estimates from UHP metasediments and eclogites all lie on a lower geothermal gradient—and thus on a colder P-T path at the slab-wedge interface—than that defined by the HP eclogites and meta-volcaniclastic rocks studied here. This suggests that the slab-subduction angle steepened sharply at approximately 90 km depth, just between the depths at which the HP and UHP rocks equilibrated. The increase in subduction angle may result from a greater slab pull resulting from eclogitization densification. An additional factor may be an ephemeral weakening of the slab as it undergoes eclogitization reactions [3, 4]. We

  17. Evidence for additive and interaction effects of host genotype and infection in malaria

    PubMed Central

    Idaghdour, Youssef; Quinlan, Jacklyn; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Berghout, Joanne; Gbeha, Elias; Bruat, Vanessa; de Malliard, Thibault; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Gomez, Selma; Gros, Philippe; Rahimy, Mohamed Chérif; Sanni, Ambaliou; Awadalla, Philip

    2012-01-01

    The host mechanisms responsible for protection against malaria remain poorly understood, with only a few protective genetic effects mapped in humans. Here, we characterize a host-specific genome-wide signature in whole-blood transcriptomes of Plasmodium falciparum-infected West African children and report a demonstration of genotype-by-infection interactions in vivo. Several associations involve transcripts sensitive to infection and implicate complement system, antigen processing and presentation, and T-cell activation (i.e., SLC39A8, C3AR1, FCGR3B, RAD21, RETN, LRRC25, SLC3A2, and TAPBP), including one association that validated a genome-wide association candidate gene (SCO1), implicating binding variation within a noncoding regulatory element. Gene expression profiles in mice infected with Plasmodium chabaudi revealed and validated similar responses and highlighted specific pathways and genes that are likely important responders in both hosts. These results suggest that host variation and its interplay with infection affect children’s ability to cope with infection and suggest a polygenic model mounted at the transcriptional level for susceptibility. PMID:22949651

  18. Liner mounting assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halila, Ely E. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A mounting assembly includes an annular supporting flange disposed coaxially about a centerline axis which has a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart supporting holes therethrough. An annular liner is disposed coaxially with the supporting flange and includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced apart mounting holes aligned with respective ones of the supporting holes. Each of a plurality of mounting pins includes a proximal end fixedly joined to the supporting flange through a respective one of the supporting holes, and a distal end disposed through a respective one of the liner mounting holes for supporting the liner to the supporting flange while unrestrained differential thermal movement of the liner relative to the supporting flange.

  19. Stable mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1990-01-01

    An improved mirror mount assembly is disclosed. The mirror mount assembly provides a post assembly slidable in a Y-axis orientation and a nut plate assembly slidable in an X-axis orientation and a device for simultaneously locking the post assembly and the key assembly in a fixed position.

  20. Stable mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, R.W.

    1983-11-04

    An improved mirror mount assembly is disclosed. The mirror mount assembly provides a post assembly slidable in a Y-axis orientation and a nut plate assembly slidable in an X-axis orientation and means for simultaneously locking said post assembly and said key assembly in a fixed position.

  1. Spherical mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, Jay L. (Inventor); Messick, Glenn C. (Inventor); Nardell, Carl A. (Inventor); Hendlin, Martin J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A spherical mounting assembly for mounting an optical element allows for rotational motion of an optical surface of the optical element only. In that regard, an optical surface of the optical element does not translate in any of the three perpendicular translational axes. More importantly, the assembly provides adjustment that may be independently controlled for each of the three mutually perpendicular rotational axes.

  2. Thermistor mount efficiency calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Cable, J.W.

    1980-05-01

    Thermistor mount efficiency calibration is accomplished by use of the power equation concept and by complex signal-ratio measurements. A comparison of thermistor mounts at microwave frequencies is made by mixing the reference and the reflected signals to produce a frequency at which the amplitude and phase difference may be readily measured.

  3. Optoelectronic Mounting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R. F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Chu, Dahwey; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Peterson, David W.; Peterson, Gary D.; Reber, Cathleen A.; Reysen, Bill H.

    2004-10-05

    An optoelectronic mounting structure is provided that may be used in conjunction with an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module. The mounting structure may be a flexible printed circuit board. Thermal vias or heat pipes in the head region may transmit heat from the mounting structure to the heat spreader. The heat spreader may provide mechanical rigidity or stiffness to the heat region. In another embodiment, an electrical contact and ground plane may pass along a surface of the head region so as to provide an electrical contact path to the optoelectronic devices and limit electromagnetic interference. In yet another embodiment, a window may be formed in the head region of the mounting structure so as to provide access to the heat spreader. Optoelectronic devices may be adapted to the heat spreader in such a manner that the devices are accessible through the window in the mounting structure.

  4. [Water cults on Soratte Mount].

    PubMed

    Falchetti, Mario; Ottini, Laura

    2011-01-01

    Mount Soratte is a limestone ridge that rises on a lonely plateau of Pliocene tuff on the right of the Tiber, about forty kilometers North of Rome. Studies related to human settlements during prehistory in this territory have been sporadic and occasional. The first evidence of prehistoric cults on mount Soratte has been found in the early Fifties when ajar, dating back to Neolithic times, was discovered in the cave of the Meri. The jar was placed in a position to be always filled of water and indicates the existence of ancient practices of worship linked to groundwater. In the Middle Ages, although caves became a step towards the Hell, dripping caves were often associated with the magical-religious and therapeutic aspects of water linked to fertility in the popular imagination. In the cave church of the Saint Romana, on the eastern slope of Mount Soratte close to Meri, there is a small marble basin near the altar and the water drips from the rock above it. This water is taken out for devotion and drunk by mothers who did not get milk from their breasts. Recently, the water of the Saint Romana would have drained as a result of an act of sacrilege, albeit unintentionally, as reported in a oral testimony. Overall, the territory of Mount Soratte is characterized by a sharp and clear karst. This causes the water, that collects on the inside, coming out in many springs all around the valley. This water is collected to supply fountains used years ago by farmers and livestock and nowadays may represent a cultural space of social life with the aim to build a strong link with the territory and a new awareness of the past and history of the countryside around Mount Soratte. PMID:23057207

  5. 38 CFR 20.304 - Rule 304. Filing additional evidence does not extend time limit for appeal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rule 304. Filing additional evidence does not extend time limit for appeal. 20.304 Section 20.304 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) BOARD OF VETERANS' APPEALS: RULES OF PRACTICE Filing § 20.304 Rule 304. Filing...

  6. Evidence for dose-additive effects of a type II pyrethroid mixture. In vitro assessment.

    PubMed

    Romero, A; Ares, I; Ramos, E; Castellano, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Larrañaga, M R; Anadón, A; Martínez, M A

    2015-04-01

    Despite the widespread use of pyrethroid insecticides that led to common exposure in the population, few studies have been conducted to quantitatively assess dose-additive effects of pyrethroids using a funcional measure involved in the common toxic mode of action. The aim of this study was to evaluate the potency and efficacy of 6 Type II pyretroids (α-cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, λ-cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, cyphenothrin and esfenvalerate) to evoke induction of both nitric oxide and lipid peroxides levels measured as malondialdehyde in three in vitro models (SH-SY5Y, HepG2 and Caco-2 human cells) as well as to test the hypothesis of dose additivity for mixtures of these same 6 pyrethroids. Concentration-responses for 6 pyrethroids were determined as well as the response to mixtures of all 6 pyrethroids. Additivity was tested assuming a dose-additive model. The human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line was the most sensitive in vitro model. The rank order of potency for cell SH-SY5Y viability MTT assay was deltamethrin>cyphenothrin>λ-cyhalothrin>cyfluthrin>esfenvalerate>α-cypermethrin. When 6 pyrethroids were present in the mixture at an equitoxic mixing ratio, the action on nitric oxide (NO) and lipid peroxides measured as malondialdehyde (MDA) production was consistent with a dose-additive model. The results of the present study are consistent with previous reports of additivity of pyrethroids in vivo e in vitro. PMID:25688004

  7. Geologic strip map along the Hines Creek Fault showing evidence for Cenozoic displacement in the western Mount Hayes and northeastern Healy quadrangles, eastern Alaska Range, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nokleberg, Warren J.; Aleinikoff, John N.; Bundtzen, Thomas K.; Hanshaw, Maiana N.

    2013-01-01

    Geologic mapping of the Hines Creek Fault and the adjacent Trident Glacier and McGinnis Glacier Faults to the north in the eastern Alaska Range, Alaska, reveals that these faults were active during the Cenozoic. Previously, the Hines Creek Fault, which is considered to be part of the strike-slip Denali Fault system (Ridgway and others, 2002; Nokleberg and Richter, 2007), was interpreted to have been welded shut during the intrusion of the Upper Cretaceous Buchanan Creek pluton (Wahrhaftig and others, 1975; Gilbert, 1977; Sherwood and Craddock, 1979; Csejtey and others, 1992). Our geologic mapping along the west- to west-northwest-striking Hines Creek Fault in the northeastern Healy quadrangle and central to northwestern Mount Hayes quadrangle reveals that (1) the Buchanan Creek pluton is truncated by the Hines Creek Fault and (2) a tectonic collage of fault-bounded slices of various granitic plutons, metagabbro, metabasalt, and sedimentary rock of the Pingston terrane occurs south of the Hines Creek Fault.

  8. Thyroid-hormone-disrupting chemicals: evidence for dose-dependent additivity or synergism.

    PubMed

    Crofton, Kevin M; Craft, Elena S; Hedge, Joan M; Gennings, Chris; Simmons, Jane E; Carchman, Richard A; Carter, W Hans; DeVito, Michael J

    2005-11-01

    Endocrine disruption from environmental contaminants has been linked to a broad spectrum of adverse outcomes. One concern about endocrine-disrupting xenobiotics is the potential for additive or synergistic (i.e., greater-than-additive) effects of mixtures. A short-term dosing model to examine the effects of environmental mixtures on thyroid homeostasis has been developed. Prototypic thyroid-disrupting chemicals (TDCs) such as dioxins, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers have been shown to alter thyroid hormone homeostasis in this model primarily by up-regulating hepatic catabolism of thyroid hormones via at least two mechanisms. Our present effort tested the hypothesis that a mixture of TDCs will affect serum total thyroxine (T4) concentrations in a dose-additive manner. Young female Long-Evans rats were dosed via gavage with 18 different polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons [2 dioxins, 4 dibenzofurans, and 12 PCBs, including dioxin-like and non-dioxin-like PCBs] for 4 consecutive days. Serum total T4 was measured via radioimmunoassay in samples collected 24 hr after the last dose. Extensive dose-response functions (based on seven to nine doses per chemical) were determined for individual chemicals. A mixture was custom synthesized with the ratio of chemicals based on environmental concentrations. Serial dilutions of this mixture ranged from approximately background levels to 100-fold greater than background human daily intakes. Six serial dilutions of the mixture were tested in the same 4-day assay. Doses of individual chemicals that were associated with a 30% TH decrease from control (ED30), as well as predicted mixture outcomes were calculated using a flexible single-chemical-required method applicable to chemicals with differing dose thresholds and maximum-effect asymptotes. The single-chemical data were modeled without and with the mixture data to determine, respectively, the expected mixture response (the additivity model

  9. Neurobehavioral deficits in Persian Gulf veterans: additional evidence from a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Storzbach, D; Rohlman, D S; Anger, W K; Binder, L M; Campbell, K A

    2001-01-01

    Reports of low-concentration nerve gas exposures during the Gulf War (GW) have spurred concern about possible health consequences and symptoms reported by many returning veterans. The Portland Environmental Hazards Research Center is studying veterans from the northwest United States who report persistent, unexplained "Gulf War" symptoms (cases) and those who do not report those symptoms (controls). An epidemiological survey focused on exposures and symptoms was mailed to a random sample of GW veterans from Oregon and southwestern Washington. Volunteers recruited from survey respondents agreed to undergo a thorough medical examination and psychological and neurobehavioral assessment. Persistent symptoms with no medical explanation associated with Persian Gulf service (e.g., fatigue, muscle pain, memory deficits) beginning during or after the war qualified respondents as cases. The 239 cases with unexplained symptoms and the 112 controls without symptoms were administered a computerized assessment battery of 12 psychosocial and 6 neurobehavioral tests. Replicating and extending previous interim findings, a subgroup of veterans emerged from the initial analysis in the form of extreme outliers which produced a visually and quantitatively obvious bimodal distribution. This led, as it had previously, to analyses of the outliers as a separate group (labeled "slow ODTP"), which confirmed the initial findings of neurobehavioral differences between the outliers and the other cases and controls and provided more convincing evidence that the majority of cases who report neurobehavioral symptoms have no objective evidence of neurobehavioral deficits. However, the larger group of symptomatic veterans do have highly significant and compelling evidence of psychological distress based on scores from 11 separate psychological tests. Whereas the cases differed from the controls by poorer neurobehavioral test performance, extraction of the slow ODTP participants (almost all cases

  10. Evidence That Certain Waste Tank Headspace Vapor Samples Were Contaminated by Semivolatile Polymer Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, James L.

    2006-02-09

    Vapor samples collected from the headspaces of the Hanford Site high-level radioactive waste tanks in 1994 and 1995 using the Vapor Sampling System (VSS) were reported to contain trace levels of phthalates, antioxidants, and certain other industrial chemicals that did not have a logical origin in the waste. This report examines the evidence these chemicals were sampling artifacts (contamination) and identifies the chemicals reported as headspace constituents that may instead have been contaminants. Specific recommendations are given regarding the marking of certain chemicals as suspect on the basis they were sampling manifold contaminants.

  11. Additivity of semantic and phonological effects: Evidence from speech production in Mandarin.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xuebing; Zhang, Qingfang; Damian, Markus F

    2016-11-01

    A number of previous studies using picture-word interference (PWI) tasks conducted with speakers of Western languages have demonstrated non-additive effects of semantic and form overlap between pictures and words, which may indicate underlying non-discrete processing stages in lexical retrieval. The present study used Mandarin speakers and presented Chinese characters as distractors. In two experiments, we crossed semantic relatedness with "pure" phonological (i.e., orthographically unrelated) relatedness and found statistically additive effects. In a third experiment, semantic relatedness was crossed with orthographic overlap (phonological overlap was avoided), and once again we found an additive pattern. The results are discussed with regard to possible cross-linguistic differences between Western and non-Western languages in terms of phonological encoding, as well as concerning the locus of relatedness effects in PWI tasks. PMID:26730809

  12. NIF small mirror mount

    SciTech Connect

    McCarville, T

    1999-07-01

    A number of small mirror mounts have been identified that meet the stringent stability, wave front, and cleanliness standards of the NIF. These requirements are similar to those required in other performance critical optical design applications. Future design teams would conserve time and effort if recognized standards were established for mirror mount design and performance characteristics. Standards for stability, physical features, wave front distortion, and cleanliness would simplify the qualification process considerably. At this point such standards are not difficult to define, as the technical support work has been performed repeatedly by mirror mount consumers and suppliers.

  13. Additional Validity Evidence and Across-Group Equivalency of the "HOPE Teacher Rating Scale"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Scott J.; Gentry, Marcia

    2013-01-01

    The "HOPE Scale" was developed to identify academic and social components of giftedness and talent in elementary-aged students with particular attention to students from low-income and/or culturally diverse families. Based on previous findings, additional research was conducted on revisions made to the "HOPE Scale". Items were added, and 71…

  14. Additional evidence of far transfer of scientific reasoning skills acquired in a CLASP reformed physics course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Wendell H.; Lynch, Robert B.

    2013-01-01

    The introductory physics course taken by biological science majors at UC Davis, Physics 7, was radically reformed 16 years ago in order to explicitly emphasize the development of scientific reasoning skills in all elements of the course. We have previously seen evidence of increased performance on the biological and physical science portions of the MCAT exam, in a rigorous systemic physiology course, and higher graduating GPAs for students who took Physics 7 rather than a traditionally taught introductory physics course. We report here on the increased performance by a group of biological-science majors in a general chemistry course who took the first quarter of Physics 7 prior to beginning the chemistry course sequence compared to a similar group who began taking physics after completing the first two quarters of general chemistry.

  15. Additional evidence of EUV blank defects first seen by wafer printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonckheere, Rik; Van den Heuvel, Dieter; Bret, Tristan; Hofmann, Thorsten; Magana, John; Aharonson, Israel; Meshulach, Doron; Hendrickx, Eric; Ronse, Kurt

    2011-11-01

    First experimental evidence is given that a second generation blank inspection tool has missed a number of printing reticle defects caused by an imperfection of its EUV mirror, i.e., so-called multi-layer defects (ML-defects). This work continued to use a combination of blank inspection (BI), patterned mask inspection (PMI) and wafer inspection (WI) to find as many as possible printing defects on EUV reticles. The application of more advanced wafer inspection, combined with a separate repeater analysis for each of the multiple focus conditions used for exposure on the ASML Alpha Demo Tool (ADT) at IMEC, has allowed to increase the detection capability for printing ML-defects. It exploits the previous finding that ML-defects may have a through-focus printing behavior. They cause a different grade of CD impact on the pattern in their neighborhood, depending on the focus condition. Subsequent reticle review is done on the corresponding locations with both SEM (Secondary Electron Microscope) and AFM (Atomic Force Microscope). This review methodology has allowed achieving clear evidence of printing ML defects missed by this BI tool, despite of a too high nuisance rate, reported before. This establishes a next step in the investigation how essential actinic blank inspection (ABI) is. Presently it is the only known technique whose detection capability is considered independent from the presence of a (residual) distortion of the multi-layer at the top surface. This is considered an important asset for blank inspection, because the printability of a ML-defect in EUV lithography is determined by the distortion throughout the multilayer, not that at the top surface.

  16. Mounting for ceramic scroll

    DOEpatents

    Petty, Jack D.

    1993-01-01

    A mounting for a ceramic scroll on a metal engine block of a gas turbine engine includes a first ceramic ring and a pair of cross key connections between the first ceramic ring, the ceramic scroll, and the engine block. The cross key connections support the scroll on the engine block independent of relative radial thermal growth and for bodily movement toward an annular mounting shoulder on the engine. The scroll has an uninterrupted annular shoulder facing the mounting shoulder on the engine block. A second ceramic ring is captured between mounting shoulder and the uninterrupted shoulder on the scroll when the latter is bodily shifted toward the mouting shoulder to define a gas seal between the scroll and the engine block.

  17. Mechanical strain isolator mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Gordon E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Certain devices such as optical instruments must preserve their alignmental integrity while being subjected to mechanical strain. A mechanical strain isolator mount is provided to preserve the alignmental integrity of an alignment sensitive instrument. An alignment sensitive instrument is mounted on a rectangular base. Flexural legs are connected at their proximal ends to the rectangular base. Flexural legs are also spaced parallel to the sides. Mounting pads are connected to the legs at the distal end and the mechanical strain isolator mount is attached to the substrate by means of threaded bolts. When a mounting pad and its respective leg is subjected to lateral strain in either the X or Y direction via the substrate, the respective leg relieves the strain by bending in the direction of the strain. An axial strain on a mounting pad in the Z direction is relieved by a rotational motion of the legs in the direction of the strain. When the substrate is stress free, the flexural legs return to their original condition and thus preserve the original alignment integrity of the alignment sensitive instrument.

  18. Processing of multi-digit additions in high math-anxious individuals: psychophysiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Núñez-Peña, María Isabel; Suárez-Pellicioni, Macarena

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the time course of neural processing of multi-digit additions in high- (HMA) and low-math anxious (LMA) individuals. Seventeen HMA and 17 LMA individuals were presented with two-digit additions and were asked to perform a verification task. Behavioral data showed that HMA individuals were slower and more error prone than their LMA peers, and that incorrect solutions were solved more slowly and less accurately than correct ones. Moreover, HMA individuals tended to need more time and commit more errors when having to verify incorrect solutions than correct ones. ERPs time-locked to the presentation of the addends (calculation phase) and to the presentation of the proposed solution (verification phase) were also analyzed. In both phases, a P2 component of larger amplitude was found for HMA individuals than for their LMA peers. Because the P2 component is considered to be a biomarker of the mobilization of attentional resources toward emotionally negative stimuli, these results suggest that HMA individuals may have invested more attentional resources both when processing the addends (calculation phase) and when they had to report whether the proposed solution was correct or not (verification phase), as compared to their LMA peers. Moreover, in the verification phase, LMA individuals showed a larger late positive component (LPC) for incorrect solutions at parietal electrodes than their HMA counterparts. The smaller LPC shown by HMA individuals when verifying incorrect solutions suggests that these solutions may have been appeared more plausible to them than to their LMA counterparts. PMID:26347705

  19. Geochemical evidence for airborne dust additions to soils in Channel Islands National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.R.; Johnson, D.L.; Reheis, M.; Beann, J.; Skipp, G.; Fisher, E.; Jones, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that dust plays important roles in climate change, biogeochemical cycles, nutrient supply to ecosystems, and soil formation. In Channel Islands National Park, California, soils are clay-rich Vertisols or Alfisols and Mollisols with vertic properties. The soils are overlain by silt-rich mantles that contrast sharply with the underlying clay-rich horizons. Silt mantles contain minerals that are rare or absent in the volcanic rocks that dominate these islands. Immobile trace elements (Sc-Th-La and Ta-Nd-Cr) and rare-earth elements show that the basalt and andesite on the islands have a composition intermediate between upper-continental crust and oceanic crust. In contrast, the silt fractions and, to a lesser extent, clay fractions of the silt mantle have compositions closer to average upper-continental crust and very similar to Mojave Desert dust. Island shelves, exposed during the last glacial period, could have provided a source of eolian sediment for the silt mantles, but this is not supported by mineralogical data. We hypothesize that a more likely source for the silt-rich mantles is airborne dust from mainland California and Baja California, either from the Mojave Desert or from the continental shelf during glacial low stands of sea. Although average winds are from the northwest in coastal California, easterly winds occur numerous times of the year when "Santa Ana" conditions prevail, caused by a high-pressure cell centered over the Great Basin. The eolian silt mantles constitute an important medium of plant growth and provide evidence that abundant eolian silt and clay may be delivered to the eastern Pacific Ocean from inland desert sources. ?? 2007 Geological Society of America.

  20. No Serological Evidence that Harbour Porpoises Are Additional Hosts of Influenza B Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Bodewes, Rogier; van de Bildt, Marco W. G.; van Elk, Cornelis E.; Bunskoek, Paulien E.; van de Vijver, David A. M. C.; Smits, Saskia L.; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Kuiken, Thijs

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses circulate among humans causing epidemics almost annually. While various hosts for influenza A viruses exist, influenza B viruses have been detected only in humans and seals. However, recurrent infections of seals in Dutch coastal waters with influenza B viruses that are antigenetically distinct from influenza B viruses circulating among humans suggest that influenza B viruses have been introduced into this seal population by another, non-human, host. Harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) are sympatric with seals in these waters and are also occasionally in close contact with humans after stranding and subsequent rehabilitation. In addition, virus attachment studies demonstrated that influenza B viruses can bind to cells of the respiratory tract of these animals. Therefore, we hypothesized that harbour porpoises might be a reservoir of influenza B viruses. In the present study, an unique set of serum samples from 79 harbour porpoises, stranded alive on the Dutch coast between 2003 and 2013, was tested for the presence of antibodies against influenza B viruses by use of the hemagglutination inhibition test and for antibodies against influenza A viruses by use of a competitive influenza A nucleoprotein ELISA. No antibodies were detected against either virus, suggesting that influenza A and B virus infections of harbour porpoises in Dutch coastal waters are not common, which was supported by statistical analysis of the dataset. PMID:24551217

  1. No serological evidence that harbour porpoises are additional hosts of influenza B viruses.

    PubMed

    Bodewes, Rogier; van de Bildt, Marco W G; van Elk, Cornelis E; Bunskoek, Paulien E; van de Vijver, David A M C; Smits, Saskia L; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Kuiken, Thijs

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A and B viruses circulate among humans causing epidemics almost annually. While various hosts for influenza A viruses exist, influenza B viruses have been detected only in humans and seals. However, recurrent infections of seals in Dutch coastal waters with influenza B viruses that are antigenetically distinct from influenza B viruses circulating among humans suggest that influenza B viruses have been introduced into this seal population by another, non-human, host. Harbour porpoises (Phocoena phocoena) are sympatric with seals in these waters and are also occasionally in close contact with humans after stranding and subsequent rehabilitation. In addition, virus attachment studies demonstrated that influenza B viruses can bind to cells of the respiratory tract of these animals. Therefore, we hypothesized that harbour porpoises might be a reservoir of influenza B viruses. In the present study, an unique set of serum samples from 79 harbour porpoises, stranded alive on the Dutch coast between 2003 and 2013, was tested for the presence of antibodies against influenza B viruses by use of the hemagglutination inhibition test and for antibodies against influenza A viruses by use of a competitive influenza A nucleoprotein ELISA. No antibodies were detected against either virus, suggesting that influenza A and B virus infections of harbour porpoises in Dutch coastal waters are not common, which was supported by statistical analysis of the dataset. PMID:24551217

  2. A new analysis of the WASP-3 system: no evidence for an additional companion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montalto, M.; Gregorio, J.; Boué, G.; Mortier, A.; Boisse, I.; Oshagh, M.; Maturi, M.; Figueira, P.; Sousa, S.; Santos, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    In this work, we investigate the problem concerning the presence of additional bodies gravitationally bound with the WASP-3 system. We present eight new transits of this planet gathered between 2009 May and 2011 September by using the 30-cm telescope at the Crow Observatory-Portalegre, and analyse all the photometric and radial velocity data published so far. We did not observe significant periodicities in the Fourier spectrum of the observed minus calculated (O - C) transit timing and radial velocity diagrams (the highest peak having false-alarm probabilities of 56 and 31 per cent, respectively) or long-term trends. Combining all the available information, we conclude that the radial velocity and transit timing techniques exclude, at 99 per cent confidence limit, any perturber more massive than M ≳ 100 Mearth with periods up to 10 times the period of the inner planet. We also investigate the possible presence of an exomoon in this system and determine that considering the scatter of the O - C transit timing residuals a coplanar exomoon would likely produce detectable transits. This hypothesis is however apparently ruled out by observations conducted by other researchers. In the case where the orbit of the moon is not coplanar, the accuracy of our transit timing and transit duration measurements prevents any significant statement. Interestingly, on the basis of our reanalysis of SOPHIE data we noted that WASP-3 passed from a less active (logR HK '=-4.95) to a more active (logR HK '=-4.8) state during the 3 yr monitoring period spanned by the observations. Despite the fact that no clear spot crossing has been reported for this system, this analysis suggests a more intensive monitoring of the activity level of this star in order to understand its impact on photometric and radial velocity measurements.

  3. Vibration isolation mounting system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Sam D. (Inventor); Bastin, Paul H. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A system is disclosed for mounting a vibration producing device onto a spacecraft structure and also for isolating the vibration forces thereof from the structure. The system includes a mount on which the device is securely mounted and inner and outer rings. The rings and mount are concentrically positioned. The system includes a base (secured to the structure) and a set of links which are interconnected by a set of torsion bars which allow and resist relative rotational movement therebetween. The set of links are also rotatably connected to a set of brackets which are rigidly connected to the outer ring. Damped leaf springs interconnect the inner and outer rings and the mount allow relative translational movement therebetween in X and Y directions. The links, brackets and base are interconnected and configured so that they allow and resist translational movement of the device in the Z direction so that in combination with the springs they provide absorption of vibrational energy produced by the device in all three dimensions while providing rotational stiffness about all three axes to prevent undesired rotational motions.

  4. Pressure vessel bottle mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingett, Paul (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A mounting assembly for mounting a composite pressure vessel to a vehicle includes a saddle having a curved surface extending between two pillars for receiving the vessel. The saddle also has flanged portions which can be bolted to the vehicle. Each of the pillars has hole in which is mounted the shaft portion of an attachment member. A resilient member is disposed between each of the shaft portions and the holes and loaded by a tightening nut. External to the holes, each of the attachment members has a head portion to which a steel band is attached. The steel band circumscribes the vessel and translates the load on the springs into a clamping force on the vessel. As the vessel expands and contracts, the resilient members expand and contract so that the clamping force applied by the band to the vessel remains constant.

  5. Additional evidence that rosacea pathogenesis may involve demodex: new information from the topical efficacy of ivermectin and praziquantel.

    PubMed

    Abokwidir, Manal; Fleischer, Alan B

    2015-09-01

    Additional evidence that Demodex folliculorum may contribute to the pathogenesis of papulopustular rosacea are new studies of two topical antiparasitic agents. Ivermectin and praziquantel have recently been shown to be effective in decreasing the severity of papulopustular rosacea. These two agents significantly differ in molecular structure, but yield similar antiparasitic mechanisms of action. Higher numbers of Demodex mites are found in the skin of patients with rosacea than in people with normal skin. If Demodex play a role in pathogenesis, then hypersensitivity to the mites, their flora, or their products could explain the observed efficacy of antidemodectic therapy. PMID:26437294

  6. Evidence for early Pleistocene Glaciation(s) in tropical Africa: Stratigraphy, Paleomagnetism, Paleosols and Paleoclimate of the Gorges Moraine System, Mount Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahaney, W. C.; Barendregt, R. W.; Hamilton, T.; Hancock, R.

    2011-12-01

    and paleosol evidence, at least two tropical glaciations during the Matuyama Reversed Chron are documented from Mt. Kenya, suggesting this volcanic edifice had attained sufficient relief to form an ice mass and outlet glaciers, despite its equatorial latitude.

  7. Transducer-Mounting Fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, Kirk W.

    1990-01-01

    Transducer-mounting fixture holds transducer securely against stud. Projects only slightly beyond stud after installation. Flanged transducer fits into fixture when hinged halves open. When halves reclosed, fixture tightened onto threaded stud until stud makes contact with transducer. Knurled area on fixture aids in tightening fixture on stud.

  8. MountPointAttributes

    2001-06-16

    MountPointAttributes is a software component that provides client code with a technique to raise the local namespace of a file to a global namespace. Its abstractions and mechanisms allow the client code to gather global properties of a file and to use them in devising an effective storage access strategy on this file.

  9. Housing And Mounting Structure

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Gene R.; Armendariz, Marcelino G.; Baca, Johnny R.F.; Bryan, Robert P.; Carson, Richard F.; Duckett, III, Edwin B.; McCormick, Frederick B.; Miller, Gregory V.; Peterson, David W.; Smith, Terrance T.

    2005-03-08

    This invention relates to an optical transmitter, receiver or transceiver module, and more particularly, to an apparatus for connecting a first optical connector to a second optical connector. The apparatus comprises: (1) a housing having at least a first end and at least a second end, the first end of the housing capable of receiving the first optical connector, and the second end of the housing capable of receiving the second optical connector; (2) a longitudinal cavity extending from the first end of the housing to the second end of the housing; and (3) an electromagnetic shield comprising at least a portion of the housing. This invention also relates to an apparatus for housing a flexible printed circuit board, and this apparatus comprises: (1) a mounting structure having at least a first surface and a second surface; (2) alignment ridges along the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure, the alignment ridges functioning to align and secure a flexible printed circuit board that is wrapped around and attached to the first and second surfaces of the mounting structure; and (3) a series of heat sink ridges adapted to the mounting structure, the heat sink ridges functioning to dissipate heat that is generated from the flexible printed circuit board.

  10. Geologic Map of Mount Mazama and Crater Lake Caldera, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.

    2008-01-01

    Crater Lake partly fills one of the most spectacular calderas of the world, an 8-by-10-km basin more than 1 km deep formed by collapse of the volcano known as Mount Mazama (fig. 1) during a rapid series of explosive eruptions about 7,700 years ago. Having a maximum depth of 594 m, Crater Lake is the deepest lake in the United States. Crater Lake National Park, dedicated in 1902, encompasses 645 km2 of pristine forested and alpine terrain, including the lake itself, virtually all of Mount Mazama, and most of the area of the geologic map. The geology of the area was first described in detail by Diller and Patton (1902) and later by Williams (1942), whose vivid account led to international recognition of Crater Lake as the classic collapse caldera. Because of excellent preservation and access, Mount Mazama, Crater Lake caldera, and the deposits formed by the climactic eruption constitute a natural laboratory for study of volcanic and magmatic processes. For example, the climactic ejecta are renowned among volcanologists as evidence for systematic compositional zonation within a subterranean magma chamber. Mount Mazama's climactic eruption also is important as the source of the widespread Mazama ash, a useful Holocene stratigraphic marker throughout the Pacific Northwest, adjacent Canada, and offshore. A detailed bathymetric survey of the floor of Crater Lake in 2000 (Bacon and others, 2002) provides a unique record of postcaldera eruptions, the interplay between volcanism and filling of the lake, and sediment transport within this closed basin. Knowledge of the geology and eruptive history of the Mount Mazama edifice, greatly enhanced by the caldera wall exposures, gives exceptional insight into how large volcanoes of magmatic arcs grow and evolve. Lastly, the many smaller volcanoes of the High Cascades beyond the limits of Mount Mazama are a source of information on the flux of mantle-derived magma through the region. General principles of magmatic and eruptive

  11. Mount St. Helens Rebirth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The catastrophic eruption of Mt. St. Helens 20 years ago today (on May 18, 1980), ranks among the most important natural events of the twentieth century in the United States. Because Mt. St. Helens is in a remote area of the Cascades Mountains, only a few people were killed by the eruption, but property damage and destruction totaled in the billions of dollars. Mount St. Helens is an example of a composite or stratovolcano. These are explosive volcanoes that are generally steep-sided, symmetrical cones built up by the accumulation of debris from previous eruptions and consist of alternating layers of lava flows, volcanic ash and cinder. Some of the most photographed mountains in the world are stratovolcanoes, including Mount Fuji in Japan, Mount Cotopaxi in Ecuador, Mount Hood in Oregon, and Mount Rainier in Washington. The recently erupting Mount Usu on the island of Hokkaido in Japan is also a stratovolcano. Stratovolcanoes are characterized by having plumbing systems that move magma from a chamber deep within the Earth's crust to vents at the surface. The height of Mt. St. Helens was reduced from about 2950 m (9677 ft) to about 2550 m (8364 ft) as a result of the explosive eruption on the morning of May 18. The eruption sent a column of dust and ash upwards more than 25 km into the atmosphere, and shock waves from the blast knocked down almost every tree within 10 km of the central crater. Massive avalanches and mudflows, generated by the near-instantaneous melting of deep snowpacks on the flanks of the mountain, devastated an area more than 20 km to the north and east of the former summit, and rivers choked with all sorts of debris were flooded more than 100 km away. The area of almost total destruction was about 600 sq. km. Ash from the eruption cloud was rapidly blown to the northeast and east producing lightning which started many small forest fires. An erie darkness caused by the cloud enveloped the landscape more than 200 km from the blast area, and ash

  12. Floating mirror mount

    SciTech Connect

    Koop, D.E.

    1989-01-03

    This patent describes a floating mirror mount for a mirror of a laser is described consisting of: a mirror having a front surface and a back surface, a keeper encircling the mirror and having a peripheral flange engaging the front surface of the mirror when the mirror is not installed in a laser, a retainer positioned rearwardly of the back surface of the mirror and connected to the keeper and having a spring seating surface, spring means engageable with the spring seating surface of the retainer for exerting a resilient biasing force on the mirror, and fastening means for connecting the retainer to the mirror positioning structure of the laser on installation of the mirror mount in the laser.

  13. Mount Erebus activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An international team of scientists reports that unusually high seismic activity joggled Mount Erebus last fall. However, the Antarctic volcano showed no external signs of an eruption.When scientists from the United States, Japan, and New Zealand returned to the world's southernmost active volcano last November for their annual field expedition, they found that seismic stations recorded 650 small tremors on October 8; prior to that, the number of quakes had averaged between 20 and 80 per day. The October 8 maximum was followed by 140 on October 9 and 120 on October 10. Philip R. Kyle, assistant professor of geochemistry at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology in Socorro and leader of the team studying Mount Erebus, noted that some of the strongest earthquakes recorded during the team's 3 years of observations occurred on October 8; these registered less than 2 on the Richter scale.

  14. Mount Wilson Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Mount Wilson Observatory, located in the San Gabriel Mountains near Pasadena, California, was founded in 1904 by George Ellery Hale with financial support from Andrew Carnegie. In the 1920s and 1930s, working at the 2.5 m Hooker telescope, Edwin Hubble made two of the most important discoveries in the history of astronomy: first, that `nebulae' are actually island universes—galaxies—each with bil...

  15. Plasma Screen Floating Mount

    DOEpatents

    Eakle, Robert F.; Pak, Donald J.

    2004-10-26

    A mounting system for a flat display screen, particularly a plasma display screen, suspends the screen separately in each of the x-, y- and z-directions. A series of frames located by linear bearings and isolated by springs and dampers allows separate controlled movement in each axis. The system enables the use of relatively larger display screens in vehicles in which plasma screen are subject to damage from vibration.

  16. Who discovered Mount Everest?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickey, Parke A.

    The discovery that Mount Everest is the highest mountain in the world was made by the officers of the Survey of India. This organization measured a network of triangulation across India between 1800 and 1870. In order to reduce the measurements to geodetic coordinates, it was necessary to determine the size and shape of the earth. This was accomplished by measuring the length of an arc of the meridian under the direction of the Surveyor General, Sir George Everest. This measurement disagreed with the observations of the stars for latitude by 5 seconds of arc (530 ft or 162 m). In 1855, Pratt and Airy pointed out that the discrepancy was due to the gravitational effect of the Himalayas. Their work was the first indication that the material of the earth's crust under the mountains is lighter than that under plains. During the course of the survey the officers made observations on the snowy Himalayas. They were excluded from Nepal; observations had to be taken from more than 100 mi (160 km) away in jungles infested by malaria. Mount Everest was observed by three different officers between November 27, 1847, and January 17, 1850. The height of the mountain had to be determined by the (human) computers in the survey headquarters in Dehra Dun. The fact that it is the highest mountain in the Himalayas, and probably in the world, was announced by Surveyor General Andrew Waugh in 1856. It is not clear whether the chief computer who made the calculations was an Indian, Radanath Sikhdar, or an Englishman born in India of an Indian mother, John B. N. Hennesy. The local name for the mountain, if it had any, was unknown, so Waugh named it Mount Everest, in honor of the great scientist who was largely responsible for the accomplishments of the Survey of India.

  17. Mounting of SSM's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohjonen, Juha

    1993-01-01

    A step by step description of how to mount SSM's (Second Surface Mirrors) on the space instruments is presented. Experiences of the first SSM implementation are described. The Soho satellite has in its payload, an instrument ERNE, which has a radiation wing covered with SSM. SSM's are easy to use and reliable for thermal control design to space instruments. SSM's have a very small alpha(sub s) compared to the epsilon(sub n). The radiation from the Sun is reflected and at the same time the heat generated by the instrument is emitted to the space. This gives a good opportunity to tune the thermal control design according to the temperature.

  18. Ash-flow eruptive megabreccias of the Manhattan and Mount Jefferson calderas, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Shawe, D.R.; Snyder, D.B.

    1988-01-01

    A detailed field study of ash-flow megabreccias associated with the Manhattan and Mount Jefferson calderas shows that megaclasts were brecciated in sub-caldera level before incorporation in ash flows. This evidence in addition to the presence of some clast lithologies that are nowhere recognized in caldera walls and the occurrence of some megabreccia units as outflow suggest an origin by eruption rather than by collapse of caldera walls. Geophysical investigations and a mathematical analysis are presented in the paper.

  19. Pyroclastic flow injury. Mount St. Helens, May 18, 1980.

    PubMed

    Parshley, P F; Kiessling, P J; Antonius, J A; Connell, R S; Miller, S H; Green, F H

    1982-05-01

    Three patients who were on the periphery of the pyroclastic flow of the Mount St. Helens eruption on May 18, 1980 were treated for severe thermal and inhalation injuries. Although exposed in identical manner, two patients arrived with heavily colonized burn wounds and developed adult respiratory distress syndrome leading directly to their death, whereas the third patient, with a noncolonized burn wound and little evidence of adult respiratory distress syndrome, survived. Evidence of inhaled ash complicating various stages of adult respiratory distress syndrome was confirmed by energy dispersive roentgenographic analysis. In the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, and the Aleutian Islands, potential for further injuries of this type in even larger numbers exists. Should these occur, those who treat the victims should be aware of the potential for severe inhalation problems in addition to the obvious burns. PMID:7081562

  20. Pyroclastic flow injury. Mount St. Helens, May 18, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Parshley, P.F.; Kiessling, P.J.; Antonius, J.A.; Connell, R.S.; Miller, S.H.; Green, F.H.

    1982-05-01

    Three patients who were on the periphery of the pyroclastic flow of the Mount St. Helens eruption on May 18, 1980 were treated for severe thermal and inhalation injuries. Although exposed in identical manner, two patients arrived with heavily colonized burn wounds and developed adult respiratory distress syndrome leading directly to their death, whereas the third patient, with a noncolonized burn wound and little evidence of adult respiratory distress syndrome, survived. Evidence of inhaled ash complicating various stages of adult respiratory distress syndrome was confirmed by energy dispersive roentgenographic analysis. In the Pacific Northwest, Alaska, and the Aleutian Islands, potential for further injuries of this type in even larger numbers exists. Should these occur, those who treat the victims should be aware of the potential for severe inhalation problems in addition to the obvious burns.

  1. Surface mount component jig

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1990-08-07

    A device for bending and trimming the pins of a dual-inline-package component and the like for surface mounting rather than through mounting to a circuit board comprises, in a first part, in pin cutter astride a holder having a recess for holding the component, a first spring therebetween, and, in a second part, two flat members pivotally interconnected by a hinge and urged to an upward peaked position from a downward peaked position by a second spring. As a downward force is applied to the pin cutter it urges the holder downward, assisted by the first spring and a pair of ridges riding on shoulders of the holder, to carry the component against the upward peaked flat members which guide the pins outwardly. As the holder continues downwardly, the flat members pivot to the downward peaked position bending the pins upwardly against the sides of the holder. When the downward movement is met with sufficient resistance, the ridges of the pin cutter ride over the holder's shoulders to continue downward to cut any excess length of pin.

  2. Predictors of victim disclosure in child sexual abuse: Additional evidence from a sample of incarcerated adult sex offenders.

    PubMed

    Leclerc, Benoit; Wortley, Richard

    2015-05-01

    The under-reporting of child sexual abuse by victims is a serious problem that may prolong the suffering of victims and leave perpetrators free to continue offending. Yet empirical evidence indicates that victim disclosure rates are low. In this study, we perform regression analysis with a sample of 369 adult child sexual offenders to examine potential predictors of victim disclosure. Specifically, we extend the range of previously examined potential predictors of victim disclosure and investigate interaction effects in order to better capture under which circumstances victim disclosure is more likely. The current study differs from previous studies in that it examines the impact of victim and offense variables on victim disclosure from the perspective of the offender. In line with previous studies, we found that disclosure increased with the age of the victim and if penetration had occurred. In addition, we found that disclosure increased when the victim came from a non-dysfunctional family and resisted the abuse. The presence of an interaction effect highlighted the impact of the situation on victim disclosure. This effect indicated that as victims get older, they are more likely to disclose the abuse when they are not living with the offender at the time of abuse, but less likely to do so when they are living with the offender at the time of abuse. These findings are discussed in relation to previous studies and the need to facilitate victim disclosure. PMID:25812798

  3. Evidence of Rapidly Warming Rivers in the UK from an Extensive Additive Modelling Study at the National Scale Using R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    River water temperature data exhibit non-linear behaviour over the past 50 or so years. Standard techniques for identifying and quantifying trends have centred around the use of linear regression and Mann-Kendall and Thiel-Sen procedures. Observational data from UK rivers suggest that temperatures are far more variable then assumed under these statistical models. In a national-scale assessment of the response of riverine systems to global climatic change, an additive model framework was employed to model patterns in water temperatures from a large database of temporal observational data. Models were developed using R, which allowed for the deployment of cutting-edge additive modelling techniques to describe trends at 2773 sites across England and Wales, UK. At a subset of sites, additive models were used to model long-term trends, trends within seasons and the long-term variation in the seasonal pattern of water temperatures. Changes in water temperature have important consequences for aquatic ecology, with some species being particularly sensitive even to small shifts in temperature during some or all of their lifecycle. While there are many studies reporting increasing regional and global air temperatures, evidence for changes in river water temperature has thus far been site specific and/or from sites heavily influenced by human activities that could themselves lead to warming. Here I present selected results from a national-scale assessment of changing river water temperatures, covering the whole of England and Wales, comprising data from 2,773 locations. Positive trends in water temperature were observed at 86% of sites. At a subset of sites, seasonal trend models were developed, which showed that 90% of locations demonstrated statistically significant increases in water temperature during Autumn and Winter periods. Multivariate smoothers, that allow for within-year and longer-term trend interactions in time, suggest that periods of warmer waters now extend

  4. Mount Vesuvius, Italy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image of Mt. Vesuvius, Italy was acquired September 26, 2000. The full-size false-color image covers an area of 36 by 45 km. Vesuvius overlooks the city of Naples and the Bay of Naples in central Italy. (Popocatepetl and Mount Fuji are other volcanos surrounded by dense urban areas.) In 79 AD, Vesuvius erupted cataclysmically, burying all of the surrounding cites with up to 30 m of ash. The towns of Pompeii and Herculanaeum were rediscovered in the 18th century, and excavated in the 20th century. They provide a snapshot of Roman life from 2000 years ago: perfectly preserved are wooden objects, food items, and the casts of hundreds of victims. Vesuvius is intensively monitored for potential signs of unrest that could signal the beginning of another eruption. Image courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team

  5. The forces and moments on airplane engine mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donely, Philip

    1936-01-01

    A resume of the equations and formulas for the forces and moments on an aircraft-engine mount is presented. In addition, available experimental data have been included to permit the computation of these forces and moments. A sample calculation is made and compared with present design conditions for engine mounts.

  6. Advanced centering of mounted optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Christian; Winkelmann, Ralf; Klar, Rainer; Philippen, Peter; Garden, Ron; Pearlman, Sasha; Pearlman, Guy

    2016-03-01

    Camera objectives or laser focusing units consist of complex lens systems with multiple lenses. The optical performance of such complex lens systems is dependent on the correct positioning of lenses in the system. Deviations in location or angle within the system directly affect the achievable image quality. To optimize the achievable performance of lens systems, these errors can be corrected by machining the mount of the lens with respect to the optical axis. The Innolite GmbH and Opto Alignment Technology have developed a novel machine for such center turning operation. A confocal laser reflection measurement sensor determines the absolute position of the optical axis with reference to the spindle axis. As a strong advantage compared to autocollimator measurements the utilized Opto Alignment sensor is capable of performing centration and tilt measurements without changing objectives on any radius surface from 2 mm to infinity and lens diameters from 0.5 mm to 300 mm, including cylinder, aspheric, and parabolic surfaces. In addition, it performs significantly better on coated lenses. The optical axis is skewed and offset in reference to the spindle axis as determined by the measurement. Using the information about the mount and all reference surfaces, a machine program for an untrue turning process is calculated from this data in a fully automated manner. Since the optical axis is not collinear with the spindle axis, the diamond tool compensates for these linear and tilt deviations with small correction movements. This results in a simple machine setup where the control system works as an electronic alignment chuck. Remaining eccentricity of <1 μm and angular errors of < 10 sec are typical alignment results.

  7. Mount Zion Cemetery, 1975 Plot Plan Mount Zion Cemetery/ ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Mount Zion Cemetery, 1975 Plot Plan - Mount Zion Cemetery/ Female Union Band Cemetery, Bounded by 27th Street right-of-way N.W. (formerly Lyons Mill Road), Q Street N.W., & Mill Road N.W., Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  8. 75 FR 43816 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mount Airy, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ...This action amends Class E Airspace at Mount Airy, NC, to accommodate the additional airspace needed for the Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) developed for Mount Airy-Surry County...

  9. Surface Mounted Neutron Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo-Decanini, Juan M.

    2012-10-01

    A deuterium-tritium (DT) base reaction pulsed neutron generator packaged in a flat computer chip shape of 1.54 cm (0.600 in) wide by 3.175 cm (1.25 in) length and 0.3 cm (0.120 in) thick has been successfully demonstrated to produce 14 MeV neutrons at a rate of 10^9 neutrons per second. The neutron generator is based on a deuterium ion beam accelerated to impact a tritium loaded target. The accelerating voltage is in the 15 to 20 kV in a 3 mm (0.120 in) gap, the ion beam is shaped by using a lens design to produce a flat ion beam that conforms to the flat rectangular target. The ion source is a simple surface mounted deuterium filled titanium film with a fused gap that operates at a current-voltage design to release the deuterium during a pulse length of about 1 μs. We present the general description of the working prototypes, which we have labeled the ``NEUTRISTOR.''[4pt] Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. Work funded by the LDRD office.

  10. Mount St. Helens Flyover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image of Mt. St. Helens volcano in Washington State was acquired on August 8, 2000 and covers an area of 37 by 51 km. Mount Saint Helens, a volcano in the Cascade Range of southwestern Washington that had been dormant since 1857, began to show signs of renewed activity in early 1980. On 18 May 1980, it erupted with such violence that the top of the mountain was blown off, spewing a cloud of ash and gases that rose to an altitude of 19 kilometers. The blast killed about 60 people and destroyed all life in an area of some 180 square kilometers (some 70 square miles), while a much larger area was covered with ash and debris. It continues to spit forth ash and steam intermittently. As a result of the eruption, the mountain's elevation decreased from 2,950 meters to 2,549 meters. The simulated fly-over was produced by draping ASTER visible and near infrared image data over a digital topography model, created from ASTER's 3-D stereo bands. The color was computer enhanced to create a 'natural' color image, where the vegetation appears green. The topography has been exaggerated 2 times to enhance the appearance of the relief. Landsat7 aquired an image of Mt. St. Helens on August 22, 1999. Image and animation courtesy NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  11. Spectroscopic Evidence for Covalent Binding of Sulfadiazine to Natural Soils via 1,4-nucleophilic addition (Michael Type Addition) studied by Spin Labeling ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    with different polarity. As shown by the spin labeling ESR experiment, molecules modeling SDZ were promptly bound to non-hydrolysable network of soil organic matter only via the aromatic amines that was accompanied by a prompt enlargement of humic particles binding aromatic amines, whereas binding of decomposition products of SDZ to humic acids of soil via the aliphatic amines was not observable. The ESR spectra obviously showed a single-phase process of covalent binding of the aromatic amines. Repeated washouts of labeled soil samples using distil water and ultrafiltration through the membrane of 5000 MWCO PES confirmed irreversible binding of the aromatic amines, and showed that via the aliphatic amines, binding of SDZ or decomposition products of SDZ to soil might also occur but reversibly and only to small soil molecules, which don't enter into the composition of non-hydrolysable part of soil organic matter. SL ESR experiments of different soils at the presence of Laccase highlighted that covalent binding of the aromatic amines to humic particles occurred in the specific hydrophobic areas of soil found as depleted in oxygen. All measured data evidenced that first, SDZ might be decomposed that allowed for measuring the same change of a paramagnetic signal of soil organic matter influenced by both aromatic and aliphatic amines as in the experiment of the interaction of soil with SDZ. Second, a decomposition product of SDZ with the aromatic amine might be bound to non-hydrolysable parts of soil organic matter under specific anaerobic conditions only via 1,4 - nucleophilic addition, Michael-type addition. Gulkowska, A., Thalmann, B., D., Hollender, J., & Krauss, M. (2014). Chemosphere, 107, 366 - 372. Müller, T., Rosendahl, I., Focks, A., Siemens, J., Klasmeier, J., & Matthies. (2013). Environmental Pollution, 172,180 - 185. Nowak, K.M., Miltner, A., Gehre, M., Schaeffer, A., & Kaestner, M. (2011). Environmental Science & Technology 45, 999 - 1006. Weber, E.J., Spidle

  12. Spectroscopic Evidence for Covalent Binding of Sulfadiazine to Natural Soils via 1,4-nucleophilic addition (Michael Type Addition) studied by Spin Labeling ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    with different polarity. As shown by the spin labeling ESR experiment, molecules modeling SDZ were promptly bound to non-hydrolysable network of soil organic matter only via the aromatic amines that was accompanied by a prompt enlargement of humic particles binding aromatic amines, whereas binding of decomposition products of SDZ to humic acids of soil via the aliphatic amines was not observable. The ESR spectra obviously showed a single-phase process of covalent binding of the aromatic amines. Repeated washouts of labeled soil samples using distil water and ultrafiltration through the membrane of 5000 MWCO PES confirmed irreversible binding of the aromatic amines, and showed that via the aliphatic amines, binding of SDZ or decomposition products of SDZ to soil might also occur but reversibly and only to small soil molecules, which don't enter into the composition of non-hydrolysable part of soil organic matter. SL ESR experiments of different soils at the presence of Laccase highlighted that covalent binding of the aromatic amines to humic particles occurred in the specific hydrophobic areas of soil found as depleted in oxygen. All measured data evidenced that first, SDZ might be decomposed that allowed for measuring the same change of a paramagnetic signal of soil organic matter influenced by both aromatic and aliphatic amines as in the experiment of the interaction of soil with SDZ. Second, a decomposition product of SDZ with the aromatic amine might be bound to non-hydrolysable parts of soil organic matter under specific anaerobic conditions only via 1,4 - nucleophilic addition, Michael-type addition. Gulkowska, A., Thalmann, B., D., Hollender, J., & Krauss, M. (2014). Chemosphere, 107, 366 - 372. Müller, T., Rosendahl, I., Focks, A., Siemens, J., Klasmeier, J., & Matthies. (2013). Environmental Pollution, 172,180 - 185. Nowak, K.M., Miltner, A., Gehre, M., Schaeffer, A., & Kaestner, M. (2011). Environmental Science & Technology 45, 999 - 1006. Weber, E.J., Spidle

  13. Mouse Cochlear Whole Mount Immunofluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Akil, Omar; Lustig, Lawrence R.

    2016-01-01

    This protocol comprises the entire process of immunofluorescence staining on mouse cochlea whole mount, starting from tissue preparation to the mounting of the tissue. This technique provides “three-dimensional” views of the stained components in order to determine the localization of a protein of interest in the tissue in its natural state and environment. PMID:27547786

  14. Motorized Panoramic Camera Mount - Calibration and Image Capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauhanen, H.; Rönnholm, P.; Lehtola, V. V.

    2016-06-01

    interesting applications. Among the large variation of panoramic camera systems, we have focused on concentric panoramic imaging with a frame camera. In order to establish the concentric image acquisition, the camera mount must be calibrated so that the projection centre of the camera is located at the rotation centre of the mount. For this purpose, we developed a novel mount calibration method, which allows an accurate recovery of the rotation centre in two image acquisition steps. In addition, we have built a motorized camera mount that can self-calibrate the camera position within the mount, given the previously solved rotation centre, and then be used to automatically capture panoramic images. Hence, we have streamlined the previously laborious manual phase of iterative position calibration, but also automated the capturing of panoramic images. For validation purposes, reference results from a conventional manual mount are provided. In the case of non-motorized mount, the average distance between the projection centre of the camera and the rotation centre of the mount was 0.253 mm and the standard deviation was 0.161 mm. For the motorized mount, the corresponding average distance and standard deviation were 0.549 mm and 0.404 mm, respectively.

  15. Mount St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) image of Mount St. Helens was captured one week after the March 8, 2005, ash and steam eruption, the latest activity since the volcano's reawakening in September 2004. The new lava dome in the southeast part of the crater is clearly visible, highlighted by red areas where ASTER's infrared channels detected hot spots from incandescent lava. The new lava dome is 155 meters (500 feet) higher than the old lava dome, and still growing.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 21.9 by 24.4 kilometers (13.6 by 15.1 miles) Location: 46.2 degrees North latitude, 122.2 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 8, 3, and 1 Original Data Resolution

  16. Mount Everest snow plume: A case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, G. W. K.

    2004-11-01

    A plume of snow blowing from the summit of Mount Everest is one of the most iconic images of the world's highest mountain. Its presence provides evidence of the strong jet stream winds that can buffet the mountain. In January 2004, astronauts onboard the International Space Station (ISS) observed a 15 to 20 km long snow plume emanating from the summit of Mount Everest. Remarkably little is known about these plumes and the role that they play in the redistribution of snow in the high Himalaya. In this paper we use a variety of meteorological datasets to show that the observed plume was the combination of high winds associated with the East Asian Jet Stream (EAJS) and a heavy snowfall that had occurred over the Himalaya during the preceding week. A simple model of a blown snow plume is shown to be consistent with the observations made from the ISS.

  17. Detector Mount Design for IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jae Sok; Park, Chan; Cha, Sang-Mok; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Kwijong; Kim, Kang-Min; Chun, Moo-Young; Ko, Kyeongyeon; Oh, Heeyoung; Jeong, Ueejeong; Nah, Jakyoung; Lee, Hanshin; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2014-06-01

    The Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) is a near-infrared wide-band high-resolution spectrograph jointly developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute and the University of Texas at Austin. IGRINS employs three HAWAII-2RG Focal Plane Array (H2RG FPA) detectors. We present the design and fabrication of the detector mount for the H2RG detector. The detector mount consists of a detector housing, an ASIC housing, a Field Flattener Lens (FFL) mount, and a support base frame. The detector and the ASIC housing should be kept at 65 K and the support base frame at 130 K. Therefore they are thermally isolated by the support made of GFRP material. The detector mount is designed so that it has features of fine adjusting the position of the detector surface in the optical axis and of fine adjusting yaw and pitch angles in order to utilize as an optical system alignment compensator. We optimized the structural stability and thermal characteristics of the mount design using computer-aided 3D modeling and finite element analysis. Based on the structural and thermal analysis, the designed detector mount meets an optical stability tolerance and system thermal requirements. Actual detector mount fabricated based on the design has been installed into the IGRINS cryostat and successfully passed a vacuum test and a cold test.

  18. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-04-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  19. SXI prototype mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this contract was to provide optomechanical engineering and fabrication support to the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) program in the areas of mirror, optical bench and camera assemblies of the telescope. The Center for Applied Optics (CAO) worked closely with the Optics and S&E technical staff of MSFC to develop and investigate the most viable and economical options for the design and fabrication of a number of parts for the various telescope assemblies. All the tasks under this delivery order have been successfully completed within budget and schedule. A number of development hardware parts have been designed and fabricated jointly by MSFC and UAH for the engineering model of SXI. The major parts include a nickel electroformed mirror and a mirror mount, plating and coating of the ceramic spacers, and gold plating of the contact rings and fingers for the camera assembly. An aluminum model of the high accuracy sun sensor (HASS) was also designed and fabricated. A number of fiber optic tapers for the camera assembly were also coated with indium tin oxide and phosphor for testing and evaluation by MSFC. A large number of the SXI optical bench parts were also redesigned and simplified for a prototype telescope. These parts include the forward and rear support flanges, front aperture plate, the graphite epoxy optical bench and a test fixture for the prototype telescope. More than fifty (50) drawings were generated for various components of the prototype telescope. Some of these parts were subsequently fabricated at UAH machine shop or at MSFC or by the outside contractors. UAH also provide technical support to MSFC staff for a number of preliminary and critical design reviews. These design reviews included PDR and CDR for the mirror assembly by United Technologies Optical Systems (UTOS), and the program quarterly reviews, and SXI PDR and CDR. UAH staff also regularly attended the monthly status reviews, and made a significant number of suggestions to improve

  20. Addition of a Decision Point in Evidence-Based Practice Process Steps to Distinguish EBP, Research and Quality Improvement Methodologies.

    PubMed

    Mick, JoAnn

    2015-06-01

    This column shares the best evidence-based strategies and innovative ideas on how to facilitate the learning of EBP principles and processes by clinicians as well as nursing and interprofessional students. Guidelines for submission are available at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1741--6787. PMID:25773966

  1. Adjustable Optical Mount Is More Rigid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Bill G.; Coombs, David S.; Jones, Irby W.; Moore, Alvah S., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Improved mount for lens or mirror in laser offers rigidity similar to that of nonadjustable optical mount. In comparison with older adjustable optical mounts, this one less susceptible to movements and distortions caused by vibrations and by thermal expansions and contractions. Mount contains neither adjustment rods (which grow or shrink as temperature varies) nor springs (which transmit vibrations to mounted optic).

  2. A Four-Step and Four-Criteria Approach for Evaluating Evidence of Dose Addition in Chemical Mixture Toxicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dose addition is the most frequently-used component-based approach for predicting dose response for a mixture of toxicologically-similar chemicals and for statistical evaluation of whether the mixture response is consistent with dose additivity and therefore predictable from the ...

  3. Solar panel parallel mounting configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mutschler, Jr., Edward Charles (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A spacecraft includes a plurality of solar panels interconnected with a power coupler and an electrically operated device to provide power to the device when the solar cells are insolated. The solar panels are subject to bending distortion when entering or leaving eclipse. Spacecraft attitude disturbances are reduced by mounting each of the solar panels to an elongated boom made from a material with a low coefficient of thermal expansion, so that the bending of one panel is not communicated to the next. The boom may be insulated to reduce its bending during changes in insolation. A particularly advantageous embodiment mounts each panel to the boom with a single mounting, which may be a hinge. The single mounting prevents transfer of bending moments from the panel to the boom.

  4. Kinematic high bandwidth mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1995-03-21

    An adjustable mirror mount system for a mirror is disclosed comprising a mirror support having a planar surface thereon, a mirror frame containing a mirror and having a planar surface behind the mirror facing the planar surface of the mirror support and parallel to the reflecting surface of the mirror and mounted pivotally to the mirror support at a point central to the frame, a first adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along one axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame; and a second adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along a second axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame and perpendicular to the first axis. 7 figures.

  5. Kinematic high bandwidth mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1995-01-01

    An adjustable mirror mount system for a mirror is disclosed comprising a mirror support having a planar surface thereon, a mirror frame containing a mirror and having a planar surface behind the mirror facing the planar surface of the mirror support and parallel to the reflecting surface of the mirror and mounted pivotally to the mirror support at a point central to the frame, a first adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along one axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame; and a second adjustment means between the mirror support and the mirror frame spaced from the central pivot mount for adjusting the movement of the mirror along a second axis lying in the plane of the planar surface of the mirror frame and perpendicular to the first axis.

  6. Evidence-Based Communication Practices for Children with Visual Impairments and Additional Disabilities: An Examination of Single-Subject Design Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Amy T.; Grimmett, Eric S.; Summers, Sharon

    2008-01-01

    This review examines practices for building effective communication strategies for children with visual impairments, including those with additional disabilities, that have been tested by single-subject design methodology. The authors found 30 studies that met the search criteria and grouped intervention strategies to align any evidence of the…

  7. Solderability of surface mount devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, Nanette S.

    1993-06-01

    As electronic products become much smaller, a limiting factor in the reduction of product size has been the size of the electronic components which make up the product. The leads of the current electronic components are inserted onto a printed circuit board through holes. Due to the use of wire leads, it becomes more difficult to decrease the size of the components. A new method was created to mount components directly to the surface of the printed circuit board. This new technique is surface mount technology. A concern over the use of this is experienced by the military. Since the leads are not inserted through the board and crimped before soldering as conventional components are mounted, there is some regard as to whether the components can be mounted securely to the board. Due to the high forces that many munitions experience when dispensed, it is imperative that the electronic components be soldered to the circuits boards so they will not slip out of place or fall from the board. The military also requires many munitions to lie dormant in storage warehouses for up to 20 years. When the munition is needed, it must perform reliably. Little work has been done to study the effects of this long-term storage on these surface mount devices, particularly on the ability of different soldering techniques used to attach surface mount components to printed circuit boards to withstand damaging effects of long-term storage.

  8. Adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems

    DOEpatents

    Hale, L.C.

    1997-07-01

    An adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems is disclosed. The adjustable link is a low-cost, passive device that provides backlash-free adjustment along its single constraint direction and flexural freedom in all other directions. The adjustable link comprises two spheres, two sockets in which the spheres are adjustable retain, and a connection link threadly connected at each end to the spheres, to provide a single direction of restraint and to adjust the length or distance between the sockets. Six such adjustable links provide for six degrees of freedom for mounting an instrument on a support. The adjustable link has applications in any machine or instrument requiring precision adjustment in six degrees of freedom, isolation from deformations of the supporting platform, and/or additional structural damping. The damping is accomplished by using a hollow connection link that contains an inner rod and a viscoelastic separation layer between the two. 3 figs.

  9. Adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems

    DOEpatents

    Hale, Layton C.

    1997-01-01

    An adjustable link for kinematic mounting systems. The adjustable link is a low-cost, passive device that provides backlash-free adjustment along its single constraint direction and flexural freedom in all other directions. The adjustable link comprises two spheres, two sockets in which the spheres are adjustable retain, and a connection link threadly connected at each end to the spheres, to provide a single direction of restraint and to adjust the length or distance between the sockets. Six such adjustable links provide for six degrees of freedom for mounting an instrument on a support. The adjustable link has applications in any machine or instrument requiring precision adjustment in six degrees of freedom, isolation from deformations of the supporting platform, and/or additional structural damping. The damping is accomplished by using a hollow connection link that contains an inner rod and a viscoelastic separation layer between the two.

  10. An Empirically Derived Approach to the Latent Structure of the Adult Attachment Interview: Additional Convergent and Discriminant Validity Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Haydon, Katherine C.; Roisman, Glenn I.; Marks, Michael J.; Fraley, R. Chris

    2011-01-01

    Building on studies examining the latent structure of attachment-related individual differences as assessed by the Adult Attachment Interview (AAI) via Principal Components Analysis, the current report further explores the validity of four AAI dimensions reported by Haydon, Roisman, and Burt (in press): dismissing states of mind, preoccupied states of mind, and inferred negative experience with maternal and paternal caregivers. Study 1 reports evidence of distinctive cognitive correlates of dismissing v. preoccupied states of mind with reaction time in an attachment Stroop task and the valence of endorsed self-descriptors, respectively. Study 2 replicates prior meta-analytic findings of generally trivial convergence between state of mind dimensions and self-reported avoidance and anxiety (i.e., Roisman, Holland, et al., 2007). Study 3 contrastively demonstrates moderate empirical overlap between inferred experience—but not state of mind—AAI scales and self-reported avoidance and anxiety when the latter were assessed at the level of specific caregivers. Taken together, these findings add to accumulating evidence that an empirically-driven approach to scaling adults on AAI dimensions (Haydon et al., in press; Roisman et al., 2007) aids in identifying theoretically anticipated and distinctive affective, behavioral, and cognitive correlates of dismissing versus preoccupied states of mind. PMID:21838649

  11. Design of infrared astronomical satellite /IRAS/ primary mirror mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreibman, M.; Young, P.

    1980-01-01

    The design of an operational mount to rigidly secure the primary mirror to its baseplate without the introduction of figure error always proves to be a major task on diffraction limited optical systems. A summary of the design of the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) primary mirror mount is given. The mirror was designed to be alligned and tested at room temperature and operated in a zero 'g' field at temperatures of 2K. To minimize overstressing, a stiffness requirement of greater than 150 Hz was required for cold launch and room temperature vibration acceptance testing. Additional isolation was required to minimize strains, introduced via the mounting base, due to thermal and mechanical distortions.

  12. Geochemical and mineralogical evidence for Sahara and Sahel dust additions to Quaternary soils on Lanzarote, eastern Canary Islands, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.; Skipp, G.; Prospero, J.M.; Patterson, D.; Bettis, E. Arthur, III

    2010-01-01

    Africa is the most important source of dust in the world today, and dust storms are frequent on the nearby Canary Islands. Previous workers have inferred that the Sahara is the most important source of dust to Canary Islands soils, with little contribution from the Sahel region. Soils overlying a late Quaternary basalt flow on Lanzarote, Canary Islands, contain, in addition to volcanic minerals, quartz and mica, exotic to the island's bedrock. Kaolinite in the soils also likely has an exotic origin. Trace-element geochemistry shows that the soils are derived from varying proportions of locally derived basalt and African dust. Major-element geochemistry, clay mineralogy and interpretation of satellite imagery suggest that dust additions to the Canary Islands come not only from the Sahara Desert, but also from the Sahel region. ?? Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  13. Behavioural response of adult sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) to predator and conspecific alarm cues: evidence of additive effects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Di Rocco, Richard T; Imre, Istvan; Johnson, Nicholas; Brown, Grant B

    2015-01-01

    Sea lampreys Petromyzon marinus, an invasive pest in the Upper Great Lakes, avoid odours that represent danger in their habitat. These odours include conspecific alarm cues and predator cues, like 2-phenylethylamine hydrochloride (PEA HCl), which is found in the urine of mammalian predators. Whether conspecific alarm cues and predator cues function additively or synergistically when mixed together is unknown. The objectives of this experimental study were to determine if the avoidance response of sea lamprey to PEA HCl is proportional to the concentration delivered, and if the avoidance response to the combination of a predator cue (PEA HCl) and sea lamprey alarm cue is additive. To accomplish the first objective, groups of ten sea lampreys were placed in an artificial stream channel and presented with stepwise concentrations of PEA HCl ranging from 5 × 10−8 to 5 × 10−10 M and a deionized water control. Sea lampreys exhibited an increase in their avoidance behaviour in response to increasing concentrations of PEA HCl. To accomplish the second objective, sea lampreys were exposed to PEA HCl, conspecific alarm cue and a combination of the two. Sea lampreys responded to the combination of predator cue and conspecific alarm cue in an additive manner.

  14. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2015-10-20

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  15. Solar panel truss mounting systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Al-Haddad, Tristan Farris; Cavieres, Andres; Gentry, Russell; Goodman, Joseph; Nolan, Wade; Pitelka, Taylor; Rahimzadeh, Keyan; Brooks, Bradley; Lohr, Joshua; Crooks, Ryan; Porges, Jamie; Rubin, Daniel

    2016-06-28

    An exemplary embodiment of the present invention provides a solar panel truss mounting system comprising a base and a truss assembly coupled to the base. The truss assembly comprises a first panel rail mount, second panel rail mount parallel to the first panel rail mount, base rail mount parallel to the first and second panel rail mounts, and a plurality of support members. A first portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first and second panel rail mounts. A second portion of the plurality of support members extends between the first panel rail mount and the base rail mount. A third portion of the plurality of support members extends between the second panel rail mount and the base rail mount. The system can further comprise a plurality of connectors for coupling a plurality of photovoltaic solar panels to the truss assembly.

  16. Additional evidence for a dual-strategy model of reasoning: Probabilistic reasoning is more invariant than reasoning about logical validity.

    PubMed

    Markovits, Henry; Brisson, Janie; de Chantal, Pier-Luc

    2015-11-01

    One of the major debates concerning the nature of inferential reasoning is between counterexample-based strategies such as mental model theory and the statistical strategies underlying probabilistic models. The dual-strategy model proposed by Verschueren, Schaeken, and d'Ydewalle (2005a, 2005b) suggests that people might have access to both kinds of strategies. One of the postulates of this approach is that statistical strategies correspond to low-cost, intuitive modes of evaluation, whereas counterexample strategies are higher-cost and more variable in use. We examined this hypothesis by using a deductive-updating paradigm. The results of Study 1 showed that individual differences in strategy use predict different levels of deductive updating on inferences about logical validity. Study 2 demonstrated no such variation when explicitly probabilistic inferences were examined. Study 3 showed that presenting updating problems with probabilistic inferences modified performance on subsequent problems using logical validity, whereas the opposite was not true. These results provide clear evidence that the processes used to make probabilistic inferences are less subject to variation than those used to make inferences of logical validity. PMID:26148720

  17. Stimulus modality and working memory performance in Greek children with reading disabilities: additional evidence for the pictorial superiority hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Constantinidou, Fofi; Evripidou, Christiana

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of stimulus presentation modality on working memory performance in children with reading disabilities (RD) and in typically developing children (TDC), all native speakers of Greek. It was hypothesized that the visual presentation of common objects would result in improved learning and recall performance as compared to the auditory presentation of stimuli. Twenty children, ages 10-12, diagnosed with RD were matched to 20 TDC age peers. The experimental tasks implemented a multitrial verbal learning paradigm incorporating three modalities: auditory, visual, and auditory plus visual. Significant group differences were noted on language, verbal and nonverbal memory, and measures of executive abilities. A mixed-model MANOVA indicated that children with RD had a slower learning curve and recalled fewer words than TDC across experimental modalities. Both groups of participants benefited from the visual presentation of objects; however, children with RD showed the greatest gains during this condition. In conclusion, working memory for common verbal items is impaired in children with RD; however, performance can be facilitated, and learning efficiency maximized, when information is presented visually. The results provide further evidence for the pictorial superiority hypothesis and the theory that pictorial presentation of verbal stimuli is adequate for dual coding. PMID:21942734

  18. Part mounting revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hannah, P.R.; Garcia, F.P.; Stewart, D.D.

    1992-10-01

    Having been involved with single point diamond turning since the 1960`s; I share with others of my age, a unique perspective of the craft. I am amazed at how the fundamentals seem to be forgotten or misplaced, and need to be re emphasized and re learned. Each new precision machine operator not only needs to re learn (many times the hard way), these fundamentals, but seems to inherit all the folklore; good and bad, from his predecessor. Let me explain. I spend some of my time as a consultant to the shops` division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, at which there are five precision turning machines divided between two buildings. The main shop area houses an old friction way (hydrodynamic) turning Machine. The base of this turning machine is made from the base of an old Moore measuring machine. The air bearing spindle, a ``Red Head`` was made by the Heald Machine Tool Co. With the addition of an Allen-Bradley Numerical control system, this machine has become a work horse, used primarily to make smooth flat surfaces in the fly-cutting mode. Recently, I became involved in the evaluation and repair of the machine as it no longer produced smooth surfaces. Smooth surfaces are not the point of this narrative, accurate geometry however is.

  19. Part mounting revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hannah, P.R.; Garcia, F.P.; Stewart, D.D.

    1992-01-01

    Having been involved with single point diamond turning since the 1960's; I share with others of my age, a unique perspective of the craft. I am amazed at how the fundamentals seem to be forgotten or misplaced, and need to be re emphasized and re learned. Each new precision machine operator not only needs to re learn (many times the hard way), these fundamentals, but seems to inherit all the folklore; good and bad, from his predecessor. Let me explain. I spend some of my time as a consultant to the shops' division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, at which there are five precision turning machines divided between two buildings. The main shop area houses an old friction way (hydrodynamic) turning Machine. The base of this turning machine is made from the base of an old Moore measuring machine. The air bearing spindle, a Red Head'' was made by the Heald Machine Tool Co. With the addition of an Allen-Bradley Numerical control system, this machine has become a work horse, used primarily to make smooth flat surfaces in the fly-cutting mode. Recently, I became involved in the evaluation and repair of the machine as it no longer produced smooth surfaces. Smooth surfaces are not the point of this narrative, accurate geometry however is.

  20. An improved instrument mounting arm.

    PubMed

    Gendeh, B S; Khalid, B A; Alberti, P W

    2001-02-01

    Although some form of commercial instrument mounting arm is available, a paucity of information in the literature may cause problems in selecting the most appropriate model for an ENT department wishing to trial their invention for use in the clinic or operating theatre. The instrument mounting arm described here is based on existing designs used by hobbyists and model makers for many years but the main benefit of this innovation is its multi-purpose use in the operating theatre and cost effectiveness since it is made of aluminum alloy. It is compact, stable and easily adjustable and can incorporate an endoscope holder or an operating end piece to mount various ENT instruments that offers considerable advantages to the unassisted operator. PMID:11320829

  1. VIBRATION DAMPING AND SHOCK MOUNT

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, D.J.; Forman, G.W.

    1963-12-10

    A shock absorbing mount in which vibrations are damped by an interference fit between relatively movable parts of the mount is described. A pair of generally cup-shaped parts or members have skirt portions disposed in an oppositely facing nesting relationship with the skirt of one member frictionally engaging the skirt of the other. The outermost skirt may be slotted to provide spring-like segments which embrace the inner skirt for effecting the interference fit. Belleville washers between the members provide yieldable support for a load carried by the mount. When a resonant frequency of vibration forces acting upon the moumt attains a certain level the kinetic energy of these forces is absorbed by sliding friction between the parts. (AEC)

  2. Less is often more, but not always: additional evidence that familiarity breeds contempt and a call for future research.

    PubMed

    Norton, Michael I; Frost, Jeana H; Ariely, Dan

    2013-12-01

    Ullrich, Krueger, Brod, and Groschupf (2013)-using a replication of the trait paradigm from Norton, Frost, and Ariely (2007)-suggest that less information does not always equal greater liking. We first ground the current debate in a larger historical debate in social psychology regarding the merits of configural versus algebraic models of person perception. We next review (a) related research that has suggested that more information can in some cases lead to more liking and (b) a large body of "real world" data-from friendships, daters, married couples, employment, celebrities, and politics-that suggests that more information often leads to less liking. We then provide an additional replication of our "less is more" effect, using a slight variation of the trait-list paradigm. The existing data suggest a need for further integrative explorations of when familiarity leads to contempt or liking or has no effect. PMID:24295381

  3. Phylogeny of the Heelwalkers (Insecta: Mantophasmatodea) based on mtDNA sequences, with evidence for additional taxa in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Damgaard, Jakob; Klass, Klaus-Dieter; Picker, Mike D; Buder, Gerda

    2008-05-01

    We examined the phylogeny of Mantophasmatodea from southern Africa (South Africa, Namibia) using approx. 1300 bp of mitochondrial DNA sequence data from the genes encoding COI and 16S. The taxon sample comprised multiple specimens from eight described species (Namaquaphasma ookiepense, Austrophasma rawsonvillense, A. caledonense, A. gansbaaiense, Lobatophasma redelinghuysense, Hemilobophasma montaguense, Karoophasma botterkloofense, K. biedouwense) and four undescribed species of Austrophasmatidae; three specimens of Sclerophasma paresisense (Mantophasmatidae); and two specimens of Praedatophasma maraisi and one of Tyrannophasma gladiator (not yet convincingly assigned to any family). For outgroup comparison a broad selection from hemimetabolous insect orders was included. Equally weighted parsimony analyses of the combined COI+16S data sets with gaps in 16S scored as a fifth character state supported Austrophasmatidae and all species and genera of Mantophasmatodea as being monophyletic. Most species were highly supported with 98-100% bootstrap/7-39 Bremer support (BS), but K. biedouwense had moderate support (87/4) and A. caledonense low support (70/1). Mantophasmatodea, Austrophasmatidae, and a clade Tyrannophasma gladiator+Praedatophasma maraisi were all strongly supported (99-100/12-25), while relationships among the two latter clades and Mantophasmatidae remain ambiguous. Concerning the relationships among genera of Austrophasmatidae, support values are moderately high for some nodes, but not significant for others. We additionally calculated the partitioned BS values of COI and 16S for all nodes in the strict consensus of the combined tree. COI and 16S are highly congruent at the species level as well as at the base of Mantophasmatodea, but congruence is poor for most intergeneric relationships. In forthcoming studies, deeper relationships in the order should be additionally explored by nuclear genes, such as 18S and 28S, for a reduced sample of specimens

  4. Oblique fault systems crossing the Seattle Basin: Geophysical evidence for additional shallow fault systems in the central Puget Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Chris G.; Keranen, Katie M.

    2012-03-01

    Upper plate seismicity in the Puget Lowland is more broadly distributed than mapped fault systems and presents a conundrum for understanding the active tectonics of the region. Although many previous studies have mapped faulting in the Puget Lowland from subsurface geophysical data, many of these efforts have focused specifically on mapping the structure of the Seattle Fault Zone and the South Whidbey Island Fault. The thick glacial sediments and extensive water bodies may conceal additional active faults away from these major structures. We map fault networks in Quaternary sediments broadly throughout the central Puget Lowland using existing marine multichannel seismic reflection data sets with widely distributed profiles to extend the results of previous work. We identify a NE-SW zone of recent high-angle faulting and shallow sediment deformation crossing the Seattle Uplift and the Seattle Basin that segments the Seattle Fault Zone and is distinct from previously mapped fault systems. Faults in this zone cut or deform sediments at the seafloor, and the zone trends across the central Puget Lowland at an oblique angle to major regional structures. Two additional zones of faulting trend NW-SE and cut through the Seattle Basin and the Kingston Arch, respectively. Aeromagnetic lineations extend the NE-SW trend of deformation across the Seattle Uplift and connect deformation of shallow sediment in the Puget Sound with deformation of shallow sediment in the Hood Canal. These oblique fault structures may partially control the wide distribution of seismicity within the central Puget Lowland and should be considered in seismic hazard assessments.

  5. Randomised Controlled Feasibility Trial of an Evidence-Informed Behavioural Intervention for Obese Adults with Additional Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Sniehotta, Falko F.; Dombrowski, Stephan U.; Avenell, Alison; Johnston, Marie; McDonald, Suzanne; Murchie, Peter; Ramsay, Craig R.; Robertson, Kim; Araujo-Soares, Vera

    2011-01-01

    Background Interventions for dietary and physical activity changes in obese adults may be less effective for participants with additional obesity-related risk factors and co-morbidities than for otherwise healthy individuals. This study aimed to test the feasibility and acceptability of the recruitment, allocation, measurement, retention and intervention procedures of a randomised controlled trial of an intervention to improve physical activity and dietary practices amongst obese adults with additional obesity related risk factors. Method Pilot single centre open-labelled outcome assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial of obese (Body Mass Index (BMI)≥30 kg/m2) adults (age≥18 y) with obesity related co-morbidities such as type 2 diabetes, impaired glucose tolerance or hypertension. Participants were randomly allocated to a manual-based group intervention or a leaflet control condition in accordance to a 2∶1 allocation ratio. Primary outcome was acceptability and feasibility of trial procedures, secondary outcomes included measures of body composition, physical activity, food intake and psychological process measures. Results Out of 806 potentially eligible individuals identified through list searches in two primary care general medical practices N = 81 participants (63% female; mean-age = 56.56(11.44); mean-BMI = 36.73(6.06)) with 2.35(1.47) co-morbidities were randomised. Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD) was the only significant predictor of providing consent to take part in the study (higher chances of consent for invitees with lower levels of deprivation). Participant flowcharts, qualitative and quantitative feedback suggested good acceptance and feasibility of intervention procedures but 34.6% of randomised participants were lost to follow-up due to overly high measurement burden and sub-optimal retention procedures. Participants in the intervention group showed positive trends for most psychological, behavioural and body

  6. Early Holocene human remains from the Argentinean Pampas: additional evidence for distinctive cranial morphology of early South Americans.

    PubMed

    Pucciarelli, Héctor M; Perez, S Ivan; Politis, Gustavo G

    2010-10-01

    The cranial morphology of Early Holocene American human samples is characterized by a long and narrow cranial vault, whereas more recent samples exhibit a shorter and wider cranial vault. Two hypotheses have been proposed to account for the morphological differences between early and late-American samples: (a) the migratory hypothesis that suggests that the morphological variation between early and late American samples was the result of a variable number of migratory waves; and (b) the local diversification hypothesis, that is, the morphological differences between early and late American samples were mainly generated by local, random (genetic drift), and nonrandom factors (selection and phenotypic plasticity). We present the first craniometric study of three early skulls from the Argentinean Pampas, dated ∼8,000 cal. years BP (Arroyo Seco 2, Chocorí, and La Tigra), and one associated with mega-faunal remains (Fontezuelas skull). In addition, we studied several Late Holocene samples. We show that the skulls from the Argentinean Pampas are morphologically similar to other Early Holocene American skulls (i.e., Lagoa Santa from Brazil, Tequendama, Checua, and Aguazuque from Colombia, Lauricocha from Peru, and early Mexicans) that exhibit long and narrow cranial vaults. These samples differ from the Late Holocene American samples that exhibit a shorter and wider cranial vault. Our results underscore the important differences in cranial morphology between early and late-American samples. However, we emphasize the need for further studies to discuss alternative hypotheses regarding such differences. PMID:20623674

  7. Arrest Histories of High-Risk Gay and Bisexual Men in Miami: Unexpected Additional Evidence For Syndemic Theory†

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven P.

    2009-01-01

    Gay and bisexual men continue to suffer the highest burden of HIV/AIDS in the U.S. Since the beginning of the epidemic, substance abuse has been shown to be one of the strongest predictors of sexual risk behaviors and seroconversion among this population. Recent research has focused on additional aspects of health risk disparities among gay and bisexual men, including depression and other mental health problems, childhood sexual abuse, and adult victimization, suggesting that these men are impacted by a syndemic of health risks. The involvement of gay and bisexual men with the criminal justice system is largely absent from the literature. This article describes the nature, extent and predictors of the arrest histories of a sample of gay and bisexual substance users at very high risk for HIV infection and/or transmission. These histories are surprisingly extensive, and are strongly associated with poverty, severe mental distress, substance abuse and dependence, and victimization. The involvement of gay and bisexual men in the criminal justice system deserves a stronger research focus because of the unique challenges facing such men and also because arrests are yet another marker for a host of health risks among them. PMID:19283955

  8. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  9. Shock Mounting for Heavy Machines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, A. R.

    1984-01-01

    Elastomeric bearings eliminate extraneous forces. Rocket thrust transmitted from motor to load cells via support that absorbs extraneous forces so they do not affect accuracy of thrust measurements. Adapter spoked cone fits over forward end of rocket motor. Shock mounting developed for rocket engines under test used as support for heavy machines, bridges, or towers.

  10. Cryogenically cooled detector pin mount

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Jr., William E; Chrisp, Michael P

    2014-06-03

    A focal plane assembly facilitates a molybdenum base plate being mounted to another plate made from aluminum. The molybdenum pin is an interference fit (press fit) in the aluminum base plate. An annular cut out area in the base plate forms two annular flexures.

  11. 36 Views of Mount Rainier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fortune, Tracy

    2011-01-01

    Look for ways to take students on virtual journeys to faraway places, and then connect the experience to something they can relate to on a more personal level. In this article, the author describes a block-printing unit inspired by Japanese printmaker, Katsushika Hokusai (1760-1849), and his series of art prints, "Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji."…

  12. Mount St. Mary's College. Exemplars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannozzi, Maria

    This report describes the efforts of Mount St. Mary's College (California) to extend the benefits of a strong, traditional baccalaureate program to an underserved population of women in an urban region, including substantial numbers of minority and first-generation college students. To help realize its service mission and increase access to…

  13. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oberbeck, V. R.; Farlow, N. H.; Fong, W.; Snetsinger, K. G.; Ferry, G. V.; Hayes, D. M.

    1982-01-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  14. Mount St. Helens aerosol evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Oberbeck, V.R.; Farlow, N.H.

    1982-08-01

    Stratospheric aerosol samples were collected using a wire impactor during the year following the eruption of Mount St. Helens. Analysis of samples shows that aerosol volume increased for 6 months due to gas-to-particle conversion and then decreased to background levels in the following 6 months.

  15. Habitat changes: Mount Haggin Wildlife Management Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frisina, M.R.; Keigley, R.B.

    2004-01-01

    In 1984, a rest-rotation grazing system was established on the Mount Haggin Wildlife Management Area (MHWMA) in southwest Montana. The area is a mixture of wet and dry meadow types, grass/shrublands, and forest. Prior to implementing the grazing system, photo-monitoring points were established on the MHWMA at locations were cattle concentrate were grazing. The area consists of a three pasture rest-rotation system incorporating 20,000 acres. Photo essays revealed changes in riparian, lowland, and upland sites within the grazing system. In addition, gross changes in the amount of willow present were documented.

  16. Angular Alignment Testing of Laser Mirror Mounts Under Temperature Cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bullock, K. T.; DeYoung, R. J.; Sandford, S. P.

    1997-01-01

    A number of commercial and custom-built laser mirror mounts were tested for angular alignment sensitivity during temperature cycling from room temperature (20 C) to 40 C. A Nd:YAG laser beam was reflected off a mirror that was held by the mount under test and was directed to a position-sensitive detector. Horizontal and vertical movement of the reflected beam was recorded, and the angular movement, as a function of temperature (coefficient of thermal tilt (CTT)) was calculated from these data. In addition, the amount of hysteresis in the movement after cycling from room temperature to 40 C and back was determined. All commercial mounts showed greater angular movement than the simpler National Aeronautics and Space Administration Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment (NASA LASE) custom mirror mounts.

  17. Helmet-Mounted Display Of Clouds Of Harmful Gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diner, Daniel B.; Barengoltz, Jack B.; Schober, Wayne R.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed helmet-mounted opto-electronic instrument provides real-time stereoscopic views of clouds of otherwise invisible toxic, explosive, and/or corrosive gas. Display semitransparent: images of clouds superimposed on scene ordinarily visible to wearer. Images give indications on sizes and concentrations of gas clouds and their locations in relation to other objects in scene. Instruments serve as safety devices for astronauts, emergency response crews, fire fighters, people cleaning up chemical spills, or anyone working near invisible hazardous gases. Similar instruments used as sensors in automated emergency response systems that activate safety equipment and emergency procedures. Both helmet-mounted and automated-sensor versions used at industrial sites, chemical plants, or anywhere dangerous and invisible or difficult-to-see gases present. In addition to helmet-mounted and automated-sensor versions, there could be hand-held version. In some industrial applications, desirable to mount instruments and use them similarly to parking-lot surveillance cameras.

  18. 15N electron nuclear double resonance of the primary donor cation radical P+.865 in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides: additional evidence for the dimer model.

    PubMed Central

    Lubitz, W; Isaacson, R A; Abresch, E C; Feher, G

    1984-01-01

    Four 15N hyperfine coupling constants, including signs, have been measured by electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) and electron nuclear nuclear triple resonance (TRIPLE) for the bacteriochlorophyll a radical cation, BChla+., in vitro and for the light-induced primary donor radical cation, P+.865, in reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. A comparison of the data shows that the hyperfine coupling constants have the same sign in both radicals and are, on the average, smaller by a factor of 2 in P+.865. These results provide additional evidence that P+.865 is a bacteriochlorophyll dimer and are in contradiction with the monomer structure of P+.865 recently proposed by O'Malley and Babcock. The reduction factors of the individual 15N couplings, together with the evidence from proton ENDOR data and molecular orbital calculations, indicate a dimer structure in which only two rings (either I and I or III and III) of the bacteriochlorophyll macrocycles overlap. PMID:6096857

  19. A passive vibration-cancelling isolation mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sykes, Alan O.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of an idealized passive vibration-cancelling two-terminal mount with one degree of freedom at each mechanical terminal isolating a nonrigid machine from a nonrigid foundation is presented. To evaluate a vibration-cancelling (VC) mount, its effectiveness as a function of frequency is compared with the effectiveness of both conventional and compound mounts isolating a rigid machine from a nonrigid foundation. The comparisons indicate that a carefully designed and manufactured VC mount should provide substantially greater vibration reduction at its cancellation frequency than either a conventional or compound mount having the same low frequency stiffness, i.e., stiffness at the natural frequency of the machine mount system.

  20. Sample mounts for microcrystal crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Robert E. (Inventor); Stum, Zachary (Inventor); O'Neill, Kevin (Inventor); Kmetko, Jan (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Sample mounts (10) for mounting microcrystals of biological macromolecules for X-ray crystallography are prepared by using patterned thin polyimide films (12) that have curvature imparted thereto, for example, by being attached to a curved outer surface of a small metal rod (16). The patterned film (12) preferably includes a tapered tip end (24) for holding a crystal. Preferably, a small sample aperture is disposed in the film for reception of the crystal. A second, larger aperture can also be provided that is connected to the sample aperture by a drainage channel, allowing removal of excess liquid and easier manipulation in viscous solutions. The curvature imparted to the film (12) increases the film's rigidity and allows a convenient scoop-like action for retrieving crystals. The polyimide contributes minimally to background and absorption, and can be treated to obtain desired hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity.

  1. Sample mounts for microcrystal crystallography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, Robert E. (Inventor); Stum, Zachary (Inventor); O'Neill, Kevin (Inventor); Kmetko, Jan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Sample mounts (10) for mounting microcrystals of biological macromolecules for X-ray crystallography are prepared by using patterned thin polyimide films (12) that have curvature imparted thereto, for example, by being attached to a curved outer surface of a small metal rod (16). The patterned film (12) preferably includes a tip end (24) for holding a crystal. Preferably, a small sample aperture is disposed in the film for reception of the crystal. A second, larger aperture can also be provided that is connected to the sample aperture by a drainage channel, allowing removal of excess liquid and easier manipulation in viscous solutions. The curvature imparted to the film (12) increases the film's rigidity and allows a convenient scoop-like action for retrieving crystals. The polyimide contributes minimally to background and absorption, and can be treated to obtain desired hydrophobicity or hydrophilicity.

  2. MOUNT JEFFERSON PRIMITIVE AREA, OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, George W.; Pattee, Eldon C.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral and reconnaissance geothermal surveys of the Mount Jefferson Primitive Area in the Cascade Range of Oregon indicate little likelihood that metallic or nonmetallic mineral or energy resources exist in the area. Several mining claims, presumably located for gold, are present, but analyses of samples from the claims failed to detect the presence of gold or other valuable metals. Rock for construction purposes is abundantly present, but better and more accessible deposits are available in adjacent areas.

  3. Twins Across the Pacific: A Comparison of Bezymianny Volcano, Russia and Mount St. Helens, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, W.

    2006-12-01

    Triggered sector collapse is a common event in the lifetime of a stratovolcano. Classic triggered edifice failures were observed in historic time both at Bezymianny Volcano, Russia and at Mount St. Helens, Washington providing an ideal opportunity for comparison. The volcanic behaviors associated with these eruptions and subsequent dome growth share many striking similarities, including morphology of the dome, despite compositional variations. Bezymianny volcano experienced a sector collapse and associated lateral blast on March 30, 1956. Immediately following, voluminous dome extrusion commenced, punctuated by minor explosive eruptions. Dome growth originated with the extrusion of intact blocks of andesite, forming a structure called the "Nautilus". Beginning in 1977, strong explosive eruptions were occasionally accompanied by lava flows near the top of the dome. Recently, dome growth has been accompanied by powerful plinian and sub-plinian eruptions occurring nearly bi-annually, the most recent having occurred on May 9, 2006. Compositions have become increasingly more mafic over time. A lateral blast and plinian eruption occurred at Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, approximately equivalent in landslide and tephra volume to the 1956 eruption of Bezymianny. Like Bezymianny, Mount St. Helens began dome extrusion coupled with minor eruptive activity immediately after the decompression event, but on a smaller volume scale. In addition, the dome at Mount St. Helens exhibited features called "Whalebacks" beginning in 2004, similar to the "Nautilus" seen at Bezymianny. Unlike Bezymianny, the dacitic composition of erupted materials has remained nearly constant or grown slightly more silicic with time and, as of August 2006, Mount St. Helens has not exhibited plinian or sub-plinian eruptions since 1980. Both volcanoes currently exhibit only very shallow seismicity, despite evidence that the magma is coming from much deeper sources. During the summer of 2006, two

  4. Mount Unzen kills three volcanologists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeVito, M. Catherine

    Three AGU members were among 37 people killed June 3 when Mount Unzen, a volcano in Nagasaki prefecture, Japan, erupted. Unzen last erupted in 1792. The first signs of renewed activity appeared in mid-1990, with increases in seismicity and the first volcanic tremor since observations began in 1966. The three volcanologists, Harry Glicken and Maurice and Katia Krafft, had traveled to Mount Unzen to monitor the increased seismic activity. Glicken, 33, was a visiting scientist at Tokyo Metropolitan University and an assistant researcher in geological sciences at the University of California, Santa Barbara. He worked for the U.S. Geological Survey until 1989, and narrowly escaped death in the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington.Glicken had been an AGU member since 1980 and was known for his work in debris avalanches. Maurice, 45, and Katia Krafft, 44, of Cernay, France, were professional volcanologists known for their extensive work in publishing books and films on volcanology for the general public. Both Kraffts joined AGU in 1975.

  5. Quaternary glaciation of Mount Everest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Lewis A.; Robinson, Ruth; Benn, Douglas I.; Finkel, Robert C.; Davis, Nicole K.; Yi, Chaolu; Putkonen, Jaakko; Li, Dewen; Murray, Andrew S.

    2009-07-01

    The Quaternary glacial history of the Rongbuk valley on the northern slopes of Mount Everest is examined using field mapping, geomorphic and sedimentological methods, and optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and 10Be terrestrial cosmogenic nuclide (TCN) dating. Six major sets of moraines are present representing significant glacier advances or still-stands. These date to >330 ka (Tingri moraine), >41 ka (Dzakar moraine), 24-27 ka (Jilong moraine), 14-17 ka (Rongbuk moraine), 8-2 ka (Samdupo moraines) and ˜1.6 ka (Xarlungnama moraine), and each is assigned to a distinct glacial stage named after the moraine. The Samdupo glacial stage is subdivided into Samdupo I (6.8-7.7 ka) and Samdupo II (˜2.4 ka). Comparison with OSL and TCN defined ages on moraines on the southern slopes of Mount Everest in the Khumbu Himal show that glaciations across the Everest massif were broadly synchronous. However, unlike the Khumbu Himal, no early Holocene glacier advance is recognized in the Rongbuk valley. This suggests that the Khumbu Himal may have received increased monsoon precipitation in the early Holocene to help increase positive glacier mass balances, while the Rongbuk valley was too sheltered to receive monsoon moisture during this time and glaciers could not advance. Comparison of equilibrium-line altitude depressions for glacial stages across Mount Everest reveals asymmetric patterns of glacier retreat that likely reflects greater glacier sensitivity to climate change on the northern slopes, possibly due to precipitation starvation.

  6. ATST telescope mount: telescope of machine tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffers, Paul; Stolz, Günter; Bonomi, Giovanni; Dreyer, Oliver; Kärcher, Hans

    2012-09-01

    The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, and will be able to provide the sharpest views ever taken of the solar surface. The telescope has a 4m aperture primary mirror, however due to the off axis nature of the optical layout, the telescope mount has proportions similar to an 8 meter class telescope. The technology normally used in this class of telescope is well understood in the telescope community and has been successfully implemented in numerous projects. The world of large machine tools has developed in a separate realm with similar levels of performance requirement but different boundary conditions. In addition the competitive nature of private industry has encouraged development and usage of more cost effective solutions both in initial capital cost and thru-life operating cost. Telescope mounts move relatively slowly with requirements for high stability under external environmental influences such as wind buffeting. Large machine tools operate under high speed requirements coupled with high application of force through the machine but with little or no external environmental influences. The benefits of these parallel development paths and the ATST system requirements are being combined in the ATST Telescope Mount Assembly (TMA). The process of balancing the system requirements with new technologies is based on the experience of the ATST project team, Ingersoll Machine Tools who are the main contractor for the TMA and MT Mechatronics who are their design subcontractors. This paper highlights a number of these proven technologies from the commercially driven machine tool world that are being introduced to the TMA design. Also the challenges of integrating and ensuring that the differences in application requirements are accounted for in the design are discussed.

  7. Mounting support for a photovoltaic module

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Gregory Michael; Barsun, Stephan K.; Coleman, Nathaniel T.; Zhou, Yin

    2013-03-26

    A mounting support for a photovoltaic module is described. The mounting support includes a foundation having an integrated wire-way ledge portion. A photovoltaic module support mechanism is coupled with the foundation.

  8. Evidence of Shared Genome-Wide Additive Genetic Effects on Interpersonal Trauma Exposure and Generalized Vulnerability to Drug Dependence in a Population of Substance Users.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Rohan H C; Nugent, Nicole R; Brick, Leslie A; Bidwell, Cinnamon L; McGeary, John E; Keller, Matthew C; Knopik, Valerie S

    2016-06-01

    Exposure to traumatic experiences is associated with an increased risk for drug dependence and poorer response to substance abuse treatment (Claus & Kindleberger, 2002; Jaycox, Ebener, Damesek, & Becker, 2004). Despite this evidence, the reasons for the observed associations of trauma and the general tendency to be dependent upon drugs of abuse remain unclear. Data (N = 2,596) from the Study of Addiction: Genetics and Environment were used to analyze (a) the degree to which commonly occurring single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; minor allele frequency > 1%) in the human genome explains exposure to interpersonal traumatic experiences, and (b) the extent to which additive genetic effects on trauma are shared with additive genetic effects on drug dependence. Our results suggested moderate additive genetic influences on interpersonal trauma, h(2) SNP-Interpersonal = .47, 95% confidence interval (CI) [.10, .85], that are partially shared with additive genetic effects on generalized vulnerability to drug dependence, h(2) SNP-DD = .36, 95% CI [.11, .61]; rG-SNP = .49, 95% CI [.02, .96]. Although the design/technique does not exclude the possibility that substance abuse causally increases risk for traumatic experiences (or vice versa), these findings raise the possibility that commonly occurring SNPs influence both the general tendency towards drug dependence and interpersonal trauma. PMID:27214850

  9. Holding fixture for metallographic mount polishing

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, C.H.; Cramer, C.E.

    1996-12-31

    A fixture for holding mounted specimens for polishing, having an arm; a body attached to one end of the arm, the body having at least one flange having an opening to accommodate a mounted specimen; and a means applying pressure against the outer surface of the mounted specimen to hold the specimen in contact with the polishing surface.

  10. Holding fixture for metallographic mount polishing

    DOEpatents

    Barth, C.H.; Cramer, C.E.

    1997-12-30

    A fixture is described for holding mounted specimens for polishing, having an arm; a body attached to one end of the arm, the body having at least one flange having an opening to accommodate a mounted specimen; and a means applying pressure against the outer surface of the mounted specimen to hold the specimen in contact with the polishing surface. 3 figs.

  11. Holding fixture for metallographic mount polishing

    DOEpatents

    Barth, Clyde H.; Cramer, Charles E.

    1997-01-01

    A fixture for holding mounted specimens for polishing, having an arm; a body attached to one end of the arm, the body having at least one flange having an opening to accommodate a mounted specimen; and a means applying pressure against the outer surface of the mounted specimen to hold the specimen in contact with the polishing surface.

  12. Experience with HEP analysis on mounted filesystems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Patrick; Gasthuber, Martin; Kemp, Yves; Ozerov, Dmitry

    2012-12-01

    We present results on different approaches on mounted filesystems in use or under investigation at DESY. dCache, established since long as a storage system for physics data has implemented the NFS v4.1/pNFS protocol. New performance results will be shown with the most current version of the dCache server. In addition to the native usage of the mounted filesystem in a LAN environment, the results are given for the performance of the dCache NFS v4.1/pNFS in WAN case. Several commercial vendors are currently in alpha or beta phase of adding the NFS v4.1/pNFS protocol to their storage appliances. We will test some of these vendor solutions for their readiness for HEP analysis. DESY has recently purchased an IBM Sonas system. We will present the result of a thorough performance evaluation using the native protocols NFS (v3 or v4) and GPFS. As the emphasis is on the usability for end user analysis, we will use latest ROOT versions and current end user analysis code for benchmark scenarios.

  13. Apollo Telescope Mount Thermal Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1970-01-01

    The Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) was designed and developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and served as the primary scientific instrument unit aboard Skylab (1973-1979). The ATM consisted of eight scientific instruments as well as a number of smaller experiments. This image is of the ATM thermal unit being tested in MSFC's building 4619. The thermal unit consisted of an active fluid-cooling system of water and methanol that was circulated to radiators on the outside of the canister. The thermal unit provided temperature stability to the ultrahigh resolution optical instruments that were part of the ATM.

  14. Lahars of Mount Pinatubo, Philippines

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Newhall, Christopher G.; Stauffer, Peter H.; Hendley, James W., II

    1997-01-01

    On June 15, 1991, Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines exploded in the second largest volcanic eruption on Earth this century. This eruption deposited more than 1 cubic mile (5 cubic kilometers) of volcanic ash and rock fragments on the volcano's slopes. Within hours, heavy rains began to wash this material down into the surrounding lowlands in giant, fast-moving mudflows called lahars. In the next four rainy seasons, lahars carried about half of the deposits off the volcano, causing even more destruction in the lowlands than the eruption itself.

  15. Evidence for the formation of an enamine species during aldol and Michael-type addition reactions promiscuously catalyzed by 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase.

    PubMed

    Poddar, Harshwardhan; Rahimi, Mehran; Geertsema, Edzard M; Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W H; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2015-03-23

    The enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), which has a catalytic N-terminal proline residue (Pro1), can promiscuously catalyze various carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, including aldol condensation of acetaldehyde with benzaldehyde to yield cinnamaldehyde, and Michael-type addition of acetaldehyde to a wide variety of nitroalkenes to yield valuable γ-nitroaldehydes. To gain insight into how 4-OT catalyzes these unnatural reactions, we carried out exchange studies in D2 O, and X-ray crystallography studies. The former established that H-D exchange within acetaldehyde is catalyzed by 4-OT and that the Pro1 residue is crucial for this activity. The latter showed that Pro1 of 4-OT had reacted with acetaldehyde to give an enamine species. These results provide evidence of the mechanism of the 4-OT-catalyzed aldol and Michael-type addition reactions in which acetaldehyde is activated for nucleophilic addition by Pro1-dependent formation of an enamine intermediate. PMID:25728471

  16. Nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure

    DOEpatents

    Faulder, Leslie J.; Frey, deceased, Gary A.; Nielsen, Engward W.; Ridler, Kenneth J.

    1997-01-01

    The present nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure configuration increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress between the mounting structure having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than that of the mounting structure. The mounting structure includes an outer sealing portion forming a cradling member in which an annular ring member is slidably positioned. The mounting structure further includes an inner mounting portion to which a hooked end of the nozzle and shroud assembly is attached. As the inner mounting portion expands and contracts, the nozzle and shroud assembly slidably moves within the outer sealing portion.

  17. Nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure

    DOEpatents

    Faulder, L.J.; Frey, G.A.; Nielsen, E.W.; Ridler, K.J.

    1997-08-05

    The present nozzle and shroud assembly mounting structure configuration increases component life and reduces maintenance by reducing internal stress between the mounting structure having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion and the nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than that of the mounting structure. The mounting structure includes an outer sealing portion forming a cradling member in which an annular ring member is slidably positioned. The mounting structure further includes an inner mounting portion to which a hooked end of the nozzle and shroud assembly is attached. As the inner mounting portion expands and contracts, the nozzle and shroud assembly slidably moves within the outer sealing portion. 3 figs.

  18. EXPERIMENTAL EVIDENCE FOR THE FORMATION OF HIGHLY SUPERHYDROGENATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS THROUGH H ATOM ADDITION AND THEIR CATALYTIC ROLE IN H{sub 2} FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Thrower, J. D.; Jorgensen, B.; Friis, E. E.; Baouche, S.; Luntz, A. C.; Andersen, M.; Hammer, B.; Hornekaer, L.; Mennella, V.

    2012-06-10

    Mass spectrometry measurements show the formation of highly superhydrogenated derivatives of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecule coronene through H atom addition reactions. The observed product mass distribution provides evidence also for abstraction reactions resulting in H{sub 2} formation, in agreement with recent IR measurements. Complementary density functional theory calculations confirm the stability of the observed superhydrogenated species toward spontaneous H and H{sub 2} loss indicating that abstraction reactions may be the dominant route to H{sub 2} formation involving neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The results indicate that highly superhydrogenated PAHs could well be formed and could act as efficient catalysts for H{sub 2} formation in the interstellar medium in low UV flux regions.

  19. Liver transplantation at Mount Sinai.

    PubMed

    Kim-Schluger, L; Florman, S S; Gondolesi, G; Emre, S; Sheiner, P A; Fishbein, T M; Schwartz, M E; Miller, C M

    2000-01-01

    Nearly 2000 liver transplants have been performed over the past 12 years at Mount Sinai, with a recent exponential growth in living donor surgeries. Living-donor liver transplantation has emerged as an important option for our patients with end-stage liver disease. We are only beginning to recognize fully the advantages that 'scheduled' liver transplantation can offer. In this era of severe cadaver organ shortages, living donation offers patients the option of liver replacement in a timely fashion, before life-threatening complications of hepatic failure and/or carcinoma progression prohibit transplantation. The next era of transplantation at Mount Sinai will bring significant increases in the number of transplants performed with living donors, with projections of over 50% of the total transplants each year expected to involve living donations. We are committed to offering this option while recognizing that donor safety remains paramount and cannot be overemphasized. Proper donor and recipient selection, as well as surgical experience are imperative to success with this technically demanding procedure. Recurrent disease after transplantation, particularly with hepatitis C, remains a challenge clinically. Further investigations into the pathogenesis of the rapid progression of recurrent hepatitis C need to be addressed. Living donor transplantation could be an important option for these patients and would allow timely transplantation and the potential for improved survival in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:11512318

  20. Side mount universal battery terminal

    SciTech Connect

    Byfield, D. Jr.

    1987-06-16

    An automobile battery is described of the type having side mounted, threaded bolt hole terminal connectors, battery cables having bored disc shaped terminals with peripheral insulating covers and, an improved terminal connector bolt adapted to accommodate the battery cable terminals and other electrical accessory terminals comprising: an elongated body of electrically conducting material having a longitudinal axis and an inner end and an outer end; a first generally cylindrical threaded stud formed on the inner end of the body. The first stud has a length and diameter disposed to permit thread engagement of the stud with one of the side mounted terminal connectors on the battery in electrical connection therewith, and pass through the bore in one of the battery cable terminals; a central portion on the body adjacent to and outwardly from the first stud, the central portion has a peripheral diameter greater than the first stud portion and has a first shoulder surface generally normal to the longitudinal axis of the body facing toward the inner end of the body and disposed to engage the face surface of one of the battery cable terminals in an electrically conducting relationship.

  1. Mount Rainier, a decade volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Kuehn, S.C.; Hooper, P.R. . Dept. of Geology); Eggers, A.E. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Mount Rainier, recently designated as a decade volcano, is a 14,410 foot landmark which towers over the heavily populated southern Puget Sound Lowland of Washington State. It last erupted in the mid-1800's and is an obvious threat to this area, yet Rainier has received little detailed study. Previous work has divided Rainier into two distinct pre-glacial eruptive episodes and one post-glacial eruptive episode. In a pilot project, the authors analyzed 253 well-located samples from the volcano for 27 major and trace elements. Their objective is to test the value of chemical compositions as a tool in mapping the stratigraphy and understanding the eruptive history of the volcano which they regard as prerequisite to determining the petrogenesis and potential hazard of the volcano. The preliminary data demonstrates that variation between flows is significantly greater than intra-flow variation -- a necessary condition for stratigraphic use. Numerous flows or groups of flows can be distinguished chemically. It is also apparent from the small variation in Zr abundances and considerable variation in such ratios as Ba/Nb that fractional crystallization plays a subordinate role to some form of mixing process in the origin of the Mount Rainier lavas.

  2. Diesel particulate trap mounting system

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, P.R.

    1992-01-21

    This patent describes a particulate trap assembly. It comprises an outer housing having a gas inlet and a gas outlet and a passageway interconnecting the gas inlet and the gas outlet; a particulate trapping means located within the passageway of the housing for trapping particles entrained in gas passing through the passageway, the passageway and the particulate trapping means having circumferential extents which fall within relatively large predetermined manufacturing tolerances respectively; tourniquet means surrounding the particulate trapping means for applying a predetermined radial pressure to the trapping means which is substantially independent of the circumferential extents of the passageway and the including an encircling element having a selectably adjustable circumferential extent for permitting the tourniquet means to conform to the circumferential extent of the particulate trapping means when mounted in compressive relationship about the particulate trapping means, and mounting means for retaining the particulate trapping means radially and axially within the passageway in a manner which imposes no further substantial radial compressive force to the particulate trapping means.

  3. Chytridiomycosis in frogs of Mount Gede Pangrango, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Kusrini, M D; Skerratt, L F; Garland, S; Berger, L; Endarwin, W

    2008-12-22

    Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) is a fungus recognised as one of the causes of global amphibian population declines. To assess its occurrence, we conducted PCR diagnostic assays of 147 swab samples, from 13 species of frogs from Mount Gede Pangrango National Park, Indonesia. Four swab samples, from Rhacophorus javanus, Rana chalconota, Leptobrachium hasseltii and Limnonectes microdiscus, were positive for Bd and had low to moderate levels of infection. The sample from L. hasseltii was from a tadpole with mouthpart deformities and infection was confirmed by histology and immunohistochemistry. An additional sample from Leptophryne cruentata showed a very low level of infection (< or = 1 zoospore equivalent). This is the first record of Bd in Indonesia and in Southeast Asia, dramatically extending the global distribution of Bd, with important consequences for international amphibian disease control, conservation and trade. Consistent with declines in amphibian populations caused by Bd in other parts of the world, evidence exists for the decline and possible extirpation of amphibian populations at high elevations and some decline with recovery of populations at lower elevations on this mountain. Therefore, it is essential to manage Bd in Indonesia where it is likely to be threatening amphibian populations. This will require a national strategy to mitigate the spread of Bd in Indonesia and neighboring countries as well as the impact of that spread. It is also important to collect information on the extent of the impact of Bd on frog populations in Indonesia. PMID:19244970

  4. Rack assembly for mounting solar modules

    DOEpatents

    Plaisted, Joshua Reed; West, Brian

    2012-09-04

    A rack assembly is provided for mounting solar modules over an underlying body. The rack assembly may include a plurality of rail structures that are arrangeable over the underlying body to form an overall perimeter for the rack assembly. One or more retention structures may be provided with the plurality of rail structures, where each retention structure is configured to support one or more solar modules at a given height above the underlying body. At least some of the plurality of rail structures are adapted to enable individual rail structures to be sealed over the underlying body so as to constrain air flow underneath the solar modules. Additionally, at least one of (i) one or more of the rail structures, or (ii) the one or more retention structures are adjustable so as to adapt the rack assembly to accommodate solar modules of varying forms or dimensions.

  5. Rack assembly for mounting solar modules

    DOEpatents

    Plaisted, Joshua Reed; West, Brian

    2014-06-10

    A rack assembly is provided for mounting solar modules over an underlying body. The rack assembly may include a plurality of rail structures that are arrangeable over the underlying body to form an overall perimeter for the rack assembly. One or more retention structures may be provided with the plurality of rail structures, where each retention structure is configured to support one or more solar modules at a given height above the underlying body. At least some of the plurality of rail structures are adapted to enable individual rail structures o be sealed over the underlying body so as to constrain air flow underneath the solar modules. Additionally, at least one of (i) one or more of the rail structures, or (ii) the one or more retention structures are adjustable so as to adapt the rack assembly to accommodate solar modules of varying forms or dimensions.

  6. Rack assembly for mounting solar modules

    DOEpatents

    Plaisted, Joshua Reed; West, Brian

    2010-12-28

    A rack assembly is provided for mounting solar modules over an underlying body. The rack assembly may include a plurality of rail structures that are arrangeable over the underlying body to form an overall perimeter for the rack assembly. One or more retention structures may be provided with the plurality of rail structures, where each retention structure is configured to support one or more solar modules at a given height above the underlying body. At least some of the plurality of rail structures are adapted to enable individual rail structures o be sealed over the underlying body so as to constrain air flow underneath the solar modules. Additionally, at least one of (i) one or more of the rail structures, or (ii) the one or more retention structures are adjustable so as to adapt the rack assembly to accommodate solar modules of varying forms or dimensions.

  7. Accurate Telescope Mount Positioning with MEMS Accelerometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, L.; Jaskó, A.; Pál, A.; Csépány, G.

    2014-08-01

    This paper describes the advantages and challenges of applying microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (MEMS accelerometers) in order to attain precise, accurate, and stateless positioning of telescope mounts. This provides a completely independent method from other forms of electronic, optical, mechanical or magnetic feedback or real-time astrometry. Our goal is to reach the subarcminute range which is considerably smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. Here we present how this subarcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors and we also detail how our procedures can be extended in order to attain even finer measurements. In addition, our paper discusses how can a complete system design be implemented in order to be a part of a telescope control system.

  8. A Ground Deformation Monitoring Approach to Understanding Magma Chamber Systems and Eruptive Cycles of Mount Cameroon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, S.; Clarke, A.

    2005-05-01

    Mount Cameroon is a 13,400ft basanite volcano on the passive margin of West Africa. It has erupted seven times in the past century making it one of the most active volcanoes in Africa. Most recently Mount Cameroon erupted in 1999 and 2000 first issuing strombolian explosions from vents near the summit, and later erupting effusively from a fissure running southwest from the summit (Suh et al., 2003). Prior to 2004, the only monitoring equipment on Mount Cameroon was a small seismometer network installed following the 1982 eruption. By 1999 only a single seismometer in the network was functional. Seismic activity did not rise above background levels until the few days immediately preceding the eruption. In an effort to raise awareness of the volcano's condition and provide a more efficient warning of impending eruptions we have begun constructing a ground deformation network on Mount Cameroon. The new network currently consists of two Applied Geomechanics 711-2A(4X) biaxial tiltmeters capable of resolving 0.1 microradians of tilt. One station is located approximately 500 m from the 2000 summit vent, and the other is approximately 1km away from the central fissure approximately 5km southwest of the 2000 summit vent. Three primary processes could precede eruptions at Mt. Cameroon, offering the opportunity for detection and prediction by our network. These processes are magma chamber pressurization, magma ascent via a central conduit, and/or propagation of magma along the central fissure. Magma chamber location, if a significant chamber exists, is poorly constrained, however, previous petrologic studies on Mount Cameroon (Suh et al., 2003; Fitton et al., 1983) suggest Mount Cameroon magmas originate at a depth less than 40km. Published seismic data (Ambeh, 1989) contains evidence of magmatic activity and possible chambers at depths ranging from 10km to 70km. Preliminary calculations using a simple Mogi model suggest deformation caused by pressurization of a large

  9. Anaglyph with Landsat Overlay, Mount Meru, Tanzania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mount Meru is an active volcano located just 70 kilometers (44 miles) west of Mount Kilimanjaro. It reaches 4,566 meters (14,978 feet) in height but has lost much of its bulk due to an eastward volcanic blast sometime in its distant past, perhaps similar to the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in Washington State in 1980. Mount Meru most recently had a minor eruption about a century ago. The several small cones and craters seen in the vicinity probably reflect numerous episodes of volcanic activity. Mount Meru is the topographic centerpiece of Arusha National Park, but Ngurdoto Crater to the east (image top) is also prominent. The fertile slopes of both volcanoes rise above the surrounding savanna and support a forest that hosts diverse wildlife, including nearly 400 species of birds, and also monkeys and leopards, while the floor of Ngurdoto Crater hosts herds of elephants and buffaloes.

    The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a digital elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space

  10. Mount St. Helens: the aftermath

    SciTech Connect

    Flaherty, D.C.

    1983-01-01

    During the May 18, 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens, ash fell over a 100,000 sq mile area to the east. The Idaho studies showed that, although the ashfall altered the food chains of some forest streams, within a year they fully recovered. The effects of ashfall on lake benthic organisms are still being assessed by sediment sampling. The Montana studies reported on snow avalanche models adapted to mudflows, trophic impact of ash deposits on Montana lakes, and the volcanic ash as nutrient subsidy to sub-alpine lakes. The Oregon studies reported herring and smelt egg and larvae damage due to suspended ash. The drainage patterns in eruption debris were studied along with the filling of Columbia River berths with ash.

  11. In Brief: Mount Wilson centennial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2008-11-01

    The 60-inch reflecting telescope at Mount Wilson Observatory, in southern California, which helped scientists measure the Milky Way and determine our solar system's position within it, celebrates its 100th anniversary in December. ``The 60-inch continued the Copernican Revolution by dethroning the Sun from the center of our galaxy,'' noted observatory director Harold McAlister. The telescope, with its silver-on-glass reflectors, also established the basic design for observatory telescopes on Earth. Capable of operating in several different optical configurations, the telescope was the first one built primarily for photographic and spectrographic use. With its 5-foot-diameter mirror, the telescope was the largest in the world until 1917. The telescope is retired from active science but is made available to groups for viewing astronomical objects. The observatory was founded by astronomer George Ellery Hale under the auspices of the Carnegie Institution of Washington. For more information, visit http://www.mtwilson.edu.

  12. 75 FR 14381 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Mount Airy, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ...This action proposes to amend Class E Airspace at Mount Airy, NC, to accommodate the additional airspace needed for the Standard Instrument Approach Procedures (SIAPs) developed for Mount Airy-Surry County Airport. This action enhances the safety and airspace management of Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) operations at the...

  13. Large-amplitude traveling ionospheric distrubance produced by the May 18, 1980, explosion of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, D.H.; Klobuchar, J.A.; Fougere, P.F.; Hendrickson, D.H.

    1982-08-01

    A remarkable long-lived, large-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (TID), excited by the May 18, 1980, explosion of Mount St. Helens, has been detected in total electron content monitor data. Oscillatory perturbations in the electron column density of the ionosphere with amplitudes about 10% of the nominal daytime content were detected at three stations whose ionospheric penetration points lie between 1610 and 1890 km from Mount St. Helens. Smaller perturbations were detected at five of six additional stations between 3760 and 4950 km away. The period of the TID increased linearly with great-circle distance from Mount St. Helens, ranging from roughly-equal37 min at the nearest station to roughly-equal116 min at the most distant one. The TID persisted for at least four cycles at the three close stations and three cycles at the more distant stations and was qualitatively similar to TID's produced by the low-altitude thermonuclear detonations of the 1960's. The disturbance front of this TID accelerated from an average velocity of roughly-equal350 m/s between Mt. St. Helens and the close stations to an average velocity of roughly-equal550 m/s to the more distant ones.A model based on the free wave response of an isothermal atmosphere to a point disturbance provides a good fit to the data at the three closest stations, but no such model can account for all of the data. Modeling of the long-distance behavior of the Mount St. Helens TID in terms of upper-atmosphere guided gravity waves is complicated by the requirement of exciting them by a ground-level explosion. There was no evidence for a strong supersonic shock wave in the ionosphere. As a result, the Mount St. Helens disturbance may prove to be a cleaner test of detailed theories of the point excitation and propagation of gravity waves in a realistic atmosphere than were TID's excited by thermonuclear weapons.

  14. Mounting and Alignment of IXO Mirror Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kai-Wing; Zhang, William; Evans, Tyler; McClelland, Ryan; Hong, Melinda; Mazzarella, James; Saha, Timo; Jalota, Lalit; Olsen, Lawrence; Byron, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    A suspension-mounting scheme is developed for the IXO (International X-ray Observatory) mirror segments in which the figure of the mirror segment is preserved in each stage of mounting. The mirror, first fixed on a thermally compatible strongback, is subsequently transported, aligned and transferred onto its mirror housing. In this paper, we shall outline the requirement, approaches, and recent progress of the suspension mount processes.

  15. Optical Mounts for Cryogenic Beam Splitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudman, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    Spring-loaded optical mounts maintain flatness and alinement of rigid, framed, or pellicle beam splitters over wide temperature range, despite differences in thermal expansion amoung materials. Mounts permit optical adjustments at ambient temperature even though optical system operated subsequently within few degrees of absolute zero. Mounts useful as holders for integrated-circuit master patterns, survey targets, vibrating membranes, noise- or pressure-sensing membranes, osmosis filters, and fuel-cell elements.

  16. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    SciTech Connect

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  17. Holographic center high-mounted stoplight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Ronald T.

    1991-07-01

    The holographic center high mounted stoplight achieves the required performance of a conventional center high mounted stoplight, but without the obstruction to the driver's view through the rear window. A lamp located in the roof illuminates a transmission image hologram mounted on the inner surface of the automobile rear window. The hologram strongly diffracts the incident light rearward but is transparent to the driver looking in his rearview mirror.

  18. Continuous monitoring of Mount St. Helens Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1980-01-01

    Day by day monitoring of the Mount St. Helens Volcano. These are four scenarios, very different scenarios, that can occur in a average week at Mount St. Helens. Ranging from eruptions of gas and to steam to eruptions of ash and pyroclastic flows to even calm days. This example of monitoring illustrates the differences from day to day volcanic activities at Mount St. Helens. 

  19. Bonded mounts for small cryogenic optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vukobratovich, Daniel; Fetterhoff, Ken A.; Myers, James R.; Wheelwright, Paul D.; Cunnington, George R.

    2000-11-01

    Adhesive bonded mounting of small optics for use at cryogenic temperatures provides improved heat transfer, low optical surface distortion, and reduced cost in comparison with conventional flexural mounts. A design methodology based on the thermo-elastic properties of the adhesive and its interaction with the mounted optic is presented. Key factors in the selection of the appropriate adhesive are high thermal conductivity, a low elastic modulus, a low glass-transition temperature, good adhesion characteristics to optic and substrate, and low outgassing. A design example of 17-mm diameter, 2-mm thick circular polycrystalline germanium window used at a temperature of below 100 K is discussed. During cooling at a rate of more than 3 K/sec the temperature at the center of the window mounted in this way lags behind the mount by no more than 20 K at any instant, and reaches equilibrium with the mount in about 50 sec. Maximum optical surface deformation of the mounted optic is less than 0.031 waves RMS differential (1 wave equals 633 nm) for a temperature change of 300 K to 102 K. Predicted peak tensile stress is less than 17 MPa. The adhesive bonded mount is also simple and economical in comparison with the complex flexural mounts often used for cryogenic optics.

  20. Hydrothermal processes at Mount Rainier, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Field studies and thermal-infrared mapping at Mount Rainier indicate areas of active hydrothermal alteration where excess surface heat flux is about 9 megawatts. Three representative settings include: (1) An extensive area (greater than 12,000 m/sup 2/) of heated ground and slightly acidic boiling-point fumaroles at 76-82/sup 0/C at East and West Craters on the volcano's summit; (2) A small area (less than 500 m/sup 2/) of heated ground and sub-boiling-point fumaroles at 55-60/sup 0/C on the upper flank at Disappointment Cleaver, and other probably similar areas at Willis Wall, Sunset Amphitheater, and the South Tahoma and Kautz headwalls; (3) Sulfate and carbon dioxide enriched thermal springs at 9-24/sup 0/C on the lower flank of the volcano in valley walls beside the Winthrop and Paradise Glaciers. In addition, chloride- and carbon dioxide-enriched thermal springs issue from thin sediments that overlie Tertiary rocks at, or somewhat beyond, the base of the volcanic edifice in valley bottoms of the Nisqually and Ohanapecosh Rivers where maximum spring temperatures are 19-25/sup 0/C, respectively, and where extensive travertine deposits have developed. The heat flow, distribution of thermal activity, and nature of alteration products indicate that a narrow, central hydrothermal system exists within Mount Rainier forming steam-heated snowmelt at the summit craters and localized leakage of steam-heated fluids within 2 kilometers of the summit. The lateral extent of the hydrothermal system is limited in that only sparse, neutral sulfate-enriched thermal water issues from the lower flank of the cone. Simulations of geochemical mass transfer suggest that the thermal springs may be derived from an acid sulfate-chloride parent fluid which has been neutralized by reaction with andesite and highly diluted with shallow ground water.

  1. Additional Evidence for Morpho-Dimensional Tooth Crown Variation in a New Indonesian H. erectus Sample from the Sangiran Dome (Central Java)

    PubMed Central

    Zanolli, Clément

    2013-01-01

    This contribution reports fifteen human fossil dental remains found during the last two decades in the Sangiran Dome area, in Central Java, Indonesia. Among this sample, only one of the specimens had already been briefly described, with the other fourteen remaining unreported. Seven of the fifteen isolated teeth were found in a secured stratigraphic context in the late Lower-early Middle Pleistocene Kabuh Formation. The remaining elements were surface finds which, based on coincidental sources of information, were inferred as coming from the Kabuh Formation. Mainly constituted of permanent molars, but also including one upper incisor and one upper premolar, this dental sample brings additional evidence for a marked degree of size variation and time-related structural reduction in Javanese H. erectus. This is notably expressed by a significant decrease of the mesiodistal diameter, frequently associated to the reduction or even loss of the lower molar distal cusp (hypoconulid) and to a more square occlusal outline. In addition to the hypoconulid reduction or loss, this new sample also exhibits a low frequency of the occlusal Y-groove pattern, with a dominance of the X and, to a lesser extent, of the+patterns. This combination is rare in the Lower and early Middle Pleistocene paleoanthropological record, including in the early Javanese dental assemblage from the Sangiran Dome. On the other hand, similar dental features are found in Chinese H. erectus and in H. heidelbergensis. As a whole, this new record confirms the complex nature of the intermittent exchanges that occurred between continental and insular Southeast Asia through the Pleistocene. PMID:23843996

  2. Additional evidence for morpho-dimensional tooth crown variation in a New Indonesian H. erectus sample from the Sangiran Dome (Central Java).

    PubMed

    Zanolli, Clément

    2013-01-01

    This contribution reports fifteen human fossil dental remains found during the last two decades in the Sangiran Dome area, in Central Java, Indonesia. Among this sample, only one of the specimens had already been briefly described, with the other fourteen remaining unreported. Seven of the fifteen isolated teeth were found in a secured stratigraphic context in the late Lower-early Middle Pleistocene Kabuh Formation. The remaining elements were surface finds which, based on coincidental sources of information, were inferred as coming from the Kabuh Formation. Mainly constituted of permanent molars, but also including one upper incisor and one upper premolar, this dental sample brings additional evidence for a marked degree of size variation and time-related structural reduction in Javanese H. erectus. This is notably expressed by a significant decrease of the mesiodistal diameter, frequently associated to the reduction or even loss of the lower molar distal cusp (hypoconulid) and to a more square occlusal outline. In addition to the hypoconulid reduction or loss, this new sample also exhibits a low frequency of the occlusal Y-groove pattern, with a dominance of the X and, to a lesser extent, of the+patterns. This combination is rare in the Lower and early Middle Pleistocene paleoanthropological record, including in the early Javanese dental assemblage from the Sangiran Dome. On the other hand, similar dental features are found in Chinese H. erectus and in H. heidelbergensis. As a whole, this new record confirms the complex nature of the intermittent exchanges that occurred between continental and insular Southeast Asia through the Pleistocene. PMID:23843996

  3. Mount Meager landslide flow history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, L.; Allstadt, K.; Mangeney, A.; Capdeville, Y.; Stutzmann, E.; Bouchut, F.

    2013-12-01

    Gravitational instabilities, such as landslides, avalanches, or debris flows, play a key role in erosional processes and represent one of the major natural hazards in mountainous, coastal, and volcanic regions. Despite the great amount of field, experimental and numerical work devoted to this problem, the understanding of the physical processes at work in gravitational flows is still an open issue, in particular due to the lack of observations relevant to their dynamics. In this context, the seismic signal generated by gravitational flows is a unique opportunity to obtain information on their dynamics. Indeed, as shown recently by Favreau et al., (2010), simulation of the seismic signal generated by landslides makes it possible to discriminate different flow scenarios and estimate rheological parameters. Global and regional seismic networks continuously record gravitational instabilities, so this new method will help gather new data on landslide behavior, particularly when combined with a landslide numerical modeling. Using this approach, we focus on the 6 August 2010 Mount Meager landslide: a 48.5 Mm3 rockslide-debris flow occurring in the Mount Meager Volcanic complex in the Southwest British Columbia. This landslide traveled over 12.7 km in just a few minutes time and was recorded by 25 broadband seismic stations. The time history of the forces exerted by the landslide on the ground surface was inverted from the seismic waveforms. The forcing history revealed the occurrence of a complicated initiation and showed features attributable to flow over a complicated path that included two sharp turns and runup at a valley wall barrier. To reliably interpret this signal and thus obtain detailed information about the dynamics of the landslide, we ran simulations for a range of scenarios by varying the coefficient of friction and the number, mass, and timings of subevents and compute the forces generated in each case. By comparing the results of these simulations to the

  4. Additional enhancer copies, with intact cdx binding sites, anteriorize Hoxa-7/lacZ expression in mouse embryos: evidence in keeping with an instructional cdx gradient.

    PubMed

    Gaunt, Stephen J; Cockley, Adam; Drage, Deborah

    2004-09-01

    Expression of a Hoxa-7/lacZ reporter construct in transgenic mouse embryos is shifted anteriorly when the upstream enhancer is multimerized. The shift occurs in spinal ganglia, neurectoderm and in both paraxial and lateral plate mesoderms. Much of the multimer effect is inhibited by destruction of a single caudal (cdx) binding motif in the additional copies of the enhancer. These observations are in agreement with earlier enhancer multimerization analyses made for Hoxb-8 (Charite et al., 1998). Our findings therefore provide further evidence that the anterior limit of a Hox gene's expression domain is normally dependent upon and is determined by, the dosage of transcription factor(s) which bind to its enhancer element(s) and that these factors may be, or must include, the cdx proteins. We consider these findings in terms of both instructional (morphogen-like) gradient and timing models for the establishment of Hox gene expression domains. Enhancer multimerization results in an earlier onset of Hoxa-7/lacZ activity in the embryo. In neurectoderm at 8.7 days and in mesoderm at 10.5 days, the anterior boundaries of expression are located posterior to those seen at some earlier stages of development. We discuss how these findings are in keeping with a model where Hox expression boundaries become set along instructional cdx gradients, formed by cdx decay in cells moving away from the primitive streak region. PMID:15470633

  5. Additional Evidence that Juvenile Oyster Disease Is Caused by a Member of the Roseobacter Group and Colonization of Nonaffected Animals by Stappia stellulata-Like Strains†

    PubMed Central

    Boettcher, Katherine J.; Barber, Bruce J.; Singer, John T.

    2000-01-01

    Juvenile oyster disease (JOD) causes significant annual mortalities of hatchery-produced Eastern oysters, Crassostrea virginica, cultured in the Northeast. We have reported that a novel species of the α-proteobacteria Roseobacter group (designated CVSP) was numerically dominant in JOD-affected animals sampled during the 1997 epizootic on the Damariscotta River, Maine. In this study we report the isolation of CVSP bacteria from JOD-affected oysters during three separate epizootics in 1998. These bacteria were not detected in nonaffected oysters at the enzootic site, nor in animals raised at a JOD-free site. Animals raised at the JOD enzootic site that were unaffected by JOD were stably and persistently colonized by Stappia stellulata-like strains. These isolates (designated M1) inhibited the growth of CVSP bacteria in a disk-diffusion assay and thus may have prevented colonization of these animals by CVSP bacteria in situ. Laboratory-maintained C. virginica injected with CVSP bacteria experienced statistically significant elevated mortalities compared to controls, and CVSP bacteria were recovered from these animals during the mortality events. Together, these results provide additional evidence that CVSP bacteria are the etiological agent of JOD. Further, there are no other descriptions of specific marine α-proteobacteria that have been successfully cultivated from a defined animal host. Thus, this system presents an opportunity to investigate both bacterial and host factors involved in the establishment of such associations and the role of the invertebrate host in the ecology of these marine α-proteobacteria. PMID:10966410

  6. Perspective View with Landsat Overlay, Mount Shasta, Calif.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The volcanic nature of Mount Shasta is clearly evident in this computer-generated perspective viewed from the northwest. At over 4,300 meters (14,000 feet), Mount Shasta is California's tallest volcano and part of the Cascade chain of volcanoes extending south from Washington. The twin summits of Shasta and Shastina tower over a lava flow on the flank of the volcano. Cutting across the lava flow is the bright line of a railroad. The bright area at the right edge is the town of Weed.

    This 3-D perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and an enhanced false-color Landsat 5 satellite image. Colors are from Landsat bands 3, 2, and 1 as red, green and blue, respectively. Topographic expression is exaggerated two times.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive.

    The Landsat Thematic Mapper image used here came from an online mosaic of Landsat images for the continental United States (http://mapus.jpl.nasa.gov), a part of NASA's Digital Earth effort.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space

  7. Structural considerations in designing magnetorheological fluid mounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, The; Ciocanel, Constantin; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2010-04-01

    Modern vehicles have been increasingly equipped with advanced technologies such as hybrid and cylinder-on-demand to enhance fuel efficiency. These technologies also come with vibration problems due to the switching between the power sources or the variation of the number of active cylinders. To mitigate these vibrations, a large variety of vibration isolators have been proposed, ranging from passive to active isolators. Semi-active mounts are often preferred to other solutions because of their overall low power requirement in operation as well as relatively simpler configurations. Among the semi-active categories, the magnetorheological fluid (MRF) mounts have been proven to be a viable solution for modern vehicle vibration isolation. These mounts can change their stiffness and damping characteristic without involving moving parts, by controlling the yield stress of the MRF housed inside the mount by means of magnetic field. This study looked into several innovative designs for MRF mounts. The characteristics of the mount depend significantly on the compliances of the rubber, the number and arrangement of the fluid chambers and the number of flow passages connecting the chambers. These parameters provide the designers with various options to design the mounts to function in various conditions and over a wide range of frequencies. Different values of the aforementioned parameters were selected to form specific designs with certain characteristics. Mathematical models have been developed for each design and MATLAB/Simulink was used to simulate the response of each mount to certain excitations. As the hydraulic and magnetorheological (MR) effects are dominant in the mount, the elastomer behavior is considered linear. A discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of each design, based on the simulated response, is presented. The outcomes of this study can be a useful reference for MRF mount designers and leads to the development of a general MRF mount design

  8. Helmet-Mounted Liquid-Crystal Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steve; Plough, Alan; Clarke, Robert; Mclean, William; Fournier, Joseph; Marmolejo, Jose A.

    1991-01-01

    Helmet-mounted binocular display provides text and images for almost any wearer; does not require fitting for most users. Accommodates users from smallest interpupillary distance to largest. Two liquid-crystal display units mounted in helmet. Images generated seen from any position head can assume inside helmet. Eyes directed to position for best viewing.

  9. Flexible pivot mount eliminates friction and hysteresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Highman, C. O.

    1970-01-01

    Flexible steel pivot mount, suspended by flat vertical beryllium copper springs, is capable of rotation, free of hysteresis and starting friction. Mount requires no lubrication, is made in varying sizes, and is driven with either dc torque motor or mechanical linkage.

  10. Sting-Mounted Flow Survey Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashby, G. C., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Flow survey instrumentation integral part of model support system. Drive motor, limit switches, and position transducer contained within streamlined housing and operable in near vacuum wing-tunnel environment. Sting-mounted system has advantages over conventional wall-mounted flow-field survey equipment, include more efficiently utilized run time, higher position accuracy, and fewer runs to map flow field.

  11. A flexible cruciform journal bearing mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, A. E.; Geiger, W. A.

    1973-01-01

    Flexible mount achieves low roll, pitch and yaw stiffnesses while maintaining high radial stiffness by holding bearing pad in fixed relationship to deep web cruciform member and holding this member in fixed relationship to bearing support. This mount has particular application in small, high performance gas turbines.

  12. Three-point spherical mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1990-01-01

    A three-point spherical mirror mount for use with lasers is disclosed. The improved mirror mount is adapted to provide a pivot ring having an outer surface with at least three spaced apart mating points to engage an inner spherical surface of a support housing.

  13. Three-point spherical mirror mount

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, R.W.

    1984-01-23

    A three-point spherical mirror mount for use with lasers is disclosed. The improved mirror mount is adapted to provide a pivot ring having an outer surface with at least three spaced apart mating points to engage an inner spherical surface of a support housing.

  14. Mm-wave power meter mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, D. L.; Oltmans, D. A.; Stelzried, C. T.

    1968-01-01

    E-band thermistor mount and a technique for adjusting a temperature compensating thermistor to provide an electrically balanced bridge are used for measuring RF power in the mm-wavelength. The mount is relatively insensitive to temperature effects that cause measurement errors in single ended circuits.

  15. A miniaturized pointing mount for Spacelab missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritz, C. G.; Howell, T., Jr.; Nicaise, P. D.; Parker, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A Miniaturized Pointing Mount (MPM) for Spacelab missions is defined and simulation results are described. This mount is proposed to complement the Spacelab Instrument Pointing System (IPS). It uses the same mount isolator concept as the Spacelab IPS but is much more efficient and economical for the accommodation of small shuttle payloads. The MPM is built from star tracker assemblies left over from the Apollo Telescope Mount program thereby assuring low cost and development risk. Simulation results indicate a high level of instrument stability can be expected. The short development time of the MPM would permit it to serve as a precursor to the Spacelab IPS for verifying critical new concepts such as the mount isolation and hold down mechanisms.

  16. Primary succession in Mount Pinatubo

    PubMed Central

    Marler, Thomas E; del Moral, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Vegetation structure on the east flank of Mount Pinatubo was investigated to determine the inventory of species at 15 y post-eruption, then to ascertain environmental variables that have influenced the early patterns of primary succession. Unconstrained and constrained ordination methods were used to determine the influence of spatial, elevation, and substrate patterns on vegetation. Vegetation was assigned to one of 3 habitat types. Scours were eroded flat surfaces, terraces were perched flat surfaces, and talus piles were created along the canyon edges as mass waste events. The influence of habitat type on vegetation was multifaceted because they represent different conditions and different histories. The talus piles have preferential access to colonists from the vegetation on the canyon walls above and a more benign microclimate than the exposed terrace and scour sites. Scoured sites on the valley floor exhibited the least vegetation cover, as these substrates had the least mature surfaces and the most restricted capacity for root exploration. Perched terraces exhibited greater plant dominance than did the other habitats in the early stages of succession because of the ubiquitous appearance of Parasponia rugosa as initial colonists on these relatively flat surfaces. Polynomial canonical correspondence analysis was more closely aligned with the pattern of vegetation than linear canonical correspondence analysis, and therefore more closely approximated accurate descriptions of correlations among site ordination positions and measured variables. These results confirm that a variety of statistical approaches can clarify applications for restoration ecology following landslide and volcanic disturbances or agriculture and forestry anthropogenic disturbances in the lowland tropics. PMID:24505499

  17. Drill cuttings mount formation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, Su Yean; Koh, Hock Lye

    2014-07-01

    Oil, Gas and Energy sector has been identified as an essential driving force in the Malaysian Economic Transformation Programs (ETP). Recently confirmed discovery of many offshore oil and gas deposits in Malaysian waters has ignited new confidence in this sector. However, this has also spurred intense interest on safeguarding the health and environment of coastal waters in Malaysia from adverse impact resulting from offshore oil and gas production operation. Offshore discharge of spent drilling mud and rock cuttings is the least expensive and simplest option to dispose of large volumes of drilling wastes. But this onsite offshore disposal may have adverse environmental impacts on the water column and the seabed. It may also pose occupational health hazards to the workers living in the offshore platforms. It is therefore important to model the transport and deposition of drilling mud and rock cuttings in the sea to enable proper assessment of their adverse impacts on the environment and the workers. Further, accumulation of drill particles on the seabed may impede proper operation of pipelines on the seabed. In this paper, we present an in-house application model TUNA-PT developed to cater to local oil and gas industry needs to simulate the dispersion and mount formation of drill cuttings by offshore oil and gas exploration and production platforms. Using available data on Malaysian coastal waters, simulation analyses project a pile formation on the seabed with a maximum height of about 1 m and pile radius of around 30 to 50 m. Simulated pile heights are not sensitive to the heights of release of the cuttings as the sensitivity has been mitigated by the depth of water.

  18. The Six Sigma initiative at Mount Sinai Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Chassin, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Lean Six Sigma, in various forms, has been used widely in many Fortune 500 companies. Motorola, General Electric, Sony, American Express, and Bechtel all use Six Sigma to improve quality and performance. While the impact of this methodology has been documented extensively by the press in manufacturing and transactional settings, less evidence is available regarding its utility in health care environments. Mount Sinai Medical Center initiated a Six Sigma program in 2000 to determine its applicability and value in a large academic medical center. This article discusses Mount Sinai Medical Center's experience adapting this methodology to improve both patient care and business processes and outcomes. We present an overview of Six Sigma, and offer examples of projects undertaken using this data-driven approach to performance improvement. Lastly, the article provides insights and lessons learned regarding this organization-wide experience. PMID:18306249

  19. JWST ISIM Primary Structure and Kinematic Mount Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartoszyk, Andrew; Carnahan, Tim; Hendricks, Steve; Kaprielian, Charles; Kuhn, Jonathan; Kunt, Cengiz

    2004-01-01

    In this presentation we will review the evolution of the ISIM primary structure tube topology and kinematic mount configuration to the current baseline concept. We will also show optimization procedures used and challenges resulting from complex joints under launch loads. Two additional key ISIM structure challenges of meeting thermal distortion and stability requirements and metal-composite bonded joint survivability at cryogenic temperatures are covered in other presentations.

  20. Decoupling analysis for a powertrain mounting system with a combination of hydraulic mounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jinfang; Chen, Wuwei; Huang, He

    2013-07-01

    The existing torque roll axis(TRA) decoupling theories for a powertrain mounting system assume that the stiffness and viscous damping properties are constant. However, real-life mounts exhibit considerable spectrally varying stiffness and damping characteristics, and the influence of the spectrally-varying properties of the hydraulic mounts on the powertrain system cannot be ignored. To overcome the deficiency, an analytical quasi-linear model of the hydraulic mount and the coupled properties of the powertrain and hydraulic mounts system are formulated. The influence of the hydraulic mounts on the TRA decoupling of a powertrain system is analytically examined in terms of eigensolutions, frequency, and impulse responses, and then a new analytical axiom is proposed based on the TRA decoupling indices. With the experimental setup of a fixed decoupler hydraulic mount in the context of non-resonant dynamic stiffness testing procedure, the quasi-linear model of the hydraulic mount is verified by comparing the predictions with the measurement. And the quasi-linear formulation of the coupled system is also verified by comparing the frequency responses with the numerical results obtained by the direct inversion method. Finally, the mounting system with a combination of hydraulic mounts is redesigned in terms of the stiffness, damping and mount locations by satisfying the new axiom. The frequency and time domain results of the redesigned system demonstrate that the torque roll axis of the redesigned powertrain mounting system is indeed decoupled in the presence of hydraulic mounts (given oscillating torque or impulsive torque excitation). The proposed research provides an important basis and method for the research on a powertrain system with spectrally-varying mount properties, especially for the TRA decoupling.

  1. Line spread functions of blazed off-plane gratings operated in the Littrow mounting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeRoo, Casey T.; McEntaffer, Randall L.; Miles, Drew M.; Peterson, Thomas J.; Marlowe, Hannah; Tutt, James H.; Donovan, Benjamin D.; Menz, Benedikt; Burwitz, Vadim; Hartner, Gisela; Allured, Ryan; Smith, Randall K.; Günther, Ramses; Yanson, Alex; Vacanti, Giuseppe; Ackermann, Marcelo

    2016-04-01

    Future soft x-ray (10 to 50 Å) spectroscopy missions require higher effective areas and resolutions to perform critical science that cannot be done by instruments on current missions. An x-ray grating spectrometer employing off-plane reflection gratings would be capable of meeting these performance criteria. Off-plane gratings with blazed groove facets operating in the Littrow mounting can be used to achieve excellent throughput into orders achieving high resolutions. We have fabricated two off-plane gratings with blazed groove profiles via a technique that uses commonly available microfabrication processes, is easily scaled for mass production, and yields gratings customized for a given mission architecture. Both fabricated gratings were tested in the Littrow mounting at the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE) PANTER x-ray test facility to assess their performance. The line spread functions of diffracted orders were measured, and a maximum resolution of 800±20 is reported. In addition, we also observe evidence of a blaze effect from measurements of relative efficiencies of the diffracted orders.

  2. Mount Shasta Wilderness study area, California

    SciTech Connect

    Christiansen, R.L.; Tuchek, E.T.

    1984-01-01

    The Mount Shasta Wilderness study area was surveyed in 1975. It lies wholly on the slopes and summit area of Mount Shasta and consists almost entirely of the products of geologically young volcanism. Small deposits of volcanic cinders and pumice are present. The volcanic system of Mount Shasta is judged to have probable resource potential for geothermal energy but that potential is least within the wilderness study area boundaries. Because any geothermal energy resource beneath the volcano would lie at considerable depths, exploration or development would be most likely at lower altitudes on the gentler slopes outside the study area.

  3. Two degree of freedom camera mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Robert O. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A two degree of freedom camera mount. The camera mount includes a socket, a ball, a first linkage and a second linkage. The socket includes an interior surface and an opening. The ball is positioned within an interior of the socket. The ball includes a coupling point for rotating the ball relative to the socket and an aperture for mounting a camera. The first and second linkages are rotatably connected to the socket and slidably connected to the coupling point of the ball. Rotation of the linkages with respect to the socket causes the ball to rotate with respect to the socket.

  4. Vibration dissipation mount for motors or the like

    DOEpatents

    Small, Thomas R.

    1987-01-01

    A vibration dissipation mount which permits the mounting of a motor, generator, or the like such that the rotatable shaft thereof passes through the mount and the mount permits the dissipation of self-induced and otherwise induced vibrations wherein the mount comprises a pair of plates having complementary concave and convex surfaces, a semi-resilient material being disposed therebetween.

  5. Flow Through Surface Mounted Continuous Slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tariq, A.; Ali, M. A.; Gad-El-Hak, M.

    2014-11-01

    Ribs are used inside certain gas-turbine blades as passive devices to enhance heat transfer. Slits in those ribs are utilized to control the primary shear layer. The role of secondary flow through a continuous slit behind a surface mounted rib is investigated herein in a rectangular duct using hotwire anemometry and particle image velocimetry. Changing the open-area-ratio and the slit's location within the rib dominate the observed shear layer. The behavior of discrete Fourier modes of the velocity fluctuations generated by different configurations is explored. Two distinct flow mechanisms are observed in the rib's wake. Both mechanisms are explained on the basis of large-scale spectral peak in the shear layer. The results show the successful impact of changing the open-area-ratio by manipulating the small-scale vortices at the leeward corner of the rib, which is suspected to be the potential cause of surface ``hot spots'' in a variety of engineering devices with heat transfer. Eventually, the size and location of the slit are seen to be an additional parameter that can be used to control the fluid flow structures behind rib turbulators.

  6. Examiner's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, Naohiro; Niwayama, Masatsugu

    2014-06-01

    The best way to assess fetal condition is to observe the oxygen status of the fetus (as well as to assess the condition of infants, children, and adults). Previously, several fetal oximeters have been developed; however, no instrument has been utilized in clinical practice because of the low-capturing rate of the fetal oxygen saturation. To overcome the problem, we developed a doctor's finger-mounted fetal tissue oximeter, whose sensor volume is one hundredth of the conventional one. Additionally, we prepared transparent gloves. The calculation algorithm of the hemoglobin concentration was derived from the light propagation analysis based on the transport theory. We measured neonatal and fetal oxygen saturation (StO2) with the new tissue oximeter. Neonatal StO was measured at any position of the head regardless of amount of hair. Neonatal StO was found to be around 77%. Fetal StO was detected in every position of the fetal head during labor regardless of the presence of labor pain. Fetal StO without labor pain was around 70% in the first stage of labor and around 60% in the second stage of labor. We concluded that our new concept of fetal tissue oximetry would be useful for detecting fetal StO in any condition of the fetus.

  7. Helmet-Mounted Display Design Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, Richard L.; Greeley, Kevin W.

    1997-01-01

    Helmet Mounted Displays (HMDs) present flight, navigation, and weapon information in the pilot's line of sight. The HMD was developed to allow the pilot to retain aircraft and weapon information while looking off boresight. This document reviews current state of the art in HMDs and presents a design guide for the HMD engineer in identifying several critical HMD issues: symbol stabilization, inadequate definitions, undefined symbol drive laws, helmet considerations, and Field Of View (FOV) vs. resolution tradeoff requirements. In particular, display latency is a key issue for HMDs. In addition to requiring further experimental studies, it impacts the definition and control law issues. Symbol stabilization is also critical. In the case of the Apache helicopter, the lack of compensation for pilot head motion creates excessive workload during hovering and Nap Of the Earth (NOE) flight. This translates into excessive training requirements. There is no agreed upon set of definitions or descriptions for how HMD symbols are driven to compensate for pilot head motion. A set of definitions is proposed to address this. There are several specific areas where simulation and flight experiments are needed: development of hover and NOE symbologies which compensate for pilot head movement; display latency and sampling, and the tradeoff between FOV, sensor resolution and symbology.

  8. Strain Gauges Mounted To Retain Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Barry L.

    1993-01-01

    Silicon-based semiconductor strain gauges mounted in such way they retain original calibration for several years instead of few months. Improvement effected by bonding gauges to ceramic substrates with glasses instead of epoxies as adhesives.

  9. High frequency testing of rubber mounts.

    PubMed

    Vahdati, Nader; Saunders, L Ken Lauderbaugh

    2002-04-01

    Rubber and fluid-filled rubber engine mounts are commonly used in automotive and aerospace applications to provide reduced cabin noise and vibration, and/or motion accommodations. In certain applications, the rubber mount may operate at frequencies as high as 5000 Hz. Therefore, dynamic stiffness of the mount needs to be known in this frequency range. Commercial high frequency test machines are practically nonexistent, and the best high frequency test machine on the market is only capable of frequencies as high as 1000 Hz. In this paper, a high frequency test machine is described that allows test engineers to study the high frequency performance of rubber mounts at frequencies up to 5000 Hz. PMID:12071247

  10. Microgravity isolation mounts based upon Piezoelectric film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonflotow, Andreas

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) actuator; a semi-active soft mount; a 3-axis experiment; low frequency disturbance attenuation; the control problem; and a 6-axis laboratory prototype.

  11. Apollo Telescope Mount of Skylab: an overview.

    PubMed

    Tousey, R

    1977-04-01

    This introductory paper describes Skylab and the course of events that led to this complex space project. In particular it covers the Apollo Telescope Mount and its instruments and the method of operation of the ATM mission. PMID:20168601

  12. A magneto-rheological fluid mount featuring squeeze mode: analysis and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peng; Bai, Xian-Xu; Qian, Li-Jun; Choi, Seung-Bok

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a mathematical model for a new semi-active vehicle engine mount utilizing magneto-rheological (MR) fluids in squeeze mode (MR mount in short) and validates the model by comparing analysis results with experimental tests. The proposed MR mount is mainly comprised of a frame for installation, a main rubber, a squeeze plate and a bobbin for coil winding. When the magnetic fields on, MR effect occurs in the upper gap between the squeeze plate and the bobbin, and the dynamic stiffness can be controlled by tuning the applied currents. Employing Bingham model and flow properties between parallel plates of MR fluids, a mathematical model for the squeeze type of MR mount is formulated with consideration of the fluid inertia, MR effect and hysteresis property. The field-dependent dynamic stiffness of the MR mount is then analyzed using the established mathematical model. Subsequently, in order to validate the mathematical model, an appropriate size of MR mount is fabricated and tested. The field-dependent force and dynamic stiffness of the proposed MR mount are evaluated and compared between the model and experimental tests in both time and frequency domains to verify the model efficiency. In addition, it is shown that both the damping property and the stiffness property of the proposed MR mount can be simultaneously controlled.

  13. Mount Rainier: living with perilous beauty

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Kevin M.; Wolfe, Edward W.; Driedger, Carolyn L.

    1998-01-01

    Mount Rainier is an active volcano reaching more than 2.7 miles (14,410 feet) above sea level. Its majestic edifice looms over expanding suburbs in the valleys that lead to nearby Puget Sound. USGS research over the last several decades indicates that Mount Rainier has been the source of many volcanic mudflows (lahars) that buried areas now densely populated. Now the USGS is working cooperatively with local communities to help people live more safely with the volcano.

  14. Model mount system for testing flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, M. G. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A wind tunnel model mount system is disclosed for effectively and accurately determining the effects of attack and airstream velocity on a model airfoil or aircraft. The model mount system includes a rigid model attached to a splitter plate which is supported away from the wind tunnel wall several of flexible rods. Conventional instrumentation is employed to effect model rotation through a turntable and to record model flutter data as a function of the angle of attack versus dynamic pressure.

  15. Raster graphic helmet-mounted display study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beamon, William S.; Moran, Susanna I.

    1990-01-01

    A design of a helmet mounted display system is presented, including a design specification and development plan for the selected design approach. The requirements for the helmet mounted display system and a survey of applicable technologies are presented. Three helmet display concepts are then described which utilize lasers, liquid crystal display's (LCD's), and subminiature cathode ray tubes (CRT's), respectively. The laser approach is further developed in a design specification and a development plan.

  16. Motorized control for mirror mount apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.

    1989-01-01

    A motorized control and automatic braking system for adjusting mirror mount apparatus is disclosed. The motor control includes a planetary gear arrangement to provide improved pitch adjustment capability while permitting a small packaged design. The motor control for mirror mount adjustment is suitable for laser beam propagation applications. The brake is a system of constant contact, floating detents which engage the planetary gear at selected between-teeth increments to stop rotation instantaneously when the drive motor stops.

  17. Secondary prevention of HAPE in a Mount Everest summiteer.

    PubMed

    Dunin-Bell, Ola; Boyle, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Climbers who have suffered a previous episode of high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) are at significantly increased risk of developing it again on return to high altitude. In spite of the high mortality associated with HAPE, some climbers are willing to take this risk in order to summit the tallest mountains in the world. This is a case report of a climber who suffered an episode of HAPE partway up Mount Everest. He was determined to complete his summit attempt that same climbing season, which would involve a return to extreme altitude less than 3 weeks following recovery. Based on experimental evidence suggesting that sildenafil, salmeterol, and acetazolamide may have therapeutic value for both the prevention and treatment of HAPE, he used these medications for secondary prevention. He was able to successfully reach the summit of Mount Everest and return to base camp without any evidence of recurrence of pulmonary edema. This provides clinical evidence that medication can be used to increase the safety margin for HAPE-susceptible individuals traveling to extremely high altitudes. PMID:19775220

  18. A study of the TCAS 2 collision avoidance system mounted on a Boeing 737 aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grandchamp, B.; Burnside, W. D.; Rojas, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to determine the effects of scattering from major aircraft structures on the TCAS 2 collision avoidance system mounted on a Boeing 737. It is found that the major source of scattering for angles of observation above the horizon is the vertical stabilizer and that its effect may be greatly reduced by mounting the TCAS 2 array close to the nose of the aircraft. In addition, by mounting the array close to the nose, the effects of fuselage blockage on the array patterns at elevation angles below the horizon may be greatly reduced in the forward direction.

  19. Critical testing for helmet-mounted displays: a tracking system accuracy test for the joint helmet mounted cueing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, Adam P.

    2012-06-01

    Helmet mounted displays have not been supported with adequate methods and materials to validate and verify the performance of the underlying tracking systems when tested in a simulated or operational environment. Like most electronic systems on aircraft, HMDs evolve over the lifecycle of the system due to requirements changes or diminishing manufacturing sources. Hardware and software bugs are often introduced as the design evolves and it is necessary to revalidate a systems performance attributes over the course of these design changes. An on-aircraft test has been developed and refined to address this testing gap for the Joint Helmet Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS) on F-16 aircraft. This test can be readily ported to other aircraft systems which employ the JHMCS, and has already been ported to the F-18. Additionally, this test method could provide an added value in the testing of any HMD that requires accurate cueing, whether used on fixed or rotary wing aircraft.

  20. Mount control system for the CFGT telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinqi; Dong, Zhiming; Zhou, Wangping

    2006-06-01

    The concept for Chinese Future Giant Telescope (CFGT) with 30-m aperture has been around for several years, although the requirements for control system are still far from completed and conclusive at this stage. Since the project was proposed more study on a number of key issues relevant to the control system has been conducted. In particular the mount control system for the giant telescope has been put forward under exploration. With our ongoing 4-m LAMOST telescope just underwent a successful mount drive test the LAMOST control group has become more knowledgeable with hands on experience that would be quite useful for mount drive design of even large telescope. This paper focuses on the mount control system design for CFGT telescope in general. Particular aspects such as the effect of large moment of inertia with ultra low-speed and multi-disturbance are included. Friction drive is opted for both historical and economical reasons. Drive stiffness and servo control parameters optimization are discussed based on the workshop test with LAMOST mount that could possibly be mapped to CFGT.

  1. Modal analysis of gear housing and mounts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Teik C.; Singh, RAJ.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    1989-01-01

    Dynamic finite element analysis of a real gear housing is presented. The analysis was conducted for the housing without the rotating components (gears, shafts, and bearings). Both rigid and flexible mounting conditions for the gear housing are considered in this analysis. The flexible support simulates the realistic mounting condition on a rotorcraft, and the rigid one is analyzed for comparison purposes. The effect of gear housing stiffeners is also evaluated. The results indicate that the first six natural modes of the flexibly mounted gear housing in the 0 to 200 Hz range correspond to the translational and rotational rigid body vibration modes of the housing. Above this range, the housing plate elastic modes begin to occur. In the case of the rigid mount, only the housing plate elastic modes are observed which are verified by modal analysis experiments. Parametric studies show that the housing plate stiffeners and rigid mounts tend to increase most of the natural frequencies, the lower ones being affected the most.

  2. Digital Data for Volcano Hazards in the Mount Jefferson Region, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schilling, S.P.; Doelger, S.; Walder, J.S.; Gardner, C.A.; Conrey, R.M.; Fisher, B.J.

    2008-01-01

    Mount Jefferson has erupted repeatedly for hundreds of thousands of years, with its last eruptive episode during the last major glaciation which culminated about 15,000 years ago. Geologic evidence shows that Mount Jefferson is capable of large explosive eruptions. The largest such eruption occurred between 35,000 and 100,000 years ago. If Mount Jefferson erupts again, areas close to the eruptive vent will be severely affected, and even areas tens of kilometers (tens of miles) downstream along river valleys or hundreds of kilometers (hundreds of miles) downwind may be at risk. Numerous small volcanoes occupy the area between Mount Jefferson and Mount Hood to the north, and between Mount Jefferson and the Three Sisters region to the south. These small volcanoes tend not to pose the far-reaching hazards associated with Mount Jefferson, but are nonetheless locally important. A concern at Mount Jefferson, but not at the smaller volcanoes, is the possibility that small-to-moderate sized landslides could occur even during periods of no volcanic activity. Such landslides may transform as they move into lahars (watery flows of rock, mud, and debris) that can inundate areas far downstream. The geographic information system (GIS) volcano hazard data layer used to produce the Mount Jefferson volcano hazard map in USGS Open-File Report 99-24 (Walder and others, 1999) is included in this data set. Both proximal and distal hazard zones were delineated by scientists at the Cascades Volcano Observatory and depict various volcano hazard areas around the mountain.

  3. The January 2006 Volcanic-Tectonic Earthquake Swarm at Mount Martin, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Power, John A.

    2009-01-01

    On January 8, 2006, a swarm of volcanic-tectonic earthquakes began beneath Mount Martin at the southern end of the Katmai volcanic cluster. This was the first recorded swarm at Mount Martin since continuous seismic monitoring began in 1996. The number of located earthquakes increased during the next four days, reaching a peak on January 11. For the next two days, the seismic activity decreased, and on January 14, the number of events increased to twice the previous day's total. Following this increase in activity, seismicity declined, returning to background levels by the end of the month. The Alaska Volcano Observatory located 860 earthquakes near Mount Martin during January 2006. No additional signs of volcanic unrest were noted in association with this earthquake swarm. The earthquakes in the Mount Martin swarm, relocated using the double difference technique, formed an elongated cluster dipping to the southwest. Focal mechanisms beneath Mount Martin show a mix of normal, thrust, and strike-slip solutions, with normal focal mechanisms dominating. For earthquakes more than 1 km from Mount Martin, all focal mechanisms showed normal faulting. The calculated b-value for the Mount Martin swarm is 0.98 and showed no significant change before, during, or after the swarm. The triggering mechanism for the Mount Martin swarm is unknown. The time-history of earthquake occurrence is indicative of a volcanic cause; however, there were no low-frequency events or observations, such as increased steaming associated with the swarm. During the swarm, there was no change in the b-value, and the distribution and type of focal mechanisms were similar to those in the period before the anomalous activity. The short duration of the swarm, the similarity in observed focal mechanisms, and the lack of additional signs of unrest suggest this swarm did not result from a large influx of magma within the shallow crust beneath Mount Martin.

  4. Optimal design of high damping force engine mount featuring MR valve structure with both annular and radial flow paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Q. H.; Choi, S. B.; Lee, Y. S.; Han, M. S.

    2013-11-01

    This paper focuses on the optimal design of a compact and high damping force engine mount featuring magnetorheological fluid (MRF). In the mount, a MR valve structure with both annular and radial flows is employed to generate a high damping force. First, the configuration and working principle of the proposed MR mount is introduced. The MRF flows in the mount are then analyzed and the governing equations of the MR mount are derived based on the Bingham plastic behavior of the MRF. An optimal design of the MR mount is then performed to find the optimal structure of the MR valve to generate a maximum damping force with certain design constraints. In addition, the gap size of MRF ducts is empirically chosen considering the ‘lockup’ problem of the mount at high frequency. Performance of the optimized MR mount is then evaluated based on finite element analysis and discussions on performance results of the optimized MR mount are given. The effectiveness of the proposed MR engine mount is demonstrated via computer simulation by presenting damping force and power consumption.

  5. Mounting system for optical frequency reference cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Notcutt, Mark (Inventor); Hall, John L. (Inventor); Ma, Long-Sheng (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A technique for reducing the vibration sensitivity of laser-stabilizing optical reference cavities is based upon an improved design and mounting method for the cavity, wherein the cavity is mounted vertically. It is suspended at one plane, around the spacer cylinder, equidistant from the mirror ends of the cavity. The suspension element is a collar of an extremely low thermal expansion coefficient material, which surrounds the spacer cylinder and contacts it uniformly. Once the collar has been properly located, it is cemented in place so that the spacer cylinder is uniformly supported and does not have to be squeezed at all. The collar also includes a number of cavities partially bored into its lower flat surface, around the axial bore. These cavities are support points, into which mounting base pins will be inserted. Hence the collar is supported at a minimum of three points.

  6. Whole-mount immunoelectron tomography of chromosomes and cells.

    PubMed

    Engelhardt, Peter; Meriläinen, Jari; Zhao, Fang; Uchiyama, Susumu; Fukui, Kiichi; Lehto, Veli-Pekka

    2007-01-01

    Standard immunogold-labeling methods in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) are unable to locate immunogold particles in the depth direction. This inability does not only concern bulky whole mounts, but also sections. A partial solution to the problem is stereo inspection. However, three-dimensional reconstruction of immunogold-labeled structures, that is, immuno-electron tomography (IET), is a correct solution for this inconsistency. Striking improvement in resolution is achieved: the 1.4-nm immunogold particles are shown in IET that are not detected in the original tilt series. IET is not restricted to laboratories with advanced medium- or high-voltage TEM and super-computing facilities; the methods we have developed for whole-mounted chromosomes and also for whole-mounted cytoskeleton of fibroblasts work remarkably well with ordinary 80-kV TEMs equipped with a goniometer to collect tilt series for IET on film. In addition, free programs are available to produce three-dimensional reconstructions even without high-performance computers. These improvements make it possible to many laboratories without modern facilities to perform IET reconstruction with standard TEM apparatus. PMID:17656761

  7. Perspective with Landsat Overlay, Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mount Kilimanjaro (Kilima Njaro or 'shining mountain' in Swahili), the highest point in Africa, reaches 5,895 meters (19,340 feet) above sea level, tall enough to maintain a permanent snow cap despite being just 330 kilometers (210 miles) south of the equator. It is the tallest free-standing mountain on the Earth's land surface world, rising about 4,600 meters (15,000 feet) above the surrounding plain. Kilimanjaro is a triple volcano (has three peaks) that last erupted perhaps more than 100,000 years ago but still exudes volcanic gases. It is accompanied by about 20 other nearby volcanoes, some of which are seen to the west (left) in this view, prominently including Mount Meru, which last erupted only about a century ago. The volcanic mountain slopes are commonly fertile and support thick forests, while the much drier grasslands of the plains are home to elephants, lions, and other savanna wildlife.

    This 3-D perspective view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), a Landsat 7 satellite image, and a false sky. Topographic expression is vertically exaggerated two times.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved

  8. Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies

    DOEpatents

    Miller, David H.

    2012-04-10

    Sensor mount assemblies and sensor assemblies are provided. In an embodiment, by way of example only, a sensor mount assembly includes a busbar, a main body, a backing surface, and a first finger. The busbar has a first end and a second end. The main body is overmolded onto the busbar. The backing surface extends radially outwardly relative to the main body. The first finger extends axially from the backing surface, and the first finger has a first end, a second end, and a tooth. The first end of the first finger is disposed on the backing surface, and the tooth is formed on the second end of the first finger.

  9. Mounting small optics for cryogenic space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mammini, Paul V.; Holmes, Howard C.; Jacoby, Mike S.; Kvamme, E. Todd

    2011-09-01

    The Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) includes numerous optical assemblies. The instrument will operate at 35K after experiencing launch loads at ~293K and the optic mounts must accommodate all associated thermal and mechanical stresses, plus maintain exceptional optical quality during operation. Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company (LMSSC) conceived, designed, analyzed, assembled, tested, and integrated the optical assemblies for the NIRCam instrument. With using examples from NIRCam, this paper covers techniques for mounting small mirrors and lenses for cryogenic space missions.

  10. Mount Sinai Hospital's journey into TQM.

    PubMed

    Freedman, T; Mapa, J; Droppo, L

    1994-01-01

    Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital commenced its total quality management journey in the late 1980s as a complement to its extensive experience in quality assurance. This article focuses on Phase I--the process of setting up teams. This phase includes project nomination and selection; team membership selection and education; and the quality improvement process. The authors share the lessons they learned during the course of the journey and present the directions that TQM at Mount Sinai will take in the future. PMID:10133636

  11. Reports from Science Mount St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollack, James B.

    1981-01-01

    The following reports describe extensive measurements of the properties of the gases and aerosols (particles) in the volcanic clouds produced by the eruptions of Mount St. Helens from March through August 1980. Volcanic material was first injected into the atmosphere on 27 March 1980. This material, as well as that introduced by subsequent eruptions during the next 2 months, was confined to the troposphere. On 18 May the first of several major explosions occurred in which some of the volcanic cloud penetrated well into the stratosphere. The nature of the volcanic activity at Mount St. Helens from the end of March through June was described.

  12. Landsat observations of Mount St. Helens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohn, C. G.; Bly, B. G.

    1981-01-01

    The eruption of Mount St. Helens on May 18, 1980, and subsequent destruction of approximately 593 square kilometers (229 square miles) of vegetation, clearly provided a unique opportunity for earth-oriented satellite remote sensing systems. Landsat, a relatively high resolution Multispectral Scanner (MSS) system, imaged Mount St. Helens both before and after its major eruption. Digital data have been used to create a damage assessment map and a change detection image. Several classes of timber damage and land cover modification have been developed. Acreages for each class have been tabulated.

  13. 14 CFR 23.363 - Side load on engine mount.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Side load on engine mount. 23.363 Section....363 Side load on engine mount. (a) Each engine mount and its supporting structure must be designed for a limit load factor in a lateral direction, for the side load on the engine mount, of not less...

  14. Evidence-Based Design for Project-Based Learning: A Case Study for a 50,000 SF Addition Dedicated to the New Tech Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moretti, Richard D.; Conte, Philip R.

    2012-01-01

    The Seaford School District, Seaford, Delaware, determined that a component of their "reinvention" of Seaford High School would be the creation of a New Tech Academy, affiliated with the New Tech Network and housed in an addition to that building. The New Tech Network, headquartered in Napa, California, is a rapidly growing association of New Tech…

  15. A new specimen of the Mount Dooling iron meteorite from Mount Manning, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Laeter, J. R.

    1980-06-01

    The discovery of an iron meteorite near the Mount Manning Range in Western Australia which has been identified with the Mount Dooling meteorite is reported. The 701-kg iron meteorite was found embedded in the ground at a site 3 km east of the Mount Manning Range and approximately 6 km from the probable discovery site of Mount Dooling. The meteorite has a fan-shaped or delta wing configuration, with one side smooth and slightly concave with a well defined fusion crust and the other side rough, convex and possessing numerous regmaglypts; it is suggested that the meteorite performed a delta-wing-like flight at high angle of attack through much of the atmosphere. A comparison of the chemical composition, surface features, microstructure and location of the present meteorite with those of the Mount Dooling siderite confirms that the find represents a larger specimen of Mount Dooling. In light of the present discovery and that of another Mount Dooling fragment, Gosnells, it is predicted that other specimens may be discovered in the future.

  16. Vibration mounts for noise and vibration control

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, P.

    1995-04-01

    Isolating noise and vibration is of major importance in engine applications whether on board ship or land. Ulstein Bergen, for instance, has virtually standardized on Metalastik D Series mounts for its range of lean-burn, gas engines used in power generation and cogeneration plants. In the largest engine installations, the Metalastik suspension system can carry as much as 47 tons, total weight. The system is designed to isolate the forces generated by a three megawatt engine able to develop full power within 10 seconds of starting. In setups of this size, as many as 24 mounts are arranged underneath the baseplate of the power unit. Metalastik recently announced an entirely new and innovative mounting for marine applications. The new Cushymount K mounting incorporates four separate rubber/metal spring elements housed between top and bottom iron castings. The design combines three-way control of engine movement with relatively large deflection in the rubber. The new design is claimed to be robust and easy to install by means of four bolt holes on the top and bottom castings. Other recommended applications include compressors, exhaust gas silencers, refrigeration/air-conditioning plant and similar ancillary equipment. 2 figs.

  17. PC board mount corrosion sensitive sensor

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Casias, Adrian L.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Laguna, George R.

    2016-03-22

    The present invention relates to surface mount structures including a capacitive element or a resistive element, where the element has a property that is responsive to an environmental condition. In particular examples, the structure can be optionally coupled to a printed circuit board. Other apparatuses, surface mountable structures, and methods of use are described herein.

  18. Dish-mounted latent heat buffer storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manvi, R.

    1981-01-01

    Dish-mounted latent heat storage subsystems for Rankine, Brayton, and Stirling engines operating at 427 C, 816 C, and 816 C respectively are discussed. Storage requirements definition, conceptual design, media stability and compatibility tests, and thermal performance analyses are considered.

  19. Shock absorbing mount for electrical components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, R. F., Jr.; Mayne, R. C. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A shock mount for installing electrical components on circuit boards is described. The shock absorber is made of viscoelastic material which interconnects the electrical components. With this system, shocks imposed on one component of the circuit are not transmitted to other components. A diagram of a typical circuit is provided.

  20. Photovoltaic module mounting clip with integral grounding

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2010-08-24

    An electrically conductive mounting/grounding clip, usable with a photovoltaic (PV) assembly of the type having an electrically conductive frame, comprises an electrically conductive body. The body has a central portion and first and second spaced-apart arms extending from the central portion. Each arm has first and second outer portions with frame surface-disrupting element at the outer portions.

  1. Mount Everest as seen from STS-58

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The best, nearly cloud-free Shuttle view yet of Mount Everest, the highest mountain in the world at 29,028 feet. The peak, on the border between Nepal and China, is almost exactly in the center of the photograph. The challenging North Face is in shadow; valley glaciers radiate in all directions from the central massif.

  2. Earthquake swarms on Mount Erebus, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminuma, Katsutada; Baba, Megumi; Ueki, Sadato

    1986-12-01

    Mount Erebus (3794 m), located on Ross Island in McMurdo Sound, is one of the few active volcanoes in Antartica. A high-sensitivity seismic network has been operated by Japanese and US parties on and around the Volcano since December, 1980. The results of these observations show two kinds of seismic activity on Ross Island: activity concentrated near the summit of Mount Erebus associated with Strombolian eruptions, and micro-earthquake activity spread through Mount Erebus and the surrounding area. Seismicity on Mount Erebus has been quite high, usually exceeding 20 volcanic earthquakes per day. They frequently occur in swarms with daily counts exceeding 100 events. Sixteen earthquake swarms with more than 250 events per day were recorded by the seismic network during the three year period 1982-1984, and three notable earthquake swarms out of the sixteen were recognized, in October, 1982 (named 82-C), March-April, 1984 (84-B) and July, 1984 (84-F). Swarms 84-B and 84-F have a large total number of earthquakes and large Ishimoto-Iida's "m"; hence these two swarms are presumed to constitute on one of the precursor phenomena to the new eruption, which took place on 13 September, 1984, and lasted a few months.

  3. Eurofighter helmet-mounted display: status update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Stephen J.; Cameron, Alexander A.

    2000-06-01

    BAE SYSTEMS are developing a high performance Helmet Mounted Display system for the Eurofighter/Typhoon combat aircraft. This paper presents an overview of the design solutions, as well as details of the development program status. Finally, it gives some indicators as to future growth applications.

  4. Fixture for mounting small parts for processing

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, Larry R.; Gomez, Veronica M.; Thomas, Michael H.

    1990-01-01

    A fixture for mounting small parts, such as fusion target spheres or microelectronic components. A glass stalk is drawn and truncated near its tip. The truncated end of the glass stalk is dipped into silicone rubber forming an extending streamer. After the rubber cures for approximately 24 hours, a small part is touched to the streamer, and will be held securely throughout processing.

  5. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies variants at CLU and PICALM associated with Alzheimer's disease, and shows evidence for additional susceptibility genes

    PubMed Central

    Harold, Denise; Abraham, Richard; Hollingworth, Paul; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Hamshere, Marian; Singh Pahwa, Jaspreet; Moskvina, Valentina; Dowzell, Kimberley; Williams, Amy; Jones, Nicola; Thomas, Charlene; Stretton, Alexandra; Morgan, Angharad; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John; Proitsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle K; Brayne, Carol; Rubinsztein, David C.; Gill, Michael; Lawlor, Brian; Lynch, Aoibhinn; Morgan, Kevin; Brown, Kristelle; Passmore, Peter; Craig, David; McGuinness, Bernadette; Todd, Stephen; Holmes, Clive; Mann, David; Smith, A. David; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Hardy, John; Mead, Simon; Fox, Nick; Rossor, Martin; Collinge, John; Maier, Wolfgang; Jessen, Frank; Schürmann, Britta; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Heuser, Isabella; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Dichgans, Martin; Frölich, Lutz; Hampel, Harald; Hüll, Michael; Rujescu, Dan; Goate, Alison; Kauwe, John S.K.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Nowotny, Petra; Morris, John C.; Mayo, Kevin; Sleegers, Kristel; Bettens, Karolien; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter; van Broeckhoven, Christine; Livingston, Gill; Bass, Nicholas J.; Gurling, Hugh; McQuillin, Andrew; Gwilliam, Rhian; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.; Tsolaki, Magda; Singleton, Andrew; Guerreiro, Rita; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Klopp, Norman; Wichmann, H-Erich; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Younkin, Steven G.; Holmans, Peter; O'Donovan, Michael; Owen, Michael J.; Williams, Julie

    2010-01-01

    We undertook a two-stage genome-wide association study of Alzheimer's disease involving over 16,000 individuals. In stage 1 (3,941 cases and 7,848 controls), we replicated the established association with the APOE locus (most significant SNP: rs2075650, p= 1.8×10−157) and observed genome-wide significant association with SNPs at two novel loci: rs11136000 in the CLU or APOJ gene (p= 1.4×10−9) and rs3851179, a SNP 5′ to the PICALM gene (p= 1.9×10−8). Both novel associations were supported in stage 2 (2,023 cases and 2,340 controls), producing compelling evidence for association with AD in the combined dataset (rs11136000: p= 8.5×10−10, odds ratio= 0.86; rs3851179: p= 1.3×10−9, odds ratio= 0.86). We also observed more variants associated at p< 1×10−5 than expected by chance (p=7.5×10−6), including polymorphisms at the BIN1, DAB1 and CR1 loci. PMID:19734902

  7. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  8. Shaded Relief with Height as Color, Mount Meru, Tanzania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mount Meru is an active volcano located just 70 kilometers (44 miles) west of Mount Kilimanjaro. It reaches 4,566 meters (14,978 feet) in height but has lost much of its bulk due to an eastward volcanic blast sometime in its distant past, perhaps similar to the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in Washington State in 1980. Mount Meru most recently had a minor eruption about a century ago. The several small cones and craters seen in the vicinity probably reflect numerous episodes of volcanic activity. Mount Meru is the topographic centerpiece of Arusha National Park. Its fertile slopes rise above the surrounding savanna and support a forest that hosts diverse wildlife, including nearly 400 species of birds, and also monkeys and leopards.

    Two visualization methods were combined to produce this image: shading and color coding of topographic height. The shade image was derived by computing topographic slope in the north-south direction. Northern slopes appear bright and southern slopes appear dark, as would be the case at noon at this latitude in June. Color coding is directly related to topographic height, with green at the lower elevations, rising through yellow, red, and magenta, to blue and white at the highest elevations.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U.S. Department of Defense and the German and Italian space

  9. Sub-meter desiccation crack patterns imaged by Curiosity at Gale Crater on Mars shed additional light on former lakes evident from examined outcrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallet, B.; Sletten, R. S.; Mangold, N.; Oehler, D. Z.; Williams, R. M. E.; Bish, D. L.; Heydari, E.; Rubin, D. M.; Rowland, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Small-scale desiccation crack patterns (mudcrack-like arrays of uniform ~0.1 to 1 m polygonal domains separated by linear or curving cracks in exposed bedding) imaged by Curiosity in Gale Crater, Mars complement a wealth of diverse data obtained from exposures of sedimentary rocks that point to deposition "in fluvial, deltaic, and lacustrine environments" including an "intracrater lake system likely [to have] existed intermittently for thousands to millions of years …"(e.g. Grotzinger et al., 2015, Science, submitted). We interpret these mudcrack-like patterns, found on many of the bedrock exposures imaged by Curiosity, as desiccation cracks that developed either of two ways: 1) at the soft sediment-air interface like common mudcracks, or 2) at or below the sediment-water interface by synaeresis or diastasis (involving differential compaction). In the context of recent studies of terrestrial mudcracks, and cracks formed experimentally in various wet powders as they loose moisture, these desiccation features reflect diverse aspects of the formative environment. If they formed as mudcracks, some of the lakes were shallow enough to permit the recurrent drying and wetting that can lead to the geometric regularity characteristic of several of sets of mudcracks. Moreover, the water likely contained little suspended sediment otherwise the mudcracks would be buried too rapidly for the crack pattern to persist and to mature into regular polygonal patterns. The preservation of these desiccation crack patterns does not require, but does not exclude, deep burial and exhumation. Although invisible from satellite because of their size, a multitude of Mastcam and Navcam images reveals these informative features in considerable detail. These images complement much evidence, mostly from HiRISE data from several regions, suggesting that potential desiccation polygons on larger scales may be more common on the surface of Mars than generally recognized.

  10. Cytogenetics of nine species of mediterranean blennies and additional evidence for an unusual multiple sex-chromosome system in Parablennius tentacularis (Perciformes, Blenniidae).

    PubMed

    Caputo, V; Machella, N; Nisi-Cerioni, P; Olmo, E

    2001-01-01

    The chromosomal complements of nine species of Blenniidae (Aidablennius sphylnx, Blennius ocellaris, Lypophris adriaticus, L. pavo, L. trigloides, Parcablennius gattorugine, P. ponticus, P. sanguinolentus, P. tentacularis) from the Adriatic Sea were analysed with several banding methods and in-situ hybridization. In all species, the diploid set consists of 48 mostly acrocentric chromosomes and has a similar location (terminal centromeric) of NORs, except for L. pavo (interstitial pericentric) and P. ponticus (terminal on the long arm). There are major differences in karyotype with regard to the amount and distribution of heterochromatin. Parablennius tentacularis shows a distinctive sex-chromosome system involving 2n = 48 males with a large totally heterochromatic Y chromosome, and males with 2n = 47. This difference is likely to be the consequence of a translocation of an autosome on the original Y. This finding constitutes an additional instance of the great variability in origins of multiple sex chromosome systems in vertebrates. PMID:11272790

  11. Oblique Fault Systems Crossing the Seattle Basin: Seismic and Aeromagnetic Evidence for Additional Shallow Fault Systems in the Central Puget Lowland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keranen, K. M.; Mace, C.

    2011-12-01

    Upper-plate seismicity in the Puget Lowland is more broadly distributed than mapped fault systems and presents a conundrum for understanding the active tectonics of the region. Although many previous studies have mapped faulting in the Puget Lowland from subsurface geophysical data, many of these efforts have focused specifically on mapping the structure of the Seattle Fault Zone and the South Whidbey Island Fault. The thick glacial sediments and extensive water bodies may conceal additional active faults away from these major structures. To extend the results of the previous work, we mapped fault networks and patterns of sediment deposition in Quaternary sediments broadly throughout the central Puget Lowland using a combination of existing multi-channel seismic reflection datasets with widely distributed profiles and aeromagnetic data. We identify a NE-SW zone of high-angle faulting and shallow sediment deformation crossing the Seattle Uplift and the Seattle Basin that segments the Seattle Fault Zone (SFZ), offsetting aeromagnetic anomalies along the SFZ by 1.2 km in a dextral sense. Aeromagnetic lineations trace the NE-SW trend of deformation across the Seattle Uplift and connect deformation within the Puget Sound and the Hood Canal. Two additional zones of faulting trend NW-SE and cut through the Seattle Basin and the Kingston Arch, respectively. We also interpreted five regional seismic horizons, representing erosional unconformities, throughout our dataset, and created sediment thickness maps for each time interval. The thickness maps reveal changing patterns of sediment deposition through time, possibly controlled by changes in the regional pattern of deformation. Holocene sediment deposition shows strong control by the oblique fault systems. These oblique fault structures may be partially responsible for the wide distribution of seismicity within the central Puget Lowland.

  12. Linking community and ecosystem development on Mount St. Helens.

    PubMed

    Gill, Richard A; Boie, Jennifer A; Bishop, John G; Larsen, Lindsay; Apple, Jennifer L; Evans, R David

    2006-06-01

    In the two decades following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens in Washington State, the N2-fixing colonizer Lupinus lepidus is associated with striking heterogeneity in plant community and soil development. We report on differences in nutrient availability and plant tissue chemistry between older, dense patches (core) of L. lepidus and more recently established low density patches (edge). In addition, we conducted a factorial nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization experiment in core patches to examine the degree of N and P limitation in early primary succession. We found that there were no significant differences in N or P availability between core and edge L. lepidus patches during the dry summer months, although nutrient availability is very low across the landscape. In the high density patches we found lower tissue N content and higher fiber content in L. lepidus tissue than in the younger edge patches. The addition of nutrients substantially altered plant community composition, with N addition causing an increase in other forb biomass and a corresponding competition-induced decline in L. lepidus biomass. The majority of the positive biomass response came from Hypochaeris radicata. In the second year of the fertilization experiment, the addition of N significantly increased total community biomass while L. lepidus biomass declined by more than 50%. The response of every species other than L. lepidus to N additions suggests that N may be the macronutrient most limiting plant production on Mount St. Helens but that the gains in productivity were somewhat offset by a decline of the dominant species. By the third year of the experiment, L. lepidus began to increase in abundance with P addition. This result suggests co-limitation of the community by N and P. PMID:16463176

  13. Incidence and predictors of acute mountain sickness among trekkers on Mount Kilimanjaro.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Stewart J; Varley, James; Sellers, Claudia; Josephs, Katherine; Codrington, Lucy; Duke, Georgina; Njelekela, Marina A; Drummond, Gordon; Sutherland, Andrew I; Thompson, A A Roger; Baillie, J Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the incidence of AMS amongst a general population of trekkers on Mount Kilimanjaro, using the Lake Louise consensus scoring system (LLS). Additionally we examined the effect of prophylactic acetazolamide and different ascent profiles. Climbers on 3 different ascent itineraries were recruited. At 2743 m we recruited 177 participants (mean age 31, range [18-71]) who completed LLS together with an epidemiological questionnaire. At 4730 m participants (n=189, male=108, female=68, mean age 33, range [1871]) completed LLS, 136 of whom had been followed up from 2730 m. At 2743 m, 3% (5/177) of climbers were AMS positive, and 47% (89/189) of climbers from all itineraries were AMS positive at 4730 m. Of climbers attempting the Marangu itineraries, 33% (45/136) were taking acetazolamide. This group had a similar rate of AMS and no statistical difference in severity of LLS when compared with those not taking prophylactic drugs. We also did not demonstrate a difference between the incidence of AMS in climbers who did or did not take a rest day at 3700  m. However, there was a significant reduction in the incidence of AMS amongst pre-acclimatized subjects. Consistent with previous work, we found that the rate of AMS on Mount Kilimanjaro is high. Furthermore, at these fast ascent rates, there was no evidence of a protective effect of acetazolamide or a single rest day. There is a need to increase public awareness of the risks of altitude sickness and we advocate a pragmatic "golden rules" approach (http://www.altitude.org/altitude_sickness.php). PMID:20919888

  14. Environmental conditions at the South Col of Mount Everest and their impact on hypoxia and hypothermia experienced by mountaineers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hypoxia and hypothermia are acknowledged risk factors for those who venture into high-altitude regions. There is, however, little in situ data that can be used to quantify these risks. Here, we use 7 months of continuous meteorological data collected at the South Col of Mount Everest (elevation 7,896 m above sea level) to provide the first in situ characterization of these risks near the summit of Mount Everest. Methods This is accomplished through the analysis of barometric pressure, temperature and wind speed data collected by an automatic weather station installed at the South Col. These data were also used as inputs to parameterizations of wind chill equivalent temperature (WCT) and facial frostbite time (FFT). Results The meteorological data show clear evidence of seasonality, with evidence of pre-monsoon, monsoon and post-monsoon conditions. Low pressures, cold temperatures and high wind speeds characterize the pre- and post-monsoon periods with significant variability associated with the passage of large-scale weather systems. In contrast, the monsoon period is characterized by higher pressures, warmer temperatures and lower wind speeds with a pronounced reduction in variability. These environmental conditions are reflected in WCTs as low as −50°C and FFTs as short as 2 min during the pre- and post-monsoon periods. During the monsoon, the risk of cold injury is reduced with WCTs of order −20°C and FFTs longer than 60 min. The daily cycle in the various parameters is also investigated in order to assess the changes in conditions that would be experienced during a typical summit day. The post-monsoon period in particular shows a muted daily cycle in most parameters that is proposed to be the result of the random timing of large-scale weather systems. Conclusions Our results provide the first in situ characterization of the risk of hypoxia and hypothermia on Mount Everest on daily, weekly and seasonal timescales, and provide additional

  15. Systems and methods for mirror mounting with minimized distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonille, Scott R. (Inventor); Wallace, Thomas E. (Inventor); Content, David A. (Inventor); Wake, Shane W. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for mounting a mirror for use in a telescope includes attaching the mirror to a plurality of adjustable mounts; determining a distortion in the mirror caused by the plurality adjustable mounts, and, if the distortion is determined to be above a predetermined level: adjusting one or more of the adjustable mounts; and determining the distortion in the mirror caused by the adjustable mounts; and in the event the determined distortion is determined to be at or below the predetermined level, rigidizing the adjustable mounts.

  16. Geology, Mineralogy and Geochemistry of the Mount Deans Pegmatite Field, Eastern Yilgarn Craton/Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittrich, Thomas; Seifert, Thomas; Schulz, Bernhard

    2014-05-01

    Lithium-Cesium-Tantal (LCT) pegmatites are an important source for the rare metals Li, Cs and Ta, commodities that are now consumed in a rapidly increasing amount in high technology applications. Despite that LCT pegmatites are characteristic features for the Archaean geology of Western Australia, only the Greenbushes, Cattlin Creek and Wodgina deposits are currently exploited for Li and Ta. Therefore, Western Australia still possesses a great potential for the identification of additional resources for Li, Ta and possibly also Cs. The present study presents an overview of the geology, mineralogy and geochemistry of the Mount Deans pegmatite field, located c. 13 km S of Norseman, in the Eastern Goldfields Terrane of the Yilgarn Craton. The Mount Deans pegmatite field is Meso- to Neo-Archaean in age and hosted in the N-S trending Dundas Hill greenstone belt. The pegmatite field covers an area of 6 km in N-S and 4 km in E-W extension and comprises several dozens of individual pegmatite sheets and lenses. Structurally the pegmatite bodies are subdivided into two distinct types. Type I occurs predominantly in the southern part, is gently dipping (5-10°) to various directions and has variable thicknesses (3-25 m). Type II occurs in the northern part of the pegmatite field, dips steeply (50-90°) with a general N-S striking and has only a limited thickness (10 cm to 5 m). A clear distinction can also be made through their internal structure and mineralogy. Type I pegmatites exhibit a distinct structural and mineralogical zoning, whereas type II pegmatites are unzoned. Also albite, zinnwaldite, lepidolite and quartz form the bulk of the pegmatite; lepidolite is considerably more common in type II. Based on its peraluminous and strongly calc-alkaline character, as well as its enrichment in rare elements (i.e., Li, Rb, Cs, Ta, Nb, F), the pegmatites at Mount Deans are interpreted as LCT-pegmatites. However, despite the occurrence of rare element minerals like cassiterite

  17. Micro-inverter solar panel mounting

    DOEpatents

    Morris, John; Gilchrist, Phillip Charles

    2016-02-02

    Processes, systems, devices, and articles of manufacture are provided. Each may include adapting micro-inverters initially configured for frame-mounting to mounting on a frameless solar panel. This securement may include using an adaptive clamp or several adaptive clamps secured to a micro-inverter or its components, and using compressive forces applied directly to the solar panel to secure the adaptive clamp and the components to the solar panel. The clamps can also include compressive spacers and safeties for managing the compressive forces exerted on the solar panels. Friction zones may also be used for managing slipping between the clamp and the solar panel during or after installation. Adjustments to the clamps may be carried out through various means and by changing the physical size of the clamps themselves.

  18. Painless acute myocardial infarction on Mount Kilimanjaro.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Nasiruddin; Rajhy, Mubina; Bapumia, Mustaafa

    2016-01-01

    An individual experiencing dyspnoea or syncope at high altitude is commonly diagnosed to have high-altitude pulmonary edema or cerebral edema. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is generally not considered in the differential diagnosis. There have been very rare cases of AMI reported only from Mount Everest. We report a case of painless ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) that occurred while climbing Mount Kilimanjaro. A 51-year-old man suffered dyspnoea and loss of consciousness near the mountain peak, at about 5600 m. At a nearby hospital, he was treated as a case of high-altitude pulmonary edema. ECG was not obtained. Two days after the incident, he presented to our institution with continued symptoms of dyspnoea, light-headedness and weakness, but no pain. He was found to have inferior wall and right ventricular STEMI complicated by complete heart block. He was successfully managed with coronary angioplasty, with good recovery. PMID:26989121

  19. A history of helmet mounted displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foote, Bob; Melzer, James

    2015-05-01

    In more than 40 years of development, the Helmet-Mounted Display (HMD) has become a key part of the equipment for fixed and rotary wing pilots and ground soldiers, proving to be a force multiplier and reducing user workload. Rockwell Collins has been a key player in the development of modern HMD technology and is currently fielding major HMDs supporting pilots around the world including the Joint Hemet Mounted Cueing System (JHMCS) and Strike Eye. This paper will outline the history of HMDs over the last 40 years for fixed wing, rotorcraft and soldiers and discuss Rockwell Collins' role. We will discuss the development and testing required for introduction of HMDs into the modern pilot environment. Within the paper we will point out some of the misconceptions, facts and legends of HMDS.

  20. The Geologic Story of Mount Rainier

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crandell, Dwight Raymond

    1969-01-01

    Ice-clad Mount Rainier, towering over the landscape of western Washington, ranks with Fuji-yama in Japan, Popocatepeti in Mexico, and Vesuvius in Italy among the great volcanoes of the world. At Mount Rainier, as at other inactive volcanoes, the ever-present possibility of renewed eruptions gives viewers a sense of anticipation, excitement, and apprehension not equaled by most other mountains. Even so, many of us cannot imagine the cataclysmic scale of the eruptions that were responsible for building the giant cone which now stands in silence. We accept the volcano as if it had always been there, and we appreciate only the beauty of its stark expanses of rock and ice, its flower-strewn alpine meadows, and its bordering evergreen forests. Mount Rainier owes its scenic beauty to many features. The broad cone spreads out on top of a major mountain range - the Cascades. The volcano rises about 7,000 feet above its 7,000-foot foundation, and stands in solitary splendor - the highest peak in the entire Cascade Range. Its rocky ice-mantled slopes above timberline contrast with the dense green forests and give Mount Rainier the appearance of an arctic island in a temperate sea, an island so large that you can see its full size and shape only from the air. The mountain is highly photogenic because of the contrasts it offers among bare rock, snowfields, blue sky, and the incomparable flower fields that color its lower slopes, shadows cast by the multitude of cliffs, ridges, canyons, and pinnacles change constantly from sunrise to sunset, endlessly varying the texture and mood of the mountain. The face of the mountain also varies from day to day as its broad snowfields melt during the summer. The melting of these frozen reservoirs makes Mount Rainier a natural resource in a practical as well as in an esthetic sense, for it ensures steady flows of water for hydroelectric power in the region, regardless of season. Seen from the Puget Sound country to the west, Mount Rainier has

  1. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Mount St. Helens' eruption has taught geologists invaluable lessons about how volcanoes work. Such information will be crucial in saving lives and property when other dormant volcanoes in the northwestern United States--and around the world--reawaken, as geologists predict they someday will. Since 1912, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have pioneered the study of volcanoes through work on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. In Vancouver, Wash., scientists at the Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory are studying the after-effects of Mount St. Helens' catalysmic eruption as well as monitoring a number of other now-dormant volcanoes in the western United States. This paper briefly reviews the similarities and differences between the Hawaiian and Washington volcanoes and what these volcanoes are teaching the volcanologists.

  2. The AMiBA Hexapod Telescope Mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Patrick M.; Kesteven, Michael; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Jiang, Homin; Lin, Kai-Yang; Umetsu, Keiichi; Huang, Yau-De; Raffin, Philippe; Chen, Ke-Jung; Ibañez-Romano, Fabiola; Chereau, Guillaume; Huang, Chih-Wei Locutus; Chen, Ming-Tang; Ho, Paul T. P.; Pausch, Konrad; Willmeroth, Klaus; Altamirano, Pablo; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Su-Wei; Han, Chih-Chiang; Kubo, Derek; Li, Chao-Te; Liao, Yu-Wei; Liu, Guo-Chin; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Oshiro, Peter; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Wei, Ta-Shun; Wu, Jiun-Huei Proty; Birkinshaw, Mark; Chiueh, Tzihong; Lancaster, Katy; Lo, Kwok Yung; Martin, Robert N.; Molnar, Sandor M.; Patt, Ferdinand; Romeo, Bob

    2009-04-01

    The Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA) is the largest hexapod astronomical telescope in current operation. We present a description of this novel hexapod mount with its main mechanical components—the support cone, universal joints, jack screws, and platform—and outline the control system with the pointing model and the operating modes that are supported. The AMiBA hexapod mount performance is verified based on optical pointing tests and platform photogrammetry measurements. The photogrammetry results show that the deformations in the inner part of the platform are less than 120 μm rms. This is negligible for optical pointing corrections, radio alignment, and radio phase errors for the currently operational seven-element compact configuration. The optical pointing error in azimuth and elevation is successively reduced by a series of corrections to about 0farcm 4 rms which meets our goal for the seven-element target specifications.

  3. Additive genetic variation in resistance traits of an exotic pine species: little evidence for constraints on evolution of resistance against native herbivores

    PubMed Central

    Moreira, X; Zas, R; Sampedro, L

    2013-01-01

    The apparent failure of invasions by alien pines in Europe has been explained by the co-occurrence of native pine congeners supporting herbivores that might easily recognize the new plants as hosts. Previous studies have reported that exotic pines show reduced tolerance and capacity to induce resistance to those native herbivores. We hypothesize that limited genetic variation in resistance to native herbivores and the existence of evolutionary trade-offs between growth and resistance could represent additional potential constraints on the evolution of invasiveness of exotic pines outside their natural range. In this paper, we examined genetic variation for constitutive and induced chemical defences (measured as non-volatile resin in the stem and total phenolics in the needles) and resistance to two major native generalist herbivores of pines in cafeteria bioassays (the phloem-feeder Hylobius abietis and the defoliator Thaumetopoea pityocampa) using half-sib families drawn from a sample of the population of Pinus radiata introduced to Spain in the mid-19th century. We found (i) significant genetic variation, with moderate-to-high narrow-sense heritabilities for both the production of constitutive non-volatile resin and induced total phenolics, and for constitutive resistance against T. pityocampa in bioassays, (ii) no evolutionary trade-offs between plant resistance and growth traits or between the production of different quantitative chemical defences and (iii) a positive genetic correlation between constitutive resistance to the two studied herbivores. Overall, results of our study indicate that the exotic pine P. radiata has limited genetic constraints on the evolution of resistance against herbivores in its introduced range, suggesting that, at least in terms of interactions with these enemies, this pine species has potential to become invasive in the future. PMID:23232833

  4. Additive genetic variation in resistance traits of an exotic pine species: little evidence for constraints on evolution of resistance against native herbivores.

    PubMed

    Moreira, X; Zas, R; Sampedro, L

    2013-05-01

    The apparent failure of invasions by alien pines in Europe has been explained by the co-occurrence of native pine congeners supporting herbivores that might easily recognize the new plants as hosts. Previous studies have reported that exotic pines show reduced tolerance and capacity to induce resistance to those native herbivores. We hypothesize that limited genetic variation in resistance to native herbivores and the existence of evolutionary trade-offs between growth and resistance could represent additional potential constraints on the evolution of invasiveness of exotic pines outside their natural range. In this paper, we examined genetic variation for constitutive and induced chemical defences (measured as non-volatile resin in the stem and total phenolics in the needles) and resistance to two major native generalist herbivores of pines in cafeteria bioassays (the phloem-feeder Hylobius abietis and the defoliator Thaumetopoea pityocampa) using half-sib families drawn from a sample of the population of Pinus radiata introduced to Spain in the mid-19th century. We found (i) significant genetic variation, with moderate-to-high narrow-sense heritabilities for both the production of constitutive non-volatile resin and induced total phenolics, and for constitutive resistance against T. pityocampa in bioassays, (ii) no evolutionary trade-offs between plant resistance and growth traits or between the production of different quantitative chemical defences and (iii) a positive genetic correlation between constitutive resistance to the two studied herbivores. Overall, results of our study indicate that the exotic pine P. radiata has limited genetic constraints on the evolution of resistance against herbivores in its introduced range, suggesting that, at least in terms of interactions with these enemies, this pine species has potential to become invasive in the future. PMID:23232833

  5. A comparison of constituents of Mount St. Helens eruption clouds with those of some other volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cadle, R. D.; Heidt, L.

    1982-01-01

    Gases from Mount St. Helens were collected from the eruption clouds using an airplane during the period April 2 to April 8, 1980, and were analyzed for CO2, H2, CH4, and COS. The results were of similar magnitude to those obtained from magmatic eruptions in Central America. Thus, although the eruptions were evidently largely phreatic, magmatic gases may have played a larger role in these early small eruptions than has generally been believed. Electron micrographs of ash particles collected from the Mount St. Helens eruption clouds showed that the particles were for the most part much larger than those from the Central American eruptions.

  6. Evolving magma storage conditions beneath Mount St. Helens inferred from chemical variations in melt inclusions from the 1980-1986 and current (2004-2006) eruptions: Chapter 33 in A volcano rekindled: the renewed eruption of Mount St. Helens, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blundy, Jon; Cashman, Katharine V.; Berlo, Kim

    2008-01-01

    O contents, consistent with magma extraction from shallow depths. Highly enriched Li in melt inclusions suggests that vapor transport of Li is a characteristic feature of Mount St. Helens. Melt inclusions from the current eruption have subtly different trace-element chemistry from all but one of the 1980-86 melt inclusions, with steeper rareearth-element (REE) patterns and low U, Th, and high-fieldstrength elements (HFSE), indicating addition of a new melt component to the magma system. It is anticipated that increasing involvement of the new melt component will be evident as the current eruption proceeds.

  7. MOUNT ZIRKEL WILDERNESS AND VICINITY, COLORADO.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, George L.; Patten, Lowell L.

    1984-01-01

    Several areas of metallic and nonmetallic mineralization have been identified from surface occurrences within the Mount Zirkel Wilderness and vicinity, Colorado. Three areas of probable copper-lead-zinc-silver-gold resource potential, two areas of probable chrome-platinum resource potential, four areas of probable uranium-thorium resource potential, two areas of probable molybdenum resource potential, and one area of probable fluorspar potential were identified. No potential for fossil fuel or geothermal resources was identified.

  8. Conceptual design for PSP mounting bracket

    SciTech Connect

    Ransom, G.; Stein, R.

    1991-12-31

    Protective structural packages (PSP`s or overpacks) used to ship 2 1/2-ton UF{sub 6} product cylinders are bolted to truck trailers. All bolts penetrate two longitudinal rows of wooden planks. Removal and replacement is required at various intervals for maintenance and routine testing. A conceptual design is presented for mounting brackets which would securely attach PSP`s to trailer frames, reduce removal and replacement time, and minimize risk of personnel injury.

  9. Cantilever mounted resilient pad gas bearing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Etsion, I. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A gas-lubricated bearing is described, employing at least one pad mounted on a rectangular cantilever beam to produce a lubricating wedge between the face of the pad and a moving surface. The load-carrying and stiffness characteristics of the pad are related to the dimensions and modulus of elasticity of the beam. The bearing is applicable to a wide variety of types of hydrodynamic bearings.

  10. Holographic Helmet-Mounted Display Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, James R., II; Larussa, Joseph A.

    1995-01-01

    Helmet-mounted display unit designed for use in testing innovative concepts for display of information to aircraft pilots. Operates in conjunction with computers generating graphical displays. Includes two ocular subunits containing miniature cathoderay tubes and optics providing 40 degrees vertical, 50 degrees horizontal field of view to each eye, with or without stereopsis. In future color application, each ocular subunit includes trichromatic holographic combiner tuned to red, green, and blue wavelengths of phosphors used in development of miniature color display devices.

  11. Fixture for mounting small parts for processing

    DOEpatents

    Foreman, L.R.; Gomez, V.M.; Thomas, M.H.

    1990-05-29

    A fixture for mounting small parts, such as fusion target spheres or microelectronic components is disclosed. A glass stalk is drawn and truncated near its tip. The truncated end of the glass stalk is dipped into silicone rubber forming an extending streamer. After the rubber cures for approximately 24 hours, a small part is touched to the streamer, and will be held securely throughout processing. 5 figs.

  12. Mounts For Selective Rotation And Translation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Earl R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Blade-in-groove bearings stacked to obtain necessary degrees of freedom. Mounting system allows panels to be tilted, rotated, and translated selectively. Developed for large solar reflectors or antennas composed of hexagonal panels about 6 ft. wide and 6 in. thick. With system, each panel tilted around two axes to focus antenna. At same time, each panel translates along these axes to accommodate thermal expansion and contraction without affecting focus.

  13. Machine-mounted scrubber helps ventilate face

    SciTech Connect

    Volkwein, J.C.

    1985-02-01

    The authors describe work carried out under contract for US Bureau of Mines on a machine-mounted scrubber system for ventilating the face during an extended advance. Underground tests showed that a suitable scrubber system can adequately ventilate the face at brattice setbacks up to 15m. Face methane levels were effectively controlled at large setbacks, but respirable dust levels increased by as much as 33% at the operator's cab at setbacks greater than 7.5m.

  14. Mount Dutton volcano, Alaska: Aleutian arc analog to Unzen volcano, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, T. P.; Chertkoff, D. G.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Coombs, M. L.

    1999-04-01

    Holocene eruptions from Mount Dutton, a small Late Quaternary volcano near the tip of the Alaska Peninsula, bear strong physical and petrologic similarities to the 1990-1995 Unzen Fugendake eruption in Japan. The volcano had a protracted phase of effusive calcalkaline andesitic (54-59 wt.% SiO 2) cone-building in the late Pleistocene followed by an abrupt switch to more silicic (˜65 wt.% SiO 2) lavas, emplaced as a central summit cluster of steep-sided domes beginning in the early Holocene. The flanks of the volcano are mantled by pyroclastic flows, debris flows, and talus formed as a result of gravitational dome collapse. Disequilibrium mineral assemblages, including coexisting quartz and olivine in eruptive episodes ranging from the initial cone-building basaltic andesite lavas to the latest Holocene dacite domes, suggest extensive magma mixing. In addition, up to meter-sized, pillow-like cognate mafic enclaves of hornblende+plagioclase+glass are common in the latest of the summit dacite domes. Mineralogical evidence and bulk chemical data indicate the enclaves represent a high-alumina basalt parent with variable and subordinate reservoir contaminant, and the host lava is reservoir magma with variable and subordinate basaltic contaminant. Mount Dutton's history and petrology can be interpreted as reflecting the monotonous repetitive intrusion of mantle-derived mafic magma into a silicic crystal-rich crustal reservoir. During the Holocene, these injections resulted in the extrusion of partially crystallized, viscous, `sticky' central domes which typically failed by collapse resulting in small volume Merapi-type flowage deposits. We speculate that slow introduction of mafic magma into the silicic chamber leads both to enclave formation and to the effusive eruption style. Mount Dutton volcano experienced severe shallow earthquake swarms in 1984, 1988, and to a lesser extent in 1991; although none of these swarms resulted in an eruption, their epicenter distribution

  15. Effects of nutrient enrichment on channel catfish growth and consumption in Mount Storm Lake, West Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blanc, T.J.; Margraf, F.J.

    2002-01-01

    With the objective of augmenting fish production in Mount Storm Lake, Virginia Electric and Power Company initiated a programme of phosphorus addition to increase primary production, and ultimately, channel catfish (Ictaturus punctatus) growth in the 486 ha cooling reservoir. We simulated channel catfish growth dynamics using two bioenergetics modelling scenarios: (i) effects of average reservoir temperature on growth, conversion efficiency and consumption; and (ii) effects of reservoir enrichment on growth, which is simulated by increasing feeding rates. During 1991-1993, fish were sampled monthly, but sampling was increased to every 2 weeks during the peak growing season (June-September). Most of the channel catfish collected were aged 0 year and aged 1 year with rapid annual growth rates ranging from 9.0 to 13.7 J/g. We found many age 1 250-300 mm catfish, but few beyond this size. Conversion efficiency (joules gained/joules consumed) was low at approximately 18-19%. High algae consumption (40%) was evident, but consumption of zooplankton and Asiatic clam (Corbicula sp.) increased over the study. Simulated increased feeding rates showed that channel catfish were food limited in summer and fall (July-December). Weight gains with 5 and 10% feeding increases were 6-13% and 18-38%, respectively, from the baseline. Catfish of all sizes should benefit from phosphorus additions.

  16. MEMS accelerometers in accurate mount positioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mészáros, László; Pál, András.; Jaskó, Attila

    2014-07-01

    In order to attain precise, accurate and stateless positioning of telescope mounts we apply microelectromechanical accelerometer systems (also known as MEMS accelerometers). In common practice, feedback from the mount position is provided by electronic, optical or magneto-mechanical systems or via real-time astrometric solution based on the acquired images. Hence, MEMS-based systems are completely independent from these mechanisms. Our goal is to investigate the advantages and challenges of applying such devices and to reach the sub-arcminute range { that is well smaller than the field-of-view of conventional imaging telescope systems. We present how this sub-arcminute accuracy can be achieved with very cheap MEMS sensors. Basically, these sensors yield raw output within an accuracy of a few degrees. We show what kind of calibration procedures could exploit spherical and cylindrical constraints between accelerometer output channels in order to achieve the previously mentioned accuracy level. We also demonstrate how can our implementation be inserted in a telescope control system. Although this attainable precision is less than both the resolution of telescope mount drive mechanics and the accuracy of astrometric solutions, the independent nature of attitude determination could significantly increase the reliability of autonomous or remotely operated astronomical observations.

  17. Dynamics of the Mount Nyiragongo lava lake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgi, P.-Y.; Darrah, T. H.; Tedesco, D.; Eymold, W. K.

    2014-05-01

    The permanent and presently rising lava lake at Mount Nyiragongo constitutes a major potential geological hazard to the inhabitants of the Virunga volcanic region in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Rwanda. Based on two field campaigns in June 2010 and 2011, we estimate the lava lake level from the southeastern crater rim (~400 m diameter) and lava lake area (~46,550 m2), which constrains, respectively, the lava lake volume (~9 × 106 m3) and volume flow rate needed to keep the magma in a molten state (0.6 to 3.5 m3 s-1). A bidirectional magma flow model, which includes the characterization of the conduit diameter and funnel-shaped lava lake geometry, is developed to constrain the amount of magma intruded/emplaced within the magmatic chamber and rift-related structures that extend between Mount Nyiragongo's volcanic center and the city of Goma, DRC, since Mount Nyiragongo's last eruption (17 January 2002). Besides matching field data of the lava lake level covering the period 1977 to 2002, numerical solutions of the model indicate that by 2022, 20 years after the January 2002 eruption, between 300 and 1700 × 106 m3 (0.3 to 1.7 km3) of magma could have intruded/emplaced underneath the edifice, and the lava lake volume could exceed 15 × 106 m3.

  18. Disruptive advancement in precision lens mounting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamontagne, Frédéric; Desnoyers, Nichola; Doucet, Michel; Côté, Patrice; Gauvin, Jonny; Anctil, Geneviève

    2015-09-01

    Threaded rings are used to fix lenses in a large portion of opto-mechanical assemblies. This is the case for the low cost drop-in approach in which the lenses are dropped into cavities cut into a barrel and clamped with threaded rings. The walls of a cavity are generally used to constrain the lateral and axial position of the lens within the cavity. In general, the drop-in approach is low cost but imposes fundamental limitations especially on the optical performances. On the other hand, active alignment methods provide a high level of centering accuracy but increase the cost of the optical assembly. This paper first presents a review of the most common lens mounting techniques used to secure and center lenses in optical systems. Advantages and disadvantages of each mounting technique are discussed in terms of precision and cost. Then, the different contributors which affect the centering of a lens when using the drop-in approach, such as the threaded ring, friction, and manufacturing errors, are detailed. Finally, a patent pending lens mounting technique developed at INO that alleviates the drawbacks of the drop-in and the active alignment approaches is introduced. This innovative auto-centering method requires a very low assembly time, does not need tight manufacturing tolerances and offers a very high level of centering accuracy, usually less than 5 μm. Centering test results performed on real optical assemblies are also presented.

  19. Advanced semi-active engine and transmission mounts: tools for modelling, analysis, design, and tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farjoud, Alireza; Taylor, Russell; Schumann, Eric; Schlangen, Timothy

    2014-02-01

    This paper is focused on modelling, design, and testing of semi-active magneto-rheological (MR) engine and transmission mounts used in the automotive industry. The purpose is to develop a complete analysis, synthesis, design, and tuning tool that reduces the need for expensive and time-consuming laboratory and field tests. A detailed mathematical model of such devices is developed using multi-physics modelling techniques for physical systems with various energy domains. The model includes all major features of an MR mount including fluid dynamics, fluid track, elastic components, decoupler, rate-dip, gas-charged chamber, MR fluid rheology, magnetic circuit, electronic driver, and control algorithm. Conventional passive hydraulic mounts can also be studied using the same mathematical model. The model is validated using standard experimental procedures. It is used for design and parametric study of mounts; effects of various geometric and material parameters on dynamic response of mounts can be studied. Additionally, this model can be used to test various control strategies to obtain best vibration isolation performance by tuning control parameters. Another benefit of this work is that nonlinear interactions between sub-components of the mount can be observed and investigated. This is not possible by using simplified linear models currently available.

  20. Design of the magnetorheological mount with high damping force for medium speed diesel generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, O.-H.; Kim, W.-H.; Joo, W. H.; Park, J.-H.

    2013-04-01

    This paper investigates the controllable magnetorheological (MR) mount for the marine diesel-generator (D/G) sets. Sometimes, significant vibrations over the allowable limit are observed on the D/G sets due to their huge excitation forces. Because the severe vibration can lead to structural damages to the D/G sets, it should be reduced to below the limit. Although passive mounts with rubber isolators are usually used, the vibration reduction performance is not always sufficient. In addition, expecting that the vibration levels required by customers will get more severe, semi-active vibration isolation system needs to be developed. To the aim, the valve (flow) mode type of MR mount has been designed. Especially, the annular-radial configuration was adopted to enhance the damping force within the restricted space. The geometry of the mount has been optimized to obtain the required damping force and the magnetic field analysis has been carried out using ANSYS APDL. To verify the performance of the developed MR mount, excitation test was conducted and the dynamic characteristics were identified. Since damping property of the MR fluid is changed by the applied magnetic field strength and excitation frequency, responses to changing applied currents and frequencies were obtained. From the results, damping performance of the MR mount was evaluated.

  1. Transfer alignment from a personal locator system to a handheld or head-mounted instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda, Lauro; Borenstein, Johann

    2011-06-01

    This paper presents a method for computing position and attitude of an instrument attached to the human body such as a handheld or head-mounted video camera. The system uses two Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs). One IMU is part of our earlier-developed Personal Dead-Reckoning (PDR) system, which tracks the position and heading of a walking person relative to a known starting position. The other IMU is rigidly attached to the handheld or head-mounted instrument. Our existing PDR system is substantially more accurate than conventional IMU-based systems because the IMU is mounted on the foot of the user where error correction techniques can be applied that are unavailable for IMUs mounted anywhere else on the body. However, if the walker is waving a handheld or head-mounted instrument, the position and attitude of the instrument is not known. Equipping the instrument with an additional IMU is by itself an unsatisfactory solution because that IMU is subject to accelerometer and gyro drift, which, unlike in the case of the foot-mounted IMU, cannot be corrected and cause unbounded position and heading errors. Our approach uses transfer alignment techniques and takes advantage of the fact that the handheld IMU moves with the walker. This constraint is used to bound and correct errors by a Kalman filter. The paper explains our method and presents extensive experimental results. The results show up to a five-fold reduction in heading errors for the handheld IMU.

  2. Spinal neurosurgery with the head-mounted "Varioscope" microscope.

    PubMed

    Kuchta, J; Simons, P

    2009-05-01

    We present a preliminary report on the intra-operative use of a head-mounted microscope ("Varioscope" Leica HM500) in spinal neurosurgery. The Varioscope is a dynamic microscope mounted on a head-set. It weights 297 g and measures 73 x 120 x 63 mm (length x width x height). It offers an infinitely variable range of magnification from 3.6x to 7.2x. The working distance ranges from 300 to 600 mm. The field of view varies between 30-144 mm, depending on the selected enlargement factor and the working distance. In addition to the zoom function, the device offers a focus function (automatic or on demand). The optical elements for focus and zoom are located in two separate tubes which are mounted on a middle section containing the mechanical components as well as the receiver unit for the focussing elements. The lenses are adjusted by means of motor-driven push/pull cables. The autofocus works well in larger operative fields and a working distance between 30 and 60 cm. Nevertheless, when used in today's "keyhole" approaches, the autofocus is not helpful when operating in deep structures. Based on the satisfactory results achieved in our series, we can recommend the Varioscope, especially when no stationary microscope is available. The portable device can be packed in a suitcase and can travel with the consultant microsurgeon to different hospitals and distant units. The built-in video camera is ideal for patients, staff, assistant surgeons, and student education with real-time video monitoring of procedures from the microsurgeon's perspective. For daily microsurgery, we felt more comfortable with fixed, stationary operating microscopes. PMID:19711265

  3. 9. March 1960 FRONT ROOM OF THE ADDITION BUILT BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. March 1960 FRONT ROOM OF THE ADDITION BUILT BY JOHN RUSSELL POPE FACING ON MOUNT VERNON PLACE. THIS WAS EITHER A LIBRARY OR A ROOM FOR DISPLAYING TROPHIES OR OBJETS D'ART. THE VIEW IS LOOKING SOUTH, THROUGH A STAIRCASE HALL, TO THE THEATER OR BALLROOM - Garrett-Jacobs House, 7, 9, 11, 13 West Mount Vernon Place, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  4. 5. March 1960 ROOM IN BASEMENT OF THE ADDITION BUILT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. March 1960 ROOM IN BASEMENT OF THE ADDITION BUILT BY JOHN RUSSELL POPE, SUPPER ROOM, LOOKING NORTH 9I.E. IN THE DIRECTION OF MOUNT VERNON PLACE) - Garrett-Jacobs House, 7, 9, 11, 13 West Mount Vernon Place, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  5. 1. View looking northwest, from Middle Mount Vernon Road, showing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View looking northwest, from Middle Mount Vernon Road, showing the slight rise upon which the building was constructed. - Perry Township School No. 3, Middle Mount Vernon & Eickhoff Roads, Evansville, Vanderburgh County, IN

  6. Adhesive-backed terminal board eliminates mounting screws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Low-profile terminal board is used in dense electronic circuits where mounting and working space is limited. The board has a thin layer of pressure-sensitive adhesive backing which eliminates the need for mounting screws.

  7. 4. Panama Mount. Note concrete ring and metal rail. Note ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Panama Mount. Note concrete ring and metal rail. Note cliff erosion under foundation at left center. Looking 297° W. - Fort Funston, Panama Mounts for 155mm Guns, Skyline Boulevard & Great Highway, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  8. 49 CFR 178.255-11 - Tank mountings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... mountings to provide a secure base in transit. “Skids” or similar devices shall be deemed to comply with this requirement. (b) All tank mountings such as skids, fastenings, brackets, cradles, lifting...

  9. Historic Image: Aerial view of Mount of Victory Plot. Photograph ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Historic Image: Aerial view of Mount of Victory Plot. Photograph 1961. NCA History Collection - Cypress Hills National Cemetery, Mount of Victory Plot Unit, 625 Jamaica Avenue, Brooklyn, Kings County, NY

  10. A new tree-ring date for the ``floating island'' lava flow, Mount St. Helens, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, David K.; Hoblitt, Richard P.; Lawrence, Donald B.

    1990-09-01

    Anomalously narrow and missing rings in trees 12 m from Mount St. Helens' “floating island” lava flow, and synchronous growth increases in trees farther from the flow margin, are evidence that this andesitic flow was extruded between late summer 1799 and spring 1800 a.d., within a few months after the eruption of Mount St. Helens' dacitic layer T tephra. For ease of reference, we assign here an 1800 a.d. date to this flow. The new date shows that the start of Mount St. Helens' Goat Rocks eruptive period (1800 1857 a.d.) resembled the recent (1980 1986) activity in both petrochemical trends and timing. In both cases, an initial explosive eruption of dacite was quickly succeeded by the eruption of more mafic lavas; dacite lavas then reappeared during an extended concluding phase of activity. This behavior is consistent with a recently proposed fluid-dynamic model of magma withdrawal from a compositionally zoned magma chamber.

  11. Mount Gambier drinking water and birth defects. A laboratory study in rats after earlier epidemiological findings.

    PubMed

    Dreosti, I E; McMichael, A J; Bridle, T M

    1984-09-29

    Experimental studies in pregnant rats failed to demonstrate the presence of a teratogenic agent in water from the Mount Gambier Blue Lake or from several local bores, even when the water from each of those two sources was concentrated tenfold and fivefold, respectively, by freeze drying. The experimental data thus failed to corroborate the previously reported epidemiological evidence of an increased risk of human teratogenesis in pregnant women who were drinking water from these sources. The growth of rat embryos in culture on serum taken from pregnant women in the Mount Gambier region was identical, regardless of the source of drinking water consumed by the individual donors. The findings do not suggest the presence of a teratogen in Mount Gambier water supplies; however, they should be regarded with the caution which is necessarily associated with teratology studies conducted across the boundaries of species. PMID:6472176

  12. First observations of surface ozone concentration from the summit region of Mount Everest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semple, John L.; Moore, G. W. K.

    2008-10-01

    The extreme height of Mount Everest is such that its summit region may periodically be in the lower stratosphere. In this regard it provides a unique location for observing the exchange of ozone between the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Here we report the first surface ozone measurements from the summit region of Mount Everest. Simultaneous measurements were recorded at different elevations on the north side from base camp (5676 m) to the summit (8848 m) during May 2005. The concentrations measured were as high as 70 ppb. Meteorological diagnostics suggest that the stratosphere as well as the long range transport of polluted tropospheric air masses from South East Asia are sources of the observed ozone. There is evidence that the source region for ozone in the vicinity of Mount Everest may vary with the onset of the summer monsoon.

  13. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  14. Mounting apparatus for a nozzle guide vane assembly

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, G.L.; Shaffer, J.E.

    1995-09-12

    The present invention provides a ceramic nozzle guide assembly with an apparatus for mounting it to a metal nozzle case that includes an intermediate ceramic mounting ring. The mounting ring includes a plurality of projections that are received within a plurality of receptacles formed in the nozzle case. The projections of the mounting ring are secured within the receptacles by a ceramic retainer that allows contact between the two components only along arcuate surfaces thus eliminating sliding contact between the components. 8 figs.

  15. Mounting apparatus for a nozzle guide vane assembly

    DOEpatents

    Boyd, Gary L.; Shaffer, James E.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention provides a ceramic nozzle guide assembly with an apparatus for mounting it to a metal nozzle case that includes an intermediate ceramic mounting ring. The mounting ring includes a plurality of projections that are received within a plurality of receptacles formed in the nozzle case. The projections of the mounting ring are secured within the receptacles by a ceramic retainer that allows contact between the two components only along arcuate surfaces thus eliminating sliding contact between the components.

  16. Integral Flexure Mounts for Metal Mirrors for Cryogenic Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zewari, S. Wahid; Hylan, Jason E.; Irish, Sandra M.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Conkey, Shelly B.

    2006-01-01

    Semi-kinematic, six-degree-of-freedom flexure mounts have been incorporated as integral parts of metal mirrors designed to be used under cryogenic conditions as parts of an astronomical instrument. The design of the mirrors and their integral flexure mounts can also be adapted to other instruments and other operating temperatures. In comparison with prior kinematic cryogenic mirror mounts, the present mounts are more compact and can be fabricated easily using Ram-EDM (electrical discharge machining) process

  17. Stereo Pair, Mount St Helens, Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens catastrophically erupted, causing the worst volcanic disaster in the recorded history of the United States. An earthquake shook loose the northern flank of the volcano, and about 2.8 cubic kilometers (0.67 cubic miles) of rock slid downslope in the world's largest recorded landslide. The avalanche released pressure on the volcano and unleashed a huge explosion, which was directed generally northward. The mountain ultimately lost 227 meters (1314 feet) of its height and devastated about 600 square kilometers (230 square miles) of forest.

    This stereoscopic view combines a Landsat satellite image with a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission elevation model to show the volcanic crater and most of the zone of devastation. Areas now relatively devoid of vegetation appear bright. Note the landslide debris clogging the northern drainages and forming natural dams (or enlarging previously existing ones). Also note the volcanic dome built up within the crater, and the extensive floating debris still present on Spirit Lake (northeast of the crater) 12 years after the eruption.

    This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was

  18. Anaglyph, Mount St Helens, Washington State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    On May 18, 1980, Mount St. Helens catastrophically erupted, causing the worst volcanic disaster in the recorded history of the United States. An earthquake shook loose the northern flank of the volcano, and about 2.8 cubic kilometers (0.67 cubic miles) of rock slid downslope in the world's largest recorded landslide. The avalanche released pressure on the volcano and unleashed a huge explosion, which was directed generally northward. The mountain ultimately lost 227 meters (1314 feet) of its height and devastated about 600 square kilometers (230 square miles) of forest.

    This anaglyph combines a Landsat satellite image with a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission elevation model to show the volcanic crater and most of the zone of devastation. Areas now relatively devoid of vegetation appear bright. Note the landslide debris clogging the northern drainages and forming natural dams (or enlarging previously existing ones). Also note the volcanic dome built up within the crater, and the extensive floating debris still present on Spirit Lake (northeast of the crater) 12 years after the eruption.

    The stereoscopic effect of this anaglyph was created by first draping a Landsat satellite image over a digital elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), and then generating two differing perspectives, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot)resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space

  19. 36 CFR 7.77 - Mount Rushmore National Memorial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mount Rushmore National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.77 Mount Rushmore National Memorial. (a) Climbing Mount Rushmore is prohibited....

  20. 36 CFR 7.77 - Mount Rushmore National Memorial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mount Rushmore National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.77 Mount Rushmore National Memorial. (a) Climbing Mount Rushmore is prohibited....

  1. 36 CFR 7.77 - Mount Rushmore National Memorial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mount Rushmore National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.77 Mount Rushmore National Memorial. (a) Climbing Mount Rushmore is prohibited....

  2. 36 CFR 7.77 - Mount Rushmore National Memorial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mount Rushmore National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.77 Mount Rushmore National Memorial. (a) Climbing Mount Rushmore is prohibited....

  3. 36 CFR 7.77 - Mount Rushmore National Memorial.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mount Rushmore National... INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.77 Mount Rushmore National Memorial. (a) Climbing Mount Rushmore is prohibited....

  4. 29 CFR 1926.553 - Base-mounted drum hoists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Base-mounted drum hoists. 1926.553 Section 1926.553 Labor... § 1926.553 Base-mounted drum hoists. (a) General requirements. (1) Exposed moving parts such as gears... is ineffective. (4) All base-mounted drum hoists in use shall meet the applicable requirements...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.553 - Base-mounted drum hoists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Base-mounted drum hoists. 1926.553 Section 1926.553 Labor... § 1926.553 Base-mounted drum hoists. (a) General requirements. (1) Exposed moving parts such as gears... is ineffective. (4) All base-mounted drum hoists in use shall meet the applicable requirements...

  6. 29 CFR 1926.553 - Base-mounted drum hoists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Base-mounted drum hoists. 1926.553 Section 1926.553 Labor... § 1926.553 Base-mounted drum hoists. (a) General requirements. (1) Exposed moving parts such as gears... is ineffective. (4) All base-mounted drum hoists in use shall meet the applicable requirements...

  7. 29 CFR 1926.553 - Base-mounted drum hoists.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Base-mounted drum hoists. 1926.553 Section 1926.553 Labor... § 1926.553 Base-mounted drum hoists. (a) General requirements. (1) Exposed moving parts such as gears... is ineffective. (4) All base-mounted drum hoists in use shall meet the applicable requirements...

  8. 14 CFR 33.23 - Engine mounting attachments and structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; General § 33.23 Engine mounting attachments and structure. (a) The maximum allowable limit and ultimate loads for engine mounting... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engine mounting attachments and...

  9. 30 Cool Facts about Mount St. Helens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Driedger, Carolyn; Liz, Westby; Faust, Lisa; Frenzen, Peter; Bennett, Jeanne; Clynne, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Commemorating the 30th anniversary of the 1980 eruptions of Mount St. Helens 1-During the past 4,000 years, Mount St. Helens has erupted more frequently than any other volcano in the Cascade Range. 2-Most of Mount St. Helens is younger than 3,000 years old (younger than the pyramids of Egypt). 3-Some Native American names that refer to smoke at the volcano include- Lawala Clough, Low-We- Lat-Klah, Low-We-Not- Thlat, Loowit, Loo-wit, Loo-wit Lat-kla, and Louwala-Clough. 4-3,600 years ago-Native Americans abandoned hunting grounds devastated by an enormous eruption four times larger than the May 18, 1980 eruption. 5-1792-Captain George Vancouver named the volcano for Britain's ambassador to Spain, Alleyne Fitzherbert, also known as Baron St. Helens. 6-1975-U.S. Geological Survey geologists forecasted that Mount St. Helens would erupt again, 'possibly before the end of the century.' 7-March 20, 1980-A magnitude 4.2 earthquake signaled the reawakening of the volcano after 123 years. 8-Spring 1980-Rising magma pushed the volcano's north flank outward 5 feet per day. 9-Morning of May 18, 1980- The largest terrestrial landslide in recorded history reduced the summit by 1,300 feet and triggered a lateral blast. 10-Within 3 minutes, the lateral blast, traveling at more than 300 miles per hour, blew down and scorched 230 square miles of forest. 11-Within 15 minutes, a vertical plume of volcanic ash rose over 80,000 feet. 12-Afternoon of May 18, 1980-The dense ash cloud turned daylight into darkness in eastern Washington, causing streetlights to turn on in Yakima and Ritzville. 13-The volcanic ash cloud drifted east across the United States in 3 days and encircled Earth in 15 days. 14-Lahars (volcanic mudflows) filled rivers with rocks, sand, and mud, damaging 27 bridges and 200 homes and forcing 31 ships to remain in ports upstream. 15-The May 18, 1980 eruption was the most economically destructive volcanic event in U.S. history. 16-Small plants and trees beneath winter snow

  10. The Large Binocular Telescope mount control system architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashby, David S.; McKenna, Dan; Brynnel, Joar G.; Sargent, Tom; Cox, Dan; Little, John; Powell, Keith; Holmberg, Gene

    2006-06-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) features dual 8.4 m diameter mirrors in a common elevation-over-azimuth mount. The LBT moves in elevation on two large crescent-shaped C-rings that are supported by radial hydrostatic bearing pads located near the four corners of the rectangular azimuth frame. The azimuth frame, in turn, is supported by four hydrostatic bearing pads and uses hydrodynamic roller bearings for centering. Each axis is gear driven by four large electric motors. In addition to precision optical motor encoders, each axis is equipped with Farrand Inductosyn strip encoders which yield 0.005 arcsecond resolution. The telescope weighs 580 metric tons and is designed to track with 0.03 arcsecond or better servo precision under wind speeds as high as 24 km/hr. Though the telescope is still under construction, the Mount Control System (MCS) has been routinely exercised to achieve First Light. The authors present a description of the unique, DSP-based synchronous architecture of the MCS and its capabilities.

  11. Helmet-mounted pilot night vision systems: Human factors issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.; Brickner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    Helmet-mounted displays of infrared imagery (forward-looking infrared (FLIR)) allow helicopter pilots to perform low level missions at night and in low visibility. However, pilots experience high visual and cognitive workload during these missions, and their performance capabilities may be reduced. Human factors problems inherent in existing systems stem from three primary sources: the nature of thermal imagery; the characteristics of specific FLIR systems; and the difficulty of using FLIR system for flying and/or visually acquiring and tracking objects in the environment. The pilot night vision system (PNVS) in the Apache AH-64 provides a monochrome, 30 by 40 deg helmet-mounted display of infrared imagery. Thermal imagery is inferior to television imagery in both resolution and contrast ratio. Gray shades represent temperatures differences rather than brightness variability, and images undergo significant changes over time. The limited field of view, displacement of the sensor from the pilot's eye position, and monocular presentation of a bright FLIR image (while the other eye remains dark-adapted) are all potential sources of disorientation, limitations in depth and distance estimation, sensations of apparent motion, and difficulties in target and obstacle detection. Insufficient information about human perceptual and performance limitations restrains the ability of human factors specialists to provide significantly improved specifications, training programs, or alternative designs. Additional research is required to determine the most critical problem areas and to propose solutions that consider the human as well as the development of technology.

  12. Whole Mount Dissection and Immunofluorescence of the Adult Mouse Cochlea.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Scott C; Cox, Brandon C

    2016-01-01

    The organ of Corti, housed in the cochlea of the inner ear, contains mechanosensory hair cells and surrounding supporting cells which are organized in a spiral shape and have a tonotopic gradient for sound detection. The mouse cochlea is approximately 6 mm long and often divided into three turns (apex, middle, and base) for analysis. To investigate cell loss, cell division, or mosaic gene expression, the whole mount or surface preparation of the cochlea is useful. This dissection method allows visualization of all cells within the organ of Corti when combined with immunostaining and confocal microscopy to image cells at different planes in the z-axis. Multiple optical cross-sections can also be obtained from these z-stack images. In addition, the whole mount dissection method can be used for scanning electron microscopy, although a different fixation method is needed. Here, we present a method to isolate the organ of Corti as three intact cochlear turns (apex, middle, and base). This method can be used for mice ranging from one week of age through adulthood and differs from the technique used for neonatal samples where calcification of the cochlea is incomplete. A slightly modified version can be used for dissection of the rat cochlea. We also demonstrate a procedure for immunostaining with fluorescently tagged antibodies. PMID:26779585

  13. Head-mounted spatial instruments: Synthetic reality or impossible dream

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, Stephen R.; Grunwald, Arthur; Velger, Mordekhai

    1988-01-01

    A spatial instrument is defined as a display device which has been either geometrically or symbolically enhanced to better enable a user to accomplish a particular task. Research conducted over the past several years on 3-D spatial instruments has shown that perspective displays, even when viewed from the correct viewpoint, are subject to systematic viewer biases. These biases interfere with correct spatial judgements of the presented pictorial information. It is also found that deliberate, appropriate geometric distortion of the perspective projection of an image can improve user performance. These two findings raise intriguing questions concerning the design of head-mounted spatial instruments. The design of such instruments may not only require the introduction of compensatory distortions to remove the neutrally occurring biases but also may significantly benefit from the introduction of artificial distortions which enhance performance. These image manipulations, however, can cause a loss of visual-vestibular coordination and induce motion sickness. Additionally, adaptation to these manipulations is apt to be impaired by computational delays in the image display. Consequently, the design of head-mounted spatial instruments will require an understanding of the tolerable limits of visual-vestibular discord.

  14. Design concepts for the EST mount

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kärcher, Hans J.; Süss, Martin; Fischer, David

    2012-09-01

    The EST has unique an optical layout, with an on-axis Gregorian tube system and the altitude axis behind the M1 mirror unit - a great challenge for the mount designer in regard of balancing. Three different structural design concepts and various alternatives for the bearing and drive systems were investigated. Hydrostatic bearings with direct drives are compared with roller bearings and geared drives. The influence of available bearing and drive technology were investigated by FE calculations, dynamic analysis and end-to-end simulations. The finally recommended design concept is based on large-diameter segmented roller bearings and so-called pinion motors in both axes.

  15. Star tracker for the Apollo telescope mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. E.

    1971-01-01

    The star tracker for the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) has been designed specifically to meet the requirements of the Skylab vehicle and mission. The functions of the star tracker are presented, as well as descriptions of the optical-mechanical assembly (OMA) and the star tracker electronics (STE). Also included are the electronic and mechanical specifications, interface and operational requirements, support equipment and test requirements, and occultation information. Laboratory functional tests, environmental qualification tests, and life tests have provided a high confidence factor in the performance of the star tracker in the laboratory and on the Skylab mission.

  16. Photovoltaic module mounting clip with integral grounding

    DOEpatents

    Lenox, Carl J.

    2008-10-14

    An electrically conductive mounting/grounding clip, for use with a photovoltaic assembly of the type having an electrically conductive frame, comprises an electrically conductive body. The body has a central portion and first and second spaced-apart arms extending generally perpendicular to the central portion. Each arm has an outer portion with each outer portion having an outer end. At least one frame surface-disrupting element is at each outer end. The central portion defines a plane with the frame surface-disrupting elements pointing towards the plane. In some examples each arm extends from the central portion at an acute angle to the plane.

  17. Next-generation head-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, James P., Jr.

    2010-02-01

    Head Mounted Displays (HMDs) have been utilized by the military for various applications since the 1980's. In the 1990's, this technology migrated to the consumer market. Most of these early systems suffered the major drawback that they were "look-at" versus "see through" systems, which prevented the user from seeing their environment. This reduced the utility of the devices and could potentially lead to safety issues. This presentation discusses the optical design of a novel see-through High Definition display device with a 40 degree field of view.

  18. Mount St. Helens Volcano, WA, USA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Mount St. Helens Volcano (46.0N, 122.0W) and its blast zone can be seen in this northeast looking infrared view. Mt. Rainier and Mt. Adams can also be seen in the near area. The Columbia River can be seen at the bottom of the view. When Mt. St. Helens erupted on 18 May 80, the top 1300 ft. disappeared within minutes. The blast area covered an area of more than 150 sq. miles and sent thousands of tons of ash into the upper atmosphere.

  19. Trace Metals in Amphibole from Mount St. Helens, Mt. Hood, Shiveluch, and Mount Pinatubo: Insight into Metal Mobility in Volcanic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loewen, M.; Kent, A. J.; Rowe, M. C.

    2013-12-01

    Arc magmas associated with subduction zones are often linked to the formation of some magmatic ore deposits. Observing the processes associated with metal mobility and enrichment in active arc volcanoes can elucidate the controls that lead to the formation of such ore deposits. In addition, volatile element mobility in a volcanic system may be related to the timing and style of volcanic eruptions. We have undertaken a study of trace metal abundances (Li, Cu, Zn, Pb, Sn, Mo, others) in amphibole from a number of intermediate volcanic systems to constrain the timing of trace metal mobility in arc magmas. Individual volcanoes show variable behavior. At Mount St. Helens, most analyzed metals show systematic variations similar to lithophile elements that can be explained with magma mixing and/or fractional crystallization. Lithium and Cu, however, are clearly decoupled from other trace elements, and concentrations vary by sample and date of eruption. For example, Li and Cu concentrations in amphibole are 3-5x higher in samples from the May 18 cryptodome than the May 18 pumice, in otherwise chemically identical phenocrysts. No significant zoning of Li or Cu has been observed. These two elements are likely transported in volatile fluids and rapidly equilibrated with phenocrysts in the region of volatile enrichment. In the case of the May 18 eruption, the cryptodome was fluxed with Li and Cu-bearing volatiles while it stalled at the top of a volatile-saturated magma chamber. Over the summer of 1980, variations in Li and Cu concentrations suggest Cu and Li were reconcentrated in magmas, as concentrations of Cu and Li exceeding that of the cryptodome occur in samples from the June 12 eruption, and the lowest concentrations are recorded from the July 22 and August 7 eruption. At Mt. Hood, Li and Cu concentrations correlate with each other but are decoupled from lithophile trace elements. Although two distinct depths of amphibole crystallization have been established for this

  20. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  1. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  2. MUSE: feeding and mounting 24 spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicklas, Harald; Seifert, Walter; Xu, Wenli; Hofmann, Denni; Köhler, Christof; Loupias, Magali

    2008-07-01

    The Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer MUSE is an integral field device containing 24 spectrographs at the Nasmyth focus of the VLT unit telescope. The total field size of 1'x1' needs to be split and separated into 24 sub-fields which are relayed along a central structure into the entrance aperture of the individual spectrographs. The realization of the optics for field splitting and separation as well as the relay optics to direct the light of the individual fields to the spectrographs is described here. A very tight link exists between the relay optics system layout and the mechanical arrangement of the spectrographs in the common central structure. A compact mounting is essential due to the restricted space for such a large instrument even on the VLT Nasmyth platform. A suitable arrangement of vertical and horizontal stacking of the spectrographs was found enabling their feeding from the unobstructed front side of the instrumental structure. The central instrument mount was designed as a stiff structure absorbing print-through effects due to thermal mismatch with the telescope platform but rigid enough to withstand earthquakes.

  3. Evaluation of shear mounted elastomeric damper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zorzi, E.; Walton, J.

    1982-01-01

    Viton-70 elastomeric shear mounted damper was built and tested on a T-55 power turbine spool in the rotor's high speed balancing rig. This application of a shear mounted elastomeric damper demonstrated for the first time, the feasibility of using elastomers as the primary rotor damping source in production turbine engine hardware. The shear damper design was selected because it was compatible with actual gas turbine engine radial space constraints, could accommodate both the radial and axial thrust loads present in gas turbine engines, and was capable of controlled axial preload. The shear damper was interchangeable with the production T-55 power turbine roller bearing support so that a direct comparison between the shear damper and the production support structure could be made. Test results show that the Viton-70 elastomer damper operated successfully and provided excellent control of both synchronous and nonsynchronous vibrations through all phases of testing up to the maximum rotor speed of 16,000 rpm. Excellent correlation between the predicted and experienced critical speeds, mode shapes and log decrements for the power turbine rotor and elastomer damper assembly was also achieved.

  4. Gas geothermometry for typical and atypical hydrothermal gases: A case study of Mount Mageik and Trident Volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taryn, Lopez; Tassi, Franco; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Chiodini, Giovanni; Fiebig, Jens; Rizzo, Andrea; Caliro, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    The chemical and isotopic composition of volcanic gases can be used to detect subsurface magma, qualitatively constrain magma degassing depth, evaluate temperature and pressure conditions of hydrothermal reservoirs, and constrain volatile sources, all of which are important for volcano monitoring, eruption forecasting and hazard mitigation. Two persistently degassing and seismically active volcanoes from the Katmai Volcanic Complex, Alaska, were targeted during this study to characterize subvolcanic conditions. Fumarole and steam condensate samples were collected for chemical and isotopic analysis from Mount Mageik and Trident Volcanoes in July 2013. These volcanoes are located within 10 km of each other, both show evidence for active hydrothermal systems, and both have boiling point temperature fumaroles, yet emit notably different gas compositions. Mount Mageik's gases are composed primarily of H20, CO2, H2S, and N2, with minor CH4, CO and H2 and negligible HCl amounts, reflecting a typical "hydrothermal" gas composition. Although, Trident's gases are somewhat similar in composition to those of Mount Mageik, they show several unusual features for hydrothermal fluids, most notably extremely high concentrations of reduced gas species. Specifically, the H2/H2O values are ≈1 log-unit lower (i.e. more reducing) than those produced by the rock redox buffers commonly dominating in a hydrothermal environment. These anomalous ratios are accompanied by relatively high concentrations high-temperature (CO, and H2S), and low temperature (CH4) gases, suggesting a strong chemical disequilibrium and/or chemical-physical conditions far from those typically acting on hydrothermal fluids. Additionally, when δ13C ratios of methane, ethane and propane are considered, a deviation from the expected "hydrothermal" carbon number trend is observed for Trident volcano, suggesting an "abiogenic reversal". Gas geothermometry in the H2O-CO2-H2-CO-CH4 system provides estimated temperatures

  5. 49 CFR 180.413 - Repair, modification, stretching, rebarrelling, or mounting of specification cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... to each repair, modification, stretching, rebarrelling, or mounting, the cargo tank motor vehicle must be emptied of any hazardous material lading. In addition, cargo tank motor vehicles used to... not required. When a repair is made of defects revealed by the wet fluorescent magnetic...

  6. 49 CFR 180.413 - Repair, modification, stretching, rebarrelling, or mounting of specification cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to each repair, modification, stretching, rebarrelling, or mounting, the cargo tank motor vehicle must be emptied of any hazardous material lading. In addition, cargo tank motor vehicles used to... not required. When a repair is made of defects revealed by the wet fluorescent magnetic...

  7. 49 CFR 180.413 - Repair, modification, stretching, rebarrelling, or mounting of specification cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... to each repair, modification, stretching, rebarrelling, or mounting, the cargo tank motor vehicle must be emptied of any hazardous material lading. In addition, cargo tank motor vehicles used to... not required. When a repair is made of defects revealed by the wet fluorescent magnetic...

  8. Transition of Mount Etna lavas from a mantle-plume to an island-arc magmatic source.

    PubMed

    Schiano, P; Clocchiatti, R; Ottolini, L; Busà, T

    2001-08-30

    Mount Etna lies near the boundary between two regions that exhibit significantly different types of volcanism. To the north, volcanism in the Aeolian island arc is thought to be related to subduction of the Ionian lithosphere. On Sicily itself, however, no chemical or seismological evidence of subduction-related volcanism exists, and so it is thought that the volcanism-including that on Mount Etna itself-stems from the upwelling of mantle material, associated with various surface tectonic processes. But the paucity of geological evidence regarding the primary composition of magma from Mount Etna means that its source characteristics remain controversial. Here we characterize the trace-element composition of a series of lavas emitted by Mount Etna over the past 500 kyr and preserved as melt inclusions inside olivine phenocrysts. We show that the compositional change in primary magmas from Mount Etna reflects a progressive transition from a predominantly mantle-plume source to one with a greater contribution from island-arc (subduction-related) basalts. We suggest that this is associated with southward migration of the Ionian slab, which is becoming juxtaposed with a mantle plume beneath Sicily. This implies that the volcanism of Mount Etna has become more calc-alkaline, and hence more explosive, during its evolution. PMID:11528476

  9. A compact eyetracked optical see-through head-mounted display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Hong; Gao, Chunyu

    2012-03-01

    An eye-tracked head-mounted display (ET-HMD) system is able to display virtual images as a classical HMD does, while additionally tracking the gaze direction of the user. There is ample evidence that a fully-integrated ETHMD system offers multi-fold benefits, not only to fundamental scientific research but also to emerging applications of such technology. For instance eyetracking capability in HMDs adds a very valuable tool and objective metric for scientists to quantitatively assess user interaction with 3D environments and investigate the effectiveness of various 3D visualization technologies for various specific tasks including training, education, and augmented cognition tasks. In this paper, we present an innovative optical approach to the design of an optical see-through ET-HMD system based on freeform optical technology and an innovative optical scheme that uniquely combines the display optics with the eye imaging optics. A preliminary design of the described ET-HMD system will be presented.

  10. Spectral measurements of HCl in the plume of the Antarctic Volcano Mount Erebus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keys, J. G.; Wood, S. W.; Jones, N. B.; Murcray, F. J.

    A favourable combination of circumstances on 7 September 1996 allowed tracking of the sun through the plume of the active Antarctic volcano, Mount Erebus (77.5°S, 167.2°E, height 3794m). Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) measurements were therefore possible from the Arrival Heights laboratory (77.8°S, 166.7°E), located approximately 30km south of the volcano. FTS scans were made with the interferometer looking upwind and downwind of the summit, resulting in spectra of HCl which showed large column enhancements of the gas when the sun was viewed through the volcanic plume. Pressure broadened spectra confirm that this enhancement was due to an additional tropospheric component in the column. Assumptions have been made of the plume dimensions and velocity, and a daily downwind flux of HCl derived. This is compared with the daily average flux emitted at the volcanic crater source during periods of passive outgassing, as derived from measurements using other techniques. The result suggests that for this quiescent type of emission from the volcano there is no evidence of rapid tropospheric scavenging of HCl, as might be expected for more explosive events and a less dry atmosphere.

  11. Weather And Death On Mount Everest: An Analysis Of The Into Thin Air Storm.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, G. W. K.; Semple, John L.

    2006-04-01

    Scientific interest in Mount Everest has been largely focused on the physiology of hypoxia caused by the summit's low barometric pressure. Although weather is recognized as a significant risk for climbers on the mountain, it has not been extensively studied. In this paper, we reconstruct the meteorological conditions associated with the deadly outbreak of high-impact weather on Mount Everest that occurred in May 1996 and was the subject of the best-selling book Into Thin Air. The authors show that during this event, two jet streaks—an upper-level short-wave trough and an intrusion of stratospheric air into the upper troposphere—were present in the vicinity of Mount Everest. Meanwhile, in the lower troposphere, there was convergence of water vapor transport from both the Arabian Sea and the Bay of Bengal into the region to the south of Mount Everest. The authors propose that the ageostrophic circulation associated with the upper-level features resulted in a region of large-scale ascent near Mount Everest that, in combination with the anomalous availability of moisture in the region, triggered convective activity. The resulting high-impact weather trapped over 20 climbers on Mount Everest's exposed upper slopes leading to the deaths of 8. These synoptic-scale characteristics provide some expectation of predicting life-threatening high-altitude storms in the Himalayas. In addition, the authors argue that the falling barometric pressure and the presence of ozone-rich stratospheric air that occurred near the summit of Mount Everest during this event could have shifted a coping climber from a state of brittle tolerance to physiological distress.

  12. Deposits of large volcanic debris avalanches at Mount St. Helens and Mount Shasta volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Glicken, H.

    1985-01-01

    Large volcanic debris avalanches are among the world's largest mass movements. The rockslide-debris avalanche of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens produced a 2.8 km/sup 3/ deposit and is the largest historic mass movement. A Pleistocene debris avalanche at Mount Shasta produced a 26 km/sup 3/ deposit that may be the largest Quaternary mass movement. The hummocky deposits at both volcanoes consist of rubble divided into (1) block facies that comprises unconsolidated pieces of the old edifice transported relatively intact, and (2) matrix facies that comprises a mixture of rocks from the old mountain and material picked up from the surrounding terrain. At Mount St. Helens, the juvenile dacite is found in the matrix facies, indicating that matrix facies formed from explosions of the erupting magma as well as from disaggregation and mixing of blocks. The block facies forms both hummocks and interhummock areas in the proximal part of the St. Helens avalanche deposit. At Mount St. Helens, the density of the old cone is 21% greater than the density of the avalanche deposit. Block size decreases with distance. Clast size, measured in the field and by sieving, coverages about a mean with distance, which suggests that blocks disaggregated and mixed together during transport.

  13. Side-mounted IR window aero-optic and aerothermal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pond, John E.; Welch, Charles T.; Sutton, George W.

    1999-07-01

    Addition of a side mounted IR seeker, to an existing missile design, introduces new issues involving the aerodynamic flow over the optical window and its near field effect on the ability of the seeker to view the target. Image aberration, distortion and boresight shift vary according to flow conditions and the thermal state of the window system. A detailed analysis of the aerodynamic flow and its aero-optic effect for a side mounted IR window was performed to quantify target image degradation, window heating and bending, and window structural failure probability due to aerothermal and aero-optical effects.

  14. Pedestrian Navigation Using Foot-Mounted Inertial Sensor and LIDAR

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duy Duong; Suh, Young Soo

    2016-01-01

    Foot-mounted inertial sensors can be used for indoor pedestrian navigation. In this paper, to improve the accuracy of pedestrian location, we propose a method using a distance sensor (LIDAR) in addition to an inertial measurement unit (IMU). The distance sensor is a time of flight range finder with 30 m measurement range (at 33.33 Hz). Using a distance sensor, walls on corridors are automatically detected. The detected walls are used to correct the heading of the pedestrian path. Through experiments, it is shown that the accuracy of the heading is significantly improved using the proposed algorithm. Furthermore, the system is shown to work robustly in indoor environments with many doors and passing people. PMID:26797619

  15. Digital Image Processing Overview For Helmet Mounted Displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parise, Michael J.

    1989-09-01

    Digital image processing provides a means to manipulate an image and presents a user with a variety of display formats that are not available in the analog image processing environment. When performed in real time and presented on a Helmet Mounted Display, system capability and flexibility are greatly enhanced. The information content of a display can be increased by the addition of real time insets and static windows from secondary sensor sources, near real time 3-D imaging from a single sensor can be achieved, graphical information can be added, and enhancement techniques can be employed. Such increased functionality is generating a considerable amount of interest in the military and commercial markets. This paper discusses some of these image processing techniques and their applications.

  16. Pedestrian Navigation Using Foot-Mounted Inertial Sensor and LIDAR.

    PubMed

    Pham, Duy Duong; Suh, Young Soo

    2016-01-01

    Foot-mounted inertial sensors can be used for indoor pedestrian navigation. In this paper, to improve the accuracy of pedestrian location, we propose a method using a distance sensor (LIDAR) in addition to an inertial measurement unit (IMU). The distance sensor is a time of flight range finder with 30 m measurement range (at 33.33 Hz). Using a distance sensor, walls on corridors are automatically detected. The detected walls are used to correct the heading of the pedestrian path. Through experiments, it is shown that the accuracy of the heading is significantly improved using the proposed algorithm. Furthermore, the system is shown to work robustly in indoor environments with many doors and passing people. PMID:26797619

  17. Mount St. Helens related aerosol properties from solar extinction measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michalsky, J. J.; Kleckner, E. W.; Stokes, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A network of solar radiometers, operated on the North American Continent for an average of 2 years before the first major eruption of Mount St. Helens, Washington, continues to collect direct solar data through the eruptive phase of this volcano. The radiometers collect spectral data through 12 interference filters spanning the sensitivity of the photodiode used as detector. The data are collected every 5 minutes in seven filters and every 15 minutes in five additional filters. A variant of the classical Langley method has been used to measure the optical depth of the aerosols as a function of wavelength. The network, which is the nearest station, is located some 180 kilometers east of the volcano, well within range of noticeable effects during much of the minor as well as major activity. The wavelength dependence of the aerosol-optical depth before and after the 22 July 1980 major eruption, which was well characterized because of favorable meteorological conditions is discussed.

  18. Eruptive history and petrology of Mount Drum volcano, Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, D.H.; Moll-Stalcup, E. J.; Miller, T.P.; Lanphere, M.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Smith, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    Mount Drum is one of the youngest volcanoes in the subduction-related Wrangell volcanic field (80x200 km) of southcentral Alaska. It lies at the northwest end of a series of large, andesite-dominated shield volcanoes that show a northwesterly progression of age from 26 Ma near the Alaska-Yukon border to about 0.2 Ma at Mount Drum. The volcano was constructed between 750 and 250 ka during at least two cycles of cone building and ring-dome emplacement and was partially destroyed by violent explosive activity probably after 250 ka. Cone lavas range from basaltic andesite to dacite in composition; ring-domes are dacite to rhyolite. The last constructional activity occured in the vicinity of Snider Peak, on the south flank of the volcano, where extensive dacite flows and a dacite dome erupted at about 250 ka. The climactic explosive eruption, that destroyed the top and a part of the south flank of the volcano, produced more than 7 km3 of proximal hot and cold avalanche deposits and distal mudflows. The Mount Drum rocks have medium-K, calc-alkaline affinities and are generally plagioclase phyric. Silica contents range from 55.8 to 74.0 wt%, with a compositional gap between 66.8 and 72.8 wt%. All the rocks are enriched in alkali elements and depleted in Ta relative to the LREE, typical of volcanic arc rocks, but have higher MgO contents at a given SiO2, than typical orogenic medium-K andesites. Strontium-isotope ratios vary from 0.70292 to 0.70353. The compositional range of Mount Drum lavas is best explained by a combination of diverse parental magmas, magma mixing, and fractionation. The small, but significant, range in 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the basaltic andesites and the wide range of incompatible-element ratios exhibited by the basaltic andesites and andesites suggests the presence of compositionally diverse parent magmas. The lavas show abundant petrographic evidence of magma mixing, such as bimodal phenocryst size, resorbed phenocrysts, reaction rims, and

  19. Fire and forest history at Mount Rushmore.

    PubMed

    Brown, Peter M; Wienk, Cody L; Symstad, Amy J

    2008-12-01

    Mount Rushmore National Memorial in the Black Hills of South Dakota is known worldwide for its massive sculpture of four of the United States' most respected presidents. The Memorial landscape also is covered by extensive ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest that has not burned in over a century. We compiled dendroecological and forest structural data from 29 plots across the 517-ha Memorial and used fire behavior modeling to reconstruct the historical fire regime and forest structure and compare them to current conditions. The historical fire regime is best characterized as one of low-severity surface fires with occasional (> 100 years) patches (< 100 ha) of passive crown fire. We estimate that only approximately 3.3% of the landscape burned as crown fire during 22 landscape fire years (recorded at > or = 25% of plots) between 1529 and 1893. The last landscape fire was in 1893. Mean fire intervals before 1893 varied depending on spatial scale, from 34 years based on scar-to-scar intervals on individual trees to 16 years between landscape fire years. Modal fire intervals were 11-15 years and did not vary with scale. Fire rotation (the time to burn an area the size of the study area) was estimated to be 30 years for surface fire and 800+ years for crown fire. The current forest is denser and contains more small trees, fewer large trees, lower canopy base heights, and greater canopy bulk density than a reconstructed historical (1870) forest. Fire behavior modeling using the NEXUS program suggests that surface fires would have dominated fire behavior in the 1870 forest during both moderate and severe weather conditions, while crown fire would dominate in the current forest especially under severe weather. Changes in the fire regime and forest structure at Mount Rushmore parallel those seen in ponderosa pine forests from the southwestern United States. Shifts from historical to current forest structure and the increased likelihood of crown fire justify the need for

  20. Space radar image of Mount Everest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    These are two comparison images of Mount Everest and its surroundings, along the border of Nepal and Tibet. The peak of Mount Everest, the highest elevation on Earth at 8,848 meters (29,028 feet), can be seen near the center of each image. The image at the top was acquired through thick cloud cover by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on April 16, 1994. The image on the bottom is an optical photograph taken by the Endeavour crew under clear conditions during the second flight of SIR-C/X-SAR on October 10, 1994. Both images show an area approximately 70 kilometers by 38 kilometers (43 miles by 24 miles) that is centered at 28.0 degrees north latitude and 86.9 degrees east longitude. North is toward the upper left. The colors in the radar image were obtained using the following radar channels: red represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received); green represents the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received); blue represents the C-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received). Radar illumination is from the top of the frame. The optical photograph has been geometrically adjusted to better match the area shown in the radar image. Many features of the Himalayan terrain are visible in both images. Snow covered areas appear white in the optical photograph while the same areas appear bright blue in the radar image. The radar image was taken in early spring and shows deep snow cover, while the optical photograph was taken in late summer and shows minimum snow cover. The curving and branching features seen in both images are glaciers. The two wavelengths and multiple polarizations of the SIR-C radar are sensitive to characteristics of the glacier surfaces that are not detected by conventional photography, such as the ice roughness, water content and stratification. For this reason, the glaciers show a variety of colors in the radar image (blue, purple, red

  1. Weather and Death on Mount Everest: Is there a link between Storms and Human Physiology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K.; Semple, J.

    2004-05-01

    Scientific interest in Mount Everest has been largely focused on the hypoxia caused by the summit's low barometric pressure. Although weather is recognized as a significant risk factor, it has not been extensively studied. Through the use of observations made at the mountain's South Col, elevation 7986m, and other datasets, we show that high impact weather events on Mount Everest, including the May 1996 storm in which 8 climbers perished, are often associated with continental-scale intrusions of stratospheric air into the upper-troposphere. The variability in wind speeds associated with these intrusions triggered convective activity that resulted in the high impact weather. In addition, the validation of existing meteorological data allows for useful insights into the possibility of forecasting these high impact weather events and their physiological impacts thereby mitigating deaths that occur on the exposed upper slopes of Mount Everest.

  2. Integrated crystal mounting and alignment system for high-throughput biological crystallography

    DOEpatents

    Nordmeyer, Robert A.; Snell, Gyorgy P.; Cornell, Earl W.; Kolbe, William F.; Yegian, Derek T.; Earnest, Thomas N.; Jaklevich, Joseph M.; Cork, Carl W.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2007-09-25

    A method and apparatus for the transportation, remote and unattended mounting, and visual alignment and monitoring of protein crystals for synchrotron generated x-ray diffraction analysis. The protein samples are maintained at liquid nitrogen temperatures at all times: during shipment, before mounting, mounting, alignment, data acquisition and following removal. The samples must additionally be stably aligned to within a few microns at a point in space. The ability to accurately perform these tasks remotely and automatically leads to a significant increase in sample throughput and reliability for high-volume protein characterization efforts. Since the protein samples are placed in a shipping-compatible layered stack of sample cassettes each holding many samples, a large number of samples can be shipped in a single cryogenic shipping container.

  3. Integrated crystal mounting and alignment system for high-throughput biological crystallography

    DOEpatents

    Nordmeyer, Robert A.; Snell, Gyorgy P.; Cornell, Earl W.; Kolbe, William; Yegian, Derek; Earnest, Thomas N.; Jaklevic, Joseph M.; Cork, Carl W.; Santarsiero, Bernard D.; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2005-07-19

    A method and apparatus for the transportation, remote and unattended mounting, and visual alignment and monitoring of protein crystals for synchrotron generated x-ray diffraction analysis. The protein samples are maintained at liquid nitrogen temperatures at all times: during shipment, before mounting, mounting, alignment, data acquisition and following removal. The samples must additionally be stably aligned to within a few microns at a point in space. The ability to accurately perform these tasks remotely and automatically leads to a significant increase in sample throughput and reliability for high-volume protein characterization efforts. Since the protein samples are placed in a shipping-compatible layered stack of sample cassettes each holding many samples, a large number of samples can be shipped in a single cryogenic shipping container.

  4. 6. SIDE ELEVATION, DETAIL SHOWING ORIGINAL LOG CONSTRUCTION, CLAPBOARD ADDITION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. SIDE ELEVATION, DETAIL SHOWING ORIGINAL LOG CONSTRUCTION, CLAPBOARD ADDITION AND CHIMNEY STACK - Shinn-Curtis Log Cabin, 23 Washington Street (moved from Rancocas Boulevard), Mount Holly, Burlington County, NJ

  5. Stereo Pair with Landsat Overlay, Mount Meru, Tanzania

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mount Meru is an active volcano located just 70 kilometers (44 miles)west of Mount Kilimanjaro. It reaches 4,566 meters (14,978 feet) in height but has lost much of its bulk due to an eastward volcanic blast sometime in its distant past, perhaps similar to the eruption of Mount Saint Helens in Washington State in 1980. Mount Meru most recently had a minor eruption about a century ago. The several small cones and craters seen in the vicinity probably reflect numerous episodes of volcanic activity. Mount Meru is the topographic centerpiece of Arusha National Park, but Ngurdoto Crater to the east (image top) is also prominent. The fertile slopes of both volcanoes rise above the surrounding savanna and support a forest that hosts diverse wildlife, including nearly 400 species of birds, and also monkeys and leopards, while the floor of Ngurdoto Crater hosts herds of elephants and buffaloes.

    This stereoscopic image was generated by draping a Landsat satellite image over a Shuttle Radar Topography Mission digital elevation model. Two differing perspectives were then calculated, one for each eye. They can be seen in 3-D by viewing the left image with the right eye and the right image with the left eye (cross-eyed viewing or by downloading and printing the image pair and viewing them with a stereoscope. When stereoscopically merged, the result is a vertically exaggerated view of Earth's surface in its full three dimensions.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot)resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar

  6. Space Station body mounted radiator design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleming, M. L.; Duschatko, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration has been given to utilizing the external area of the Space Station common modules or resource nodes to provide heat rejection. A program was undertaken to define the best body mounted radiator design, to define and build a full size test article and to conduct testing to verify performance. Trade studies were conducted and a preferred design selected. The selected design employed high performance grooved heat pipes of an off-the-shelf design. Twenty panels, each about 1.2 m wide by 5.6 m long are installed on each module rejecting a total of about 12 kW. The radiators are interfaced with the module thermal control loop by use of a refrigerant 21 loop with an on-orbit operable disconnect at each panel. A one-panel test article has been designed and is currently being fabricated. Testing is scheduled to be conducted in June of 1987.

  7. Temperature compensated sleeve type mirror mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The primary mirror of a large (26-inch diameter aperture) solar telescope was made of glass ceramic and designed with an integral hub on the back of the center of the mirror. This permits heat from the mirror to radiate off its back to a nearby cold plate. To permit mounting without high stresses, the hub was ground down to a smooth cylindrical surface 3.5 inch in diameter. The ground surface was then acid-etched to remove 0.007 inch (on the diameter) by immersion for five minutes in a mixture of four parts 92% sulfuric acid and three parts 50% hydrofluoric acid. The acid etching removes microcracks from the ground Cer-Vit surface. An Invar sleeve was fabricated to fit over the hub with about 0.010 inch radial (0.020 inch diametral) clearance.

  8. Reusable vibration resistant integrated circuit mounting socket

    DOEpatents

    Evans, Craig N.

    1995-01-01

    This invention discloses a novel form of socket for integrated circuits to be mounted on printed circuit boards. The socket uses a novel contact which is fabricated out of a bimetallic strip with a shape which makes the end of the strip move laterally as temperature changes. The end of the strip forms a barb which digs into an integrated circuit lead at normal temperatures and holds it firmly in the contact, preventing loosening and open circuits from vibration. By cooling the contact containing the bimetallic strip the barb end can be made to release so that the integrated circuit lead can be removed from the socket without damage either to the lead or to the socket components.

  9. Article mounting and position adjustment stage

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, Ronald W.; Silva, Leonard L.

    1988-01-01

    An improved adjustment and mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A ring sensor holder has locating pins on a first side thereof which are positioned within a linear keyway in a surrounding housing for permitting reciprocal movement of the ring along the keyway. A rotatable ring gear is positioned within the housing on the other side of the ring from the linear keyway and includes an oval keyway which drives the ring along the linear keyway upon rotation of the gear. Motor-driven single-stage and dual (x, y) stage adjustment systems are disclosed which are of compact construction and include a large laser transmission hole.

  10. Article mounting and position adjustment stage

    DOEpatents

    Cutburth, R.W.; Silva, L.L.

    1988-05-10

    An improved adjustment and mounting stage of the type used for the detection of laser beams is disclosed. A ring sensor holder has locating pins on a first side thereof which are positioned within a linear keyway in a surrounding housing for permitting reciprocal movement of the ring along the keyway. A rotatable ring gear is positioned within the housing on the other side of the ring from the linear keyway and includes an oval keyway which drives the ring along the linear keyway upon rotation of the gear. Motor-driven single-stage and dual (x, y) stage adjustment systems are disclosed which are of compact construction and include a large laser transmission hole. 6 figs.

  11. The Advanced Technology Solar Telescope mount assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, Mark; Cho, Myung; Goodrich, Bret; Hansen, Eric; Hubbard, Rob; Lee, Joon Pyo; Wagner, Jeremy

    2006-06-01

    When constructed on the summit of Haleakala on the island of Maui, Hawaii, the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) will be the world's largest solar telescope. The ATST is a unique design that utilizes a state-of-the-art off-axis Gregorian optical layout with five reflecting mirrors delivering light to a Nasmyth instrument rotator, and nine reflecting mirrors delivering light to an instrument suite located on a large diameter rotating coude lab. The design of the telescope mount structure, which supports and positions the mirrors and scientific instruments, has presented noteworthy challenges to the ATST engineering staff. Several novel design solutions, as well as adaptations of existing telescope technologies to the ATST application, are presented in this paper. Also shown are plans for the control system and drives of the structure.

  12. Solder Mounting Technologies for Electronic Packaging

    SciTech Connect

    VIANCO, PAUL T.

    1999-09-23

    Soldering provides a cost-effective means for attaching electronic packages to circuit boards using both small scale and large scale manufacturing processes. Soldering processes accommodate through-hole leaded components as well as surface mount packages, including the newer area array packages such as the Ball Grid Arrays (BGA), Chip Scale Packages (CSP), and Flip Chip Technology. The versatility of soldering is attributed to the variety of available solder alloy compositions, substrate material methodologies, and different manufacturing processes. For example, low melting temperature solders are used with temperature sensitive materials and components. On the other hand, higher melting temperature solders provide reliable interconnects for electronics used in high temperature service. Automated soldering techniques can support large-volume manufacturing processes, while providing high reliability electronic products at a reasonable cost.

  13. Lidar measurements of Mount St. Helens effluents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, M. P.

    1982-01-01

    Lidar measurements of the worldwide movement of stratospheric aerosols produced by the 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens are described. Ground-based and airborne measurements show that the layers below 20 km produced by this eruption moved in an easterly direction while those above 20 km moved in a westerly direction. The effluent at jet stream altitudes of 10 to 12 km circled the globe in about 16 days and the effluent at 23 km (the highest altitude recorded) circled the globe in about 56 days. Mass calculations, using backscatter-to-mass conversion models, indicate that approximately half a million metric tons of new stratospheric material were produced by this eruption. Even though this represents a 200% increase in Northern Hemispheric aerosol, no significant long-term atmospheric temperature change should occur.

  14. In the wake of Mount St Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Nania, J.; Bruya, T.E.

    1982-04-01

    On May 18, 1980, Mount St Helens, Washington State's most active volcano, erupted violently. Volcanic eruptions in recent geologic history have demonstrated tremendous environmental impact and caused significant loss of human life. Volcanic ash expelled during the eruption was deposited on much of eastern Washington and had a profound effect on local air quality. Although ash is relatively inert, analysis revealed a small but significant amount of free crystalline silica, the causative agent of silicosis. The fine particles of ash were of respirable size, and there was a remarkable increase in the volume of respiratory cases seen in emergency departments during the period of high airborne particulate levels. Numerous cases of injury indirectly related to the fall of ash were also seen. The long-term effect of exposure to this volcanic ash is unknown. A prompt, coordinated community medical response is necessary to protect the general population from the potential hazard of exposure to volcanic ash.

  15. Mount St. Helens' volcanic ash: hemolytic activity.

    PubMed

    Vallyathan, V; Mentnech, M S; Stettler, L E; Dollberg, D D; Green, F H

    1983-04-01

    Volcanic ash samples from four Mount St. Helens' volcanic eruptions were subjected to mineralogical, analytical, and hemolytic studies in order to evaluate their potential for cytotoxicity and fibrogenicity. Plagioclase minerals constituted the major component of the ash with free crystalline silica concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 7.2%. The in vitro hemolytic activity of the volcanic ash was compared to similar concentrations of cytotoxic and inert minerals. The ash was markedly hemolytic, exhibiting an activity similar to chrysotile asbestos, a known fibrogenic agent. The hemolysis of the different ash samples varied with particle size but not with crystalline silica concentration. The results of these studies taken in conjunction with the results of our animal studies indicate a fibrogenic potential of volcanic ash in heavily exposed humans. PMID:6832120

  16. A visit to Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Meadows, D.G.

    1994-04-01

    The May 18, 1980, eruption displaced roughly 2.6 km[sup 3] of rock and devastated more than 500 km[sup 2] of forest, mostly to the north of the mountain. Trees within 10--15 km of the mountain peak were burned and uprooted. Beyond that, high winds and flying debris created a blowdown zone. Up to 150 m of rock and ice covered some areas. Accumulations of ash were measured as much as 330 km from the volcano. Mud flows choked nearby rivers and streams. Two years later, the US Congress established the 44,000-hectare Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument. The Act essentially directed the USDA Forest Service to allow the area to recover naturally. The paper reviews what changes the ecosystem has been going through since the eruption and the lessons learned that suggest some new resource management techniques.

  17. In the wake of Mount St Helens.

    PubMed

    Nania, J; Bruya, T E

    1982-04-01

    On May 18, 1980, Mount St Helens, Washington State's most active volcano, erupted violently. Volcanic eruptions in recent geologic history have demonstrated tremendous environmental impact and caused significant loss of human life. Volcanic ash expelled during the eruption was deposited on much of eastern Washington and had a profound effect on local air quality. Although ash is relatively inert, analysis revealed a small but significant amount of free crystalline silica, the causative agent of silicosis. The fine particles of ash were of respirable size, and there was a remarkable increase in the volume of respiratory cases seen in emergency departments during the period of high airborne particulate levels. Numerous cases of injury indirectly related to the fall of ash were also seen. The long-term effect of exposure to this volcanic ash is unknown. A prompt, coordinated community medical response is necessary to protect the general population from the potential hazard of exposure to volcanic ash. PMID:7073033

  18. Mount Unzen dome continues to grow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volcanic activity on Japan's Mount Unzen, which erupted on June 3 killing 41 people, continues to build, according to latest reports. Dome extrusion and pyroclastic-flow formation continued at Unzen as of June 24. On June 14, the dome was 100 m wide and 50 m high; it grew another 20 m in height by June 16. Cracks in the dome emitted gas to 200-300 m height, and periodic explosions produced 1-km-high ash columns. The evacuation area was expanded on June 17, bringing the total number of evacuees to more than 10,000. The following report on recent activity at Unzen was provided by the Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Network. All times are local (= UT + 9 hours).

  19. Mount Hood Wilderness and adjacent areas, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Keith, T.E.C.; Causey, J.D.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Mount Hood Wilderness, Oregon, was conducted in 1980. Geochemical data indicate two areas of substantiated mineral-resource potential containing weak epithermal mineralization: an area on the north side of Zigzag Mountain, where vein-type lead-zinc-silver deposits occur and an area on the south side of Zigzag Mountain, where the upper part of a quartz diorite pluton has propylitic alteration associated with mineralization of copper, gold, silver, lead, and zinc in discontinuous veins. Geothermal-resource potential for low- to intermediate-temperature (less than 248/sup 0/F) hot-water systems in the wilderness is probable in three areas. Part of the wilderness is classified as a Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA), which is considered to have probable geothermal-resource potential, and two parts of the wilderness have been included in geothermal lease areas.

  20. Environmental evaluation of Surface Mounted Devices (SMD)

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, V.C.; Andrade, A.D.

    1997-06-01

    We evaluated the comparative reliability of solder interconnections used for Leadless Chip Carriers (LCCs), Meaded, and flat-pack hybrid microcircuits mounted on FR-4 glass epoxy printed wiring boards (PWBs). The board assemblies, with solder attached microcircuits, were repeatedly thermal cycled from - 65 to +125{degrees}C. We recognize that this temperature range far exceeds most testing of assemblies. The purposes of these tests were to evaluate worst-case conditions and to obtain comparative information. Identical PWB assemblies, using these three component types, were subjected to both thermal shock testing (1 cycle every 42 minutes) and temperature cycle testing (1 cycle every 3 hours). The double testing evaluated the differences in stress application and evaluated the potential of replacing slow transition, expensive temperature cycle testing (which has been an industry standard for years) with the much more rapid thermal shock testing.

  1. Analytical results and sample locality map of stream-sediment, heavy-mineral-concentrate, and rock samples from the Little Rockies, Mount Pennell, and Mount Hillers Wilderness Study Areas (UT-050-247,248,249), Garfield County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Detra, D.E.; Erickson, M.S.; Kemp, W.M. III; Willson, W.R.

    1984-01-01

    This report presents the results of a geochemical and mineralogical survey of the Little Rockies, Mount Pennell, and Mount Hillers Wilderness Study Areas (UT-050-247,248,249), Garfield County, Utah. The Little Rockies, Mount Pennell, and Mount Hillers Wilderness Study Areas comprise about 350 mi/sup 2/ (910 km/sup 2/) in Garfield County, Utah. The study areas occupy the southern portion of the Henry Mountains and includes Mount Pennell, Mount Hillers, and Mount Ellsworth. The areas consist of a series of diorite porphyry laccoliths and their satellite bodies, all of Eocene age, which intrude the 8000 ft (2500 m) thick Henry Basin sediments which range in age from Permian to Holocene. Only Triassic and younger rocks are exposed in the areas. Samples were collected at 153 sites. At nearly all of those sites, both a stream-sediment sample and a heavy-mineral-concentrate sample were collected. Where suitable outcrop was available, rock samples were collected. In addition to the spectrographic analysis all heavy-mineral-concentrate samples were mineralogically analyzed. Minerals reported include zircon (round and euhedral), sphene, rutile, anatase, barite, apatite, scheelite, epidote, pyrite, pyroxene, arsenopyrite, amphibole, and rock fragments.

  2. Overview Of Mount St. Helens Volcanic Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilling, Robert I.

    Dormant since 1857, Mount St. Helens Volcano in southwestern Washington stirred from its repose to erupt on March 27, 1980, following a week of premonitory earthquake activity. The eruption was the first in the conterminous United States since the 1914-1921 activity of Lassen Peak, California. The eruptive activity through May 17 was intermittent and relatively mild, but the accompanying seismic activity remained intense. On May 18, a catastrophic eruption, triggered by a magnitude 5.0 earthquake, produced a massive landslide/debris avalanche, a devastating lateral "blast," pyroclastic flows, mudflows, and an ash column that rose more than 20 km into the stratosphere. Winds carried the ash easterly, and more than 7 cm of ash was deposited locally in parts of eastern Washington. The landslide/debris avalanche and associated mudflows caused flooding of the Toutle and Cowlitz River valleys, which carried sediment as far as the confluence with the Columbia, where it choked off the channel to navigation. Smaller but significant explosive eruptions followed in May, June, July, August, and October, 1980, with lava domes being extruded in the crater following the June, August, and October eruptions. Subsequently in December 1980 and February 1981, lava domes were extruded without significant preceding explosive activity. Except for the latter two, each dome was partly or wholly destroyed by succeeding explosive events. Scientists expect similar activity to continue for months or years--possibly even decades. The Mount St. Helens eruptions severely tested the ability of scientists to respond swiftly and effectively in assisting public officials during a geologic disaster. At the same time, they shall continue to provide an unprecedented opportunity for the systematic investigation of volcanic phenomena, and hopefully, the insight to meet possible future eruptions there and elsewhere in the Cascade Range with equal success.

  3. The Mount Rainier Lahar Detection System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockhart, A. B.; Murray, T. L.

    2003-12-01

    To mitigate the risk of unheralded lahars from Mount Rainier, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Pierce County, Washington, installed a lahar-detection system on the Puyallup and Carbon rivers that originate on Mount Rainier's western slopes. The system, installed in 1998, is designed to automatically detect the passage of lahars large enough to potentially affect populated areas downstream (approximate volume threshold 40 million cubic meters), while ignoring small lahars, earthquakes, extreme weather and floods. Along each river valley upstream, arrays of independent lahar-monitoring stations equipped with geophones and short tripwires telemeter data to a pair of redundant computer base stations located in and near Tacoma at existing public safety facilities that are staffed around the clock. Monitored data consist of ground-vibration levels, tripwire status, and transmissions at regular intervals. The base stations automatically evaluate these data to determine if a dangerous lahar is passing through the station array. The detection algorithm requires significant ground vibration to occur at those stations in the array that are above the anticipated level of inundation, while lower level `deadman' stations, inundated by the flow, experience tripwire breakage or are destroyed. Once a base station detects a lahar, it alerts staff who execute a call-down of public-safety officials and schools, initiating evacuation of areas potentially at risk. Because the system's risk-mitigation task imposes high standards of reliability on all components, it has been under test for several years. To date, the system has operated reliably and without false alarms, including during the nearby M6.8 Nisqually Earthquake on February 28, 2001. The system is being turned over to Pierce County, and activated as part of their lahar warning system.

  4. Birth defects and household water supply. Epidemiological studies in the Mount Gambier region of South Australia.

    PubMed

    Scragg, R K; Dorsch, M M; McMichael, A J; Baghurst, P A

    We report a descriptive study indicating a localised excess of congenital malformations in Mount Gambier, South Australia, and summary results of a subsequent case-control study showing an association between the occurrence of congenital malformations and the consumption of underground water by pregnant women. The internal cohesion of the data analyses, and the plausibility conferred by experimental evidence, suggests that the underground water, and its elevated concentration of nitrates, may warrant further consideration as a source of human teratogens. PMID:7162445

  5. Camera Mount for a Head-Up Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geoge, Wayne; Barnes, Monica; Johnson, Larry; Shelton, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    A mounting mechanism was designed and built to satisfy requirements specific to a developmental head-up display (HUD) to be used by pilots in a Boeing 757 airplane. This development was necessitated by the fact that although such mounting mechanisms were commercially available for other airplanes, there were none for the 757. The mounting mechanism supports a miniature electronic camera that provides a forward view. The mechanism was designed to be integrated with the other HUD instrumentation and to position the camera so that what is presented to the pilot is the image acquired by the camera, overlaid with alphanumeric and/or graphical symbols, from a close approximation of the pilot s natural forward perspective. The mounting mechanism includes an L-shaped mounting arm that can be adjusted easily to the pilot s perspective, without prior experience. The mounting mechanism is lightweight and flexible and presents little hazard to the pilot.

  6. Debris-flow hazards caused by hydrologic events at Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vallance, James W.; Cunico, Michelle L.; Schilling, Steve P.

    2003-01-01

    At 4393 m, ice-clad Mount Rainier has great potential for debris flows owing to its precipitous slopes and incised steep valleys, the large volume of water stored in its glaciers, and a mantle of loose debris on its slopes. In the past 10,000 years, more than sixty Holocene lahars have occurred at Mount Rainier (Scott et al., 1985), and, in addition more than thirty debris flows not related to volcanism have occurred in historical time (Walder and Driedger, 1984). Lahars at Mount Rainier can be classed in 3 groups according to their genesis: (1) flank collapse of hydrothermally altered, water-saturated rock; (2) eruption-related release of water and loose debris; and (3) hydrologic release of water and debris (Scott et al., 1985). Lahars in the first two categories are commonly voluminous and are generally related to unrest and explosions that occur during eruptive episodes. Lahars in the third category, distinguished here as debris flows, are less voluminous than the others but occur frequently at Mount Rainier, often with little or no warning. Historically at Mount Rainier, glacial outburst floods, torrential rains, and stream capture have caused small- to moderate-size debris flows (Walder and Driedger, 1984). Such debris flows are most likely to occur in drainages that have large glaciers in them. Less commonly, a drainage diversion has triggered a debris flow in an unglaciated drainage basin. For example, the diversion of Kautz Glacier meltwater into Van Trump basin triggered debris flows on the south side of Rainier in August 2001. On the basis of historical accounts, debris flows having hydrologic origins are likely to be unheralded, and have occurred as seldom as once in 8 years and as often as four times per year at Mount Rainier (Walder and Driedger, 1984). Such debris flows are most likely to occur during periods of hot dry weather or during periods of intense rainfall, and therefore must occur during the summer and fall. They are likely to begin at or

  7. A multiple pointing-mount control strategy for space platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. D.

    1992-01-01

    A new disturbance-adaptive control strategy for multiple pointing-mount space platforms is proposed and illustrated by consideration of a simplified 3-link dynamic model of a multiple pointing-mount space platform. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the new platform control strategy. The simulation results also reveal a system 'destabilization phenomena' that can occur if the set of individual platform-mounted experiment controllers are 'too responsive.'

  8. Additions to the stoneflies (Plecoptera) of Mount Rainier National Park, Washington, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kondratieff, B.C.; Lechleitner, R.A.; Zuellig, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    In summary, 88 species of stoneflies are now known from MRNP, representing 65% of the recorded Washington State fauna (Stark and Baumann 2005). At least two of these species are apparently restricted to the MRNP, Soliperla fenderi (Jewett) (Stark and Gustafson 2004) and P. lechleitneri.

  9. Mount Ararat, Turkey, Perspective with Landsat Image Overlay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This perspective view shows Mount Ararat in easternmost Turkey, which has been the site of several searches for the remains of Noah's Ark. The main peak, known as Great Ararat, is the tallest peak in Turkey, rising to 5165 meters (16,945 feet). This southerly, near horizontal view additionally shows the distinctly conically shaped peak known as 'Little Ararat' on the left. Both peaks are volcanoes that are geologically young, but activity during historic times is uncertain.

    This image was generated from a Landsat satellite image draped over an elevation model produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM). The view uses a 1.25-times vertical exaggeration to enhance topographic expression. Natural colors of the scene are enhanced by image processing, inclusion of some infrared reflectance (as green) to highlight the vegetation pattern, and inclusion of shading of the elevation model to further highlight the topographic features.

    Volcanoes pose hazards for people, the most obvious being the threat of eruption. But other hazards are associated with volcanoes too. In 1840 an earthquake shook the Mount Ararat region, causing an unstable part of mountain's north slope to tumble into and destroy a village. Visualizations of satellite imagery when combined with elevation models can be used to reveal such hazards leading to disaster prevention through improved land use planning.

    But the hazards of volcanoes are balanced in part by the benefits they provide. Over geologic time volcanic materials break down to form fertile soils. Cultivation of these soils has fostered and sustained civilizations, as has occurred in the Mount Ararat region. Likewise, tall volcanic peaks often catch precipitation, providing a water supply to those civilizations. Mount Ararat hosts an icefield and set of glaciers, as seen here in this late summer scene, that are part of this beneficial natural process

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar

  10. Retired NASA F-18 being mounted on pedestal mount at Lancaster California Municipal Baseball Stadium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    While workers on the ground steady the craft with guy ropes, workers atop a high-lift truck align the mounting plates as an F/A-18 Hornet airplane formerly flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center is mounted on a 28-foot-tall pedestal in front of the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. The aircraft was loaned to the city for pulbic display after its recent retirement by Dryden, which is located at nearby Edwards, California. The blue-and-white twin-jet aircraft was flown as a safety chase and support aircraft by NASA Dryden for about nine years before being retired. Known as 'The Hangar,' the stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.

  11. Convenient mounting method for electrical measurements of thin samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matus, L. G.; Summers, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    A method for mounting thin samples for electrical measurements is described. The technique is based on a vacuum chuck concept in which the vacuum chuck simultaneously holds the sample and established electrical contact. The mounting plate is composed of a glass-ceramic insulating material and the surfaces of the plate and vacuum chuck are polished. The operation of the vacuum chuck is examined. The contacts on the sample and mounting plate, which are sputter-deposited through metal masks, are analyzed. The mounting method was utilized for van der Pauw measurements.

  12. Static Performance of a Wing-Mounted Thrust Reverser Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asbury, Scott C.; Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1998-01-01

    An experimental investigation was conducted in the Jet-Exit Test Facility at NASA Langley Research Center to study the static aerodynamic performance of a wing-mounted thrust reverser concept applicable to subsonic transport aircraft. This innovative engine powered thrust reverser system is designed to utilize wing-mounted flow deflectors to produce aircraft deceleration forces. Testing was conducted using a 7.9%-scale exhaust system model with a fan-to-core bypass ratio of approximately 9.0, a supercritical left-hand wing section attached via a pylon, and wing-mounted flow deflectors attached to the wing section. Geometric variations of key design parameters investigated for the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept included flow deflector angle and chord length, deflector edge fences, and the yaw mount angle of the deflector system (normal to the engine centerline or parallel to the wing trailing edge). All tests were conducted with no external flow and high pressure air was used to simulate core and fan engine exhaust flows. Test results indicate that the wing-mounted thrust reverser concept can achieve overall thrust reverser effectiveness levels competitive with (parallel mount), or better than (normal mount) a conventional cascade thrust reverser system. By removing the thrust reverser system from the nacelle, the wing-mounted concept offers the nacelle designer more options for improving nacelle aero dynamics and propulsion-airframe integration, simplifying nacelle structural designs, reducing nacelle weight, and improving engine maintenance access.

  13. Visual feedback mounted on surgical tool: proof of concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, K.; Vaughan, T.; Holden, M.; Gauvin, G.; Pezeshki, P.; Lasso, A.; Ungi, T.; Morin, E.; Rudan, J.; Engel, C. J.; Fichtinger, G.

    2016-03-01

    PURPOSE: When using surgical navigation systems in the operating room, feedback is typically displayed on a computer monitor. The surgeon's attention is usually focused on the tool and the surgical site, so the display is typically out of the direct line of sight. The purpose is to develop a visual feedback device mounted on an electromagnetically tracked electrosurgical cauterizer which will provide navigation information for the surgeon in their field of view. METHODS: A study was conducted to determine the usefulness of the visual feedback in adjunct to the navigation system currently in use. Subjects were asked to follow tumor contours with the tracked cauterizer using 3D screen navigation with the mounted visual feedback and the 3D navigation screen alone. The movements of the cauterizer were recorded. RESULTS: The study showed a significant decrease in the subjects' distance from the tumor margin, a significant increase in the subjects' confidence to avoid cutting the tumor and a statistically significant reduction in the subjects' perception of the need to look at the screen when using the visual feedback device compared to without. DISCUSSION: The LED feedback device helped the subjects feel confident in their ability to identify safe margins and minimize the amount of healthy tissue removed in the tumor resection. CONCLUSION: Good potential for the visual LED feedback has been shown. With additional training, this approach promises to lead to improved resection technique, with fewer cuts into the tumor and less healthy tissue removed.

  14. Seasonality of Shallow Icequakes at Mount Erebus Volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, H. A.; Aster, R. C.; Kyle, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    Background (non-eruptive) seismicity at Mount Erebus Volcano is dominated by icequake activity on its extensive ice fields and glaciers. We examine icequake seismograms recorded by both long-running and temporary densification deployments spanning seven years (2003-2009) to assess event frequency, size, apparent seasonality, event mechanism, and geographic distribution. In addition to generally investigating mountain glacial ice seismicity in cold and dry glacial environments, we also hope to exploit icequakes as local sources for tomographic imaging of the volcano’s interior in conjunction with 2008-2010 active source and explosive volcanism data. Using Antelope-based methodologies, we determined the distribution and magnitude of a subset of well-recorded icequakes using data from the long-running Mount Erebus Volcano Network (MEVO) network, as well as two dense IRIS PASSCAL supported temporary networks deployed during 2008 and 2009 (the MEVO network consists of six broadband and nine short period stations with environmental data streams; the dense arrays consisted of 24 broadband stations arranged in two concentric rings around the volcano and 99 short period stations deployed near the summit of Erebus volcano and along the Terror-Erebus axis of Ross Island). During each of the seven years, we note a number of large icequake swarms (up to many hundreds of events per day). We hypothesize that many of these events occur in very shallow ice, based on the apparent ambient temperature-driven seasonality of the events. Specifically, approximately 43% of the events occur between March and May and approximately 30% occur between October and December. Each of these times feature rapidly changing ambient air temperatures due to the high latitude appearance/disappearance of the sun. A shallow mechanism is predicted by 1-D thermal skin depth calculations that show that annual temperature fluctuations decay by 1/e within the top few meters of ice.

  15. Distribution of melt beneath Mount St Helens and Mount Adams inferred from magnetotelluric data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hill, G.J.; Caldwell, T.G.; Heise, W.; Chertkoff, D.G.; Bibby, H.M.; Burgess, M.K.; Cull, J.P.; Cas, Ray A.F.

    2009-01-01

    Three prominent volcanoes that form part of the Cascade mountain range in Washington State (USA)Mounts StHelens, Adams and Rainierare located on the margins of a mid-crustal zone of high electrical conductivity1,5. Interconnected melt can increase the bulk conductivity of the region containing the melt6,7, which leads us to propose that the anomalous conductivity in this region is due to partial melt associated with the volcanism. Here we test this hypothesis by using magnetotelluric data recorded at a network of 85 locations in the area of the high-conductivity anomaly. Our data reveal that a localized zone of high conductivity beneath thisvolcano extends downwards to join the mid-crustal conductor. As our measurements were made during the recent period of lava extrusion at Mount St Helens, we infer that the conductivity anomaly associated with the localized zone, and by extension with the mid-crustal conductor, is caused by the presence of partial melt. Our interpretation is consistent with the crustal origin of silicic magmas erupting from Mount St Helens8, and explains the distribution of seismicity observed at the time of the catastrophic eruption in 1980 (refs9, 10). ?? 2009 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  16. Geology of Mount Rainier National Park, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fiske, Richard S.; Hopson, Clifford Andrae; Waters, Aaron Clement

    1963-01-01

    Mount Rainier National Park includes 378 square miles of rugged terrain on the west slope of the Cascade Mountains in central Washington. Its mast imposing topographic and geologic feature is glacier-clad Mount Rainier. This volcano, composed chiefly of flows of pyroxene andesite, was built upon alt earlier mountainous surface, carved from altered volcanic and sedimentary rocks invaded by plutonic and hypabyssal igneous rocks of great complexity. The oldest rocks in the park area are those that make up the Olmnapecosh Formation of late Eocene age. This formation is more than 10,000 feet thick, and consists almost entirely of volcanic debris. It includes some lensoid accumulations of lava and coarse mudflows, heaped around volcanic centers., but these are surrounded by vastly greater volumes of volcanic clastic rocks, in which beds of unstratified coarse tuff-breccia, about 30 feet in average thickness, alternate with thin-bedded breccias, sandstones, and siltstones composed entirely of volcanic debris. The coarser tuff-breccias were probably deposited from subaqueous volcanic mudflows generated when eruption clouds were discharged directly into water, or when subaerial ash flows and mudflows entered bodies of water. The less mobile mudflows and viscous lavas built islands surrounded by this sea of thinner bedded water-laid clastics. In compostion the lava flows and coarse lava fragments of the Ohanapecosh Formation are mostly andesite, but they include less abundant dacite, basalt, and rhyolite. The Ohanapecosh Formation was folded, regionally altered to minerals characteristic of the zeolite facies of metamorphism, uplifted, and deeply eroded before the overlying Stevens Ridge Formation of Oligocene or early Miocene age was deposited upon it. The Stevens Ridge rocks, which are about 3,000 feet in maximum total thickness, consist mainly of massive ash flows. These are now devitrified and altered, but they originally consisted of rhyodacite pumice lapilli and glass

  17. Assembling surface mounted components on ink-jet printed double sided paper circuit board.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Henrik A; Manuilskiy, Anatoliy; Haller, Stefan; Hummelgård, Magnus; Sidén, Johan; Hummelgård, Christine; Olin, Håkan; Nilsson, Hans-Erik

    2014-03-01

    Printed electronics is a rapidly developing field where many components can already be manufactured on flexible substrates by printing or by other high speed manufacturing methods. However, the functionality of even the most inexpensive microcontroller or other integrated circuit is, at the present time and for the foreseeable future, out of reach by means of fully printed components. Therefore, it is of interest to investigate hybrid printed electronics, where regular electrical components are mounted on flexible substrates to achieve high functionality at a low cost. Moreover, the use of paper as a substrate for printed electronics is of growing interest because it is an environmentally friendly and renewable material and is, additionally, the main material used for many packages in which electronics functionalities could be integrated. One of the challenges for such hybrid printed electronics is the mounting of the components and the interconnection between layers on flexible substrates with printed conductive tracks that should provide as low a resistance as possible while still being able to be used in a high speed manufacturing process. In this article, several conductive adhesives are evaluated as well as soldering for mounting surface mounted components on a paper circuit board with ink-jet printed tracks and, in addition, a double sided Arduino compatible circuit board is manufactured and programmed. PMID:24521824

  18. Assembling surface mounted components on ink-jet printed double sided paper circuit board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Henrik A.; Manuilskiy, Anatoliy; Haller, Stefan; Hummelgård, Magnus; Sidén, Johan; Hummelgård, Christine; Olin, Håkan; Nilsson, Hans-Erik

    2014-03-01

    Printed electronics is a rapidly developing field where many components can already be manufactured on flexible substrates by printing or by other high speed manufacturing methods. However, the functionality of even the most inexpensive microcontroller or other integrated circuit is, at the present time and for the foreseeable future, out of reach by means of fully printed components. Therefore, it is of interest to investigate hybrid printed electronics, where regular electrical components are mounted on flexible substrates to achieve high functionality at a low cost. Moreover, the use of paper as a substrate for printed electronics is of growing interest because it is an environmentally friendly and renewable material and is, additionally, the main material used for many packages in which electronics functionalities could be integrated. One of the challenges for such hybrid printed electronics is the mounting of the components and the interconnection between layers on flexible substrates with printed conductive tracks that should provide as low a resistance as possible while still being able to be used in a high speed manufacturing process. In this article, several conductive adhesives are evaluated as well as soldering for mounting surface mounted components on a paper circuit board with ink-jet printed tracks and, in addition, a double sided Arduino compatible circuit board is manufactured and programmed.

  19. Frequent eruptions of Mount Rainier over the last ∼2,600 years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sisson, T.W.; Vallance, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Field, geochronologic, and geochemical evidence from proximal fine-grained tephras, and from limited exposures of Holocene lava flows and a small pyroclastic flow document ten–12 eruptions of Mount Rainier over the last 2,600 years, contrasting with previously published evidence for only 11–12 eruptions of the volcano for all of the Holocene. Except for the pumiceous subplinian C event of 2,200 cal year BP, the late-Holocene eruptions were weakly explosive, involving lava effusions and at least two block-and-ash pyroclastic flows. Eruptions were clustered from ∼2,600 to ∼2,200 cal year BP, an interval referred to as the Summerland eruptive period that includes the youngest lava effusion from the volcano. Thin, fine-grained tephras are the only known primary volcanic products from eruptions near 1,500 and 1,000 cal year BP, but these and earlier eruptions were penecontemporaneous with far-traveled lahars, probably created from newly erupted materials melting snow and glacial ice. The most recent magmatic eruption of Mount Rainier, documented geochemically, was the 1,000 cal year BP event. Products from a proposed eruption of Mount Rainier between AD 1820 and 1854 (X tephra of Mullineaux (US Geol Surv Bull 1326:1–83, 1974)) are redeposited C tephra, probably transported onto young moraines by snow avalanches, and do not record a nineteenth century eruption. We found no conclusive evidence for an eruption associated with the clay-rich Electron Mudflow of ∼500 cal year BP, and though rare, non-eruptive collapse of unstable edifice flanks remains as a potential hazard from Mount Rainier.

  20. A Natural Application for High Temperature Superconductors: a Bearing for the Azimuth Mount of a Lunar Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ma, Ki; Lamb, Mark; Chen, Peter; Wilson, Thomas; Cooley, Rodger; Xia, Harold; Fowler, Clay; Chen, Quark; Chu, Wei-Kan

    1995-01-01

    A bearing for telescope mounts on the moon has to function in a cold dusty vacuum environment that impairs the operation of almost all traditional bearings, but it is a natural environment for bearings constructed out of magnets and high temperature superconductors. The challenge lies not so much in the weight of the telescope that has to be supported, but in the smoothness of forces required for precision positioning control over a long stretch of time without human intervention. In this paper, we present a design of hybrid superconductor magnet bearings intended for use on the azimuth mount of an altitude-azimuth telescope mount system. In addition to the general features of hybrid super conducting magnet bearings, we will address particular issues connected with the application of these bearings on a telescope mount.

  1. Electro-optic component mounting device

    DOEpatents

    Gruchalla, Michael E.

    1994-01-01

    A technique is provided for integrally mounting a device such as an electro-optic device (50) in a transmission line to avoid series resonant effects. A center conductor (52) of the transmission line has an aperture (58) formed therein for receiving the device (50). The aperture (58) splits the center conductor into two parallel sections on opposite sides of the device. For a waveguide application, the center conductor is surrounded by a conductive ground surface (54), which is spaced apart from the center conductor with a dielectric material (56). One set of electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device (50) is directly connected to the center conductor 52 and an electrode formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the conductive ground surface (54). The electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device are formed on curved sections of the surface of the device to mate with correspondingly shaped electrodes on the conductor and ground surface to provide a uniform electric field across the electro-optic device. The center conductor includes a passage ( 60) formed therein for passage of optical signals to an electro-optic device.

  2. Electro-optic component mounting device

    DOEpatents

    Gruchalla, M.E.

    1994-09-13

    A technique is provided for integrally mounting a device such as an electro-optic device in a transmission line to avoid series resonant effects. A center conductor of the transmission line has an aperture formed therein for receiving the device. The aperture splits the center conductor into two parallel sections on opposite sides of the device. For a waveguide application, the center conductor is surrounded by a conductive ground surface which is spaced apart from the center conductor with a dielectric material. One set of electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the center conductor and an electrode formed on the surface of the electro-optic device is directly connected to the conductive ground surface. The electrodes formed on the surface of the electro-optic device are formed on curved sections of the surface of the device to mate with correspondingly shaped electrodes on the conductor and ground surface to provide a uniform electric field across the electro-optic device. The center conductor includes a passage formed therein for passage of optical signals to an electro-optic device. 10 figs.

  3. The Mount Kozak magmatic complex, Western Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altunkaynak, Ş.; Yılmaz, Y.

    1998-10-01

    The Mount Kozak igneous complex is located close to the towns of Ayvalık, Bergama and Burhaniye in the Western Anatolia, Turkey. Magmatic activity occurred during the Late Oligocene-Early Miocene, beginning with the emplacement of the Kozak pluton. Sheet intrusive rocks formed around it coevally. They are surrounded by the volcanic rocks, partly contemporaneously with the emplacement of the granitic rocks during the Early Miocene. The Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene magmatic rocks of the Kozak region are represented by a high-K, calc-alkaline suite of predominantly intermediate and acidic composition. Their geochemical characteristics suggest that the magmas are hybrid, and were formed from a similar source, representing mantle-derived magmas, contaminated by crustal materials. The cogenetic plutonic rocks, the hypabyssal rocks and the overlying volcanic associations are related to one another in space and time, and appear to have been connected to a shallow level granitic intrusion in a caldera collapse setting. The calc-alkaline magmatic activity waned during the Middle Miocene. When the volcanism was rejuvenated during the Late Miocene-Pliocene, alkaline basalt lavas were formed as fissure eruptions.

  4. Solar collector mounting and support apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchison, J.A.

    1981-12-22

    A solar collector system is described of the type having a movable surface for receiving solar radiation having improved means for rotatably supporting the movable surface and for rotating the collector surface. A support axle for the collector includes a ball at one end which is carried within a cylindrical sleeve in the solar collector to support the weight of the collector. A torque transmitting arm comprising a flexible flat strip is connected at one end to the axle and at the other end to the collector surface. An improved rotational drive mechanism includes a first sprocket wheel carried on the axle and a second sprocket wheel supported on a support pylon with a drive chain engaging both sprockets. A double acting piston also supported by the pylon is coupled to the chain so that the chain may be driven by a hydraulic control system to rotate the collector surfaces as required. An improved receiver tube support ring is also provided for use with the improved mounting and support apparatus to improve overall efficiency by reducing thermal losses.

  5. Evaluation of Helmet Mounted Display Alerting Symbology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMaio, Joe; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Proposed helicopter helmet mounted displays will be used to alert the pilot to a variety of conditions, from threats to equipment problems. The present research was performed under the NASA Safe All-weather Flight Operations Research (SAFOR) program supported by a joint Army/NASA research agreement. The purpose of the research was to examine ways to optimize the alerting effectiveness of helmet display symbology. The research used two approaches to increasing the effectiveness of alerts. One was to increase the ability of the alert to attract attention by using the entire display surface. The other was to include information about the required response in the alert itself. The investigation was conducted using the NASA Ames Research Center's six-degree-of-freedom vertical motion simulator (VMS) with a rotorcraft cockpit. Helmet display symbology was based on the AH-64's pilot night vision system (PNVS), cruise mode symbology. A standardized mission was developed, that consisted of 11 legs. The mission included four tasks, which allowed variation in the frequency of alerts. The general trend in the data points to a small benefit from both the full-screen alert and the partial information alert.

  6. Alternative Mounting Systems for the Galileoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welling, Christine; Pompea, S.; Sparks, R.

    2012-01-01

    The Galileoscope is a kit telescope produced for the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) in 2009. As an educational tool, it has been distributed across the world. In order to successfully observe with the Galileoscope, it must be steadied in some way. The preferred method for stabilizing the Galileoscope is to use a tripod. However, this is not always possible, and other stabilization methods are needed. Alternative systems were designed to be constructable worldwide, and cost less than $5 to build. Seventeen alternative mounting systems were built and tested. Comparisons were made based on price to build, ease of construction, ease of use, and whether the system would remain pointed. This research was supported by the NOAO/KPNO Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program which is funded by the National Science Foundation Research Experiences for Undergraduates Program and the Department of Defense ASSURE program through Scientific Program Order No. 13 (AST-0754223) of the Cooperative Agreement No. AST-0132798 between the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) and the NSF.

  7. Nd:YAG breech mounted laser igniter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Christopher R.; Myers, Michael J.; Myers, John D.; Gadson, Robert L.; Leone, Joseph; Fay, Josiah W.; Boyd, Kevin

    2005-09-01

    Nd:YAG lasers have been successfully used to demonstrate laser ignition of howitzer propellant charges including bag, stick, and the Modular Artillery Charge System (MACS). Breech Mount Laser Ignition Systems (BMLIS) have been designed, installed and tested on many artillery systems, including the US Army's M109A6 Paladin, M198, M777 Light Weight, Crusader, and Non-Line-of-Sight Cannon (NLOS-C). The NLOS-C incorporates advanced weapon technologies, to include a BMLIS. United Defense's Armament Systems Division has recently designed and built a NLOS-C System Demonstrator that uses a BMLIS that incorporates Kigre's patented square pulse technology. NLOS-C is one of the weapon systems being developed for use with the US Army's "systems of systems" Future Combat System (FCS), Manned Ground Vehicles (MGV) program, and is currently undergoing development testing at Yuma Proving Grounds. In this paper we discuss many technical aspects of an artillery laser ignition system and present BMLIS test data obtained from actual gun firings conducted with a number of different US Army howitzer platforms.

  8. Virtual sine arm kinematic mount system

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Randall, K.J.

    1997-09-01

    A novel kinematic mount system for a vertical focusing mirror of the soft x-ray spectroscopy beamline at the Advanced Photon Source is described. The system contains three points in a horizontal plane. Each point consists of two horizontal linear precision stages, a spherical ball bearing, and a vertical precision stage. The horizontal linear stages are aligned orthogonally and are conjoined by a spherical ball bearing, supported by the vertical linear stage at each point. The position of each confined horizontal stage is controlled by a motorized micrometer head by spring-loading the flat tip of the micrometer head onto a tooling ball fixing on the carriage of the stage. A virtual sine arm is formed by tilting the upstream horizontal stage down and the two downstream horizontal stages up by a small angle. The fine pitch motion is achieved by adjusting the upstream stage. This supporting structure is extremely steady due to a relatively large span across the supporting points and yields extremely high resolution on the pitch motion. With a one degree tilt and a microstepping motor, the authors achieved a 0.4 nanoradian resolution on the mirror pitch motion.

  9. Magnetotelluric investigations at Mount Hood, Oregon

    SciTech Connect

    Mozley, E.C.; Goldstein, N.E.; Morrison, H.F.

    1986-10-01

    Magnetotelluric data, with both electric and magnetic field references for noise cancellation, were collected at accessible locations around and as close as possible to the Mount Hood andesite-dacite volcano. The purpose of the study was to identify and map conductive features and to relate them to the thermal regime of the region. Several conductors could be discerned. The shallowest, at a depth of around 500 m below the surface, was identified as a flow of heated water moving away from the summit: the deepest (--50 km) might be a melt zone in the upper mantle. Of particular interest is an elongate conductor that strikes N 10/sup 0/ W and extends from a depth of 12 km down to 22 km. Because the conductor strike is close to the trend of the chain of Cascade volcanoes and because of the high conductive thermal gradients reported for the area, this feature was initially believed to be a zone of partial melt following the volcanic axis. However, because no teleseismic P wave velocity anomaly has been found, the cause of the conductor is more problematic. While the existence of small zones of melt cannot be ruled out, it is possible that the conductor is caused by a large volume of intensely deformed rocks with brine-filled microfractures.

  10. Overview of Mount Washington Icing Sensors Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryerson, Charles C.; Politovich, Marcia K.; Rancourt, Kenneth L.; Koenig, George G.; Reinking, Roger F.; Miller, Dean R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA, the FAA, the Department of Defense, the National Center for Atmospheric Research and NOAA are developing techniques for retrieving cloud microphysical properties from a variety of remote sensing technologies. The intent is to predict aircraft icing conditions ahead of aircraft. The Mount Washington Icing Sensors Project MWISP), conducted in April, 1999 at Mt. Washington, NH, was organized to evaluate technologies for the prediction of icing conditions ahead of aircraft in a natural environment, and to characterize icing cloud and drizzle environments. April was selected for operations because the Summit is typically in cloud, generally has frequent freezing precipitation in spring, and the clouds have high liquid water contents. Remote sensing equipment, consisting of radars, radiometers and a lidar, was placed at the base of the mountain, and probes measuring cloud particles, and a radiometer, were operated from the Summit. NASA s Twin Otter research aircraft also conducted six missions over the site. Operations spanned the entire month of April, which was dominated by wrap-around moisture from a low pressure center stalled off the coast of Labrador providing persistent upslope clouds with relatively high liquid water contents and mixed phase conditions. Preliminary assessments indicate excellent results from the lidar, radar polarimetry, radiosondes and summit and aircraft measurements.

  11. Characterization of linear viscoelastic anti-vibration rubber mounts

    SciTech Connect

    Lodhia, B.B.; Esat, I.I.

    1996-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to identify the dynamic characteristics that are evident in linear viscoelastic rubber mountings. The characteristics under consideration included the static and dynamic stiffnesses with the variation of amplitude and frequency of the sinusoidal excitation. Test samples of various rubber mix were tested and compared to reflect magnitude of dependency on composition. In the light of the results, the validity and effectiveness of a mathematical model was investigated and a suitable technique based on the Tschoegl and Emri Algorithm, was utilized to fit the model to the experimental data. The model which was chosen, was an extension of the basic Maxwell model, which is based on linear spring and dashpot elements in series and parallel called the Wiechert model. It was found that the extent to which the filler and vulcanisate was present in the rubber sample, did have a great effect on the static stiffness characteristics, and the storage and loss moduli. The Tschoegl and Emri Algorithm was successfully utilized in modelling the frequency response of the samples.

  12. Reestablishment of endogonaceae on Mount St. Helens: survival of residuals

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, M.F.; MacMahon, J.A.; Andersen, D.C.

    1984-01-01

    The 18 May 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens resulted in the burial of relatively well developed soils under variable depths of sterile tephra and ash. During summer 1982, we examined a series of sites and estimated the numbers of spores of Endogonaceae that had been transported from the buried soil to the new ground surface by either abiotic or biotic vectors. There was no difference between spore counts of Endogone spp. or Glomus spp. in the buried soils of forests and clear-cuts; spores were rare in the tephra at any site. In areas featuring less than or equal to 50 cm of tephra, spores were transported to the surface by gophers (in previous clear-cut areas) and by ants (in previous forest and clear-cut habitats). In the Pumice Plain, an area devoid of gophers and ants, erosion exposed spores to the surface. We found no evidence to suggest that endogonaceous fungi grow back up root systems from buried horizons. We hypothesize that small-scale perturbations (erosion, gopher and ant mounds) following the major volcanic disturbance may drive succession by exposing buried mycorrhizal and decomposer fungi. 26 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Maintenance Procedure Display: Head Mounted Display (HMD) Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Milrian; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Solem, Jody A.; Holden, Kritina L.; Hoffman, Ronald R.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing maintenance procedures for head mounted displays is shown. The topics include: 1) Study Goals; 2) Near Eye Displays (HMDs); 3) Design; 4) Phase I-Evaluation Methods; 5) Phase 1 Results; 6) Improved HMD Mounting; 7) Phase 2 -Evaluation Methods; 8) Phase 2 Preliminary Results; and 9) Next Steps.

  14. Installation/Removal Tool for Screw-Mounted Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, J. P.

    1984-01-01

    Tweezerlike tool simplifies installation of screws in places reached only through narrow openings. With changes in size and shape, basic tool concept applicable to mounting and dismounting of transformers, sockets, terminal strips and mechanical parts. Inexpensive tool fabricated as needed by bending two pieces of steel wire. Exact size and shape selected to suit part manipulated and nature of inaccessible mounting space.

  15. The Mount Sinai Hospital Library, 1883 to 1970

    PubMed Central

    Culp, Robert W.

    1972-01-01

    A history of the Mount Sinai Hospital Library in New York City from its inception in 1883 to 1970 is presented. From its modest beginnings the growth and development of the library is reviewed through eight decades. The paper reports the library's expanded role in the Mount Sinai School of Medicine of the City University of New York. Images PMID:4559908

  16. Hole-thru-laminate mounting supports for photovoltaic modules

    SciTech Connect

    Wexler, Jason; Botkin, Jonathan; Culligan, Matthew; Detrick, Adam

    2015-02-17

    A mounting support for a photovoltaic module is described. The mounting support includes a pedestal having a surface adaptable to receive a flat side of a photovoltaic module laminate. A hole is disposed in the pedestal, the hole adaptable to receive a bolt or a pin used to couple the pedestal to the flat side of the photovoltaic module laminate.

  17. 75 FR 1285 - Vehicle-Mounted Earth Stations (VMES)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 25 Vehicle-Mounted Earth Stations (VMES) AGENCY: Federal Communications Commission... Rules and Procedures to Govern the Use of Vehicle-Mounted Earth Stations in Certain Frequency Bands Allocated to the Fixed-Satellite Service, IB Docket No. 07-101, FCC 09-64, at 74 FR 57092. The Report...

  18. Mount Pinatubo, Philippine Islands as seen from STS-59

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    View of Mount Pinatubo, Philippine Islands. Subic Bay is at the lower left corner, with the sea at the left and Clark Air Force Base (abandoned after the eruption) is to the lower right of the volcano. A turquoise lake occupies the caldera just below the center of the photograph. Mount Pinatubo erupted in June, 1991 after several hundred years of quiet.

  19. 36 CFR 7.5 - Mount Rainier National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mount Rainier National Park. 7.5 Section 7.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.5 Mount Rainier National Park. (a) Fishing. (1) The following waters are closed...

  20. The CF6 jet engine performance improvement: New front mount

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasching, W. A.

    1979-01-01

    The New Front Mount was evaluated in component tests including stress, deflection/distortion and fatigue tests. The test results demonstrated a performance improvement of 0.1% in cruise sfc, 16% in compressor stall margin and 10% in compressor stator angle margin. The New Front Mount hardware successfully completed 35,000 simulated flight cycles endurance testing.

  1. View north from inside historic Mount Zion Cemetery entrance area ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north from inside historic Mount Zion Cemetery entrance area across a pile of removed gravestones along the subtle ridgeline to the Doughty-Beck monument. - Mount Zion Cemetery/ Female Union Band Cemetery, Bounded by 27th Street right-of-way N.W. (formerly Lyons Mill Road), Q Street N.W., & Mill Road N.W., Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  2. View south from inside historic Mount Zion Cemetery entrance area ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View south from inside historic Mount Zion Cemetery entrance area across a pile of removed gravestones to Mill Street houses. - Mount Zion Cemetery/ Female Union Band Cemetery, Bounded by 27th Street right-of-way N.W. (formerly Lyons Mill Road), Q Street N.W., & Mill Road N.W., Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  3. Helmet-Mounted Visual Display For Flight Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Anthony M.

    1990-01-01

    Helmet-mounted visual display system provides pilot with broad range of visual information for flight simulation. Offers nearly unlimited field of regard. Optical fibers transmit wide-angle images in response to motions of head. Two "pancake" lenses mounted on lightweight helmet. Cable of optical fibers carries images to each lens. "Light-valve" projectors deliver computer-generated binocular images to cables.

  4. Mount Chacaltaya Regional GAW Station in the Central Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaratti, Francesco; Forno, Ricardo N.; Lolli, Simone

    2010-05-01

    The Mount Chacaltaya Laboratory (MCL), located 30 km from the city of La Paz , at 5300 m asl, is well known as a cosmic ray laboratory that made important contributions to the Elementary Particles Physics in the 40's and 50's of the last century. Since its beginnings, the MCL has also hosted instruments and experiments devoted to atmospheric research and health studies at high altitude locations. In addition, the Chacaltaya glacier has attracted the interest of worldwide climatologists, due to its dramatic retreat. In fact, this glacier does not exist almost anymore. Recently, the Atmospheric Physics Laboratory (LFA-UMSA) has begun to take permanent and field measurements of some relevant atmospheric parameters at MCL, such as carbon dioxide, aerosols and ultraviolet irradiance. In this work we show some characteristics that made Chacaltaya a Regional GAW Station (CHC), recently nominated by WMO. In addition we show some pioneering steps of this project, supported by research institutes from France, Italy, Switzerland and USA. Finally, thanks to the vigorous co-operation of the Raman lidar group at Goddard Space Flight Center, a new YAG Laser is being installed, to be operated together with the "old" Alexandrite Lidar in the study of aerosols at La Paz.

  5. Grism cryogenic mount for the Euclid-NISP mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossin, Ch.; Grange, R.; Sanchez, P.; Caillat, A.; Costille, A.; Laurent, P.; Dessaux, F.; Ceria, W.

    2014-07-01

    The spectroscopic channel of the Euclid Near Infrared SpectroPhotometer (NISP) relies on four grisms mounted on a wheel via Invar mounts. The mount design was studied to maintain the optical performances and alignment at cryogenic operating temperature (120K), and to survive launch vibrations. We designed two stages of radially compliant blades: one set of 9 blades is bonded to the Silica grism and the second set of 3 blades is located at interface points with the wheel. Severe packaging and mass constraints yielded us to design a ring mount with strong weight relief. In fall 2013 we proceeded to thermal cycling (323K-105K), vibration tests (10.7 g rms) to successfully qualify the grism mount in the Euclid environment. Thanks to detailed finite element analyses, we correlated simulations and tests.

  6. Laser housing having integral mounts and method of manufacturing same

    DOEpatents

    Herron, Michael Alan; Brickeen, Brian Keith

    2004-10-19

    A housing adapted to position, support, and facilitate aligning various components, including an optical path assembly, of a laser. In a preferred embodiment, the housing is constructed from a single piece of material and broadly comprises one or more through-holes; one or more cavities; and one or more integral mounts, wherein the through-holes and the cavities cooperate to define the integral mounts. Securement holes machined into the integral mounts facilitate securing components within the integral mounts using set screws, adhesive, or a combination thereof. In a preferred method of making the housing, the through-holes and cavities are first machined into the single piece of material, with at least some of the remaining material forming the integral mounts.

  7. Installation of a Roof Mounted Photovoltaic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, M.

    2015-12-01

    In order to create a safe and comfortable environment for students to learn, a lot of electricity, which is generated from coal fired power plants, is used. Therefore, ISF Academy, a school in Hong Kong with approximately 1,500 students, will be installing a rooftop photovoltaic (PV) system with 302 solar panels. Not only will these panels be used to power a classroom, they will also serve as an educational opportunity for students to learn about the importance of renewable energy technology and its uses. There were four different options for the installation of the solar panels, and the final choice was made based on the loading capacity of the roof, considering the fact that overstressing the roof could prove to be a safety hazard. Moreover, due to consideration of the risk of typhoons in Hong Kong, the solar panel PV system will include concrete plinths as counterweights - but not so much that the roof would be severely overstressed. During and after the installation of the PV system, students involved would be able to do multiple calculations, such as determining the reduction of the school's carbon footprint. This can allow students to learn about the impact renewable energy can have on the environment. Another project students can participate in includes measuring the efficiency of the solar panels and how much power can be produced per year, which in turn can help with calculate the amount of money saved per year and when we will achieve economic parity. In short, the installation of the roof mounted PV system will not only be able to help save money for the school but also provide learning opportunities for students studying at the ISF Academy.

  8. Solar Radius Measurements at Mount Wilson

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, S.; Bertello, L.; Ulrich, R. K.; Boyden, J. E.; Rozelot, J.

    2004-12-01

    Variations of the solar radius are not only important for solar physics but they also play a fundamental role in the research of terrestrial climate. In fact, changes in the apparent size of the Sun could account for a significant fraction of the total irradiance variations, and solar irradiance is known to be a primary force in driving atmospheric circulation. While the MDI instrument aboard SOHO is likely to provide the most accurate constraint on possible solar radius variations, the radius measurements obtained from ground base observations represent a unique resource due to their long temporal coverage. Since 1970, the Mount Wilson synoptic programme of solar magnetic observations carried out at the 150-foot tower scans the solar disk using the radiation in the neutral iron line at 525.0 nm. For these images, the radius has been determined and results are presented on this paper. We show first the temporal behavior of these measurements. Secondly, if data are gathered by heliolatitude, the shape of the Sun differs from a perfect ellipsoid and shows solar distortions. We compare these results with others obtained with the heliometer at the Pic du Midi observatory in France. The comparison show a similitude in the shape with a bulge near the equator extending on 20-30 degrees followed by a depression at higher latitude near 60-70 degrees. These solar distortions needs to be confirmed by future space measurements (PICARD microsatellite) but it already raises the problem of a better understanding of the physics in the sub-surface layers.

  9. Gravity Probe B Detector Mount Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    In this photo, the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) detector mount assembly is shown in comparison to the size of a dime. The assembly is used to detect exactly how much starlight is coming through different beams from the beam splitter in the telescope. The measurements from the tiny chips inside are what keeps GP-B aimed at the guide star. The GP-B is the relativity experiment developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004 , the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Image credit to Paul Ehrensberger, Stanford University.)

  10. Retired NASA F-18 being mounted on pedestal mount at Lancaster California Municipal Baseball Stadium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    An F/A-18 Hornet aircraft formerly flown by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, is sandwiched between two groups of workers as they mount it atop a pedestal at the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. NASA Dryden had flown the blue-and-white twin-jet as a safety chase and support aircraft for about nine years prior to its recent retirement. The aircraft is now in loan to the city for public display. Known as 'The Hangar,' the stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.

  11. Retired NASA F-18 being mounted on pedestal mount at Lancaster California Municipal Baseball Stadium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Workers carefully align a mounting bracket attached to an F/A-18 Hornet aircraft with the top of a pedestal in front of the municipal baseball stadium in the city of Lancaster, California. The Blue-and-white twin-jet aircraft, formerly flown as a safety chase and support aircraft by NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, was loaned to the city for display following its recent retirement. Known as 'The Hangar,' the stadium is the home field of the Lancaster Jethawks, a Class-A farm team of the Seattle Mariners.

  12. Steering law for parallel mounted double-gimbaled control moment gyros. Revision A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennel, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    Mounting of double-gimbaled control moment gyros (CMG's) of unlimited outer gimbal angle freedom with all their outer gimbal axes parallel allows drastic simplification of the CMG steering law development hardware. The advantages of the parallel mounting for the CMG steering law development are such that a law could be developed which is applicable to any number of CMG's with arbitrary angular momentum. Parallel mounting of the CMG's in conjunction with the steering law can therefore be considered a CMG kit suitable for many missions of differing momentum requirements. It also means that increasing momentum demands during the design phase of a space vehicle can be easily met by the addition of one or more CMG's of the original momentum capacity rather than a redesign to a larger momentum capacity. Another advantage of the parallel mounting is that the failure of any CMG can be treated like any other, i.e., only one failure mode is possible. The CMG steering law distributes the CMG momentum vectors such that all inner gimbal angles are equal which reduces the rate requirements on the outer gimbal axes. The steering law also spreads the outer gimbals which ensures avoidance of singularities internal to the angular momentum envelope.

  13. Silicon Carbide Mounts for Fabry-Perot Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindemann, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Etalon mounts for tunable Fabry- Perot interferometers can now be fabricated from reaction-bonded silicon carbide structural components. These mounts are rigid, lightweight, and thermally stable. The fabrication of these mounts involves the exploitation of post-casting capabilities that (1) enable creation of monolithic structures having reduced (in comparison with prior such structures) degrees of material inhomogeneity and (2) reduce the need for fastening hardware and accommodations. Such silicon carbide mounts could be used to make lightweight Fabry-Perot interferometers or could be modified for use as general lightweight optical mounts. Heretofore, tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer structures, including mounting hardware, have been made from the low-thermal-expansion material Invar (a nickel/iron alloy) in order to obtain the thermal stability required for spectroscopic applications for which such interferometers are typically designed. However, the high mass density of Invar structures is disadvantageous in applications in which there are requirements to minimize mass. Silicon carbide etalon mounts have been incorporated into a tunable Fabry-Perot interferometer of a prior design that originally called for Invar structural components. The strength, thermal stability, and survivability of the interferometer as thus modified are similar to those of the interferometer as originally designed, but the mass of the modified interferometer is significantly less than the mass of the original version.

  14. Design and structural/optical analysis of a kinematic mount for the testing of silicon carbide mirrors at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Christopher; Frohlich, Charles; Shirgur, Badri; Mink, Ronald G.

    2004-10-01

    A kinematic mount has been designed to support two Silicon Carbide-based spherical mirrors during cryogenic testing at the Goddard Space Flight Center. The mirrors are flight representative test mirrors for the NIRSpec Instrument of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), provided by Galileo Avionica of Florence, Italy. One is cold-pressed Silicon Carbide (SiC) and one is Carbon reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC); both are coated in a SiC-based chemical vapor deposit. Each is lightweighted and has an integral mount on the rear surface. The integral mount is used as an interface to the kinematic mount, which is designed to support the mirrors during cryogenic testing while minimizing distortions induced by CTE mismatch among the materials. Additionally, an alternative "simply supported" mount is used to hold the mirrors around the outer edge of the optical surface. This eliminates the bending of the integral mount under the weight of the mirror and evaluates the effectiveness of the kinematic mount. The mirrors were analyzed for optical performance during testing from room temperature to 20K using Finite Element Analysis (FEA) with MSC/NASTRAN 2001. Predicted surface figure error (SFE) based on the removal of bias, tilt, and power was calculated using an in-house Matlab script for spherical mirrors. SFE was verified using the SigFit optical post-processing program to provide Zernike polynomial input for analysis with the Zemax optical software. The results show that the kinematic mount induces minimal figure error on the optical surface.

  15. Development and Optimization of Kinematic Mounts for NIRCam: a JWST Science Instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Daniel; Bartoszyk, Andrew; Cofie, Emmanuel; Johnston, John; Kunt, Cengiz

    2005-01-01

    Finite element analysis was vital to the design and optimization of the kinematic mounts for the Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument The design had to meet dueling structural requirements driven by 12G launch loads, a survivability of bulk cool down from room temperature to 22 K, minimum first mode of 50 Hz and mass allocation constraints. Additionally the design has to meet stability and Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) interfaces when cooled to 22K.

  16. A decade of dome growth at Mount St. Helens, 1980-90

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The growth of the dacite dome at Mount St. Helens between 1980 and 1986 has been more intensively studied than that of any other dome-building eruption. The growth has been complex in detail, but remarkably regular overall. This paper summarizes some of what has been learned and provides many references to additional information. Whether dome building has ended is an open question, particularly in view of the renewed, though minor, explosive activity of late 1989 and early 1990. -Author

  17. Freeform correction polishing for optics with semi-kinematic mounting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chien-Yao; Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Peng, Wei-Jei; Yu, Zong-Ru; Ho, Cheng-Fang; Hsu, Ming-Ying; Hsu, Wei-Yao

    2015-10-01

    Several mounting configurations could be applied to opto-mechanical design for achieving high precise optical system. The retaining ring mounting is simple and cost effective. However, it would deform the optics due to its unpredictable over-constraint forces. The retaining ring can be modified to three small contact areas becoming a semi-kinematic mounting. The semi-kinematic mounting can give a fully constrained in lens assembly and avoid the unpredictable surface deformation. However, there would be still a deformation due to self-weight in large optics especially in vertical setup applications. The self-weight deformation with a semi-kinematic mounting is a stable, repeatable and predictable combination of power and trefoil aberrations. This predictable deformation can be pre-compensated onto the design surface and be corrected by using CNC polisher. Thus it is a freeform surface before mounting to the lens cell. In this study, the freeform correction polishing is demonstrated in a Φ150 lens with semi-kinematic mounting. The clear aperture of the lens is Φ143 mm. We utilize ANSYS simulation software to analyze the lens deformation due to selfweight deformation with semi-kinematic mounting. The simulation results of the self-weight deformation are compared with the measurement results of the assembled lens cell using QED aspheric stitching interferometer (ASI). Then, a freeform surface of a lens with semi-kinematic mounting due to self-weight deformation is verified. This deformation would be corrected by using QED Magnetorheological Finishing (MRF® ) Q-flex 300 polishing machine. The final surface form error of the assembled lens cell after MRF figuring is 0.042 λ in peak to valley (PV).

  18. The effect of Center High Mounted Stop Lamp (CHMSL) on rear-end accidents in Israel.

    PubMed

    Bar-Gera, Hillel; Schechtman, Edna

    2005-05-01

    This paper examines the effect of the use of Center High Mounted Stop Lamp (CHMSL) on rear-end accidents, as reflected in Israeli police records from calendar years 1991-2002. The basic analysis, similar to that used in previous CHMSL studies, compares the involvement in accidents of passenger cars of model years 1994-1996 that are equipped with CHMSL with passenger cars of model years 1991-1993 that are not equipped with CHMSL. The number of involvements as the struck vehicle in a rear-end accident was used as the relevant measurement and the number of involvements as the striking vehicle in a rear-end accident was used as the reference measurement. The results yielded an odds ratio of 0.93. The explanation that the CHMSL is responsible for the 7% decrease is intuitively appealing and is consistent with previous findings. However, the strength of this evidence is marginal (p = 0.07). Additional analyses evaluated the model year effect in greater detail, in order to determine whether there exists a change point between 1993 and 1994 as would be expected from a CHMSL effect, or whether the effect is spurious. Detailed analyses were performed on the ratio of struck to striking involvements as well as the rates of involvement of both types. These analyses showed that (1) the chosen reference measurement is an appropriate one, but (2) the 0.93 odds ratio is quite possibly due to other reasons unrelated to the CHMSL, thus further limiting the confidence in CHMSL effectiveness. PMID:15784207

  19. Side mounted V-type 4-cycle engine

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, A.; Kato, K.

    1987-06-09

    This patent describes a V-type four-cycle engine having overhead camshafts and a crankshaft, comprising: idle gear trains, the idle gear tram extending between the crankshaft and a camshaft and including idle gears; a gear retainer having first and second axles for rotatably mounting the idle gears; the first axle including a journal portion having a cylindrical surface about a first axial centerline and mounting portions having a cylindrical surface about a second axial centerline displaced from the first axial centerline; the mounting portions being supported by the gear retainer; and means for retaining the journal portion in selectable angular orientation with respect to the gear retainer.

  20. Methods and apparatus for radially compliant component mounting

    DOEpatents

    Bulman, David Edward; Darkins, Jr., Toby George; Stumpf, James Anthony; Schroder, Mark S.; Lipinski, John Joseph

    2012-03-27

    Methods and apparatus for a mounting assembly for a liner of a gas turbine engine combustor are provided. The combustor includes a combustor liner and a radially outer annular flow sleeve. The mounting assembly includes an inner ring surrounding a radially outer surface of the liner and including a plurality of axially extending fingers. The mounting assembly also includes a radially outer ring coupled to the inner ring through a plurality of spacers that extend radially from a radially outer surface of the inner ring to the outer ring.

  1. New uses for calcium chloride solution as a mounting medium.

    PubMed

    Herr, J M

    1992-01-01

    Fresh cross sections of stems (Psilotum nudum, Coleus blumei, and Pelargonium peltatum) and roots (Setcreasea purpurea) 120 microns thick were fixed in FPA50 (formalin: propionic acid: 50% ethanol, 5:5:90, v/v) for 24 hr and stored in 70% ethanol. The sections were transferred to water and then to 1% phloroglucin in 20% calcium chloride solution plus either hydrochloric, nitric, or lactic acid in the following ratios of phloroglucin-CaCl2 solution:acid: 25:4, 20:2, or 15:5. The sections were mounted on slides either in one of the three mixtures or in fresh 20% calcium chloride solution. A rapid reaction of the acid-phloroglucin with lignin produced a deep red color in tracheary elements and an orange-red color in sclerenchyma. Fixed and stored leaf pieces from Nymphaea odorata were autoclaved in lactic acid, washed in two changes of 95% ethanol, transferred to water, and treated with the three acid-phloroglucin-calcium chloride mixtures. The abundant astrosclereids stained an orange-red color similar to that of sclerenchyma in the sections. In addition, a new method is reported for specifically staining lignified tissues. When sections or leaf pieces are stained in aqueous 0.05% toluidine blue O, then placed in 20% calcium chloride solution, all tissues destain except those with lignified or partially lignified cell walls. Thus, toluidine blue O applied as described becomes a reliable specific test for lignin comparable to the acid-phloroglucin test. PMID:1377501

  2. MSFC Skylab Apollo Telescope Mount thermal control system mission evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hueter, U.

    1974-01-01

    The Skylab Saturn Workshop Assembly was designed to expand the knowledge of manned earth orbital operations and accomplish a multitude of scientific experiments. The Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), a module of the Skylab Saturn Workshop Assembly, was the first manned solar observatory to successfully observe, monitor, and record the structure and behavior of the sun outside the earth's atmosphere. The ATM contained eight solar telescopes that recorded solar phenomena in X-ray, ultraviolet, white light, and hydrogen alpha regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. In addition, the ATM contained the Saturn Workshop Assembly's pointing and attitude control system, a data and communication system, and a solar array/rechargeable battery power system. This document presents the overall ATM thermal design philosophy, premission and mission support activity, and the mission thermal evaluation. Emphasis is placed on premission planning and orbital performance with particular attention on problems encountered during the mission. ATM thermal performance was satisfactory throughout the mission. Although several anomalies occurred, no failure was directly attributable to a deficiency in the thermal design.

  3. Window-mounted unit cleans air at hazardous waste site

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, J.M. ); Sawyer, P.

    1994-07-01

    Uncontrolled hazardous waste sites present the potential for exposure to numerous airborne chemicals--both identified and unidentified. This was the case at an Elizabeth, N.J., remediation project managed by a major environmental contractor. The four-acre site housed three active manufacturing facilities and was bordered by an operation commuter railroad line. About 6,300 drums of assorted organic chemicals, mostly acid chlorides and bromides, awaited sampling and removal. In addition, 120 tanks and vessels required sampling, characterization and removal. Due to site restrictions, support trailers were located relatively close to active work areas. Damaged drums littering the site contained water-reactive, organic acid chlorides and bromides, and released slight emissions during humid or rainy conditions. Shifting winds could (and did) carry trace releases or trace contaminants toward the trailers, potentially exposing unprotected workers. Efforts were begun to alleviate even trace contaminant at levels in the remediation site's temporary office trailers. One potential solution to managing trace contaminants at the site was to use a window-mounted, air conditioner-type unit that would replenish each trailer with filtered air three times an hour, and provide positive pressure in the trailer to compensate for repeated openings and closings of doors. The design uses common, off-the-shelf components to temper the approximately 10 percent makeup air, which provides positive pressure.

  4. Mount St. Helens plume dispersion based on trajectory analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielsen, E. F.

    1982-01-01

    The major eruption of Mount St. Helens on 18 May 1980, had sufficient energy to traverse the troposphere (9 km above the mountain top) and to penetrate an additional 10 km into the stratosphere. This plume, initially quasi-vertical, rapidly acquired the horizontal momentum of the environmental winds and suffered differential rotation due to a positive speed shear in the troposphere and a negative shear in the stratosphere. Advected rapidly eastward by the undulating jet stream, the lower stratospheric portion of the plume circled the globe at an average speed of approx. 25 m s/l, reentering North America over California in early June. During the same period, the uppermost portion slowly looped over the northwestern United States and then moved westward over the northern Pacific Ocean. Thus, plume dispersion was initiated by the vertical shears of the horizontal winds which converted a nearly vertical plume to a thin, quasi-horizontal, quasi-zonal lamina. Horizontal shears then dispersed the lamina meridionally while small-scale, wave turbulent motions spread it slowly vertically.

  5. Satellite-mounted Light Source as Photometric Calibration Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, J.; Burgett, W.; Rhodes, J.; Battat, J.

    At AMOS 2006 we proposed a tunable laser-based satellite-mounted spectrophotometric and absolute flux calibration system, to be utilized by ground- and space-based telescopes, for precision calibration of ground-based telescope photometry and flux. Since then, we have performed a campaign of observations of the 532 nm pulsed laser aboard the CALIPSO satellite (launched Apr. 2006), using a portable network of cameras and NIST-calibrated photodiodes, to test the precision of this method of measuring atmospheric extinction. This technique has astrophysical applications including reducing a major systematic uncertainty (absolute photometry) on cosmological parameter measurement using type Ia supernovae, as well as in upcoming photometric red shift surveys measuring growth of large scale structure in the Universe. In addition, upcoming systems potentially have broad utility for defense and national security applications such as ground target illumination and space communication. We will report on our measurements using our observations of the CALIPSO laser, and discuss future directions and applications. For further details please see http://www.arxiv.org/abs/astro-ph/0604339 and http://www8.nationalacademies.org/astro2010/DetailFileDisplay.aspx?id=546.

  6. The Qartaba Structure (Mount Lebanon): structural study and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmar, Chloé; Grasemann, Bernhard; Tari, Gabor

    2014-05-01

    The prominent Qartaba Anticline is located on the western side of the northern Mount Lebanon, one of the major physiographic elements in Lebanon. The studied part of this anticline (~20 km long, ~5 km wide) represents a large-scale box-fold structure bounded by two SW- and NE-vergent monoclines. The aim of the structural study on the Qartaba Anticline was to get a better understanding on the poorly known mechanism and timing of folding of the structure. The main data elements used in this study included vintage geologic maps, very high-resolution satellite images, a satellite-based Digital Elevation Model and numerous field measurements taken during several field trips in the Mount Lebanon area. The database was incorporated into an ArcGis platform in order to carry out quantitative remote sensing analysis to have a better three-dimensional understanding of the geometry of the Qartaba structure and to model it. Using the Three-Point-Method that was developed on a MatLab platform and adapted into an ArcGis toolbox, it was possible to determine dip and dip direction of the folded strata of the Qartaba Structure in order to build additional input data points besides the field observations. The results from the ArcGis Model show that the eastern and western flanks of the anticline represent oppositely verging monoclines with average dip values increasing from about 15° at the outer limits of the structure to 30° closer to the center area and reaching values up to almost 90° at the steepest part of the eastern flank. The strata become more or less horizontal on the top of the structure, just a few hundred meters away from the limbs of the anticline. Therefore, the whole structure resembles a large scale box-fold. The structural model of the Qartaba Anticline presents new constraints on the timing and the mechanism of deformation of the structure. This new model has important implications for the tectonic evolution of Lebanon, for example, the footprint of the Syrian

  7. Anaglyph, Metro Los Angeles, Calif.: Malibu to Mount Baldy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Mount San Antonio (more commonly known as Mount Baldy) crowns the San Gabriel Mountains northeast of Los Angeles in this computer-generated east-northeast anaglyph perspective viewed from above the Malibu coastline. On the right, the Pacific Ocean and Santa Monica are in the foreground. Further away are downtown Los Angeles and then the San Gabriel Valley, which lies adjacent to the mountain front. The San Fernando Valley appears in the left foreground, separated from the ocean by the Santa Monica Mountains. At 3,068 meters (10,064 feet) Mount Baldy rises above the tree line, exposing bright white rocks that are not snow capped in this early autumn scene.

    This anaglyph perspective (stereoscopic 3-D) view was generated using topographic data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and a Landsat 7 satellite image. Topographic expression is exaggerated one and one-half times. Two perspectives (from slightly differing geographic positions) were created, one for each eye. When viewed through special glasses, the result is a near horizontal view of the Earth's surface in its full three dimensions. Anaglyph glasses cover the left eye with a red filter and cover the right eye with a blue filter.

    Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and will substantially help in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive. The Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image used here was provided to the SRTM project by the United States Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, Sioux Falls, S.D.

    Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR)that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour

  8. Mounting technique for pressure transducers minimizes measurement interferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanham, R. N.; Taylor, C. E.; Balmer, C. E.; Hwang, C.

    1975-01-01

    Miniaturized transducers are fabricated from commercially available four-arm semiconductor gages; transducers are connected as bridge circuit and mounted on internal face of small diaphragm. Jacket made of conductive plastic may be needed to avoid buildup or static charges.

  9. Surface-mounted flat conductor cable for home wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hankins, J. D.; Carden, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The concepts are discussed which are being considered and developed for surface-mounted wiring using flat conductor cable. Safety aspects, problems being encountered, and advantages are also discussed.

  10. 14. BRIDGE ABUTMENT AND ARCH TRUSS MOUNTING PLATE SHOWING EYEBAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. BRIDGE ABUTMENT AND ARCH TRUSS MOUNTING PLATE SHOWING EYE-BAR CONNECTION AND EYE-BAR PIN LOCATION - Spruce Street Bridge, East Spruce Street, 500 Block, spanning Power Canal, Sault Ste. Marie, Chippewa County, MI

  11. BATON ROUGE NATIONAL CEMETERY PLAQUE MOUNTED ON BASE OF FLAGPOLE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BATON ROUGE NATIONAL CEMETERY PLAQUE MOUNTED ON BASE OF FLAGPOLE, WITH NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES PLAQUE AT RIGHT. VIEW TO NORTH. - Baton Rouge National Cemetery, 220 North 19th Street, Baton Rouge, East Baton Rouge Parish, LA

  12. 16. Interior detail, top floor, Union Switch Signal Timer, mounted ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Interior detail, top floor, Union Switch Signal Timer, mounted on west wall. - New York, New Haven, & Hartford Railroad, Shell Interlocking Tower, New Haven Milepost 16, approximately 100 feel east of New Rochelle Junction, New Rochelle, Westchester County, NY

  13. 52. photocopy of bronze eagle which later was mounted on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. photocopy of bronze eagle which later was mounted on Tower. Photograph taken at Tacony Iron and Metal Co. works, c. 1892. PCA - The New Public Buildings, Penn Square, Broad & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. How Mount Stromlo Observatory shed its imperial beginnings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhathal, Ragbir

    2014-12-01

    In the 90 years since its foundation in 1924, Mount Stromlo Observatory in Australia has changed from an outpost of empire to an international research institution. Ragbir Bhathal examines how the British influence waxed and waned.

  15. 13. Photocopy of photograph mounted on Christmas card (from St. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of photograph mounted on Christmas card (from St. Paul's Church) Photographer unknown 1906 INTERIOR LOOKING EAST - St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 120 East J Street, Benicia, Solano County, CA

  16. 51. photocopy of Indian figure which later was mounted on ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. photocopy of Indian figure which later was mounted on Tower. Photograph taken at Tacony Iron and Metal Co. works, c. 1892. PCA - The New Public Buildings, Penn Square, Broad & Market Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  17. Inexpensive mount for a large millimeter-wavelength telescope.

    PubMed

    Padin, S

    2014-07-10

    A telescope mount with a single-point force support at the center of gravity of the primary mirror is proposed in order to eliminate much of the structure and cost of a large, millimeter-wavelength telescope. The single-point support gives repeatable thermal and gravitational deformation, so the surface of the primary can be controlled based on lookup tables for elevation and temperature. The new design is most appropriate for a survey telescope because locating the support above the vertex of the primary limits the range of motion of the mount to about 1 rad. A 30 m diameter, λ=850  μm telescope with the proposed mount is a factor of 4 lighter than a design with a conventional elevation-over-azimuth mount, and roughly half the cost. PMID:25090062

  18. Inexpensive mount for a large millimeter-wavelength telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padin, S.

    2014-07-01

    A telescope mount with a single-point force support at the center of gravity of the primary mirror is proposed in order to eliminate much of the structure and cost of a large, millimeter-wavelength telescope. The single-point support gives repeatable thermal and gravitational deformation, so the surface of the primary can be controlled based on lookup tables for elevation and temperature. The new design is most appropriate for a survey telescope because locating the support above the vertex of the primary limits the range of motion of the mount to about 1 rad. A 30 m diameter, λ=850 μm telescope with the proposed mount is a factor of 4 lighter than a design with a conventional elevation-over-azimuth mount, and roughly half the cost.

  19. 49 CFR 178.255-11 - Tank mountings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... provide a secure base in transit. “Skids” or similar devices shall be deemed to comply with this requirement. (b) All tank mountings such as skids, fastenings, brackets, cradles, lifting lugs, etc.,...

  20. 49 CFR 178.255-11 - Tank mountings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... provide a secure base in transit. “Skids” or similar devices shall be deemed to comply with this requirement. (b) All tank mountings such as skids, fastenings, brackets, cradles, lifting lugs, etc.,...

  1. 49 CFR 178.255-11 - Tank mountings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... provide a secure base in transit. “Skids” or similar devices shall be deemed to comply with this requirement. (b) All tank mountings such as skids, fastenings, brackets, cradles, lifting lugs, etc.,...

  2. 49 CFR 178.255-11 - Tank mountings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... provide a secure base in transit. “Skids” or similar devices shall be deemed to comply with this requirement. (b) All tank mountings such as skids, fastenings, brackets, cradles, lifting lugs, etc.,...

  3. 17. DETAIL VIEW OF CUPOLA ATOP OPERATOR'S CABIN WHICH MOUNTS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. DETAIL VIEW OF CUPOLA ATOP OPERATOR'S CABIN WHICH MOUNTS SIGNAL HORNS, WEATHER VANE - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  4. 11. Submersible torpedo tube mounted on platform of elevator at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Submersible torpedo tube mounted on platform of elevator at northeast (starboard) elevator tower. - Naval Torpedo Station, Firing Pier, North end of Gould Island in Narragansett Bay, Newport, Newport County, RI

  5. 6. ROOF DETAIL OF MIRROR MOUNTS FOR VIEWING LAUNCH FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. ROOF DETAIL OF MIRROR MOUNTS FOR VIEWING LAUNCH FROM INSIDE BLOCKHOUSE, PAD A IN BACKGROUND; VIEW TO EAST. - Cape Canaveral Air Station, Launch Complex 17, Facility 28401, East end of Lighthouse Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  6. 10. Storage and shipping container, ballistic missile, mounted on ballistic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Storage and shipping container, ballistic missile, mounted on ballistic missile trailer, view from left front - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  7. 11. Storage and shipping container, ballistic missile, mounted on ballistic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Storage and shipping container, ballistic missile, mounted on ballistic missile trailer, view from left side - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, 10 mile radius around Exit 127 off Interstate 90, Interior, Jackson County, SD

  8. 2. DETAIL OF CEILING MOUNTED EXHAUST FAN USED TO REMOVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. DETAIL OF CEILING MOUNTED EXHAUST FAN USED TO REMOVE STEAM FROM SCALDING/SCRAPING AREA ON LEVEL 4 - Rath Packing Company, Hog Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  9. Low radioactivity material for use in mounting radiation detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Marshall; Metzger, Albert E.; Fox, Richard L.

    1988-01-01

    Two materials, sapphire and synthetic quartz, have been found for use in Ge detector mounting assemblies. These materials combine desirable mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties with the radioactive cleanliness required to detect minimal amounts of K, Th, and U.

  10. FEATURE C. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH REMNANT OF MOUNT, VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE C. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH REMNANT OF MOUNT, VIEW FACING SOUTH-SOUTHEAST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Machine Gun Positions, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  11. 6. INTERIOR DETAIL OF GUN MOUNT ON TERRACE, LOOKING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR DETAIL OF GUN MOUNT ON TERRACE, LOOKING EAST (1992). - Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Area B, Building 22, Armament Laboratory & Gun Range, On flightline between Tenth & Eleventh Streets, Dayton, Montgomery County, OH

  12. FEATURE B. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH LEWIS MOUNT, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE B. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH LEWIS MOUNT, VIEW FACING NORTHWEST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Machine Gun Positions, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  13. FEATURE B. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH LEWIS MOUNT, VIEW FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FEATURE B. MACHINE GUN POSITION WITH LEWIS MOUNT, VIEW FACING NORTHWEST (with scale stick). - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Battery-Machine Gun Positions, South of Point Cruz Road & west of Coral Sea Road, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  14. 7. VAL CAMERA STATION, INTERIOR VIEW OF CAMERA MOUNT, COMMUNICATION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VAL CAMERA STATION, INTERIOR VIEW OF CAMERA MOUNT, COMMUNICATION EQUIPMENT AND STORAGE CABINET. - Variable Angle Launcher Complex, Camera Stations, CA State Highway 39 at Morris Reservior, Azusa, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. 212. MOUNT SINAI CHURCH OF GOD AT 530 SOUTH TWENTIETH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    212. MOUNT SINAI CHURCH OF GOD AT 530 SOUTH TWENTIETH STREET, SOUTH SIDE - Russell Neighborhood, Bounded by Congress & Esquire Alley, Fifteenth & Twenty-first Streets, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  16. 16. CONCRETE PAD ON WHICH AN ELECTRICAL REACTOR WAS MOUNTED, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. CONCRETE PAD ON WHICH AN ELECTRICAL REACTOR WAS MOUNTED, IN THE BASEMENT, EAST WALL - Bonneville Power Administration South Bank Substation, I-84, South of Bonneville Dam Powerhouse, Bonneville, Multnomah County, OR

  17. View of CCTV camera mounted on aft payload bay bulkhead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    View of the closed circuit television (CCTV) camera mounted on aft payload bay bulkhead on the starboard side of the space shuttle near the orbital maneuvering systems (OMS) reaction control system (RCS) pods.

  18. 19. VIEW OF MOUNTING PRESS, showing removal of water guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. VIEW OF MOUNTING PRESS, showing removal of water guard prior to dismounting from press. Gary Stich, operator. - Juniata Shops, Erecting Shop & Machine Shop, East of Fourth Avenue, between Fourth & Fifth Streets, Altoona, Blair County, PA

  19. VIEW FACING NORTH OF WEST QUARRY WALL, WITH METAL MOUNTING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FACING NORTH OF WEST QUARRY WALL, WITH METAL MOUNTING BOLT FOR DERRICK VISIBLE - Granite Hill Plantation, Quarry No. 1, South side of State Route 16, 1.3 miles northeast east of Sparta, Sparta, Hancock County, GA

  20. 10. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL 4, MOUNTING STAND. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. ENGINE TEST CELL BUILDING INTERIOR. CELL 4, MOUNTING STAND. LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Fairchild Air Force Base, Engine Test Cell Building, Near intersection of Arnold Street & George Avenue, Spokane, Spokane County, WA