Science.gov

Sample records for addition participants completed

  1. Black Women in Nursing Education Completion Programs: Issues Affecting Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiken, Lolita Chappel; Cervero, Ronald M.; Johnson-Bailey, Juanita

    2001-01-01

    Interviews with 10 black women enrolled in or graduated from baccalaureate nursing programs identified intrapersonal and cultural factors encouraging their participation. Hindrances were classified as the experience of being the "other" and the culture of racism. Findings show that individual and institutional racism is a barrier in registered…

  2. Successful completion: an examination of factors influencing drug court completion for white and non-white male participants.

    PubMed

    DeVall, Kristen E; Lanier, Christina L

    2012-08-01

    This research examines the influence of demographic and legal factors on the successful completion of the Seahawk Drug Treatment Court Program for White and Non-White male participants. Located in a medium-size city, the program targets male felony offenders and has been in operation for more than 10 years. The research sample is comprised of 526 participants with a program disposition between January 1, 2005 and September 30, 2010. Using race-specific logistic regression models, results reveal both similarities and differences among these groups. The implications and limitations of this research are discussed, as well as avenues for future research.

  3. Research output after participants complete a Structured Operational Research and Training (SORT IT) course.

    PubMed

    Guillerm, N; Tayler-Smith, K; Dar Berger, S; Bissell, K; Kumar, A M V; Ramsay, A; Reid, A J; Zachariah, R; Harries, A D

    2015-12-21

    Eighteen months after successfully completing one of six Structured Operational Research and Training Initiative (SORT IT) courses, e-mail questionnaires assessing post-course research output were returned by 63 participants (100% response rate). Thirty-two (51%) participants had completed new research projects, 24 (38%) had published papers, 28 (44%) had presented abstracts at conferences, 15 (24%) had facilitated at further OR courses, and 21 (33%) had reviewed scientific papers. Seven (11%) had secured further research funding and 22 (35%) stated that their institutions were involved in implementation or capacity building in operational research. Significant research output continues beyond course completion, further endorsing the value of the SORT IT model.

  4. An Intervention Designed to Increase Participation and Completion Rates of Community College Students in Nontraditional Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straight, Carli A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the missions of California Community Colleges (CCCs) is to provide career and technical education (CTE) to students that will prepare them for the workforce. Major funding for CTE programs comes from grant monies that are tied to the condition that institutions must demonstrate an effort to increase the participation and completion rates of…

  5. 78 FR 4868 - Notice of Deadline for Submitting Completed Applications To Begin Participation in the Tribal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... in the Tribal Self-Governance Program in Fiscal Year 2014 or Calendar Year 2014 AGENCY: Bureau of... Self-Governance (OSG) establishes a March 1, 2013, deadline for Indian tribes/consortia to submit completed applications to begin participation in the tribal self-governance program in fiscal year 2014...

  6. 10 CFR 431.175 - Additional requirements applicable to non-Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Additional requirements applicable to non-Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants. 431.175 Section 431.175 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... requirements applicable to non-Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants. If you are...

  7. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  8. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  9. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  10. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  11. 42 CFR 482.104 - Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... for kidney transplant centers. 482.104 Section 482.104 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID....104 Condition of participation: Additional requirements for kidney transplant centers. (a) Standard: End stage renal disease (ESRD) services. Kidney transplant centers must directly...

  12. 78 FR 55135 - Request for Comments on Additional Participants in Trade in Services Agreement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... additional trading partners, Paraguay and Liechtenstein, are willing and able to meet the high standards... http://www.regulations.gov under docket number USTR-2013-0001. With the addition of Paraguay and... Participants--Paraguay and Liechtenstein.'' In order to be assured of consideration, comments should...

  13. 42 CFR 493.1807 - Additional sanctions: Laboratories that participate in Medicare.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... in Medicare. 493.1807 Section 493.1807 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES... Enforcement Procedures § 493.1807 Additional sanctions: Laboratories that participate in Medicare. The... CLIA conditions and that have approval to receive Medicare payment for their services. (a)...

  14. Addition of sodium bicarbonate to complete pelleted diets fed to dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, T B; Wangsness, P J; Muller, L D; Griel, L C

    1980-11-01

    During two trials, 35 and 27 Holstein calves were fed ad libitum complete, pelleted diets containing either 35% alfalfa (Trial 1) or 35% grass (Trial 2) hay from birth to 12 wk of age. Calves in Trial 1 were fed one of the following diets: control, control + 3.5% sodium chloride, or control + 5% sodium bicarbonate. In Trial 2, diets were: control, control + 5% sodium bicarbonate, or control + 5% sodium bicarbonate + loose, chopped grass hay. Intake of dry matter, gain in body weight, ruminal pH, or fecal starch did not differ. Calves fed sodium bicarbonate in Trial 1 but not 2 had a reduced feed efficiency compared with control and supplemented diets. In Trial 1 added sodium bicarbonate did not alter intake or digestible energy. Addition of sodium bicarbonate increased concentration of ruminal acetate and butyrate and decreased propionate in both trials. Fecal pH was elevated in calves fed sodium bicarbonate diets during both trials. Sodium chloride increased water intake in Trial 1, and sodium bicarbonate increased water indigestible energy. Addition of sodium bicarbonate increased concentration of ruminal acetate and butyrate and decreased propionate in both trials. Fecal pH was elevated in calves fed sodium bicarbonate diets during both trials. Sodium chloride increased water intake in Trial 1, and sodium bicarbonate increased water indigestible energy. Addition of sodium bicarbonate increased concentration of ruminal acetate and butyrate and decreased propionate in both trials. Fecal pH was elevated in calves fed sodium bicarbonate diets during both trials. Sodium chloride increased water intake in Trial 1, and sodium bicarbonate increased water intake in Trial 2. Incidence of free-gas bloat was higher in calves fed sodium bicarbonate in both trials. Addition of sodium bicarbonate to complete pelleted diets containing 35% alfalfa or 35% grass hay appeared to have no benefit for young, growing dairy calves in performance and health.

  15. 10 CFR 431.174 - Additional requirements applicable to Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Independent Certification Program participants. 431.174 Section 431.174 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY... requirements applicable to Voluntary Independent Certification Program participants. (a) Description of Voluntary Independent Certification Program participant. For purposes of this subpart, a manufacturer...

  16. What happens after participants complete a Union-MSF structured operational research training course?

    PubMed

    Guillerm, N; Tayler-Smith, K; Berger, S D; Bissell, K; Kumar, A M V; Ramsay, A; Reid, A J; Zachariah, R; Harries, A D

    2014-06-21

    Contexte : Huit cours de recherche opérationnelle (OR) structurée achevés de L'Union et Médecins sans Frontières pour des participants de pays à revenu faible ou intermédiaire. On ignore si les participants continuent à pratiquer la recherche opérationnelle après avoir suivi le cours.Objectifs : Déterminer 1) les activités de recherche des participants et de leurs institutions après la fin du cours ; 2) l'influence des bourses de recherche sur ces activités ; et 3) les activités des collègues n'ayant pas assisté au cours, stratifiées par sexe, région et statut professionnel.Schéma : Une enquête par questionnaire auto-administré envoyée par e-mail.Résultats : Sur 83 participants qui ont terminé le cours, 76 (92%) ont répondu au questionnaire. Après la fin du cours, 47 (62%) participants ont réalisé de nouveaux projets de recherche, 38 (50%) ont publié des articles (comparés à 25 [33%] qui en avaient publié avant le cours), 42 (55%) ont exposé des affiches ou présenté des résumés oraux lors de conférences, 33 (43%) ont été facilitateurs lors de cours suivants, 29 (38%) ont revu des articles scientifiques, 25 (33%) ont obtenu un financement ultérieur pour le recherche opérationnelle et 55 (72%) ont affirmé que leurs institutions étaient impliquées dans la mise en œuvre de recherche ou de renforcement des capacités. Les participants au cours ont eu une meilleure performance que les autres. Parmi ces derniers, les hommes et les participants venant d'Asie ont eu de meilleurs résultats que les femmes et les participants venant d'Afrique (P < 0,05).Conclusion : Une proportion significative de participants a continué à réaliser des recherches opérationnelles après la fin du cours. Ces constatations sont encourageantes en termes d'impact à long terme de ce modèle de renforcement des capacités.

  17. Science Courses Participated in and Completed by Students at Each of the Colleges in the Los Angeles Community College District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedlander, Jack

    The transcripts of 8,873 students, representing 7% of the enrollments in the Los Angeles Community College District, were examined to determine course participation and completion rates in science. Six curricular areas were investigated: (1) agriculture; (2) biological sciences; (3) engineering; (4) mathematics and computer science; (5) physical…

  18. Dual Enrollment Courses in Kentucky: High School Students' Participation and Completion Rates. REL 2016-137

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lochmiller, Chad R.; Sugimoto, Thomas J.; Muller, Patricia A.; Mosier, Gina G.; Williamson, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Kentucky is using dual enrollment as one strategy to improve access to postsecondary education for its high school students, particularly after passage of Kentucky Senate Bill 1 in 2009, which focused on improving college and career readiness. The Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Appalachia undertook a descriptive study of participation in…

  19. The Challenge Is Yours. WBVTAE Leadership Identification Program. Projects Completed by Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Board of Vocational, Technical, and Adult Education, Madison.

    This guide describes 35 programs developed by the Wisconsin Leadership Identification Program. The Leadership Identification Program offers mentee participants a structured mentee/mentor relationship, an opportunity to design a formal professional growth plan, a statewide leadership training session, visibility through a statewide newsletter, and…

  20. Educational and Occupational Participation and Completion Patterns of the Class of '88: A Ten Year Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andres, Lesley

    This document discusses findings from the Paths on Life's Way project which began in 1989 with a sample of the British Columbia high school graduating class of 1988. By 1998, 1,055 individuals from all parts of the province remained in the study. Analyses of participation patterns indicated that only a few students had not attended some type of…

  1. Network meta-analysis of the outcome 'participant complete clearance' in nonimmunosuppressed participants of eight interventions for actinic keratosis: a follow-up on a Cochrane review.

    PubMed

    Gupta, A K; Paquet, M

    2013-08-01

    The conclusions of pairwise meta-analyses of interventions for actinic keratosis (AK) are limited due to the lack of direct comparison between some interventions. Consequently, we performed a network meta-analysis for eight treatments [5-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA)-photodynamic therapy (PDT), cryotherapy, diclofenac 3% in 2·5% hyaluronic acid (DCF/HA), 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) 0·5% or 5·0%, imiquimod (IMI) 5%, ingenol mebutate (IMB) 0·015-0·05%, methyl aminolaevulinate (MAL)-PDT and placebo/vehicle (including placebo-PDT)] to determine their relative efficacies. As part of a prior Cochrane systematic review, different databases and grey literature were searched for randomized controlled trials up to April 2012. The inclusion criteria were parallel-group studies with nonimmunosuppressed participants: (i) reporting 'participant complete clearance' and (ii) comparing at least two of the interventions. Thirty-two publications met the criteria and they included the following number of individual or pooled studies (n) and total number of participants (N) for the different interventions: 5-FU 0·5% (n = 4, N = 169), 5-FU 5·0% (n = 2, N = 44), ALA-PDT (n = 6, N = 739), cryotherapy (n = 2, N = 174), DCF/HA (n = 5, N = 299), IMI (n = 14, N = 1411), IMB (n = 3, N = 560), MAL-PDT (n = 7, N = 557) and placebo (n = 32, N = 2520). Network analyses using a random-effects Bayesian model were carried out with the software ADDIS v1.16.1. The interventions were ranked as follows based on calculated probabilities and odd ratios: 5-FU > ALA-PDT ≈ IMI ≈ IMB ≈ MAL-PDT > cryotherapy > DCF/HA > placebo. This efficacy ranking was obtained based on the current available data on 'participant complete clearance' from randomized controlled trials and the analysis model used. However, several other factors should also be considered when prescribing a treatment for AK.

  2. 12 CFR 516.220 - If OTS requests additional information to complete my application, how will it process my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... complete my application, how will it process my application? 516.220 Section 516.220 Banks and Banking... Standard Treatment § 516.220 If OTS requests additional information to complete my application, how will it... your response. OTS will notify you that it has extended the period before the end of the initial...

  3. 12 CFR 116.220 - If the OCC requests additional information to complete my application, how will it process my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... complete my application, how will it process my application? 116.220 Section 116.220 Banks and Banking... Treatment § 116.220 If the OCC requests additional information to complete my application, how will it... that it has extended the period before the end of the initial 15-day period and will briefly...

  4. 12 CFR 516.220 - If OTS requests additional information to complete my application, how will it process my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... complete my application, how will it process my application? 516.220 Section 516.220 Banks and Banking... Standard Treatment § 516.220 If OTS requests additional information to complete my application, how will it... your response. OTS will notify you that it has extended the period before the end of the initial...

  5. 12 CFR 390.128 - If the FDIC requests additional information to complete my application, how will it process my...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... complete my application, how will it process my application? 390.128 Section 390.128 Banks and Banking... additional information to complete my application, how will it process my application? (a) You may use the... will notify you that it has extended the period before the end of the initial 15-day period and...

  6. Complete Plastome Sequences from Glycine syndetika and Six Additional Perennial Wild Relatives of Soybean

    PubMed Central

    Sherman-Broyles, Sue; Bombarely, Aureliano; Grimwood, Jane; Schmutz, Jeremy; Doyle, Jeff

    2014-01-01

    Organelle sequences have a long history of utility in phylogenetic analyses. Chloroplast sequences when combined with nuclear data can help resolve relationships among flowering plant genera, and within genera incongruence can point to reticulate evolution. Plastome sequences are becoming plentiful because they are increasingly easier to obtain. Complete plastome sequences allow us to detect rare rearrangements and test the tempo of sequence evolution. Chloroplast sequences are generally considered a nuisance to be kept to a minimum in bacterial artificial chromosome libraries. Here, we sequenced two bacterial artificial chromosomes per species to generate complete plastome sequences from seven species. The plastome sequences from Glycine syndetika and six other perennial Glycine species are similar in arrangement and gene content to the previously published soybean plastome. Repetitive sequences were detected in high frequencies as in soybean, but further analysis showed that repeat sequence numbers are inflated. Previous chloroplast-based phylogenetic trees for perennial Glycine were incongruent with nuclear gene–based phylogenetic trees. We tested whether the hypothesis of introgression was supported by the complete plastomes. Alignment of complete plastome sequences and Bayesian analysis allowed us to date putative hybridization events supporting the hypothesis of introgression and chloroplast “capture.” PMID:25155272

  7. 45 CFR 2522.230 - Under what circumstances may an AmeriCorps participant be released from completing a term of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...'s control, such as, but not limited to: (A) A participant's disability or serious illness; (B) Disability, serious illness, or death of a participant's family member if this makes completing a term... participant to complete service with the same or similar AmeriCorps program at a later time. (b) Release...

  8. 42 CFR 441.256 - Additional condition for Federal financial participation (FFP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... participation (FFP). 441.256 Section 441.256 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... financial participation (FFP). (a) FFP is not available in expenditures for any sterilization or... through November 2, 1982, FFP is available in expenditures for those services if the documentation...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  10. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  11. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  12. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  13. 25 CFR 1000.15 - How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... self-governance per year? 1000.15 Section 1000.15 Indians OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY, INDIAN... Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.15 How many additional Tribes/Consortia may participate in self-governance per year? (a) Sections 402(b) and (c) of the Act authorize the Director...

  14. Generation of a complete set of additive shape-invariant potentials from an Euler equation.

    PubMed

    Bougie, Jonathan; Gangopadhyaya, Asim; Mallow, Jeffry V

    2010-11-19

    In supersymmetric quantum mechanics, shape invariance is a sufficient condition for solvability. We show that all conventional additive shape-invariant superpotentials that are independent of ℏ can be generated from two partial differential equations. One of these is equivalent to the one-dimensional Euler equation expressing momentum conservation for inviscid fluid flow, and it is closed by the other. We solve these equations, generate the set of all conventional shape-invariant superpotentials, and show that there are no others in this category. We then develop an algorithm for generating all additive shape-invariant superpotentials including those that depend on ℏ explicitly. PMID:21231274

  15. Generation of a Complete Set of Additive Shape-Invariant Potentials from an Euler Equation

    SciTech Connect

    Bougie, Jonathan; Gangopadhyaya, Asim; Mallow, Jeffry V.

    2010-11-19

    In supersymmetric quantum mechanics, shape invariance is a sufficient condition for solvability. We show that all conventional additive shape-invariant superpotentials that are independent of ({h_bar}/2{pi}) can be generated from two partial differential equations. One of these is equivalent to the one-dimensional Euler equation expressing momentum conservation for inviscid fluid flow, and it is closed by the other. We solve these equations, generate the set of all conventional shape-invariant superpotentials, and show that there are no others in this category. We then develop an algorithm for generating all additive shape-invariant superpotentials including those that depend on ({h_bar}/2{pi}) explicitly.

  16. Generation of a complete set of additive shape-invariant potentials from an Euler equation.

    PubMed

    Bougie, Jonathan; Gangopadhyaya, Asim; Mallow, Jeffry V

    2010-11-19

    In supersymmetric quantum mechanics, shape invariance is a sufficient condition for solvability. We show that all conventional additive shape-invariant superpotentials that are independent of ℏ can be generated from two partial differential equations. One of these is equivalent to the one-dimensional Euler equation expressing momentum conservation for inviscid fluid flow, and it is closed by the other. We solve these equations, generate the set of all conventional shape-invariant superpotentials, and show that there are no others in this category. We then develop an algorithm for generating all additive shape-invariant superpotentials including those that depend on ℏ explicitly.

  17. Qualitatively Assessing the Experiences of College Students Completing AlcoholEdu: Do Participants Report Altering Behavior After Intervention?

    PubMed

    Barry, Adam E; Hobbs, Laura Ansley; Haas, Emily J; Gibson, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    To reduce college student drinking and associated alcohol-related consequences, many universities are turning to e-interventions, such as AlcoholEdu. To date, however, results of evaluations examining the impact of AlcoholEdu are mixed. Among these evaluations, few qualitative assessments have examined the experiences and perceptions of students who complete AlcoholEdu. This investigation aimed to assess whether students (a) find the program educational and engaging, (b) implemented specific strategies learned from participation, and (c) self-report altering their behavior as a result of participation. Even though respondents universally reported an increase in alcohol-related knowledge, there was an evident disconnect between this knowledge and their actual behavior. In other words, respondents reported that they did not implement what was taught in AlcoholEdu. Moreover, students highlighted several limitations associated with the program that would have influenced its overall impact, such as ignoring video segments of the program and clicking through assessments simply to complete the task. If used, college administrators and health professionals should implement e-interventions such as AlcoholEdu as one component of a multifaceted approach rather than a panacea for the current high-risk drinking practices of college students.

  18. 40 CFR 155.46 - Deciding that a registration review is complete and additional review is not needed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Deciding that a registration review is complete and additional review is not needed. 155.46 Section 155.46 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS REGISTRATION STANDARDS AND REGISTRATION REVIEW Registration Review Procedures §...

  19. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  20. Regulating tissue research: do we need additional rules to protect research participants?

    PubMed

    Wright, Jessica; Ploem, Corrette; Sliwka, Marcin; Gevers, Sjef

    2010-12-01

    This article explores whether additional rules are needed for the regulation of tissue research in Europe. A human rights-based approach (referring to international documents and illustrative examples from national legislation) is taken to address the question: what is so special about tissue, in particular when compared to personal data? The existing regimes in Europe on data protection and clinical trials are presented and examined for their suitability to govern tissue research, taking into account the differences between data and tissue. Six recommendations are outlined, highlighting important points future legislation on tissue research must take into account.

  1. Physiological basis of tolerance to complete submergence in rice involves genetic factors in addition to the SUB1 gene.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sudhanshu; Mackill, David J; Ismail, Abdelbagi M

    2014-01-01

    Recurring floods in Asia cause poor crop establishment. Yields decline drastically when plants are completely submerged for a few days. Traditional rice cultivars predominate because they have acquired moderate tolerance to flooding but they carry the penalty of inherently lower grain yields. In contrast, modern high-yielding varieties are highly susceptible to flooding. Cultivars with tolerance to complete submergence were recently developed in the background of popular varieties by transferring the submergence tolerance gene SUBMERGENCE1 (SUB1) from the highly tolerant Indian landrace FR13A. The present study evaluated three pairs of Sub1 near-isogenic lines (NILs) together with FR13A and two of its submergence-tolerant derivatives under field conditions to assess the survival and growth processes occurring during submergence and recovery that are associated with SUB1. Under control conditions, the NILs showed similar growth and biomass accumulation, indicating that SUB1 had no apparent effects. Submergence substantially decreased biomass accumulation but with greater reduction in the genotypes lacking SUB1, particularly when submergence was prolonged for 17 days. When submerged, the lines lacking SUB1 showed greater elongation and lower or negative biomass accumulation. Sub1 lines maintained higher chlorophyll concentrations during submergence and lost less non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) after submergence. This indicates that the introgression of SUB1 resulted in better regulation of NSC during submergence and that high pre-submergence NSC is not essential for the submergence tolerance conferred by SUB1. During recovery, chlorophyll degradation was faster in genotypes lacking SUB1 and any surviving plants showed poorer and delayed emergence of tillers and leaves. Sub1 lines restored new leaf and tiller production faster. During submergence, FR13A showed not only slower leaf elongation but also accumulated extra biomass and was able to recover faster than Sub

  2. Quasi-Experimental Pilot Study of Intervention to Increase Participant Retention and Completed Home Visits in the Nurse-Family Partnership

    PubMed Central

    Ingoldsby, Erin M.; Baca, Pilar; McClatchey, Maureen W.; Luckey, Dennis W.; Ramsey, Mildred O.; Loch, Joan M.; Lewis, Jan; Blackaby, Terrie S.; Petrini, Mary B.; Smith, Bobbie J.; McHale, Mollie; Perhacs, Marianne; Olds, David L.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated an intervention to increase participant retention and engagement in community practice settings of the Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), an evidence-based program of nurse home visiting for low-income, first-time parents. Using a quasi-experimental design (six intervention and 11 controls sites that delivered the NFP), we compared intervention and control sites on retention and number of completed home visits during a 10-month period after the intervention was initiated. Nurses at the 5 intervention sites were guided in tailoring the frequency, duration, and content of the visits to participants’ needs. NFP nurses at the control sites delivered the program as usual. At intervention sites, participant retention and completed home visits increased from the pre-intervention to intervention periods, while at control sites these outcomes decreased from the pre-intervention to intervention periods, leading to a significant intervention-control difference in change in participant retention (Hazard Ratio: 0.42, p = .015) and a 1.4 visit difference in change in completed home visits (p<.001, ES = 0.36). We conclude that training nurse home visitors to promote adaptation of program dosage and content to meet families’ needs shows promise as a way to improve participant retention and completed home visits. PMID:23832657

  3. Factors Associated with Successful Completion of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program among Middle-Aged and Older Asian-American Participants: A National Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, SangNam; Smith, Matthew Lee; Cho, Jinmyoung; Jiang, Luohua; Post, Lindsey; Ory, Marcia G.

    2014-01-01

    Asian-Americans are a small but fast-growing population in the United States who are increasingly experiencing multiple chronic diseases. While the evidence-based Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been disseminated among various racial and ethnic populations, few studies specifically investigate participants with an Asian background. The study aims to identify characteristics of middle-aged and older Asian-American CDSMP participants (older than 50 years) and investigate factors related to successful workshop completion (i.e., attending 4+ of the 6 sessions) among this population. Data were analyzed from 2,716 middle-aged and older Asian-Americans collected during a 2-year national dissemination of CDSMP. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify individual- and workshop-level covariates related to successful workshop completion. The majority of participants were female, living with others, and living in metro areas. The average age was 71.3 years old (±9.2), and the average number of chronic conditions was 2.0 (±1.5). Successful completion of CDSMP workshops among participants was associated with their number of chronic conditions (OR = 1.10, P = 0.011), living in non-metro areas (OR = 1.77, P = 0.009), attending workshops from area agencies on aging (OR = 1.56, P = 0.018), and attending a workshop with higher completion rates (OR = 1.03, P < 0.001). This study is the first large-scale examination of Asian-American participants enrolled in CDSMP and highlights characteristics related to intervention attendance among this under-studied minority population. Knowing such characteristics is important for serving the growing number of Asian-Americans with chronic conditions. PMID:25964933

  4. 20 CFR 664.210 - How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.210 How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an...

  5. 20 CFR 664.210 - How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.210 How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an...

  6. 20 CFR 664.210 - How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an educational program, or to secure and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) YOUTH ACTIVITIES UNDER TITLE I OF THE WORKFORCE INVESTMENT ACT Eligibility for Youth Services § 664.210 How is the “requires additional assistance to complete an...

  7. Defining the posterior palatal seal on a definitive impression for a maxillary complete denture by using a nonfluid wax addition technique.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Russell; Ahuja, Swati; Jain, Vinay

    2014-12-01

    The posterior palatal seal area is defined as the soft tissue area at or beyond the junction of the hard and soft palates on which pressure within physiologic limits can be applied by a removable complete denture to aid in its retention. The retention of the maxillary denture is affected by the extent and the design of the posterior palatal seal. This article discusses a method of defining the posterior palatal seal on a definitive impression for a maxillary complete denture by using microabrasion and a nonfluid wax addition technique.

  8. Single-port plus an additional port robotic complete mesocolic excision and intracorporeal anastomosis using a robotic stapler for right-sided colon cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Sung Uk; Jeong, Woon Kyung

    2016-01-01

    The concept of complete mesocolic excision and central vascular ligation for colonic cancer has been recently introduced. The paper describes a technique of right-sided complete mesocolic excision and intracorporeal anastomosis by using a single-port robotic approach with an additional conventional robotic port. We performed a single-port plus an additional port robotic surgery using the Da Vinci Single-Site platform via the Pfannenstiel incision and the wristed robotic instruments via an additional robotic port in the left lower quadrant. The total operative and docking times were 280 and 25 minutes, respectively. The total number of lymph nodes harvested was 36 and the proximal and distal resection margins were 31 and 50 cm, respectively. Single-port plus an additional port robotic surgery for right-sided complete mesocolic excision and intracorporeal anastomosis appears to be feasible and safe. This system can overcome certain limitations of the previous robotic systems and conventional single-port laparoscopic surgery. PMID:27757400

  9. Transmission of alien chromosomes from selfed progenies of a complete set of Allium monosomic additions: the development of a reliable method for the maintenance of a monosomic addition set.

    PubMed

    Shigyo, M; Wako, T; Kojima, A; Yamauchi, N; Tashiro, Y

    2003-12-01

    Selfed progeny of a complete set of Allium fistulosum - Allium cepa monosomic addition lines (2n = 2x + 1 = 17, FF+1A-FF+8A) were produced to examine the transmission rates of respective alien chromosomes. All eight types of the selfed monosomic additions set germinable seeds. The numbers of chromosomes (2n) in the seedlings were 16, 17, or 18. The eight extra chromosomes varied in transmission rate (%) from 9 (FF+2A) to 49 (FF+8A). The complete set of monosomic additions was reproduced successfully by self-pollination. A reliable way to maintain a set of Allium monosomic additions was developed using a combination of two crossing methods, selfing and female transmission. FF+8A produced two seedlings with 18 chromosomes. Cytogenetical analyses, including GISH, showed that the seedlings were disomic addition plants carrying two entire homologous chromosomes from A. cepa in an integral diploid background of A. fistulosum. Flow cytometry analysis showed that a double dose of the alien 8A chromosome caused fluorescence intensity values spurring in DNA content, and isozyme analysis showed increased glutamate dehydrogenase activity at the gene locus Gdh-1.

  10. Transmission of alien chromosomes from selfed progenies of a complete set of Allium monosomic additions: the development of a reliable method for the maintenance of a monosomic addition set.

    PubMed

    Shigyo, M; Wako, T; Kojima, A; Yamauchi, N; Tashiro, Y

    2003-12-01

    Selfed progeny of a complete set of Allium fistulosum - Allium cepa monosomic addition lines (2n = 2x + 1 = 17, FF+1A-FF+8A) were produced to examine the transmission rates of respective alien chromosomes. All eight types of the selfed monosomic additions set germinable seeds. The numbers of chromosomes (2n) in the seedlings were 16, 17, or 18. The eight extra chromosomes varied in transmission rate (%) from 9 (FF+2A) to 49 (FF+8A). The complete set of monosomic additions was reproduced successfully by self-pollination. A reliable way to maintain a set of Allium monosomic additions was developed using a combination of two crossing methods, selfing and female transmission. FF+8A produced two seedlings with 18 chromosomes. Cytogenetical analyses, including GISH, showed that the seedlings were disomic addition plants carrying two entire homologous chromosomes from A. cepa in an integral diploid background of A. fistulosum. Flow cytometry analysis showed that a double dose of the alien 8A chromosome caused fluorescence intensity values spurring in DNA content, and isozyme analysis showed increased glutamate dehydrogenase activity at the gene locus Gdh-1. PMID:14663528

  11. 45 CFR 2522.230 - Under what circumstances may an AmeriCorps participant be released from completing a term of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... must have enrolled in a drug rehabilitation program; (ii) For an individual who has been convicted for... successfully completed a drug rehabilitation program. (e) Release prior to serving 15 percent of a term...

  12. Bevacizumab Addition in Neoadjuvant Treatment Increases the Pathological Complete Response Rates in Patients with HER-2 Negative Breast Cancer Especially Triple Negative Breast Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Binglan; Shi, Changle; Liu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Background Neoadjuvant therapy is administered to breast cancer patients as an induction process before surgery or radiotherapy to reduce tumor size. Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER-2) negative breast cancer lacks effective standard target therapy. Bevacizumab has a controversial role in the treatment of breast cancer and we conduct a meta-analysis to evaluate the value of adding bevacizumab in neoadjuvant regimen. Methods Potentially eligible studies were retrieved using PubMed, EMBASE and Medline. Clinical characteristics of patients and statistical data with pathological complete response (pCR) data were collected. Then a meta-analysis model was established to investigate the correlation between administration of bevacizumab in neoadjuvant therapy and pCR rates in HER-2 negative breast cancer. Results Seven eligible studies and 5408 patients were yielded. The pCR rates for “breast” or “breast plus lymph node” were similar. In subgroup analysis, we emphasized on patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). In the criterion of “lesions in breast” the pooled ORs was 1.55 [1.29, 1.86], P<0.00001 and regarding to the evaluation criterion of “lesions in breast and lymph nodes”, the pooled ORs was 1.48 [1.23, 1.78], P<0.0001, in favor of bevacizumab administration. Conclusion According to our pooled results, we finally find that bevacizumab addition as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy component, for induction use with limited cycle to improve the pCR rates and patients may avoid long-term adverse event and long-term invalid survival improvement. Especially in subgroup analysis, pCR rates could be improved significantly and physicians could consider bevacizumab with caution. As patients could avoid the adverse event caused by long-term using of bevacizumab, long-term quality of life improvement may be achieved, especially in TNBC. PMID:27579484

  13. Computer-Based Training at a Military Medical Center: Understanding Decreased Participation in Training among Staff and Ways to Improve Completion Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Military health care facilities make extensive use of computer-based training (CBT) for both clinical and non-clinical staff. Despite evidence identifying various factors that may impact CBT, the problem is unclear as to what factors specifically influence employee participation in computer-based training. The purpose of this mixed method case…

  14. An examination of participants who develop an eating disorder despite completing an eating disorder prevention program: implications for improving the yield of prevention efforts.

    PubMed

    Horney, Audra C; Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Numerous trials provide support for the Body Project, an eating disorder prevention program wherein young women with body image concerns critique the thin ideal. Despite medium to large effects, some participants subsequently develop an eating disorder, suggesting that intervention or recruitment procedures could be improved. This study investigated baseline and acute intervention predictors of DSM-5 eating disorder development during a 3-year follow-up among Body Project participants. Combined data from two trials compare participants who experienced eating disorder onset during follow-up (n = 20) to those who did not (n = 216). Participants who did versus did not develop an eating disorder started the intervention with higher eating disorder symptoms (η (2) = 0.08), negative affect (η (2) = 0.06), thin-ideal internalization (η (2) = 0.02), and body dissatisfaction (η (2) = 0.02); the same baseline predictors of eating disorder onset emerged in controls. Attenuated pre-post reductions in eating disorder symptoms (η (2) = 0.01) predicted eating disorder onset but not after controlling for baseline levels. Given that Body Project and control participants who later developed an eating disorder started with initial elevations in risk factors and eating disorder symptoms, it might be useful to develop a more intensive variant of this program for those exhibiting greater risk at baseline and to deliver the prevention program earlier to prevent initial escalation of risk. The fact that nonresponders also showed greater negative affect and eating disorder symptoms suggests that it might be useful to add activities to improve affect and increase dissonance about disordered eating.

  15. An examination of participants who develop an eating disorder despite completing an eating disorder prevention program: implications for improving the yield of prevention efforts.

    PubMed

    Horney, Audra C; Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2015-05-01

    Numerous trials provide support for the Body Project, an eating disorder prevention program wherein young women with body image concerns critique the thin ideal. Despite medium to large effects, some participants subsequently develop an eating disorder, suggesting that intervention or recruitment procedures could be improved. This study investigated baseline and acute intervention predictors of DSM-5 eating disorder development during a 3-year follow-up among Body Project participants. Combined data from two trials compare participants who experienced eating disorder onset during follow-up (n = 20) to those who did not (n = 216). Participants who did versus did not develop an eating disorder started the intervention with higher eating disorder symptoms (η (2) = 0.08), negative affect (η (2) = 0.06), thin-ideal internalization (η (2) = 0.02), and body dissatisfaction (η (2) = 0.02); the same baseline predictors of eating disorder onset emerged in controls. Attenuated pre-post reductions in eating disorder symptoms (η (2) = 0.01) predicted eating disorder onset but not after controlling for baseline levels. Given that Body Project and control participants who later developed an eating disorder started with initial elevations in risk factors and eating disorder symptoms, it might be useful to develop a more intensive variant of this program for those exhibiting greater risk at baseline and to deliver the prevention program earlier to prevent initial escalation of risk. The fact that nonresponders also showed greater negative affect and eating disorder symptoms suggests that it might be useful to add activities to improve affect and increase dissonance about disordered eating. PMID:25342026

  16. An Examination of Participants Who Develop an Eating Disorder Despite Completing an Eating Disorder Prevention Program: Implications for Improving the Yield of Prevention Efforts

    PubMed Central

    Stice, Eric; Rohde, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Numerous trials provide support for the Body Project, an eating disorder prevention program wherein young women with body image concerns critique the thin ideal. Despite medium to large effects, some participants subsequently develop an eating disorder, suggesting that intervention or recruitment procedures could be improved. This study investigated baseline and acute intervention predictors of DSM-5 eating disorder development during a 3-year follow-up among Body Project participants. Combined data from two trials compare participants who experienced eating disorder onset during follow-up (n=20) to those who did not (n=216). Participants who did versus did not develop an eating disorder started the intervention with higher eating disorder symptoms (η2=0.08), negative affect (η2=0.06), thin-ideal internalization (η2=0.02), and body dissatisfaction (η2=0.02); the same baseline predictors of eating disorder onset emerged in controls. Attenuated pre–post reductions in eating disorder symptoms (η2=0.01) predicted eating disorder onset but not after controlling for baseline levels. Given that Body Project and control participants who later developed an eating disorder started with initial elevations in risk factors and eating disorder symptoms, it might be useful to develop a more intensive variant of this program for those exhibiting greater risk at baseline and to deliver the prevention program earlier to prevent initial escalation of risk. The fact that nonresponders also showed greater negative affect and eating disorder symptoms suggests that it might be useful to add activities to improve affect and increase dissonance about disordered eating. PMID:25342026

  17. Reducing Perceptions of Time Required to Complete Math Assignments by Adding Problems to Assignments: A Synthesis of the Additive Interspersal Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billington, Eric J.; Skinner, Christopher H.

    2006-01-01

    Results from nine experiments were analyzed to evaluate the relationship between relative problem completion rates (RPCR) and judgments of time involving mathematics assignments. For each experiment, control assignments contained only target mathematics computation or word problems. Matched experimental assignments contained similar target…

  18. Secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effects in irreversible additions of hydride and carbon nucleophiles to aldehydes: A spectrum of transition states from complete bond formation to single electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, J.J.; Bocian, W.; Harris, N.J.; Olson, L.P.; Gajewski, J.P.

    1999-01-20

    The competitive kinetics of hydride and organometallic additions to benzaldehyde-H and -D were determined at {minus}78 C using LiAlH{sub 4}, LiBEt{sub 3}H, NaBH{sub 4}, LiBH{sub 4}, LiAl(O-tert-butoxy){sub 3}H, NaB(OMe){sub 3}H, NaB-(Ac){sub 3}H (at 20 C) methyl, phenyl, and allyl Grignard, and methyl-, phenyl-, n-butyl-, tert-butyl-, and allyllithium. The additions of hydride were found to have an inverse secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effects in all cases, but the magnitude of the effect varied inversely with the apparent reactivity of the hydride. In the additions of methyl Grignard reagent and of methyllithium and phenyllithium, inverse secondary deuterium isotope effects were observed; little if any isotope effect was observed with phenyl Grignard or n-butyl- and tert-butyllithium. With allyl Grignard and allyllithium, a normal secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effect was observed. The results indicate that rate-determining single-electron transfer occurs with allyl reagents, but direct nucleophilic reaction occurs with all of the other reagents, with the extent of bond formation dependent on the reactivity of the reagent. In the addition of methyllithium to cyclohexanecarboxyaldehyde, a less inverse secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effect was observed than that observed in the addition of methyllithium to benzaldehyde, and allyllithium addition to cyclohexanecarboxaldehyde had a kinetic isotope effect near unity. The data with organometallic additions, which are not incompatible with observations of carbonyl carbon isotope effects, suggest that electrochemically determined redox potentials which indicate endoergonic electron transfer with energies less than ca. 13 kcal/mol allow electron-transfer mechanisms to compete well with direct polar additions to aldehydes, provided that the reagent is highly stabilized, like allyl species. Methyllithium and phenyllithium and methyl and phenyl Grignard reagents are estimated to undergo electron transfer with

  19. 20 CFR 641.540 - What types of training may grantees and sub-recipients provide to SCSEP participants in addition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... available resources, including host agencies, at no cost or reduced cost to the SCSEP. (e) Grantees and sub-recipients may pay for participant training, including the payment of reasonable costs of instructors, classroom rental, training supplies, materials, equipment, and tuition. (OAA § 502(c)(6)(A)(ii))....

  20. 20 CFR 641.540 - What types of training may grantees and sub-recipients provide to SCSEP participants in addition...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... available resources, including host agencies, at no cost or reduced cost to the SCSEP. (e) Grantees and sub-recipients may pay for participant training, including the payment of reasonable costs of instructors, classroom rental, training supplies, materials, equipment, and tuition. (OAA § 502(c)(6)(A)(ii))....

  1. Demand for University Continuing Education in Canada: Who Participates and Why?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamuti-Trache, Maria; Schuetze, Hans G.

    2009-01-01

    The demand for and participation in continuing education by Canadian university graduates who completed bachelor and/or first professional degrees in 1995 are analyzed in this article. Within five years of completing their first degree, in addition to participating in graduate programs, a large number of those graduates participated in non-degree…

  2. SWOG S0800 (NCI CDR0000636131): addition of bevacizumab to neoadjuvant nab-paclitaxel with dose-dense doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide improves pathologic complete response (pCR) rates in inflammatory or locally advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nahleh, Z A; Barlow, W E; Hayes, D F; Schott, A F; Gralow, J R; Sikov, W M; Perez, E A; Chennuru, S; Mirshahidi, H R; Corso, S W; Lew, D L; Pusztai, L; Livingston, R B; Hortobagyi, G N

    2016-08-01

    SWOG S0800, a randomized open-label Phase II clinical trial, compared the combination of weekly nab-paclitaxel and bevacizumab followed by dose-dense doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide (AC) with nab-paclitaxel followed or preceded by AC as neoadjuvant treatment for HER2-negative locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) or inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). Patients were randomly allocated (2:1:1) to three neoadjuvant chemotherapy arms: (1) nab-paclitaxel with concurrent bevacizumab followed by AC; (2) nab-paclitaxel followed by AC; or (3) AC followed by nab-paclitaxel. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR) with stratification by disease type (non-IBC LABC vs. IBC) and hormone receptor status (positive vs. negative). Overall survival (OS), event-free survival (EFS), and toxicity were secondary endpoints. Analyses were intent-to-treat comparing bevacizumab to the combined control arms. A total of 215 patients were accrued including 11 % with IBC and 32 % with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). The addition of bevacizumab significantly increased the pCR rate overall (36 vs. 21 %; p = 0.019) and in TNBC (59 vs. 29 %; p = 0.014), but not in hormone receptor-positive disease (24 vs. 18 %; p = 0.41). Sequence of administration of nab-paclitaxel and AC did not affect the pCR rate. While no significant differences in OS or EFS were seen, a trend favored the addition of bevacizumab for EFS (p = 0.06) in TNBC. Overall, Grade 3-4 adverse events did not differ substantially by treatment arm. The addition of bevacizumab to nab-paclitaxel prior to dose-dense AC neoadjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved the pCR rate compared to chemotherapy alone in patients with triple-negative LABC/IBC and was accompanied by a trend for improved EFS. This suggests reconsideration of the role of bevacizumab in high-risk triple-negative locally advanced breast cancer.

  3. Complete prewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyshin, P.; Parry, A. O.; Kalliadasis, S.

    2016-07-01

    We study continuous interfacial transitions, analagous to two-dimensional complete wetting, associated with the first-order prewetting line, which can occur on steps, patterned walls, grooves and wedges, and which are sensitive to both the range of the intermolecular forces and interfacial fluctuation effects. These transitions compete with wetting, filling and condensation producing very rich phase diagrams even for relatively simple prototypical geometries. Using microscopic classical density functional theory to model systems with realistic Lennard-Jones fluid–fluid and fluid–substrate intermolecular potentials, we compute mean-field fluid density profiles, adsorption isotherms and phase diagrams for a variety of confining geometries.

  4. Community-Academic Partnership Participation.

    PubMed

    Meza, Rosemary; Drahota, Amy; Spurgeon, Emily

    2016-10-01

    Community-academic partnerships (CAPs) improve the research process, outcomes, and yield benefits for the community and researchers. This exploratory study examined factors important in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) community stakeholders, previously contacted to participate in a CAP (n = 18), completed the 15-item Decision to Participate Questionnaire (DPQ). The DPQ assessed reasons for participating or declining participation in the ASD CAP. CAP participants rated networking with other providers, fit of collaboration with agency philosophy, and opportunity for future training/consultations as factors more important in their decision to participate in the ASD CAP than nonparticipants. Nonparticipants reported the number of requests to participate in research as more important in their decision to decline participation than participants. Findings reveal important factors in community stakeholders' decision to participate in CAPs that may provide guidance on increasing community engagement in CAPs and help close the science-to-service gap.

  5. Participative Design for Participative Democracy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emery, Merrelyn, Ed.

    This four-part volume addresses design principles for introducing democratic forms in workplaces, educational institutions, and social institutions, based on a trend toward participative democracy in Australia. Following an introduction, part I sets the context with two papers: "The Agenda for the Next Wave" and "Educational Paradigms: An…

  6. Extracurricular participation among adolescents from immigrant families.

    PubMed

    Camacho, Daisy E; Fuligni, Andrew J

    2015-06-01

    Participation in organized after-school activities could be especially beneficial for youth from immigrant backgrounds, whose families often have little knowledge of American school systems. The role of extracurricular involvement in the achievement and motivation of students from immigrant families was examined among 468 eleventh grade (52.4% female) students from Asian American (44.4%), European American (19.0%) and Latino (36.5%) backgrounds who varied in generational status (first: 25%; second: 52.4%, third: 22.6%) and attended high school in the Los Angeles area. Participants completed questionnaires regarding their extracurricular activities, school belonging, and intrinsic motivation. Students' grade point average (GPA) was obtained from official school records. Controls included parental education, ethnicity, generational status, gender, school, and the outcome variables in tenth grade. First generation students were less likely to participate in academic activities than their third generation peers but, overall, there were few generational differences in participation. Participation predicted achievement and engagement after accounting for tenth grade levels of educational adjustment. Most notably, although all students benefitted from participation, the gain in GPA as a function of participation was greater for first generation than third generation students. Results suggest that organized after-school activities are particularly important for students in immigrant families, providing them with additional experiences that contribute to academic achievement.

  7. Sports participation with Chiari I malformation.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Geh, Ndi; Selzer, Béla J; Bower, Regina; Himedan, Mai; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Wetjen, Nicholas M; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with Chiari I malformation (CM-I). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with the imaging finding of CM-I. METHODS A prospective survey was administered to 503 CM-I patients at 2 sites over a 46-month period. Data were gathered on imaging characteristics, treatment, sports participation, and any sport-related injuries. Additionally, 81 patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry and were included in a prospective group, with a mean prospective follow-up period of 11 months. RESULTS Of the 503 CM-I patients, 328 participated in sports for a cumulative duration of 4641 seasons; 205 of these patients participated in contact sports. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. One patient had temporary extremity paresthesias that resolved within hours, and this was not definitely considered to be related to the CM-I. In the prospective cohort, there were no permanent neurological injuries. CONCLUSIONS No permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries were observed in CM-I patients participating in athletic activities. The authors believe that the risk of such injuries is low and that, in most cases, sports participation by children with CM-I is safe.

  8. Can the Swedish new variant of Chlamydia trachomatis (nvCT) be detected by UK NEQAS participants from seventeen European countries and five additional countries/regions in 2009?

    PubMed

    Unemo, M; Rossouw, A; James, V; Jenkins, C

    2009-05-14

    In 2006, a new variant of Chlamydia trachomatis (nvCT) was reported in Sweden. The nvCT contains a deletion that includes the targets for the C. trachomatis genetic diagnostic single-target systems from Roche Diagnostics and Abbott Laboratories. Roche and Abbott have now developed certified dual-target assays that can detect the nvCT. This study examined the nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs) currently used (in 2009) for C. trachomatis detection in laboratories from 17 European countries and five countries/regions outside Europe that are participating in the United Kingdom (UK) National External Quality Assessment Service (NEQAS). It further examined changes in these laboratories' testing strategy during the period from 2006 to 2009, and their performance regarding nvCT detection. A UK NEQAS blinded nvCT specimen was distributed to all 283 participating laboratories, which were asked to analyse the specimen according to their routine C. trachomatis diagnostic protocols for endocervical swabs. BD ProbeTec was the most commonly used NAAT, followed by Cobas Amplicor, Cobas TaqMan, and Aptima. From 2006 to 2009, the use of Cobas Amplicor, which does not detect the nvCT, decreased, but it was still used by 22% (n=57) of responding participants in 59% of the countries, 54 of these 57 used it as first assay. Virtually all of the other participants detected the nvCT correctly. Laboratories using commercial or in house NAATs that do not detect the nvCT are encouraged to carefully monitor their C. trachomatis incidence, participate in effective internal and external quality assurance and controls schemes, and to consider changing their testing system. PMID:19442398

  9. Self-Regulated Learning and Perceived Health among Students Participating in University Physical Activity Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Ron E.; Xiang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Three hundred and sixty-one students participating in university physical activity classes completed questionnaires assessing perceived health and self-regulated learning. In addition, 20 students (11 men; 9 women) were interviewed about their reasons for enrolling, participation and goals in the class. Results indicated the students endorsed…

  10. Children's Additive Concepts: Promoting Understanding and the Role of Inhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Katherine M.; Dube, Adam K.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the promotion of children's understanding and acquisition of arithmetic concepts and the effects of inhibitory skills. Children in Grades 3, 4, and 5 solved two sets of three-term addition and subtraction problems (e.g., 3 + 24 - 24, 3 + 24 - 22) and completed an inhibition task. Half of the participants received a…

  11. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  12. "No, Rolanda, Completely Wrong!" Positioning, Classroom Participation and ESL Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kayi-Aydar, Hayriye

    2013-01-01

    The current study, drawing on Positioning Theory, presents an analysis of various storylines of classroom interaction to illustrate how an adult ESL learner positioned himself and others in an academic oral skills class. Through a recursive micro-analysis of classroom talk, the findings demonstrate how this outspoken student shaped classroom…

  13. 22 CFR 513.510 - Participants' responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... principals. In addition, each participant may, but is not required to, check the Nonprocurement List for its... principals. In addition, a participant may, but is not required to, check the Nonprocurement List for...

  14. Complete genome sequence of Thermomonospora curvata type strain (B9)

    SciTech Connect

    Chertkov, Olga; Sikorski, Johannes; Nolan, Matt; Lapidus, Alla L.; Lucas, Susan; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Goodwin, Lynne A.; Pitluck, Sam; Liolios, Konstantinos; Ivanova, N; Mavromatis, K; Mikhailova, Natalia; Ovchinnikova, Galina; Pati, Amrita; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Ngatchou, Olivier Duplex; Land, Miriam L; Hauser, Loren John; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jeffries, Cynthia; Brettin, Thomas S; Han, Cliff; Detter, J. Chris; Rohde, Manfred; Goker, Markus; Woyke, Tanja; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Kyrpides, Nikos C

    2011-01-01

    Thermomonospora curvata Henssen 1957 is the type species of the genus Thermomonospora. This genus is of interest because members of this clade are sources of new antibiotics, enzymes, and products with pharmacological activity. In addition, members of this genus participate in the active degradation of cellulose. This is the first complete genome sequence of a member of the family Thermomonosporaceae. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. The 5,639,016 bp long genome with its 4,985 protein-coding and 76 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  15. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  16. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  17. Developing Informed Research Participants in an Introductory Psychology Participant Pool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael P.; Lashley, Sarah L.

    2009-01-01

    This activity offers a way to use the informed consent procedure to help students better understand the responsibilities of research participants. During a class activity, students completed a brief study. The study included presentation of consent forms and questionnaires before a surprise quiz over material from the consent form and a discussion…

  18. Insert tree completion system

    SciTech Connect

    Brands, K.W.; Ball, I.G.; Cegielski, E.J.; Gresham, J.S.; Saunders, D.N.

    1982-09-01

    This paper outlines the overall project for development and installation of a low-profile, caisson-installed subsea Christmas tree. After various design studies and laboratory and field tests of key components, a system for installation inside a 30-in. conductor was ordered in July 1978 from Cameron Iron Works Inc. The system is designed to have all critical-pressure-containing components below the mudline and, with the reduced profile (height) above seabed, provides for improved safety of satellite underwater wells from damage by anchors, trawl boards, and even icebergs. In addition to the innovative nature of the tree design, the completion includes improved 3 1/2-in. through flowline (TFL) pumpdown completion equipment with deep set safety valves and a dual detachable packer head for simplified workover capability. The all-hydraulic control system incorporates a new design of sequencing valve for both Christmas tree control and remote flowline connection. A semisubmersible drilling rig was used to initiate the first end flowline connection at the wellhead for subsequent tie-in to the prelaid, surface-towed, all-welded subsea pipeline bundle.

  19. Epilepsy and sports participation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Gregory M; Radloff, Monika; Sevier, Thomas L

    2004-02-01

    Epilepsy is a common disease found in 2% of the population, affecting both young and old. Unfortunately, epileptics have previously been discouraged from participation in physical activity and sports for fear of inducing seizures or increasing seizure frequency. Despite a shift in medical recommendations toward encouraging rather than restricting participation, the stigma remains and epileptics continue to be less active than the general population. This results in increased body mass index, decreased aerobic endurance, poorer self-esteem, and higher levels of anxiety and depression. Although there are rare cases of exercise-induced seizures, studies have shown that physical activity can decrease seizure frequency, as well as lead to improved cardiovascular and psychologic health. The majority of sports are safe for epileptics to participate in with special attention to adequate seizure control, close monitoring of medications, and preparation of family, coaches, or trainers. Contact sports including football, hockey, and soccer have not been shown to induce seizures, and epileptics should not be precluded from participation. Water sports and swimming are felt to be safe if seizures are well controlled and direct supervision is present. Additional care must be taken in sports involving heights such as gymnastics, harnessed rock climbing, or horseback riding. Sports such as hang-gliding, scuba diving, or free climbing are not recommended, given the risk of severe injury or death, if a seizure were to occur during the activity. This article reviews the risks and benefits of physical activity in epileptics, discusses sports in which epileptics may participate, and addresses how to decrease possible risks for injury.

  20. Worksite health promotion program participation: a study to examine the determinants of participation.

    PubMed

    Hall, Michael Edward; Bergman, Randall J; Nivens, Samantha

    2014-09-01

    This study explores the relationship between organizational health climate and worksite health promotion program participation, specifically engaging individuals who are unlikely to make positive health behavior choices on their own. Participants consisted of employees at three separate furniture-manufacturing facilities completing a voluntary survey. Using responses (n = 349) from the health climate instrument, which is a measure of the collective attitudes, beliefs, and readiness to change a health behavior, this study identified two factors that were significant contributors to worksite health promotion program participation. Health norms, the collective attitudes regarding healthy lifestyle, as measured by the subscales-health scale and intention to make a behavior change-and "optimistic bias," the overassessment of one's personal health, were found to be predictors of participation. Additionally, significant (p < .05) predictors of self-assessed health, included perceived control to initiate, competence to carry out, and the organizational support of the health behavior change. The findings suggest that the organization's health norms and self-assessed health are associated with the worker's motivation to become involved with health promotion interventions. Offering worksite health screenings and advanced programming and creating a culture of health at work can help address program participation. PMID:24231632

  1. The Failure of Deactivating Intentions: Aftereffects of Completed Intentions in the Repeated Prospective Memory Cue Paradigm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walser, Moritz; Fischer, Rico; Goschke, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    We used a newly developed experimental paradigm to investigate aftereffects of completed intentions on subsequent performance that required the maintenance and execution of new intentions. Participants performed an ongoing number categorization task and an additional prospective memory (PM) task, which required them to respond to PM cues that…

  2. Persistence motives in irrational decisions to complete a boring task.

    PubMed

    Halkjelsvik, Torleif; Rise, Jostein

    2015-01-01

    We explored a novel task paradigm where participants from the online work marketplace Amazon Mechanical Turk were given the choice to quit or continue an unfinished boring task for identical economic rewards. In Studies 1a and 1b, about half the participants chose to continue (corresponding to an average of 55 and 35 cents in foregone earnings). Participants' self-reported reasons for continuing involved various types of persistence motives, reflecting a desire to persist or complete per se. Studies 2, 3a, 3b, and 3c ruled out the possibility that people continued because they enjoyed the task or believed there were additional rewards for continuing. Study 4 showed that the choice to quit/continue was associated with the manner in which the choice was presented (persistence test vs. decision-making test) and individual differences in dispositional persistence motives. The present data indicate that motivational forces independent of the focal reward may affect intertemporal decisions. PMID:25355585

  3. Sports participation with arachnoid cysts.

    PubMed

    Strahle, Jennifer; Selzer, Béla J; Geh, Ndi; Srinivasan, Dushyanth; Strahle, MaryKathryn; Martinez-Sosa, Meleine; Muraszko, Karin M; Garton, Hugh J L; Maher, Cormac O

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT There is currently no consensus on the safety of sports participation for patients with an intracranial arachnoid cyst (AC). The authors' goal was to define the risk of sports participation for children with this imaging finding. METHODS A survey was prospectively administered to 185 patients with ACs during a 46-month period at a single institution. Cyst size and location, treatment, sports participation, and any injuries were recorded. Eighty patients completed at least 1 subsequent survey following their initial entry into the registry, and these patients were included in a prospective registry with a mean prospective follow-up interval of 15.9 ± 8.8 months. RESULTS A total 112 patients with ACs participated in 261 sports for a cumulative duration of 4410 months or 1470 seasons. Of these, 94 patients participated in 190 contact sports for a cumulative duration of 2818 months or 939 seasons. There were no serious or catastrophic neurological injuries. Two patients presented with symptomatic subdural hygromas following minor sports injuries. In the prospective cohort, there were no neurological injuries CONCLUSIONS Permanent or catastrophic neurological injuries are very unusual in AC patients who participate in athletic activities. In most cases, sports participation by these patients is safe.

  4. Amodal Completion in Bonobos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nagasaka, Yasuo; Brooks, Daniel I.; Wasserman, Edward A.

    2010-01-01

    We trained two bonobos to discriminate among occluded, complete, and incomplete stimuli. The occluded stimulus comprised a pair of colored shapes, one of which appeared to occlude the other. The complete and incomplete stimuli involved the single shape that appeared to have been partially covered in the occluded stimulus; the complete stimulus…

  5. Biospecimen repositories: Are blood donors willing to participate?

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Erik A.; Schlumpf, Karen S.; Mathew, Sunitha M.; Mast, Alan E.; Busch, Michael P.; Gottschall, Jerome L.

    2010-01-01

    Background Sponsored by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institutes (NHLBI), the Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Studies (REDS-I and -II) have conducted epidemiological, laboratory and survey research on volunteer blood donors. Some studies request additional permission to store biospecimens in a repository for future studies. Even if minority enrollment goals are achieved, minority participants may decline to participate in biospecimen repositories, potentially reducing the representativeness and applicability of studies performed using repositories. Study Design and Methods Demographics of donors consenting to “study only” or “study and repository” participation in the 2007 REDS-II Leukocyte Antibodies Prevalence Study (LAPS) were compared to data from a 1998 REDS-I survey of donor opinion regarding storage and use of biospecimens. Results Overall, 91% of LAPS subjects agreed to participate in the repository. Odds of repository participation were lower for subjects who were African American or Hispanic, 35 to 43 years old or had not completed high school. Odds of repository participation were lowest at one geographic location, regardless of other demographics. The 1998 survey of 50,000 blood donors revealed that 97% would approve of long-term storage of biospecimens for blood safety monitoring. Many donors would want notification or permission prior to repository participation. Conclusion Minority blood donors are less likely to participate in biospecimen repositories than Caucasians, though other variables also influence participation. The reluctance of minority donors to participate in repositories may result in a reduced number of biospecimens available for study and a decreased ability to definitely answer specific research questions in these populations. PMID:20456705

  6. Improving Homework Completion of Students through Tutored Study Hall

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicken, Kori S.; Foreman, Carol D.; Jensen, Robin L.; Sherwood, Justin A.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a guided study hall on homework completion. Two groups of students were analyzed in their homework completion rates. Homework completion rates of the students that participated in Site A were reviewed in their five core subjects, while the homework completion rates of the students at Site B…

  7. Adolescent Girls' Participation in Physical Activity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Janice; Hall, M. Ann

    A longitudinal study of girls from the sixth through tenth grades sought to determine if the extent and type of participation in physical activities changed with age. A sample of 207 girls was selected with 140 completing the survey over 5 years. Participation was measured by activities in interschool teams, intramural activities,…

  8. Latino College Completion: Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  9. Latino College Completion: Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  10. Latino College Completion: Minnesota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: Nevada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Latino College Completion: Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Latino College Completion: Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. Latino College Completion: Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  15. Fostering Participation and Leadership Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaiswal, Preeti

    2006-01-01

    Schools play a very significant role in fostering participation and leadership skills and in promoting the way forward to a better future. This article offers a number of strategies which can pave developmental pathways to student leadership. In addition, it analyses the beneficial aspects of such activities in enhancing the competency of students…

  16. Participant dropout as a function of survey length in internet-mediated university studies: implications for study design and voluntary participation in psychological research.

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Michael

    2010-12-01

    Internet-mediated research has offered substantial advantages over traditional laboratory-based research in terms of efficiently and affordably allowing for the recruitment of large samples of participants for psychology studies. Core technical, ethical, and methodological issues have been addressed in recent years, but the important issue of participant dropout has received surprisingly little attention. Specifically, web-based psychology studies often involve undergraduates completing lengthy and time-consuming batteries of online personality questionnaires, but no known published studies to date have closely examined the natural course of participant dropout during attempted completion of these studies. The present investigation examined participant dropout among 1,963 undergraduates completing one of six web-based survey studies relatively representative of those conducted in university settings. Results indicated that 10% of participants could be expected to drop out of these studies nearly instantaneously, with an additional 2% dropping out per 100 survey items included in the study. For individual project investigators, these findings hold ramifications for study design considerations, such as conducting a priori power analyses. The present results also have broader ethical implications for understanding and improving voluntary participation in research involving human subjects. Nonetheless, the generalizability of these conclusions may be limited to studies involving similar design or survey content.

  17. Impact of the Addition of Carboplatin and/or Bevacizumab to Neoadjuvant Once-per-Week Paclitaxel Followed by Dose-Dense Doxorubicin and Cyclophosphamide on Pathologic Complete Response Rates in Stage II to III Triple-Negative Breast Cancer: CALGB 40603 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Sikov, William M.; Berry, Donald A.; Perou, Charles M.; Singh, Baljit; Cirrincione, Constance T.; Tolaney, Sara M.; Kuzma, Charles S.; Pluard, Timothy J.; Somlo, George; Port, Elisa R.; Golshan, Mehra; Bellon, Jennifer R.; Collyar, Deborah; Hahn, Olwen M.; Carey, Lisa A.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Winer, Eric P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose One third of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) achieve pathologic complete response (pCR) with standard neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). CALGB 40603 (Alliance), a 2 × 2 factorial, open-label, randomized phase II trial, evaluated the impact of adding carboplatin and/or bevacizumab. Patients and Methods Patients (N = 443) with stage II to III TNBC received paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 once per week (wP) for 12 weeks, followed by doxorubicin plus cyclophosphamide once every 2 weeks (ddAC) for four cycles, and were randomly assigned to concurrent carboplatin (area under curve 6) once every 3 weeks for four cycles and/or bevacizumab 10 mg/kg once every 2 weeks for nine cycles. Effects of adding these agents on pCR breast (ypT0/is), pCR breast/axilla (ypT0/isN0), treatment delivery, and toxicities were analyzed. Results Patients assigned to either carboplatin or bevacizumab were less likely to complete wP and ddAC without skipped doses, dose modification, or early discontinuation resulting from toxicity. Grade ≥ 3 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia were more common with carboplatin, as were hypertension, infection, thromboembolic events, bleeding, and postoperative complications with bevacizumab. Employing one-sided P values, addition of either carboplatin (60% v 44%; P = .0018) or bevacizumab (59% v 48%; P = .0089) significantly increased pCR breast, whereas only carboplatin (54% v 41%; P = .0029) significantly raised pCR breast/axilla. More-than-additive interactions between the two agents could not be demonstrated. Conclusion In stage II to III TNBC, addition of either carboplatin or bevacizumab to NACT increased pCR rates, but whether this will improve relapse-free or overall survival is unknown. Given results from recently reported adjuvant trials, further investigation of bevacizumab in this setting is unlikely, but the role of carboplatin could be evaluated in definitive studies, ideally limited to biologically defined patient subsets most likely

  18. Mexican-Origin Youth Participation in Extracurricular Activities: Predicting Trajectories of Involvement from 7th to 12th Grade.

    PubMed

    Dawes, Nickki Pearce; Modecki, Kathryn L; Gonzales, Nancy; Dumka, Larry; Millsap, Roger

    2015-11-01

    The potential benefits of participation in extracurricular activities may be especially important for youth who are at risk for academic underachievement, such as low income Mexican-origin youth in the U.S. To advance understanding of factors that drive participation for this population, this study examined Mexican-origin youth's trajectories of participation in extracurricular activities across Grades 7-12 and tested theoretically-derived predictors of these trajectories. Participants were 178 adolescents (53.9 % Female, Mage = 12.28) and their mothers who separately completed in-home interviews. Youth reported the frequency of their participation across a range of extracurricular activities. Latent growth curve models of overall extracurricular activities participation, sports participation, and fine arts participation were individually estimated via structural equation modeling. The findings demonstrated developmental declines in overall participation and in sports participation. For fine arts, declines in participation in middle school were followed by subsequent increases during high school (a curvilinear pattern). Motivationally-salient predictors of participation trajectories included youth's traditional cultural values orientation (sports), the mothers' educational aspirations for the youth (sports, fine arts, overall activity), and youth gender (sports, fine arts). Overall, the results suggest variability in participation trajectories based on program type, and highlight the need for additional research to enhance our understanding of the impact of culturally-relevant predictors on participation over time.

  19. Promoting People's Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Colin

    1981-01-01

    Discusses problems associated with communication in rural areas to promote participation in development programs. Suggests that success of such programs depends on continued government policy in favor of citizen participation in agricultural and rural development. (SK)

  20. Federal participation in LEED

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, Christopher; Dyer, Beverly

    2004-11-10

    The federal government has been an active participant in the development and use of USGBC's Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design Green Building Rating System (LEED). This paper presents a review of this participation and some expectations for ongoing partnership.

  1. Participative Training Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodwell, John

    Based on extensive field experience, this two-part book is intended to be a practical guide for maximizing participative training methods. The first part of the book looks at the principles and the core skills involved in participative training. It shows how trainee participation corresponds to the processes of adult learning and describes each…

  2. School Lunch Program Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucchino, Lori; Ranney, Christine K.

    1990-01-01

    Reductions in participation in National School Lunch Program in 1981-82 are of concern to hunger groups and legislators. Extent to which Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Acts (OBRA) of 1980-81 contributes to participation decline was measured by simulation model in New York State. Results suggest that OBRA increased participation; declining…

  3. Complete binasal hemianopia

    PubMed Central

    Pomeranz, Howard D.; Smith, Kyle H.

    2014-01-01

    Binasal hemianopia is a rarely encountered visual field defect. We examined two asymptomatic female patients, aged 17 and 83, with complete binasal hemianopia. Both patients had unremarkable eye exams except for the visual field deficits and minimally reduced visual acuity and color vision. Both patients had normal neuroimaging. These are the first reported cases of complete binasal visual field defects without an identifiable ocular or neurologic cause. PMID:25484511

  4. Validation of the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire

    PubMed Central

    Morley, David; Dummett, Sarah; Kelly, Laura; Dawson, Jill; Fitzpatrick, Ray; Jenkinson, Crispin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is growing interest in the management of long-term conditions and in keeping people active and participating in the community. Testing the effectiveness of interventions that aim to affect activities and participation can be challenging without a well-developed, valid, and reliable instrument. This study therefore aims to develop a patient-reported outcome measure, the Oxford Participation and Activities Questionnaire (Ox-PAQ), which is theoretically grounded in the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) and fully compliant with current best practice guidelines. Methods Questionnaire items generated from patient interviews and based on the nine chapters of the ICF were administered by postal survey to 386 people with three neurological conditions: motor neuron disease, multiple sclerosis, and Parkinson’s disease. Participants also completed the Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and EQ-5D-5L. Results Thus, 334 participants completed the survey, a response rate of 86.5%. Factor analysis techniques identified three Ox-PAQ domains, consisting of 23 items, accounting for 72.8% of variance. Internal reliability for the three domains was high (Cronbach’s α: 0.81–0.96), as was test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation: 0.83–0.92). Concurrent validity was demonstrated through highly significant relationships with relevant domains of the MOS SF-36 and the EQ- 5D-5L. Assessment of known-groups validity identified significant differences in Ox-PAQ scores among the three conditions included in the survey. Conclusion Results suggest that the Ox-PAQ is a valid and reliable measure of participation and activity. The measure will now be validated in a range of further conditions, and additional properties, such as responsiveness, will also be assessed in the next phase of the instrument’s development. PMID:27366108

  5. Utility participation in a multispecies plan

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, D.W.

    1996-11-01

    Single-species listings under provisions of the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA) have caused, or have been accused of causing, significant regional economic impact. In an attempt to avoid such adverse effects on regional economic development. The pilot NCCP program for the conservation of several threatened, endangered, and category 1 species, plus an additional 35 coastal sage scrub-related species in southern California, was completed and submitted to the public for review and comment in December 1995. This program proposes the voluntary establishment of a 86,600-ha multispecies reserve system. Once completed, participating landowners will receive ESA Section 10(a) {open_quotes}incidental take{close_quotes} permits for present and identified future projects. Utility rights-of-way are incorporated into the program as important connective linkages between reserve units and other adjacent important habitat areas. All data and information regarding the proposed results of the NCCP are subject to change pending agency response to public comments on the draft Habitat Conservation Plan and joint EIR/EIS. 10 refs., 2 tabs.

  6. Postscript: Filling-in Models of Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Barton L.

    2007-01-01

    Presents some additional comments from the current author regarding his original article "Filling-in models of completion: Rejoinder to Kellman, Garrigan, Shipley, and Keane (2007) and Albert (2007)." Despite repeated assertions by Kellman et al., I have never claimed that luminance constraints block modal completion; rather, they merely weaken…

  7. Congenital complete atrioventricular block.

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, N J; Fenrich, A L; Friedman, R A

    1997-01-01

    Congenital complete atrioventricular block is found in 1 of 22,000 live births. Over time, it has become apparent that these patients represent not a single distinct disease process, but several processes with the common manifestation of atrioventricular block. The evaluation of these patients to determine their risk of sudden death and need for pacing is not well defined. Images PMID:9456483

  8. Making College Completion Personal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Heather

    2011-01-01

    There are countless justifications for why young adults, faced with so many distractions, do not complete their educations. Many students fail to finish college because of a lack of information and understanding about healthy relationships and sex education. The author's own struggles and eventual successes as a student and mother compelled her to…

  9. Completing a Simple Circuit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slater, Timothy F.; Adams, Jeffrey P.; Brown, Thomas R.

    2000-01-01

    Students have problems successfully arranging an electric circuit to make the bulb produce light. Investigates the percentage of students able to complete a circuit with a given apparatus, and the effects of prior experience on student success. Recommends hands-on activities at the elementary and secondary school levels. (Contains 14 references.)…

  10. Beyond FASFA Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castleman, Ben; Page, Lindsay

    2015-01-01

    The Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA)--which students must complete to qualify for most federal, state, and institutional financial aid--is a gateway to college through which many students must pass, particularly those from low- to moderate-income households (King, 2004; Kofoed, 2013). Yet given the complexity of the…

  11. Patterns of public participation.

    PubMed

    Slutsky, Jean; Tumilty, Emma; Max, Catherine; Lu, Lanting; Tantivess, Sripen; Hauegen, Renata Curi; Whitty, Jennifer A; Weale, Albert; Pearson, Steven D; Tugendhaft, Aviva; Wang, Hufeng; Staniszewska, Sophie; Weerasuriya, Krisantha; Ahn, Jeonghoon; Cubillos, Leonardo

    2016-08-15

    Purpose - The paper summarizes data from 12 countries, chosen to exhibit wide variation, on the role and place of public participation in the setting of priorities. The purpose of this paper is to exhibit cross-national patterns in respect of public participation, linking those differences to institutional features of the countries concerned. Design/methodology/approach - The approach is an example of case-orientated qualitative assessment of participation practices. It derives its data from the presentation of country case studies by experts on each system. The country cases are located within the historical development of democracy in each country. Findings - Patterns of participation are widely variable. Participation that is effective through routinized institutional processes appears to be inversely related to contestatory participation that uses political mobilization to challenge the legitimacy of the priority setting process. No system has resolved the conceptual ambiguities that are implicit in the idea of public participation. Originality/value - The paper draws on a unique collection of country case studies in participatory practice in prioritization, supplementing existing published sources. In showing that contestatory participation plays an important role in a sub-set of these countries it makes an important contribution to the field because it broadens the debate about public participation in priority setting beyond the use of minipublics and the observation of public representatives on decision-making bodies. PMID:27468773

  12. A Comparison of Selected Outcomes of Secondary Tech Prep Participants and Non-Participants in Texas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Carrie H.

    2000-01-01

    A 5-year study of 10th-12th graders in Texas compared participants in tech prep, non-tech prep career-technical education participants, and general education students. Tech prep students had higher attendance and lower dropout rates, slightly higher graduation rates, and increasing completion of college prep. Similar results for ethnic, at-risk,…

  13. Predicting Participation in Group Parenting Education in an Australian Sample: The Role of Attitudes, Norms, and Control Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Katherine M.; Wellington, Larne

    2009-01-01

    We examined the theory of planned behavior (TPB) in predicting intentions to participate in group parenting education. One hundred and seventy-six parents (138 mothers and 38 fathers) with a child under 12 years completed TPB items assessing attitude, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control (PBC), and two additional social influence…

  14. Additive manufacturing of optical components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Andreas; Rank, Manuel; Maillard, Philippe; Suckow, Anne; Bauckhage, Yannick; Rößler, Patrick; Lang, Johannes; Shariff, Fatin; Pekrul, Sven

    2016-08-01

    The development of additive manufacturing methods has enlarged rapidly in recent years. Thereby, the work mainly focuses on the realization of mechanical components, but the additive manufacturing technology offers a high potential in the field of optics as well. Owing to new design possibilities, completely new solutions are possible. This article briefly reviews and compares the most important additive manufacturing methods for polymer optics. Additionally, it points out the characteristics of additive manufactured polymer optics. Thereby, surface quality is of crucial importance. In order to improve it, appropriate post-processing steps are necessary (e.g. robot polishing or coating), which will be discussed. An essential part of this paper deals with various additive manufactured optical components and their use, especially in optical systems for shape metrology (e.g. borehole sensor, tilt sensor, freeform surface sensor, fisheye lens). The examples should demonstrate the potentials and limitations of optical components produced by additive manufacturing.

  15. Children's Participation in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brostrom, Stig

    2012-01-01

    In (post) modern society children are seen as active subjects and participants who have a legitimate basis in the United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child. As a consequence of this, children are able to play an active role in the planning of/and participation in both education and research in their own preschool settings. This article…

  16. Depression and Political Participation*

    PubMed Central

    Ojeda, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I propose that depression is a political phenomenon insofar as it has political sources and consequences. I then investigate one aspect of this argument—whether depression reduces participation. I hypothesize that individuals with depression lack the motivation and physical capacity to vote and engage in other forms of political participation due to somatic problems and feelings of hopelessness and apathy. Moreover, I examine how depression in adolescence can have downstream consequences for participation in young adulthood. The analyses, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal data, show that voter turnout and other forms of participation decrease as the severity of depressed mood increases. These findings are discussed in light of disability rights and potential efforts to boost participation among this group. PMID:26924857

  17. Physician views regarding substance use-related participation in a state physician health program.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Lisa J; Greene, William M

    2010-01-01

    Physician Health Programs (PHPs) safeguard the public by monitoring impaired physicians, but participation is not always voluntary, and many physicians resist referral. In this study, 80 physicians (85.1% male) who were referred to a state PHP for substance use-related problems completed an anonymous online survey regarding their experiences in the program. Results indicated that 78.1% of program completers had a 5-year contract, with 100% including random drug screening. In addition, 84.8% continued participation in 12-step fellowships after the required monitoring period. Participants were generally satisfied with the program, and 92.5% indicated that they would recommend it to others. They provided suggestions to increase the acceptability and efficacy of PHPs for physicians.  PMID:20958849

  18. A Comparison of Procedural Variations in Teaching Behavior Chains: Manual Guidance, Trainer Completion, and No Completion of Untrained Steps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bancroft, Stacie L.; Weiss, Julie S.; Libby, Myrna E.; Ahearn, William H.

    2011-01-01

    We compared variations for teaching a sequence of responses through forward chaining. Seven children who had been diagnosed with autism participated in a comparison of teacher completion (TC) of steps beyond the training step and manually guiding the student (SC) to complete steps beyond the training step. A no-completion (NC) condition, in which…

  19. Complete normal ordering 1: Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Skliros, Dimitri P.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new prescription for quantising scalar field theories (in generic spacetime dimension and background) perturbatively around a true minimum of the full quantum effective action, which is to 'complete normal order' the bare action of interest. When the true vacuum of the theory is located at zero field value, the key property of this prescription is the automatic cancellation, to any finite order in perturbation theory, of all tadpole and, more generally, all 'cephalopod' Feynman diagrams. The latter are connected diagrams that can be disconnected into two pieces by cutting one internal vertex, with either one or both pieces free from external lines. In addition, this procedure of 'complete normal ordering' (which is an extension of the standard field theory definition of normal ordering) reduces by a substantial factor the number of Feynman diagrams to be calculated at any given loop order. We illustrate explicitly the complete normal ordering procedure and the cancellation of cephalopod diagrams in scalar field theories with non-derivative interactions, and by using a point splitting 'trick' we extend this result to theories with derivative interactions, such as those appearing as non-linear σ-models in the world-sheet formulation of string theory. We focus here on theories with trivial vacua, generalising the discussion to non-trivial vacua in a follow-up paper.

  20. STEM Club Participation and STEM Schooling Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfried, Michael A.; Williams, Darryl N.

    2013-01-01

    To develop a more robust understanding of the relationship between non-formal, school-based STEM activities and students' success and persistence in STEM fields, this study evaluates how math club participation influences math GPA and how science club participation influences science GPA. Additionally, this study evaluates how math or science club…

  1. The Role of Session Zero in Successful Completion of Chronic Disease Self-Management Program Workshops

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Luohua; Smith, Matthew Lee; Chen, Shuai; Ahn, SangNam; Kulinski, Kristie P.; Lorig, Kate; Ory, Marcia G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been widely disseminated among various racial and ethnic populations. In addition to the six required CDSMP workshop sessions, the delivery sites have the option to offer a Session Zero (or zero class), an information session offered prior to Session One as a marketing tool. Despite assumptions that a zero class is helpful, little is known about the prevalence of these additional sessions or their impact on retaining participants in CDSMP workshops. This study aims to describe the proportion of CDSMP workshops that offered Session Zero and examine the association between Session Zero and workshop completion rates. Methods: Data were analyzed from 80,987 middle-aged and older adults collected during a two-year national dissemination of CDSMP. Generalized estimating equation regression analyses were conducted to assess the association between Session Zero and successful workshop completion (attending four or more of the six workshop sessions). Results: On average, 21.04% of the participants attended workshops that offered Session Zero, and 75.33% successfully completed the CDSMP workshop. The participants of the workshops that offered Session Zero had significantly higher odds of completing CDSMP workshops than those who were not offered Session Zero (OR = 1.099, P = <0.001) after controlling for participants’ demographic characteristics, race, ethnicity, living status, household income, number of chronic conditions, and workshop delivery type. Conclusion: As one of the first studies reporting the importance of an orientation session for participant retention in chronic disease management intervention projects, our findings suggest offering an orientation session may increase participant retention in similar translational efforts. PMID:25964918

  2. 33 CFR 238.8 - Other participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DEFENSE WATER RESOURCES POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES IN URBAN AREAS § 238.8 Other participation. In addition to providing flood damage reduction works in urban areas, the Corps...

  3. 33 CFR 238.8 - Other participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... DEFENSE WATER RESOURCES POLICIES AND AUTHORITIES: FLOOD DAMAGE REDUCTION MEASURES IN URBAN AREAS § 238.8 Other participation. In addition to providing flood damage reduction works in urban areas, the Corps...

  4. Out of bounds additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; et al

    2013-03-01

    Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an additive manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but multiple yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.

  5. Hepatitis A/B vaccine completion among homeless adults with history of incarceration.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline M; Marlow, Elizabeth; Branson, Catherine; Marfisee, Mary; Nandy, Karabi

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination rates for incarcerated adults remain low despite their high risk for infection. This study determined predictors of vaccine completion in homeless adults (N= 297) who reported histories of incarceration and who participated in one of three nurse-led hepatitis programs of different intensity. Moreover time since release from incarceration was also considered. Just over half of the former prisoners completed the vaccine series. Older age (≥40), having a partner, and chronic homelessness were associated with vaccine completion. Recent research has documented the difficulty in providing vaccine services to younger homeless persons and homeless males at risk for HBV. Additional strategies are needed to achieve HBV vaccination completion rates greater than 50% for formerly incarcerated homeless men.

  6. Participating in Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn Javascript on. Participating in Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials A Research Study With Human Subjects A clinical ... to treat or cure a disease. Phases of Clinical Trials Clinical trials of drugs are usually described based ...

  7. Understanding Participation in Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Alan L.

    1991-01-01

    Adherence to program planning principles does not guarantee participation. Attention must be paid to characteristics that make a program responsive: target audience, promotion and marketing, competition, and logistics. (SK)

  8. Clinical Trials - Participants

    MedlinePlus

    ... participating in was reviewed by an IRB. Further Reading For more information about research protections, see: Office ... data and decide whether the results have medical importance. Results from clinical trials are often published in ...

  9. Learning through Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeb, David; Prentiss, William C.

    1970-01-01

    An experimental program at Valencia Junior College (Florida) allows every student to actively participate in all phases of the political science course. A variety of multimedia materials, which the students help to develop and evaluate, are used. (BB)

  10. Public Participation Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    The purpose of this Public Participation Plan is to describe the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) plan for involving the public in the decision-making process for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The plan describes how the DOE will meet the public participation requirements of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978, as amended, and of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. It includes the UMTRA Project Office plans for complying with DOE Order 5440.1D and for implementing the DOE`s Public Participation Policy for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (1992) and Public Participation Guidance for Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (1993).

  11. NITARP: Effects on Student Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Richard; Odden, Caroline; Hall, Garrison; Rebull, Luisa M.

    2016-01-01

    NITARP (NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program) is a teacher mentorship program designed to give educators experiences in authentic research in the area of astronomy. While the main focus of the program is aimed at giving educators experience working with and publishing scientific research, teachers are encouraged to involve students with the experience. NITARP funds up to two students to travel along with the educator while allowing an additional two students to attend but with no additional financial assistance. Teachers are welcome to have more student participants but no more than 4 may travel with the teacher to Caltech and the AAS meeting. Given that the focus of the NITARP program is on the educators, little is known about the effects of the program on the student participants other than anecdotal evidence. In order to better understand the impact on the students, we have designed a survey to be administered to past student participants. The survey was constructed with a goal to determine if the NITARP experience had an impact on students' views of science and influenced their educational paths. While the NITARP project has assembled some evidence of the impact on students, this is the first formal attempt to capture that impact. This poster will present the results of that survey.

  12. The correlates of sports participation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Downward, Paul; Lera-López, Fernando; Rasciute, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Eurobarometer data from 2009 (N = 26,788), this paper investigates the correlates of sports participation. In addition to examining standard socio-demographic, economic and lifestyle factors, the paper also focuses on the impact of motivational factors, the availability of sports infrastructure and government support, for the first time collectively at the European level. A further contribution of the paper is that it simultaneously investigates both the decision to participate in sport and the frequency of sports participation in this context. This is made possible through the application of a Zero-Inflated Ordered Probit estimator. This estimator also takes into account two types of non-participants: those who have never participated in sport and those who did not participate at the time of the survey. The results show that the decision to participate in sports and the frequency of sports participation of males and females are affected by different factors, therefore distinct government policies should be applied to attract new, and retain the existing, participants. For example, women are affected more by a need to improve self-esteem, while the men to produce social integration. The provision of sports facilities is of more importance for males, which may indicate a male-oriented nature of the sports facilities, for example, the gym. However, the number of adults and the number of children in the household reduce the probability of sports participation by females. Therefore, higher provision of childcare may be important if female participation is to be increased.

  13. The impact of vasculitis on patients’ social participation and friendships

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Delesha M.; Meador, Amy E.; Elstad, Emily A.; Hogan, Susan L.; DeVellis, Robert F.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Our objective is to explore how vasculitis, affects patients’ friendships and social participation. Methods Vasculitis patients (n=221) completed an online questionnaire that asked if, and how, relationships with friends have changed since receiving a vasculitis diagnosis. Participants’ written responses were imported into Atlas.ti, and two independent researchers used both structured and unstructured coding to identify themes. After reaching 100% consensus on the themes present in each participant’s responses, the coders determined how themes were interrelated across participants. Results Over half of patients (52%) expressed that vasculitis negatively impacted their friendships and 25% noted a negative impact on their social participation. At limes, this negative impact was related to structural changes in patients’ social networks due to loss of friendships. Reduced social participation was also associated with friends’ inability to understand vasculitis and its effects, vasculitis-related fatigue, and lifestyle changes such as not being able to drink alcohol and avoiding infection-prone events. Additionally, patients withdrew from social engagements due to fatigue or because of physical symptoms and side effects. Conclusion The unique circumstances associated with a rare chronic illness like vasculitis can create significant barriers to friendships, including loss of these relationships. Interventions designed to help patients cope with the social impact of vasculitis are implicated, especially if they increase patients’ ability to engage in dialogue about their illness with their friends. PMID:22325346

  14. Motivation to participate of divers with and without disabilities.

    PubMed

    Yarwasky, L; Furst, D M

    1996-06-01

    8 divers with disabilities and 8 able-bodied divers completed a survey regarding motivation to participate in SCUBA. Analysis showed that the two groups participated in SCUBA mainly for how it made them feel emotionally. Groups had comparable rankings of the three most and least important reasons for participation.

  15. Completely bootstrapped tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. ); Boozer, A.H. )

    1992-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the evolution of large-scale magnetic fields have been developed using a mean-field Ohm's law. The Ohm's law is coupled to a {Delta}{prime} stabilty analysis and a magnetic island growth equation in order to simulate the behavior of tokamak plasmas that are subject to tearing modes. In one set of calculations, the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD)-stable regime of the tokamak is examined via the construction of an {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} diagram. The results confirm previous calculations that show that tearing modes introduce a stability boundary into the {ital l}{sub {ital i}} -{ital q}{sub {ital a}} space. In another series of simulations, the interaction between tearing modes and the bootstrap current is investigated. The results indicate that a completely bootstrapped tokamak may be possible, even in the absence of any externally applied loop voltage or current drive.

  16. SCUBA 2 Nears Completion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, I.; Holland, W.; Fairley, A.; MacIntosh, M.; Walton, A.; Parker, W.; Irwin, K.; Hilton, G.; Peter, A.; Halpern, M.; Fich, M.

    2005-12-01

    The second generation submillimetre camera for the JCMT, SCUBA-2, is now in the Assembly-Integration-Test phase in the lab at the UK ATC Edinburgh. The prototype 850 and 450 micron arrays have both been tested at Cardiff and are well within specification. The cryogenic performance of the instrument has been verified with sub 100mK performance achieved and the prototype arrays will receive first light in the instrument before Christmas 2005. The science grade arrays are currently under production from NIST, University of Edinburgh and Raytheon and the first devices will arrive in the UK in November 2005. Testing of the complete system with the Multi-Channel-Electronics from UBC will commence in January and SCUBA-2 will be delivered to the JCMT in August 2006.

  17. Beyond complete positivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominy, Jason M.; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2016-04-01

    We provide a general and consistent formulation for linear subsystem quantum dynamical maps, developed from a minimal set of postulates, primary among which is a relaxation of the usual, restrictive assumption of uncorrelated initial system-bath states. We describe the space of possibilities admitted by this formulation, namely that, far from being limited to only completely positive (CP) maps, essentially any C-linear, Hermiticity-preserving, trace-preserving map can arise as a legitimate subsystem dynamical map from a joint unitary evolution of a system coupled to a bath. The price paid for this added generality is a trade-off between the set of admissible initial states and the allowed set of joint system-bath unitary evolutions. As an application, we present a simple example of a non-CP map constructed as a subsystem dynamical map that violates some fundamental inequalities in quantum information theory, such as the quantum data processing inequality.

  18. Sign and Share: What Influences Our Participation in Online Microvolunteering.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Stacey A; White, Katherine M; Obst, Patricia L

    2016-04-01

    Microvolunteering is bite-size volunteering with no commitment to repeat and minimum formality, involving short and specific actions. Online microvolunteering occurs through an internet-connected device. University students' online microvolunteering decisions were investigated using an extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) comprising attitudes and normative and control perceptions, with the additional variables of moral norm and group norm. Participants (N = 303) completed the main TPB questionnaire and 1-month follow-up survey (N = 171) assessing engagement in online microvolunteering. Results generally supported standard and additional TPB constructs predicting intention. Intention predicted behavior. The findings suggest an important role for attitudes and moral considerations in understanding what influences this increasingly popular form of online activity. PMID:27057593

  19. Assessing the Perceived Value of Research Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    VanWormer, Lisa A.; Jordan, Erica F.; Blalock, Lisa Durrance

    2014-01-01

    Undergraduate psychology majors are encouraged to engage in research to improve understanding of research methods and increase research skills. This study examines the potential of volunteering as a research participant to increase student perceptions of knowledge and interest in research. Undergraduate students completed a survey regarding the…

  20. Enhancing Residential Treatment for Drug Court Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koob, Jeff; Brocato, Jo; Kleinpeter, Christine

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors describe and evaluate the impact of increased access to residential treatment added to traditional drug court services in Orange County, California, with a goal of increasing program retention, successful completion, and graduation rates for a high-risk drug offender population participating in drug court between January…

  1. Employer-Supported Child Care: Who Participates?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissey, Taryn W.; Warner, Mildred E.

    2009-01-01

    Child-care vouchers are becoming more common and can provide child-care assistance to a wide spectrum of the population. There is little empirical research, however, on which workers participate in their employer's child-care programs. In this exploratory study, employees with children at 1 large university completed questionnaires to gather…

  2. Attrition in drug court research: Examining participant characteristics and recommendations for follow-up.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Natasha S; Linley, Jessica V; Nochajski, Thomas H; Farrell, Mark G

    2013-01-01

    Drug court research is often challenged by study attrition. In this study, researchers attempted to predict study completion using variables traditionally associated with treatment attrition. Findings showed that participants who reported a need for additional help to resolve legal problems and who reported accessing outpatient treatments were more likely to complete the study at the three-month follow-up. The study also demonstrated a relationship between trauma-related symptoms and study attrition. Although sample size was a limitation with these pilot data, researchers are urged to examine attrition and increase efforts to engage drug court enrollees in research studies, especially those with trauma-related symptoms.

  3. Attrition in drug court research: Examining participant characteristics and recommendations for follow-up.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Natasha S; Linley, Jessica V; Nochajski, Thomas H; Farrell, Mark G

    2013-01-01

    Drug court research is often challenged by study attrition. In this study, researchers attempted to predict study completion using variables traditionally associated with treatment attrition. Findings showed that participants who reported a need for additional help to resolve legal problems and who reported accessing outpatient treatments were more likely to complete the study at the three-month follow-up. The study also demonstrated a relationship between trauma-related symptoms and study attrition. Although sample size was a limitation with these pilot data, researchers are urged to examine attrition and increase efforts to engage drug court enrollees in research studies, especially those with trauma-related symptoms. PMID:24475320

  4. Attrition in drug court research: Examining participant characteristics and recommendations for follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Natasha S.; Linley, Jessica V.; Nochajski, Thomas H.; Farrell, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    Drug court research is often challenged by study attrition. In this study, researchers attempted to predict study completion using variables traditionally associated with treatment attrition. Findings showed that participants who reported a need for additional help to resolve legal problems and who reported accessing outpatient treatments were more likely to complete the study at the three-month follow-up. The study also demonstrated a relationship between trauma-related symptoms and study attrition. Although sample size was a limitation with these pilot data, researchers are urged to examine attrition and increase efforts to engage drug court enrollees in research studies, especially those with trauma-related symptoms. PMID:24475320

  5. Analysis of operator participation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zarakovskiy, G. M.; Zinchenko, V. P.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of providing a psychological conception of the analysis of operator participation in a form that will allow the qualitative approach to be combined with the quantitative approach is examined. This conception is based on an understanding of the essence of human endeavor in automated control systems that now determine the development of society's productive forces and that are the main object of ergonomic research. Two main types of operator participation were examined; information retrieval with immediate service and information retrieval with delayed service.

  6. 7 CFR 1493.30 - Information required for program participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... participation, if any, during the past three years in U.S. Government programs, contracts or agreements; and (6... additional information for consideration by CCC. (d) Ineligibility for program participation. An...

  7. Katimavik Participant Information Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    OPCAN, Montreal (Quebec).

    The guide provides prospective participants with an overview of Katimavik, a 9-month community volunteer service and learning program for 17- to 21-year-olds sponsored since 1977 by the Canadian Government. The guide describes the application process and computerized random selection procedures; work projects, which may range from building…

  8. Narrowing Participation Gaps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hand, Victoria; Kirtley, Karmen; Matassa, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Shrinking the achievement gap in mathematics is a tall order. One way to approach this challenge is to think about how the achievement gap manifests itself in the classroom and take concrete action. For example, opportunities to participate in activities that involve mathematical reasoning and argumentation in a safe and supportive manner are…

  9. Participative Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John; And Others

    Chapter 6 in a volume on school leadership, this chapter makes a case for the use of participative decision-making (PDM) at the school-site level, outlines guidelines for its implementation, and describes the experiences of some schools with PDM systems. It begins by citing research indicating the advantages of PDM, including better decisions,…

  10. Participative Decision-Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindelow, John; And Others

    Chapter 7 of a revised volume on school leadership, this chapter advocates the use of participative decision-making (PDM) at the school site level, outlines implementation guidelines, and describes the experiences of some schools with PDM systems. A cornerstone of a reform movement to make organizational operations more democratic and less…

  11. Communication Games: Participant's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krupar, Karen R.

    Using a series of communicational games, the author leads the participant through self-awareness, verbal and nonverbal communication, decision-making, problem-solving, and skills in perception, listening, and small group, organizational, and cultural communications. The thesis behind the book is that model-making, role-playing, or other forms of…

  12. Canada's Participation in TIMSS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConaghy, Tom

    1998-01-01

    In the grade 12 portion of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study, Canadian students performed better than other participating G-8 countries. In fact, Canada scored consistently above the international mean for all three age groups tested. However, some educators and reformers have expressed dissatisfaction with these results. (MLH)

  13. Reported changes in sexual behaviour and human papillomavirus knowledge in Peruvian female sex workers following participation in a human papillomavirus vaccine trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Heidari, O; Carcamo, C; Halsey, N A

    2013-07-01

    Limited data exist on the effect of clinical trial participation on sexual behavioural change. Two hundred female sex workers working in Lima, Peru received human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in either the standard (0, 2, 6 months) or modified (0, 3, 6 months) schedule. Participants received comprehensive screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), counselling on safe sex practices, education about HPV and the HPV vaccine, contraceptives (oral and condoms) and family planning at each visit. We assessed vaccine completion rates, change in sexual practices, and changes in HPV knowledge before and after participation in the vaccine trial. There were high rates of vaccine completion, 91% overall. The estimated number of reported new and total clients over a 30-day period decreased significantly (P < 0.001). Knowledge about HPV and HPV-related disease increased among all participants. In addition, all participants listed at least one preventive strategy during the month 7 follow-up survey. PMID:23970767

  14. Student Approaches to Learning in Relation to Online Course Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balter, Olle; Cleveland-Innes, Martha; Pettersson, Kerstin; Scheja, Max; Svedin, Maria

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the relationship between approaches to studying and course completion in two online preparatory university courses in mathematics and computer programming. The students participating in the two courses are alike in age, gender, and approaches to learning. Four hundred and ninety-three students participating in these courses…

  15. [Participative health diagnosis in Cotacachi].

    PubMed

    Buitron, M; Velasco, N

    1997-09-01

    Social participation may be understood as a process in which the population itself assumes responsibility for identifying, carrying out, and evaluating actions necessary for solving problems. The Ecuadorian canton of Cotacachi, under the guidance of the mayor, created mechanisms for identifying and resolving problems through collective work. Assemblies were held in September and October 1996 in the canton and zone to discuss problems. Health problems identified by participants included toxic effects of pesticides used by flower plantations, absence of environmental protection, lack of health education, and poor medical attention. The community proposed a series of solutions: educational programs, potable water and sewage services, municipal ordinances, and an inter-institutional committee. The Intersectorial Health Committee of Cotacachi was formed in December 1996 and immediately formed a Diagnostic Commission consisting of representatives of the health and educational sectors, the local peasant syndicate, and other organizations, with technical assistance from Cepar. The representatives made available the information on Cotacachi from their organizations, but the Commission concluded that existing information was incomplete and failed to reflect the viewpoints of the local community. A survey was planned to fill in the gaps. Community members were trained as interviewers for the survey, which was based on the problems identified by community members. The organizations provided logistical assistance and conducted a campaign to explain the survey to the population and request cooperation. The results will serve as the basis for proposing solutions once data processing is complete.

  16. Development of additional tasks for the executive function performance test.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Bridget; Baum, Carolyn; Moore, Jennifer; Ehrlich-Jones, Linda; Spoeri, Susan; Doherty, Meghan; Wolf, Timothy J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The Executive Function Performance Test (EFPT) is a reliable and valid performance-based assessment of executive function for people with stroke. The objective of this study was to enhance the clinical utility of the EFPT by developing and testing additional tasks for the EFPT in the Alternate EFPT (aEFPT). METHOD. We performed a cross-sectional study with poststroke participants (n = 25) and healthy control participants (n = 25). All participants completed a neuropsychological assessment battery and both the EFPT and the aEFPT. RESULTS. No statistically significant differences were found between the EFPT and the aEFPT when examining total scores, construct scores, and two overall task scores. Correlations between the aEFPT and the neuropsychological measures were adequate to strong (r2s = .59-.83). CONCLUSION. The aEFPT tasks are comparable to the original EFPT tasks, providing occupational therapy practitioners with additional tasks that can be used clinically to identify performance-based executive function deficits in people with stroke. PMID:25397771

  17. Developmental Brain Research with Participants from Underprivileged Communities: Strategies for Recruitment, Participation, and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habibi, Assal; Sarkissian, Alissa Der; Gomez, Martha; Ilari, Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Challenges associated with recruitment and retention of participants from underprivileged social communities, in addition to neuroscience researchers' unfamiliarity with these communities, possibly explain the limited number of individuals from these communities who participate in neuroscience research studies. The consequence is a scarcity of…

  18. Insights on GRACE (Gender, Race, And Clinical Experience) from the patient's perspective: GRACE participant survey.

    PubMed

    Squires, Kathleen; Feinberg, Judith; Bridge, Dawn Averitt; Currier, Judith; Ryan, Robert; Seyedkazemi, Setareh; Dayaram, Yaswant K; Mrus, Joseph

    2013-06-01

    The Gender, Race And Clinical Experience (GRACE) study was conducted between October 2006 and December 2008 to evaluate sex- and race-based differences in outcomes after treatment with a darunavir/ritonavir-based antiretroviral regimen. Between June 2010 and June 2011, former participants of the GRACE trial at participating sites were asked to complete a 40-item questionnaire as part of the GRACE Participant Survey study, with a primary objective of assessing patients' characteristics, experiences, and opinions about participation in GRACE. Of 243 potential survey respondents, 151 (62%) completed the survey. Respondents were representative of the overall GRACE population and were predominantly female (64%); fewer were black, and more reported recreational drug use compared with nonrespondents (55% vs. 62% and 17% vs. 10%, respectively). Access to treatment (41%) and too many blood draws (26%) were reported as the best and worst part of GRACE, respectively. Support from study site staff was reported as the most important factor in completing the study (47%). Factors associated with nonadherence, study discontinuation, and poor virologic response in univariate analyses were being the primary caregiver for children, unemployment, and transportation difficulties, respectively. Patients with these characteristics may be at risk of poor study outcomes and may benefit from additional adherence and retention strategies in future studies and routine clinical care.

  19. Selection of intervention components in an internet stop smoking participant preference trial: beyond randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Schueller, Stephen M; Leykin, Yan; Pérez-Stable, Eliseo J; Muñoz, Ricardo F

    2013-01-30

    To address health problems that have a major impact on global health requires research designs that go beyond randomized controlled trials. One such design, the participant preference trial, provides additional information in an ecologically valid manner, once intervention efficacy has been demonstrated. The current study presents illustrative data from a participant preference trial of an internet-based smoking cessation intervention. Participants (N=7763) from 124 countries accessed the intervention and were allowed to choose from nine different site components to aid their quit attempt. Of consenting participants, 36.7% completed at least one follow-up assessment. Individuals with depression were more likely to choose a mood management module and participants who smoked a higher number of cigarettes were more likely to choose a cigarette counter and a nicotine replacement therapy guide. Furthermore, depressed participants selecting the mood management component were more likely to report at least one successful 7 day quit (37.2% vs. 22.2%) in the 12 months following the intervention. Thus, participants with depressive symptoms appear to make choices on the basis of their needs and to benefit from these decisions. This suggests that providing the ability to customize previously validated resources may be a successful way to widely disseminate interventions.

  20. Stability of leisure participation from school-age to adolescence in individuals with cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Majnemer, Annette; Shikako-Thomas, Keiko; Schmitz, Norbert; Shevell, Michael; Lach, Lucy

    2015-12-01

    With increasing age, youth with disabilities are at risk for decreased participation in leisure activities, a key component for physical and mental health. This prospective study describes changes in leisure participation and leisure preferences from school-age to adolescence in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Participants were recruited at school-age (6-12 years) for a study on participation and reassessed for a second study on adolescents (12-19 years) if >12 years. Thirty-eight children (24 males) with CP who could actively participate in the completion of the Children's Assessment of Participation and Enjoyment (CAPE) and the Preferences for Activities of Children (PAC) comprised the sample. Average time between assessments was 5.0 ± 1.3 years. Most children were ambulatory (32/38 Gross Motor Function Classification System I-II). In addition to the CAPE and PAC, children were evaluated using the Gross Motor Function Measure-66 and parents completed a socio-demographic questionnaire. Paired t-tests revealed a significant decline in leisure participation diversity and intensity (CAPE) for recreation (p<.0001), skill-based (p<.0001) and self-improvement (p<.05) activities, whereas social participation remained stable (p>.05). Diversity of active-physical activities increased modestly (p=.06) although intensity of participation in this activity domain decreased (p=.003). There was also a decline in enjoyment of leisure activities. Preferences for these leisure activities remained unchanged between school-age and adolescence, except for recreational activities. Gender, maternal education, family income and gross motor ability were not related to differences in CAPE/PAC scores with increasing age. Findings suggest that over time, children with CP's participation in leisure activities diminishes, which is of concern to their functioning and well-being. Parents may be more involved in early childhood in facilitating participation whereas in adolescence, youth may

  1. Survey of geothermal completion fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, M.R.

    1980-01-01

    A survey of oil field fluids companies indicates that there are no geothermal completion fluids on the market. It is recommended that development of a completion fluid and appropriate support testing be funded.

  2. Network Completion for Static Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Natsu

    2014-01-01

    We tackle the problem of completing and inferring genetic networks under stationary conditions from static data, where network completion is to make the minimum amount of modifications to an initial network so that the completed network is most consistent with the expression data in which addition of edges and deletion of edges are basic modification operations. For this problem, we present a new method for network completion using dynamic programming and least-squares fitting. This method can find an optimal solution in polynomial time if the maximum indegree of the network is bounded by a constant. We evaluate the effectiveness of our method through computational experiments using synthetic data. Furthermore, we demonstrate that our proposed method can distinguish the differences between two types of genetic networks under stationary conditions from lung cancer and normal gene expression data. PMID:24826192

  3. Exploring the relationship between criminogenic risk assessment and mental health court program completion.

    PubMed

    Bonfine, Natalie; Ritter, Christian; Munetz, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    The two primary goals of mental health courts are to engage individuals with severe mental illness in the criminal justice system with clinical mental health services and to prevent future involvement with the criminal justice system. An important factor in helping to achieve both goals is to identify participants' level of clinical needs and criminogenic risk/needs. This study seeks to better understand how criminogenic risk affects outcomes in a mental health court. Specifically, we explore if high criminogenic risk is associated with failure to complete mental health court. Our subjects are participants of a municipal mental health court (MHC) who completed the Level of Services Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) upon entry to the program (N=146). We used binary logistic regression to determine the association between termination from the program with the total LSI-R. Our findings suggest that, net of prior criminal history, time in the program and clinical services received, high criminogenic risk/need is associated with failure to complete mental health court. In addition to providing clinical services, our findings suggest the need for MHCs to include criminogenic risk assessment to identify criminogenic risk. For participants to succeed in MHCs, both their clinical and criminogenic needs should be addressed. PMID:26968092

  4. Exploring the relationship between criminogenic risk assessment and mental health court program completion.

    PubMed

    Bonfine, Natalie; Ritter, Christian; Munetz, Mark R

    2016-01-01

    The two primary goals of mental health courts are to engage individuals with severe mental illness in the criminal justice system with clinical mental health services and to prevent future involvement with the criminal justice system. An important factor in helping to achieve both goals is to identify participants' level of clinical needs and criminogenic risk/needs. This study seeks to better understand how criminogenic risk affects outcomes in a mental health court. Specifically, we explore if high criminogenic risk is associated with failure to complete mental health court. Our subjects are participants of a municipal mental health court (MHC) who completed the Level of Services Inventory-Revised (LSI-R) upon entry to the program (N=146). We used binary logistic regression to determine the association between termination from the program with the total LSI-R. Our findings suggest that, net of prior criminal history, time in the program and clinical services received, high criminogenic risk/need is associated with failure to complete mental health court. In addition to providing clinical services, our findings suggest the need for MHCs to include criminogenic risk assessment to identify criminogenic risk. For participants to succeed in MHCs, both their clinical and criminogenic needs should be addressed.

  5. Citizen Participation in Collaborative Watershed Partnerships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehler, Brandi; Koontz, Tomas M.

    2008-02-01

    Collaborative efforts are increasingly being used to address complex environmental problems, both in the United States and abroad. This is especially true in the growing field of collaborative watershed management, where diverse stakeholders work together to develop and advance water-quality goals. Active citizen participation is viewed as a key component, yet groups often struggle to attract and maintain citizen engagement. This study examined citizen participation behavior in collaborative watershed partnerships by way of a written survey administered to citizen members of 12 collaborative watershed groups in Ohio. Results for the determination of who joins such groups were consistent with the dominant-status model of participation because group members were not demographically representative of the broader community. The dominant-status model, however, does not explain which members are more likely to actively participate in group activities. Instead, individual characteristics, including political activity, knowledge, and comfort in sharing opinions with others, were positively correlated with active participation. In addition, group characteristics, including government-based membership, rural location, perceptions of open communication, perceptions that the group has enough technical support to accomplish its goals, and perceived homogeneity of participant opinions, were positively correlated with active participation. Overall, many group members did not actively participate in group activities.

  6. Social and community participation following spinal cord injury: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Linda; McDonald, Rachael; Lentin, Primrose

    2015-03-01

    Evaluation of rehabilitation outcomes following acquired disability should include participation in social and community life. Evidence is needed to guide clinical practice to ensure that it is client-centered; therefore, findings from studies that report on social and community participation following spinal cord injury (SCI) need to be reviewed and synthesized. The objectives of this critical literature review are to examine the available evidence on social and community participation following SCI and to examine the factors that influence that participation. The barriers and facilitators will be identified and described in terms of the contextual factors - personal or environmental, as outlined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. An additional objective is to appraise the quality of the evidence examined. A systematic literature search was completed in the databases OVID MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL PLUS, PSYCHINFO, and hand searches were carried out. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods studies were included. Twenty-three studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria: 17 quantitative, five qualitative, and one mixed methods. In general, studies were of low methodological quality, and no intervention studies were identified. The terms participation, social participation, and community participation were used interchangeably often without clarification of meaning. Adequate personal care assistance, appropriate social support, having adequate specialized equipment, and appropriate occupational therapy input were found to facilitate social and community participation, whereas problems with transport, inaccessibility of the natural and built environment, issues with healthcare services and rehabilitation providers, and pain were identified as barriers. In-depth investigation into what aspects of social and community participation are important to those living with SCI is needed so that client-focused solutions and interventions can

  7. Social and community participation following spinal cord injury: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Linda; McDonald, Rachael; Lentin, Primrose

    2015-03-01

    Evaluation of rehabilitation outcomes following acquired disability should include participation in social and community life. Evidence is needed to guide clinical practice to ensure that it is client-centered; therefore, findings from studies that report on social and community participation following spinal cord injury (SCI) need to be reviewed and synthesized. The objectives of this critical literature review are to examine the available evidence on social and community participation following SCI and to examine the factors that influence that participation. The barriers and facilitators will be identified and described in terms of the contextual factors - personal or environmental, as outlined by the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health. An additional objective is to appraise the quality of the evidence examined. A systematic literature search was completed in the databases OVID MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL PLUS, PSYCHINFO, and hand searches were carried out. Quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods studies were included. Twenty-three studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria: 17 quantitative, five qualitative, and one mixed methods. In general, studies were of low methodological quality, and no intervention studies were identified. The terms participation, social participation, and community participation were used interchangeably often without clarification of meaning. Adequate personal care assistance, appropriate social support, having adequate specialized equipment, and appropriate occupational therapy input were found to facilitate social and community participation, whereas problems with transport, inaccessibility of the natural and built environment, issues with healthcare services and rehabilitation providers, and pain were identified as barriers. In-depth investigation into what aspects of social and community participation are important to those living with SCI is needed so that client-focused solutions and interventions can

  8. The correlates of sports participation in Europe.

    PubMed

    Downward, Paul; Lera-López, Fernando; Rasciute, Simona

    2014-01-01

    Based on the Eurobarometer data from 2009 (N = 26,788), this paper investigates the correlates of sports participation. In addition to examining standard socio-demographic, economic and lifestyle factors, the paper also focuses on the impact of motivational factors, the availability of sports infrastructure and government support, for the first time collectively at the European level. A further contribution of the paper is that it simultaneously investigates both the decision to participate in sport and the frequency of sports participation in this context. This is made possible through the application of a Zero-Inflated Ordered Probit estimator. This estimator also takes into account two types of non-participants: those who have never participated in sport and those who did not participate at the time of the survey. The results show that the decision to participate in sports and the frequency of sports participation of males and females are affected by different factors, therefore distinct government policies should be applied to attract new, and retain the existing, participants. For example, women are affected more by a need to improve self-esteem, while the men to produce social integration. The provision of sports facilities is of more importance for males, which may indicate a male-oriented nature of the sports facilities, for example, the gym. However, the number of adults and the number of children in the household reduce the probability of sports participation by females. Therefore, higher provision of childcare may be important if female participation is to be increased. PMID:24498937

  9. Individualized additional instruction for calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, Ken

    2010-10-01

    College students enrolling in the calculus sequence have a wide variance in their preparation and abilities, yet they are usually taught from the same lecture. We describe another pedagogical model of Individualized Additional Instruction (IAI) that assesses each student frequently and prescribes further instruction and homework based on the student's performance. Our study compares two calculus classes, one taught with mandatory remedial IAI and the other without. The class with mandatory remedial IAI did significantly better on comprehensive multiple-choice exams, participated more frequently in classroom discussion and showed greater interest in theorem-proving and other advanced topics.

  10. [Women's participation in science].

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Guzmán, María Alejandra; Corona-Vázquez, Teresa

    2009-01-01

    The participation of women in higher education in Mexico took place in the late 19th and early 20th century. The rise of women's enrollment in universities known as the "feminization of enrollment" occurred in the last thirty years. In this review we analyze how the new conditions that facilitated better access to higher education are reflected in the inclusion of women in science. We include an overview of the issues associated with a change in the demographics of enrollment, segregation of academic areas between men and women and participation in post graduate degrees. We also review the proportion of women in science. While in higher education the ratio between male and women is almost 50-50 and in some areas the presence of women is even higher, in the field of scientific research women account for barely 30% of professionals. This is largely due to structural conditions that limit the access of women to higher positions of power that have been predominantly taken by men.

  11. Completion techniques for horizontal wells in the Pearsall Austin Chalk

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, C.D.; Handren, P.J. )

    1992-05-01

    Oryx Energy Co. used three basic completion techniques and various combinations of them to complete 20 horizontal wells in the Pearsall Austin Chalk. The completion method selected is based on a general set of guidelines. In this paper additionally, equipment selection and various types of workover operations are reviewed.

  12. The LBNL High School Student Research Participation Program (HSSRPP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMahan, M. A.

    2007-04-01

    The HSSRPP, which has been in operation at LBNL since 2001, places 25-35 students each year in summer research internships at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, a multi-purpose Department of Energy laboratory. The paid six-week internships, which are restricted to students who have completed their junior or senior year of high school, are highly sought over, with nearly 300 applications in 2006. With funding from Bechtel, the success of the program has been assessed through surveys and tracking of the student participants. In addition, as part of the application process, the students are asked the essay question, ``If you were in charge of the Science Department at your High School, what changes would you make to motivate more students to pursue careers in science and why?'' The responses of all applicants for 2004-2006 have been analyzed by gender and school district. The results will be discussed.

  13. Effects of Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Epidural Stimulation for Standing after Chronic Complete Paralysis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rejc, Enrico; Angeli, Claudia; Harkema, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Sensory and motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI) has been considered functionally complete resulting in permanent paralysis with no recovery of voluntary movement, standing or walking. Previous findings demonstrated that lumbosacral spinal cord epidural stimulation can activate the spinal neural networks in one individual with motor complete, but sensory incomplete SCI, who achieved full body weight-bearing standing with independent knee extension, minimal self-assistance for balance and minimal external assistance for facilitating hip extension. In this study, we showed that two clinically sensory and motor complete participants were able to stand over-ground bearing full body-weight without any external assistance, using their hands to assist balance. The two clinically motor complete, but sensory incomplete participants also used minimal external assistance for hip extension. Standing with the least amount of assistance was achieved with individual-specific stimulation parameters, which promoted overall continuous EMG patterns in the lower limbs’ muscles. Stimulation parameters optimized for one individual resulted in poor standing and additional need of external assistance for hip and knee extension in the other participants. During sitting, little or negligible EMG activity of lower limb muscles was induced by epidural stimulation, showing that the weight-bearing related sensory information was needed to generate sufficient EMG patterns to effectively support full weight-bearing standing. In general, electrode configurations with cathodes selected in the caudal region of the array at relatively higher frequencies (25–60 Hz) resulted in the more effective EMG patterns for standing. These results show that human spinal circuitry can generate motor patterns effective for standing in the absence of functional supraspinal connections; however the appropriate selection of stimulation parameters is critical. PMID:26207623

  14. Yough, literacy and participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillette, Arthur

    1985-12-01

    The number of illiterates in the world continues to grow. Simultaneously, there are few if any literacy efforts in the world today that do not depend upon the energies and skills (and sometimes ideas) of young people. Youth's participation in the provision of literacy, in some industrialized as well as in many developing countries, is classified according to three patterns: the project pattern, the programme pattern, and the campaign pattern. The project pattern is not seen to hold out the prospect of enabling youth to make serious inroads into growing illiteracy. Conversely, the campaign pattern seemed largely exceptional. Suggestions are made to draw on elements of both the project and the campaign patterns to show ways of enrichting, systematizing and generalizing the programme pattern.

  15. Researching participant recruitment times.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Rachel; Black, Polly

    2015-11-01

    Conducting research in emergency departments is relatively new, and there are a number of ethical and practical challenges to recruiting patients in these settings. In 2008, the Emergency Medicine Research Group Edinburgh (EMERGE) was set up at the Royal Infirmary of Edinburgh emergency department to support researchers and encourage the growth of research in emergency medicine. As part of a review of their working methods, the group's clinical nurse researchers undertook a small study to identify participant recruitment times. The results showed a significant difference between perceived and actual recruitment times, which has implications for planning staff numbers and budgets. This article describes the evaluation process and methods of data collection, and discusses the results. PMID:26542924

  16. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  17. Looking forward and looking back: integrating completion and sunk-cost effects within an escalation-of-commitment progress decision.

    PubMed

    Moon, H

    2001-02-01

    Currently, there are 2 conflicting frameworks with which to understand why decision makers might escalate their commitment to a previously chosen course of action: sunk costs and project completion. The author proposes that sunk costs and need to complete exert simultaneous pressures, both independent and interactive, on a decision maker's level of commitment. The responses of 340 participants were analyzed and supported a complementary relationship between the 2 predictors. In addition, sunk costs demonstrated a curvilinear influence on commitment and an interaction with level of completion that supported a Level of Completion x Sunk Cost moderation model. (A marginal utility model was not supported.) Results are discussed in terms of their relevance toward offering a complementary view of 2 potential antecedents to a decision maker's propensity to escalate his or her commitment to a previously chosen course of action.

  18. Characteristics of Teachers Participating in Voluntary Music Integration Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Diana; Baron, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    This study examines characteristics of teachers participating in the national Guitars in the Classroom program in the 2007-2008 school year. 96 teacher participants from programs across the United States completed an online survey at the start of their professional development programs, usually 6-10 hours. 75 percent of teachers electing to…

  19. 42 CFR 485.721 - Condition of participation: Clinical records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition of participation: Clinical records. 485... participation: Clinical records. The organization maintains clinical records on all patients in accordance with accepted professional standards, and practices. The clinical records are completely and...

  20. Analysis of post audits for Gulf of Mexico completions leads to continuous improvement in completion practices

    SciTech Connect

    Pashen, M.A.; McLeod, H.O. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    Final production rate alone is not an adequate measure of the success of a well completion. Rather, we must estimate the {open_quotes}potential{close_quotes} of a reservoir and judge the ultimate success of a completion on how close we come to achieving this potential. Specific productivity indexes (SPI`s - BFPD/(PSI*FT)), specific injectivity indexes SII`s - (BFPD/(PSI*FT)), and completion efficiencies (CE`s -percent of Darcy radial flow) can be calculated at various times throughout a well completion. Analysis of these data quantifies the efficiency of the completion after each individual completion operation, allowing a determination of the effects of each completion practice to be made. In addition to completion efficiency data, a comparison of gravel placement volumes behind casing helps quantify optimum gravel packing procedures. Twenty-two Gulf of Mexico completions have been analyzed using this technique. This paper will detail the results of this analysis, in particular the productivity effects of various methods of underbalanced perforating, gravel packing, and well control. Items of discussion include: the effects of underbalanced perforating on well performance, the effects of flowback after perforating on perforation tunnel cleaning, productivity impacts of various types of well control methods following perforating and gravel packing, and comparisons of gravel pack design parameters and gravel placement behind casing.

  1. Participation in research bronchoscopy: a literature review

    PubMed Central

    Martinsen, Einar Marius Hjellestad; Leiten, Elise Orvedal; Bakke, Per Sigvald; Eagan, Tomas Mikal Lind; Grønseth, Rune

    2016-01-01

    Bronchoscopy is the preferred method for collecting biological samples from the lower airways of subjects in clinical research. However, ensuring participation in clinical research can be challenging when the research includes an invasive procedure. For this report we reviewed the literature to look for information on participation in research bronchoscopy studies to better design our own study, the Bergen COPD Microbiome study (MicroCOPD). We performed a systematic literature search on participation in research bronchoscopy studies in February 2014 using the search engines of PubMed and EMBASE. The literature search resulted in seven relevant papers. Motivation was an end point in six of the seven papers, but reasons for declining participation and recruitment strategies also seemed important. Human subjects participate in research bronchoscopy studies for personal benefit and altruistic reasons. Inconvenience associated with research, in addition to fear of procedures, is considered a barrier. Radio, especially news stations, generated the most inquiries for a clinical study involving bronchoscopy. There is a lack of information on participation in research bronchoscopy studies in the literature. A bronchoscopy study has been initiated at Haukeland University Hospital, Bergen, Norway, to examine the role of the microbiome in COPD, and participation will be explored as a substudy. PMID:26847517

  2. Complete to Compete: Common College Completion Metrics. Technical Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyna, Ryan; Reindl, Travis; Witham, Keith; Stanley, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    Improved college completion rates are critical to the future of the United States, and states must have better data to understand the nature of the challenges they confront or target areas for policy change. The 2010-2011 National Governors Association (NGA) Chair's initiative, "Complete to Compete", recommends that all states collect data from…

  3. Public Participation in the Process of Local Public Health Policy, Using Policy Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yukyung; Kim, Chang-yup; You, Myoung Soon; Lee, Kun Sei; Park, Eunyoung

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the current public participation in-local health policy and its implications through the analysis of policy networks in health center programs. Methods: We examined the decision-making process in sub-health center installations and the implementation process in metabolic syndrome management program cases in two districts (‘gu’s) of Seoul. Participants of the policy network were selected by the snowballing method and completed self-administered questionnaires. Actors, the interactions among actors, and the characteristics of the network were analyzed by Netminer. Results: The results showed that the public is not yet actively participating in the local public health policy processes of decision-making and implementation. In the decision-making process, most of the network actors were in the public sector, while the private sector was a minor actor and participated in only a limited number of issues after the major decisions were made. In the implementation process, the program was led by the health center, while other actors participated passively. Conclusions: Public participation in Korean public health policy is not yet well activated. Preliminary discussions with various stakeholders, including civil society, are needed before making important local public health policy decisions. In addition, efforts to include local institutions and residents in the implementation process with the public officials are necessary to improve the situation. PMID:25475197

  4. Participation motivation and competition anxiety among Korean and non-Korean wheelchair tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Irully; Park, Sunghee

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine differences in participation motivation and competition anxiety between Korean and non-Korean wheelchair tennis players and to identify relations between participation motivation and competition anxiety in each group. Sixty-six wheel-chair tennis players who participated in the 2013 Korea Open Wheel-chair Tennis Tournament in Seoul completed the Participation Motivation Survey and the Competitive State Anxiety Inventory II. Data were analyzed by a frequency analysis, descriptive statistics, Pearson’s correlation analysis, and independent samples t-test to identify participants’ demographic characteristics, differences in participation motivation, competition anxiety between Korean and non-Korean players, and correlations between participation motivation and competition anxiety in each group. Korean players reported significantly higher motivation in purification compared to non-Korean players, whereas non-Korean players reported significantly higher motivation in enjoyment. In addition, non-Korean players demonstrated higher cognitive anxiety and self-confidence compared to Korean players. Moreover, the physical anxiety of Korean players was negatively correlated with learning, health-fitness, and enjoyment motivation. On the other hand, only self-confidence was significantly related to learning motivation and enjoyment motivation in non-Korean players. Thus, the results presented herein provide evidence for the development of specialized counseling programs that consider the psychological characteristics of Korean wheelchair tennis players. PMID:24409429

  5. Do Participants Differ in Their Cognitive Abilities, Task Motivation, or Personality Characteristics as a Function of Time of Participation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robison, Matthew K.; Unsworth, Nash

    2016-01-01

    Four experiments tested the conventional wisdom in experimental psychology that participants who complete laboratory tasks systematically differ in their cognitive abilities, motivational levels, and personality characteristics as a function of the time at which they participate during an academic term. Across 4 experiments with over 2,900…

  6. High School Completion Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Education, 2009

    2009-01-01

    While Alberta enjoys proven high, world-class results in student achievement, raising high school completion rates is one of the top priorities in improving the provincial education system. The 2011-12 targeted high school completion rate is 82% five years after entering Grade 10--a 2.5% increase from the current average rate of 79.5%. The purpose…

  7. Latino College Completion: North Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  8. Latino College Completion: South Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  9. Latino College Completion: United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  10. Latino College Completion: West Virginia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  11. Latino College Completion: Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  12. Latino College Completion: New York

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  13. Latino College Completion: New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Excelencia in Education (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    In 2009, Excelencia in Education launched the Ensuring America's Future initiative to inform, organize, and engage leaders in a tactical plan to increase Latino college completion. An executive summary of Latino College Completion in 50 states synthesizes information on 50 state factsheets and builds on the national benchmarking guide. Each…

  14. Strictly homogeneous laterally complete modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chilin, V. I.; Karimov, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Let A be a laterally complete commutative regular algebra and X be a laterally complete A-module. In this paper we introduce a notion of homogeneous and strictly homogeneous A-modules. It is proved that any homogeneous A-module is strictly homogeneous A-module, if the Boolean algebra of all idempotents in A is multi-σ-finite.

  15. Pure-state informationally complete and 'really' complete measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.

    2004-11-01

    I construct a positive-operator-valued measure (POVM) which has 2d rank-1 elements and which is informationally complete for generic pure states in d dimensions, thus confirming a conjecture made by Flammia, Silberfarb, and Caves (e-print quant-ph/0404137). I show that if a rank-1 POVM is required to be informationally complete for all pure states in d dimensions, it must have at least 3d-2 elements. I also show that, in a POVM which is informationally complete for all pure states in d dimensions, for any vector there must be at least 2d-1 POVM elements which do not annihilate that vector.

  16. Social Mobility and Social Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sewell, William H.

    1978-01-01

    Examines data related to social mobility and social participation of Americans. Topics include educational and occupational mobility; voting; volunteer work; charitable giving; community participation; views on religion; and anomie. For journal availability, see SO 506 144. (Author/DB)

  17. Complete DNA sequence of yeast chromosome XI.

    PubMed

    Dujon, B; Alexandraki, D; André, B; Ansorge, W; Baladron, V; Ballesta, J P; Banrevi, A; Bolle, P A; Bolotin-Fukuhara, M; Bossier, P; Bou, G; Boyer, J; Bultrago, M J; Cheret, G; Colleaux, L; Dalgnan-Fornler, B; del Rey, F; Dlon, C; Domdey, H; Düsterhoft, A; Düsterhus, S; Entlan, K D; Erfle, H; Esteban, P F; Feldmann, H; Fernandes, L; Robo, G M; Fritz, C; Fukuhara, H; Gabel, C; Gaillon, L; Carcia-Cantalejo, J M; Garcia-Ramirez, J J; Gent, N E; Ghazvini, M; Goffeau, A; Gonzaléz, A; Grothues, D; Guerreiro, P; Hegemann, J; Hewitt, N; Hilger, F; Hollenberg, C P; Horaitis, O; Indge, K J; Jacquier, A; James, C M; Jauniaux, C; Jimenez, A; Keuchel, H; Kirchrath, L; Kleine, K; Kötter, P; Legrain, P; Liebl, S; Louis, E J; Maia e Silva, A; Marck, C; Monnier, A L; Möstl, D; Müller, S; Obermaier, B; Oliver, S G; Pallier, C; Pascolo, S; Pfeiffer, F; Philippsen, P; Planta, R J; Pohl, F M; Pohl, T M; Pöhlmann, R; Portetelle, D; Purnelle, B; Puzos, V; Ramezani Rad, M; Rasmussen, S W; Remacha, M; Revuelta, J L; Richard, G F; Rieger, M; Rodrigues-Pousada, C; Rose, M; Rupp, T; Santos, M A; Schwager, C; Sensen, C; Skala, J; Soares, H; Sor, F; Stegemann, J; Tettelin, H; Thierry, A; Tzermia, M; Urrestarazu, L A; van Dyck, L; Van Vliet-Reedijk, J C; Valens, M; Vandenbo, M; Vilela, C; Vissers, S; von Wettstein, D; Voss, H; Wiemann, S; Xu, G; Zimmermann, J; Haasemann, M; Becker, I; Mewes, H W

    1994-06-01

    The complete DNA sequence of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome XI has been determined. In addition to a compact arrangement of potential protein coding sequences, the 666,448-base-pair sequence has revealed general chromosome patterns; in particular, alternating regional variations in average base composition correlate with variations in local gene density along the chromosome. Significant discrepancies with the previously published genetic map demonstrate the need for using independent physical mapping criteria.

  18. Participative management: a contingency approach.

    PubMed

    Callahan, C B; Wall, L L

    1987-09-01

    The participative management trend has been misinterpreted by staff to mean that they make all the decisions. To decrease the discrepancy between the management philosophy of participation and the subordinate interpretation of the system, the selection of appropriate decision participation procedures is essential. When the leaders communicate the degree of influence that subordinates will have, the staff learn to trust and support the participative management system. PMID:3655932

  19. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  20. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  1. The impact of participating in suicide research online.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Susanne; Boden, Zoe V R; Benson, Outi; Brand, Sarah L

    2014-08-01

    The impact of participation in online mixed-methods suicide research was investigated. Participants, who described feeling suicidal, completed an 18-item questionnaire before and after taking part (n = 103), and answered open-ended questions about participation (n = 97). Overall, participation reduced negative experiences and had no effect on positive experiences. Feelings of calm increased, but participants felt less supported. Some participants did experience distress, but some also reported this distress to be manageable. Anonymously sharing experiences of suicidality was viewed as important, had therapeutic benefits, and engendered hopes for recovery. The findings suggest a need to ensure vulnerable participants in online studies are well supported while protecting their anonymity.

  2. Enabling Participation In Exoplanet Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Stuart F.

    2015-08-01

    Determining the distribution of exoplanets has required the contributions of a community of astronomers, who all require the support of colleagues to finish their projects in a manner to enable them to enter new collaborations to continue to contribute to understanding exoplanet science.The contributions of each member of the astronomy community are to be encouraged and must never be intentionally obstructed.We present a member’s long pursuit to be a contributing part of the exoplanet community through doing transit photometry as a means of commissioning the telescopes for a new observatory, followed by pursuit of interpreting the distributions in exoplanet parameter data.We present how the photometry projects have been presented as successful by the others who have claimed to have completed them, but how by requiring its employees to present results while omitting one member has been obstructive against members working together and has prevented the results from being published in what can genuinely be called a peer-reviewed fashion.We present how by tolerating one group to obstruct one member from finishing participation and then falsely denying credit is counterproductive to doing science.We show how expecting one member to attempt to go around an ostracizing group by starting something different is destructive to the entire profession. We repeat previously published appeals to help ostracized members to “go around the observatory” by calling for discussion on how the community must act to reverse cases of shunning, bullying, and other abuses. Without better recourse and support from the community, actions that do not meet standard good collegial behavior end up forcing good members from the community. The most important actions are to enable an ostracized member to have recourse to participating in group papers by either working through other authors or through the journal. All journals and authors must expect that no co-author is keeping out a major

  3. Children's Participation Rights in Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Mary Ann; Smith, Anne B.

    2009-01-01

    This article explores children's participation in research, from the perspectives of researchers who have conducted research with children. Researchers' reports, gained using an email interviewing method, suggest that children's participation rights are particularly compromised when the potential child participants are considered vulnerable and…

  4. [Biological review of completed suicide].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ikuo; Sora, Ichiro; Hishimoto, Akitoyo

    2016-06-01

    Family, twin and adoption studies have revealed genetic factors involved in suicide, while the accumulation of stress and mental illnesses are major contributing factors of suicide. Since higher lethality of suicidal behavior is considered to increase familial liability to suicidal behavior, we believe biological research of completed suicide is most important for a better understanding of the pathophysiology in suicide. Dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has gained a special interest in the neurobiology of suicide, mostly because of the findings using a dexamethasone suppression test (DST), in which DST non-suppressors show a nearly 10-fold higher risk of completed suicide than DST suppressors in a depressed cohort. Other data mainly from postmortem brain studies indicate abnormalities of the noradrenergic-locus coeruleus system, serotonergic system, endogenous opioid system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, inflammatory cytokines and omega-3 fatty acid in completed suicide. However, genetic research of complete suicide is behind other mental problems because it is extremely difficult to obtain tissue samples of completed suicide. Under the difficult situation, we now retain over 800 blood samples of suicide completers thanks to bereaved families' cooperation. We are actively working on the research of suicide, for instance, by performing a GWAS using 500 samples of suicide completers.

  5. [Biological review of completed suicide].

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Ikuo; Sora, Ichiro; Hishimoto, Akitoyo

    2016-06-01

    Family, twin and adoption studies have revealed genetic factors involved in suicide, while the accumulation of stress and mental illnesses are major contributing factors of suicide. Since higher lethality of suicidal behavior is considered to increase familial liability to suicidal behavior, we believe biological research of completed suicide is most important for a better understanding of the pathophysiology in suicide. Dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has gained a special interest in the neurobiology of suicide, mostly because of the findings using a dexamethasone suppression test (DST), in which DST non-suppressors show a nearly 10-fold higher risk of completed suicide than DST suppressors in a depressed cohort. Other data mainly from postmortem brain studies indicate abnormalities of the noradrenergic-locus coeruleus system, serotonergic system, endogenous opioid system, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, inflammatory cytokines and omega-3 fatty acid in completed suicide. However, genetic research of complete suicide is behind other mental problems because it is extremely difficult to obtain tissue samples of completed suicide. Under the difficult situation, we now retain over 800 blood samples of suicide completers thanks to bereaved families' cooperation. We are actively working on the research of suicide, for instance, by performing a GWAS using 500 samples of suicide completers. PMID:27506081

  6. Priming in word stem completion tasks: comparison with previous results in word fragment completion tasks

    PubMed Central

    Soler, María J.; Dasí, Carmen; Ruiz, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates priming in an implicit word stem completion (WSC) task by analyzing the effect of linguistic stimuli characteristics on said task. A total of 305 participants performed a WSC task in two phases (study and test). The test phase included 63 unique-solution stems and 63 multiple-solution stems. Analysis revealed that priming (mean = 0.22) was stronger in the case of multiple-solution stems, indicating that they were not a homogeneous group of stimuli. Thus, further analyses were performed only for the data of the unique-solution stems. Correlations between priming and familiarity, frequency of use, and baseline completion were significant. The less familiar words, which were less frequent, had higher priming values. At the same time, the stems with lower baseline completion generated more priming. A regression analysis showed that baseline completion was the only significant predictor of priming, suggesting that the previous processing of the stimuli had a greater impact on the stimuli with low baseline performance. At the same time, baseline completion showed significant positive correlations with familiarity and frequency of use, and a negative correlation with length. When baseline completion was the dependent variable in the regression analysis, the significant variables in the regression were familiarity and length. These results were compared with those obtained in a study using word fragment completion (WFC) by Soler et al. (2009), in which the same words and procedure were employed. Analysis showed that the variables that correlated with priming were the same as in the WSC task, and that completion baseline was the variable that showed the greatest predictive power of priming. This coincidence of results obtained with WFC and WSC tasks highlights the importance of controlling the characteristics of the stimuli used when exploring the nature of priming. PMID:26321987

  7. Tongue support of complete dentures in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Fen; Yang, Yi-Hsin; Lee, Ji-Hua; Chen, Jen-Hao; Lee, Huey-Er; Chou, Tsau-Mau

    2012-05-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the tongue's role in supporting maxillary denture retention (MDR), in providing additional stabilization for the mandibular denture, and the tongue's relationship with the oral health-related well being in elderly complete denture patients. Four hundred elderly individuals, 263 males and 137 females, were enrolled in this study. All were older than 65 years, and wore complete dentures. Intraoral examinations were performed in accordance with the 10 criteria embedded in the Functional Assessment of Dentures (FAD). Participants also received personal interviews and completed the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14) questionnaire. The associations between MDR (tongue support) with the mean OHIP-14 sum scores and FAD categories were analyzed using the t test or analysis of variance (ANOVA). Combinations of MDR (tongue support), MDR (resistance to vertical pull), and mandibular denture stability (anterior-posterior movement) were also assessed with the remaining FAD criteria and OHIP-14 domain scores. Individuals with adequate MDR (tongue support) were significantly associated with denture articulation, denture occlusion, MDR (resistance to vertical pull), maxillary denture stability (pronounced rocking), and mandibular denture stability (anterior-posterior movement). When individuals with adequate MDR (tongue support) were analyzed in conjunction with adequate MDR (resistance to vertical pull) and adequate mandibular denture stability (anterior-posterior movement), significant associations were observed with the mean OHIP-14 sum score and three individual OHIP-14 domains: functional limitation, physical pain, and physical disability (p < 0.05). The mean OHIP-14 sum score was lower among individuals with both adequate MDR (tongue support) and inadequate MDR (resistance to vertical pull) than among participants with both inadequate MDR (tongue support) and inadequate MDR (resistance to vertical pull). MDR (tongue support) demonstrated

  8. Low Back Pain in Adolescents: A Comparison of Clinical Outcomes in Sports Participants and Nonparticipants

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Julie M.; Clifford, Shannon N.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Back pain is common in adolescents. Participation in sports has been identified as a risk factor for the development of back pain in adolescents, but the influence of sports participation on treatment outcomes in adolescents has not been adequately examined. Objective: To examine the clinical outcomes of rehabilitation for adolescents with low back pain (LBP) and to evaluate the influence of sports participation on outcomes. Design: Observational study. Setting: Outpatient physical therapy clinics. Patients or Other Participants: Fifty-eight adolescents (age  =  15.40 ± 1.44 years; 56.90% female) with LBP referred for treatment. Twenty-three patients (39.66%) had developed back pain from sports participation. Intervention(s): Patients completed the Modified Oswestry Disability Questionnaire and numeric pain rating before and after treatment. Treatment duration and content were at the clinician's discretion. Adolescents were categorized as sports participants if the onset of back pain was linked to organized sports. Additional data collected included diagnostic imaging before referral, clinical characteristics, and medical diagnosis. Main Outcome Measure(s): Baseline characteristics were compared based on sports participation. The influence of sports participation on outcomes was examined using a repeated-measures analysis of covariance with the Oswestry and pain scores as dependent variables. The number of sessions and duration of care were compared using t tests. Results: Many adolescents with LBP receiving outpatient physical therapy treatment were involved in sports and cited sports participation as a causative factor for their LBP. Some differences in baseline characteristics and clinical treatment outcomes were noted between sports participants and nonparticipants. Sports participants were more likely to undergo magnetic resonance imaging before referral (P  =  .013), attended more sessions (mean difference  =  1.40, 95

  9. Probabilistic participation in public goods games.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Tatsuya; Okada, Isamu; Unemi, Tatsuo

    2007-10-22

    Voluntary participation in public goods games (PGGs) has turned out to be a simple but effective mechanism for promoting cooperation under full anonymity. Voluntary participation allows individuals to adopt a risk-aversion strategy, termed loner. A loner refuses to participate in unpromising public enterprises and instead relies on a small but fixed pay-off. This system leads to a cyclic dominance of three pure strategies, cooperators, defectors and loners, but at the same time, there remain two considerable restrictions: the addition of loners cannot stabilize the dynamics and the time average pay-off for each strategy remains equal to the pay-off of loners. Here, we introduce probabilistic participation in PGGs from the standpoint of diversification of risk, namely simple mixed strategies with loners, and prove the existence of a dynamical regime in which the restrictions ono longer hold. Considering two kinds of mixed strategies associated with participants (cooperators or defectors) and non-participants (loners), we can recover all basic evolutionary dynamics of the two strategies: dominance; coexistence; bistability; and neutrality, as special cases depending on pairs of probabilities. Of special interest is that the expected pay-off of each mixed strategy exceeds the pay-off of loners at some interior equilibrium in the coexistence region.

  10. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  11. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  12. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  13. Increasing HPV vaccination series completion rates via text message reminders.

    PubMed

    Matheson, Elaine C; Derouin, Anne; Gagliano, Martha; Thompson, Julie A; Blood-Siegfried, Jane

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most frequently diagnosed sexually transmitted infection in the United States. It is associated with the development of cervical, anal-genital, and oral-pharyngeal cancers. The rate of HPV infection among adolescents and young adults in the United States remains high, and completion rates of an HPV vaccine series remain low. At an urban pediatric clinic, adolescent and young adult participants aged 11 to 22 years (n = 37) received text message reminders for their second and third dose of HPV vaccine over an 8-month study period. Of the participants receiving text message reminders, 14% completed the vaccine series at the optimal time, whereas 0% of an interested group (n = 43) and only 3% of a standard care group (n = 232) completed the vaccine series at the optimal time. Findings support the use of text message reminders to improve HPV vaccine series completion rates in a pediatric practice. PMID:24200295

  14. Genotype imputation via matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Chi, Eric C; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  15. Written debriefing: Evaluating the impact of the addition of a written component when debriefing simulations.

    PubMed

    Reed, Shelly J

    2015-11-01

    Debriefing, the reflective period following a simulation, is said to be where the bulk of simulation learning takes place. Many expert opinions regarding debriefing exist, but evidence-based best practices have yet to be identified. Written debriefing is one of these practices; experts state learning can be extended through the addition of a written component to the debriefing process, but no evidence exists to support this. This study compares three debriefing types: discussion alone, and discussion followed by journaling or blogging. Undergraduate nursing students participating in a simulation were randomized as a simulation group to one of these three debriefing types. Following completion of debriefing activities, students completed a Debriefing Experience Scale, a tool designed to evaluate the student experience during debriefing. Data obtained from completed scales were analyzed with ANOVA followed by Fisher LSD post hoc testing. The results showed the students preferred their experience with discussion debriefing over discussion debriefing with a written component added.

  16. "I've been NIATxed": participants' experience with process improvement.

    PubMed

    Crèvecoeur-MacPhail, Desirée; Bellows, Anne; Rutkowski, Beth A; Ransom, Loretta; Myers, Ana Ceci; Rawson, Richard A

    2010-09-01

    Process improvement strategies provide industries with a method for improving outcomes and performance at a low cost and with minimal training. In Los Angeles County, two process improvement projects were implemented as a way to improve access to, and engagement and retention in, alcohol and other drug abuse treatment. A qualitative evaluation was completed after the Phase II pilot project to assess how the providers felt about the project, what worked, what did not work, what was learned, and the degree to which process improvements changed program operations. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 33 individuals, representing every level of staff participation in the project. Overall, comments indicated a positive experience for staff, administrators, and clients. Providers noted the relative ease of implementation and how quickly changes resulted in impressive improvements. Challenging issues included resistant staff or a lack of additional resources to pay for the project; however, most noted that these issues were resolved. Interview participants also requested more training on data collection and a reduction in the frequency of the project conference calls. This study gives support to the idea of process improvement being a tool that dramatically improves services to consumers of addiction treatment services. PMID:21138201

  17. Symptom targeted intervention webinar trainings: feedback from participants.

    PubMed

    McCool, Melissa; Boyd, Shaun; Aebel-Groesch, Kathy; Gonzalez, Teresa; Evans, Deborah

    2014-06-01

    Professional trainings through the use of webinar format are widely used, but participant feedback is seldom studied. In the spring of 2013, 83 nephrology social workers participated in weekly webinar trainings to learn how to implement Symptom Targeted Intervention (STI) into their clinical practice. At the end of the project, participants were asked to complete an online questionnaire to provide feedback on the perceived value and effectiveness of the trainings. Sixty-eight participants completed the questionnaire. The results indicate that social workers found the webinar trainings to be very useful and wanted the trainings to continue beyond the project. Based on participant feedback, clinical training and case presentation through the use of ongoing webinars is a useful education modality for nephrology professionals, but more research is indicated to evaluate how best to utilize webinars to maximize learning.

  18. Research with protected populations--vulnerable participants.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Bonnie

    2005-04-01

    Workers as study participants are a vulnerable population and additional considerations for their protection in research are needed. Issues related to invasion of privacy and coercion to participate in research studies must be carefully weighed and closely monitored. Worker autonomy must be fostered with respect to assuring that informed consent is given, meaning the information transferred is understood. Research will add to the body of knowledge and advance nursing practice, but one must always remember that risks and benefits must be balanced to achieve appropriate end results.

  19. Is complete seizure control imperative?

    PubMed

    Andermann, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    Is complete control imperative? The answer depends on whether complete control is indeed possible, on the possibility of achieving modifications of lifestyle, and on the type of epilepsy, with particular reference to the presence of progressive dysfunction. This may be seen in patients with temporal lobe or other forms of focal epilepsy, in the epileptic encephalopathies such as West and Lennox Gastaut Syndromes and even in some patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Progressive memory changes and global cognitive problems are examples. Progressive language deterioration, secondary epileptogenesis and phenomena analogous to kindling are also important issues. How long treatment should be continued depends on many factors, not least the preference of the patient and of the family. Weighing the benefits of complete control versus the side effects and risks of medication or surgery is crucial. There are obvious benefits to complete control; it is imperative if these benefits are greater than the cost.

  20. JWST Primary Mirror Installation Complete

    NASA Video Gallery

    Completing the assembly of the primary mirror, which took place at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, is a significant milestone and the culmination of over a decade of desi...

  1. Is complete seizure control imperative?

    PubMed

    Andermann, Frederick

    2002-01-01

    Is complete control imperative? The answer depends on whether complete control is indeed possible, on the possibility of achieving modifications of lifestyle, and on the type of epilepsy, with particular reference to the presence of progressive dysfunction. This may be seen in patients with temporal lobe or other forms of focal epilepsy, in the epileptic encephalopathies such as West and Lennox Gastaut Syndromes and even in some patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. Progressive memory changes and global cognitive problems are examples. Progressive language deterioration, secondary epileptogenesis and phenomena analogous to kindling are also important issues. How long treatment should be continued depends on many factors, not least the preference of the patient and of the family. Weighing the benefits of complete control versus the side effects and risks of medication or surgery is crucial. There are obvious benefits to complete control; it is imperative if these benefits are greater than the cost. PMID:12143366

  2. Complete Blood Count (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... Metabolic Panel (BMP) Blood Test: Hemoglobin Basic Blood Chemistry Tests Word! Complete Blood Count (CBC) Medical Tests ...

  3. Blue Shield Plan Physician Participation

    PubMed Central

    Yett, Donald E.; Der, William; Ernst, Richard L.; Hay, Joel W.

    1981-01-01

    Many Blue Shield Plans offer participation agreements to physicians that are structurally similar to the participation provisions of Medicaid programs. This paper examines physicians' participation decisions in two such Blue Shield Plans where the participation agreements were on an all-or-nothing basis. The major results show that increases in the Plans' reasonable fees or fee schedules significantly raise the probability of participation, and that physicians with characteristics associated with “low quality” are significantly more likely to participate than are physicians with characteristics associated with “high quality.” In this sense the results highlight the tradeoff that must be faced in administering governmental health insurance policy. On the one hand, restricting reasonable and scheduled fees is the principal current tool for containing expenditures on physicians' services. Yet these restrictions tend to depress physicians' willingness to participate in government programs, thereby reducing access to high quality care by the populations those programs were designed to serve. PMID:10309468

  4. 76 FR 70752 - Deadline for Submitting Completed Applications To Begin Participation in the Tribal Self...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-15

    ... information collection is authorized by OMB Control Number 1076-0143, Tribal Self-Governance Program, which... Tribal Self-Governance Program in Fiscal Year 2013 or Calendar Year 2013 AGENCY: Office of Self... notice, the Office of Self-Governance (OSG) establishes a March 1, 2012, deadline for Indian...

  5. Apprenticeships and Traineeships: Participation, Progress and Completion. LSAY Briefing Number 19

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ainley, John; Holden, Steve; Rothman, Sheldon

    2010-01-01

    Apprenticeships and traineeships offer pathways from school to adult working life for a significant proportion of young people by formally combining study and work to link learning in the workplace with learning in an educational institution. They contribute in important ways to the formation of skills for individuals and for the community as a…

  6. 76 FR 5395 - Notice of Deadline for Submitting Completed Applications To Begin Participation in the Tribal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... in the Tribal Self-Governance Program in Fiscal Year 2012 or Calendar Year 2012 AGENCY: Office of Self-Governance, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Application Deadline. SUMMARY: In this notice, the Office of Self-Governance (OSG) establishes a March 1, 2011, deadline for Indian tribes/consortia to...

  7. Perceptions of College Readiness and Social Capital of GED Completers in Entry-Level College Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Donalyn Leufroy

    2012-01-01

    Examining the efficacy of literacy improvement, general education development (GED) completion, and GED completers' perceptions of college readiness and social capital was the purpose of this study. The participant sample (n = 321), derived from the target population (N = 1050), consisted of former participants of Adult Literacy Education…

  8. Male Adolescents' Reasons for Participating in Physical Activity, Barriers to Participation, and Suggestions for Increasing Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Kenneth R.; Dwyer, John J. M.; Goldenberg, Ellie; Fein, Allan; Yoshida, Karen K.; Boutilier, Marie

    2005-01-01

    This study explored male adolescents' reasons for participating in moderate and vigorous physical activity, perceived barriers to moderate and vigorous physical activity, and suggestions as to what can be done to increase participation in physical activity. A total of 26 male 15- and 16-year-old adolescents participated in focus group sessions,…

  9. Determinants of Follow-Up Participation in the Internet-Based European Influenza Surveillance Platform Influenzanet

    PubMed Central

    Bajardi, Paolo; Vespignani, Alessandro; Funk, Sebastian; Eames, Ken TD; Edmunds, W John; Turbelin, Clément; Debin, Marion; Colizza, Vittoria; Smallenburg, Ronald; Koppeschaar, Carl E; Franco, Ana O; Faustino, Vitor; Carnahan, Annasara; Rehn, Moa

    2014-01-01

    Background “Influenzanet” is a network of Internet-based platforms aimed at collecting real-time data for influenza surveillance in several European countries. More than 30,000 European volunteers participate every year in the study, representing one of the largest existing Internet-based multicenter cohorts. Each week during the influenza season, participants are asked to report their symptoms (if any) along with a set of additional questions. Objective Focusing on the first influenza season of 2011-12, when the Influenzanet system was completely harmonized within a common framework in Sweden, the United Kingdom, the Netherlands, Belgium, France, Italy, and Portugal, we investigated the propensity of users to regularly come back to the platform to provide information about their health status. Our purpose was to investigate demographic and behavioral factors associated with participation in follow-up. Methods By means of a multilevel analysis, we evaluated the association between regular participation during the season and sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics as measured by a background questionnaire completed by participants on registration. Results We found that lower participation in follow-up was associated with lower educational status (odds ratio [OR] 0.80, 95% CI 0.75-0.85), smoking (OR 0.64, 95% CI 0.59-0.70), younger age (OR ranging from 0.30, 95% CI 0.26-0.33 to 0.70, 95% CI 0.64-0.77), not being vaccinated against seasonal influenza (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.72-0.84), and living in a household with children (OR 0.69, 95% CI 0.65-0.74). Most of these results hold when single countries are analyzed separately. Conclusions Given the opportunistic enrollment of self-selected volunteers in the Influenzanet study, we have investigated how sociodemographic and behavioral characteristics may be associated with follow-up participation in the Influenzanet cohort. The study described in this paper shows that, overall, the most important determinants of

  10. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  11. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  12. [Discussion paper on participation and participative methods in gerontology].

    PubMed

    Aner, Kirsten

    2016-02-01

    The concept of "participation" and the demand for the use of "participative methods" in human, healthcare, nursing and gerontological research as well as the corresponding fields of practice are in great demand; however, the targets and organization of "participation" are not always sufficiently explicated. The working group on critical gerontology of the German Society of Gerontology and Geriatrics uses this phenomenon as an opportunity for positioning and develops a catalogue of criteria for reflection and assessment of participation of elderly people in science and practice, which can also be considered a stimulus for further discussions.

  13. 10 CFR 70.74 - Additional reporting requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Additional Requirements for Certain Licensees Authorized To Possess a Critical Mass of Special Nuclear... subpart is complete. (5) Each licensee shall provide reasonable assurance that reliable communication...

  14. Attitudinal barriers to participation in oncology clinical trials: factor analysis and correlates of barriers

    PubMed Central

    MANNE, S.; KASHY, D.; ALBRECHT, T.; WONG, Y.-N.; FLAMM, A. LEDERMAN; BENSON, A. B.; MILLER, S.M.; FLEISHER, LINDA; BUZAGLO, J.; ROACH, N.; KATZ, M.; ROSS, E.; COLLINS, M.; POOLE, D.; RAIVITCH, S.; MILLER, D.M.; KINZY, T.G.; LIU, T.; MEROPOL, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    Patient participation in cancer clinical trials is low. Little is known about attitudinal barriers to participation, particularly among patients who may be offered a trial during an imminent initial oncology consult. The aims of the present study were to confirm the presence of proposed subscales of a recently developed cancer clinical trial attitudinal barriers measure, describe the most common cancer clinical trials attitudinal barriers, and evaluate socio-demographic, medical and financial factors associated with attitudinal barriers. A total of 1256 patients completed a survey assessing demographic factors, perceived financial burden, prior trial participation and attitudinal barriers to clinical trials participation. Results of a factor analysis did not confirm the presence of the proposed four attitudinal barriers subscale/factors. Rather, a single factor represented the best fit to the data. The most highly-rated barriers were fear of side-effects, worry about health insurance and efficacy concerns. Results suggested that less educated patients, patients with non-metastatic disease, patients with no previous oncology clinical trial participation, and patients reporting greater perceived financial burden from cancer care were associated with higher barriers. These patients may need extra attention in terms of decisional support. Overall, patients with fewer personal resources (education, financial issues) report more attitudinal barriers and should be targeted for additional decisional support. PMID:24467411

  15. 42 CFR 68.16 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.16 Additional conditions. (a) When a shortage of funds exists, participants may be funded only partially, as determined by the NIH. However, once an NIH LRP contract has been signed by both parties, the NIH will obligate such funds...

  16. 42 CFR 68.16 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH (NIH) LOAN REPAYMENT PROGRAMS (LRPs) § 68.16 Additional conditions. (a) When a shortage of funds exists, participants may be funded only partially, as determined by the NIH. However, once an NIH LRP contract has been signed by both parties, the NIH will obligate such funds...

  17. 42 CFR 68a.15 - Additional conditions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DISADVANTAGED BACKGROUNDS (CR-LRP) § 68a.15 Additional conditions. When a shortage of funds exists, participants may be funded partially, as determined by the Secretary. However, once a CR-LRP contract has been signed by both parties, the Secretary will obligate such funds as necessary to ensure that...

  18. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  19. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  20. Posttraumatic stress disorder and completed suicide.

    PubMed

    Gradus, Jaimie L; Qin, Ping; Lincoln, Alisa K; Miller, Matthew; Lawler, Elizabeth; Sørensen, Henrik Toft; Lash, Timothy L

    2010-03-15

    Most research regarding posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and suicide has focused on suicidal ideation or attempts; no known study of the association between PTSD and completed suicide in a population-based sample has been reported. This study examined the association between PTSD and completed suicide in a population-based sample. Data were obtained from the nationwide Danish health and administrative registries, which include data on all 5.4 million residents of Denmark. All suicides between January 1, 1994, and December 31, 2006, were included, and controls were selected from a sample of all Danish residents. Using this nested case-control design, the authors examined 9,612 suicide cases and 199,306 controls matched to cases on gender, date of birth, and time. Thirty-eight suicide cases (0.40%) and 95 controls (0.05%) were diagnosed with PTSD. The odds ratio associating PTSD with suicide was 9.8 (95% confidence interval: 6.7, 15). The association between PTSD and completed suicide remained after controlling for psychiatric and demographic confounders (odds ratio = 5.3, 95% confidence interval: 3.4, 8.1). Additionally, persons with PTSD and depression had a greater rate of suicide than expected based on their independent effects. In conclusion, a registry-based diagnosis of PTSD based on International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision, is a risk factor for completed suicide. PMID:20160171

  1. Participation-Based Services: Promoting Children's Participation in Natural Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Philippa

    2004-01-01

    When children are young, the activities and routines in which they participate are influenced by family decisions as well as by opportunities for participation. Families report that finding community opportunities for their young children with disabilities can be difficult. Furthermore, ensuring their children's success in these settings requires…

  2. Complete nitrification by Nitrospira bacteria.

    PubMed

    Daims, Holger; Lebedeva, Elena V; Pjevac, Petra; Han, Ping; Herbold, Craig; Albertsen, Mads; Jehmlich, Nico; Palatinszky, Marton; Vierheilig, Julia; Bulaev, Alexandr; Kirkegaard, Rasmus H; von Bergen, Martin; Rattei, Thomas; Bendinger, Bernd; Nielsen, Per H; Wagner, Michael

    2015-12-24

    Nitrification, the oxidation of ammonia via nitrite to nitrate, has always been considered to be a two-step process catalysed by chemolithoautotrophic microorganisms oxidizing either ammonia or nitrite. No known nitrifier carries out both steps, although complete nitrification should be energetically advantageous. This functional separation has puzzled microbiologists for a century. Here we report on the discovery and cultivation of a completely nitrifying bacterium from the genus Nitrospira, a globally distributed group of nitrite oxidizers. The genome of this chemolithoautotrophic organism encodes the pathways both for ammonia and nitrite oxidation, which are concomitantly activated during growth by ammonia oxidation to nitrate. Genes affiliated with the phylogenetically distinct ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine dehydrogenase genes of Nitrospira are present in many environments and were retrieved on Nitrospira-contigs in new metagenomes from engineered systems. These findings fundamentally change our picture of nitrification and point to completely nitrifying Nitrospira as key components of nitrogen-cycling microbial communities. PMID:26610024

  3. Participation in Physical, Social, and Religious Activity and Risk of Depression in the Elderly: A Community-Based Three-Year Longitudinal Study in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Hyun Woong; Hong, Chang Hyung; Lee, Yunhwan; Oh, Byoung Hoon; Lee, Kang Soo; Chang, Ki Jung; Kang, Dae Ryong; Kim, Jinhee; Lee, SooJin; Back, Joung Hwan; Chung, Young Ki; Lim, Ki Young; Noh, Jai Sung; Kim, Dongsoo; Son, Sang Joon

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the longitudinal association between participation in individual or combinations of physical, social, and religious activity and risk of depression in the elderly. Methods Elderly subjects aged ≥60 years who completed the Living Profiles of Older People Survey in Korea (n = 6,647) were included. The baseline assessment, Wave 1, was conducted in 2008, and a follow-up assessment, Wave 2, was conducted in 2011. We defined participation in frequent physical activity as ≥3 times weekly (at least 30 minutes per activity). Frequent participation in social and religious activity was defined as ≥1 activity weekly. The primary outcome was depression at 3-year follow up. Results Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that subjects who participated in frequent physical, social, and religious activity had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.81 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.69–0.96), 0.87 (95% CI, 0.75–1.00), and 0.78 (95% CI, 0.67–0.90), respectively, compared with participants who did not participate in each activity. Participants who participated in only one type of activity frequently and participants who participated in two or three types of activities frequently had an adjusted odds ratio of 0.86 (95% CI, 0.75–0.98) and 0.64 (95% CI, 0.52–0.79), respectively, compared with participants who did not participate in any type of physical, social, and religious activity frequently. Conclusion Participation in physical, social, and religious activity was associated with decreased risk of depression in the elderly. In addition, risk of depression was much lower in the elderly people who participated in two or three of the above-mentioned types of activity than that in the elderly who did not. PMID:26172441

  4. Graduate engineering research participation in aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, A. S., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Graduate student engineering research in aeronautics at Old Dominion University is surveyed. Student participation was facilitated through a NASA sponsored university program which enabled the students to complete degrees. Research summaries are provided and plans for the termination of the grant program are outlined. Project topics include: Failure modes for mechanically fastened joints in composite materials; The dynamic stability of an earth orbiting satellite deploying hinged appendages; The analysis of the Losipescu shear test for composite materials; and the effect of boundary layer structure on wing tip vortex formation and decay.

  5. Astronaut Health Participant Summary Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kathy; Krog, Ralph; Rodriguez, Seth; Wear, Mary; Volpe, Robert; Trevino, Gina; Eudy, Deborah; Parisian, Diane

    2011-01-01

    The Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH) Participant Summary software captures data based on a custom information model designed to gather all relevant, discrete medical events for its study participants. This software provides a summarized view of the study participant s entire medical record. The manual collapsing of all the data in a participant s medical record into a summarized form eliminates redundancy, and allows for the capture of entire medical events. The coding tool could be incorporated into commercial electronic medical record software for use in areas like public health surveillance, hospital systems, clinics, and medical research programs.

  6. Best practices in record completion.

    PubMed

    Doyon, Cindy

    2004-01-01

    Completion of hospital and office (clinic) medical records is one of the least popular of clinicians' duties. Adherence to Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) requirements and submission of hospital and provider bills to insurers and patients, however, are predicated on patient charts being completed and signed in a timely manner. This article details the rules and regulations that many institutions impose on providers to assure that records are up to date. It also discusses the carrot-and-stick approaches that are frequently used to assure compliance.

  7. The Complete Information Literacy? Unforgetting Creation and Organization of Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huvila, Isto

    2011-01-01

    Even though the concept of information literacy typically embraces an idea of a complete participation in an information community, its definitions have tended to underline the phases of seeking, searching and evaluation instead of creating information. Shortcomings of information creation can, however, explain many of the difficulties of finding…

  8. Completing the Dissertation: It's Not Only about Academics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dominguez, Ramon

    2006-01-01

    The culminating project in completing a doctorate in education is the preparation and final defense of the dissertation. Specifically in educational administration and leadership, the student will have exerted hours of energy participating in course work, internships as well as in written and oral comprehensive examinations. By the time a student…

  9. Promoting Completion through Organizational Development and Process Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    David, Kevin M.; Sivadon, Angela D.; Wood, Donna G.; Stecher, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, Tulsa Community College (TCC) joined the national Achieving the Dream (ATD) network, which is dedicated to developing data-informed interventions to increase persistence and completion among community college students. TCC's participation in the national initiative set it down a path for positive institutional change, but it was the…

  10. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  11. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  12. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  13. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  14. What attitudes and beliefs underlie patients' decisions about participating in chemotherapy trials?

    PubMed

    Sutherland, H J; da Cunha, R; Lockwood, G A; Till, J E

    1998-01-01

    The theory of reasoned action, which postulates that personal attitudes and external social influences predict intentions to undertake a behavior, was used as a conceptual framework for developing a questionnaire to elicit beliefs and attitudes associated with the decision to participate in a hypothetical cancer chemotherapy trial. After completing the questionnaire, two-thirds of the 150 respondents indicated they would enroll in such a trial if it were available. Considerable variation existed in both "universal" and "trial-specific" beliefs and attitudes underpinning their intentions. A substantial amount of the variance in "intention" to participate was explained by "attitude" alone (75%). Social influences, although statistically significant, made a mere 1% additional contribution. One interpretation is that subjective expected-utility theory, which essentially predicts beliefs or "attitude," is a better model. The authors conclude that both theories may be criticized regarding how well they capture the rationality and nuances of decision behavior. PMID:9456210

  15. Does finger sense predict addition performance?

    PubMed

    Newman, Sharlene D

    2016-05-01

    The impact of fingers on numerical and mathematical cognition has received a great deal of attention recently. However, the precise role that fingers play in numerical cognition is unknown. The current study explores the relationship between finger sense, arithmetic and general cognitive ability. Seventy-six children between the ages of 5 and 12 participated in the study. The results of stepwise multiple regression analyses demonstrated that while general cognitive ability including language processing was a predictor of addition performance, finger sense was not. The impact of age on the relationship between finger sense, and addition was further examined. The participants were separated into two groups based on age. The results showed that finger gnosia score impacted addition performance in the older group but not the younger group. These results appear to support the hypothesis that fingers provide a scaffold for calculation and that if that scaffold is not properly built, it has continued differential consequences to mathematical cognition. PMID:26993292

  16. A-3 steel work completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center engineers celebrated a key milestone in construction of the A-3 Test Stand on April 9 - completion of structural steel work. Workers with Lafayette (La.) Steel Erector Inc. placed the last structural steel beam atop the stand during a noon ceremony attended by more than 100 workers and guests.

  17. Review of "A Complete Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warren, Beth

    2010-01-01

    The research summary, "A Complete Education," presents the Obama administration's proposal for ensuring that all students have a comprehensive education. The key areas include: strengthening instruction in literacy and in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM); increasing access to instruction in a broader range of subject…

  18. Indiana College Completion. 2014 Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana Commission for Higher Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The Indiana Commission for Higher Education is committed to providing a clearer and more comprehensive picture of college completion in order to inform and advance Indiana's collective efforts to boost education attainment. In partnership with Indiana public colleges and the National Student Clearinghouse, the Commission has collected completion…

  19. Program Costs and Student Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manning, Terri M.; Crosta, Peter M.

    2014-01-01

    Community colleges are under pressure to increase completion rates, prepare students for the workplace, and contain costs. Colleges need to know the financial implications of what are often perceived as routine decisions: course scheduling, program offerings, and the provision of support services. This chapter presents a methodology for estimating…

  20. Complete feeds-intensive systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Most commercially cultivated fish are raised in high-density culture systems where the assumption is that the contribution of natural foods to the nutrition of the fish is insignificant. Thus, intensively cultured fish must be fed a nutritionally complete feed. A short section on the concept and im...

  1. Correlates of Senior Center Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanssen, Anne M.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    To determine the extent to which multiservice centers serve the varied needs of the senior population, this study examined users of a Senior Center and three groups of nonusers: persons only attending a nutrition site, former center participants, and persons who never participated. Differences were found in life styles. (Author)

  2. Fiscal Management Training. Participant's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Student Financial Assistance (ED), Washington, DC.

    This document is the participant's guide for fiscal management training for administrators managing an institution's Title IV program funds. The workshop is designed to prepare participants to understand an institution's responsibilities with regard to Title IV. It describes the recordkeeping requirements of the Title IV program and the accounting…

  3. Pupil Participation and Curriculum Relevance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramadas, Jayashree; Kulkarni, V. G.

    1982-01-01

    Investigated relationship between lesson content and participation of pupils in rural India primary schools. Spontaneous participation in teacher-directed classrooms (N=136) was shown to be correlated with time spent by teachers in relating textbook content to pupils' natural experience. Experiments and teaching aids were also useful in drawing…

  4. Who Benefits from Participative Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benoliel, Pascale; Somech, Anit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study seeks to explore the moderating role of teachers' personality traits from the Big Five typology on the relationship between participative management and teacher outcomes with respect to performance, satisfaction and strain. The study suggests that participative management may produce different results depending on teachers'…

  5. Moving the Participation Agenda Forward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Malcolm; Davis, John; Prout, Alan; Tisdall, Kay

    2004-01-01

    This article sets the scene for the other papers in this Special Issue on children's and young people's participation, by outlining the nature of the ESRC Seminar Series from which all are derived and by developing the main themes discussed at the seminars. The focus of this Issue is participation by children and young people as this relates to…

  6. Fuel Additives: Canada bans MMT

    SciTech Connect

    Sissell, K.

    1997-04-16

    The Canadian Senate voted late last week to ban use of the manganese-based fuel additive MMT, produced only in the US by Ethyl. MMT, which has been sold in Canada for the past 20 years and accounts for about half of Ethyl`s Canadian sales, has been criticized by environmentalists, who have raised public health concerns, and automakers, who say it harms emission control systems. {open_quotes}Canada`s vote is a great victory for public health and the environment,{close_quotes} says Environmental Defense Fund executive director Fred Krupp. {open_quotes}The US should move swiftly to follow suit and suspend sales of MMT until adequate toxicity testing on the additive is completed.{close_quotes} EPA had refused to approve MMT for sale because of health concerns but was compelled to do so by a December 1995 court ruling. Ethyl asserts the ban violates Canada`s obligations under Nafta and says it will file a damage claim with the Nafta arbitration panel.

  7. Participation of nurses in abortions.

    PubMed

    Neustatter, P L

    1980-11-29

    Doctors for a Woman's Choice on Abortion would agree with 1 point in Lord Denning's ruling on the role of nurses in abortions induced by (PGS) prostaglandins (November 15, p. 1091). The nurse should not be doing a doctor's job, as Lord Denning indicated, and we sympathize with any nurse who is doing so (though the 1967 Abortion Act allows any nurse to abstain, on grounds of conscience). However, the ruling that nurses are not legally covered to participate in any way with the "procuring of a miscarriage" (using terminology of the 1861 Offenses against the Persons Act upon which the ruling is based) does not require a radical change in the practice of late abortions (constituting only 7% of the terminations) or any change in the law. PG abortion can be done without a nurse. With the extraamniotic technique, a very cheap pump can be used to give subsequent doses of the PG (a function normally performed by a nurse) through the catheter left inserted through the cervix after the 1st dose has been given by the doctor. Alternatively, the intraamniotic method can be used, where PG is instilled into the amniotic sac via a needle passed through the abdominal wall. This normally requires only 1 dose, given by the doctor. Rarely are subsequent doses needed; however they could be given by the doctor with very little addition to his or her workload. While the fact that PG abortion can be done without nurses is not realized, late abortion will be restricted, a situation which is entirely deplorable. Also deplorable are the comments of an antiabortion nature made by Lord Denning, over and above the legal ruling in his jurisdiction to make. His ruling, furthermore, seems to have been sufficiently confused for the Department of Health to withdraw its circular on abortion and await an interpretation before issuing another. PMID:6107800

  8. Outcomes of complete versus targeted approaches to endoscopic sinus surgery

    PubMed Central

    DeConde, Adam S.; Suh, Jeffrey D.; Mace, Jess C.; Alt, Jeremiah A; Smith, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) was historically predicated on targeted widening of narrow anatomic structures that caused post-obstructive persistent sinus inflammation. It is now clear that chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is a multi-factorial disease with subsets of patients which may require a more extensive surgical approach. This study compares quality-of-life (QOL) and disease severity outcomes after FESS based on the extent of surgical intervention. Methods Participants with CRS were prospectively enrolled into an on-going, multi-institutional, observational, cohort study. Surgical extent was determined by physician discretion. Participants undergoing bilateral frontal sinusotomy, ethmoidectomy, maxillary antrostomy, and sphenoidotomy were considered to have undergone ‘complete’ surgery, while all other participants were categorized as receiving ‘targeted’ surgery. Improvement was evaluated between surgical subgroups with at least 6-month follow-up using the 22-item Sinonasal Outcome Test (SNOT-22) and the Brief Smell Inventory Test (BSIT). Results 311 participants met inclusion criteria with 147 subjects undergoing complete surgery and 164 targeted surgery. A higher prevalence of asthma, ASA sensitivity, nasal polyposis, and a history of prior sinus surgery (p≤0.002) was present in participants undergoing complete surgery. Mean improvement in SNOT-22 (28.1[21.9] vs. 21.9[20.6];p=0.011) and BSIT (0.8[3.1] vs 0.2[2.4];p=0.005) was greater in subjects undergoing complete surgery. Regression models demonstrated a 5.9[2.5] greater relative mean improvement on SNOT-22 total scores with complete surgery over targeted approaches (p=0.016). Conclusions Complete surgery was an independent predictor of greater postoperative SNOT-22 score improvement, yet did not achieve clinical significance. Further study is needed to determine the optimal surgical extent. PMID:25907972

  9. [Sports participation and fair play].

    PubMed

    Cecchini Estrada, José A; González-Mesa, Carmen González; Méndez, Javier Montero

    2007-02-01

    This study examined whether the participation in intermediate contact sports affects the opinions about the behaviors and attitudes of fair play in the sports context and whether these effects are influenced by ego orientation. The participants were high level sportsmen from university and professional basketball and football players (N = 131). They filled in questionnaires to assess their participation in sports, their goal orientations, and their fair play attitudes and behaviors. The analyses of the structural equation model indicated that participation in intermediate contact sports predicted ego orientation; these analyses consecutively predicted low levels of fair play. The direct effects of sports participation in fair play decreased significantly in the presence of ego orientation, indicating that the last construct partially mediates the relation between the first two variables. These discoveries help us to better understand the processes that operate in contact sports. Finally, their implications for eliminating unsportsmanlike behaviors are discussed.

  10. Participation of HNO3 CIMS Instrument in the Sage III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisele, F. L.

    2001-01-01

    This project was part of a larger SOLVE project led by Paul Wennberg at California Institute of Technology. The work completed on this project included participating in the installation and preflight testing of a new chemical ionization mass spectrometer for measuring gas and particle phase nitric acid on the ER-2. The investigators subsequently participated in SOLVE where additional instrument improvements were made and a substantial data set was generated. The two Georgia Tech investigators that participated in this work (Fred Eisele and Dave Tanner) had previously been responsible for much of the design and construction of the ion source and mass spectrometer which would be used to measure HNO3 in SOLVE, with Caltech focusing on inlets, calibration, gas supplies/pumping computer control, and overall integration. Thus, a similar focus remained during the SOLVE measurements though all investigators worked on most if not all aspects of the instrument at some point in the mission. Some of the more interesting results from the study included measurements of nitric acid on what are thought to be 5-20 microns diameter individual particles which could supply a local mechanism for HNO3 removal, Nitric acid measurements on SOLVE were completed as a collaborative effort with a great deal of overlap between this project and the larger parent project led by Paul Wennberg. As such, the instrumentation used, its operation, and the resulting measurements are far more fully discussed in the attached report (appendix A) which describes the joint SOLVE nitric acid measurement effort.

  11. The Threat Index: An Additive Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Paul J.; Wood, Keith

    1985-01-01

    Examined the effects of actualization and integration on death anxiety in 120 students who completed the Threat Index, Collett-Lester Fear of Death Scale, and Templer Death Anxiety Scale. Results provided clear evidence that actualization and integration have an additive effect on death fear and anxiety. (JAC)

  12. 24 CFR 964.150 - Funding tenant participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... addition to the Performance Funding System (PFS), as provided by 24 CFR part 990, to permit HAs to fund $25... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Funding tenant participation. 964... § 964.150 Funding tenant participation. (a) Funding duly elected resident councils and jurisdiction...

  13. 24 CFR 964.150 - Funding tenant participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... addition to the Performance Funding System (PFS), as provided by 24 CFR part 990, to permit HAs to fund $25... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Funding tenant participation. 964... § 964.150 Funding tenant participation. (a) Funding duly elected resident councils and jurisdiction...

  14. Tracking Club Sport Participation from Childhood to Early Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Rosalina; Williams, Sheila; Poulton, Richie; Reeder, Anthony I.

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the strength of tracking sport participation from childhood to early adulthood among the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort. Participation in sport, dance, or gymnastics as part of a club or group (outside of school) was assessed at ages 7, 9, 15, 18, and 21 years. In addition to the traditionally…

  15. Quality and Quantity of Oral Participation and English Proficiency Gains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaney, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    There are many reasons to believe that oral participation in the target language (TL) is beneficial for classroom language learners. In addition to the prominence current second language acquisition (SLA) theory gives to processes that assume learner production of the TL (e.g. negotiation of meaning), teachers often view oral participation as a…

  16. Descriptive Assessment of Exercise Program on Fitness and Correlates of Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanier, Angela Baldwin; Jackson, Erica Marie; Azar-Dickens, John; Anderson, Brock; Briggs, Meredith

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess health-related fitness, physical activity correlates, and completion of a half-marathon using a 3-day training program in a college community. Methods: 26 volunteers participated in a 20-week, half-marathon training program. Results: All participants completed the half-marathon. Positive changes in health-related fitness and…

  17. 7 CFR 1493.420 - Information required for program participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... certified statement describing the applicant's participation, if any, during the past three years in U.S... to qualify will be given an opportunity to provide additional information for consideration by...

  18. Subsea completion technology needs advances

    SciTech Connect

    Ledbetter, R.

    1995-09-18

    Subsea technology needs further advances to reduce operational costs before operators will expand the use of subsea well completions in the Gulf of Mexico. They will continue to choose surface completion-oriented systems as long as these are more economical operationally than subsea system. Designs of subsea equipment such as trees, connectors, control pods, umbilicals, and flow lines, must bring about reductions in the cost of both installation and workover compatibility. Remote operated vehicle (ROV) manipulation is one avenue that should be exploited. The bottom line is that significant cooperation between equipment manufacturers and ROV companies is needed to develop advanced ROV technology, and operators should be involved to help guide operational strategies.

  19. Contour Completion Without Region Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Ming, Yansheng; Li, Hongdong; He, Xuming

    2016-08-01

    Contour completion plays an important role in visual perception, where the goal is to group fragmented low-level edge elements into perceptually coherent and salient contours. Most existing methods for contour completion have focused on pixelwise detection accuracy. In contrast, fewer methods have addressed the global contour closure effect, despite psychological evidences for its importance. This paper proposes a purely contour-based higher order CRF model to achieve contour closure, through local connectedness approximation. This leads to a simplified problem structure, where our higher order inference problem can be transformed into an integer linear program and be solved efficiently. Compared with the methods based on the same bottom-up edge detector, our method achieves a superior contour grouping ability (measured by Rand index), a comparable precision-recall performance, and more visually pleasing results. Our results suggest that contour closure can be effectively achieved in contour domain, in contrast to a popular view that segmentation is essential for this purpose.

  20. Complete EOS for PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph S

    2009-10-08

    PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic-bonded explosive based on triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB). A complete equation of state (EOS) is constructed for unreacted PBX 9502 suitable for reactive burn models, i.e., high pressure regime in which material strength is unimportant. The PBX EOS is composed of two parts: a complete EOS for TATB and a porosity model which allows for variations in the initial PBX density. The TATB EOS is based on a cold curve and a thermal model for lattice vibrations. The heat capacity, and hence thermal model, is determined by the vibrational spectrum from Raman scattering. The cold curve is calibrated to diamond anvil cell data for isothermal compression using a two-piece Keane fitting form. Hugoniot data for PBX 9502 is used as a consistency check.

  1. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  2. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  3. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  4. Sarks as additional fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Jyoti; Frampton, Paul H.; Jack Ng, Y.; Nishino, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Osamu

    1991-03-01

    An extension of the standard model is proposed. The gauge group is SU(2) X ⊗ SU(3) C ⊗ SU(2) S ⊗ U(1) Q, where all gauge symmetries are unbroken. The colour and electric charge are combined with SU(2) S which becomes strongly coupled at approximately 500 GeV and binds preons to form fermionic and vector bound states. The usual quarks and leptons are singlets under SU(2) X but additional fermions, called sarks. transform under it and the electroweak group. The present model explains why no more than three light quark-lepton families can exist. Neutral sark baryons, called narks, are candidates for the cosmological dark matter having the characteristics designed for WIMPS. Further phenomenological implications of sarks are analyzed i including electron-positron annihilation. Z 0 decay, flavor-changing neutral currents. baryon-number non-conservation, sarkonium and the neutron electric dipole moment.

  5. Complete liquefaction methods and apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2013-10-15

    A method and apparatus are described to provide complete gas utilization in the liquefaction operation from a source of gas without return of natural gas to the source thereof from the process and apparatus. The mass flow rate of gas input into the system and apparatus may be substantially equal to the mass flow rate of liquefied product output from the system, such as for storage or use.

  6. Does mandating offenders to treatment improve completion rates?

    PubMed

    Coviello, Donna M; Zanis, Dave A; Wesnoski, Susan A; Palman, Nicole; Gur, Arona; Lynch, Kevin G; McKay, James R

    2013-04-01

    While it is known that community-based outpatient treatment for substance abusing offenders is effective, treatment completion rates are low and much of the prior research has been conducted with offenders in residential treatment or therapeutic communities. The aim of the present study was to assess whether offenders who are mandated to community-based outpatient treatment have better completion rates compared to those who enter treatment voluntarily. The 160 research participants were a heterogeneous group of substance abusers who were under various levels of criminal justice supervision (CJS) in the community. The participants were enrolled in an intensive outpatient program and were recruited into the study between July 2007 and October 2010. All offenders received weekly therapy sessions using a cognitive problem solving framework and 45% completed the 6 month treatment program. Interestingly, those who were mandated demonstrated less motivation at treatment entry, yet were more likely to complete treatment compared to those who were not court-ordered to treatment. While controlling for covariates known to be related to treatment completion, the logistic regression analyses demonstrated that court-ordered offenders were over 10 times more likely to complete treatment compared to those who entered treatment voluntarily (OR=10.9, CI=2.0-59.1, p=.006). These findings demonstrate that stipulated treatment for offenders may be an effective way to increase treatment compliance.

  7. The impact of stage hypnosis on audience members and participants.

    PubMed

    MacKillop, James; Jay Lynn, Steven; Meyer, Eric

    2004-07-01

    Before and after a stage-hypnosis performance, 67 audience members and 6 participants completed the Hypnotic Attitudes Questionnaire (HAQ), the Posthypnotic Experience Scale (PES), and several questions related to attitudes about performing in public. Audience members' beliefs about hypnosis (HAQ total and factor scores),experience ratings (PES factor scores: pleasantness, anger/irritability,anxiety), and responses to the performance-related questions changed in a positive direction after the performance. The participants in the show reported no significant pre- to postperformance changes. How-ever, there were indications that the on stage participants exhibited generally favorable attitudes toward hypnosis and performing before they engaged in the actual performance.

  8. An Experience in Participant Observation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Bettie S.

    1975-01-01

    The conflict in participant observation is between the nurse as observer and the nurse as care provider. For nursing, the gains are descriptive, theory-generating data; for the nurse researcher, a heightened awareness of the human condition. (Author)

  9. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822

  10. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.

  11. Factors associated with the completion of falls prevention program.

    PubMed

    Batra, Anamica; Page, Timothy; Melchior, Michael; Seff, Laura; Vieira, Edgar Ramos; Palmer, Richard C

    2013-12-01

    Falls and fear of falling can affect independence and quality of life of older adults. Falls prevention programs may help avoiding these issues if completed. Understanding factors that are associated with completion of falls prevention programs is important. To reduce fear of falling and increase activity levels, a Matter of Balance (MOB) and un Asunto de Equilibrio (ADE) workshops were offered to 3420 older adults in South Florida between 1 October 2008 and 31 December 2011. Workshops were conducted in English or Spanish over eight, 2-hour sessions. Participants completed a demographic and a pre-post questionnaire. Factors associated with program completion were identified using logistic regression. For MOB, females were more likely to complete the program (OR = 2.076, P = 0.02). For ADE, females, moderate and extreme interference by falls in social activities were found to affect completion (OR = 2.116, P = 0.001; OR = 2.269, P = 0.003 and OR = 4.133, P = 0.008, respectively). Different factors predicted completion of both programs. Awareness of these factors can help lower the attrition rates, increase benefits and cost effectiveness of program. Future research needs to explore why certain groups had a higher likelihood of completing either program.

  12. The Wildlife Habitat Education Program: Moving from Contest Participation to Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kevin; Elmore, R. Dwayne; Harper, Craig

    2013-01-01

    Do members participating in the Wildlife Habitat Education Program (WHEP) apply knowledge gained by implementing wildlife management practices at the local level? 4-H members who participated in the National WHEP Contest from 2003-2005 and 2007-2011 completed an evaluation at the end of each contest. The evaluation asked participants if they…

  13. Sport Education and Extracurricular Sport Participation: An Examination Using the Trans-Contextual Model of Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallhead, Tristan L.; Hagger, Martin; Smith, Derek T.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we used the trans-contextual model of motivation (TCM) to examine the effect of Sport Education (SE) on students' participation in a voluntary lunch recess sport club. A total of 192 participants (ages 9-14 years) completed measures of the TCM constructs before and after a 12-week SE intervention period. Participants had the…

  14. Opinions and feelings on eating with complete dentures: a qualitative inquiry.

    PubMed

    Obrez, A; Grussing, P G

    1999-01-01

    Our knowledge of variables affecting the coping strategies that lead to acceptance of foods in populations wearing complete dentures is limited. Focus groups were conducted with the specific aim of determining factors responsible for successful adaptation to chewing with complete dentures. Each of the five focus groups consisted of eight to 15 participants (mean = 11; mean age = 64 yrs), of mixed gender, with at least five years of denture-wearing experience (mean = 7 years), and with groups varying in their socio-economic and ethnic backgrounds. Participants' statements (n = 324) were sorted for their content, by consensus between the two investigators, into 12 conceptually independent domains (listed in decreasing order of frequency of mention): foods and food textures causing difficulties when eating, foods being avoided, stability and retention of dentures, social constraints, bolus size, general satisfaction with the current dentures, general experience with dentures, sensation of temperature, experience of pain during chewing, experiences with taste, experiences with rinsing the dentures after eating, and time involved with chewing. In addition, further analysis of statements showed that food texture was the most commonly mentioned with foods that were either difficult to chew or avoided. These perceptions significantly affected the choice of food. The results of this qualitative study indicate that food texture is one of the major factors influencing the choice of a coping strategy by denture wearers when trying to overcome difficulties in chewing specific foods. As such, food texture may have a significant effect on patients' success in the process of their functional adaptation.

  15. Complete Photo-production Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D'Angelo, A.; Bartalini, O.; Fantini, A.; Schaerf, C.; Vegna, V.; Ardashev, K.; Bade, C.; Hicks, K.; Kizilgul, S.; Lucas, M.; Mahon, J.; Bellini, V.; Blecher, M.; Bocquet, J.-P.; Lleres, A.; Rebreyend, D.; Capogni, M.; Caracappa, A.; Kistner, O. C.; Miceli, L.

    2011-10-24

    The extraction of resonance parameters from meson photo-reaction data is a challenging effort, that would greatly benefit from the availability of several polarization observables, measured for each reaction channel on both proton and neutron targets. In the aim of obtaining such complete experiments, polarized photon beams and targets have been developed at facilities, worldwide. We report on the latest results from the LEGS and GRAAL collaborations, providing single and double polarization measurements on pseudo-scalar meson photo-production from the nucleon.

  16. A longitudinal study of the educational and career trajectories of female participants of an urban informal science education program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadigan, Kathleen Ann

    The purpose of this study is to describe the educational trajectories of a sample of young women from urban, low-income, single-parent families who participated in the Women in Natural Sciences (WINS) program during their ninth and/or tenth grade years of high school. This study also attempts to determine how the WINS program affected the participants' educational and career choices in order to provide insight into the role informal science education programs play in increasing the participation of women and minorities in science, math, engineering, and technology (SMET)-related fields. The research takes the form of a longitudinal, descriptive case study. The case is composed of 152 WINS participants who applied for, were accepted into, and completed at least one year of the program between 1992 and 1997. Data were drawn from program records, surveys, and interviews. Pre-WINS desired educational and career trajectory data were available for 152 participants. Post-WINS actual educational and career trajectory data were available for 101 of the young women in the sample. Seventy-eight women completed a WINS survey. The researcher conducted semi-structured interviews with 12 former participants. Findings revealed a 100 percent high school completion rate. A total of 109 participants (93.16%) enrolled in a college program following high school completion. Careers in medical or health-related fields followed by careers in SMET emerged as the highest ranking career paths with 24 students (23.76%) and 21 students (20.79%), respectively, employed in or pursuing careers in these areas. Taking a greater number of advanced or honors level SMET high school courses was the only contextual variable showing a significant relationship to pursuing a career in SMET. The majority of participants perceived having the WINS staff as people you could talk to, the job skills learned in WINS, and having the museum as a safe place to go as having influenced their educational and career

  17. Electrophilic addition and cyclization reactions of allenes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shengming

    2009-10-20

    Modern organic synthesis depends on the development of highly selective methods for the efficient construction of potentially useful target molecules. A primary goal in our laboratory is the discovery of new reactions that convert readily available starting materials to complex products with complete control of regio- and stereoselectivity. Allenes are one underused moiety in organic synthesis, because these groups are often thought to be highly reactive. However, many compounds containing the allene group, including natural products and pharmaceuticals, are fairly stable. The chemistry of allenes has been shown to have significant potential in organic synthesis. Electrophilic additions to allenes have often been considered to be synthetically less attractive due to the lack of efficient control of the regio- and stereoselectivity. However, this Account describes electrophilic reactions of allenes with defined regio- and stereoselectivity developed in our laboratory. Many substituted allenes are readily available from propargylic alcohols. Our work has involved an exploration of the reactions of these allenes with many different electrophiles: the E- or Z-halo- or seleno-hydroxylations of allenyl sulfoxides, sulfones, phosphine oxides, carboxylates, sulfides or selenides, butenolides, and arenes, and the halo- or selenolactonization reactions of allenoic acids and allenoates. These reactions have produced a host of new compounds such as stereodefined allylic alcohols, ethers, amides, thiiranes, and lactones. In all these reactions, water acts as a reactant and plays an important role in determining the reaction pathway and the stereoselectivity. The differing electronic properties of the two C=C bonds in these allenes determine the regioselectivity of these reactions. Through mechanistic studies of chirality transfer, isolation and reactivity of cyclic intermediates, (18)O-labeling, and substituent effects, we discovered that the E-stereoselectivity of some

  18. Determinants of successful completion of pulmonary rehabilitation in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Angel T; Hitchcock, Jason; Schumann, Christopher; Wells, J Michael; Dransfield, Mark T; Bhatt, Surya P

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite known benefits, a significant proportion of patients with COPD do not complete pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Little is known regarding which factors promote successful completion of PR. Methods We analyzed data from a prospectively maintained database of subjects with COPD who attended a PR program at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, from 1996 to 2013. Subjects were categorized as either completers or non-completers, based on successful completion of at least 8 weeks of PR. Demographics and comorbidities were recorded. Short Form 36 Health Survey, Beck Depression Inventory-II, and San Diego Shortness of Breath Questionnaire were administered to all participants at baseline and on completion of PR to assess participants’ perception of their health status, severity of depression, and dyspnea with performance of activities of daily living. Univariate and multivariable analyses were performed to identify predictors of successful completion of PR. Results Four hundred and forty subjects were included, of whom 229 completed PR. Forty-one percent were female, and 17% were African American. Compared with non-completers, completers had greater Short Form 36 Health Survey pain score, lower forced expiratory volume in the first second, and lower Beck Depression Inventory score, and included a lower percentage of current smokers. On multivariate analysis, cigarette smoking at enrollment was associated with lower likelihood of completion of PR (adjusted odds ratio 0.38, 95% confidence interval 0.16–0.90; P=0.02). Conclusion Cigarette smoking was the sole independent predictor of PR dropout, and smoking cessation may warrant greater emphasis prior to enrollment. PMID:26955269

  19. Global warming: The complete briefing

    SciTech Connect

    Houghton, J.

    1994-12-31

    John Houghton has drawn on the exhaustive efforts of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to produce a notably compact, impeccably complete and authoritative, meticulously balanced, and lucidly presented guide to the complex yet vital issue of global warming. Its subtitle is not mere hyperbole: this truly is a complete briefing. Certainly, one could not ask for a more authoritative brief: Houghton has led an imposing series of national and international efforts relating to climate, including the most recent scientific assessments of the IPCC. Citing many concrete examples, Houghton begins by convincing that climate truly is important to humankind and that climate is far from constant. He then elucidates the mechanisms that maintain the benign climate of our planet, providing in the process, for example, the most accurate explanation of the natural greenhouse effect that has yet appeared in print. He then treats the individual greenhouse gases responsible for maintaining the earth`s warmth and presents projections of their probable future concentrations as influenced by human activities. Further chapters deal with conclusions drawn from climate models, estimates of the impacts on human activities, and possible policies and actions to mitigate or alleviate the changes and their consequences.

  20. NGPL Louisiana station nears completion

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-22

    Construction on a 3,600-hp compressor station on the Louisiana line of Natural Gas Pipeline Co. of America near Henry, La., was scheduled for completion later this month. The Louisiana line extends some 205 miles along the Gulf Coast between New Caney, Tex., and the Henry hub area. The new compressor station will be located about 44 miles west of the Henry hub. Work began on the $5.1 million expansion project in Cameron Parish, La., in May following Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) certification. By mid-September, the compressor building, service building, and meter house has been erected, final compressor inspections were under way, and gas piping tie-ins had been completed, according to NGPL. Powered by three 1,200-hp Solar Saturn gas-fired centrifugal engines, the station is designed to increase the capacity of the Louisiana line east of the Stingray pipeline system by up to 220 MMcfd. Current capacity for east bound flows is approximately 900 MMcfd.

  1. Complete NMR characterization of zilpaterol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zilpaterol is a ß-agonist feed additive used by cattle producers to increase the feed efficiency and weight gain of beef animals, leading to increased value. Typical applications are made during the final 3-6 weeks prior to slaughter; a short withdrawal period prior to animal slaughter is required ...

  2. Understanding experiences of participating in a weight loss lifestyle intervention trial: a qualitative evaluation of South Asians at high risk of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Zoe; Douglas, Anne; Bhopal, Raj; Sheikh, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the reasons for enrolling, experiences of participating and reasons for remaining in a family-based, cluster randomised controlled trial of a dietitian-delivered lifestyle modification intervention aiming to reduce obesity in South Asians at high risk of developing diabetes. Design Qualitative study using narrative interviews of a purposive sample of trial participants following completion of the intervention. Data were thematically analysed. Setting The intervention was conducted in Scotland and resulted in a modest decrease in weight, but did not statistically reduce the incidence of diabetes. Participants We conducted 21 narrative interviews with 24 participants (20 trial participants and four family volunteers). Results Many participants were motivated to participate because of: known family history of diabetes and the desire to better understand diabetes-related risks to their own and their family's health; ways to mitigate these risks and to benefit from personalised monitoring. Home-based interventions, communication in the participant's chosen language(s) and continuity in dietitians supported their continuing engagement with the trial. Adaptations in food choices were initially accommodated by participants, although social and faith-based responsibilities were reported as important barriers to persevering with agreed dietary goals. Many participants reported that increasing their level of physical activity was difficult given their long working hours, physically demanding employment and domestic commitments; this being compounded by Scotland's challenging climate and a related reluctance to exercise in the outdoors. Conclusions Although participants had strong personal interests in participation and found the information provided by dietitians useful, they nonetheless struggled to incorporate the dietary and exercise recommendations into their daily lives. In particular, increasing levels of physical exercise was described as an

  3. Children's eyewitness memory: effects of participation and forensic context.

    PubMed

    Tobey, A E; Goodman, G S

    1992-01-01

    We examined effects of participation and forensic context on 4-year-old children's testimony. Children in "participant" and "police" conditions actively participated in games with a "babysitter"; each child in the "observer" condition watched a videotape of a child and the babysitter playing. Eleven days later, children were individually questioned about the event. Before the interview began, children in the police condition talked to a police officer who said the babysitter might have done something bad. Comparison of participant- and observer-condition performance indicated that participation increased free-recall accuracy concerning actions that took place and lowered suggestibility. Comparison of participant- and police-condition performance indicated that forensic context led to increased error in free recall and additional comments to misleading questions. However, forensic context also resulted in higher accuracy on an age-identification task and did not affect children's accuracy in answering abuse-related questions.

  4. Spatial evolutionary public goods game on complete graph and dense complex networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho; Chae, Huiseung; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Yup

    2015-03-23

    We study the spatial evolutionary public goods game (SEPGG) with voluntary or optional participation on a complete graph (CG) and on dense networks. Based on analyses of the SEPGG rate equation on finite CG, we find that SEPGG has two stable states depending on the value of multiplication factor r, illustrating how the "tragedy of the commons" and "an anomalous state without any active participants" occurs in real-life situations. When r is low (<), the state with only loners is stable, and the state with only defectors is stable when r is high (>). We also derive the exact scaling relation for r*. All of the results are confirmed by numerical simulation. Furthermore, we find that a cooperator-dominant state emerges when the number of participants or the mean degree, 〈k〉, decreases. We also investigate the scaling dependence of the emergence of cooperation on r and 〈k〉. These results show how "tragedy of the commons" disappears when cooperation between egoistic individuals without any additional socioeconomic punishment increases.

  5. Spatial evolutionary public goods game on complete graph and dense complex networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinho; Chae, Huiseung; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Yup

    2015-01-01

    We study the spatial evolutionary public goods game (SEPGG) with voluntary or optional participation on a complete graph (CG) and on dense networks. Based on analyses of the SEPGG rate equation on finite CG, we find that SEPGG has two stable states depending on the value of multiplication factor r, illustrating how the "tragedy of the commons" and "an anomalous state without any active participants" occurs in real-life situations. When r is low (<), the state with only loners is stable, and the state with only defectors is stable when r is high (>). We also derive the exact scaling relation for r*. All of the results are confirmed by numerical simulation. Furthermore, we find that a cooperator-dominant state emerges when the number of participants or the mean degree, 〈k〉, decreases. We also investigate the scaling dependence of the emergence of cooperation on r and 〈k〉. These results show how "tragedy of the commons" disappears when cooperation between egoistic individuals without any additional socioeconomic punishment increases. PMID:25796988

  6. Spatial evolutionary public goods game on complete graph and dense complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jinho; Chae, Huiseung; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Yup

    2015-03-01

    We study the spatial evolutionary public goods game (SEPGG) with voluntary or optional participation on a complete graph (CG) and on dense networks. Based on analyses of the SEPGG rate equation on finite CG, we find that SEPGG has two stable states depending on the value of multiplication factor r, illustrating how the ``tragedy of the commons'' and ``an anomalous state without any active participants'' occurs in real-life situations. When r is low (), the state with only loners is stable, and the state with only defectors is stable when r is high (). We also derive the exact scaling relation for r*. All of the results are confirmed by numerical simulation. Furthermore, we find that a cooperator-dominant state emerges when the number of participants or the mean degree, , decreases. We also investigate the scaling dependence of the emergence of cooperation on r and . These results show how ``tragedy of the commons'' disappears when cooperation between egoistic individuals without any additional socioeconomic punishment increases.

  7. Experimental renewal in human participants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, James Byron; Sanjuan, María del Carmen; Vadillo-Ruiz, Sandra; Pérez, Joana; León, Samuel P

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments with human participants are presented that differentiate renewal from other behavioral effects that can produce a response after extinction. Participants played a video game and learned to suppress their behavior when sensor stimuli predicted an attack. Contexts (A, B, & C) were provided by fictitious galaxies where the game play took place. In Experiment 1, participants who received conditioning in A, extinction in B, and testing in A showed some context specificity of conditioning during extinction and a recovery of suppression on test. Experiment 2 demonstrated recovery of extinguished responding when participants were conditioned in A, extinguished in B, and tested in C, a third, neutral context. The experiment also demonstrated that the context of extinction did not control performance by becoming inhibitory. Results are discussed in terms of mechanisms that can produce a response recovery after extinction. The experiments demonstrated a renewal effect: a response recovery that was not attributable to the contexts acting as simple conditioned stimuli and is the first work with human participants to conclusively do so.

  8. Information Technology Curriculum Development for Participation and Equity Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Post, Maarten; And Others

    A study explored ways in which training in information technology could be included in Participation and Equity Programs (PEP) in the areas of hospitality/tourism, retailing, and business and finance. The research team conducted a literature search, obtained completed questionnaires from 10 colleges offering a total of 22 PEPs, visited an…

  9. Students' Autobiographical Memory of Participation in Multiple Sport Education Seasons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinelnikov, Oleg A.; Hastie, Peter A.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the recollections of the Sport Education experiences of a cohort of students (15 boys and 19 girls) who had participated in seasons of basketball, soccer and badminton across grades six through eight (average age at data collection = 15.6 years). Using autobiographic memory theory techniques, the students completed surveys and…

  10. Widening Access, Widening Participation, Widening Success: An Indian Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Multiple deprivations are widespread in rural India. Literacy levels remain stubbornly low, albeit gradually improving. Caste, class, religion, gender, age and disability all impact on access to education, participation and successful completion. The education of girls remains problematic given the higher value attached to sons, especially in…

  11. Men's Reactions to Participating in Interpersonal Violence Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Katie M.; Gidycz, Christine A.; Desai, Angeli D.

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed college men's reactions immediately following and 2 months after completing self-report measures of interpersonal violence. Results showed that 4.3% of men experienced immediate negative emotional reactions. Greater immediate negative reactions were related to personal benefits to research participation, anticipation of future…

  12. 7 CFR 1416.705 - Obligations of a participant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS 2005 Hurricane Tree Assistance Program § 1416.705 Obligations of a participant. (a) Eligible producers must execute all required documents and complete the 2005 Hurricane TAP funded practice... becomes ineligible for all or part of a 2005 Hurricane TAP benefit, the person and successor shall...

  13. Supervised Agricultural Experience: An Examination of Student Knowledge and Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Lauren J.; Rayfield, John; Moore, Lori L.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate student Supervised Agricultural Experience (SAE) knowledge and participation. This descriptive study was conducted in 120 randomly selected agricultural education programs throughout four purposively selected states representative of the National FFA regions. Students completed a questionnaire assessing…

  14. Participation in "Handwashing University" Promotes Proper Handwashing Techniques for Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenton, Ginger; Radhakrishna, Rama; Cutter, Catherine Nettles

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the Handwashing University on teaching youth the benefits of proper handwashing. The Handwashing University is an interactive display with several successive stations through which participants move to learn necessary skills for proper handwashing. Upon completion of the Handwashing University,…

  15. To Participate or Not to Participate: That Is the Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borden, Lynne M.; Perkins, Daniel F.; Villarruel, Francisco A.; Stone, Margaret R.

    2005-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in issues pertaining to how a young person chooses to participate (or not) in youth programs, both school based (for example, sports, drama, yearbook) and community based (for example, Boys and Girls Clubs, Scouts, 4-H, sports, faith-based programs). Scholars, youth workers, policymakers, national organizations,…

  16. Accuracy and completeness of drug information in Wikipedia.

    PubMed

    Clauson, Kevin A; Polen, Hyla H; Boulos, Maged N K; Dzenowagis, Joan H

    2008-01-01

    Web 2.0 technologies, where users participate in content production, are increasingly used as informational and educational resources. Wikipedia is frequently cited by students in the healthcare professions. This study compared the accuracy and completeness of drug information in Wikipedia to Medscape Drug Reference, a traditionally-edited resource. Wikipedia answered fewer questions [40.0% vs. 82.5%] (p<0.001) and was less complete (p=0.00076) than Medscape. No gross errors were found in Wikipedia and its content has improved over time. PMID:18998977

  17. Research participation as a contract.

    PubMed

    Lawson, Craig

    1995-01-01

    In this article, I present a contractualist conception of human-participant research ethics, arguing that the most appropriate source of the rights and responsibilities of researcher and participant is the contractual understanding between them. This conception appears to explain many of the more fundamental ethical incidents of human-participant research. I argue that a system of contractual rights and responsibilities would allow a great deal of research that has often been felt to be ethically problematic, such as research involving deception, concealed research, and research on dependent populations. However, in defining the conditions under which such research should be permissible, my contractualist theory also makes it clear that there are limits -- and explains what those limits are -- to the propriety of such research.

  18. Participation in an Intensive Longitudinal Study with Weekly Web Surveys Over 2.5 Years

    PubMed Central

    Barber, Jennifer; Kusunoki, Yasamin; Schulz, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Technological advances have made it easier for researchers to collect more frequent longitudinal data from survey respondents via personal computers, smartphones, and other mobile devices. Although technology has led to an increase in data-intensive longitudinal studies, little is known about attrition from such studies or the differences between respondents who complete frequently administered surveys in a timely manner, and respondents who do not. Objective We examined respondent characteristics and behaviors associated with continued and on-time participation in a population-based intensive longitudinal study, using weekly web-based survey interviews over an extended period. Methods We analyzed data from the Relationship Dynamics and Social Life study, an intensive longitudinal study that collected weekly web-based survey interviews for 2.5 years from 1003 18- and 19-year-olds to investigate factors shaping the dynamics of their sexual behavior, contraceptive use, and pregnancies. Results Ordinary least squares and logistic regression analyses showed background respondent characteristics measured at baseline were associated with the number of days respondents remained enrolled in the study, the number of interviews they completed, and the odds that they were late completing interviews. In addition, we found that changes in pregnancy-related behaviors reported in the weekly interviews were associated with late completion of interviews. Specifically, after controlling for sociodemographic, personality, contact information, and prior experience variables, we found that weekly reports such as starting to have sex (odds ratio [OR] 1.17, 95% CI 1.03-1.32, P=.01), getting a new partner (OR 1.76, 95% CI 1.53-2.03, P<.001), stopping the use of contraception (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.10-1.49, P=.001), and having a new pregnancy (OR 5.57, 95% CI 4.26-7.29, P<.001) were significantly associated with late survey completion. However, young women who reported changes in

  19. Consumer participation and social accountability.

    PubMed

    Metsch, J M; Veney, J E

    1976-04-01

    Consumer participation in the planning and management of health care programs is prescribed as a method for increasing provider responsiveness to the goals and needs of users of services. However, issues related to the nature of mandates to implement consumer participation has not had the impact on policy development proposed for it. While structural changes can be identified which might enhance the consumer role in decision making, it will also be necessary for the consumer sector to develop a strategy which will prompt major rather than incremental movement. PMID:1263625

  20. To Participate or Not to Participate: The Perceptions of Gifted Students regarding an Honors Program at a Private Southeastern University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robbins, Gerri Ann

    2010-01-01

    The number of students who become completers of an honors program on college campuses is low. A mixed methods approach was utilized to determine the perceptions of gifted students regarding an honors program at a private, Southeastern university. Students who were honors program participants, honors program drop-outs, and qualified…

  1. Motivation of fitness center participants toward resistance training.

    PubMed

    Kathrins, Bess P; Turbow, David J

    2010-09-01

    There is a need to better understand the behavior and sense of motivation of fitness center participants. The purpose of this study was to assess whether or not demographic characteristics and health self-determinism (intrinsic or extrinsic motivation) of fitness center participants were predictive of their levels of resistance training. A cross-sectional design was used; participants were recruited via the Internet to complete an online survey. There were 185 participants (age = 39.1 +/- 11.3 years) in the study. The majority of respondents reported having carried out levels of resistance training that met national health organization recommendations. Regression analysis of the data revealed that health self-determinism predicted quantity of resistance training reported (p = 0.014), whereas demographics did not. Being intrinsically motivated to health self-determinism predicted meeting national resistance training recommendations compared to participants extrinsically motivated (p = 0.007). For those who work with fitness center participants, our findings are useful by identifying participants as a predominantly intrinsically motivated group of people that performs adequate quantities of resistance training; the methodology employed in this study can be used to identify participants in need of increased levels of resistance training and heightened sense of motivation to do so. PMID:20802286

  2. Elite sport is not an additional source of distress for adolescents with high stress levels.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe; Brand, Serge

    2011-04-01

    This study examined whether participation in elite sport interacts with stress in decreasing or increasing symptoms of depression and anxiety among adolescents, and further, whether the interplay between participation in high-performance sport and stress is related to the perceived quality of sleep. 434 adolescents (278 girls, 156 boys; age: M = 17.2 yr.) from 15 "Swiss Olympic Sport Classes" and 9 conventional classes answered a questionnaire and completed a 7-day sleep log. Analyses of covariance showed that heightened stress was related to more depressive symptoms and higher scores for trait-anxiety. Moreover, those classified as having poor sleep by a median split cutoff reported higher levels of depressive symptoms. No significant (multivariate) main effects were found for high-performance sport athletes. Similarly, no significant two- or three-way interaction effects were found. These results caution against exaggerated expectations concerning sport participation as a stress buffer. Nevertheless, participation in high-performance sport was not found to be an additional source of distress for adolescents who reported high stress levels despite prior research that has pointed toward such a relationship.

  3. Rare Earth Additions in Continuously Cast Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, William G.; Heaslip, L. J.; Sommerville, I. D.

    1985-09-01

    Rare earth (lanthanide metals) addiiions to continuously cast steel are particularly advantageous because of their ability to refine as-cast structures, reduce segregation and increase hot ductility at temperatures just below that of solidification. The complete shape control of sulfides in steels containing Rare Earth Metals (REM), whether continuously cast or ingot cast, is primarily responsible for improvements in ductility related mechanical properties, weldability, fatigue resistance and resistance to hydrogen damage. Complete sulfide shape control can be obtained with REM additions at sulfur levels as high as.020%. The greatest improvements, however, are obtained with REM additions to low sulfur steels. However, to achieve full operational advantages afforded by REM, nozzle blockage problems must be circumvented. Water model studies indicate a possible solution.

  4. Effect of denture adhesive on stability of complete dentures and the masticatory function.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Sho; Sekita, Toshiaki; Hayakawa, Iwao

    2003-12-01

    This study examines the effects of denture adhesive on the retention and stability of complete dentures and the masticatory function. The authors estimated the stability of complete dentures from 3-dimensional (3-D) denture movement and rotational denture movement and additionally the masticatory function from cycle time and chewing time. Six edentulous subjects who participated in this study had old and newly fabricated complete dentures. Upper denture movement was recorded using a 3-D motion capture system while chewing 3 kinds of food (peanuts, fish paste, raisins). Both the new and old dentures showed that using a denture adhesive contributes to reducing 3-D denture movement, rotational denture movement and chewing time during chewing the various foods. The cycle time in new and old dentures was statistically unaffected by applying denture adhesive. There was no statistically significant difference in improvement in 3-D denture movement or rotational denture movement between the new and old dentures, for any of the foods. This study observes the overall effect of denture adhesive during use for both dentures. The results of this study suggest that denture adhesive contributes to reducing denture movement and so improves chewing function.

  5. Public Participation in Health Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Mary

    2003-01-01

    Focus groups with 62 Alberta adults identified health learning needs; results were used by a community-university partnership to develop health education sessions in local settings. The initiative focused on community needs and participation rather than the dominant revenue-generation model, which has questionable ethical standing in…

  6. Prevention Program Management. Participant Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Research Corp., Bethesda, MD.

    This training package, which centers on effective management and the operation of valid prevention programs, presents a five-day training experience designed to help managers of substance-abuse prevention programs. In this participant manual, the introduction includes a list of program goals and objectives and a summary of the ten individual…

  7. Citizen Participation: Antagonists or Allies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, William G.

    1976-01-01

    If participation does not include an openness to the issues that are of real concern to the community and an opportunity to influence policy relating to those issues, it becomes an empty public relations gesture fostering apathy, disinterest, resistance, or counter-organization. (MB)

  8. Empowered Participation: Reinventing Urban Democracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fung, Archon

    2006-01-01

    Every month in every neighborhood in Chicago, residents, teachers, school principals, and police officers gather to deliberate about how to improve their schools and make their streets safer. Residents of poor neighborhoods participate as much or more as those from wealthy ones. All voices are heard. Since the meetings began more than a dozen…

  9. Emergency Exercise Participation and Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julie; Black, Lynette; Williams, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Extension is uniquely positioned to participate in emergency exercises, formally or informally, with the goal of engaging community members in emergency and disaster preparedness. With their knowledge of community needs, Extension personnel are valuable resources and can assist emergency managers in the process of identifying local risks and…

  10. A Rationale for Participant Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boody, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    There are many different models or approaches to doing program evaluation. Fitzpatrick, Sanders, and Worthen classify them into five general approaches: (a) objectives oriented, (b) management oriented, (c) consumer oriented, (d) expertise oriented, and (e) participant oriented. Within each of these general categories, of course, reside many…

  11. Training of Trainers: Participant Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Research Corp., Bethesda, MD.

    This manual is designed to be used by individuals being trained to deliver courses developed within the National Training System of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The guide provides resources essential to understanding course content, and provides materials to enable participants to be actively involved in the learning exercises. The…

  12. Training Alcoholism Trainers. Participant Workbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Alcohol Education, Arlington, VA.

    This workbook is to be used in conjunction with the Trainer Manual entitled Training Alcoholism Trainers. The program was developed to upgrade training design and delivery skills of inservice trainers in the field of alcoholism. The workbook contains all the handout sheets necessary for participant sessions. (Author/BMW)

  13. Information Technology and Citizen Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Charles S.

    This paper explores the claims of technology's ability to enhance citizen participation, with particular attention focused on the Internet. The claims are grounded within the larger context of political theory, specifically the tension between representative and direct forms of democracy. Sections of the paper are: Introduction; "What's Wrong with…

  14. Completing fault models for abductive diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Knill, E. ); Cox, P.T.; Pietrzykowski, T. )

    1992-11-05

    In logic-based diagnosis, the consistency-based method is used to determine the possible sets of faulty devices. If the fault models of the devices are incomplete or nondeterministic, then this method does not necessarily yield abductive explanations of system behavior. Such explanations give additional information about faulty behavior and can be used for prediction. Unfortunately, system descriptions for the consistency-based method are often not suitable for abductive diagnosis. Methods for completing the fault models for abductive diagnosis have been suggested informally by Poole and by Cox et al. Here we formalize these methods by introducing a standard form for system descriptions. The properties of these methods are determined in relation to consistency-based diagnosis and compared to other ideas for integrating consistency-based and abductive diagnosis.

  15. Well completion and work over method

    SciTech Connect

    Mondshine, T.C.

    1980-02-05

    A nondamaging work over and completion fluid having water soluble bridging agents includes a saturated brine solution having at least one water soluble salt which is insoluble in the saturated brine solution and having particle size range of about 5 microns to about 800 microns and wherein greater than about 5 of the particles are coarser than 44 microns. Viscosifier and suspension additive is added to provide the desired viscosity and assist in maintaining the water soluble sized salt suspended in the saturated brine solution. If desired or necessary a fluid loss control agent may be added to enhance the fluid loss control or filtration control of the completion fluid. The invention may be practiced by pumping or discharging the fluid or a slug or pill of the fluid into an oil, gas, water, injection or storage well where operations are to be conducted in which it is desired to temporarily plug the permeable zone while such operations are carried out. Thereafter, the water soluble bridging agents are removed by connate water from the permeable zone, or a nonsaturated brine wash, or ordinary water circulated in the well.

  16. Complete Mie-Gruneisen Equation of State

    SciTech Connect

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2012-06-28

    The Mie-Gruneisen equation of state (EOS) is frequently used in hydro simulations to model solids at high pressure (up to a few Mb). It is an incomplete EOS characterized by a Gruneisen coefficient, {Lambda} = -V({partial_derivative}{sub e}P){sub V}, that is a function of only V. Expressions are derived for isentropes and isotherms. This enables the extension to a complete EOS. Thermodynamic consistency requires that the specific heat is a function of a single scaled temperature. A complete extension is uniquely determined by the temperature dependence of the specific heat at a fixed reference density. In addition we show that if the domain of the EOS extends to T = 0 and the specific heat vanishes on the zero isotherm then {Lambda} a function of only V is equivalent to a specific heat with a single temperature scale. If the EOS domain does not include the zero isotherm, then a specific heat with a single temperature scale leads to a generalization of the Mie-Gruneisen EOS in which the pressure is linear in both the specific energy and the temperature. Such an EOS has previously been used to model liquid nitromethane.

  17. Randomized Comparison of Mobile and Web-Tools to Provide Dementia Risk Reduction Education: Use, Engagement and Participant Satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Elodie; Hatherly, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Background Encouraging middle-aged adults to maintain their physical and cognitive health may have a significant impact on reducing the prevalence of dementia in the future. Mobile phone apps and interactive websites may be one effective way to target this age group. However, to date there has been little research investigating the user experience of dementia risk reduction tools delivered in this way. Objective The aim of this study was to explore participant engagement and evaluations of three different targeted smartphone and Web-based dementia risk reduction tools following a four-week intervention. Methods Participants completed a Web-based screening questionnaire to collect eligibility information. Eligible participants were asked to complete a Web-based baseline questionnaire and were then randomly assigned to use one of the three dementia risk reduction tools for a period of four weeks: (1) a mobile phone application; (2) an information-based website; and (3) an interactive website. User evaluations were obtained via a Web-based follow-up questionnaire after completion of the intervention. Results Of 415 eligible participants, 370 (89.16%) completed the baseline questionnaire and were assigned to an intervention group; 200 (54.05%) completed the post-intervention questionnaire. The average age of participants was 52 years, and 149 (75%) were female. Findings indicated that participants from all three intervention groups reported a generally positive impression of the tools across a range of domains. Participants using the information-based website reported higher ratings of their overall impression of the tool, F2,191=4.12, P=.02; how interesting the information was, F2,189=3.53, P=.03; how helpful the information was, F2,192=4.15, P=.02; and how much they learned, F2,188=3.86, P=.02. Group differences were significant between the mobile phone app and information-based website users, but not between the interactive website users and the other two groups

  18. Mass community cycling events: Who participates and is their behaviour influenced by participation?

    PubMed Central

    Bowles, Heather R; Rissel, Chris; Bauman, Adrian

    2006-01-01

    Background Participation in mass physical activity events may be a novel approach for encouraging inactive or low active adults to trial an active behaviour. The public health applicability of this strategy has not been investigated thoroughly. The purpose of this study to was describe participants in a mass cycling event and examine the subsequent effect on cycling behaviour. Methods A sample of men and women aged 16 years and older (n = 918) who registered online for a mass cycling event reported cycling ability and number of times they rode a bicycle during the month before the event. One month after the event participants completed an online follow-up questionnaire and reported cycling ability, lifestyle physical activity, and number of times they rode a bicycle during the month after the event. McNemar's test was used to examine changes in self-rated cycling ability, and repeated measures mixed linear modeling was used to determine whether average number of monthly bicycle rides changed between pre-event and post-event assessment. Results Participants in the cycling event were predominantly male (72%), 83% rated themselves as competent or regular cyclists, and 68% rated themselves as more active than others of the same sex and age. Half of the survey respondents that rated their cycling ability as low before the event subsequently rated themselves as high one month after the event. Respondents with low pre-event self-rated cycling ability reported an average 4 sessions of bicycle riding the month before the event and an average 6.8 sessions of bicycle riding a month after the event. This increase in average sessions of bicycle riding was significant (p < .0001). Similarly, first-time participants in this particular cycling event significantly increased average sessions of cycling from 7.2 pre-event to 8.9 sessions one month after the event. Conclusion Participants who were novice riders or first time participants significantly increased their number of bicycle

  19. Understanding motivations to participate in an observational research study: Why do patients enroll?

    PubMed

    Soule, Michael C; Beale, Eleanor E; Suarez, Laura; Beach, Scott R; Mastromauro, Carol A; Celano, Christopher M; Moore, Shannon V; Huffman, Jeff C

    2016-01-01

    By understanding common motivations for participating in observational research studies, clinicians may better understand the perceived benefits of research participation from their clients' perspective. We enrolled 164 cardiac patients in a study about the effects of gratitude and optimism. Two weeks post-enrollment, participants completed a four-item questionnaire regarding motivations for study enrollment. Altruistic motivation ranked highest, while intellectual, health-related, and financial motivations rated lower. Four subgroups of participants emerged, each with distinct characteristics and different priorities for participating. These findings may help front-line clinicians to understand which motivations for participation apply to their clients who enroll in non-treatment-based research projects. PMID:26933943

  20. Characteristics of Advanced Placement environmental science reading teacher participants and their perceptions of the reading as a professional development experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Freda M.

    Sixty percent of American high schools offer one or more Advanced Placement courses, and several thousand Advanced Placement teachers serve as Readers or graders of Advanced Placement exams each year. This study was conducted to determine the characteristics of teachers who choose to participate in Advanced Placement Environmental Science Readings and determine how these teachers view the Reading experience as a form of professional development. This study was conducted with teacher participants at the June 2004 Advanced Placement Environmental Science Reading. Sixty of the 114 teacher participants completed a survey regarding their education background, age, experience level, educational philosophy, involvement in professional development opportunities, perceptions of the professional benefits of the Reading, and the influence of the Reading experience on their pedagogical practices. Semi-structured interviews were then conducted with a subset of 18 teacher participants to determine their perceptions regarding the professional benefits of the Reading experience, its potential to serve as a professional development activity, and perceived changes in their pedagogical practices resulting from participation in the Reading process. Results indicate that APES Reading teacher participants are experienced, effective teachers from many parts of the country. These teachers participate in ongoing professional development activities, can delineate components of effective professional development, strongly believe that effective professional development occurs at the APES Reading, and report that their pedagogical practice has improved as a result of participation in the APES Reading. Considering the crucial role teachers play in the educational process, it is important to pursue this additional avenue of professional development in order to further improve APES teacher effectiveness.

  1. Symptoms of depression and successful drug court completion.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Natasha S; Trinidad, Jonathan R; Nochajski, Thomas H; Farrell, Mark C

    2013-12-01

    The majority of drug abusing offenders who need substance abuse treatment do not receive it. Although interventions like drug court increase the probability of offender success, little is known about how co-occurring psychological symptoms impact drug court treatment outcomes. Based on previous research, we hypothesized that co-occurring psychological symptoms would have a significant relationship with successful drug court completion. Using a sample of suburban drug court enrollees (n = 122), multivariate logistic regression was conducted with successful drug court completion as the outcome variable. Predictor variables included symptom counts of depression, post-traumatic stress, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, psychosis, generalized anxiety, and social phobia. Results indicated that participants with fewer symptoms of depression were more likely to successfully complete drug court than participants with more symptoms. The present study extends previous research by demonstrating that symptoms of depression are related to poorer outcomes for drug court enrollees. Accordingly, drug courts need to address participants' symptoms of depression to maximize success.

  2. Can participation in a school science fair improve middle school students' attitudes toward science and interest in science careers?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finnerty, Valerie

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether participation in a school-based science fair affects middle school students' attitudes toward science and interest in science and engineering careers. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare students' pre- and posttest attitudes toward and interest in science. Forty-eight of the 258 participants completed a school-based science fair during the study. In addition, twelve middle school science teachers completed an online survey. Both the Survey of Science Attitudes and Interest I and II (SSAI-I and II) measured students' attitudes toward and interest in science and science and mathematics self-efficacy, asked about classroom inquiry experiences and gathered demographic information. An online survey gathered qualitative data about science teachers' perceptions of school science fairs. The results showed no significant interactions among completion of a science fair project and attitudes toward and interest in science, science and mathematics self-efficacy or gender. There were significant differences at both pre- and posttest in attitudes between the students who did and did not complete a science fair project. All participating teachers believed that participation in science fairs could have a positive effect on students' attitudes and interest, but cited lack of time as a major impediment. There was significant interaction between level of classroom inquiry and attitudes and interest in science; students who reported more experiences had higher scores on these measures. Classroom inquiry also interacted with the effects of a science fair and participants' pre- and posttest attitude scores. Finally, the amount and source of assistance on a science fair project had a significant impact on students' posttest measures. Major limitations which affect the generalization of these findings include the timing of the administration of the pretest, the number of participants in the experimental group and differences

  3. 78 FR 44593 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission, Olympia, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission... and Recreation Commission has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the... the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission. If no additional requestors come...

  4. Impact of Open Data Policies on Consent to Participate in Human Subjects Research: Discrepancies between Participant Action and Reported Concerns.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Jorden A; Zagrodney, Jessica M; Day, T Eugene

    2015-01-01

    Research outlets are increasingly adopting open data policies as a requisite for publication, including studies with human subjects data. We investigated whether open data policies influence participants' rate of consent by randomly assigning participants to view consent forms with and without discussion of open data policies. No participants declined to participate, regardless of condition, nor did rates of drop-out vs. completion vary between conditions. Furthermore, no significant change in potential consent rates was reported when participants were openly asked about the influence of open data policies on their likelihood of consent. However, follow-up analyses indicated possible poor attention to consent forms, consistent with previous research. Moreover, thematic analysis of participants' considerations of open data policy indicated multiple considerations such as concerns regarding confidentiality, anonymity, data security, and study sensitivity. The impact of open data policies on participation raises complex issues at the intersection of ethics and scientific innovation. We conclude by encouraging researchers to consider participants as stakeholders in open data policy and by providing recommendations for open data policies in human subjects research.

  5. Is the additional greenhouse effect already evident in the current climate?

    PubMed

    Raschke, E

    2001-11-01

    Several greenhouse gases, which are in part or entirely produced by human activities, have accumulated in the atmosphere since approximately the middle of the 19th century. They are assumed to have an additional greenhouse effect causing a further increase of atmospheric temperatures near the ground and a decrease in the layers above approximately 15 km altitude. The currently observed near-surface warming over nearly the entire globe is already considered by a large fraction of our society to be result of this additional greenhouse effect. Complete justification of this assumption is, however, not yet possible, because there are still too many unknowns in our knowledge of participating processes and in our modeling capabilities.

  6. Efficiency of dairy farms participating and not participating in veterinary herd health management programs.

    PubMed

    Derks, Marjolein; Hogeveen, Henk; Kooistra, Sake R; van Werven, Tine; Tauer, Loren W

    2014-12-01

    This paper compares farm efficiencies between dairies who were participating in a veterinary herd health management (VHHM) program with dairies not participating in such a program, to determine whether participation has an association with farm efficiency. In 2011, 572 dairy farmers received a questionnaire concerning the participation and execution of a VHHM program on their farms. Data from the questionnaire were combined with farm accountancy data from 2008 through 2012 from farms that used calendar year accounting periods, and were analyzed using Stochastic Frontier Analysis (SFA). Two separate models were specified: model 1 was the basic stochastic frontier model (output: total revenue; input: feed costs, land costs, cattle costs, non-operational costs), without explanatory variables embedded into the efficiency component of the error term. Model 2 was an expansion of model 1 which included explanatory variables (number of FTE; total kg milk delivered; price of concentrate; milk per hectare; cows per FTE; nutritional yield per hectare) inserted into the efficiency component of the joint error term. Both models were estimated with the financial parameters expressed per 100 kg fat and protein corrected milk and per cow. Land costs, cattle costs, feed costs and non-operational costs were statistically significant and positive in all models (P<0.01). Frequency distributions of the efficiency scores for the VHHM dairies and the non-VHHM dairies were plotted in a kernel density plot, and differences were tested using the Kolmogorov-Smirnov two-sample test. VHHM dairies had higher total revenue per cow, but not per 100 kg milk. For all SFA models, the difference in distribution was not statistically different between VHHM dairies and non-VHHM dairies (P values 0.94, 0.35, 0.95 and 0.89 for the basic and complete model per 100 kg fat and protein corrected milk and per cow respectively). Therefore we conclude that with our data farm participation in VHHM is not related

  7. Participant evaluation results for two indoor air quality studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Dudney, C.S.; Cohen, M.A.; Spengler, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    After two surveys for indoor air pollutants (radon and other chemicals) the homeowners were surveyed for their reactions. The results of these participant evaluation surveys, assuming that the participants that responded to the survey were representative, indicate that homeowners will accept a significant level of monitoring activity as part of an indoor air quality field study. Those participants completing surveys overwhelmingly enjoyed being in the studies and would do it again. We believe that the emphasis placed on positive homeowner interactions and efforts made to inform participants throughout our studies were positive factors in this result. There was no substantial differences noted in the responses between the 70-house study, which included a homeowner compensation payment of $100, and the 300-house study, which did not include a compensation payment. These results provide encouragement to conduct future complex, multipollutant indoor air quality studies when they are scientifically sound and cost effective.

  8. Research Participation Among Older Adults With Mobility Limitation

    PubMed Central

    Schlenk, Elizabeth A.; Ross, Diana; Stilley, Carol S.; Dunbar-Jacob, Jacqueline; Olshansky, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative descriptive study was to examine reasons for participation in clinical research among older adults with mobility limitation. A purposive sample of 20 men and 20 women aged 70 years or older was recruited. Data were collected by audiotaped telephone interviews using a semi-structured interview guide and transcribed verbatim. Participants expect privacy, professionalism by research staff, and respectful treatment. Benefits to protocol adherence include personal education, comparison of their health status with that of others, opportunity to maintain vitality, and altruism. Barriers to protocol adherence are apprehension, in particular a negative impact on their health care, randomization to the control group, and experimental drugs; and inconvenience. Factors promoting study completion are obligation, reciprocity, receipt of test results, health promotion, and socialization. Implications include meeting expectations, providing health education and study results to participants, reducing barriers to participation, and presenting opportunities for interaction with others. PMID:19692549

  9. The complete human olfactory subgenome.

    PubMed

    Glusman, G; Yanai, I; Rubin, I; Lancet, D

    2001-05-01

    Olfactory receptors likely constitute the largest gene superfamily in the vertebrate genome. Here we present the nearly complete human olfactory subgenome elucidated by mining the genome draft with gene discovery algorithms. Over 900 olfactory receptor genes and pseudogenes (ORs) were identified, two-thirds of which were not annotated previously. The number of extrapolated ORs is in good agreement with previous theoretical predictions. The sequence of at least 63% of the ORs is disrupted by what appears to be a random process of pseudogene formation. ORs constitute 17 gene families, 4 of which contain more than 100 members each. "Fish-like" Class I ORs, previously considered a relic in higher tetrapods, constitute as much as 10% of the human repertoire, all in one large cluster on chromosome 11. Their lower pseudogene fraction suggests a functional significance. ORs are disposed on all human chromosomes except 20 and Y, and nearly 80% are found in clusters of 6-138 genes. A novel comparative cluster analysis was used to trace the evolutionary path that may have led to OR proliferation and diversification throughout the genome. The results of this analysis suggest the following genome expansion history: first, the generation of a "tetrapod-specific" Class II OR cluster on chromosome 11 by local duplication, then a single-step duplication of this cluster to chromosome 1, and finally an avalanche of duplication events out of chromosome 1 to most other chromosomes. The results of the data mining and characterization of ORs can be accessed at the Human Olfactory Receptor Data Exploratorium Web site (http://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/HORDE). PMID:11337468

  10. Chinese Koreans complete demographic transition.

    PubMed

    Gu, Q; Zhao, F

    1992-02-01

    The 1990 national census disclosed that there were 1,920,597 Koreans in China. There number increased 21% from 1,110, 000 in 1953 to 1,350,000 in 1964. The transition to low birth rate, low mortality rate, and low growth rate started in the mid-1960s and it was completed by 1974. Chinese Korean population increased form 1,350,000 in 1964 to 1,770,000 in 1982, and to 1,920,000 in 1990. Between 1982 and 1990, the average annual growth rate of the Han population, with the promotion of the 1-child policy, was 1.3%, while that of the Korean population who were allowed to have 2 children was only 1.0%. The total fertility rate (TFR) of Korean women in Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture decreased from 4.7 in 1965 to 1.9 in 1974, to 1.8 in 1981, and to 1.6 in 1983, and increasing to 1.9 in 1989. 89-90% of women were primiparas between 1973 and 1983. In 1989 in Jilin Province 71% of Korean women were primiparas, 26% were secundiparas, and 3% were tertiparas or had higher parity. The decelerated population growth of the Korean nationality is attributed to the popularization of compulsory education. Primary school became compulsory in 1952 and junior high school in 1958. The illiteracy rate of Koreans was only 11% in 1982, 21% lower than that of the Han nationality and 32% lower than that of other ethnic groups in China. The rate declined further to 7% in 1987. The illiteracy rate of Korean women in reproductive age was only 3%, while the national illiteracy rate of such women was 30%, and that of women in ethnic groups was 46%. The marriage age of Korean women was 20 in 1966 increasing to 23 by 1973 with the birth interval of over 5 years.

  11. The complete human olfactory subgenome.

    PubMed

    Glusman, G; Yanai, I; Rubin, I; Lancet, D

    2001-05-01

    Olfactory receptors likely constitute the largest gene superfamily in the vertebrate genome. Here we present the nearly complete human olfactory subgenome elucidated by mining the genome draft with gene discovery algorithms. Over 900 olfactory receptor genes and pseudogenes (ORs) were identified, two-thirds of which were not annotated previously. The number of extrapolated ORs is in good agreement with previous theoretical predictions. The sequence of at least 63% of the ORs is disrupted by what appears to be a random process of pseudogene formation. ORs constitute 17 gene families, 4 of which contain more than 100 members each. "Fish-like" Class I ORs, previously considered a relic in higher tetrapods, constitute as much as 10% of the human repertoire, all in one large cluster on chromosome 11. Their lower pseudogene fraction suggests a functional significance. ORs are disposed on all human chromosomes except 20 and Y, and nearly 80% are found in clusters of 6-138 genes. A novel comparative cluster analysis was used to trace the evolutionary path that may have led to OR proliferation and diversification throughout the genome. The results of this analysis suggest the following genome expansion history: first, the generation of a "tetrapod-specific" Class II OR cluster on chromosome 11 by local duplication, then a single-step duplication of this cluster to chromosome 1, and finally an avalanche of duplication events out of chromosome 1 to most other chromosomes. The results of the data mining and characterization of ORs can be accessed at the Human Olfactory Receptor Data Exploratorium Web site (http://bioinfo.weizmann.ac.il/HORDE).

  12. 24 CFR 884.212 - Project completion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Project completion. 884.212 Section... RENTAL HOUSING PROJECTS Project Development and Operation § 884.212 Project completion. (a) FmHA certifications upon completion. Upon completion of the project, FmHA shall inspect the project and, if...

  13. 24 CFR 884.212 - Project completion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Project completion. 884.212 Section... RENTAL HOUSING PROJECTS Project Development and Operation § 884.212 Project completion. (a) FmHA certifications upon completion. Upon completion of the project, FmHA shall inspect the project and, if...

  14. 24 CFR 884.212 - Project completion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Project completion. 884.212 Section... RENTAL HOUSING PROJECTS Project Development and Operation § 884.212 Project completion. (a) FmHA certifications upon completion. Upon completion of the project, FmHA shall inspect the project and, if...

  15. 40 CFR 72.61 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.61 Completeness. (a) Determination of Completeness. The Administrator will determine whether the Acid Rain permit application is complete within 60... the Acid Rain permit application is complete under paragraph (a) of this section, the...

  16. 40 CFR 72.61 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.61 Completeness. (a) Determination of Completeness. The Administrator will determine whether the Acid Rain permit application is complete within 60... the Acid Rain permit application is complete under paragraph (a) of this section, the...

  17. 40 CFR 72.61 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.61 Completeness. (a) Determination of Completeness. The Administrator will determine whether the Acid Rain permit application is complete within 60... the Acid Rain permit application is complete under paragraph (a) of this section, the...

  18. 40 CFR 72.61 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.61 Completeness. (a) Determination of Completeness. The Administrator will determine whether the Acid Rain permit application is complete within 60... the Acid Rain permit application is complete under paragraph (a) of this section, the...

  19. 40 CFR 72.61 - Completeness.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... REGULATION Federal Acid Rain Permit Issuance Procedures § 72.61 Completeness. (a) Determination of Completeness. The Administrator will determine whether the Acid Rain permit application is complete within 60... the Acid Rain permit application is complete under paragraph (a) of this section, the...

  20. Isoniazid Completion Rates for Latent Tuberculosis Infection among College Students Managed by a Community Pharmacist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Karl; Goad, Jeffery; Wu, Joanne; Johnson, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The authors' objective was to document 9-month and previously recommended 6-month treatment completion rates for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in a pharmacist-managed LTBI clinic in a community pharmacy on a college campus, and to describe patient characteristics. Participants: Participants were university students diagnosed with…

  1. 48 CFR 752.7019 - Participant training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Participant training. 752... Participant training. For use in any USAID direct contract involving training of USAID participants. Participant Training (JAN 1999) (a) Definitions. (1) Participant training is the training of any...

  2. Differences in academic performance and self-regulated learning based on level of student participation in supplemental instruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mack, Ana C.

    likely to withdraw from the course than occasional or non-SI participants. In biology, no relationship between SI participation, gender, and student ethnic background was found. In chemistry, female students were significantly more likely to attend SI regularly than males. Chemistry minority students had significantly higher representation among occasional SI participants. An important implication involved the use of pedagogical approaches that make lecture classrooms more interactive and encourage student motivation and engagement. This study could be replicated in other science and non-science courses that offer SI sessions. Additional factors in the success of SI programs and student motivation can be added, such as SI leaders' experience and major. Follow-up studies on students who completed the courses included in this study can be conducted to determine whether they reenrolled in other science courses, continued attending SI sessions, and gained self-regulated learning skills.

  3. Factors influencing students' decisions to participate in a short "dissection experience" within a systemic anatomy course.

    PubMed

    Larkin, Theresa A; McAndrew, Darryl J

    2013-01-01

    Changes in medical education have affected both curriculum design and delivery. Many medical schools now use integrated curricula and a systemic approach, with reduced hours of anatomy teaching. While learning anatomy via dissection is invaluable in educational, professional, and personal development, it is time intensive and supports a regional approach to learning anatomy; the use of prosections has replaced dissection as the main teaching method in many medical schools. In our graduate-entry medical degree, we use an integrated curriculum, with prosections to teach anatomy systemically. However, to not exclude dissection completely, and to expose students to its additional and unique benefits, we implemented a short "Dissection Experience" at the beginning of Year 2. Students attended three two-hour anatomy sessions and participated in dissection of the clinically relevant areas of the cubital fossa, femoral triangle, and infraclavicular region. This activity was voluntary and we retrospectively surveyed all students to ascertain factors influencing their decision of whether to participate in this activity, and to obtain feedback from those students who did participate. The main reasons students did not participate were previous dissection experience and time constraints. The reasons most strongly affecting students' decisions to participate related to experience (lack of previous or new) and new skill. Students' responses as to the most beneficial component of the dissection experience were based around practical skills, anatomical education, the learning process, and the body donors. We report here on the benefits and practicalities of including a short dissection experience in a systemic, prosection-based anatomy course. PMID:23213067

  4. Well completion and work over method

    SciTech Connect

    Mondshine, T.C.

    1983-01-25

    A well completion and workover method wherein a subterranean formation is contacted with a high density, nondamaging treating fluid which comprises a saturated, aqueous saline solution with at least one water soluble salt that is substantially insoluble in the saturated saline solution. The water soluble salt has a particle size range of about 5 microns to about 800 microns, and greater than about 5 percent of the particles are coarser than 44 microns to control the pressure in the formation; to bridge and seal off the formation; to avoid particle invasion; and also to minimize fluid loss to the formation. A minor amount of a fluid loss additive is included in the treating fluid to inhibit loss of fluid into the formation and a minor amount of a suspension additive is included in the treating fluid to prevent settling of the water soluble salt particles in the aqueous saline solution. The aqueous saline solution should have a density of at least about 10 pounds per gallon.

  5. Project Galileo: completing Europa, preparing for Io.

    PubMed

    Erickson, J K; Cox, Z N; Paczkowski, B G; Sible, R W; Theilig, E E

    2000-01-01

    Galileo has completed the Europa leg of the Galileo Europa Mission, and is now pumping down the apojove in each succeeding orbit in preparation for the Io phase. Including three encounters earlier in the primary mission, the total of ten close passes by Europa have provided a wealth of interesting and provocative information about this intriguing body. The results presented include new and exciting information about Europa's interactions with Jupiter's magnetosphere, its interior structure, and its tantalizing surface features, which strongly hint at a watery subsurface layer. Additional data concerning Callisto, and its own outlook for a subsurface ocean are also presented. In addition the engineering aspects of operating the spacecraft during the past year are explored, as well as a brief examination of what will be the challenges to prepare for the Io encounters. The steadily increasing radiation dosage that the spacecraft is experiencing is well beyond the original design parameters, and is contributing to a number of spacecraft problems and concerns. The ability of the flight team to analyze and solve these problems, even at the reduced staffing levels of an extended mission, is a testament to their tenacity and loyalty to the mission. The engineering data being generated by these continuing radiation-induced anomalies will prove invaluable to designers of future spacecraft to Jupiter and its satellites. The lessons learned during this arduous process are presented.

  6. Improving Project Management with Simulation and Completion Distribution Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cates, Grant R.

    2004-01-01

    million per month is being spent on this project, which is scheduled to complete by 2010. NASA project stakeholders participated in determining and managing completion distribution functions produced from PAST. The first result was that project stakeholders improved project completion risk awareness. Secondly, using PAST, mitigation options were analyzed to improve project completion performance and reduce total project cost.

  7. Factors associated with participant compliance in studies using accelerometers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Paul H; Macfarlane, Duncan J; Lam, T H

    2013-09-01

    Participant compliance is an important issue in studies using accelerometers. Some participants wear the accelerometer for the duration specified by the researchers but many do not. We investigated a range of demographic factors associated with participant compliance in obtaining analyzable accelerometer data. A total of 3601 participants (aged 47.6±13.1 years, 44.6% male) were included. They were asked to wear an accelerometer (ActiGraph) for four consecutive days after completing a household survey during March 2009-January 2011 in Hong Kong. Participants wore the accelerometer on average for 13.9h in a 24-h day. No significant difference was found between males and females (p=0.38). Using log-linear regression, it was found that older participants (0.5% more wearing hours for each year of age, p<0.001), those with full-time job (p<0.01), with tertiary education (p<0.01), non-smokers (p<0.01) and with high self-reported health (p<0.05) wore the accelerometer for more hours. These results provide details for estimating compliance rates for samples with different characteristics and thus sample size calculation to account for participant compliance. PMID:23688408

  8. Linking Evidence-Based Program Participant Data with Medicare Data: The Consenting Process and Correlates of Retrospective Participant Consents

    PubMed Central

    Ritter, Philip Lloyd; Ory, Marcia G.; Smith, Matthew Lee; Jiang, Luohua; Alonis, Audrey; Laurent, Diana D.; Lorig, Kate

    2015-01-01

    As part of a nation-wide study of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (National Study), older participants were asked to consent to have their Medicare data matched with study data. This provided an opportunity to examine the consenting process and compare consenters, refusers, and non-responders. We compared the three groups on a large number of variables. These included demographic, National Study participation, health indicator, health behavior, and health-care utilization variables. We assessed differences in 6-month change scores for time-varying variables. We also examined whether asking participants to consent prior to the final questionnaire impacted completion of that questionnaire. Of 616 possible participants, 42% consented, 44% refused, and 14% failed to respond. Differences by ethnicity were found, with Hispanics more likely to consent. There was a consistent tendency for those who participated most in the National Study to consent. With the exception of number of chronic diseases, there was no evidence of health indicators or health behaviors being associated with consenting. Participants with more physician visits and more nights in the hospital were also more likely to consent. Those asked to consent before the 12-month follow-up questionnaire were less likely to complete that questionnaire than those who were asked after. Fewer than half consented to link to their Medicare data. The greater willingness to consent by those who participated most suggests that willingness to consent may be part of program engagement. Consenters had more diseases, more MD visits, and more nights in the hospital, suggesting that greater contact with the medical system may be associated with willingness to consent. This indicates that examinations of Medicare data based only on those willing to consent could introduce bias. Asking for consent appears to reduce participation in the larger study. PMID:25964908

  9. Assessing change in health professions volunteers' perceptions after participating in Special Olympics healthy athlete events.

    PubMed

    Freudenthal, Jacqueline J; Boyd, Linda D; Tivis, Rick

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed perceptions of health professions student and faculty volunteers who participated with athletes at the 2009 Special Olympics World Winter Games in Healthy Athlete venues. The volunteers' perceptions and expectations of the abilities of intellectually disabled athletes were measured by administering pre-event and post-event questionnaires consisting of demographic questions and the Prognostic Belief Scale (PBS). Invitations to participate in the study were sent to 165 students and faculty members; of those, eighty (48.5 percent response rate) responded to the pre-event questionnaire, and sixty-seven (40.6 percent response rate) responded to the post-event questionnaire. Of the eighty respondents to the pre-event questionnaire, fifty-five (68.7 percent) also completed the post-event questionnaire. The ANOVA comparing pre- and post-event PBS scores between groups found a trend towards higher scores among the volunteers, but analysis did not demonstrate a significant effect in either group (p=.68) or the interaction of group by time (p=.46). Despite the findings from the PBS, participants' statements suggest the experience had an impact on their perceptions and expectations. Although not statistically significant, this study found a positive trend pre- to post-event in the volunteers' perceptions of the abilities of athletes with intellectual disabilities. In addition to didactic and clinical education, volunteer experiences may enhance care providers' knowledge, skill, and confidence levels for treating clients with intellectual disabilities. PMID:20837738

  10. Creating sustainable local health information exchanges: can barriers to stakeholder participation be overcome?

    PubMed

    Grossman, Joy M; Kushner, Kathryn L; November, Elizabeth A

    2008-02-01

    Local health information exchanges (HIEs) hold the promise of collecting patient clinical data across sites of care to provide more complete and timely information for treatment, as well as supporting quality improvement and reporting, public health activities, and clinical research. Findings from a study of stakeholder perspectives on participation in four HIEs by the Center for Studying Health System Change (HSC) and the National Institute for Health Care Management (NIHCM) Foundation suggest, however, that barriers to achieving data exchange remain high. Concerns about loss of competitive advantage and data misuse impede provider and health plan willingness to contribute patient data. Additionally, uncertainty about who benefits from HIEs is affecting stakeholder willingness to fund the exchanges. The more mature exchanges--Cincinnati-based HealthBridge and the Indiana Health Information Exchange (IHIE)--have achieved some viability by meeting a specific business need--more efficient delivery of hospital test results to physicians. The newer exchanges--CareSpark, serving northeast Tennessee and southwest Virginia, and the Tampa Bay Regional Health Information Organization (RHIO)--have struggled to identify and finance initial services without a similar critical mass of hospital participation. While narrow data exchange efforts that improve transaction efficiency may be a pragmatic first step to overcome barriers to stakeholder participation, expanding HIEs to achieve the broad-based data exchange necessary for quality reporting and pay-for-performance (P4P) activities raises more challenges.

  11. Participation in specific treatment components predicts alcohol-specific and general coping skills.

    PubMed

    Forys, Kelly; McKellar, John; Moos, Rudolf

    2007-08-01

    This study identified which aspects of substance abuse treatment in community residential facilities (CRFs) were correlated with patients' post-treatment coping. A total of 2376 patients supplied demographic information and completed measures at baseline (coping and abstinence self-efficacy) and one year after treatment (coping, level of drug and alcohol use, and substance-related problems). Staff provided information about treatment orientation and patients' participation in treatment (e.g., life skills training, vocational counseling). The data were used to predict coping 1 year after treatment. As expected, higher levels of general approach coping and alcohol-specific coping and lower levels of general avoidance coping were associated with less 1-year alcohol and drug use and fewer drinking problems. Patients' greater level of participation in life skills counseling predicted more approach coping at 1 year. In addition, positive social relationships and participation in 12-step self-help groups predicted less general avoidance coping and more alcohol-specific coping at 1 year post-treatment. Life skills training, 12-step self-help groups, and enhancement of supportive relationships during CRF treatment for substance abuse are related to healthy coping. Future research should examine the effect of these components in less intensive programs and with women. PMID:17182195

  12. The role of rewards in motivating participation in simple warfare.

    PubMed

    Glowacki, Luke; Wrangham, Richard W

    2013-12-01

    In the absence of explicit punitive sanctions, why do individuals voluntarily participate in intergroup warfare when doing so incurs a mortality risk? Here we consider the motivation of individuals for participating in warfare. We hypothesize that in addition to other considerations, individuals are incentivized by the possibility of rewards. We test a prediction of this "cultural rewards war-risk hypothesis" with ethnographic literature on warfare in small-scale societies. We find that a greater number of benefits from warfare is associated with a higher rate of death from conflict. This provides preliminary support for the relationship between rewards and participation in warfare.

  13. Motivation factors for participation in GLBT sports league.

    PubMed

    Place, Greg; Beggs, Brent

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated those factors that motivate members of the GLBT (gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender) community to participate in a GLBT sports league. Data from a survey of 1151 members of a Chicago GLBT sports association were analyzed using exploratory factor analysis to determine the variables that contributed most to explaining leisure motivation in this setting. Results showed that the intellectual and social factors were the primary factors in determining motivation in participation. Also contributing to determining motivation were competency mastery and stimulus avoidance. In addition, findings suggested there was no primary difference between male and female participants.

  14. Lexical Retrieval of Nouns and Verbs in a Sentence Completion Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abel, Alyson D.; Maguire, Mandy J.; Naqvi, Fizza M.; Kim, Angela Y.

    2015-01-01

    This study explored noun and verb retrieval using a sentence completion task to expand upon previous findings from picture naming tasks. Participants completed sentences missing either a target noun or verb in the final position. Non-target responses were coded for substitution type, imageability and frequency. Like picture naming, nouns and verbs…

  15. Cornerstones of Completion: State Policy Support for Accelerated, Structured Pathways to College Credentials and Transfer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Couturier, Lara K.

    2012-01-01

    In spring 2012, after a year of intensive data analysis and planning, the colleges participating in Completion by Design announced strategies for creating clear, structured routes through college for more students, often referred to as accelerated, structured pathways to completion. These strategies contain elements unique to each college, but all…

  16. 10 CFR 903.21 - Completion of rate development; provisional rates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Completion of rate development; provisional rates. 903.21... Participation in Power and Transmission Rate Adjustments and Extensions for the Alaska, Southeastern, Southwestern, and Western Area Power Administrations § 903.21 Completion of rate development; provisional...

  17. Well completion and workover fluid having low fluid loss

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, P.W.; Gallus, J.P.; Pye, D.S.

    1980-03-11

    A description is given of a non-damaging variable-density low fluid loss well completion and workover fluid composition which is a dispersion of finely divided slowly oil-soluble, water-insoluble solid particulate matter in a thickened aqueous salt solution. The fluid composition is a mixture of an aqueous solution of a watersoluble inorganic salt, a first high softening point resin fluid loss control additive, a microemulsion fluid loss control additive, and, optionally, a water-dispersible thickening agent and/or a ph control agent. The microemulsion contains water, an oil-soluble surface active agent, a water-dispersible surface active agent, and, as a fluid loss control additive, a mixture of a wax and a second low softening point resin. The microemulsion also optionally contains an additive to prevent phase separation and/or a bactericide. Also disclosed is a method for using this composition in various well drilling, completion and treating operations.

  18. Regulatory and Stakeholder Involvement is Key to Successful Project Completion

    SciTech Connect

    Ballinger, K. S.; Coleman, S. J.; Shoemake, J. M.; Olds, T. E.

    2006-07-01

    Order (Tri-Party Agreement).[1] The key governmental or regulatory organizations that can influence the ORP Mission include, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy-Headquarters, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Washington State Department of Ecology and Health, and the Washington State Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Stakeholders include the concerned citizen groups, the congressionally recognized-Hanford Advisory Board, signatories to regional agreements, Tribal Nations with treaty rights, other DOE sites, other government agencies with cross-cutting programs and local state, county, and municipal governments. [2] ORP understands that while quality work and planning are essential elements of completing their mission, they cannot accomplish it fully without public confidence and trust. Given the length of the mission, many changes will occur in the external environment of national attitudes, priorities, standards, expectations and economic conditions over the life span of the mission. There will be unanticipated events, and difficult periods of change and complex decisions that will occur over the next several years. Under these conditions, the question of how to respond is as important as the quality plans and technical abilities of the ORP. The strategy ORP employs is designed to increase effectiveness and provide meaningful opportunities for public input across many DOE missions, activities and decisions. Diverse minds working together can often come up with better solutions to problems. In addition, if people can participate in decisions that affect them, they are more likely to support those decisions, even when dissention occurs. Public involvement is not a vote, or a popularity contest. Public involvement is a process to give

  19. Packaging and Transportation of Additional Neptunium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R.; Jordan, J.; Hensel, S.

    2010-05-05

    The Savannah River Site's HB-Line Facility completed a second neptunium oxide production campaign in which nine (9) additional cans of neptunium oxide were produced and shipped to the Idaho National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory in the 9975 shipping container. These additional cans were from a different feed solution than the first fifty (50) cans of neptunium oxide that were previously produced and shipped via a Letter of Amendment to the 9975 Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP) content table. This paper will address the challenges associated with demonstrating the neptunium oxide produced from the additional feed solution was equivalent to the original neptunium oxide and within the content description of the Letter of Amendment.

  20. An investigation of the psychometric properties of the Social Thoughts and Beliefs Scale (STABS) and structure of cognitive symptoms in participants with social anxiety disorder and healthy controls.

    PubMed

    Gros, Daniel F; Sarver, Nina Wong

    2014-04-01

    Despite the recent increase of measures developed to assess the cognitive symptoms of social anxiety disorder (SOC), their validation is still largely preliminary. Thus, the present studies sought to replicate and extend the psychometric evaluation of the Social Thoughts and Beliefs Scale (STABS). Study 1 involved both participants with SOC (n=206) and healthy controls (n=222) that completed the STABS and other related measures of anxiety. In Study 2, participants with SOC (n=66) completed exposure-based psychotherapy for SOC with the STABS used to track symptom changes. Together, the two studies provided additional support for the validity and reliability of the STABS as a measure of the cognitive symptoms of SOC. However, contrary to previous research with two subscales, a single total scale was suggested as the best interpretation of the STABS, as well as the possible general presentation of the cognitive symptoms of SOC.

  1. NASA OSMA NDE Program Additive Manufacturing Foundational Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess; Walker, James; Burke, Eric; Wells, Douglas; Nichols, Charles

    2016-01-01

    NASA is providing key leadership in an international effort linking NASA and non-NASA resources to speed adoption of additive manufacturing (AM) to meet NASA's mission goals. Participants include industry, NASA's space partners, other government agencies, standards organizations and academia. Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) is identified as a universal need for all aspects of additive manufacturing.

  2. Limitations in life participation and independence due to secondary conditions.

    PubMed

    Koritsas, Stella; Iacono, Teresa

    2009-11-01

    The effects of secondary conditions across adults with autism, Down syndrome, and cerebral palsy were explored in terms of overall limitation in life participation and independence, changes over time, and the degree and nature of limitation in specific secondary conditions. Information was obtained for 35 adults with autism, 49 with Down syndrome, and 29 with cerebral palsy (N = 113). Caregivers completed a questionnaire exploring secondary conditions on two occasions. Participants with cerebral palsy experienced the greatest overall limitations of the three groups. This finding is due to several secondary conditions. There were no changes in limitation scores over time. Implications related to health care for these groups are discussed.

  3. 9 CFR 149.2 - Program participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT VOLUNTARY TRICHINAE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM § 149.2 Program participation. A producer's initial enrollment and continued participation in the Trichinae Certification Program...

  4. 9 CFR 149.2 - Program participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT VOLUNTARY TRICHINAE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM § 149.2 Program participation. A producer's initial enrollment and continued participation in the Trichinae Certification Program...

  5. 9 CFR 149.2 - Program participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT VOLUNTARY TRICHINAE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM § 149.2 Program participation. A producer's initial enrollment and continued participation in the Trichinae Certification Program...

  6. 9 CFR 149.2 - Program participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT VOLUNTARY TRICHINAE CERTIFICATION PROGRAM § 149.2 Program participation. A producer's initial enrollment and continued participation in the Trichinae Certification Program...

  7. Pre-Participation Physical Examinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... rounded physical activity program includes aerobic exercise and strength training exercise, but not necessarily in the same session. ... Cycling • Rowing • Cross country skiing • Swimming. In addition, strength training should be performed a minimum of two days ...

  8. Public Participation in Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, Louis

    2000-07-01

    In the past several years The Planetary Society has created several innovative opportunities for general public participation in the exploration of the solar system and the search for extraterrestrial life. The conduct of such exploration has traditionally been the province of a few thousand, at most, of professionally involved scientists and engineers. Yet the rationale for spending resources required by broad and far-reaching exploration involves a greater societal interest - it frequently being noted that the rationale cannot rely on science alone. This paper reports on the more notable of the opportunities for general public participation, in particular: 1) Visions of Mars: a CD containing the works of science fiction about Mars, designed to be placed on Mars as the first library to be found by eventual human explorers; 2) MAPEX: a Microelectronics And Photonics Experiment, measuring the radiation environment for future human explorers of Mars, and containing a electron beam lithograph of names of all the members of The Planetary Society at a particular time; 3) Naming of spacecraft: Involvement in the naming of spacecraft: Magellan, Sojourner; 4) The Mars Microphone: the first privately funded instrument to be sent to another world; 5) Red Rover Goes to Mars: the first commercial-education partnership on a planetary mission; 6) Student designed nanoexperiments: to fly on a Mars lander; and 7) SETI@home: a tool permitting millions to contribute to research and data processing in the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. A brief description of each of the projects will be given, and the opportunity it provided for public participation described. The evolving complexity of these projects suggest that more opportunities will be found, and that the role of public participation can increase at the same time as making substantive contributions to the flight missions. It will be suggested that these projects presage the day that planetary exploration will be truly

  9. 48 CFR 49.205 - Completed end items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Completed end items. 49.205 Section 49.205 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TERMINATION OF CONTRACTS Additional Principles for Fixed-Price Contracts Terminated...

  10. A review on the complete utilization of the Sugarbeet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Sugarbeet is one of the main sugar crops in the world. In the search for sustainability and economic value, the complete utilization of the crop is necessary. In addition to sugar and animal feed, Sugarbeets can provide many value-added co-products for biofuels, human nutrition, plastics, and ph...

  11. Public participation in environmental issues

    SciTech Connect

    Pilot, J.

    1998-12-31

    The need for public participation in environmental issues has grown in the past five years. The Responsible Care{reg_sign} Program, developed by the chemical industry, as well as government requirements for citizens` input into regulatory review have initiated public committees for environmental management issues. This paper will discuss three programs that have been implemented in Ontario to assist in public participation in environmental issues covering the following: 1. Great Waste Management Debate held in co-operation with Government, Boards of Trade, Industry, and Youth; 2. Public Liaison committee for Ontario`s Resource Recovery -- Waste to Energy Facility operating in the Region of Peel, the role they have played in its operation with the community; and 3. Brampton Environmental Community Advisory Panel, initiated by the Brampton Chemical Association`s need under Responsible Care for a public program to address concern related to company`s environmental issues in the community. As Chair of all three Committees, the paper will cover the benefits of the committees for public input and review of environmental issues related to environmental management.

  12. Male participation in reproductive health.

    PubMed

    Robey, B; Drennan, M

    1998-01-01

    Family planning programs (FPPs) have traditionally viewed women as their main clients because it is women who become pregnant, most contraceptive methods are designed for women, and reproductive health services can be conveniently offered as part of maternal and child health services. Some FPPs have avoided serving men because they believe that women need privacy and autonomy in reproductive health matters. However, this assumption that men are not interested in taking responsibility for family planning has become a self-fulfilling prophecy. FPPs have made little effort to consider men's reproductive health needs or to reach out to men. As such, men have few contacts with the reproductive health care system. Recent survey and study findings instead suggest that many men are highly interested in family planning and other reproductive health issues, and would participate in family planning if given the chance. While some family planning programs have been interested in involving men for more than a decade, men's participation has only recently become the focus of considerable attention. One reason for this newly directed focus is growing concern over the rapid spread of HIV and the targeting of HIV prevention programs upon both men and women to an almost equal extent.

  13. APS Initiatives for Broadening Participation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodapp, Theodore

    2013-03-01

    Women currently earn only about 20% of physics degrees, while African Americans and Hispanic Americans combined - representing 34% of the US population in their 20's - earn only 9% and 5-6% of the Bachelor and Doctoral degrees respectively. To address these disparities, and improve conditions for everyone who studies physics, the APS devotes significant resources to addressing these concerns and to enabling individuals and groups to work with the APS to advance these goals. In this presentation, I will outline several of our most significant programs, give data that informs decisions to adopt programs, and describe current plans. Included in this is the new APS Bridge Program (www.APSBridgeProgram.org) for increasing underrepresented minority participation at the PhD level, the APS Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics (go.aps.org/cuwip), and the APS Minority Scholars Program (www.MinoritiesInPhysics.org). Please bring your ideas and concerns for how we might improve participation for all.

  14. Participation in European water policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ast, J. A.; Boot, S. P.

    This paper considers the possibilities for interactive policy-making in European water management. In the new European Water Framework Directive, public information and consultation are major elements in the procedure (process) that leads to River Basin Management Plans. In general, decision making in integrated water management should not be limited to the application of models and desk studies. Important decisions need a high level of participation. In this interactive approach, visions, ideas, patterns of behaviour and solutions to perceived problems of different societal actors can be identified and incorporated into the decision-making process. For example, farmer organisations, environmental groups and associations of house owners, but also individual citizens often have various and differing ideas about measures that change the physical, chemical or biological characteristics of a river basin. Well-organised interaction has two main potential advantages: The quality of the decision will be higher because specific knowledge of people involved and their different views are taken into consideration. The interaction enables exchange of information which can lead to a better understanding of the ins and outs of the specific situation and in this way contribute to public support. By means of two examples of water related policy issues in Europe, i.e. economic approaches in the water framework directive and Integrated Product Policy, various opportunities for pluralistic as well as corporatist types of participation in modern water management are presented and discussed.

  15. Value of sonography in true complete diphallia.

    PubMed

    Marti-Bonmati, L; Menor, F; Gomez, J; Cortina, H; Garcia Ibarra, F

    1989-08-01

    A case of true complete diphallia associated with multiple malformations is presented. Complete radiological evaluation should include sonography of both penes preoperatively to classify the penile duplication correctly. PMID:2664222

  16. Successful horizontal completions require an integrated approach

    SciTech Connect

    Richard, B.; Smejkal, K.; Penberthy, W. Jr.

    1997-01-01

    While a perfect well completion may not exist, depleting a hydrocarbon resource at a sustained high rate--without a workover--is the ultimate goal. Unfortunately, many horizontal well completions fail to achieve this due to wellbore damage or loss of reservoir pressure. These conditions manifest themselves in reduced production rates, extended well life and reduced profitability. Standard completion techniques are not always compatible with each other for site specific well applications. The combination of two incompatible technologies or slight changes in a completion procedure may negatively impact productivity. Hence, the most successful horizontal completion results are obtained using a compatible integrated system approach--an approach that carefully combines the best completion tools and processes to deliver an undamaged well completed at the lowest possible cost. After studying the compatibilities of various drill-in fluids, screens, filter cakes and gravel packs, recommended procedures are presented for successfully completing horizontal wells.

  17. Incorporation of additives into polymers

    DOEpatents

    McCleskey, T. Mark; Yates, Matthew Z.

    2003-07-29

    There has been invented a method for incorporating additives into polymers comprising: (a) forming an aqueous or alcohol-based colloidal system of the polymer; (b) emulsifying the colloidal system with a compressed fluid; and (c) contacting the colloidal polymer with the additive in the presence of the compressed fluid. The colloidal polymer can be contacted with the additive by having the additive in the compressed fluid used for emulsification or by adding the additive to the colloidal system before or after emulsification with the compressed fluid. The invention process can be carried out either as a batch process or as a continuous on-line process.

  18. Completion Mindsets and Contexts in Doctoral Supervision

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Pam; Bowden, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Doctoral candidates are now located within a research context of performativity where the push to successfully complete in a timely manner is central. The purpose of this paper is to develop a model of completion mindset within a completion context to assist research students and supervisors. Design/methodology/approach: The research was…

  19. Improving Completion Rates for TAFE Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uren, Judith

    A study examined individual student, institutional, and environmental factors influencing student non-completions and determined strategies that Western Australia's Central TAFE (technical and further education) might introduce to improve student retention. After completing a multivariate analysis of module completion rates, further data for a…

  20. Governing Board Oversight of College Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The issue of college completion has become a hot-button topic for higher education and the public in recent years. While completion is not a new issue, several national and state-level efforts, including President Obama's 2020 college-completion goal to increase the number of college graduates to 50 percent of the population, have brought…

  1. 24 CFR 884.212 - Project completion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... RENTAL HOUSING PROJECTS Project Development and Operation § 884.212 Project completion. (a) FmHA certifications upon completion. Upon completion of the project, FmHA shall inspect the project and, if determined to be acceptable, submit to the HUD field office the following certifications: (1) The project...

  2. Isaac Newton and Student College Completion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinto, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Success in college is built upon classroom success, but success in the classroom does not in itself ensure college completion. Completion arises from success in a sequence of classes one after another over time. It does so most frequently when students are presented with coherent course pathways to degree completion, are able to gain degree credit…

  3. Completing cremation forms: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Ian; Winstanley, Alison

    2013-07-01

    Before a body can be cremated doctors must complete a series of lengthy forms better known as 'crem forms'. One doctor first completes a medical certificate (Cremation Form 4, previously known as 'Part B') while a second must complete a confirmatory medical certificate (Cremation Form 5, previously 'Part C').

  4. Measuring Homework Completion in Behavioral Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busch, Andrew M.; Uebelacker, Lisa A.; Kalibatseva, Zornitsa; Miller, Ivan W.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and validate an observer-based coding system for the characterization and completion of homework assignments during Behavioral Activation (BA). Existing measures of homework completion are generally unsophisticated, and there is no current measure of homework completion designed to capture the particularities…

  5. Completing cremation forms: a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Proctor, Ian; Winstanley, Alison

    2013-07-01

    Before a body can be cremated doctors must complete a series of lengthy forms better known as 'crem forms'. One doctor first completes a medical certificate (Cremation Form 4, previously known as 'Part B') while a second must complete a confirmatory medical certificate (Cremation Form 5, previously 'Part C'). PMID:24145671

  6. 30 CFR 250.505 - Subsea completions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... control the well and permit safe production operations. ... AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.505 Subsea completions. No subsea well completion shall be commenced until the lessee...

  7. 30 CFR 250.505 - Subsea completions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... control the well and permit safe production operations. ... AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.505 Subsea completions. No subsea well completion shall be commenced until the lessee...

  8. 30 CFR 250.505 - Subsea completions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... control the well and permit safe production operations. ... AND GAS AND SULPHUR OPERATIONS IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Well-Completion Operations § 250.505 Subsea completions. No subsea well completion shall be commenced until the lessee...

  9. [Patch-testing methods: additional specialised or additional series].

    PubMed

    Cleenewerck, M-B

    2009-01-01

    The tests in the European standard battery must occasionally be supplemented by specialised or additional batteries, particularly where the contact allergy is thought to be of occupational origin. These additional batteries cover all allergens associated with various professional activities (hairdressing, baking, dentistry, printing, etc.) and with different classes of materials and chemical products (glue, plastic, rubber...). These additional tests may also include personal items used by patients on a daily basis such as cosmetics, shoes, plants, textiles and so on.

  10. 7 CFR 1940.954 - State participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true State participation. 1940.954 Section 1940.954....954 State participation. (a) Application. If a State desires to participate in this pilot program, the... 424.1: (1) A narrative signed by the Governor including reasons for State participation in...

  11. Life experiences of patients who have completed tuberculosis treatment: a qualitative investigation in southeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite being curable, tuberculosis is still a stigmatized disease. Not only is TB patients’ suffering due to its clinical manifestations, but also because of society’s prejudice, embarrassing situations, and even self-discrimination. This study aims to investigate psychosocial experiences of patients who have completed tuberculosis treatment in São Carlos a municipality in the interior of São Paulo State, Brazil. Methods This study, of a clinical-qualitative nature, sought to understand the meanings provided by the participants themselves. Fifteen individuals, who had successfully completed tuberculosis treatment, participated in this research. The sample size was established using the information saturation criterion. Data were collected by means of interviews with in-depth open-ended questions. Data were treated by categorizing and analyzing content according to themes. Results Regardless of all progress, this study found that TB still causes patients to suffer from fear of transmission, social prejudice, and death. Despite the fact that the emotional support provided by families and healthcare professionals is considered essential to treatment adherence and completion, participants in this study reveal that friends and colleagues have distanced themselves from them for fear of contagion and/or prejudice. Ignorance about the disease and its transmission modes can be found in the interviewees’ statements, which seems to indicate that they have become vectors of transmission of stigma themselves. Patients’ medical leave from work during treatment may be due to both their health conditions and their attempt to avoid social/emotional embarrassment. There are accounts that TB has caused psychosocial damage to patients’ lives and that they feel more fatigue and lassitude and have begun to pay more attention to their own health. Conclusions Healthcare workers should be aware of the ways TB treatment affect patients’ psychosocial life and

  12. Spatial evolutionary public goods game on complete graph and dense complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinho; Chae, Huiseung; Yook, Soon-Hyung; Kim, Yup

    2015-01-01

    We study the spatial evolutionary public goods game (SEPGG) with voluntary or optional participation on a complete graph (CG) and on dense networks. Based on analyses of the SEPGG rate equation on finite CG, we find that SEPGG has two stable states depending on the value of multiplication factor r, illustrating how the “tragedy of the commons” and “an anomalous state without any active participants” occurs in real-life situations. When r is low (), the state with only loners is stable, and the state with only defectors is stable when r is high (). We also derive the exact scaling relation for r*. All of the results are confirmed by numerical simulation. Furthermore, we find that a cooperator-dominant state emerges when the number of participants or the mean degree, 〈k〉, decreases. We also investigate the scaling dependence of the emergence of cooperation on r and 〈k〉. These results show how “tragedy of the commons” disappears when cooperation between egoistic individuals without any additional socioeconomic punishment increases. PMID:25796988

  13. Preliminary development and validation of an Australian community participation questionnaire: types of participation and associations with distress in a coastal community.

    PubMed

    Berry, Helen Louise; Rodgers, Bryan; Dear, Keith B G

    2007-04-01

    Participating in the social and civic life of communities is protectively associated with the onset and course of physical and mental disorders, and is considered important in achieving health promotion goals. Despite its importance in health research, there is no systematically developed measure of community participation. Our aim was to undertake the preliminary development of a community participation questionnaire, including validating it against an external reference, general psychological distress. Participants were 963 randomly selected community members, aged 19-97, from coastal New South Wales, Australia, who completed an anonymous postal survey. There were 14 types of community participation, most of which were characterised by personal involvement, initiative and effort. Frequency of participation varied across types and between women and men. Based on multiple linear regression analyses, controlling for socio-demographic factors, nine types of participation were independently and significantly associated with general psychological distress. Unexpectedly, for two of these, "expressing opinions publicly" and "political protest", higher levels of participation were associated with higher levels of distress. The other seven were: contact with immediate household, extended family, friends, and neighbours; participating in organised community activities; taking an active interest in current affairs; and religious observance. We called these the "Big 7". Higher levels of participation in the Big 7 were associated with lower levels of distress. Participating in an increasing number of the Big 7 types of participation was strongly associated in linear fashion with decreasing distress. PMID:17241727

  14. Effects of Offender Motivation, Victim Gender, and Participant Gender on Perceptions of Rape Victims and Offenders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Damon; Angelone, D. J.; Kohlberger, Brittany; Hirschman, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The primary purpose of the present study was to examine whether knowledge of the motivation of an offender can influence participant perceptions of victim and perpetrator responsibility for a sexual assault. In addition, the synergistic influence of victim gender and participant gender with offender motivation was explored. Participants were 171…

  15. 25 CFR 1000.14 - Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Selection of Additional Tribes for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.14 Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance? Two types of entities...

  16. 25 CFR 1000.14 - Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Selection of Additional Tribes for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.14 Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance? Two types of entities...

  17. 25 CFR 1000.14 - Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Selection of Additional Tribes for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.14 Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance? Two types of entities...

  18. 25 CFR 1000.14 - Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Selection of Additional Tribes for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.14 Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance? Two types of entities...

  19. 25 CFR 1000.14 - Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance...-DETERMINATION AND EDUCATION ACT Selection of Additional Tribes for Participation in Tribal Self-Governance Eligibility § 1000.14 Who is eligible to participate in Tribal self-governance? Two types of entities...

  20. Effects of krill oil on endothelial function and other cardiovascular risk factors in participants with type 2 diabetes, a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Lobraico, Jessika M; DiLello, Lauren C; Butler, Amber D; Cordisco, Marie Elena; Petrini, Joann R; Ahmadi, Ramin

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this trial was to evaluate the effect of krill oil supplementation, a source of ω-3 fatty acids, on cardiovascular disease risk factors and blood glucose control among participants with type 2 diabetes. Research design and methods A randomized, double-blind controlled cross-over trial was employed. Outcomes assessed were: endothelial function, blood lipids, glucose, glycated hemoglobin, serum antioxidant level, C peptide, and calculated Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) scores. Participants were randomized to either krill oil or olive oil supplementation for 4 weeks, underwent a 2-week washout period, and then crossed to the other supplementation for 4 weeks. All participants were then offered an additional 17 weeks of krill supplementation. Testing occurred at 3 time points: baseline, after first supplementation, and after second supplementation. Testing also occurred after an optional 17 weeks of krill oil supplementation. Difference scores were calculated for each participant in both sequences (ie, differences in outcome measures in the first and second period of the sequence). The mean and SD of the scores in the 2 sequence groups were used to test for differences between treatment effects at a significance level of p<0.05. Results A total of 47 participants were included in the initial cross-over study. Participants who received krill oil for 4 weeks had an improvement in their endothelial function and a reduction in blood C peptide levels and HOMA scores as compared with the olive oil. A total of 34 participants completed the additional 17-week supplementation period. When compared with their respective baseline measures, these participants had a statistically significant improvement in endothelial function and blood high-density lipoprotein (HDL). Conclusions Krill oil may lead to moderate improvement of cardiovascular risks, specifically endothelial dysfunction and HDL in patients with type 2

  1. Student Engagement and Completion in Precalculus Precalculus Mega Section: Efficiently Assisting Student Engagement and Completion with Communications and Information Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brusi, Rima; Portnoy, Arturo; Toro, Nilsa

    2013-01-01

    The Precalculus Mega Section project was developed with the main purpose of improving the overall performance of the student body in Precalculus, an important gatekeeper course that affects student engagement and completion, with typical drop/failure rates of over 50 percent. Strategies such as integration of technology and additional practice…

  2. Public Participation Plan. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The purpose of this Public Participation Plan is to describe the Department of Energy's plan for involving the public in the decision-making process required by the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 as related to the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. This project was authorized by congress in the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978, PL95-604. The Act provides for a cooperative effort with affected states and Indian tribes for the cleanup of designated inactive uranium mill tailings sites and associated vicinity properties, which are located in ten western states and in Pennsylvania. The Act was amended in 1982 to also include vicinity properties contaminated with residual radioactive material in Edgemont, South Dakota.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Candidatus Ruthia magnifica.

    PubMed

    Roeselers, Guus; Newton, Irene L G; Woyke, Tanja; Auchtung, Thomas A; Dilly, Geoffrey F; Dutton, Rachel J; Fisher, Meredith C; Fontanez, Kristina M; Lau, Evan; Stewart, Frank J; Richardson, Paul M; Barry, Kerrie W; Saunders, Elizabeth; Detter, John C; Wu, Dongying; Eisen, Jonathan A; Cavanaugh, Colleen M

    2010-01-01

    The hydrothermal vent clam Calyptogena magnifica (Bivalvia: Mollusca) is a member of the Vesicomyidae. Species within this family form symbioses with chemosynthetic Gammaproteobacteria. They exist in environments such as hydrothermal vents and cold seeps and have a rudimentary gut and feeding groove, indicating a large dependence on their endosymbionts for nutrition. The C. magnifica symbiont, Candidatus Ruthia magnifica, was the first intracellular sulfur-oxidizing endosymbiont to have its genome sequenced (Newton et al. 2007). Here we expand upon the original report and provide additional details complying with the emerging MIGS/MIMS standards. The complete genome exposed the genetic blueprint of the metabolic capabilities of the symbiont. Genes which were predicted to encode the proteins required for all the metabolic pathways typical of free-living chemoautotrophs were detected in the symbiont genome. These include major pathways including carbon fixation, sulfur oxidation, nitrogen assimilation, as well as amino acid and cofactor/vitamin biosynthesis. This genome sequence is invaluable in the study of these enigmatic associations and provides insights into the origin and evolution of autotrophic endosymbiosis.

  4. Examining the relationship between recreational sport participation and intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and amotivation.

    PubMed

    Tsorbatzoudis, Haralambos; Alexandris, Konstantinos; Zahariadis, Panagiotis; Grouios, George

    2006-10-01

    This study aimed at investigating the effect of motivational dimensions proposed by Pelletier, et al. in 1995, both on sport participation levels and on intention for continuing participation among adult recreational sport participants. Two hundred and fifty-seven adult individuals, who reported participation in some type of sport and physical activity, completed the Sport Motivation Scale and a scale measuring intention. The study provided evidence to suggest that increased motivation leads to increased participation. Amotivation significantly decreased from the least to the most frequent participant groups, while both extrinsic and intrinsic motivation followed the reverse pattern. The results also indicated that increased intrinsic motivation to gain knowledge and accomplishment and extrinsic motivation (introjected regulation) are positively correlated with individuals' intentions to continue participation, while amotivation is negatively related. These results provide limited support for the self-determination theory. Implications for sport participation promotion are discussed.

  5. Impact of Pharmacists’ Participation in a Pharmacotherapy Follow-Up Program

    PubMed Central

    Dualde, Elena; Santonja, Francisco J.; Faus, Maria J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of a continuing pharmacy education (CPE) course on Spanish community pharmacists’ participation in a pharmacotherapy follow-up program. Design. Participation in a CPE course offered 4 times over a 4-year period via satellite teleconferencing was monitored and the data analyzed to determine the course’s impact on community pharmacists’ participation in a pharmacotherapy follow-up program. Assessment. Community pharmacists’ participation in the pharmaceutical care CPE course had a slightly positive impact on their participation in the pharmacotherapy follow-up program. In the best profiles, there was a probability of 7.3% that participants would participate in the pharmacotherapy follow-up program. Conclusions. Completion of pharmaceutical care CPE courses did not have a significant impact on pharmacists’ participation in a pharmacotherapy follow-up program. PMID:22438606

  6. An Analysis of Community College Career and Technical Education Course and Completion Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomerlin, Garry Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Because of low college completion rates, the focus in higher education has shifted from encouraging students to enroll in college to getting students to complete college. In essence, the paradigm has shifted from student access to student success or completion. In addition to a national agenda focusing on higher education with an emphasis on…

  7. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J. , Blocksome; Michael A. , Parker; Jeffrey J.

    2011-02-15

    Methods, systems, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA on an origin node in an origin injection FIFO, a data descriptor for an application message; inserting, by the origin DMA, a reflection descriptor in the origin injection FIFO, the reflection descriptor specifying a remote get operation for injecting a completion notification descriptor in a reflection injection FIFO on a reflection node; transferring, by the origin DMA to a target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; in response to completing the message transfer, transferring, by the origin DMA to the reflection node, the completion notification descriptor in dependence upon the reflection descriptor; receiving, by the origin DMA from the reflection node, a completion packet; and notifying, by the origin DMA in response to receiving the completion packet, the origin node's processing core that the message transfer is complete.

  8. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2011-02-15

    DMA transfer completion notification includes: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin node in an injection first-in-first-out (`FIFO`) buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target node on behalf of an application on the origin node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying a packet header for a completion notification packet; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; sending, by the origin DMA engine, the completion notification packet to a local reception FIFO buffer using a local memory FIFO transfer operation; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that transfer of the message is complete in response to receiving the completion notification packet in the local reception FIFO buffer.

  9. Who participates in internet-based worksite weight loss programs?

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The reach and representativeness are seldom examined in worksite weight loss studies. This paper describes and illustrates a method for directly assessing the reach and representativeness of a internet-based worksite weight loss program. Methods A brief health survey (BHS) was administered, between January 2008 and November 2009, to employees at 19 worksites in Southwest Virginia. The BHS included demographic, behavioral, and health questions. All employees were blinded to the existence of a future weight loss program until the completion of the BHS. Results The BHS has a participation rate of 66 percent and the subsequent weight loss program has a participation rate of 30 percent. Employees from higher income households, with higher education levels and health literacy proficiency were significantly more likely to participate in the program (p's < .01). Conclusions Worksite weight loss programs should include targeted marketing strategies to engage employees with lower income, education, and health literacy. PMID:21933429

  10. Health locus of control and participation in physical activity.

    PubMed

    Carlson, B R; Petti, K

    1989-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to determine the physical activity participation patterns of college students when defined by their Health Locus of Control orientation. One thousand thirty-three college-aged students completed the Wellness Activity Profile, a questionnaire that yielded data on Health Locus of Control and self-reported frequency of participation in physical activities. Discriminant analyses indicated that the combination of physical activities associated with internally and externally oriented students were different for both males and females. Participation in high caloric expenditure activities was more frequent among internal subjects (Male: bicycling, volleyball, other individual sports, and snorkel/scuba diving; Female: basketball, weight training, tennis, fast walking/jogging/running, and judo/karate), while low caloric expenditure activities were associated with an external orientation (Male: baseball/softball, sailing, fishing, golf, and other recreational sports; Female: track and field jumping and fishing).

  11. Impact of Open Data Policies on Consent to Participate in Human Subjects Research: Discrepancies between Participant Action and Reported Concerns

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Research outlets are increasingly adopting open data policies as a requisite for publication, including studies with human subjects data. We investigated whether open data policies influence participants’ rate of consent by randomly assigning participants to view consent forms with and without discussion of open data policies. No participants declined to participate, regardless of condition, nor did rates of drop-out vs. completion vary between conditions. Furthermore, no significant change in potential consent rates was reported when participants were openly asked about the influence of open data policies on their likelihood of consent. However, follow-up analyses indicated possible poor attention to consent forms, consistent with previous research. Moreover, thematic analysis of participants’ considerations of open data policy indicated multiple considerations such as concerns regarding confidentiality, anonymity, data security, and study sensitivity. The impact of open data policies on participation raises complex issues at the intersection of ethics and scientific innovation. We conclude by encouraging researchers to consider participants as stakeholders in open data policy and by providing recommendations for open data policies in human subjects research. PMID:25993308

  12. The Association between Graphomotor Tests and Participation of Typically Developing Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Limor

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to explore the association between graphomotor tests--VMI, ROCF, SWT--and the measures of a child's participation. Seventy-five typically developing children aged 4 to 9 years were individually evaluated using the graphomotor tests and their parents completed a participation questionnaire. After controlling for child's age, the…

  13. Russian Students' Participation in and Perceptions of a Season of Sport Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastie, Peter A.; Sinelnikov, Oleg A.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the participation and perceptions of a cohort of sixth-grade Russian students as they participated in a season of basketball that followed a Sport Education format. Thirty-seven students from two classes completed 18-lesson seasons. Throughout the initial skills practice sessions and practice games, as well as the formal…

  14. The Impact of Participating in a Peer Assessment Activity on Subsequent Academic Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jhangiani, Rajiv S.

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigates the impact of participation in a peer assessment activity on subsequent academic performance. Students in two sections of an introductory psychology course completed a practice quiz 1 week prior to each of three course exams. Students in the experimental group participated in a five-step double-blind peer assessment…

  15. Cognitive, Personality and Family Correlates of Children's Sports Participation and Competence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurz, Ronald B.; And Others

    Although sports are a part of the child's everyday experience, little is known about factors that relate to children's participation in sports, to their perceptions of self-competence in sports, and to the impression by others of the competence. Children (N=110) participating in a Pediatric Sports Medicine Project completed the psychological…

  16. Examining the Relationship between Social Capital and Career Success among Welfare to Work Participants in Louisiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis-Green, Dionne Marie

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between social capital and career success among welfare to work participants in a Louisiana program from 2007 to 2009. Based on the high percentage who do not complete the Louisiana STEP program, outcomes from 2007 to 2009 suggest current STEP work activities may not prepare participants for career success and…

  17. Barriers and Possible Facilitators to Participation in Farm to School Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Alicia S.; Lingsch, Kelsey J.; Weiss, Caitlin; Connell, Carol L.; Yadrick, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate child nutrition directors' (CNDs) Farm to School (F2S) Week participation. This cross-sectional, census survey was completed by CNDs working in Mississippi public school districts participating in the National School Lunch Program. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize demographic data and the…

  18. Genetic Knowledge Among Participants in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative.

    PubMed

    Schmidlen, Tara J; Scheinfeldt, Laura; Zhaoyang, Ruixue; Kasper, Rachel; Sweet, Kevin; Gordon, Erynn S; Keller, Margaret; Stack, Cathy; Gharani, Neda; Daly, Mary B; Jarvis, Joseph; Christman, Michael F

    2016-04-01

    Genetic literacy is essential for the effective integration of genomic information into healthcare; yet few recent studies have been conducted to assess the current state of this knowledge base. Participants in the Coriell Personalized Medicine Collaborative (CPMC), a prospective study assessing the impact of personalized genetic risk reports for complex diseases and drug response on behavior and health outcomes, completed genetic knowledge questionnaires and other surveys through an online portal. To assess the association between genetic knowledge and genetic education background, multivariate linear regression was performed. 4 062 participants completed a genetic knowledge and genetic education background questionnaire. Most were older (mean age: 50), Caucasian (90 %), female (59 %), highly educated (69 % bachelor's or higher), with annual household income over $100 000 (49 %). Mean percent correct was 76 %. Controlling for demographics revealed that health care providers, participants previously exposed to genetics, and participants with 'better than most' self-rated knowledge were significantly more likely to have a higher knowledge score (p < 0.001). Overall, genetic knowledge was high with previous genetic education experience predictive of higher genetic knowledge score. Education is likely to improve genetic literacy, an important component to expanded use of genomics in personalized medicine. PMID:26306685

  19. Enantioselective Michael Addition of Water

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry. PMID:25529526

  20. Enantioselective Michael addition of water.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bi-Shuang; Resch, Verena; Otten, Linda G; Hanefeld, Ulf

    2015-02-01

    The enantioselective Michael addition using water as both nucleophile and solvent has to date proved beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Herein, the direct, enantioselective Michael addition of water in water to prepare important β-hydroxy carbonyl compounds using whole cells of Rhodococcus strains is described. Good yields and excellent enantioselectivities were achieved with this method. Deuterium labeling studies demonstrate that a Michael hydratase catalyzes the water addition exclusively with anti-stereochemistry.

  1. Gender differences in recreational sports participation among Taiwanese adults.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Liang-Ting; Lo, Feng-En; Yang, Chih-Chien; Keller, Joseph Jordan; Lyu, Shu-Yu

    2015-01-15

    This study examines the gender differences in the enjoyment of recreational sports participation among Taiwanese adults. Data were obtained using the 2007 Taiwan Social Change Survey. The questionnaire included a topical module of the International Social Survey Program regarding leisure time and sports. Results showed that male subjects were more likely to participate in recreational sports to improve their appearance and on account of their personal interest. In addition to these factors, female subjects also experienced greater motivation to participate when Taiwanese athletes performed well in international sporting competitions. This study confirmed that the factors influencing enjoyment of recreational sports participation differ among men and women. These results can be used to better inform public health professionals and other regulatory organizations formulating physical activity intervention strategies.

  2. Gender differences in recreational sports participation among Taiwanese adults.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Liang-Ting; Lo, Feng-En; Yang, Chih-Chien; Keller, Joseph Jordan; Lyu, Shu-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the gender differences in the enjoyment of recreational sports participation among Taiwanese adults. Data were obtained using the 2007 Taiwan Social Change Survey. The questionnaire included a topical module of the International Social Survey Program regarding leisure time and sports. Results showed that male subjects were more likely to participate in recreational sports to improve their appearance and on account of their personal interest. In addition to these factors, female subjects also experienced greater motivation to participate when Taiwanese athletes performed well in international sporting competitions. This study confirmed that the factors influencing enjoyment of recreational sports participation differ among men and women. These results can be used to better inform public health professionals and other regulatory organizations formulating physical activity intervention strategies. PMID:25599374

  3. Gender Differences in Recreational Sports Participation among Taiwanese Adults

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Liang-Ting; Lo, Feng-En; Yang, Chih-Chien; Keller, Joseph Jordan; Lyu, Shu-Yu

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the gender differences in the enjoyment of recreational sports participation among Taiwanese adults. Data were obtained using the 2007 Taiwan Social Change Survey. The questionnaire included a topical module of the International Social Survey Program regarding leisure time and sports. Results showed that male subjects were more likely to participate in recreational sports to improve their appearance and on account of their personal interest. In addition to these factors, female subjects also experienced greater motivation to participate when Taiwanese athletes performed well in international sporting competitions. This study confirmed that the factors influencing enjoyment of recreational sports participation differ among men and women. These results can be used to better inform public health professionals and other regulatory organizations formulating physical activity intervention strategies. PMID:25599374

  4. The relationship between sleep and drug use characteristics in participants with cocaine or methamphetamine use disorders.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, James J; De La Garza, Richard; Jackson, Brian J; Verrico, Christopher D; Ho, Allyson; Iqbal, Tabish; Newton, Thomas F

    2014-10-30

    The goal of this project was to evaluate the relationship between self-reported sleep habits, daytime sleepiness, and drug use variables in individuals with cocaine and methamphetamine (METH) use disorders. Participants with a cocaine or meth use disorder completed questionnaires, including the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), and a demographic/drug use form. Participants with a cocaine (N=51) or meth use disorder (N=85) were separated into those with either high or low sleep deficits. In participants with a cocaine use disorder, ANOVA revealed significantly higher ESS scores among those defined as "poor sleepers" (with a PSQI score >5) when compared to those defined as "good sleepers" (with a PSQI score ≤5). In addition, poor sleepers reported using cocaine for more days out of the past 30 when compared to good sleepers. Interestingly, good sleepers reported using more grams of cocaine/day compared to poor sleepers. In participants with a METH use disorder, ANOVA revealed significantly higher ESS scores among poor sleepers when compared to good sleepers. Finally, individuals with a METH use disorder that endorsed elevated daytime sleepiness also had significantly higher PSQI scores when compared to those with normal daytime sleepiness. The results indicate that drug use variables, such as recent and daily use, may affect sleep quality and daytime sleepiness in individuals with stimulant use disorders; however, further investigations (i.e. in cocaine and METH users that do not meet criteria for a cocaine or METH use disorder) must be conducted in order to provide more conclusive evidence of the impact these usage variables may have on these sleep characteristics.

  5. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  6. PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessments) Participation versus Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeMott, Diana; Banke, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRAs) are performed for projects or programs where the consequences of failure are highly undesirable. PRAs primarily address the level of risk those projects or programs posed during operations. PRAs are often developed after the design has been completed. Design and operational details used to develop models include approved and accepted design information regarding equipment, components, systems and failure data. This methodology basically validates the risk parameters of the project or system design. For high risk or high dollar projects, using PRA methodologies during the design process provides new opportunities to influence the design early in the project life cycle to identify, eliminate or mitigate potential risks. Identifying risk drivers before the design has been set allows the design engineers to understand the inherent risk of their current design and consider potential risk mitigation changes. This can become an iterative process where the PRA model can be used to determine if the mitigation technique is effective in reducing risk. This can result in more efficient and cost effective design changes. PRA methodology can be used to assess the risk of design alternatives and can demonstrate how major design changes or program modifications impact the overall program or project risk. PRA has been used for the last two decades to validate risk predictions and acceptability. Providing risk information which can positively influence final system and equipment design the PRA tool can also participate in design development, providing a safe and cost effective product.

  7. The Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB): Item bank calibration and development of a disorder-generic short form

    PubMed Central

    Baylor, Carolyn; Yorkston, Kathryn; Eadie, Tanya; Kim, Jiseon; Chung, Hyewon; Amtmann, Dagmar

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to calibrate the items for the Communicative Participation Item Bank (CPIB) using Item Response Theory (IRT). One overriding objective was to examine if the IRT item parameters would be consistent across different diagnostic groups, thereby allowing creation of a disorder-generic instrument. The intended outcomes were the final item bank and a short form ready for clinical and research applications. Methods Self-report data were collected from 701 individuals representing four diagnoses: multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and head and neck cancer. Participants completed the CPIB and additional self-report questionnaires. CPIB data were analyzed using the IRT Graded Response Model (GRM). Results The initial set of 94 candidate CPIB items were reduced to an item bank of 46 items demonstrating unidimensionality, local independence, good item fit, and good measurement precision. Differential item function (DIF) analyses detected no meaningful differences across diagnostic groups. A 10-item, disorder-generic short form was generated. Conclusions The CPIB provides speech-language pathologists with a unidimensional, self-report outcomes measurement instrument dedicated to the construct of communicative participation. This instrument may be useful to clinicians and researchers wanting to implement measures of communicative participation in their work. PMID:23816661

  8. Influences of personality traits and continuation intentions on physical activity participation within the theory of planned behaviour.

    PubMed

    Chatzisarantis, Nikos L D; Hagger, Martin S

    2008-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that the theory of planned behaviour is insufficient in capturing all the antecedents of physical activity participation and that continuation intentions or personality traits may improve the predictive validity of the model. The present study examined the combined effects of continuation intentions and personality traits on health behaviour within the theory of planned behaviour. To examine these effects, 180 university students (N = 180, Male = 87, Female = 93, Age = 19.14 years, SD = 0.94) completed self-report measures of the theory of planned behaviour, personality traits and continuation intentions. After 5 weeks, perceived achievement of behavioural outcomes and actual participation in physical activities were assessed. Results supported discriminant validity between continuation intentions, conscientiousness and extroversion and indicated that perceived achievement of behavioural outcomes and continuation intentions of failure predicted physical activity participation after controlling for personality effects, past behaviour and other variables in the theory of planned behaviour. In addition, results indicated that conscientiousness moderated the effects of continuation intentions of failure on physical activity such that continuation intentions of failure predicted physical activity participation among conscientious and not among less conscientious individuals. These findings suggest that the effects of continuation intentions on health behaviour are contingent on personality characteristics.

  9. Characteristics of medical students completing an honors program in pathology.

    PubMed

    Fenderson, B A; Hojat, M; Damjanov, I; Rubin, E

    1999-11-01

    The Honors Program in pathology at Jefferson Medical College provides a voluntary enrichment opportunity for students who have demonstrated a superior ability to cope with the pathology curriculum and who rank in the upper fifth of their class. This study was performed to determine whether honor students possess cognitive and psychosocial attributes that distinguish them from their classmates. Students from five academic years (entering classes 1991 to 1995) were divided into 3 groups: (1) those who completed the Honors Program (n = 85), (2) those in the top 20% of the class who were offered the option but chose not to participate in the Honors Program (n = 128), and (3) students who did not qualify for the program (n = 953). Comparisons between these three groups were made on the basis of selected measures of academic achievement retrieved from the Jefferson Longitudinal Study database and psychosocial data obtained from a questionnaire completed during the first-year orientation. Students who completed the Honors Program in pathology had scored higher on the physical science section of the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and had obtained higher first-year grade point averages than students in both of the other groups. Subsequently, they attained higher second-year grade point averages and scored higher on Step 1 and Step 2 of the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE), compared with their peers in the other groups. There were no significant differences in psychosocial measures between honor students and the rest of the cohort (group 3). However, students in the top 20% of the class who declined the invitation to participate in the Honors Program (group 2) showed higher scores on the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale and the Eysenck Emotional Instability (Neuroticism) Scale than did their classmates. Despite these differences, students who completed the Honors Program (group 1) and eligible students who declined participation (group 2) selected

  10. Market research completed in El Salvador.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    Intensive market research, completed in El Salvador for the contraceptive social marketing project of the Asociacion Demografica Salvadorena (ADS), was designed to obtain a better understanding of Salvadoran usage of and attitudes toward contraceptives in general and ADS products in particular. The research results are being used to develop a new marketing plan for the Contraceptive Social Marketing (CSM) program as it works to increase the program's effectiveness in reaching consumers. Points-of-purchase (retail outlets) were surveyed in November 1982 to study brand presence and vendor perceptions of consumer behavior in order to define the market in terms of products, prices, and distribution. Focus groups were conducted during November and December 1982 to probe consumer awareness and attitudes regarding methods, brands, and purchasing behavior. The results of the focus groups helped guide the development of a door-to-door consumer survey conducted from December 1982 through February 1983 to further define the market in terms of consumer size and characteristics. Personal interviews were conducted with the owner or manager of each of 247 pharmacies selected at random but in proportion to their distributional weight as to location. Aragon and Associates found that standard-dose orals and condoms were sold in 86% of the outlets surveyed and foaming tablets and low-dose pills in 37%. In terms of brand presence in outlets, the CSM products Perla (orals) and Condor (condom) both led their respective categories. In the foaming tablet category Suave had the lowest presence and Neo Sampoon the highest. The difference between reported and actual presence of contraceptives in the outlets was significant: 32% of the sellers of Perla, 18% of the sellers of Condor, and 26% of the sellers of Suave were out of stock at the time of the survey. The difference in average CSM product prices and the next lowest priced brands is very large. Dealers reported that their contraceptive

  11. Market research completed in El Salvador.

    PubMed

    1983-01-01

    Intensive market research, completed in El Salvador for the contraceptive social marketing project of the Asociacion Demografica Salvadorena (ADS), was designed to obtain a better understanding of Salvadoran usage of and attitudes toward contraceptives in general and ADS products in particular. The research results are being used to develop a new marketing plan for the Contraceptive Social Marketing (CSM) program as it works to increase the program's effectiveness in reaching consumers. Points-of-purchase (retail outlets) were surveyed in November 1982 to study brand presence and vendor perceptions of consumer behavior in order to define the market in terms of products, prices, and distribution. Focus groups were conducted during November and December 1982 to probe consumer awareness and attitudes regarding methods, brands, and purchasing behavior. The results of the focus groups helped guide the development of a door-to-door consumer survey conducted from December 1982 through February 1983 to further define the market in terms of consumer size and characteristics. Personal interviews were conducted with the owner or manager of each of 247 pharmacies selected at random but in proportion to their distributional weight as to location. Aragon and Associates found that standard-dose orals and condoms were sold in 86% of the outlets surveyed and foaming tablets and low-dose pills in 37%. In terms of brand presence in outlets, the CSM products Perla (orals) and Condor (condom) both led their respective categories. In the foaming tablet category Suave had the lowest presence and Neo Sampoon the highest. The difference between reported and actual presence of contraceptives in the outlets was significant: 32% of the sellers of Perla, 18% of the sellers of Condor, and 26% of the sellers of Suave were out of stock at the time of the survey. The difference in average CSM product prices and the next lowest priced brands is very large. Dealers reported that their contraceptive

  12. Seasonal differences in the diurnal pattern of cortisol secretion in healthy participants and those with self-assessed seasonal affective disorder.

    PubMed

    Thorn, Lisa; Evans, Phil; Cannon, Anne; Hucklebridge, Frank; Clow, Angela

    2011-07-01

    This study compared the daily pattern of free salivary cortisol secretion in winter and in summer between two groups; participants with self-assessed seasonal affective disorder (SAD) and age- and sex-matched healthy controls. Fifty-two participants completed the study with an equal number in each group. The diurnal pattern of cortisol secretion was assessed across two consecutive weekdays in summer, and two in winter, with conditions being counterbalanced. On each study day participants collected multiple saliva samples in the domestic setting to capture the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and declining levels across the day. In addition, perceived stress, anxiety, depression, state stress and state arousal were assessed using validated questionnaires. There was no evidence for any seasonal changes in psychological data or cortisol pattern for the healthy control population. In summer, self-assessed SAD and control participants had similar psychological and cortisol profiles. In winter however, SAD participants reported greater depression, stress and anxiety, and lower levels of arousal. Furthermore, the CAR was significantly attenuated in SAD participants during winter months. There was no difference in cortisol levels during the rest of the day between controls and SAD participants in winter. In line with the above findings and previous research, there was an inverse relationship between the increase in cortisol following awakening and a measure of seasonality in winter. Furthermore in winter, a general dysphoria construct correlated inversely with the CAR, indicating that participants reporting greater depression, stress and anxiety and lower arousal, exhibited lower CARs. In conclusion, during the shortened photoperiod in winter, the cortisol response to awakening is attenuated in participants with self-assessed SAD in comparison to controls. These findings contribute to the understanding of the physiology of SAD.

  13. Disentangling Public Participation In Science and Biomedicine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This article provides a framework for disentangling the concept of participation, with emphasis on participation in genomic medicine. We have derived seven ‘dimensions’ of participation that are most frequently invoked in the extensive, heterogeneous literature on participation. To exemplify these dimensions, we use material from a database of 102 contemporary cases of participation, and focus here on cases specific to science and medicine. We describe the stakes of public participation in biomedical research, with a focus on genomic medicine and lay out the seven dimensions. Discussion We single out five cases of participation that have particular relevance to the field of genomic medicine, we apply the seven dimensions to show how we can differentiate among forms of participation within this domain. Summary We conclude with some provocations to researchers and some recommendations for taking variation in participation more seriously. PMID:24479693

  14. A Complete Public Archive for the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfand, David J.

    1996-01-01

    Consistent with our proposal to the Astrophysics Data Program in 1992, we have completed the design, construction, documentation, and distribution of a flexible and complete archive of the data collected by the Einstein Imaging Proportional Counter. Along with software and data delivered to the High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center at Goddard Space Flight Center, we have compiled and, where appropriate, published catalogs of point sources, soft sources, hard sources, extended sources, and transient flares detected in the database along with extensive analyses of the instrument's backgrounds and other anomalies. We include in this document a brief summary of the archive's functionality, a description of the scientific catalogs and other results, a bibliography of publications supported in whole or in part under this contract, and a list of personnel whose pre- and post-doctoral education consisted in part in participation in this project.

  15. 41 CFR 105-56.026 - GSA participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Offset (CSO) Procedures-GSA as Paying Agency § 105-56.026 GSA participation. (a) As required under 5 U.S... computer matching. To meet this requirement, creditor agencies will notify FMS of all past-due, legally... 31 U.S.C. 3716(c)(6). Additionally, creditor agencies may notify FMS of past-due, legally...

  16. Accountability to Research Participants: Unresolved Dilemmas and Unravelling Ethics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levinson, Martin P.

    2010-01-01

    Drawing on findings from an ethnographic study of Romani Gypsy groups in England (1996-2000), along with data from follow-up work involving original and additional participants (2005-ongoing), this paper explores several ethical issues that arose. It traces developing relationships across a 13-year period, identifying the problems of attempting to…

  17. Children's Eyewitness Memory: Effects of Participation and Forensic Context.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobey, Ann E.; Goodman, Gail S.

    1992-01-01

    This study, with 39 4-year-olds, found that children had better free recall accuracy and lowered suggestibility when they participated with a "babysitter" rather than observed a babysitter and child. Addition of forensic context (by a policeman prior to questioning) increased error in free recall but did not affect children's accuracy in answering…

  18. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  19. Differences among those who complete and fail to complete inpatient detoxification.

    PubMed

    Blondell, Richard D; Amadasu, Aimiamia; Servoss, Timothy J; Smith, Susan J

    2006-01-01

    Some individuals hospitalized for alcohol or drug detoxification leave against medical advice (AMA). We hypothesized that certain characteristics would be associated with AMA discharges. A case-control study of 1,426 hospital admissions for detoxification (representing 1,080 individuals) was conducted to compare patients leaving the hospital AMA (n=231) with a random sample of those completing detoxification (n=286). Latino ethnicity, detoxification from drugs, Friday or Saturday discharge, Medicaid or no health insurance, and not being treated by one specific attending physician were characteristics associated with an AMA discharge in a backward logistic regression model. Although 85% of the patients with all these characteristics left AMA, only one patient, without any of these five characteristics, did so. We conclude that clinicians can use certain clinical features to predict AMA discharge. Additional research could evaluate if treatment strategies that consider these ethnic and socioeconomic disparities may reduce rates of AMA discharge. PMID:16597577

  20. An Analysis of the Use of Graphical Representation in Participants' Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleich, Laurel; Ledford, Sarah; Orrill, Chandra Hawley; Polly, Drew

    2006-01-01

    InterMath participants spend time in workshops exploring technology-rich mathematical investigations and completing write-ups. These write-ups include a written explanation of their problem solving process, screen captures of files that they generated while completing the investigation and links to these files. This paper examines the use of…

  1. Direct memory access transfer completion notification

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2010-08-17

    Methods, apparatus, and products are disclosed for DMA transfer completion notification that include: inserting, by an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node in an injection FIFO buffer, a data descriptor for an application message to be transferred to a target compute node on behalf of an application on the origin compute node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine, a completion notification descriptor in the injection FIFO buffer after the data descriptor for the message, the completion notification descriptor specifying an address of a completion notification field in application storage for the application; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target compute node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that the transfer of the message is complete, including performing a local direct put operation to store predesignated notification data at the address of the completion notification field.

  2. Additive empirical force field for hexopyranose monosaccharides

    PubMed Central

    Guvench, Olgun; Greene, Shannon N.; Kamath, Ganesh; Brady, John W.; Venable, Richard M.; Pastor, Richard W.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2010-01-01

    We present an all-atom additive empirical force field for the hexopyranose monosaccharide form of glucose and its diastereomers allose, altrose, galactose, gulose, idose, mannose, and talose. The model is developed to be consistent with the CHARMM all-atom biomolecular force fields, and the same parameters are used for all diastereomers, including both the α- and β-anomers of each monosaccharide. The force field is developed in a hierarchical manner and reproduces the gas-phase and condensed-phase properties of small-molecule model compounds corresponding to fragments of pyranose monosaccharides. The resultant parameters are transferred to the full pyranose monosaccharides and additional parameter development is done to achieve a complete hexopyranose monosaccharide force field. Parametrization target data include vibrational frequencies, crystal geometries, solute – water interaction energies, molecular volumes, heats of vaporization, and conformational energies, including those for over 1800 monosaccharide conformations at the MP2/cc-pVTZ//MP2/6-31G(d) level of theory. Though not targeted during parametrization, free energies of aqueous solvation for the model compounds compare favorably with experimental values. Also well-reproduced are monosaccharide crystal unit cell dimensions and ring pucker, densities of concentrated aqueous glucose systems, and the thermodynamic and dynamic properties of the exocyclic torsion in dilute aqueous systems. The new parameter set expands the CHARMM additive force field to allow for simulation of heterogeneous systems that include hexopyranose monosaccharides in addition to proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. PMID:18470966

  3. The Diversity of Cultural Participation: Findings from a National Survey. Building Arts Participation: New Findings from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ostrower, Francie

    2005-01-01

    This survey represents a preliminary step toward demonstrating the diversity of motivations and circumstances that characterize cultural participation. This report examines only live attendance. The evidence presented in this report indicates the pressing need for additional analyses that make diversity a central facet of examining other…

  4. Impact of participation in a theatre programme on quality of life among older adults with chronic conditions: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Hon Keung; Mueller, Kris; Mayor, Ellise; Azuero, Andres

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to evaluate the effect of participation in the "Seasoned Arts At the Samford for You" (SAASY) programme, which included a 6-week acting class and four public performances, on the psychological well-being and health-related quality of life of older adults. Twelve older adults with chronic conditions from a low-income senior apartment and a senior living community participated in the programme. The acting class, led by two professional artists, met for a 2-hour class weekly for six weeks. Participants completed the General Well-being Schedule (GWBS) and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) both at the beginning of the programme and one month after the programme ended. In addition, participants were individually interviewed to explore the perceived impact of the theatre programme on their well-being. Participants reported a significantly higher score in the GWBS and on the physical but not on the mental component summary of the SF-36 at post-SAASY programme. Content analysis of the interview transcripts revealed that participants attained an improved sense of self-worth and self-advocacy and overcame self-imposed limitations. Results showed improvement in psychological well-being and health-related quality of life, most notably in the physical health component of SF-36 after participating in the programme. Practice implications for occupational therapists using drama as a creative leisure occupation to promote health among older adults with chronic conditions may involve analysis of participants' occupational profile, identification of deficit areas and adaptation of the acting programme content to meet specific needs and goals. The present study used a pretest and post test one group design that has numerous inherent limitations that affect the ability to make valid inferences from study findings. A more rigorous research design with a wait-listed control group and collection of outcome measures immediately after

  5. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  6. 34 CFR 200.65 - Determining equitable participation of teachers and families of participating private school...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... families of participating private school children. 200.65 Section 200.65 Education Regulations of the... Determining equitable participation of teachers and families of participating private school children. (a)(1... LEA shall ensure that teachers and families of participating private school children participate on...

  7. 42 CFR 425.306 - Participation agreement and exclusivity of ACO participant TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... participant TINs. 425.306 Section 425.306 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... participant TINs. (a) For purposes of the Shared Savings Program, each ACO participant TIN is required to commit to a participation agreement with CMS. (b) Each ACO participant TIN upon which...

  8. 42 CFR 425.306 - Participation agreement and exclusivity of ACO participant TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... participant TINs. 425.306 Section 425.306 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... participant TINs. (a) For purposes of the Shared Savings Program, each ACO participant TIN is required to commit to a participation agreement with CMS. (b) Each ACO participant TIN upon which...

  9. 42 CFR 425.306 - Participation agreement and exclusivity of ACO participant TINs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... participant TINs. 425.306 Section 425.306 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT... participant TINs. (a) For purposes of the Shared Savings Program, each ACO participant TIN is required to commit to a participation agreement with CMS. (b) Each ACO participant TIN upon which...

  10. 49 CFR 1012.4 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... the public will be admitted as observers only. Active participation, as by asking questions or... 49 CFR part 1116. ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public participation. 1012.4 Section...

  11. 32 CFR 37.1320 - Participant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENT AGREEMENTS Definitions of Terms Used in This Part § 37.1320 Participant. A consortium...-profit participant may be a firm or a segment of a firm (e.g., a division or other business unit)....

  12. 9 CFR 146.22 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Commercial Table-Egg Layer Flocks § 146.22 Participation. (a) Participating commercial table-egg layer flocks... of subpart B of this part. (b) Commercial table-egg laying premises with fewer than 75,000 birds...

  13. 9 CFR 146.22 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Commercial Table-Egg Layer Flocks § 146.22 Participation. (a) Participating commercial table-egg layer flocks... of subpart B of this part. (b) Commercial table-egg laying premises with fewer than 75,000 birds...

  14. 9 CFR 146.22 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Commercial Table-Egg Layer Flocks § 146.22 Participation. (a) Participating commercial table-egg layer flocks... of subpart B of this part. (b) Commercial table-egg laying premises with fewer than 75,000 birds...

  15. 9 CFR 146.22 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Commercial Table-Egg Layer Flocks § 146.22 Participation. (a) Participating commercial table-egg layer flocks... of subpart B of this part. (b) Commercial table-egg laying premises with fewer than 75,000 birds...

  16. 9 CFR 145.42 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY Special Provisions for Turkey Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.42 Participation. (a) Participating turkey flocks, and the eggs...

  17. 9 CFR 145.42 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY Special Provisions for Turkey Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.42 Participation. (a) Participating turkey flocks, and the eggs...

  18. 9 CFR 145.42 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY Special Provisions for Turkey Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.42 Participation. (a) Participating turkey flocks, and the eggs...

  19. 9 CFR 145.42 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY Special Provisions for Turkey Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.42 Participation. (a) Participating turkey flocks, and the eggs...

  20. 9 CFR 145.42 - Participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... LIVESTOCK IMPROVEMENT NATIONAL POULTRY IMPROVEMENT PLAN FOR BREEDING POULTRY Special Provisions for Turkey Breeding Flocks and Products § 145.42 Participation. (a) Participating turkey flocks, and the eggs...

  1. Sediment Properties: E-Area Completion Project

    SciTech Connect

    Millings, M.; Bagwell, L.; Amidon, M.; Dixon, K.

    2011-04-29

    To accommodate a future need for additional waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site, the Solid Waste Management Division (SWMD) designated nine additional plots for development (Kasraii 2007; SRS 2010); these plots are collectively known as the E Area Completion Project (ECP). Subsurface samples were collected from ECP plots 6, 7, 8 and 9 (Figure 1) for chemical and physical property analyses to support Performance Assessment (PA) and Special Analyses (SA) modeling. This document summarizes the sampling and analysis scheme and the resultant data, and provides interpretations of the data particularly in reference to existing soil property data. Analytical data in this document include: gamma log, cone penetrometer log, grain size (sieve and hydrometer), water retention, saturated hydraulic conductivity (falling head permeameter), porosity, dry bulk density, total organic carbon, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray fluorescence data. SRNL provided technical and safety oversight for the fieldwork, which included completion of eight soil borings, four geophysical logs, and the collection of 522 feet of core and 33 Shelby tubes from ECP plots 6, 7, 8, and 9. Boart Longyear provided sonic drilling and logging services. Two soil borings were completed at each location. The first set of boreholes extended into (but did not fully penetrate) the Warley Hill Formation. These boreholes were continuously cored, then geophysically (gamma ray) logged. The recovered core was split, photographed, and described; one half of the core was archived at SRS's Core Lab facilities, and the remaining half was consumed as necessary for testing at SRS and off-site labs. Core descriptions and geophysical data were used to calculate target elevations for Shelby tube samples, which were obtained from the second set of boreholes. Shelby tubes were shipped to MACTEC Engineering and Consulting Inc. (MACTEC) in Atlanta for physical property testing. SRNL deployed their Site Characterization

  2. Teebi hypertelorism syndrome: additional cases.

    PubMed

    Machado-Paula, Ligiane Alves; Guion-Almeida, Maria Leine

    2003-03-01

    We report on two unrelated Brazilian boys who have craniofacial and digital anomalies resembling those reported with Teebi hypertelorism syndrome. Additional features such as cleft lip and palate, large uvula, atypical chin and abnormal scapulae were observed.

  3. A Comparison of Course Completion, Satisfaction, Achievement, and Performance among Non-Profit Professionals Who Complete Andragogical or Pedagogical Online Learning Modules on Grant Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Joe Bernard, Jr.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes among staff members of nonprofit social service agencies who participated in or completed an andragogically-facilitated or a pedagogically-conducted online learning module on foundation grant writing. The efficacy of andragogical methods is unknown and often debated due to scarce empirical…

  4. Polyolefins as additives in plastics

    SciTech Connect

    Deanin, R.D.

    1993-12-31

    Polyolefins are not only major commodity plastics - they are also very useful as additives, both in other polyolefins and also in other types of plastics. This review covers ethylene, propylene, butylene and isobutylene polymers, in blends with each other, and as additives to natural rubber, styrene/butadiene rubber, polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride, polymethyl methacrylate, polyphenylene oxide, polycarbonate, thermoplastic polyesters, polyurethanes, polyamides, and mixed automotive plastics recycling.

  5. Child participation and positive youth development.

    PubMed

    Bruyere, Edmund Bernard

    2010-01-01

    This article explains how a child's right to participation in healthy relationships, experiences, and opportunities promotes positive youth development. The author identifies the substantive articles related to participation, identifies and explains the social anchors vital to promoting participation, highlights the importance of the 40 developmental assets for empowering children with the capacities necessary to assert their right to participation, and concludes by calling for a national family policy guided by the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child.

  6. Food additives and preschool children.

    PubMed

    Martyn, Danika M; McNulty, Breige A; Nugent, Anne P; Gibney, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    Food additives have been used throughout history to perform specific functions in foods. A comprehensive framework of legislation is in place within Europe to control the use of additives in the food supply and ensure they pose no risk to human health. Further to this, exposure assessments are regularly carried out to monitor population intakes and verify that intakes are not above acceptable levels (acceptable daily intakes). Young children may have a higher dietary exposure to chemicals than adults due to a combination of rapid growth rates and distinct food intake patterns. For this reason, exposure assessments are particularly important in this age group. The paper will review the use of additives and exposure assessment methods and examine factors that affect dietary exposure by young children. One of the most widely investigated unfavourable health effects associated with food additive intake in preschool-aged children are suggested adverse behavioural effects. Research that has examined this relationship has reported a variety of responses, with many noting an increase in hyperactivity as reported by parents but not when assessed using objective examiners. This review has examined the experimental approaches used in such studies and suggests that efforts are needed to standardise objective methods of measuring behaviour in preschool children. Further to this, a more holistic approach to examining food additive intakes by preschool children is advisable, where overall exposure is considered rather than focusing solely on behavioural effects and possibly examining intakes of food additives other than food colours.

  7. 34 CFR 85.980 - Participant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Participant. 85.980 Section 85.980 Education Office of the Secretary, Department of Education GOVERNMENTWIDE DEBARMENT AND SUSPENSION (NONPROCUREMENT) Definitions § 85.980 Participant. Participant means any person who submits a proposal for or who enters into...

  8. 20 CFR 632.85 - Participant limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management § 632.85 Participant limitations... other statutory limits, participation in work experience shall be limited to a maximum of 1,000 hours... limitation on work experience participation in JTPA set forth in paragraph (a) of this section: (1) Shall...

  9. 20 CFR 632.85 - Participant limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Program Design and Management § 632.85 Participant limitations... other statutory limits, participation in work experience shall be limited to a maximum of 1,000 hours... limitation on work experience participation in JTPA set forth in paragraph (a) of this section: (1) Shall...

  10. Individual and Group Credit for Class Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Cora M.; Galyon, Charles E.; Forbes, Bethany E.; Blondin, Carolyn A.; Williams, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    This research study focused on the use of cooperative groups to facilitate class-wide participation, especially for initially low participants. Undergraduates from three sections of a relatively large educational psychology course recorded their class participation in all course units. Four of the five units in each section offered either…

  11. 12 CFR 614.4330 - Loan participations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loan participations. 614.4330 Section 614.4330 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM LOAN POLICIES AND OPERATIONS Loan Purchases and Sales § 614.4330 Loan participations. Agreements to purchase or sell a participation...

  12. Child Participation and Disaster Risk Reduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez, Yany; Hayden, Jacqueline; Cologon, Kathy; Hadley, Fay

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that child participation can have positive results in the rescue, relief and rehabilitation phases of a disaster. Currently child participation is achieving increased attention as a component of disaster risk reduction (DRR). This paper examines the ongoing dialogues on child participation and reviews pertinent literature…

  13. 49 CFR 511.17 - Public participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Public participation. 511.17 Section 511.17... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ADJUDICATIVE PROCEDURES Pleadings; Form; Execution; Service of Documents § 511.17 Public participation. Participant Status. Any person interested in a proceeding...

  14. Participation in Adult Education: Attitudes and Barriers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeren, Ellen

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we control the intention theory of Fishbein and Ajzen (1980) for the participation in an adult education course. Based on the Flemish Eurostat Adult Education Survey, we reveal that participants in adult education have a more positive attitude towards learning and that within the group of non-participants, those who formulate an…

  15. Factors that Influence Participation in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vonderwell, Selma; Zachariah, Sajit

    2005-01-01

    This study explored what factors influenced learner participation in two sections of a graduate online course at a Midwestern university. Findings indicated that online learner participation and patterns of participation are influenced by the following factors: technology and interface characteristics, content area experience, student roles and…

  16. Youth Participation: A Concept Paper. RFY Reports.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollar, Bruce

    The document establishes the need for a nationwide youth participation program and suggest strategies and problems in implementing such programs. Youth participation provides a means for young people to be released from their isolation from the rest of society by providing the opportunity for participation in socially productive activities. The…

  17. Encouraging Undergraduate Class Participation: A Student Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Nichole S.; Gragg, Marcia N.; Cramer, Kenneth M.

    2009-01-01

    Undergraduate classes typically involve a professor lecturing to 100 or more students. Too often, this results in minimal opportunities for student participation. Positive reinforcement was used to promote student participation (i.e., defined as relevant comments or questions) in a second-year psychology class (N = 97). Class participation was…

  18. 5 CFR 1651.8 - Participant's estate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Participant's estate. 1651.8 Section 1651... Participant's estate. If the account is to be paid to the duly appointed executor or administrator of the participant's estate under § 1651.2(a)(5), the following rules apply: (a) Appointment by court. The...

  19. 24 CFR 1003.604 - Citizen participation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Citizen participation. 1003.604... Requirements § 1003.604 Citizen participation. (a) In order to permit residents of Indian tribes and Alaska.... Meetings shall be scheduled in ways and at times that will allow participation by residents. (3)...

  20. Research would not be possible without participants.

    PubMed

    Halcomb, Elizabeth; Peters, Kath

    2016-09-01

    Research would not be possible without participants. While this may seem like an obvious statement, all too often researchers underestimate the importance of the participants in their work, and the impact that researcher relationships can have on participation and data quality. PMID:27641698