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Sample records for addition reactive oxygen

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species as Additional Determinants for Cytotoxicity of Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B.

    PubMed

    Frädrich, Claudia; Beer, Lara-Antonia; Gerhard, Ralf

    2016-01-18

    Clostridium difficile infections can induce mild to severe diarrhoea and the often associated characteristic pseudomembranous colitis. Two protein toxins, the large glucosyltransferases TcdA and TcdB, are the main pathogenicity factors that can induce all clinical symptoms in animal models. The classical molecular mode of action of these homologous toxins is the inhibition of Rho GTPases by mono-glucosylation. Rho-inhibition leads to breakdown of the actin cytoskeleton, induces stress-activated and pro-inflammatory signaling and eventually results in apoptosis of the affected cells. An increasing number of reports, however, have documented further qualities of TcdA and TcdB, including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by target cells. This review summarizes observations dealing with the production of ROS induced by TcdA and TcdB, dissects pathways that contribute to this phenomenon and speculates about ROS in mediating pathogenesis. In conclusion, ROS have to be considered as a discrete, glucosyltransferase-independent quality of at least TcdB, triggered by different mechanisms.

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species as Additional Determinants for Cytotoxicity of Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B

    PubMed Central

    Frädrich, Claudia; Beer, Lara-Antonia; Gerhard, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections can induce mild to severe diarrhoea and the often associated characteristic pseudomembranous colitis. Two protein toxins, the large glucosyltransferases TcdA and TcdB, are the main pathogenicity factors that can induce all clinical symptoms in animal models. The classical molecular mode of action of these homologous toxins is the inhibition of Rho GTPases by mono-glucosylation. Rho-inhibition leads to breakdown of the actin cytoskeleton, induces stress-activated and pro-inflammatory signaling and eventually results in apoptosis of the affected cells. An increasing number of reports, however, have documented further qualities of TcdA and TcdB, including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by target cells. This review summarizes observations dealing with the production of ROS induced by TcdA and TcdB, dissects pathways that contribute to this phenomenon and speculates about ROS in mediating pathogenesis. In conclusion, ROS have to be considered as a discrete, glucosyltransferase-independent quality of at least TcdB, triggered by different mechanisms. PMID:26797634

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species as Additional Determinants for Cytotoxicity of Clostridium difficile Toxins A and B.

    PubMed

    Frädrich, Claudia; Beer, Lara-Antonia; Gerhard, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infections can induce mild to severe diarrhoea and the often associated characteristic pseudomembranous colitis. Two protein toxins, the large glucosyltransferases TcdA and TcdB, are the main pathogenicity factors that can induce all clinical symptoms in animal models. The classical molecular mode of action of these homologous toxins is the inhibition of Rho GTPases by mono-glucosylation. Rho-inhibition leads to breakdown of the actin cytoskeleton, induces stress-activated and pro-inflammatory signaling and eventually results in apoptosis of the affected cells. An increasing number of reports, however, have documented further qualities of TcdA and TcdB, including the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by target cells. This review summarizes observations dealing with the production of ROS induced by TcdA and TcdB, dissects pathways that contribute to this phenomenon and speculates about ROS in mediating pathogenesis. In conclusion, ROS have to be considered as a discrete, glucosyltransferase-independent quality of at least TcdB, triggered by different mechanisms. PMID:26797634

  4. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  5. TRPA1 activation leads to neurogenic vasodilatation: involvement of reactive oxygen nitrogen species in addition to CGRP and NO

    PubMed Central

    Aubdool, Aisah A; Kodji, Xenia; Abdul‐Kader, Nayaab; Heads, Richard; Fernandes, Elizabeth S; Bevan, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Transient receptor potential ankyrin‐1 (TRPA1) activation is known to mediate neurogenic vasodilatation. We investigated the mechanisms involved in TRPA1‐mediated peripheral vasodilatation in vivo using the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde. Experimental Approach Changes in vascular ear blood flow were measured in anaesthetized mice using laser Doppler flowmetry. Key Results Topical application of cinnamaldehyde to the mouse ear caused a significant increase in blood flow in the skin of anaesthetized wild‐type (WT) mice but not in TRPA1 knockout (KO) mice. Cinnamaldehyde‐induced vasodilatation was inhibited by the pharmacological blockade of the potent microvascular vasodilator neuropeptide CGRP and neuronal NOS‐derived NO pathways. Cinnamaldehyde‐mediated vasodilatation was significantly reduced by treatment with reactive oxygen nitrogen species (RONS) scavenger such as catalase and the SOD mimetic TEMPOL, supporting a role of RONS in the downstream vasodilator TRPA1‐mediated response. Co‐treatment with a non‐selective NOS inhibitor L‐NAME and antioxidant apocynin further inhibited the TRPA1‐mediated vasodilatation. Cinnamaldehyde treatment induced the generation of peroxynitrite that was blocked by the peroxynitrite scavenger FeTPPS and shown to be dependent on TRPA1, as reflected by an increase in protein tyrosine nitration in the skin of WT, but not in TRPA1 KO mice. Conclusion and Implications This study provides in vivo evidence that TRPA1‐induced vasodilatation mediated by cinnamaldehyde requires neuronal NOS‐derived NO, in addition to the traditional neuropeptide component. A novel role of peroxynitrite is revealed, which is generated downstream of TRPA1 activation by cinnamaldehyde. This mechanistic pathway underlying TRPA1‐mediated vasodilatation may be important in understanding the role of TRPA1 in pathophysiological situations. PMID:27189253

  6. Durability to oxygen reactive ion etching enhanced by addition of synthesized bis(trimethylsilyl)phenyl-containing (meth)acrylates in ultraviolet nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Shunya; Sato, Hiroki; Tasaki, Yuhei; Watanuki, Kimihito; Nemoto, Nobukatsu; Nakagawa, Masaru

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the selection of bis(trimethylsilyl)phenyl-containing (meth)acrylates as additives to improve the durability to oxygen reactive ion etching (O2 RIE) of sub-50 nm imprint resist patterns suitable for bubble-defect-free UV nanoimprinting with a readily condensable gas. 2,5-Bis(2-acryloyloxyethoxy)-1,4-bis(trimethylsilyl)benzene, which has a diacrylate chemical structure similar to that of glycerol 1,3-diglycerolate diacrylate used as a base monomer, and 3-(2-methacryloyloxyethoxy)-1-(hydroxylethoxy)-2-propoxy-3,5-bis(trimethylsilyl)benzene, which has a hydroxy group similar to the base monomer, were synthesized taking into consideration the Ohnishi and ring parameters, and the oxidization of the trimethylsilyl moiety to inorganic species during O2 RIE. The addition of the latter liquid additive to the base monomer decreased etching rate owing to the good miscibility of the additive in the base monomer, while the addition of the former crystalline additive caused phase separation after UV nanoimprinting. The latter additive worked as a compatibilizer to the former additive, which is preferred for etching durability improvement. The coexistence of the additives enabled the fabrication of a 45 nm line-and-space resist pattern by UV nanoimprinting, and its residual layer could be removed by O2 RIE.

  7. Titanium-Oxygen Reactivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafey, J. E.; Scheck, W. G.; Witzell, W. E.

    1962-01-01

    A program has been conducted at Astronautics to investigate the likelihood of occurrence of the catastrophic oxidation of titanium alloy sheet under conditions which simulate certain cases of accidental failure of the metal while it is in contact with liquid or gaseous oxygen. Three methods of fracturing the metal were used; they consisted of mechanical puncture, tensile fracture of welded joints, and perforation by very high velocity particles. The results of the tests which have been conducted provide further evidence of the reactivity of titanium with liquid and gaseous oxygen. The evidence indicates that the rapid fracturing of titanium sheet while it is in contact with oxygen initiates the catastrophic oxidation reaction. Initiation occurred when the speed of the fracture was some few feet per second, as in both the drop-weight puncture tests and the static tensile fracture tests of welded joints, as well as when the speed was several thousand feet per second, as in the simulated micrometeoroid penetration tests. The slow propagation of a crack, however, did not initiate the reaction. It may logically be concluded that the localized frictional heat of rapid fracture and/or spontaneous oxidation (exothermic) of minute particles emanating from the fracture cause initiation of the reaction. Under conditions of slow fracture, however, the small heat generated may be adequately dissipated and the reaction is not initiated. A portion of the study conducted consisted of investigating various means by which the reaction might be retarded or prevented. Providing a "barrier" at the titanium-oxygen interface consisting of either aluminum metal or a coating of a petroleum base corrosion inhibitor appeared to be only partially effective in retarding the reaction. The accidental puncturing or similar rupturing of thin-walled pressurized oxygen tanks on missiles and space vehicle will usually constitute loss of function, and may sometimes cause their catastrophic destruction

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sugamura, Koichi; Keaney, John F.

    2011-01-01

    Based on the ‘free-radical theory’ of disease, researchers have been trying to elucidate the role of oxidative stress from free radicals in cardiovascular disease. Considerable data indicate that ROS and oxidative stress are important features of cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis, hypertension, and congestive heart failure. However, blanket strategies with antioxidants to ameliorate cardiovascular disease have not generally yielded favorable results. However, our understanding or reactive oxygen species has evolved to the point that we now realize these species have important roles in physiology as well as pathophysiology. Thus, it is overly simplistic to assume a general antioxidant strategy will yield specific effects on cardiovascular disease. Indeed, there are several sources of reactive oxygen species that are known to be active in the cardiovascular system. This review will address our understanding of reactive oxygen species sources in cardiovascular disease and both animal and human data defining how reactive oxygen species contribute to physiology and pathology. PMID:21627987

  9. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES AND COLORECTAL CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Safe, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Several agents used for treatment of colon and other cancers induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) and this plays an important role in their anticancer activities. In addition to the well-known proapoptotic effects of ROS inducers, these compounds also decrease expression of specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors Sp1, Sp3 and Sp4 and several pro-oncogenic Spregulated genes important for cancer cell proliferation, survival and metastasis. The mechanism of these responses involve ROS-dependent downregulation of microRNA-27a (miR-27a) or miR-20a (and paralogs) and induction of two Sp-repressors, ZBTB10 and ZBTB4 respectively. This pathway significantly contributes to the anticancer activity of ROS inducers and should be considered in development of drug combinations for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25584043

  10. Rosacea, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Azelaic Acid

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Rosacea is a common skin condition thought to be primarily an inflammatory disorder. Neutrophils, in particular, have been implicated in the inflammation associated with rosacea and mediate many of their effects through the release of reactive oxygen species. Recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in the pathophysiology of rosacea has been recognized. Many effective agents for rosacea, including topical azelaic acid and topical metronidazole, have anti-inflammatory properties. in-vitro models have demonstrated the potent antioxidant effects of azelaic acid, providing a potential mechanistic explanation for its efficacy in the treatment of rosacea. PMID:20967185

  11. Formation and Detoxification of Reactive Oxygen Species

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuciel, Radoslawa; Mazurkiewicz, Aleksandra

    2004-01-01

    A model of reactive oxygen species metabolism is proposed as a laboratory exercise for students. The superoxide ion in this model is generated during the reaction of oxidation of xanthine, catalyzed by xanthine oxidase. The effect of catalase, superoxide dismutase, and allopurinol on superoxide ion generation and removal in this system is also…

  12. Superoxide Dismutases and Reactive Oxygen Species

    SciTech Connect

    Cabelli, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    The 'free radical theory' of aging was introduced over a half-century ago. In this theory, much of the deleterious effects of aging were attributed to the cumulative buildup of damage from reactive oxygen species. When discussing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in aerobic systems, both superoxide radicals (O{sub 2}{sup -}) and superoxide dismutases (SODs) are considered to play prominent roles. O{sub 2}{sup -} is formed by attachment of the electron to oxygen (O{sub 2}) that is present in tens to hundreds of micromolar concentration in vivo. SODs are enzymes that serve to eliminate O{sub 2}{sup -} by rapidly converting it to O{sub 2} and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Both the radical and the enzyme will be discussed with the focus on the systems that are present in humans.

  13. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  14. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES: IMPACT ON SKELETAL MUSCLE

    PubMed Central

    Powers, Scott K.; Ji, Li Li; Kavazis, Andreas N.; Jackson, Malcolm J.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that contracting muscles produce both reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Although the sources of oxidant production during exercise continue to be debated, growing evidence suggests that mitochondria are not the dominant source. Regardless of the sources of oxidants in contracting muscles, intense and prolonged exercise can result in oxidative damage to both proteins and lipids in the contracting myocytes. Further, oxidants regulate numerous cell signaling pathways and modulate the expression of many genes. This oxidant-mediated change in gene expression involves changes at transcriptional, mRNA stability, and signal transduction levels. Furthermore, numerous products associated with oxidant-modulated genes have been identified and include antioxidant enzymes, stress proteins, and mitochondrial electron transport proteins. Interestingly, low and physiological levels of reactive oxygen species are required for normal force production in skeletal muscle, but high levels of reactive oxygen species result in contractile dysfunction and fatigue. Ongoing research continues to explore the redox-sensitive targets in muscle that are responsible for both redox-regulation of muscle adaptation and oxidant-mediated muscle fatigue. PMID:23737208

  15. Additively Manufactured Metals in Oxygen Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Metals produced by additive manufacturing methods, such as Powder Bed Fusion Technology, are now mature enough to be considered for qualification in human spaceflight oxygen systems. The mechanical properties of metals produced through AM processes are being systematically studied. However, it is unknown whether AM metals in oxygen applications may present an increased risk of flammability or ignition as compared to wrought metals of the same metallurgical composition due to increased porosity. Per NASA-STD-6001B materials to be used in oxygen system applications shall be based on flammability and combustion test data, followed by a flammability assessment. Without systematic flammability and ignition testing in oxygen there is no credible method for NASA to accurately evaluate the risk of using AM metals in oxygen systems.

  16. Signaling functions of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Forman, Henry Jay; Maiorino, Matilde; Ursini, Fulvio

    2010-02-01

    We review signaling by reactive oxygen species, which is emerging as a major physiological process. However, among the reactive oxygen species, H(2)O(2) best fulfills the requirements of being a second messenger. Its enzymatic production and degradation, along with the requirements for the oxidation of thiols by H(2)O(2), provide the specificity for time and place that are required in signaling. Both thermodynamic and kinetic considerations suggest that among possible oxidation states of cysteine, formation of sulfenic acid derivatives or disulfides can be relevant as thiol redox switches in signaling. In this work, the general constraints that are required for protein thiol oxidation by H(2)O(2) to be fast enough to be relevant for signaling are discussed in light of the mechanism of oxidation of the catalytic cysteine or selenocysteine in thiol peroxidases. While the nonenzymatic reaction between thiol and H(2)O(2) is, in most cases, too slow to be relevant in signaling, the enzymatic catalysis of thiol oxidation by these peroxidases provides a potential mechanism for redox signaling.

  17. Senescence, Stress, and Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Jajic, Ivan; Sarna, Tadeusz; Strzalka, Kazimierz

    2015-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the earliest responses of plant cells to various biotic and abiotic stresses. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by oxidation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene expression, and decomposition of biomembranes. On the other hand, they also have a signaling role and changes in production of ROS can act as signals that change the transcription of genes that favor the acclimation of plants to abiotic stresses. Among the ROS, it is believed that H2O2 causes the largest changes in the levels of gene expression in plants. A wide range of plant responses has been found to be triggered by H2O2 such as acclimation to drought, photooxidative stress, and induction of senescence. Our knowledge on signaling roles of singlet oxygen (1O2) has been limited by its short lifetime, but recent experiments with a flu mutant demonstrated that singlet oxygen does not act primarily as a toxin but rather as a signal that activates several stress-response pathways. In this review we summarize the latest progress on the signaling roles of ROS during senescence and abiotic stresses and we give a short overview of the methods that can be used for their assessment. PMID:27135335

  18. Reactive oxygen species in redox cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lingying; Chuang, Chia-Chen; Wu, Shiyong; Zuo, Li

    2015-10-10

    The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells has been intensively studied for the past two decades. Cancer cells mostly have higher basal ROS levels than their normal counterparts. The induction of ROS has been shown to be associated with cancer development, metastasis, progression, and survival. Various therapeutic approaches targeting intracellular ROS levels have yielded mixed results. As widely accepted dietary supplements, antioxidants demonstrate both ROS scavenging ability and anti-cancer characteristics. However, antioxidants may not always be safe to use since excessive intake of antioxidants could lead to serious health concerns. In this review, we have evaluated the production and scavenging systems of ROS in cells, as well as the beneficial and harmful roles of ROS in cancer cells. We also examine the effect of antioxidants in cancer treatment, the effect of combined treatment of antioxidants with traditional cancer therapies, and the side effects of excessive antioxidant intake.

  19. Downregulation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Chul-Ho; Joo, Sang Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by diverse anti-cancer drugs or phytochemicals has been closely related with the induction of apoptosis in cancers. Also, the downregulation of ROS by these chemicals has been found to block initiation of carcinogenesis. Therefore, modulation of ROS by phytochemicals emerges as a crucial mechanism to regulate apoptosis in cancer prevention or therapy. This review summarizes the current understanding of the selected chemical compounds and related cellular components that modulate ROS during apoptotic process. Metformin, quercetin, curcumin, vitamin C, and other compounds have been shown to downregulate ROS in the cellular apoptotic process, and some of them even induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The cellular components mediating the downregulation of ROS include nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 antioxidant signaling pathway, thioredoxin, catalase, glutathione, heme oxygenase-1, and uncoupling proteins. The present review provides information on the relationship between these compounds and the cellular components in modulating ROS in apoptotic cancer cells. PMID:27051644

  20. Imaging reactive oxygen species in arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Tsung; Tung, Ching-Hsuan; Weissleder, Ralph

    2004-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of arthritides. Luminol was used as the primary reporter of ROS and photons resulting from the chemiluminescence reaction were detected using a super-cooled CCD photon counting system. Luminol was injected intravenously into groups of animals with different models of arthritis. Imaging signal correlated well with the severity of arthritis in focal and pan-arthritis as determined by histological measurement of ROS by formazan. Measurements were highly reproducible, sensitive, and repeatable. In vivo chemiluminescence imaging is expected to become a useful modality to elucidate the role of ROS in the pathogenesis of arthritides and in determining therapeutic efficacy of protective therapies.

  1. Metabolic Stress, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Euy-Myoung; Liu, Man; Sturdy, Megan; Gao, Ge; Varghese, Susan T.; Sovari, Ali A.; Dudley, Samuel C.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac arrhythmias can cause sudden cardiac death (SCD) and add to the current heart failure (HF) health crisis. Nevertheless, the pathological processes underlying arrhythmias are unclear. Arrhythmic conditions are associated with systemic and cardiac oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). In excitable cardiac cells, ROS regulate both cellular metabolism and ion homeostasis. Increasing evidence suggests that elevated cellular ROS can cause alterations of the cardiac sodium channel (Nav1.5), abnormal Ca2+ handling, changes of mitochondrial function, and gap junction remodeling, leading to arrhythmogenesis. This review summarizes our knowledge of the mechanisms by which ROS may cause arrhythmias and discusses potential therapeutic strategies to prevent arrhythmias by targeting ROS and its consequences. PMID:21978629

  2. Production and Consumption of Reactive Oxygen Species by Fullerenes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen ...

  3. Influence of reactive oxygen species on the sterilization of microbes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of reactive oxygen species on living cells, including various microbes, is discussed. A sterilization experiment with bacterial endospores reveals that an argoneoxygen plasma jet very effectively kills endospores of Bacillus atrophaeus (ATCC 9372), thereby indicating that oxygen radic...

  4. Arsenic, reactive oxygen, and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ellinsworth, David C

    2015-06-01

    Human exposure to drinking water contaminated with arsenic is a serious global health concern and predisposes to cardiovascular disease states, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and microvascular disease. The most sensitive target of arsenic toxicity in the vasculature is the endothelium, and incubation of these cells with low concentrations of arsenite, a naturally occurring and highly toxic inorganic form of arsenic, rapidly induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation via activation of a specific NADPH oxidase (Nox2). Arsenite also induces ROS accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells, but this is relatively delayed because, depending on the vessel from which they originate, these cells often lack Nox2 and/or its essential regulatory cytosolic subunits. The net effect of such activity is attenuation of endothelium-dependent conduit artery dilation via superoxide anion-mediated scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) and inhibition and downregulation of endothelial NO synthase, events that are temporally matched to the accumulation of oxidants across the vessel wall. By contrast, ROS induced by the more toxic organic trivalent arsenic metabolites (monomethylarsonous and dimethylarsinous acids) may originate from sources other than Nox2. As such, the mechanisms through which vascular oxidative stress develops in vivo under continuous exposure to all three of these potent arsenicals are unknown. This review is a comprehensive analysis of the mechanisms that mediate arsenic effects associated with Nox2 activation, ROS activity, and endothelial dysfunction, and also considers future avenues of research into what is a relatively poorly understood topic with major implications for human health.

  5. Reactive oxygen species and redox compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Kaludercic, Nina; Deshwal, Soni; Di Lisa, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and signaling are of major importance and regulate a number of processes in physiological conditions. A disruption in redox status regulation, however, has been associated with numerous pathological conditions. In recent years it has become increasingly clear that oxidative and reductive modifications are confined in a spatio-temporal manner. This makes ROS signaling similar to that of Ca2+ or other second messengers. Some subcellular compartments are more oxidizing (such as lysosomes or peroxisomes) whereas others are more reducing (mitochondria, nuclei). Moreover, although more reducing, mitochondria are especially susceptible to oxidation, most likely due to the high number of exposed thiols present in that compartment. Recent advances in the development of redox probes allow specific measurement of defined ROS in different cellular compartments in intact living cells or organisms. The availability of these tools now allows simultaneous spatio-temporal measurements and correlation between ROS generation and organelle and/or cellular function. The study of ROS compartmentalization and microdomains will help elucidate their role in physiology and disease. Here we will examine redox probes currently available and how ROS generation may vary between subcellular compartments. Furthermore, we will discuss ROS compartmentalization in physiological and pathological conditions focusing our attention on mitochondria, since their vulnerability to oxidative stress is likely at the basis of several diseases. PMID:25161621

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species in Skeletal Muscle Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Barbieri, Elena; Sestili, Piero

    2012-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a ubiquitous phenomenon in eukaryotic cells' life. Up to the 1990s of the past century, ROS have been solely considered as toxic species resulting in oxidative stress, pathogenesis and aging. However, there is now clear evidence that ROS are not merely toxic species but also—within certain concentrations—useful signaling molecules regulating physiological processes. During intense skeletal muscle contractile activity myotubes' mitochondria generate high ROS flows: this renders skeletal muscle a tissue where ROS hold a particular relevance. According to their hormetic nature, in muscles ROS may trigger different signaling pathways leading to diverging responses, from adaptation to cell death. Whether a “positive” or “negative” response will prevail depends on many variables such as, among others, the site of ROS production, the persistence of ROS flow or target cells' antioxidant status. In this light, a specific threshold of physiological ROS concentrations above which ROS exert negative, toxic effects is hard to determine, and the concept of “physiologically compatible” levels of ROS would better fit with such a dynamic scenario. In this review these concepts will be discussed along with the most relevant signaling pathways triggered and/or affected by ROS in skeletal muscle. PMID:22175016

  7. Arsenic, reactive oxygen, and endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ellinsworth, David C

    2015-06-01

    Human exposure to drinking water contaminated with arsenic is a serious global health concern and predisposes to cardiovascular disease states, such as hypertension, atherosclerosis, and microvascular disease. The most sensitive target of arsenic toxicity in the vasculature is the endothelium, and incubation of these cells with low concentrations of arsenite, a naturally occurring and highly toxic inorganic form of arsenic, rapidly induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation via activation of a specific NADPH oxidase (Nox2). Arsenite also induces ROS accumulation in vascular smooth muscle cells, but this is relatively delayed because, depending on the vessel from which they originate, these cells often lack Nox2 and/or its essential regulatory cytosolic subunits. The net effect of such activity is attenuation of endothelium-dependent conduit artery dilation via superoxide anion-mediated scavenging of nitric oxide (NO) and inhibition and downregulation of endothelial NO synthase, events that are temporally matched to the accumulation of oxidants across the vessel wall. By contrast, ROS induced by the more toxic organic trivalent arsenic metabolites (monomethylarsonous and dimethylarsinous acids) may originate from sources other than Nox2. As such, the mechanisms through which vascular oxidative stress develops in vivo under continuous exposure to all three of these potent arsenicals are unknown. This review is a comprehensive analysis of the mechanisms that mediate arsenic effects associated with Nox2 activation, ROS activity, and endothelial dysfunction, and also considers future avenues of research into what is a relatively poorly understood topic with major implications for human health. PMID:25788710

  8. Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Galli, Francesco; Piroddi, Marta; Annetti, Claudia; Aisa, Cristina; Floridi, Emanuela; Floridi, Ardesio

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses different aspects concerning classification/nomenclature, biochemical properties and pathophysiological roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which are pivotal to interpret the concept of oxidative stress. In vitro studies in both the prokaryotes and eukaryotes clearly demonstrate that exogenous or constitutive and inducible endogenous sources of ROS together with cofactors such as transition metals can damage virtually all the biomolecules. This adverse chemistry is at the origin of structural and metabolic defects that ultimately may lead to cell dysfunction and death as underlying mechanisms in tissue degeneration processes. The same biomolecular interpretation of aging has been proposed to embodies an oxidative stress-based process and oxidative stress may virtually accompany all the inflammatory events. As a consequence, ROS have proposed to play several roles in the pathogenesis of chronic-degenerative conditions, such as athero-thrombotic events, neurodegeneration, cancer, some forms of anemia, auto-immune diseases, and the entire comorbidity of uremia and diabetes. Nowadays, the chance to investigate biochemical and toxicological aspects of ROS with advanced biomolecular tools has, if needed, still more emphasized the interest on this area of biomedicine. These technological advancements and the huge information available in literature represent in our time a challenge to further understand the clinical meaning of oxidative stress and to develop specific therapeutic strategies.

  9. Dual-energy precursor and nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 activator treatment additively improve redox glutathione levels and neuron survival in aging and Alzheimer mouse neurons upstream of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debolina; LeVault, Kelsey R; Brewer, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether glutathione (GSH) loss or increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) are more important to neuron loss, aging, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we stressed or boosted GSH levels in neurons isolated from aging 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those from age-matched nontransgenic (non-Tg) neurons. Here, using titrating with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (GCL), we observed that GSH depletion increased neuronal death of 3xTg-AD cultured neurons at increasing rates across the age span, whereas non-Tg neurons were resistant to GSH depletion until old age. Remarkably, the rate of neuron loss with ROS did not increase in old age and was the same for both genotypes, which indicates that cognitive deficits in the AD model were not caused by ROS. Therefore, we targeted for neuroprotection activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2) by 18 alpha glycyrrhetinic acid to stimulate GSH synthesis through GCL. This balanced stimulation of a number of redox enzymes restored the lower levels of Nrf2 and GCL seen in 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those of non-Tg neurons and promoted translocation of Nrf2 to the nucleus. By combining the Nrf2 activator together with the NADH precursor, nicotinamide, we increased neuron survival against amyloid beta stress in an additive manner. These stress tests and neuroprotective treatments suggest that the redox environment is more important for neuron survival than ROS. The dual neuroprotective treatment with nicotinamide and an Nrf2 inducer indicates that these age-related and AD-related changes are reversible.

  10. Reactive oxygen species and boar sperm function.

    PubMed

    Awda, Basim J; Mackenzie-Bell, Meghan; Buhr, Mary M

    2009-09-01

    Boar spermatozoa are very susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS), but ROS involvement in damage and/or capacitation is unclear. The impact of exposing fresh boar spermatozoa to an ROS-generating system (xanthine/xanthine oxidase; XA/XO) on sperm ROS content, membrane lipid peroxidation, phospholipase (PL) A activity, and motility, viability, and capacitation was contrasted to ROS content and sperm function after cryopreservation. Exposing boar sperm (n = 4-5 ejaculates) to the ROS-generating system for 30 min rapidly increased hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and lipid peroxidation in all sperm, increased PLA in dead sperm, and did not affect intracellular O2- (flow cytometry of sperm labeled with 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorscein diacetate, BODIPY 581/591 C11, bis-BODIPY-FL C11, hydroethidine, respectively; counterstained for viability). Sperm viability remained high, but sperm became immotile. Cryopreservation decreased sperm motility, viability, and intracellular O2- significantly, but did not affect H2O2. As expected, more sperm incubated in capacitating media than Beltsville thawing solution buffer underwent acrosome reactions and protein tyrosine phosphorylation (four proteins, 58-174 kDa); which proteins were tyrosine phosphorylated was pH dependent. Pre-exposing sperm to the ROS-generating system increased the percentage of sperm that underwent acrosome reactions after incubation in capacitating conditions (P < 0.025), and decreased capacitation-dependent increases in two tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins (P < or = 0.035). In summary, H2O2 is the major free radical mediating direct ROS effects, but not cryopreservation changes, on boar sperm. Boar sperm motility, acrosome integrity, and lipid peroxidation are more sensitive indicators of oxidative stress than viability and PLA activity. ROS may stimulate the acrosome reaction in boar sperm through membrane lipid peroxidation and PLA activation. PMID:19357363

  11. Skin, Reactive Oxygen Species, and Circadian Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Mary A.; Nihal, Minakshi; Wood, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Skin, a complex organ and the body's first line of defense against environmental insults, plays a critical role in maintaining homeostasis in an organism. This balance is maintained through a complex network of cellular machinery and signaling events, including those regulating oxidative stress and circadian rhythms. These regulatory mechanisms have developed integral systems to protect skin cells and to signal to the rest of the body in the event of internal and environmental stresses. Recent Advances: Interestingly, several signaling pathways and many bioactive molecules have been found to be involved and even important in the regulation of oxidative stress and circadian rhythms, especially in the skin. It is becoming increasingly evident that these two regulatory systems may, in fact, be interconnected in the regulation of homeostasis. Important examples of molecules that connect the two systems include serotonin, melatonin, vitamin D, and vitamin A. Critical Issues: Excessive reactive oxygen species and/or dysregulation of antioxidant system and circadian rhythms can cause critical errors in maintaining proper barrier function and skin health, as well as overall homeostasis. Unfortunately, the modern lifestyle seems to contribute to increasing alterations in redox balance and circadian rhythms, thereby posing a critical problem for normal functioning of the living system. Future Directions: Since the oxidative stress and circadian rhythm systems seem to have areas of overlap, future research needs to be focused on defining the interactions between these two important systems. This may be especially important in the skin where both systems play critical roles in protecting the whole body. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2982–2996. PMID:24111846

  12. Reactive Additives for Phenylethynyl-Containing Resins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W.; Smith, Joseph G., Jr.; Hergenrother, Paul M.; Rommel, Monica L.

    2005-01-01

    Phenylethynyl-containing reactive additive (PERA) compounds and mixtures have been found to be useful for improving the processability of oligomers, polymers, co-oligomers, and copolymers that contain phenylethynyl groups. The additives can be incorporated in different forms: A solution of an amide acid or an imide of a PERA can be added to a solution of phenylethynyl-containing oligomer, polymer, co-oligomer, or copolymer; or An imide powder of a PERA can be mixed with a dry powder of a phenylethynyl-containing oligomer, polymer, co-oligomer, or copolymer. The effect of a given PERA on the processability and other properties of the resin system depends on whether the PERA is used in the amide acid or an imide form. With proper formulation, the PERA reduces the melt viscosity of the resin and thereby reduces the processing pressures needed to form the adhesive bonds, consolidate filled or unfilled moldings, or fabricate fiber-reinforced composite laminates. During thermal cure, a PERA reacts with itself as well as with the phenylethynyl-containing host resin and thereby becomes chemically incorporated into the resin system. The effects of the PERA on mechanical properties, relative to those of the host resin, depend on the amount of PERA used. Typically, the incorporation of the PERA results in (1) increases in the glass-transition temperature (Tg), modulus of elasticity, and parameters that characterize behavior under compression, and (2) greater retention of the aforementioned mechanical properties at elevated temperatures without (3) significant reduction of toughness or damage tolerance. Of the formulations tested thus far, the ones found to yield the best overall results were those for which the host resin was the amide acid form of a phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) co-oligomer having a molecular weight of 5,000 g/mole [hence, designated PETI-5] and a PERA denoted as PERA-1. PETI-5 was made from 3,3',4'4'-biphenyltetracarboxylic dianhydride, 3

  13. Production and consumption of reactive oxygen species by fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lingjun; Zepp, Richard G

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are one of the most important intermediates in chemical, photochemical, and biological processes. To understand the environmental exposure and toxicity of fullerenes better, the production and consumption of ROS (singlet oxygen, superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals) by Buckminster fullerene (C(60) ) and fullerenol were investigated in aqueous systems. Fullerenol exhibits higher photoproduction efficiency of singlet oxygen and superoxide than aqueous suspensions of C(60) aggregates (aqu/nC(60) ), and this higher efficiency results in higher steady-state concentrations of these two ROS. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that the C(60) molecules in aqu/nC(60) are much more closely packed than the C(60) cages in fullerenol. These observations provide additional evidence that the lower ROS production efficiency of aqu/nC(60) is attributable primarily to efficient self-quenching of C(60) triplet states. Production of singlet oxygen by aqu/nC(60) is accelerated by increasing oxygen concentration and in part is sensitized by fluorescent photoproducts that accumulate during irradiation. The fullerenes react slowly with singlet oxygen (second-order rate constant <4 × 10(5)  M(-1)  s(-1) ), but react rapidly with hydroxyl radicals (second-order rate constants of 5.4 × 10(9) and 4 × 10(8)  M(-1)  s(-1) for aqu/nC(60) and fullerenol, respectively). These results show that environmental conditions, including light exposure and oxygen concentration, have the potential to impact the generation of toxic ROS by fullerenes.

  14. [Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in inflammatory process].

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Ryszard; Pancewicz, Sławomir A; Rutkowski, Krzysztof; Rutkowska, Joanna

    2007-08-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated in every cell during normal oxidation. The most important ROS include: superoxide anion (O2*-), hydroxyl radical (OH*), hydroperoxyl radical (HO2*), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and singlet oxygen ((1)O2*-). Reactive oxygen species can react with key cellular structures and molecules altering their biological function. Similarly reactive nitrogen species (RNS) such as nitric oxide (NO) or peroxinitrite anion (ONOO-) have physiological activity or reacts with different types of molecules to form toxic products. ROS and RNS are important in process of energy generation, lipids peroxidation, protein and DNA oxidation, nitration, nitrosation or nitrosylation and catecholamine response. Reactive oxygen/nitrogen species are neutralized by enzymatic activity or natural antioxidants that stop the initial formation of radicals. Overproduction of ROS or RNS results in "oxidative" or "nitrosative" stress which contributes to variety of pathological processes typical for different cancer, neurodegenerative, viral, toxic or inflammatory diseases. PMID:18044345

  15. Reactive oxygen species production by catechol stabilized copper nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-12-01

    Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants.

  16. Vacuum ultraviolet radiation/atomic oxygen synergism in materials reactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koontz, Steven; Leger, Lubert; Albyn, Keith; Cross, Jon

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results are presented which indicate that low fluxes of vacuum UV (VUV) radiation exert a pronounced influence on the atomic oxygen reactivity of such fluorocarbon and fluorocarbon spacecraft materials as the FEP Teflon and PCTFE that are under consideration for the Space Station Freedom. With simultaneous exposure to VUV fluxes comparable to those experienced in LEO, the reactivity of these materials becomes comparable to that of Kapton; VUV radiation has also been shown to increase the reactivity of Kapton with thermal-energy oxygen atoms.

  17. The Absolute Rates of the Solution Phase Addition of Atomic Hydrogen to a Vinyl Ether and a Vinyl Ester. The Effect of Oxygen Substitution on Hydrogen Atom Reactivity with Olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, D. D.; Kandanarachchi, P.; Das, N. C.; Franz, James A.

    2003-04-08

    The reactions of vinyl butyl ether and vinyl butyrate with atomic hydrogen and deuterium lead to addition of atomic hydrogen to the terminal position of the olefins. This observation is consistent with the reactions carried out earlier with other olefins. Both the absolute rates of addition to vinylbutyl ether and vinyl butyrate in acetone and hexane were carried out at several temperatures. The relative rates are consistent with only modest stabilization of the transition state of the radical adduct by the ??-o substituent compared with hydrogen atom addition to 1-octene. The relative rates measured in acetone and hexane indicate no significant differential solvation of ground state relative to the transition structures of the hydrogen atom addition. The kinetics reveal that the early transition states of hydrogen atom addition exhibit little selectivity (vinyl ether versus simple olefin) in either abstraction of hydrogen ??- to the oxygen or by terminal addition to the olefinic ether, reflecting the modest influence of the increased enthalpy of reaction associated with resonance stabilization by the oxygen substituent at the developing radical site.

  18. Absolute Rates of the Solution-Phase Addition of Atomic Hydrogen to a Vinyl Ether and a Vinyl Ester: Effect of Oxygen Substitution on Hydrogen Atom Reactivity with Olefins

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, D D.; Kandanarachchi, P; Das, N. C.; Franz, James A.

    2003-04-08

    The reactions of vinyl butyl ether and vinyl butyrate with atomic hydrogen and deuterium lead to addition at the terminal position of the olefins. This observation is consistent with the reactions carried out earlier with other olefins. Both of the absolute rates of addition to vinylbutyl ether and vinyl butyrate, in acetone and hexane, were measured at several temperatures. The relative rates are consistent with only modest stabilization of the transition state of the radical adduct by the R-O substituent compared with that of hydrogen atom addition to 1-octene. The relative rates measured in acetone and hexane indicate no significant differential solvation of the ground state relative to the transition structures of the hydrogen atom addition. The kinetics reveal that the early transition states for hydrogen atom addition exhibit little selectivity (vinyl ether versus simple olefin) in either the abstraction of hydrogen R to the oxygen or by terminal addition to the olefinic ether and reflects the modest influence of the increased enthalpy of reaction associated with resonance stabilization by the oxygen substituent at the developing radical site.

  19. Generation of reactive oxygen species by the faecal matrix

    PubMed Central

    Owen, R; Spiegelhalder, B; Bartsch, H

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Reactive oxygen species are implicated in the aetiology of a range of human diseases and there is increasing interest in their role in the development of cancer.
AIM—To develop a suitable method for the detection of reactive oxygen species produced by the faecal matrix.
METHODS—A refined high performance liquid chromatography system for the detection of reactive oxygen species is described.
RESULTS—The method allows baseline separation of the products of hydroxyl radical attack on salicylic acid in the hypoxanthine/xanthine oxidase system, namely 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid, 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and catechol. The increased efficiency and precision of the method has allowed a detailed evaluation of the dynamics of reactive oxygen species generation in the faecal matrix. The data show that the faecal matrix is capable of generating reactive oxygen species in abundance. This ability cannot be attributed to the bacteria present, but rather to a soluble component within the matrix. As yet, the nature of this soluble factor is not entirely clear but is likely to be a reducing agent.
CONCLUSIONS—The soluble nature of the promoting factor renders it amenable to absorption, and circumstances may exist in which either it comes into contact with either free or chelated iron in the colonocyte, leading to direct attack on cellular DNA, or else it initiates lipid peroxidation processes whereby membrane polyunsaturated fatty acids are attacked by reactive oxygen species propagating chain reactions leading to the generation of promutagenic lesions such as etheno based DNA adducts.


Keywords: colorectal cancer; faecal matrix; hypoxanthine; phytic acid; reactive oxygen species; xanthine oxidase PMID:10644317

  20. Reactive Oxygen Species in Normal and Tumor Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian; Spitz, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in determining the fate of normal stem cells. Low levels of ROS are required for stem cells to maintain quiescence and self-renewal. Increases in ROS production cause stem cell proliferation/differentiation, senescence, and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, leading to their exhaustion. Therefore, the production of ROS in stem cells is tightly regulated to ensure that they have the ability to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair damaged tissues for the life span of an organism. In this chapter, we discuss how the production of ROS in normal stem cells is regulated by various intrinsic and extrinsic factors and how the fate of these cells is altered by the dysregulation of ROS production under various pathological conditions. In addition, the implications of the aberrant production of ROS by tumor stem cells for tumor progression and treatment are also discussed. PMID:24974178

  1. Oxygen Reactivity of a Carbon Fiber Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Theron Devol; Pawelko, Robert James; Anderl, Robert Andrew; Smolik, Galen Richard

    2002-09-01

    Carbon Fiber Composites (CFCs) are often suggested as armor material for the first wall of a fusion plasma chamber due to carbon's low atomic number, high thermal conductivity, and high melting point. However, carbon is chemically reactive in air and will react with ingress air during a Loss of Vacuum Accident and release tritium fuel that has been retained in the carbon. Tritium mobilization and carbon monoxide generation via CFC oxidation are both safety concerns. This paper discusses chemical reactivity experiments that were performed using the state-of-the-art 3-dimensional NB31 CFC produced by SNECMA and a laminar reaction gas of Ar–21 vol% O2. Oxidation reaction rates were measured for CFC temperatures of 525, 600, 700, 800, 900, and 1000 °C and a 100 standard cubic centimeters per minute (sccm) Ar–O2 flow rate. Experiments were also performed at CFC temperatures of 700 and 1000 °C and a 1000 sccm Ar–O2 flow rate. Mass spectral analyses of the exhaust reaction gas suggested that carbon monoxide was the primary reaction at the CFC surface and carbon dioxide was readily produced in the exiting reaction gas. The measured reaction rates compare well with the literature and were used to produce a CFC oxidation curve that is recommended for use in fusion safety analyses.

  2. Nucleophilic addition of reactive dyes on amidoximated acrylic fabrics.

    PubMed

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M; El-Zawahry, Manal M; Abdelghaffar, Fatma; Ahmed, Nahed S E

    2014-01-01

    Seven reactive dyes judiciously selected based on chemical structures and fixation mechanisms were applied at 2% of of shade on amidoximated acrylic fabrics. Amidoximated acrylic fabric has been obtained by a viable amidoximation process. The dyeability of these fabrics was evaluated with respect to the dye exhaustion, fixation, and colour strength under different conditions of temperature and dyeing time. Nucleophilic addition type reactive dyes show higher colour data compared to nucleophilic substitution ones. FTIR studies further implicate the binding of reactive dyes on these fabrics. A tentative mechanism is proposed to rationalize the high fixation yield obtained using nucleophilic addition type reactive dyes. Also, the levelling and fastness properties were evaluated for all dyes used. Excellent to good fastness and levelling properties were obtained for all samples irrespective of the dye used. The result of investigation offers a new method for a viable reactive dyeing of amidoximated acrylic fabrics.

  3. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling.

  4. Role of reactive oxygen species in myocardial remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2007-03-01

    Adverse cardiac remodeling is a fundamental process in the progression to chronic heart failure. Although the mechanisms underlying cardiac remodeling are multi-factorial, a significant body of evidence points to the crucial roles of increased reactive oxygen species. This article reviews recent advances in delineating the different sources of production for reactive oxygen species (namely mitochondria, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled nitric oxide synthases, and NADPH oxidases) that may be involved in cardiac remodeling and the aspects of the remodeling process that they affect. These data could suggest new ways of targeting redox pathways for the prevention and treatment of adverse cardiac remodeling. PMID:17386182

  5. Comparison of two strategies for detection of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weidong; Zhou, Yuanshu; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-09-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved treatment that was applied to oncology , dermatology, and ophthalmology. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a important role in the efficacy of PDT. Online monitoring of reactive oxygen species is the key to understand effect of PDT treatment. We used Fluorescence probes DPBF and luminescent probe luminal to measure the ROS in cells. And we revaluate the relationship between the amount of light and cell survival. There is strongly correlated between the amount of light and cell kill.

  6. Reactive oxygen species production by catechol stabilized copper nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng; Ahmed, Ishtiaq; Fruk, Ljiljana

    2013-11-01

    Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants.Stable Cu nanoparticles (NPs) prepared using catechol containing dopamine-based linkers could generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that can activate peroxidase enzymes and catalyze the degradation of fluorescent dye pollutants. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the synthesis of dopamine linkers and Cu NPs, peroxidase activity tests, H2O2 calibration and degradation tests for resorufin, RB and MB. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr03563h

  7. Reactive oxygen metabolites produced by the carcinogenic fibrous mineral erionite

    SciTech Connect

    Urano, Naoko; Yano, Eiji ); Evans, P.H. )

    1991-02-01

    Erionite, a fibrous mineral and the causative agent of the endemic outbreak of mesothelioma in Turkey, has been shown to generate reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM) from polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN). In order to investigate the mechanism of the production of ROM by erionite from PMN, a luminol-dependent chemiluminescence (CL) method was utilized. Human peripheral blood PMN were incubated with 50-800 {mu}g/ml of erionite. PMN CL was produced immediately after the addition of erionite; the maximal CL production was reached within 2 to 6 minutes and the CL response increased with the dose of erionite. Superoxide dismutase, catalase, and dimethyl sulfoxide were utilized as scavengers of O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and OH, respectively. These scavengers inhibited the production of erionite-stimulated PMN CL dose dependently, thus indicating the production of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and OH by erionite-stimulated PMN. The less phagocytically active cells, namely, mononuclear cells and erythrocytes, produced CL immediately after the addition of erionite or phorbol myristate acetate and displayed a significant delay period after the addition of zymosan. Therefore, the direct interaction between the cell surface membrane and erionite would appear to be more important than phagocytosis, per se, for the production of ROM by erionite.

  8. Investigation of the reactivity of organic materials in liquid oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, D.; Irwin, K.; Kirshen, N.; Mill, T.; Stringham, R.

    1970-01-01

    Measurements of impact-ignition sensitivity and studies of the relative reactivity of t-butoxy and t-butyl peroxy radicals toward a variety of organic compounds reveal improved methods of selection of materials for safe use in a liquid oxygen environment.

  9. Adipose dysfunction, interaction of reactive oxygen species, and inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This American Society for Nutrition sponsored symposium summary contains information about the symposium focus and the general content of speaker presentation. The focus of the symposium was to delineate the significance of obesity-associated reactive oxygen species (ROS), inflammation, and adipose ...

  10. Engineering of pyranose dehydrogenase for increased oxygen reactivity.

    PubMed

    Krondorfer, Iris; Lipp, Katharina; Brugger, Dagmar; Staudigl, Petra; Sygmund, Christoph; Haltrich, Dietmar; Peterbauer, Clemens K

    2014-01-01

    Pyranose dehydrogenase (PDH), a member of the GMC family of flavoproteins, shows a very broad sugar substrate specificity but is limited to a narrow range of electron acceptors and reacts extremely slowly with dioxygen as acceptor. The use of substituted quinones or (organo)metals as electron acceptors is undesirable for many production processes, especially of food ingredients. To improve the oxygen reactivity, site-saturation mutagenesis libraries of twelve amino acids around the active site of Agaricus meleagris PDH were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We established high-throughput screening assays for oxygen reactivity and standard dehydrogenase activity using an indirect Amplex Red/horseradish peroxidase and a DCIP/D-glucose based approach. The low number of active clones confirmed the catalytic role of H512 and H556. Only one position was found to display increased oxygen reactivity. Histidine 103, carrying the covalently linked FAD cofactor in the wild-type, was substituted by tyrosine, phenylalanine, tryptophan and methionine. Variant H103Y was produced in Pichia pastoris and characterized and revealed a five-fold increase of the oxygen reactivity. PMID:24614932

  11. BIOMONITORING OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN BIOLOGICAL FLUIDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with several disease processes in humans, including cancer, asthma, diabetes, and cardiac disease. We have explored whether ROS can be measured directly in human fluids, and their value as a biomarker of exposure an...

  12. Reactive oxygen species at phospholipid bilayers: distribution, mobility and permeation.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rodrigo M

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in biochemical processes such as redox signaling, aging, carcinogenesis and neurodegeneration. Although biomembranes are targets for reactive oxygen species attack, little is known about the role of their specific interactions. Here, molecular dynamics simulations were employed to determine the distribution, mobility and residence times of various reactive oxygen species at the membrane-water interface. Simulations showed that molecular oxygen (O2) accumulated at the membrane interior. The applicability of this result to singlet oxygen ((1)O2) was discussed. Conversely, superoxide (O2(-)) radicals and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) remained at the aqueous phase. Both hydroxyl (HO) and hydroperoxyl (HO2) radicals were able to penetrate deep into the lipid headgroups region. Due to membrane fluidity and disorder, these radicals had access to potential peroxidation sites along the lipid hydrocarbon chains, without having to overcome the permeation free energy barrier. Strikingly, HO2 radicals were an order of magnitude more concentrated in the headgroups region than in water, implying a large shift in the acid-base equilibrium between HO2 and O2(-). In comparison with O2, both HO and HO2 radicals had lower lateral mobility at the membrane. Simulations revealed that there were intermittent interruptions in the H-bond network around the HO radicals at the headgroups region. This effect is expected to be unfavorable for the H-transfer mechanism involved in HO diffusion. The implications for lipid peroxidation and for the effectiveness of membrane antioxidants were evaluated. PMID:24095673

  13. Singlet oxygen as a reactive intermediate in the photodegradation of an electroluminescent polymer

    SciTech Connect

    Scurlock, R.D.; Wang, B.; Ogilby, P.R.; Sheats, J.R.; Clough, R.L.

    1995-10-18

    Singlet molecular oxygen (a{sup 1}{Delta}{sub g}) is shown to be a reactive intermediate in the photoinduced oxidative decomposition of the electroluminescent material poly(2,5-bis(5,6-dihydrocholestanoxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) [BCHA-PPV] in both liquid solutions and solid films. Upon irradiation of this polymer in CS{sub 2}, singlet oxygen is produced by energy transfer from the BCHA-PPV triplet state to ground state oxygen with a quantum yield of nearly 0.025. Singlet oxygen reacts with BCHA-PPV, resulting in extensive chain scission of the macromolecule. The reaction with singlet oxygen is unique to the polymer; the monomeric analog of this system, stilbene, does not appreciably react with singlet oxygen. Polymer degradation is proposed to proceed via addition of singlet oxygen in a{sub {pi}} 2+{sub {pi}}2 cycloaddition reaction to the double bond that connects phenylene groups in the macromolecule. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Reactive oxygen species can modulate circadian phase and period in Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyösi, Norbert; Nagy, Dóra; Makara, Krisztina; Ella, Krisztina; Káldi, Krisztina

    2013-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) may serve as signals coupling metabolism to other cell functions. In addition to being by-products of normal metabolism, they are generated at elevated levels under environmental stress situations. We analyzed how reactive oxygen species affect the circadian clock in the model organism Neurospora crassa. In light/dark cycles, an increase in the levels of reactive oxygen species advanced the phase of both the conidiation rhythm and the expression of the clock gene frequency. Our results indicate a dominant role of the superoxide anion in the control of the phase. Elevation of superoxide production resulted in the activation of protein phosphatase 2A, a regulator of the positive element of the circadian clock. Our data indicate that even under nonstress conditions, reactive oxygen species affect circadian timekeeping. Reduction of their basal levels results in a delay of the phase in light/dark cycles and a longer period under constant conditions. We show that under entrained conditions the phase depends on the temperature and reactive oxygen species contribute to this effect. Our results suggest that the superoxide anion is an important factor controlling the circadian oscillator and is able to reset the clock most probably by activating protein phosphatase 2A, thereby modulating the activity of the White Collar complex.

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Oxygen-Sensitive Potassium Flux in Rainbow Trout Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanova, Anna Yu; Nikinmaa, Mikko

    2001-01-01

    In the present study, we have investigated if reactive oxygen species are involved in the oxygen-dependent regulation of potassium-chloride cotransport activity in trout erythrocyte membrane. An increase in the oxygen level caused an increase in chloride-sensitive potassium transport (K+-Cl− cotransport). 5 mM hydrogen peroxide caused an increase in K+-Cl− cotransport at 5% oxygen. The increase in flux could be inhibited by adding extracellular catalase in the incubation. Pretreatment of the cells with mercaptopropionyl glycine (MPG), a scavenger of reactive oxygen species showing preference for hydroxyl radicals, abolished the activation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter by increased oxygen levels. The inhibition by MPG was reversible, and MPG could not inhibit the activation of transporter by the sulfhydryl reagent, N-ethylmaleimide, indicating that the effect of MPG was due to the scavenging of reactive oxygen species and not to the reaction of MPG with the cotransporter. Copper ions, which catalyze the production of hydroxyl radicals in the Fenton reaction, activated K+-Cl− cotransport significantly at hypoxic conditions (1% O2). These data suggest that hydroxyl radicals, formed from O2 in close vicinity to the cell membrane, play an important role in the oxygen-dependent activation of the K+-Cl− cotransporter. PMID:11158169

  16. Release of elicitors from rice blast spores under the action of reactive oxygen species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on secretion of hypothesized elicitors from spores of rice blast causal fungus Magnaporthe grisea were studied. For spore exposure to exogenous ROS, they were germinated for 5 h in 50 µM H2O2 followed by addition of catalase E.C. 1.11.1.6 (to decompose pe...

  17. Mitochondria and Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Bolisetty, Subhashini; Jaimes, Edgar A.

    2013-01-01

    The air that we breathe contains nearly 21% oxygen, most of which is utilized by mitochondria during respiration. While we cannot live without it, it was perceived as a bane to aerobic organisms due to the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen metabolites by mitochondria and other cellular compartments. However, this dogma was challenged when these species were demonstrated to modulate cellular responses through altering signaling pathways. In fact, since this discovery of a dichotomous role of reactive species in immune function and signal transduction, research in this field grew at an exponential pace and the pursuit for mechanisms involved began. Due to a significant number of review articles present on the reactive species mediated cell death, we have focused on emerging novel pathways such as autophagy, signaling and maintenance of the mitochondrial network. Despite its role in several processes, increased reactive species generation has been associated with the origin and pathogenesis of a plethora of diseases. While it is tempting to speculate that anti-oxidant therapy would protect against these disorders, growing evidence suggests that this may not be true. This further supports our belief that these reactive species play a fundamental role in maintenance of cellular and tissue homeostasis. PMID:23528859

  18. Generation of reactive oxygen species by raphidophycean phytoplankton.

    PubMed

    Oda, T; Nakamura, A; Shikayama, M; Kawano, I; Ishimatsu, A; Muramatsu, T

    1997-10-01

    Chattonella marina, a raphidophycean flagellate, is one of the most toxic red tide phytoplankton and causes severe damage to fish farming. Recent studies demonstrated that Chattonella sp. generates superoxide (O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radicals (.OH), which may be responsible for the toxicity of C. marina. In this study, we found the other raphidophycean flagellates such as Heterosigma akashiwo, Olisthodiscus luteus, and Fibrocapsa japonica also produce O2- and H2O2 under normal growth condition. Among the flagellate species tested, Chattonella has the highest rates of production of O2- and H2O2 as compared on the basis of cell number. This seems to be partly due to differences in their cell sizes, since Chattonella is larger than other flagellate species. The generation of O2- by these flagellate species was also confirmed by a chemiluminescence assay by using 2-methyl-6-(p-methoxyphenyl)-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin++ +-3-one (MCLA). All these raphidophycean flagellates inhibited the proliferation of a marine bacterium, Vibrio alginolyticus, in a flagellates/bacteria co-culture system, and their toxic effects were suppressed by the addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) or catalase. Our results suggest that the generation of reactive oxygen species is a common feature of raphidophycean flagellates.

  19. Cardiac reactive oxygen species after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Brett E; Stockwell, David W.; Boas, Stefan; Andrews, Trevor; Wellman, George C.; Lockette, Warren; Freeman, Kalev

    2011-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular complications after traumatic brain injury (TBI) contribute to morbidity and mortality and may provide a target for therapy. We examined blood pressure and left ventricle contractility after TBI, and tested the hypothesis that beta-adrenergic blockade would decrease oxidative stress after TBI. Material and Methods Rodents received fluid-percussion injury or sham surgery, confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histopathology. We followed recovery with sensorimotor coordination testing and blood pressure measurements. We assessed left ventricular ejection fraction using ECG-gated cardiac MRI and measured myocardial reactive oxygen species (ROS) with dihydroethidium. We randomized additional TBI and sham animals to post-operative treatment with propranolol or control, for measurement of ROS. Results Blood pressure and cardiac contractility were elevated 48 hours after TBI. Myocardial tissue sections showed increased ROS. Treatment with propranolol diminished ROS levels following TBI. Conclusions TBI is associated with increased cardiac contractility and myocardial ROS; decreased myocardial ROS after beta-blockade suggests that sympathetic stimulation is a mechanism of oxidative stress. PMID:22172132

  20. Imaging Reactive Oxygen Species-Induced Modifications in Living Systems

    PubMed Central

    Maulucci, Giuseppe; Bačić, Goran; Bridal, Lori; Schmidt, Harald H.H.W.; Tavitian, Bertrand; Viel, Thomas; Utsumi, Hideo; Yalçın, A. Süha

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) may regulate signaling, ion channels, transcription factors, and biosynthetic processes. ROS-related diseases can be due to either a shortage or an excess of ROS. Recent Advances: Since the biological activity of ROS depends on not only concentration but also spatiotemporal distribution, real-time imaging of ROS, possibly in vivo, has become a need for scientists, with potential for clinical translation. New imaging techniques as well as new contrast agents in clinically established modalities were developed in the previous decade. Critical Issues: An ideal imaging technique should determine ROS changes with high spatio-temporal resolution, detect physiologically relevant variations in ROS concentration, and provide specificity toward different redox couples. Furthermore, for in vivo applications, bioavailability of sensors, tissue penetration, and a high signal-to-noise ratio are additional requirements to be satisfied. Future Directions: None of the presented techniques fulfill all requirements for clinical translation. The obvious way forward is to incorporate anatomical and functional imaging into a common hybrid-imaging platform. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 939–958. PMID:27139586

  1. Reactive oxygen species generation and signaling in plants

    PubMed Central

    Tripathy, Baishnab Charan; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of molecular oxygen into the atmosphere was accompanied by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as side products of many biochemical reactions. ROS are permanently generated in plastids, peroxisomes, mitochiondria, the cytosol and the apoplast. Imbalance between ROS generation and safe detoxification generates oxidative stress and the accumulating ROS are harmful for the plants. On the other hand, specific ROS function as signaling molecules and activate signal transduction processes in response to various stresses. Here, we summarize the generation of ROS in the different cellular compartments and the signaling processes which are induced by ROS. PMID:23072988

  2. HIV-1, Reactive Oxygen Species and Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Kristi M.; Sutliff, Roy L.

    2012-01-01

    Over 1 million people in the United States and 33 million individuals worldwide suffer from HIV/AIDS. Since its discovery, HIV/AIDS has been associated with an increased susceptibility to opportunistic infection due to immune dysfunction. Highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) restore immune function and, as a result, people infected with HIV-1 are living longer. This improved survival of HIV-1 patients has revealed a previously unrecognized risk of developing vascular complications, such as atherosclerosis and pulmonary hypertension. The mechanisms underlying these HIV-associated vascular disorders are poorly understood. However, HIV-induced elevations in reactive oxygen species, including superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, may contribute to vascular disease development and progression by altering cell function and redox-sensitive signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the clinical and experimental evidence demonstrating HIV- and HIV antiretroviral therapy-induced alterations in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and how these effects likely contribute to vascular dysfunction and disease. PMID:22564529

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by lunar simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Rickman, Douglas; Schoonen, Martin A.

    2016-05-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and past experiences of Apollo astronauts has rekindled interest into the possible harmful effects of lunar dust on human health. In comparison to the Apollo-era explorations, human explorers may be weeks on the Moon, which will raise the risk of inhalation exposure. The mineralogical composition of lunar dust is well documented, but its effects on human health are not fully understood. With the aim of understanding the reactivity of dusts that may be encountered on geologically different lunar terrains, we have studied Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) generation by a suite of lunar simulants of different mineralogical-chemical composition dispersed in water and Simulated Lung Fluid (SLF). To further explore the reactivity of simulants under lunar environmental conditions, we compared the reactivity of simulants both in air and inert atmosphere. As the impact of micrometeorites with consequent shock-induced stresses is a major environmental factor on the Moon, we also studied the effect of mechanical stress on samples. Mechanical stress was induced by hand crushing the samples both in air and inert atmosphere. The reactivity of samples after crushing was analyzed for a period of up to nine days. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in water and SLF was analyzed by an in situ electrochemical probe and hydroxyl radical (•OH) by Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) spectroscopy and Adenine probe. Out of all simulants, CSM-CL-S was found to be the most reactive simulant followed by OB-1 and then JSC-1A simulant. The overall reactivity of samples in the inert atmosphere was higher than in air. Fresh crushed samples showed a higher level of reactivity than uncrushed samples. Simulant samples treated to create agglutination, including the formation of zero-valent iron, showed less reactivity than untreated simulants. ROS generation in SLF is initially slower than in deionized water (DI), but the ROS formation is sustained for as long as 7

  4. Active site densities, oxygen activation and adsorbed reactive oxygen in alcohol activation on npAu catalysts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu-Cun; Friend, C M; Fushimi, Rebecca; Madix, Robert J

    2016-07-01

    The activation of molecular O2 as well as the reactivity of adsorbed oxygen species is of central importance in aerobic selective oxidation chemistry on Au-based catalysts. Herein, we address the issue of O2 activation on unsupported nanoporous gold (npAu) catalysts by applying a transient pressure technique, a temporal analysis of products (TAP) reactor, to measure the saturation coverage of atomic oxygen, its collisional dissociation probability, the activation barrier for O2 dissociation, and the facility with which adsorbed O species activate methanol, the initial step in the catalytic cycle of esterification. The results from these experiments indicate that molecular O2 dissociation is associated with surface silver, that the density of reactive sites is quite low, that adsorbed oxygen atoms do not spill over from the sites of activation onto the surrounding surface, and that methanol reacts quite facilely with the adsorbed oxygen atoms. In addition, the O species from O2 dissociation exhibits reactivity for the selective oxidation of methanol but not for CO. The TAP experiments also revealed that the surface of the npAu catalyst is saturated with adsorbed O under steady state reaction conditions, at least for the pulse reaction. PMID:27376884

  5. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-07

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N{sup 3} − N{sup 4}, where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  6. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo.

    PubMed

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N(3) - N(4), where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles. PMID:25005287

  7. Properties of reactive oxygen species by quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Andrea; Trout, Bernhardt L.; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2014-07-01

    The electronic properties of the oxygen molecule, in its singlet and triplet states, and of many small oxygen-containing radicals and anions have important roles in different fields of chemistry, biology, and atmospheric science. Nevertheless, the electronic structure of such species is a challenge for ab initio computational approaches because of the difficulties to correctly describe the statical and dynamical correlation effects in presence of one or more unpaired electrons. Only the highest-level quantum chemical approaches can yield reliable characterizations of their molecular properties, such as binding energies, equilibrium structures, molecular vibrations, charge distribution, and polarizabilities. In this work we use the variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the lattice regularized Monte Carlo (LRDMC) methods to investigate the equilibrium geometries and molecular properties of oxygen and oxygen reactive species. Quantum Monte Carlo methods are used in combination with the Jastrow Antisymmetrized Geminal Power (JAGP) wave function ansatz, which has been recently shown to effectively describe the statical and dynamical correlation of different molecular systems. In particular, we have studied the oxygen molecule, the superoxide anion, the nitric oxide radical and anion, the hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl radicals and their corresponding anions, and the hydrotrioxyl radical. Overall, the methodology was able to correctly describe the geometrical and electronic properties of these systems, through compact but fully-optimised basis sets and with a computational cost which scales as N3 - N4, where N is the number of electrons. This work is therefore opening the way to the accurate study of the energetics and of the reactivity of large and complex oxygen species by first principles.

  8. Reactive Oxygen Production Induced by the Gut Microbiota: Pharmacotherapeutic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Jones, R.M.; Mercante, J.W.; Neish, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the mammalian intestine influences diverse homeostatic functions, including regulation of cellular growth, maintenance of barrier function, and modulation of immune responses. However, it is unknown how commensal prokaryotic organisms mechanistically influence eukaryotic signaling networks. Recent data has demonstrated that gut epithelia contacted by enteric commensal bacteria rapidly generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). While the induced generation of ROS via stimulation of formyl peptide receptors is a cardinal feature of the cellular response of phagocytes to pathogenic or commensal bacteria, evidence is accumulating that ROS are also similarly elicited in other cell types, including intestinal epithelia, in response to microbial signals. Additionally, ROS have been shown to serve as critical second messengers in multiple signal transduction pathways stimulated by proinflammatory cytokines and growth factors. This physiologically-generated ROS is known to participate in cellular signaling via the rapid and transient oxidative inactivation of a defined class of sensor proteins bearing oxidant-sensitive thiol groups. These proteins include tyrosine phosphatases that serve as regulators of MAP kinase pathways, cytoskeletal dynamics, as well as components involved in control of ubiquitination-mediated NF-κB activation. Consistently, microbial-elicited ROS has been shown to mediate increased cellular proliferation and motility and to modulate innate immune signaling. These results demonstrate how enteric microbiota influence regulatory networks of the mammalian intestinal epithelia. We hypothesize that many of the known effects of the normal microbiota on intestinal physiology, and potential beneficial effects of candidate probiotic bacteria, may be at least partially mediated by this ROS-dependent mechanism. PMID:22360484

  9. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Signaling in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Labunskyy, Vyacheslav M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Redox biology is a rapidly developing area of research due to the recent evidence for general importance of redox control for numerous cellular functions under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Understanding of redox homeostasis is particularly relevant to the understanding of the aging process. The link between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and accumulation of age-associated oxidative damage to macromolecules is well established, but remains controversial and applies only to a subset of experimental models. In addition, recent studies show that ROS may function as signaling molecules and that dysregulation of this process may also be linked to aging. Recent Advances: Many protein factors and pathways that control ROS production and scavenging, as well as those that regulate cellular redox homeostasis, have been identified. However, much less is known about the mechanisms by which redox signaling pathways influence longevity. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of the molecular basis for the role of redox signaling in aging. Critical Issues: Recent studies allowed identification of previously uncharacterized redox components and revealed complexity of redox signaling pathways. It would be important to identify functions of these components and elucidate how distinct redox pathways are integrated with each other to maintain homeostatic balance. Future Directions: Further characterization of processes that coordinate redox signaling, redox homeostasis, and stress response pathways should allow researchers to dissect how their dysregulation contributes to aging and pathogenesis of various age-related diseases, such as diabetes, cancer and neurodegeneration. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1362–1372. PMID:22901002

  10. Applications of Electron Spin Resonance Spectrometry for Reactive Oxygen Species and Reactive Nitrogen Species Research

    PubMed Central

    Kohno, Masahiro

    2010-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy has been widely applied in the research of biological free radicals for quantitative and qualitative analyses of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). The ESR spin-trapping method was developed in the early 1970s and enabled the analysis of short-lived free radicals. This method is now widely used as one of the most powerful tools for free radical studies. In this report, some of the studies that applied ESR for the measurement of ROS and RNS during oxidative stress are discussed. PMID:20664724

  11. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  12. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N

    2015-07-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the 'top 10' causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•(-)), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress.

  13. Mechanisms of group A Streptococcus resistance to reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Henningham, Anna; Döhrmann, Simon; Nizet, Victor; Cole, Jason N.

    2015-01-01

    Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as group A Streptococcus (GAS), is an exclusively human Gram-positive bacterial pathogen ranked among the ‘top 10’ causes of infection-related deaths worldwide. GAS commonly causes benign and self-limiting epithelial infections (pharyngitis and impetigo), and less frequent severe invasive diseases (bacteremia, toxic shock syndrome and necrotizing fasciitis). Annually, GAS causes 700 million infections, including 1.8 million invasive infections with a mortality rate of 25%. In order to establish an infection, GAS must counteract the oxidative stress conditions generated by the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) at the infection site by host immune cells such as neutrophils and monocytes. ROS are the highly reactive and toxic byproducts of oxygen metabolism, including hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), superoxide anion (O2•−), hydroxyl radicals (OH•) and singlet oxygen (O2*), which can damage bacterial nucleic acids, proteins and cell membranes. This review summarizes the enzymatic and regulatory mechanisms utilized by GAS to thwart ROS and survive under conditions of oxidative stress. PMID:25670736

  14. Control of root growth and development by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Hironaka

    2016-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are relatively simple molecules that exist within cells growing in aerobic conditions. ROS were originally associated with oxidative stress and seen as highly reactive molecules that are injurious to many cell components. More recently, however, the function of ROS as signal molecules in many plant cellular processes has become more evident. One of the most important functions of ROS is their role as a plant growth regulator. For example, ROS are key molecules in regulating plant root development, and as such, are comparable to plant hormones. In this review, the molecular mechanisms of ROS that are mainly associated with plant root growth are discussed. The molecular links between root growth regulation by ROS and other signals will also be briefly discussed.

  15. Redox Processes in Neurodegenerative Disease Involving Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2012-01-01

    Much attention has been devoted to neurodegenerative diseases involving redox processes. This review comprises an update involving redox processes reported in the considerable literature in recent years. The mechanism involves reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress, usually in the brain. There are many examples including Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, Alzheimer’s, prions, Down’s syndrome, ataxia, multiple sclerosis, Creutzfeldt-Jacob disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, schizophrenia, and Tardive Dyskinesia. Evidence indicates a protective role for antioxidants, which may have clinical implications. A multifaceted approach to mode of action appears reasonable. PMID:23730253

  16. Reactive oxygen species and HIF-1 signalling in cancer.

    PubMed

    Galanis, Alex; Pappa, Aglaia; Giannakakis, Antonis; Lanitis, Evripidis; Dangaj, Denarda; Sandaltzopoulos, Raphael

    2008-07-18

    The heterodimeric transcription factor HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor 1) represents the key mediator of hypoxia response. HIF-1 controls numerous genes of pivotal importance for cellular metabolism, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation and inhibition of apoptosis. HIF-1 overexpression and enhanced transcriptional activity are linked to tumour initiation and progression. Malfunction of the HIF-1 signalling network has been associated with breast, ovarian and prostate cancers. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS), also observed in such tumours, have been implicated in HIF-1 signalling. Deciphering the role of ROS in cancer onset and their involvement in signalling networks should prove invaluable for the design of novel anticancer therapeutics.

  17. Manganese neurotoxicity and the role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Finley, Ebany J; Gavin, Claire E; Aschner, Michael; Gunter, Thomas E

    2013-09-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential dietary nutrient, but an excess or accumulation can be toxic. Disease states, such as manganism, are associated with overexposure or accumulation of Mn and are due to the production of reactive oxygen species, free radicals, and toxic metabolites; alteration of mitochondrial function and ATP production; and depletion of cellular antioxidant defense mechanisms. This review focuses on all of the preceding mechanisms and the scientific studies that support them as well as providing an overview of the absorption, distribution, and excretion of Mn and the stability and transport of Mn compounds in the body.

  18. Reactive Oxygen Species: A Key Hallmark of Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) have been the prime cause of mortality worldwide for decades. However, the underlying mechanism of their pathogenesis is not fully clear yet. It has been already established that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a vital role in the progression of CVDs. ROS are chemically unstable reactive free radicals containing oxygen, normally produced by xanthine oxidase, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, lipoxygenases, or mitochondria or due to the uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase in vascular cells. When the equilibrium between production of free radicals and antioxidant capacity of human physiology gets altered due to several pathophysiological conditions, oxidative stress is induced, which in turn leads to tissue injury. This review focuses on pathways behind the production of ROS, its involvement in various intracellular signaling cascades leading to several cardiovascular disorders (endothelial dysfunction, ischemia-reperfusion, and atherosclerosis), methods for its detection, and therapeutic strategies for treatment of CVDs targeting the sources of ROS. The information generated by this review aims to provide updated insights into the understanding of the mechanisms behind cardiovascular complications mediated by ROS. PMID:27774507

  19. Sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen mustards: stability and reactivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi-Qiang; Begum, Rowshan Ara; Day, Victor W; Bowman-James, Kristin

    2012-11-28

    Mustard gas, bis(β-chloroethyl) sulfide (HD), is highly toxic and harmful to humans and the environment. It comprises one class of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) that was used in both World Wars I and II. The three basic analogues or surrogates are: the monochloro derivative, known as the half mustard, 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES); an oxygen analogue, bis(β-chloroethyl) ether (BCEE); and several nitrogen analogues based on the 2,2'-dichlorodiethylamine framework (e.g., HN1, HN2, and HN3). The origin of their toxicity is considered to be from the formation of three-membered heterocyclic ions, a reaction that is especially accelerated in aqueous solution. The reaction of these cyclic ion intermediates with a number of important biological species such as DNA, RNA and proteins causes cell toxicity and is responsible for the deleterious effects of the mustards. While a number of studies have been performed over the last century to determine the chemistry of these compounds, early studies suffered from a lack of more sophisticated NMR and X-ray techniques. It is now well-established that the sulfur and nitrogen mustards are highly reactive in water, while the oxygen analog is much more stable. In this study, we review and summarize results from previous studies, and add results of our own studies of the reactivity of these mustards toward various nonaqueous solvents and nucleophiles. In this manner a more comprehensive evaluation of the stability and reactivity of these related mustard compounds is achieved. PMID:23070251

  20. Reactive oxygen species, inflammation and calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) kidney stones are formed attached to Randall’s plaques (RPs) or Randall’s plugs. Mechanisms involved in the formation and growth are poorly understood. It is our hypothesis that stone formation is a form of pathological biomineralization or ectopic calcification. Pathological calcification and plaque formation in the body is triggered by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the development of oxidative stress (OS). This review explores clinical and experimental data in support of ROS involvement in the formation of CaOx kidney stones. Under normal conditions the production of ROS is tightly controlled, increasing when and where needed. Results of clinical and experimental studies show that renal epithelial exposure to high oxalate and crystals of CaOx/calcium phosphate (CaP) generates excess ROS, causing injury and inflammation. Major markers of OS and inflammation are detectable in urine of stone patients as well as rats with experimentally induced CaOx nephrolithiasis. Antioxidant treatments reduce crystal and oxalate induced injury in tissue culture and animal models. Significantly lower serum levels of antioxidants, alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and beta-cryptoxanthine have been found in individuals with a history of kidney stones. A diet rich in antioxidants has been shown to reduce stone episodes. ROS regulate crystal formation, growth and retention through the timely production of crystallization modulators. In the presence of abnormal calcium, citrate, oxalate, and/or phosphate, however, there is an overproduction of ROS and a decrease in the antioxidant capacity resulting in OS, renal injury and inflammation. Cellular degradation products in the urine promote crystallization in the tubular lumen at a faster rate thus blocking the tubule and plugging the tubular openings at the papillary tips forming Randall’s plugs. Renal epithelial cells lining the loops of Henle/collecting ducts may become osteogenic, producing membrane vesicles

  1. In situ reactive oxygen species production for tertiary wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Guitaya, Léa; Drogui, Patrick; Blais, Jean François

    2015-05-01

    The goal of this research was to develop a new approach for tertiary water treatment, particularly disinfection and removal of refractory organic compounds, without adding any chemical. Hydrogen peroxide can indeed be produced from dissolved oxygen owing to electrochemical processes. Using various current intensities (1.0 to 4.0 A), it was possible to in situ produce relatively high concentration of H2O2 with a specific production rate of 0.05 × 10(-5) M/min/A. Likewise, by using ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy method, it was shown that other reactive oxygen species (ROS) including HO(*) radical and O3 could be simultaneously formed during electrolysis. The ROS concentration passed from 0.45 × 10(-5) M after 20 min of electrolysis to a concentration of 2.87 × 10(-5) M after 100 min of electrolysis. The disinfection and the organic matter removal were relatively high during the tertiary treatment of municipal and domestic wastewaters. More than 90 % of organic compounds (chemical oxygen demand) can be removed, whereas 99 % of faecal coliform abatement can be reached. Likewise, the process was also effective in removing turbidity (more than 90 % of turbidity was removed) so that the effluent became more and more transparent.

  2. The interplay of light and oxygen in the reactive oxygen stress response of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii dissected by quantitative mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Barth, Johannes; Bergner, Sonja Verena; Jaeger, Daniel; Niehues, Anna; Schulze, Stefan; Scholz, Martin; Fufezan, Christian

    2014-04-01

    Light and oxygen are factors that are very much entangled in the reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress response network in plants, algae and cyanobacteria. The first obligatory step in understanding the ROS network is to separate these responses. In this study, a LC-MS/MS based quantitative proteomic approach was used to dissect the responses of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to ROS, light and oxygen employing an interlinked experimental setup. Application of novel bioinformatics tools allow high quality retention time alignment to be performed on all LC-MS/MS runs increasing confidence in protein quantification, overall sequence coverage and coverage of all treatments measured. Finally advanced hierarchical clustering yielded 30 communities of co-regulated proteins permitting separation of ROS related effects from pure light effects (induction and repression). A community termed redox(II) was identified that shows additive effects of light and oxygen with light as the first obligatory step. Another community termed 4-down was identified that shows repression as an effect of light but only in the absence of oxygen indicating ROS regulation, for example, possibly via product feedback inhibition because no ROS damage is occurring. In summary the data demonstrate the importance of separating light, O₂ and ROS responses to define marker genes for ROS responses. As revealed in this study, an excellent candidate is DHAR with strong ROS dependent induction profiles.

  3. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  4. NADPH oxidase-derived reactive oxygen species in cardiac pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Cave, Alison; Grieve, David; Johar, Sofian; Zhang, Min; Shah, Ajay M

    2005-01-01

    Chronic heart failure, secondary to left ventricular hypertrophy or myocardial infarction, is a condition with increasing morbidity and mortality. Although the mechanisms underlying the development and progression of this condition remain a subject of intense interest, there is now growing evidence that redox-sensitive pathways play an important role. This article focuses on the involvement of reactive oxygen species derived from a family of superoxide-generating enzymes, termed NADPH oxidases (NOXs), in the pathophysiology of ventricular hypertrophy, the accompanying interstitial fibrosis and subsequent heart failure. In particular, the apparent ability of the different NADPH oxidase isoforms to define the response of a cell to a range of physiological and pathophysiological stimuli is reviewed. If confirmed, these data would suggest that independently targeting different members of the NOX family may hold the potential for therapeutic intervention in the treatment of cardiac disease. PMID:16321803

  5. Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiological and Physiopathological Effects on Synaptic Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Beckhauser, Thiago Fernando; Francis-Oliveira, José; De Pasquale, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is counterbalanced by antioxidant defenses. When large amounts of ROS accumulate, antioxidant mechanisms become overwhelmed and oxidative cellular stress may occur. Therefore, ROS are typically characterized as toxic molecules, oxidizing membrane lipids, changing the conformation of proteins, damaging nucleic acids, and causing deficits in synaptic plasticity. High ROS concentrations are associated with a decline in cognitive functions, as observed in some neurodegenerative disorders and age-dependent decay of neuroplasticity. Nevertheless, controlled ROS production provides the optimal redox state for the activation of transductional pathways involved in synaptic changes. Since ROS may regulate neuronal activity and elicit negative effects at the same time, the distinction between beneficial and deleterious consequences is unclear. In this regard, this review assesses current research and describes the main sources of ROS in neurons, specifying their involvement in synaptic plasticity and distinguishing between physiological and pathological processes implicated. PMID:27625575

  6. Reactive oxygen species production and discontinuous gas exchange in insects

    PubMed Central

    Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S.; Hetz, Stefan K.; Marais, Elrike; Chown, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    While biochemical mechanisms are typically used by animals to reduce oxidative damage, insects are suspected to employ a higher organizational level, discontinuous gas exchange mechanism to do so. Using a combination of real-time, flow-through respirometry and live-cell fluorescence microscopy, we show that spiracular control associated with the discontinuous gas exchange cycle (DGC) in Samia cynthia pupae is related to reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hyperoxia fails to increase mean ROS production, although minima are elevated above normoxic levels. Furthermore, a negative relationship between mean and mean ROS production indicates that higher ROS production is generally associated with lower . Our results, therefore, suggest a possible signalling role for ROS in DGC, rather than supporting the idea that DGC acts to reduce oxidative damage by regulating ROS production. PMID:21865257

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiological and Physiopathological Effects on Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Beckhauser, Thiago Fernando; Francis-Oliveira, José; De Pasquale, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is counterbalanced by antioxidant defenses. When large amounts of ROS accumulate, antioxidant mechanisms become overwhelmed and oxidative cellular stress may occur. Therefore, ROS are typically characterized as toxic molecules, oxidizing membrane lipids, changing the conformation of proteins, damaging nucleic acids, and causing deficits in synaptic plasticity. High ROS concentrations are associated with a decline in cognitive functions, as observed in some neurodegenerative disorders and age-dependent decay of neuroplasticity. Nevertheless, controlled ROS production provides the optimal redox state for the activation of transductional pathways involved in synaptic changes. Since ROS may regulate neuronal activity and elicit negative effects at the same time, the distinction between beneficial and deleterious consequences is unclear. In this regard, this review assesses current research and describes the main sources of ROS in neurons, specifying their involvement in synaptic plasticity and distinguishing between physiological and pathological processes implicated. PMID:27625575

  8. Reactive oxygen species in eradicating acute myeloid leukemic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Fang, Hai

    2014-01-01

    Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) have been proven to drive leukemia initiation, progression and relapse, and are increasingly being used as a critical target for therapeutic intervention. As an essential feature in LSCs, reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis has been extensively exploited in the past decade for targeting LSCs in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Most, if not all, agents that show therapeutic benefits are able to alter redox status by inducing ROS, which confers selectivity in eradicating AML stem cells but sparing normal counterparts. In this review, we provide the comprehensive update of ROS-generating agents in the context of their impacts on our understanding of the pathogenesis of AML and its therapy. We anticipate that further characterizing these ROS agents will help us combat against AML in the coming era of LSC-targeting strategy. PMID:27358859

  9. Reactive oxygen species, essential molecules, during plant-pathogen interactions.

    PubMed

    Camejo, Daymi; Guzmán-Cedeño, Ángel; Moreno, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continually generated as a consequence of the normal metabolism in aerobic organisms. Accumulation and release of ROS into cell take place in response to a wide variety of adverse environmental conditions including salt, temperature, cold stresses and pathogen attack, among others. In plants, peroxidases class III, NADPH oxidase (NOX) locates in cell wall and plasma membrane, respectively, may be mainly enzymatic systems involving ROS generation. It is well documented that ROS play a dual role into cells, acting as important signal transduction molecules and as toxic molecules with strong oxidant power, however some aspects related to its function during plant-pathogen interactions remain unclear. This review focuses on the principal enzymatic systems involving ROS generation addressing the role of ROS as signal molecules during plant-pathogen interactions. We described how the chloroplasts, mitochondria and peroxisomes perceive the external stimuli as pathogen invasion, and trigger resistance response using ROS as signal molecule.

  10. Reactive oxygen species-activated nanomaterials as theranostic agents

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kye S; Lee, Dongwon; Song, Chul Gyu; Kang, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated from the endogenous oxidative metabolism or from exogenous pro-oxidant exposure. Oxidative stress occurs when there is excessive production of ROS, outweighing the antioxidant defense mechanisms which may lead to disease states. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is one of the most abundant and stable forms of ROS, implicated in inflammation, cellular dysfunction and apoptosis, which ultimately lead to tissue and organ damage. This review is an overview of the role of ROS in different diseases. We will also examine ROS-activated nanomaterials with emphasis on hydrogen peroxide, and their potential medical implications. Further development of the biocompatible, stimuli-activated agent responding to disease causing oxidative stress, may lead to a promising clinical use. PMID:26328770

  11. Reactive oxygen species in organ-specific autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Di Dalmazi, Giulia; Hirshberg, Jason; Lyle, Daniel; Freij, Joudeh B; Caturegli, Patrizio

    2016-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been extensively studied in the induction of inflammation and tissue damage, especially as it relates to aging. In more recent years, ROS have been implicated in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Here, ROS accumulation leads to apoptosis and autoantigen structural changes that result in novel specificities. ROS have been implicated not only in the initiation of the autoimmune response but also in its amplification and spreading to novel epitopes, through the unmasking of cryptic determinants. This review will examine the contribution of ROS to the pathogenesis of four organ specific autoimmune diseases (Hashimoto thyroiditis, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, and vitiligo), and compare it to that of a better characterized systemic autoimmune disease (rheumatoid arthritis). It will also discuss tobacco smoking as an environmental factor endowed with both pro-oxidant and anti-oxidant properties, thus capable of differentially modulating the autoimmune response. PMID:27491295

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species in Inflammation and Tissue Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Manish; Siddiqui, Mohammad Rizwan; Tran, Khiem; Reddy, Sekhar P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key signaling molecules that play an important role in the progression of inflammatory disorders. An enhanced ROS generation by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) at the site of inflammation causes endothelial dysfunction and tissue injury. The vascular endothelium plays an important role in passage of macromolecules and inflammatory cells from the blood to tissue. Under the inflammatory conditions, oxidative stress produced by PMNs leads to the opening of inter-endothelial junctions and promotes the migration of inflammatory cells across the endothelial barrier. The migrated inflammatory cells not only help in the clearance of pathogens and foreign particles but also lead to tissue injury. The current review compiles the past and current research in the area of inflammation with particular emphasis on oxidative stress-mediated signaling mechanisms that are involved in inflammation and tissue injury. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1126–1167. PMID:23991888

  13. Reactive oxygen species, ageing and the hormesis police

    PubMed Central

    Ludovico, Paula; Burhans, William C.

    2013-01-01

    For more than 50 years the Free Radical Theory served as the paradigm guiding most investigations of ageing. However, recent studies in a variety of organisms have identified conceptual and practical limitations to this theory. Some of these limitations are related to the recent discovery that caloric restriction and other experimental manipulations promote longevity by inducing hormesis effects in association with increased reactive oxygen species (ROS). The beneficial role of ROS in lifespan extension is consistent with the essential role of these molecules in cell signalling. However, the identity of specific forms of ROS that promote longevity remains unclear. In this article, we argue that in several model systems, hydrogen peroxide plays a crucial role in the induction of hormesis. PMID:23965186

  14. Bioreductively Activated Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Generators as MRSA Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khodade, Vinayak S; Sharath Chandra, Mallojjala; Banerjee, Ankita; Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulipeta, Mallikarjuna; Rangarajan, Radha; Chakrapani, Harinath

    2014-07-10

    The number of cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections is on the rise globally and new strategies to identify drug candidates with novel mechanisms of action are in urgent need. Here, we report the synthesis and evaluation of a series of benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-triones, which were designed based on redox-active natural products. We find that the in vitro inhibitory activity of 6-(prop-2-ynyl)benzo[b]phenanthridine-5,7,12(6H)-trione (1f) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including a panel of patient-derived strains, is comparable or better than vancomycin. We show that the lead compound generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell, contributing to its antibacterial activity. PMID:25050164

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species: Physiological and Physiopathological Effects on Synaptic Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Beckhauser, Thiago Fernando; Francis-Oliveira, José; De Pasquale, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    In the mammalian central nervous system, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation is counterbalanced by antioxidant defenses. When large amounts of ROS accumulate, antioxidant mechanisms become overwhelmed and oxidative cellular stress may occur. Therefore, ROS are typically characterized as toxic molecules, oxidizing membrane lipids, changing the conformation of proteins, damaging nucleic acids, and causing deficits in synaptic plasticity. High ROS concentrations are associated with a decline in cognitive functions, as observed in some neurodegenerative disorders and age-dependent decay of neuroplasticity. Nevertheless, controlled ROS production provides the optimal redox state for the activation of transductional pathways involved in synaptic changes. Since ROS may regulate neuronal activity and elicit negative effects at the same time, the distinction between beneficial and deleterious consequences is unclear. In this regard, this review assesses current research and describes the main sources of ROS in neurons, specifying their involvement in synaptic plasticity and distinguishing between physiological and pathological processes implicated.

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species: The Achilles' Heel of Cancer Cells?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Cancer development, progression, and metastasis are multistep processes. Accumulating evidence suggests that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are critically involved in cancer cell functions. This Forum reviews our current understanding of the important and paradoxical role of ROS in the regulation of tumor-associated cell properties, genes, and signaling pathways. The six reviews in this Forum showcase the up-to-date knowledge on how ROS modulate or interact with the p53 protein, epithelial–mesenchymal transition, tumor stromal cells, angiogenesis, and cancer stem cells, which are essential factors in cancer development and metastasis. The contributions demonstrate that ROS levels in cancer cells are tightly controlled, which brings promises and challenges in the development of novel ROS-targeted anticancer therapies. Further understanding of the biological mechanisms underlying the effects of oxidative stress on tumor growth and metastasis will contribute to the advancement of cancer biology and cancer treatment. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1212–1214. PMID:22304673

  17. Serum Reactive Oxygen Metabolite Levels Predict Severe Exacerbations of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Nakamoto, Keitaro; Watanabe, Masato; Sada, Mitsuru; Inui, Toshiya; Nakamura, Masuo; Honda, Kojiro; Wada, Hiroo; Mikami, Yu; Matsuzaki, Hirotaka; Horie, Masafumi; Noguchi, Satoshi; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Koyama, Hikari; Kogane, Toshiyuki; Kohyama, Tadashi; Takizawa, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Bronchial asthma (BA) is a chronic airway disease characterized by airway hyperresponsiveness and remodeling, which are intimately linked to chronic airway inflammation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide are generated by inflammatory cells that are involved in the pathogenesis of BA. However, the role of ROS in the management of BA patients is not yet clear. We attempted to determine the role of ROS as a biomarker in the clinical setting of BA. Subjects and Methods We enrolled patients with BA from 2013 through 2015 and studied the degrees of asthma control, anti-asthma treatment, pulmonary function test results, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), serum reactive oxygen metabolite (ROM) levels, and serum levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8. Results We recruited 110 patients with BA. Serum ROM levels correlated with white blood cell (WBC) count (rs = 0.273, p = 0.004), neutrophil count (rs = 0.235, p = 0.014), CRP (rs = 0.403, p < 0.001), and IL-6 (rs = 0.339, p < 0.001). Serum ROM levels and IL-8 and CRP levels negatively correlated with %FEV1 (rs = -0.240, p = 0.012, rs = -0.362, p < 0.001, rs = -0.197, p = 0.039, respectively). Serum ROM levels were significantly higher in patients who experienced severe exacerbation within 3 months than in patients who did not (339 [302–381] vs. 376 [352–414] CARR U, p < 0.025). Receiver-operating characteristics analysis showed that ROM levels correlated significantly with the occurrence of severe exacerbation (area under the curve: 0.699, 95% CI: 0.597–0.801, p = 0.025). Conclusions Serum levels of ROM were significantly associated with the degrees of airway obstruction, WBC counts, neutrophil counts, IL-6, and severe exacerbations. This biomarker may be useful in predicting severe exacerbations of BA. PMID:27776186

  18. Cell signaling by reactive nitrogen and oxygen species in atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, R. P.; Moellering, D.; Murphy-Ullrich, J.; Jo, H.; Beckman, J. S.; Darley-Usmar, V. M.

    2000-01-01

    The production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species has been implicated in atherosclerosis principally as means of damaging low-density lipoprotein that in turn initiates the accumulation of cholesterol in macrophages. The diversity of novel oxidative modifications to lipids and proteins recently identified in atherosclerotic lesions has revealed surprising complexity in the mechanisms of oxidative damage and their potential role in atherosclerosis. Oxidative or nitrosative stress does not completely consume intracellular antioxidants leading to cell death as previously thought. Rather, oxidative and nitrosative stress have a more subtle impact on the atherogenic process by modulating intracellular signaling pathways in vascular tissues to affect inflammatory cell adhesion, migration, proliferation, and differentiation. Furthermore, cellular responses can affect the production of nitric oxide, which in turn can strongly influence the nature of oxidative modifications occurring in atherosclerosis. The dynamic interactions between endogenous low concentrations of oxidants or reactive nitrogen species with intracellular signaling pathways may have a general role in processes affecting wound healing to apoptosis, which can provide novel insights into the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis.

  19. Bordetella bronchiseptica responses to physiological reactive nitrogen and oxygen stresses

    PubMed Central

    Omsland, Anders; Miranda, Katrina M.; Friedman, Richard L.; Boitano, Scott

    2008-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can establish prolonged airway infection consistent with a highly developed ability to evade mammalian host immune responses. Upon initial interaction with the host upper respiratory tract mucosa, B. bronchiseptica are subjected to antimicrobial reactive nitrogen species (RNS) and reactive oxygen species (ROS), effector molecules of the innate immune system. However, the responses of B. bronchiseptica to redox species at physiologically relevant concentrations (nM-µM) have not been investigated. Using predicted physiological concentrations of nitric oxide (NO), superoxide (O2.−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on low numbers of colony forming units (CFU) of B. bronchiseptica, all redox active species displayed dose-dependent antimicrobial activity. Susceptibility to individual redox active species was significantly increased upon introduction of a second species at sub-antimicrobial concentrations. An increased bacteriostatic activity of NO was observed relative to H2O2. The understanding of Bordetella responses to physiologically relevant levels of exogenous RNS and ROS will aid in defining the role of endogenous production of these molecules in host innate immunity against Bordetella and other respiratory pathogens. PMID:18462394

  20. Soot-driven reactive oxygen species formation from incense burning.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Jones, Tim P; Lung, Shih-Chun C; BéruBé, Kelly A

    2011-10-15

    This study investigated the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated as a function of the physicochemistry of incense particulate matter (IPM), diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and carbon black (CB). Microscopical and elemental analyses were used to determine particle morphology and inorganic compounds. ROS was determined using the reactive dye, Dichlorodihydrofluorescin (DCFH), and the Plasmid Scission Assay (PSA), which determine DNA damage. Two common types of soot were observed within IPM, including nano-soot and micro-soot, whereas DEP and CB mainly consisted of nano-soot. These PM were capable of causing oxidative stress in a dose-dependent manner, especially IPM and DEP. A dose of IPM (36.6-102.3μg/ml) was capable of causing 50% oxidative DNA damage. ROS formation was positively correlated to smaller nano-soot aggregates and bulk metallic compounds, particularly Cu. These observations have important implications for respiratory health given that inflammation has been recognised as an important factor in the development of lung injury/diseases by oxidative stress. This study supports the view that ROS formation by combustion-derived PM is related to PM physicochemistry, and also provides new data for IPM.

  1. Reactive oxygen species and the Antarctic macroalgal wound response.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Ruth E; Amsler, Charles D; Dickinson, Dale A; McClintock, James B; Baker, Bill J

    2014-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly produced by algal, vascular plant, and animal cells involved in the innate immune response as cellular signals promoting defense and healing and/or as a direct defense against invading pathogens. The production of reactive species in macroalgae upon injury, however, is largely uncharacterized. In this study, we surveyed 13 species of macroalgae from the Western Antarctic Peninsula and show that the release of strong oxidants is common after macroalgal wounding. Most species released strong oxidants within 1 min of wounding and/or showed cellular accumulation of strong oxidants over an hour post-wounding. Exogenous catalase was used to show that hydrogen peroxide was a component of immediate oxidant release in one of five species, but was not responsible for the entire oxidative wound response as is common in vascular plants. The other component(s) of the oxidant cocktail released upon wounding are unknown. We were unable to detect protein nitration in extracts of four oxidant-producing species flash frozen 30 s after wounding, but a role for reactive nitrogen species such as peroxynitrite cannot be completely ruled out. Two species showed evidence for the production of a catalase-activated oxidant, a mechanism previously known only from the laboratory and from the synthetic drug isoniazid used to kill the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The rhodophyte Palmaria decipiens, which released strong oxidants after wounding, also produced strong oxidants upon grazing by a sympatric amphipod, suggesting that oxidants are involved in the response to grazing. PMID:26988009

  2. Applying Additive Manufacturing to a New Liquid Oxygen Turbopump Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neal, Derek

    2016-01-01

    A liquid oxygen turbopump has been designed at Marshall Space Flight Center as part of the in-house, Advanced Manufacturing Demonstrator Engine (AMDE) project. Additive manufacturing, specifically direct metal laser sintering (DMLS) of Inconel 718, is used for 77% of the parts by mass. These parts include the impeller, turbine components, and housings. The near-net shape DMLS parts have been delivered and final machining is underway. Fabrication of the traditionally manufactured hardware is also proceeding. Testing in liquid oxygen is planned for Q2 of FY2017. This topic explores the design of the turbopump along with fabrication and material testing of the DMLS hardware.

  3. Oxygen additions in serial femtosecond crystallographic protein structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jimin

    2016-10-01

    In principle, serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) could yield data sets that are completely free of the effects caused by slow, radiation-induced chemical reactions, for example, oxygen additions, responsible for radiation damage. However, experimental evidence is presented here that SFX data sets obtained by techniques that expose different parts of the same specimen to single pulses of radiation do not have this property, even if the specimen in question is frozen. The diffraction image of each such crystal obtained with the first pulse of radiation is certain to represent the structure of a protein that has not been modified chemically, but all of the images obtained subsequently from the same crystal will represent structures that have been modified to a lesser or greater extent by oxygen additions because of the rapid diffusion of oxygenic free radicals through the specimen. The higher the level of oxygen additions a crystal suffers during data collection, the poorer the statistical quality of data set obtained from it will, and the higher the free R-factors of the resulting structural model. PMID:27438534

  4. FREE RADICALS, REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES, OXIDATIVE STRESSES AND THEIR CLASSIFICATIONS.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, V I

    2015-01-01

    The phrases "free radicals" and "reactive oxygen species" (ROS) are frequently used interchangeably although this is not always correct. This article gives a brief description of two mentioned oxygen forms. During the first two-three decades after ROS discovery in biological systems (1950-1970 years) they were considered only as damaging agents, but later their involvement in organism protection and regulation of the expression of certain genes was found. The physiological state of increased steady-state ROS level along with certain physiological effects has been called oxidative stress. This paper describes ROS homeostasis and provides several classifications of oxidative stresses. The latter are based on time-course and intensity principles. Therefore distinguishing between acute and chronic stresses on the basis of the dynamics, and the basal oxidative stress, low intensity oxidative stress, strong oxidative stress, and finally a very strong oxidative stress based on the intensity of the action of the inductor of the stress are described. Potential areas of research include the development of this field with complex classification of oxidative stresses, an accurate identification of cellular targets of ROS action, determination of intracellular spatial and temporal distribution of ROS and their effects, deciphering the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell response to ROS attacks, and their participation in the normal cellular functions, i.e. cellular homeostasis and its regulation. PMID:27025055

  5. FREE RADICALS, REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES, OXIDATIVE STRESSES AND THEIR CLASSIFICATIONS.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, V I

    2015-01-01

    The phrases "free radicals" and "reactive oxygen species" (ROS) are frequently used interchangeably although this is not always correct. This article gives a brief description of two mentioned oxygen forms. During the first two-three decades after ROS discovery in biological systems (1950-1970 years) they were considered only as damaging agents, but later their involvement in organism protection and regulation of the expression of certain genes was found. The physiological state of increased steady-state ROS level along with certain physiological effects has been called oxidative stress. This paper describes ROS homeostasis and provides several classifications of oxidative stresses. The latter are based on time-course and intensity principles. Therefore distinguishing between acute and chronic stresses on the basis of the dynamics, and the basal oxidative stress, low intensity oxidative stress, strong oxidative stress, and finally a very strong oxidative stress based on the intensity of the action of the inductor of the stress are described. Potential areas of research include the development of this field with complex classification of oxidative stresses, an accurate identification of cellular targets of ROS action, determination of intracellular spatial and temporal distribution of ROS and their effects, deciphering the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell response to ROS attacks, and their participation in the normal cellular functions, i.e. cellular homeostasis and its regulation.

  6. Photosensitizing Nanoparticles and The Modulation of Reactive Oxygen Species generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tada, Dayane; Baptista, Mauricio

    2015-05-01

    The association of PhotoSensitizer (PS) molecules with nanoparticles (NPs) forming photosensitizing NPs, has emerged as a therapeutic strategy to improve PS tumor targeting, to protect PS from deactivation reactions and to enhance both PS solubility and circulation time. Since association with NPs usually alters PS photophysical and photochemical properties, photosensitizing NPs are an important tool to modulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. Depending on the design of the photosensitizing NP, i.e., type of PS, the NP material and the method applied for the construction of the photosensitizing NP, the deactivation routes of the excited state can be controlled, allowing the generation of either singlet oxygen or other ROS. Controlling the type of generated ROS is desirable not only in biomedical applications, as in Photodynamic Therapy where the type of ROS affects therapeutic efficiency, but also in other technological relevant fields like energy conversion, where the electron and energy transfer processes are necessary to increase the efficiency of photoconversion cells. The current review highlights some of the recent developments in the design of Photosensitizing NPs aimed at modulating the primary photochemical events after light absorption.

  7. Reactive oxygen species mediate growth and death in submerged plants

    PubMed Central

    Steffens, Bianka; Steffen-Heins, Anja; Sauter, Margret

    2013-01-01

    Aquatic and semi-aquatic plants are well adapted to survive partial or complete submergence which is commonly accompanied by oxygen deprivation. The gaseous hormone ethylene controls a number of adaptive responses to submergence including adventitious root growth and aerenchyma formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signaling intermediates in ethylene-controlled submergence adaptation and possibly also independent of ethylene. ROS levels are controlled by synthesis, enzymatic metabolism, and non-enzymatic scavenging. While the actors are by and large known, we still have to learn about altered ROS at the subcellular level and how they are brought about, and the signaling cascades that trigger a specific response. This review briefly summarizes our knowledge on the contribution of ROS to submergence adaptation and describes spectrophotometrical, histochemical, and live cell imaging detection methods that have been used to study changes in ROS abundance. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy is introduced as a method that allows identification and quantification of specific ROS in cell compartments. The use of advanced technologies such as EPR spectroscopy will be necessary to untangle the intricate and partially interwoven signaling networks of ethylene and ROS. PMID:23761805

  8. The immunopathogenic role of reactive oxygen species in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Mohsenzadegan, Monireh; Mirshafiey, Abbas

    2012-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced in many normal and abnormal processes in humans, including atheroma, asthma, joint diseases, cancer, and aging. Basal levels of ROS production in cells could be related to several physiological functions including cell proliferation, apoptosis and homeostasis. However, excessive ROS production above basal levels would impair and oxidize DNA, lipids, sugars and proteins and consequently result in dysfunction of these molecules within cells and finally cell death. A leading theory of the cause of aging indicates that free radical damage and oxidative stress play a major role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD). Because the brain utilizes 20% more oxygen than other tissues that also undergo mitochondrial respiration, the potential for ROS exposure increases. In fact, AD has been demonstrated to be highly associated with cellular oxidative stress, including augmentation of protein oxidation, protein nitration, glycoloxidation and lipid peroxidation as well as accumulation of Amyloid β (Aβ). The treatment with anti-oxidant compounds can provide protection against oxidative stress and Aβ toxicity. In this review, our aim was to clarify the role of ROS in pathogenesis of AD and will discuss therapeutic efficacy of some antioxidants studies in recent years in this disease.

  9. Reactive oxygen species in chick hair cells after gentamicin exposure in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hirose, K; Hockenbery, D M; Rubel, E W

    1997-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been invoked as a causative agent of cell death in many different developmental and pathological states. The presence of free radicals and their importance of hair cell death due to aminoglycosides is suggested by a number of studies that have demonstrated a protective effect of antioxidants. By using dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) a fluorescent compound that is a reporter of reactive oxygen species, we have shown that free radicals are rapidly produced by avian hair cells in vitro after exposure to gentamicin. In addition, free radical scavengers, catalase and glutathione, were tested with DCFH fluorescent imaging for their ability to quench the production of reactive oxygen species in hair cells after drug exposure. Both free radical scavengers were very effective in suppressing drug-induced production of free radicals. Next, we investigated the ability of these antioxidants to preserve the structural integrity of hair cells after exposure to gentamicin. We were not able to detect any attenuation of the hair cell loss using antioxidants in conjunction with gentamicin. This result must be qualified by the fact that the antioxidants used were not effective over long-term gentamicin exposure. Therefore, methodological constraints prevented adequately testing possible protective effects of the free radical scavengers in this model system. PMID:9119753

  10. A case of mistaken identity: are reactive oxygen species actually reactive sulfide species?

    PubMed

    DeLeon, Eric R; Gao, Yan; Huang, Evelyn; Arif, Maaz; Arora, Nitin; Divietro, Alexander; Patel, Shivali; Olson, Kenneth R

    2016-04-01

    Stepwise one-electron reduction of oxygen to water produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are chemically and biochemically similar to reactive sulfide species (RSS) derived from one-electron oxidations of hydrogen sulfide to elemental sulfur. Both ROS and RSS are endogenously generated and signal via protein thiols. Given the similarities between ROS and RSS, we wondered whether extant methods for measuring the former would also detect the latter. Here, we compared ROS to RSS sensitivity of five common ROS methods: redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein (roGFP), 2', 7'-dihydrodichlorofluorescein, MitoSox Red, Amplex Red, and amperometric electrodes. All methods detected RSS and were as, or more, sensitive to RSS than to ROS. roGFP, arguably the "gold standard" for ROS measurement, was more than 200-fold more sensitive to the mixed polysulfide H2Sn(n = 1-8) than to H2O2 These findings suggest that RSS may be far more prevalent in intracellular signaling than previously appreciated and that the contribution of ROS may be overestimated. This conclusion is further supported by the observation that estimated daily sulfur metabolism and ROS production are approximately equal and the fact that both RSS and antioxidant mechanisms have been present since the origin of life, nearly 4 billion years ago, long before the rise in environmental oxygen 600 million years ago. Although ROS are assumed to be the most biologically relevant oxidants, our results question this paradigm. We also anticipate our findings will direct attention toward development of novel and clinically relevant anti-(RSS)-oxidants.

  11. 78 FR 19413 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Reactive Blue 246 and Reactive Blue 247...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-01

    ...)ester (C.I. Reactive Blue 247) as color additives in contact lenses. This action is in response to two... additional copolymers of 1,4-bis anthraquinone (C.I. Reactive Blue 246) as color additives in contact lenses... and/or acrylic monomers for use in coloring contact lenses.\\2\\ The petitions sought to expand the...

  12. Plasma-generated reactive oxygen species for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, J. S.; Hammer, M. U.; Winter, J.; Tresp, H.; Duennbier, M.; Iseni, S.; Martin, V.; Puech, V.; Weltmann, K. D.; Reuter, S.

    2012-10-01

    To get a better insight into the effects of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on cellular components, fundamental studies are essential to determine the nature and concentration of plasma-generated ROS, and the chemistry induced in biological liquids by those ROS. In this context, we have measured the absolute density of the main ROS created in three different atmospheric pressure plasma sources: two geometrically distinct RF-driven microplasma jets (μ-APPJ [1] and kinpen [2]), and an array of microcathode sustained discharges [3]. Optical diagnostics of the plasma volumes and effluent regions have been performed: UV absorption for O3 and IR emission for O2(a^1δ) [4]. High concentrations of both ROS have been obtained (10^14--10^17cm-3). The effect of different parameters, such as gas flows and mixtures and power coupled to the plasmas, has been studied. For plasma biomedicine, the determination of the reactive species present in plasma-treated liquids is of great importance. In this work, we focused on the measurement of the concentration of H2O2 and NOX radicals, generated in physiological solutions like NaCl and PBS.[4pt] [1] N. Knake et al., J. Phys. D: App. Phys. 41, 194006 (2008)[0pt] [2] K.D. Weltmann et al., Pure Appl. Chem. 82, 1223 (2010)[0pt] [3] J.S. Sousa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 141502 (2010)[0pt] [4] J.S. Sousa et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 93, 011502 (2008)

  13. Perfluorocarbon nanoparticles enhance reactive oxygen levels and tumour growth inhibition in photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuhao; Cheng, Hao; Jiang, Chenxiao; Qiu, Xuefeng; Wang, Kaikai; Huan, Wei; Yuan, Ahu; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) kills cancer cells by converting tumour oxygen into reactive singlet oxygen ((1)O2) using a photosensitizer. However, pre-existing hypoxia in tumours and oxygen consumption during PDT can result in an inadequate oxygen supply, which in turn hampers photodynamic efficacy. Here to overcome this problem, we create oxygen self-enriching photodynamic therapy (Oxy-PDT) by loading a photosensitizer into perfluorocarbon nanodroplets. Because of the higher oxygen capacity and longer (1)O2 lifetime of perfluorocarbon, the photodynamic effect of the loaded photosensitizer is significantly enhanced, as demonstrated by the accelerated generation of (1)O2 and elevated cytotoxicity. Following direct injection into tumours, in vivo studies reveal tumour growth inhibition in the Oxy-PDT-treated mice. In addition, a single-dose intravenous injection of Oxy-PDT into tumour-bearing mice significantly inhibits tumour growth, whereas traditional PDT has no effect. Oxy-PDT may enable the enhancement of existing clinical PDT and future PDT design.

  14. Perfluorocarbon nanoparticles enhance reactive oxygen levels and tumour growth inhibition in photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yuhao; Cheng, Hao; Jiang, Chenxiao; Qiu, Xuefeng; Wang, Kaikai; Huan, Wei; Yuan, Ahu; Wu, Jinhui; Hu, Yiqiao

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) kills cancer cells by converting tumour oxygen into reactive singlet oxygen (1O2) using a photosensitizer. However, pre-existing hypoxia in tumours and oxygen consumption during PDT can result in an inadequate oxygen supply, which in turn hampers photodynamic efficacy. Here to overcome this problem, we create oxygen self-enriching photodynamic therapy (Oxy-PDT) by loading a photosensitizer into perfluorocarbon nanodroplets. Because of the higher oxygen capacity and longer 1O2 lifetime of perfluorocarbon, the photodynamic effect of the loaded photosensitizer is significantly enhanced, as demonstrated by the accelerated generation of 1O2 and elevated cytotoxicity. Following direct injection into tumours, in vivo studies reveal tumour growth inhibition in the Oxy-PDT-treated mice. In addition, a single-dose intravenous injection of Oxy-PDT into tumour-bearing mice significantly inhibits tumour growth, whereas traditional PDT has no effect. Oxy-PDT may enable the enhancement of existing clinical PDT and future PDT design. PMID:26525216

  15. Enzymatic Production of Extracellular Reactive Oxygen Species by Marine Microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, J. M.; Andeer, P. F.; Hansel, C. M.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as intermediates in a myriad of biogeochemically important processes, including cell signaling pathways, cellular oxidative stress responses, and the transformation of both nutrient and toxic metals such as iron and mercury. Abiotic reactions involving the photo-oxidation of organic matter were once considered the only important sources of ROS in the environment. However, the recent discovery of substantial biological ROS production in marine systems has fundamentally shifted this paradigm. Within the last few decades, marine phytoplankton, including diatoms of the genus Thalassiosira, were discovered to produce ample extracellular quantities of the ROS superoxide. Even more recently, we discovered widespread production of extracellular superoxide by phylogenetically and ecologically diverse heterotrophic bacteria at environmentally significant levels (up to 20 amol cell-1 hr-1), which has introduced the revolutionary potential for substantial "dark" cycling of ROS. Despite the profound biogeochemical importance of extracellular biogenic ROS, the cellular mechanisms underlying the production of this ROS have remained elusive. Through the development of a gel-based assay to identify extracellular ROS-producing proteins, we have recently found that enzymes typically involved in antioxidant activity also produce superoxide when molecular oxygen is the only available electron acceptor. For example, large (~3600 amino acids) heme peroxidases are involved in extracellular superoxide production by a bacterium within the widespread Roseobacter clade. In Thalassiosira spp., extracellular superoxide is produced by flavoproteins such as glutathione reductase and ferredoxin NADP+ reductase. Thus, extracellular ROS production may occur via secreted and/or cell surface enzymes that modulate between producing and degrading ROS depending on prevailing geochemical and/or ecological conditions.

  16. Improved dental adhesive formulations based on reactive nanogel additives.

    PubMed

    Morães, R R; Garcia, J W; Wilson, N D; Lewis, S H; Barros, M D; Yang, B; Pfeifer, C S; Stansbury, J W

    2012-02-01

    Current challenges in adhesive dentistry include over-hydrophilic bonding formulations, which facilitate water percolation through the hybrid layer and result in unreliable bonded interfaces. This study introduces nanogel-modified adhesives as a way to control the material's hydrophobic character without changing the basic monomer formulation (keeping water-chasing capacity and operatory techniques unaltered). Nanogel additives of varied hydrophobicity were synthesized in solution, rendering 10- to 100-nm-sized particles. A model BisGMA/HEMA solvated adhesive was prepared (control), to which reactive nanogels were added. The increase in adhesive viscosity did not impair solvent removal by air-thinning. The degree of conversion in the adhesive was similar between control and nanogel-modified materials, while the bulk dry and, particularly, the wet mechanical properties were significantly improved through nanogel-based network reinforcement and reduced water solubility. As preliminary validation of this approach, short-term micro-tensile bond strengths to acid-etched and primed dentin were significantly enhanced by nanogel inclusion in the adhesive resins. PMID:22019910

  17. In vivo electron spin resonance: An effective new tool for reactive oxygen species/reactive nitrogen species measurement.

    PubMed

    Han, Jin Yi; Hong, Jin Tae; Oh, Ki-Wan

    2010-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species are regarded as important factors in the initiation and progression of many diseases. Therefore, measurement of redox status would be helpful in understanding the "Redox Navigation" of such diseases. Because electron spin resonance (ESR) shows good signal responses to nitroxyl radical and various redox-related species, such as oxygen radicals and antioxidants, the in vivo ESR/nitroxyl probe technique can provide useful information on real-time redox status in a living body. ESR spectrometers for in vivo measurements can be operated at lower frequencies (approximately 3.5 GHz, 1 GHz, 700 MHz, and 300 MHz) than usual (9-10 GHz). Several types of resonators were also designed to minimize the dielectric loss of electromagnetic waves caused by water in animal bodies. In vivo ESR spectroscopy and its imaging have been used to analyze radical generation, redox status, partial pressure of oxygen and other conditions in various diseases. In addition, ESR has been used to analyze injury models related to oxidative stresses, such as nitroxyl radicals. The application of in vivo ESR for diseases related to oxidative injuries currently being investigated and the accumulation of basic data for therapy is ongoing. Recent progress in the instrumentation for in vivo ESR spectroscopy and its application to the life sciences are reviewed, because measurement of redox status in vivo is considered necessary to understand the initiation and progression of diseases.

  18. Involvement of Cytochrome P450 in Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hrycay, Eugene G; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the involvement of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems and discusses the possible involvement of reactive oxygen species and CYP enzymes in cancer. Reactive oxygen species are formed in biological systems as byproducts of the reduction of molecular oxygen and include the superoxide radical anion (∙O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (∙OH), hydroperoxyl radical (HOO∙), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), and peroxyl radical (ROO∙). Two endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species are the mammalian CYP-dependent microsomal electron transport system and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. CYP enzymes catalyze the oxygenation of an organic substrate and the simultaneous reduction of molecular oxygen. If the transfer of oxygen to a substrate is not tightly controlled, uncoupling occurs and leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species are capable of causing oxidative damage to cellular membranes and macromolecules that can lead to the development of human diseases such as cancer. In normal cells, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species are maintained in balance with intracellular biochemical antioxidants to prevent cellular damage. Oxidative stress occurs when this critical balance is disrupted. Topics covered in this review include the role of reactive oxygen species in intracellular cell signaling and the relationship between CYP enzymes and cancer. Outlines of CYP expression in neoplastic tissues, CYP enzyme polymorphism and cancer risk, CYP enzymes in cancer therapy and the metabolic activation of chemical procarcinogens by CYP enzymes are also provided.

  19. Involvement of Cytochrome P450 in Reactive Oxygen Species Formation and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hrycay, Eugene G; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2015-01-01

    This review examines the involvement of cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems and discusses the possible involvement of reactive oxygen species and CYP enzymes in cancer. Reactive oxygen species are formed in biological systems as byproducts of the reduction of molecular oxygen and include the superoxide radical anion (∙O2-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (∙OH), hydroperoxyl radical (HOO∙), singlet oxygen ((1)O2), and peroxyl radical (ROO∙). Two endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species are the mammalian CYP-dependent microsomal electron transport system and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. CYP enzymes catalyze the oxygenation of an organic substrate and the simultaneous reduction of molecular oxygen. If the transfer of oxygen to a substrate is not tightly controlled, uncoupling occurs and leads to the formation of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species are capable of causing oxidative damage to cellular membranes and macromolecules that can lead to the development of human diseases such as cancer. In normal cells, intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species are maintained in balance with intracellular biochemical antioxidants to prevent cellular damage. Oxidative stress occurs when this critical balance is disrupted. Topics covered in this review include the role of reactive oxygen species in intracellular cell signaling and the relationship between CYP enzymes and cancer. Outlines of CYP expression in neoplastic tissues, CYP enzyme polymorphism and cancer risk, CYP enzymes in cancer therapy and the metabolic activation of chemical procarcinogens by CYP enzymes are also provided. PMID:26233903

  20. Protective effect of flavonoids against reactive oxygen species production in sickle cell anemia patients treated with hydroxyurea

    PubMed Central

    Henneberg, Railson; Otuki, Michel Fleith; Furman, Aline Emmer Ferreira; Hermann, Priscila; do Nascimento, Aguinaldo José; Leonart, Maria Suely Soares

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of quercetin, rutin, hesperidin and myricetin against reactive oxygen species production with the oxidizing action of tert-butylhydroperoxide in erythrocytes from normal subjects and sickle cell anemia carriers treated with hydroxyurea. Methods Detection of intracellular reactive oxygen species was carried out using a liposoluble probe, 2',7'-dichlorfluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA). A 10% erythrocyte suspension was incubated with flavonoids (quercetin, rutin, hesperidin or myricetin; 30, 50, and 100 µmol/L), and then incubated with tert-butylhydroperoxide (75 µmol/L). Untreated samples were used as controls. Results Red blood cell exposure to tert-butylhydroperoxide resulted in significant increases in the generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species compared to basal levels. Reactive oxygen species production was significantly inhibited when red blood cells were pre-incubated with flavonoids, both in normal individuals and in patients with sickle cell anemia. Quercetin and rutin had the highest antioxidant activity, followed by myricetin and hesperidin. CONCLUSION: Flavonoids, in particular quercetin and rutin, showed better antioxidant effects against damage caused by excess reactive oxygen species characteristic of sickle cell anemia. Results obtained with patients under treatment with hydroxyurea suggest an additional protective effect when associated with the use of flavonoids. PMID:23580885

  1. Reactive Oxygen Species and Targeted Therapy for Pancreatic Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lun; Li, Jiahui; Zong, Liang; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ke; Jiang, Zhengdong; Nan, Ligang; Li, Xuqi; Li, Wei; Shan, Tao; Ma, Qingyong; Ma, Zhenhua

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generally increased in pancreatic cancer cells compared with normal cells. ROS plays a vital role in various cellular biological activities including proliferation, growth, apoptosis, and invasion. Besides, ROS participates in tumor microenvironment orchestration. The role of ROS is a doubled-edged sword in pancreatic cancer. The dual roles of ROS depend on the concentration. ROS facilitates carcinogenesis and cancer progression with mild-to-moderate elevated levels, while excessive ROS damages cancer cells dramatically and leads to cell death. Based on the recent knowledge, either promoting ROS generation to increase the concentration of ROS with extremely high levels or enhancing ROS scavenging ability to decrease ROS levels may benefit the treatment of pancreatic cancer. However, when faced with oxidative stress, the antioxidant programs of cancer cells have been activated to help cancer cells to survive in the adverse condition. Furthermore, ROS signaling and antioxidant programs play the vital roles in the progression of pancreatic cancer and in the response to cancer treatment. Eventually, it may be the novel target for various strategies and drugs to modulate ROS levels in pancreatic cancer therapy.

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species, Apoptosis, Antimicrobial Peptides and Human Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oyinloye, Babatunji Emmanuel; Adenowo, Abiola Fatimah; Kappo, Abidemi Paul

    2015-01-01

    Excessive free radical generation, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress in the biological system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and pathological conditions associated with diverse human inflammatory diseases (HIDs). Although inflammation which is considered advantageous is a defensive mechanism in response to xenobiotics and foreign pathogen; as a result of cellular damage arising from oxidative stress, if uncontrolled, it may degenerate to chronic inflammation when the ROS levels exceed the antioxidant capacity. Therefore, in the normal resolution of inflammatory reactions, apoptosis is acknowledged to play a crucial role, while on the other hand, dysregulation in the induction of apoptosis by enhanced ROS production could also result in excessive apoptosis identified in the pathogenesis of HIDs. Apparently, a careful balance must be maintained in this complex environment. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed in this review as an excellent candidate capable of playing prominent roles in maintaining this balance. Consequently, in novel drug design for the treatment and management of HIDs, AMPs are promising candidates owing to their size and multidimensional properties as well as their wide spectrum of activities and indications of reduced rate of resistance. PMID:25850012

  3. Redox Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    He, Feng; Zuo, Li

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD), a major cause of mortality in the world, has been extensively studied over the past decade. However, the exact mechanism underlying its pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a pivotal role in the progression of CVD. Particularly, ROS are commonly engaged in developing typical characteristics of atherosclerosis, one of the dominant CVDs. This review will discuss the involvement of ROS in atherosclerosis, specifically their effect on inflammation, disturbed blood flow and arterial wall remodeling. Pharmacological interventions target ROS in order to alleviate oxidative stress and CVD symptoms, yet results are varied due to the paradoxical role of ROS in CVD. Lack of effectiveness in clinical trials suggests that understanding the exact role of ROS in the pathophysiology of CVD and developing novel treatments, such as antioxidant gene therapy and nanotechnology-related antioxidant delivery, could provide a therapeutic advance in treating CVDs. While genetic therapies focusing on specific antioxidant expression seem promising in CVD treatments, multiple technological challenges exist precluding its immediate clinical applications. PMID:26610475

  4. Effects of reactive oxygen species on sperm function.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, H D; Welch, G R

    2012-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation and membrane lipid peroxidation have been recognized as problems for sperm survival and fertility. The precise roles and detection of superoxide (SO), hydrogen peroxide (HP), and membrane lipid peroxidation have been problematic, because of the low specificity and sensitivity of the established chemiluminescence assay technologies. We developed flow cytometric assays to measure SO, HP, membrane lipid peroxidation, and inner mitochondrial transmembrane potential in boar sperm. These methods were sufficiently sensitive to permit detection of early changes in ROS formation in sperm cells that were still viable. Basal ROS formation and membrane lipid peroxidation in the absence of ROS generators were low in viable sperm of both fresh and frozen-thawed boar semen, affecting less than 4% of the sperm cells on average. However, this is not the case in other species, as human, bovine, and poultry sperm have large increases in sperm ROS formation, lipid peroxidation, loss of motility, and death in vitro. Closer study of the effects of ROS formation on the relationship between sperm motility and ATP content in boar sperm was conducted using menadione (mitochondrial SO generator) and HP treatment. Menadione or HP caused an immediate disruption of motility with delayed or no decrease in sperm ATP content, respectively. Overall, the inhibitory effects of ROS on motility point to a mitochondrial-independent mechanism. The reduction in motility may have been due to a ROS-induced lesion in ATP utilization or in the contractile apparatus of the flagellum. PMID:22704396

  5. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Rita C; Carneiro, Fernando S; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed.

  6. Reactive oxygen species and mitochondria: A nexus of cellular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Dan Dunn, Joe; Alvarez, Luis Aj; Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are integral components of multiple cellular pathways even though excessive or inappropriately localized ROS damage cells. ROS function as anti-microbial effector molecules and as signaling molecules that regulate such processes as NF-kB transcriptional activity, the production of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and autophagy. The main sources of cellular ROS are mitochondria and NADPH oxidases (NOXs). In contrast to NOX-generated ROS, ROS produced in the mitochondria (mtROS) were initially considered to be unwanted by-products of oxidative metabolism. Increasing evidence indicates that mtROS have been incorporated into signaling pathways including those regulating immune responses and autophagy. As metabolic hubs, mitochondria facilitate crosstalk between the metabolic state of the cell with these pathways. Mitochondria and ROS are thus a nexus of multiple pathways that determine the response of cells to disruptions in cellular homeostasis such as infection, sterile damage, and metabolic imbalance. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondria in the generation of ROS-derived anti-microbial effectors, the interplay of mitochondria and ROS with autophagy and the formation of DNA extracellular traps, and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by ROS and mitochondria.

  7. Tamoxifen reduces fat mass by boosting reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Zou, P; Zheng, L; Linarelli, L E; Amarell, S; Passaro, A; Liu, D; Cheng, Z

    2015-01-01

    As the pandemic of obesity is growing, a variety of animal models have been generated to study the mechanisms underlying the increased adiposity and development of metabolic disorders. Tamoxifen (Tam) is widely used to activate Cre recombinase that spatiotemporally controls target gene expression and regulates adiposity in laboratory animals. However, a critical question remains as to whether Tam itself affects adiposity and possibly confounds the functional study of target genes in adipose tissue. Here we administered Tam to Cre-absent forkhead box O1 (FoxO1) floxed mice (f-FoxO1) and insulin receptor substrate Irs1/Irs2 double floxed mice (df-Irs) and found that Tam induced approximately 30% reduction (P<0.05) in fat mass with insignificant change in body weight. Mechanistically, Tam promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, apoptosis and autophagy, which was associated with downregulation of adipogenic regulator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma and dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes. However, normalization of ROS potently suppressed Tam-induced apoptosis, autophagy and adipocyte dedifferentiation, suggesting that ROS may account, at least in part, for the changes. Importantly, Tam-induced ROS production and fat mass reduction lasted for 4-5 weeks in the f-FoxO1 and df-Irs mice. Our data suggest that Tam reduces fat mass via boosting ROS, thus making a recovery period crucial for posttreatment study. PMID:25569103

  8. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species from Silicon Nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Stephen S; Cohen, Guy M; Kenyon, Allison J; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Fix, Natalie R; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Roberts, Jenny R

    2014-01-01

    Processing and synthesis of purified nanomaterials of diverse composition, size, and properties is an evolving process. Studies have demonstrated that some nanomaterials have potential toxic effects and have led to toxicity research focusing on nanotoxicology. About two million workers will be employed in the field of nanotechnology over the next 10 years. The unknown effects of nanomaterials create a need for research and development of techniques to identify possible toxicity. Through a cooperative effort between National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and IBM to address possible occupational exposures, silicon-based nanowires (SiNWs) were obtained for our study. These SiNWs are anisotropic filamentary crystals of silicon, synthesized by the vapor–liquid–solid method and used in bio-sensors, gas sensors, and field effect transistors. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be generated when organisms are exposed to a material causing cellular responses, such as lipid peroxidation, H2O2 production, and DNA damage. SiNWs were assessed using three different in vitro environments (H2O2, RAW 264.7 cells, and rat alveolar macrophages) for ROS generation and possible toxicity identification. We used electron spin resonance, analysis of lipid peroxidation, measurement of H2O2 production, and the comet assay to assess generation of ROS from SiNW and define possible mechanisms. Our results demonstrate that SiNWs do not appear to be significant generators of free radicals. PMID:25452695

  9. Reactive oxygen species, nutrition, hypoxia and diseases: Problems solved?

    PubMed Central

    Görlach, Agnes; Dimova, Elitsa Y.; Petry, Andreas; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio; Hernansanz-Agustín, Pablo; Rolo, Anabela P.; Palmeira, Carlos M.; Kietzmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Within the last twenty years the view on reactive oxygen species (ROS) has changed; they are no longer only considered to be harmful but also necessary for cellular communication and homeostasis in different organisms ranging from bacteria to mammals. In the latter, ROS were shown to modulate diverse physiological processes including the regulation of growth factor signaling, the hypoxic response, inflammation and the immune response. During the last 60–100 years the life style, at least in the Western world, has changed enormously. This became obvious with an increase in caloric intake, decreased energy expenditure as well as the appearance of alcoholism and smoking; These changes were shown to contribute to generation of ROS which are, at least in part, associated with the occurrence of several chronic diseases like adiposity, atherosclerosis, type II diabetes, and cancer. In this review we discuss aspects and problems on the role of intracellular ROS formation and nutrition with the link to diseases and their problematic therapeutical issues. PMID:26339717

  10. NSAIDs and Cardiovascular Diseases: Role of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Alajbegovic, Azra; Gomes, Aldrin V

    2015-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the most commonly used drugs worldwide. NSAIDs are used for a variety of conditions including pain, rheumatoid arthritis, and musculoskeletal disorders. The beneficial effects of NSAIDs in reducing or relieving pain are well established, and other benefits such as reducing inflammation and anticancer effects are also documented. The undesirable side effects of NSAIDs include ulcers, internal bleeding, kidney failure, and increased risk of heart attack and stroke. Some of these side effects may be due to the oxidative stress induced by NSAIDs in different tissues. NSAIDs have been shown to induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in different cell types including cardiac and cardiovascular related cells. Increases in ROS result in increased levels of oxidized proteins which alters key intracellular signaling pathways. One of these key pathways is apoptosis which causes cell death when significantly activated. This review discusses the relationship between NSAIDs and cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and the role of NSAID-induced ROS in CVD. PMID:26457127

  11. Quantitative assessment of reactive oxygen sonochemically generated by cavitation bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasuda, Jun; Miyashita, Takuya; Taguchi, Kei; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2015-07-01

    Acoustic cavitation bubbles can induce not only a thermal bioeffect but also a chemical bioeffect. When cavitation bubbles collapse and oscillate violently, they produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that cause irreversible changes to the tissue. A sonosensitizer can promote such ROS generation. A treatment method using a sonosensitizer is called sonodynamic treatment. Rose bengal (RB) is one of the sonosensitizers whose in vivo and in vitro studies have been reported. In sonodynamic treatment, it is important to produce ROS at a high efficiency. For the efficient generation of ROS, a triggered high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) sequence has been proposed. In this study, cavitation bubbles were generated in a chamber where RB solution was sealed, and a high-speed camera captured the behavior of these cavitation bubbles. The amount of ROS was also quantified by a potassium iodide (KI) method and compared with high-speed camera pictures to investigate the effectiveness of the triggered HIFU sequence. As a result, ROS could be obtained efficiently by this sequence.

  12. Shear stress, reactive oxygen species, and arterial structure and function.

    PubMed

    Matlung, Hanke L; Bakker, Erik N T P; VanBavel, Ed

    2009-07-01

    Shear stress is well known to be a key factor in the regulation of small-artery tone and structure. Although nitric oxide is a major endothelium-derived factor involved in short- and long-term regulation of vascular caliber, it is clear that other mechanisms also can be involved. This review discusses the evidence for endothelium-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) as mediators for shear-dependent arterial tone and remodeling. The work focuses on resistance vessels, because their caliber determines local perfusion. However, work on large vessels is included where needed. Attention is given to the shear-stress levels and profiles that exist in the arterial system and the differential effects of steady and oscillating shear on NO and ROS production. We furthermore address the relation between microvascular tone and remodeling and the effect of ROS and inflammation on the activity of remodeling enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases and transglutaminases. We conclude that future work should address the role of H(2)O(2) as an endothelium-derived factor mediating tone and influencing structure of small arteries over the long term.

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS): Beneficial Companions of Plants’ Developmental Processes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rachana; Singh, Samiksha; Parihar, Parul; Mishra, Rohit K.; Tripathi, Durgesh K.; Singh, Vijay P.; Chauhan, Devendra K.; Prasad, Sheo M.

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated inevitably in the redox reactions of plants, including respiration and photosynthesis. In earlier studies, ROS were considered as toxic by-products of aerobic pathways of the metabolism. But in recent years, concept about ROS has changed because they also participate in developmental processes of plants by acting as signaling molecules. In plants, ROS regulate many developmental processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation, programmed cell death, seed germination, gravitropism, root hair growth and pollen tube development, senescence, etc. Despite much progress, a comprehensive update of advances in the understanding of the mechanisms evoked by ROS that mediate in cell proliferation and development are fragmentry and the matter of ROS perception and the signaling cascade remains open. Therefore, keeping in view the above facts, an attempt has been made in this article to summarize the recent findings regarding updates made in the regulatory action of ROS at various plant developmental stages, which are still not well-known. PMID:27729914

  14. Genetically encoded reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox indicators.

    PubMed

    Pouvreau, Sandrine

    2014-02-01

    Redox processes are increasingly being recognized as key elements in the regulation of cellular signaling cascades. They are frequently encountered at the frontier between physiological functions and pathological events. The biological relevance of intracellular redox changes depends on the subcellular origin, the spatio-temporal distribution and the redox couple involved. Thus, a key task in the elucidation of the role of redox reactions is the specific and quantitative measurement of redox conditions with high spatio-temporal resolution. Unfortunately, until recently, our ability to perform such measurements was limited by the lack of adequate technology. Over the last 10 years, promising imaging tools have been developed from fluorescent proteins. Genetically encoded reactive oxygen species (ROS) and redox indicators (GERRIs) have the potential to allow real-time and pseudo-quantitative monitoring of specific ROS and thiol redox state in subcellular compartments or live organisms. Redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent proteins (rxYFP family), redox-sensitive green fluorescent proteins (roGFP family), HyPer (a probe designed to measure H2 O2 ), circularly permuted YFP and others have been used in several models and sufficient information has been collected to highlight their main characteristics. This review is intended to be a tour guide of the main types of GERRIs, their origins, properties, advantages and pitfalls.

  15. Matairesinol inhibits angiogenesis via suppression of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Boram; Kim, Ki Hyun; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2012-04-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation during hypoxia. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol exhibits potent anti-angiogenic activity both in vitro and in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Matairesinol could be a basis for the development of novel anti-angiogenic agents. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) are involved in cancer initiation and progression and function as signaling molecules in many aspects of hypoxia and growth factor-mediated signaling. Here we report that matairesinol, a natural small molecule identified from the cell-based screening of 200 natural plants, suppresses mROS generation resulting in anti-angiogenic activity. A non-toxic concentration of matairesinol inhibited the proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The compound also suppressed in vitro angiogenesis of tube formation and chemoinvasion, as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane at non-toxic doses. Furthermore, matairesinol decreased hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha} in hypoxic HeLa cells. These results demonstrate that matairesinol could function as a novel angiogenesis inhibitor by suppressing mROS signaling.

  16. Are Reactive Oxygen Species Always Detrimental to Pathogens?

    PubMed Central

    Bozza, Marcelo T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are deadly weapons used by phagocytes and other cell types, such as lung epithelial cells, against pathogens. ROS can kill pathogens directly by causing oxidative damage to biocompounds or indirectly by stimulating pathogen elimination by various nonoxidative mechanisms, including pattern recognition receptors signaling, autophagy, neutrophil extracellular trap formation, and T-lymphocyte responses. Thus, one should expect that the inhibition of ROS production promote infection. Increasing evidences support that in certain particular infections, antioxidants decrease and prooxidants increase pathogen burden. In this study, we review the classic infections that are controlled by ROS and the cases in which ROS appear as promoters of infection, challenging the paradigm. We discuss the possible mechanisms by which ROS could promote particular infections. These mechanisms are still not completely clear but include the metabolic effects of ROS on pathogen physiology, ROS-induced damage to the immune system, and ROS-induced activation of immune defense mechanisms that are subsequently hijacked by particular pathogens to act against more effective microbicidal mechanisms of the immune system. The effective use of antioxidants as therapeutic agents against certain infections is a realistic possibility that is beginning to be applied against viruses. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 1000–1037. PMID:23992156

  17. Stress granules inhibit apoptosis by reducing reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masahiko; Higuchi, Masaya; Matsuki, Hideaki; Yoshita, Manami; Ohsawa, Toshiaki; Oie, Masayasu; Fujii, Masahiro

    2013-02-01

    Cells can undergo two alternative fates following exposure to environmental stress: they either induce apoptosis or inhibit apoptosis and then repair the stress-induced alterations. These processes minimize cell loss and prevent the survival of cells with aberrant DNA and protein alterations. These two alternative fates are partly controlled by stress granules (SGs). While arsenite, hypoxia, and heat shock induce the formation of SGs that inhibit apoptosis, X-ray irradiation and genotoxic drugs do not induce SGs, and they are more prone to trigger apoptosis. However, it is unclear precisely how SGs control apoptosis. This study found that SGs suppress the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and this suppression is essential for inhibiting ROS-dependent apoptosis. This antioxidant activity of SGs is controlled by two SG components, GTPase-activating protein SH3 domain binding protein 1 (G3BP1) and ubiquitin-specific protease 10 (USP10). G3BP1 elevates the steady-state ROS level by inhibiting the antioxidant activity of USP10. However, following exposure to arsenite, G3BP1 and USP10 induce the formation of SGs, which uncovers the antioxidant activity of USP10. We also found that the antioxidant activity of USP10 requires the protein kinase activity of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM). This work reveals that SGs are critical redox regulators that control cell fate under stress conditions.

  18. Correlation between Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen and Severity of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Dorighello, Gabriel G.; Paim, Bruno A.; Kiihl, Samara F.; Ferreira, Mônica S.; Catharino, Rodrigo R.; Vercesi, Anibal E.; Oliveira, Helena C. F.

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis has been associated with mitochondria dysfunction and damage. Our group demonstrated previously that hypercholesterolemic mice present increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen (mtROS) generation in several tissues and low NADPH/NADP+ ratio. Here, we investigated whether spontaneous atherosclerosis in these mice could be modulated by treatments that replenish or spare mitochondrial NADPH, named citrate supplementation, cholesterol synthesis inhibition, or both treatments simultaneously. Robust statistical analyses in pooled group data were performed in order to explain the variation of atherosclerosis lesion areas as related to the classic atherosclerosis risk factors such as plasma lipids, obesity, and oxidative stress, including liver mtROS. Using three distinct statistical tools (univariate correlation, adjusted correlation, and multiple regression) with increasing levels of stringency, we identified a novel significant association and a model that reliably predicts the extent of atherosclerosis due to variations in mtROS. Thus, results show that atherosclerosis lesion area is positively and independently correlated with liver mtROS production rates. Based on these findings, we propose that modulation of mitochondrial redox state influences the atherosclerosis extent. PMID:26635912

  19. Reactive oxygen species in diabetic nephropathy: friend or foe?

    PubMed

    Bondeva, Tzvetanka; Wolf, Gunter

    2014-11-01

    Based on the numerous cellular and animal studies over the last decades, it has been postulated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important secondary messengers for signalling pathways associated with apoptosis, proliferation, damage and inflammation. Their adverse effects were considered to play a leading role in the onset and progression of type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus as well as in the complication of diabetic disease leading to vascular-, cardiac-, neuro-degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and diabetic nephropathy. All these complications were mostly linked to the generation of the superoxide anion, due to a prolonged hyperglycaemia in diabetes, and this anion was almost 'blamed for everything', despite the fact that its measurement and detection in life systems is extremely complicated due to the short lifespan of the superoxide anion. Therefore, a tremendous amount of research has been focused on finding ways to suppress ROS production. However, a recent report from Dugan et al. shed new insights into the life detection of superoxide generation in diabetes and raised the question of whether we treat the diabetes-related complications correctly or the target is somewhat different as thought. This review will focus on some aspects of this novel concept for the role of ROS in diabetic nephropathy. PMID:24589719

  20. Reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, antimicrobial peptides and human inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Oyinloye, Babatunji Emmanuel; Adenowo, Abiola Fatimah; Kappo, Abidemi Paul

    2015-01-01

    Excessive free radical generation, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress in the biological system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and pathological conditions associated with diverse human inflammatory diseases (HIDs). Although inflammation which is considered advantageous is a defensive mechanism in response to xenobiotics and foreign pathogen; as a result of cellular damage arising from oxidative stress, if uncontrolled, it may degenerate to chronic inflammation when the ROS levels exceed the antioxidant capacity. Therefore, in the normal resolution of inflammatory reactions, apoptosis is acknowledged to play a crucial role, while on the other hand, dysregulation in the induction of apoptosis by enhanced ROS production could also result in excessive apoptosis identified in the pathogenesis of HIDs. Apparently, a careful balance must be maintained in this complex environment. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed in this review as an excellent candidate capable of playing prominent roles in maintaining this balance. Consequently, in novel drug design for the treatment and management of HIDs, AMPs are promising candidates owing to their size and multidimensional properties as well as their wide spectrum of activities and indications of reduced rate of resistance. PMID:25850012

  1. UV-induced reactive oxygen species in photocarcinogenesis and photoaging.

    PubMed

    Scharffetter-Kochanek, K; Wlaschek, M; Brenneisen, P; Schauen, M; Blaudschun, R; Wenk, J

    1997-11-01

    The increase in UV irradiation on earth due to the stratospheric ozone depletion represents a major environmental threat to the skin increasing its risk of photooxidative damage by UV-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS). Increased ROS load has been implicated in several pathological states including photoaging and photocarcinogenesis of the skin. Large efforts have been made to better define the involvement of distinct ROS in photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. Both pathological processes share common features; however, they reveal unique molecular characteristics which finally determine the fate of the cell and its host. As well as causing permanent genetic changes involving protooncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, ROS activate cytoplasmic signal transduction pathways that are related to growth differentiation, senescence, transformation and tissue degradation. This review focuses on the role of UV-induced ROS in the photodamage of the skin resulting in biochemical and clinical characteristics of photocarcinogenesis and photoaging. A decrease in the ROS load by efficient sunscreens and/or otherwise protective agents may represent a promising strategy to prevent or at least minimize ROS induced cutaneous pathological states. PMID:9426184

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species and Respiratory Plasticity Following Intermittent Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    MacFarlane, P.M.; Wilkerson, J.E.R.; Lovett-Barr, M.R.; Mitchell, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    The neural network controlling breathing exhibits plasticity in response to environmental or physiological challenges. For example, while hypoxia initiates rapid and robust increases in respiratory motor output to defend against hypoxemia, it also triggers persistent changes, or plasticity, in chemosensory neurons and integrative pathways that transmit brainstem respiratory activity to respiratory motor neurons. Frequently studied models of hypoxia-induced respiratory plasticity include: 1) carotid chemosensory plasticity and metaplasticity induced by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), and 2) acute intermittent hypoxia (AIH) induced phrenic long-term facilitation (pLTF) in naïve and CIH preconditioned rats. These forms of plasticity share some mechanistic elements, although they differ in anatomical location and the requirement for CIH preconditioning. Both forms of plasticity require serotonin receptor activation and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). While the cellular sources and targets of ROS are not well known, recent evidence suggests that ROS modify the balance of protein phosphatase and kinase activities, shifting the balance towards net phosphorylation and favoring cellular reactions that induce and/or maintain plasticity. Here, we review possible sources of ROS, and the impact of ROS on phosphorylation events relevant to respiratory plasticity. PMID:18692605

  3. Generator-specific targets of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Bleier, Lea; Wittig, Ilka; Heide, Heinrich; Steger, Mirco; Brandt, Ulrich; Dröse, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in oxidative stress and redox signaling it is necessary to link their site of generation to the oxidative modification of specific targets. Here we have studied the selective modification of protein thiols by mitochondrial ROS that have been implicated as deleterious agents in a number of degenerative diseases and in the process of biological aging, but also as important players in cellular signal transduction. We hypothesized that this bipartite role might be based on different generator sites for "signaling" and "damaging" ROS and a directed release into different mitochondrial compartments. Because two main mitochondrial ROS generators, complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) and complex III (ubiquinol:cytochrome c oxidoreductase; cytochrome bc1 complex), are known to predominantly release superoxide and the derived hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) into the mitochondrial matrix and the intermembrane space, respectively, we investigated whether these ROS generators selectively oxidize specific protein thiols. We used redox fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis analysis to identify redox-sensitive targets in the mitochondrial proteome of intact rat heart mitochondria. We observed that the modified target proteins were distinctly different when complex I or complex III was employed as the source of ROS. These proteins are potential targets involved in mitochondrial redox signaling and may serve as biomarkers to study the generator-dependent dual role of mitochondrial ROS in redox signaling and oxidative stress.

  4. Reactive oxygen species inhibited by titanium oxide coatings.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Richard; Muyco, Julie; McKittrick, Joanna; Frangos, John A

    2003-08-01

    Titanium is a successful biomaterial that possesses good biocompatibility. It is covered by a surface layer of titanium dioxide, and this oxide may play a critical role in inhibiting reactive oxygen species, such as peroxynitrite, produced during the inflammatory response. In the present study, titanium dioxide was coated onto silicone substrates by radio-frequency sputtering. Silicone coating with titanium dioxide enhanced the breakdown of peroxynitrite by 79%. At physiologic pH, the peroxynitrite donor 3-morpholinosydnonimine-N-ethylcarbamide (SIN-1) was used to nitrate 4-hydroxyphenylacetic acid (4-HPA) to form 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl acetic acid (NHPA). Titanium dioxide-coated silicone inhibited the nitration of 4-HPA by 61% compared to aluminum oxide-coated silicone and 55% compared to uncoated silicone. J774A.1 mouse macrophages were plated on oxide-coated silicone and polystyrene and stimulated to produce superoxide and interleukin-6. Superoxide production was measured by the chemiluminescent reaction with 2-methyl-6-[p-methoxyphenyl]-3,7-dihydroimidazo[1,2-a]pyrazin-3-one (MCLA). Titanium dioxide-coated silicone exhibited a 55% decrease in superoxide compared to uncoated silicone and a 165% decrease in superoxide compared to uncoated polystyrene. Titanium dioxide-coated silicone inhibited IL-6 production by 77% compared to uncoated silicone. These results show that the anti-inflammatory properties of titanium dioxide can be transferred to the surfaces of silicone substrates.

  5. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Trigger Hypoxia-Induced Transcription

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandel, N. S.; Maltepe, E.; Goldwasser, E.; Mathieu, C. E.; Simon, M. C.; Schumacker, P. T.

    1998-09-01

    Transcriptional activation of erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, and vascular endothelial growth factor occurs during hypoxia or in response to cobalt chloride (CoCl2) in Hep3B cells. However, neither the mechanism of cellular O2 sensing nor that of cobalt is fully understood. We tested whether mitochondria act as O2 sensors during hypoxia and whether hypoxia and cobalt activate transcription by increasing generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Results show (i) wild-type Hep3B cells increase ROS generation during hypoxia (1.5% O2) or CoCl2 incubation, (ii) Hep3B cells depleted of mitochondrial DNA (ρ 0 cells) fail to respire, fail to activate mRNA for erythropoietin, glycolytic enzymes, or vascular endothelial growth factor during hypoxia, and fail to increase ROS generation during hypoxia; (iii) ρ 0 cells increase ROS generation in response to CoCl2 and retain the ability to induce expression of these genes; and (iv) the antioxidants pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate and ebselen abolish transcriptional activation of these genes during hypoxia or CoCl2 in wild-type cells, and abolish the response to CoCl2 in ρ 0 cells. Thus, hypoxia activates transcription via a mitochondria-dependent signaling process involving increased ROS, whereas CoCl2 activates transcription by stimulating ROS generation via a mitochondria-independent mechanism.

  6. Reactive oxygen species in response of plants to gravity stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadko, Sergiy

    2016-07-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) as second messengers can induce stress response of plants. Thioredoxins (Trx) and peroxiredoxins (Prx) can function as sensors and transmitters of the ROS in stress signaling and antioxidant response. 12-14 days old tissue culture of Arabidopsis thaliana have been investigated. Hypergravity stress was induced by centrifugation at 10 and 20 g during 30 and 90 min and than intensity of spontaneous chemiluminescence (SChL/ROS content), Trx and Prx activities were determined. All experiments were repeated from 3 to 5 times and the obtained data were statistically treated. In the tissue culture under development of the stress there were an increase in intensity of SChL and Trx and Prx activities. Thus, under hypergravity stress in the plant occurred early increase in the ROS level and the ROS induced the increase in the Trx and Prx activities. Prx and Trx can also participate in the formation of stress respons as acceptors and transducers of the redox signals. Increase in the activity of these enzymes primarily aimed at increasing of the total antioxidant activity in the cells to prevent of the plant to development of oxidative degradation by ROS.

  7. Roles of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species in Pain

    PubMed Central

    Salvemini, Daniela; Little, Joshua W.; Doyle, Timothy; Neumann, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Peroxynitrite (PN, ONOO−) and its reactive oxygen precursor superoxide (SO, O2·−), are critically important in the development of pain of several etiologies including in the development of pain associated with chronic use of opiates such as morphine (also known as opiate-induced hyperalgesia and antinociceptive tolerance). This is now an emerging field in which considerable progress has been made in terms of understanding the relative contribution of SO, PN, and nitroxidative stress in pain signaling at the molecular and biochemical levels. Aggressive research in this area is poised to provide the pharmacological basis for development of novel non-narcotic analgesics that are based upon the unique ability to selectively eliminate SO and/or PN. As we have a better understanding of the role of SO and PN in pathophysiological settings, targeting PN may be a better therapeutic strategy than targeting SO. This is due to the fact that unlike PN, which has no currently known beneficial role, SO may play a significant role in learning and memory [1]. Thus, the best approach may be to spare SO while directly targeting its downstream product, PN. Over the last 15 years, our team has spearheaded research concerning the roles of SO/PN in pain and these results are currently leading to the development of solid therapeutic strategies in this important area. PMID:21277369

  8. Reactive oxygen species a double-edged sword for mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Catalani, Simona; Galati, Rossella

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that oxidative stress can lead to chronic inflammation which, in turn, could mediate most chronic diseases including cancer. Oxidants have been implicated in the activity of crocidolite and amosite, the most powerful types of asbestos associated to the occurrence of mesothelioma. Currently rates of mesothelioma are rising and estimates indicate that the incidence of mesothelioma will peak within the next 10–15 years in the western world, while in Japan the peak is predicted not to occur until 40 years from now. Although the use of asbestos has been banned in many countries around the world, production of and the potentially hazardous exposure to asbestos is still present with locally high incidences of mesothelioma. Today a new man-made material, carbon nanotubes, has arisen as a concern; carbon nanotubes may display ‘asbestos-like’ pathogenicity with mesothelioma induction potential. Carbon nanotubes resulted in the greatest reactive oxygen species generation. How oxidative stress activates inflammatory pathways leading to the transformation of a normal cell to a tumor cell, to tumor cell survival, proliferation, invasion, angiogenesis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance, is the aim of this review. PMID:26078352

  9. Reactive oxygen species and mitochondria: A nexus of cellular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Dan Dunn, Joe; Alvarez, Luis AJ; Zhang, Xuezhi; Soldati, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are integral components of multiple cellular pathways even though excessive or inappropriately localized ROS damage cells. ROS function as anti-microbial effector molecules and as signaling molecules that regulate such processes as NF-kB transcriptional activity, the production of DNA-based neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), and autophagy. The main sources of cellular ROS are mitochondria and NADPH oxidases (NOXs). In contrast to NOX-generated ROS, ROS produced in the mitochondria (mtROS) were initially considered to be unwanted by-products of oxidative metabolism. Increasing evidence indicates that mtROS have been incorporated into signaling pathways including those regulating immune responses and autophagy. As metabolic hubs, mitochondria facilitate crosstalk between the metabolic state of the cell with these pathways. Mitochondria and ROS are thus a nexus of multiple pathways that determine the response of cells to disruptions in cellular homeostasis such as infection, sterile damage, and metabolic imbalance. In this review, we discuss the roles of mitochondria in the generation of ROS-derived anti-microbial effectors, the interplay of mitochondria and ROS with autophagy and the formation of DNA extracellular traps, and activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome by ROS and mitochondria. PMID:26432659

  10. Melamine Polyphosphate - the Reactive and Additive Flame Retardant for Polyurethane Foams.

    PubMed

    Lubczak, Jacek; Lubczak, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Melamine polyphosphate, MPP was applied as reactive and additive flame retardant for thermally resistant polyurethane foams. MPP was hydroxyalkylated with ethylene and propylene carbonates to get oligoetherols with 1,3,5-triazine ring and phosphorus. The structure and physical properties of the products were studied. The polyurethane foams, PUFs obtained from this oligoetherols were self-distinguishing. The addition of powdered MPP into foaming mixture resulted in further decrease of flammability modified PUFs. The MPP-modified PUFs were characterized by physical methods adequate to thermal resistance and flammability of the PUFs. The best MPP-modified PUF showed oxygen index 24.6. All the modified PUFs were remarkably thermally resistant; they could stand long lasting thermal exposure even at 200 °C. PMID:26970791

  11. Reactive Oxygen Species Alter Autocrine and Paracrine Signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Zangar, Richard C.; Bollinger, Nikki; Weber, Thomas J.; Tan, Ruimin; Markillie, Lye Meng; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-12-01

    Cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4 (CYP3A4) is the most abundant P450 protein in human liver and intestine and is highly inducible by a variety of drugs and other compounds. The P450 catalytic cycle is known to uncouple and release reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the effects of ROS from P450 and other enzymes in the endo-plasmic reticulum have been poorly studied from the perspective of effects on cell biology. In this study, we expressed low levels of CYP3A4 in HepG2 cells, a human hepatocarcinoma cell line, and examined effects on intracellular levels of ROS and on the secretion of a variety of growth factors that are important in extracellular communication. Using the redox-sensitive dye RedoxSensor red, we demonstrate that CYP3A4 expression increases levels of ROS in viable cells. A customELISA microarray platform was employed to demonstrate that expression of CYP3A4 increased secretion of amphiregulin, intracellular adhesion molecule 1, matrix metalloprotease 2, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and vascular endothelial growth factor, but suppressed secretion of CD14. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine suppressed all P450-dependent changes in protein secretion except for CD14. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that changes in protein secretion were consistently associated with corresponding changes in gene expression. Inhibition of the NF-{kappa}B pathway blocked P450 effects on PDGF secretion. CYP3A4 expression also altered protein secretion in human mammary epithelial cells and C10 mouse lung cells. Overall, these results suggest that increased ROS production in the endoplasmic reticulum alters the secretion of proteins that have key roles in paracrine and autocrine signaling.

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Nucleostemin Oligomerization and Protein Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Min; Whang, Patrick; Chodaparambil, Jayanth V.; Pollyea, Daniel A.; Kusler, Brenda; Xu, Liwen; Felsher, Dean W.; Mitchell, Beverly S.

    2011-01-01

    Nucleostemin (NS) is a nucleolar-nucleoplasmic shuttle protein that regulates cell proliferation, binds p53 and Mdm2, and is highly expressed in tumor cells. We have identified NS as a target of oxidative regulation in transformed hematopoietic cells. NS oligomerization occurs in HL-60 leukemic cells and Raji B lymphoblasts that express high levels of c-Myc and have high intrinsic levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS); reducing agents dissociate NS into monomers and dimers. Exposure of U2OS osteosarcoma cells with low levels of intrinsic ROS to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induces thiol-reversible disulfide bond-mediated oligomerization of NS. Increased exposure to H2O2 impairs NS degradation, immobilizes the protein within the nucleolus, and results in detergent-insoluble NS. The regulation of NS by ROS was validated in a murine lymphoma tumor model in which c-Myc is overexpressed and in CD34+ cells from patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis. In both instances, increased ROS levels were associated with markedly increased expression of NS protein and thiol-reversible oligomerization. Site-directed mutagenesis of critical cysteine-containing regions of nucleostemin altered both its intracellular localization and its stability. MG132, a potent proteasome inhibitor and activator of ROS, markedly decreased degradation and increased nucleolar retention of NS mutants, whereas N-acetyl-l-cysteine largely prevented the effects of MG132. These results indicate that NS is a highly redox-sensitive protein. Increased intracellular ROS levels, such as those that result from oncogenic transformation in hematopoietic malignancies, regulate the ability of NS to oligomerize, prevent its degradation, and may alter its ability to regulate cell proliferation. PMID:21242306

  13. Are mitochondrial reactive oxygen species required for autophagy?

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Jianfei; Maeda, Akihiro; Ji, Jing; Baty, Catherine J.; Watkins, Simon C.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} Autophageal and apoptotic pathways were dissected in cytochrome c deficient cells. {yields} Staurosporine (STS)-induced autophagy was not accompanied by ROS generation. {yields} Autophagy was detectable in mitochondrial DNA deficient {rho}{sup 0} cells. {yields} Mitochondrial ROS are not required for the STS-induced autophagy in HeLa cells. -- Abstract: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are said to participate in the autophagy signaling. Supporting evidence is obscured by interference of autophagy and apoptosis, whereby the latter heavily relies on ROS signaling. To dissect autophagy from apoptosis we knocked down expression of cytochrome c, the key component of mitochondria-dependent apoptosis, in HeLa cells using shRNA. In cytochrome c deficient HeLa1.2 cells, electron transport was compromised due to the lack of electron shuttle between mitochondrial respiratory complexes III and IV. A rapid and robust LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation were observed in HeLa1.2 cells treated with staurosporine (STS). Neither generation of superoxide nor accumulation of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was detected in STS-treated HeLa1.2 cells. A membrane permeable antioxidant, PEG-SOD, plus catalase exerted no effect on STS-induced LC3-I/II conversion and mitochondria degradation. Further, STS caused autophagy in mitochondria DNA-deficient {rho}{sup o} HeLa1.2 cells in which both electron transport and ROS generation were completely disrupted. Counter to the widespread view, we conclude that mitochondrial ROS are not required for the induction of autophagy.

  14. Reactive oxygen species signaling in plants under abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Shuvasish; Panda, Piyalee; Sahoo, Lingaraj; Panda, Sanjib Kumar

    2013-04-01

    Abiotic stresses like heavy metals, drought, salt, low temperature, etc. are the major factors that limit crop productivity and yield. These stresses are associated with production of certain deleterious chemical entities called reactive oxygen species (ROS), which include hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂), superoxide radical (O₂(-)), hydroxyl radical (OH(-)), etc. ROS are capable of inducing cellular damage by degradation of proteins, inactivation of enzymes, alterations in the gene and interfere in various pathways of metabolic importance. Our understanding on ROS in response to abiotic stress is revolutionized with the advancements in plant molecular biology, where the basic understanding on chemical behavior of ROS is better understood. Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in ROS generation and its potential role during abiotic stress is important to identify means by which plant growth and metabolism can be regulated under acute stress conditions. ROS mediated oxidative stress, which is the key to understand stress related toxicity have been widely studied in many plants and the results in those studies clearly revealed that oxidative stress is the main symptom of toxicity. Plants have their own antioxidant defense mechanisms to encounter ROS that is of enzymic and non-enzymic nature . Coordinated activities of these antioxidants regulate ROS detoxification and reduces oxidative load in plants. Though ROS are always regarded to impart negative impact on plants, some reports consider them to be important in regulating key cellular functions; however, such reports in plant are limited. Molecular approaches to understand ROS metabolism and signaling have opened new avenues to comprehend its critical role in abiotic stress. ROS also acts as secondary messenger that signals key cellular functions like cell proliferation, apoptosis and necrosis. In higher eukaryotes, ROS signaling is not fully understood. In this review we summarize our understanding on ROS

  15. Reactive Oxygen Species Tune Root Tropic Responses1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, Gat

    2016-01-01

    The default growth pattern of primary roots of land plants is directed by gravity. However, roots possess the ability to sense and respond directionally to other chemical and physical stimuli, separately and in combination. Therefore, these root tropic responses must be antagonistic to gravitropism. The role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in gravitropism of maize and Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots has been previously described. However, which cellular signals underlie the integration of the different environmental stimuli, which lead to an appropriate root tropic response, is currently unknown. In gravity-responding roots, we observed, by applying the ROS-sensitive fluorescent dye dihydrorhodamine-123 and confocal microscopy, a transient asymmetric ROS distribution, higher at the concave side of the root. The asymmetry, detected at the distal elongation zone, was built in the first 2 h of the gravitropic response and dissipated after another 2 h. In contrast, hydrotropically responding roots show no transient asymmetric distribution of ROS. Decreasing ROS levels by applying the antioxidant ascorbate, or the ROS-generation inhibitor diphenylene iodonium attenuated gravitropism while enhancing hydrotropism. Arabidopsis mutants deficient in Ascorbate Peroxidase 1 showed attenuated hydrotropic root bending. Mutants of the root-expressed NADPH oxidase RBOH C, but not rbohD, showed enhanced hydrotropism and less ROS in their roots apices (tested in tissue extracts with Amplex Red). Finally, hydrostimulation prior to gravistimulation attenuated the gravistimulated asymmetric ROS and auxin signals that are required for gravity-directed curvature. We suggest that ROS, presumably H2O2, function in tuning root tropic responses by promoting gravitropism and negatively regulating hydrotropism. PMID:27535793

  16. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet.

    PubMed

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-16

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  17. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    PubMed Central

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-01-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment. PMID:25319447

  18. Effect of additive oxygen gas on cellular response of lung cancer cells induced by atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joh, Hea Min; Choi, Ji Ye; Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T. H.; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2014-10-01

    The atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet driven by pulsed dc voltage was utilized to treat human lung cancer cells in vitro. The properties of plasma plume were adjusted by the injection type and flow rate of additive oxygen gas in atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The plasma characteristics such as plume length, electric current and optical emission spectra (OES) were measured at different flow rates of additive oxygen to helium. The plasma plume length and total current decreased with an increase in the additive oxygen flow rate. The electron excitation temperature estimated by the Boltzmann plot from several excited helium emission lines increased slightly with the additive oxygen flow. The oxygen atom density in the gas phase estimated by actinometry utilizing argon was observed to increase with the additive oxygen flow. The concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by fluorescence assay was found to be not exactly proportional to that of extracellular ROS (measured by OES), but both correlated considerably. It was also observed that the expression levels of p53 and the phospho-p53 were enhanced in the presence of additive oxygen flow compared with those from the pure helium plasma treatment.

  19. Reactive Oxygen Species-Driven Transcription in Arabidopsis under Oxygen Deprivation1[W

    PubMed Central

    Pucciariello, Chiara; Parlanti, Sandro; Banti, Valeria; Novi, Giacomo; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2012-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role as triggers of gene expression during biotic and abiotic stresses, among which is low oxygen (O2). Previous studies have shown that ROS regulation under low O2 is driven by a RHO-like GTPase that allows tight control of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production. H2O2 is thought to regulate the expression of heat shock proteins, in a mechanism that is common to both O2 deprivation and to heat stress. In this work, we used publicly available Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) microarray datasets related to ROS and O2 deprivation to define transcriptome convergence pattern. Our results show that although Arabidopsis response to anoxic and hypoxic treatments share a common core of genes related to the anaerobic metabolism, they differ in terms of ROS-related gene response. We propose that H2O2 production under O2 deprivation is a trait present in a very early phase of anoxia, and that ROS are needed for the regulation of a set of genes belonging to the heat shock protein and ROS-mediated groups. This mechanism, likely not regulated via the N-end rule pathway for O2 sensing, is probably mediated by a NADPH oxidase and it is involved in plant tolerance to the stress. PMID:22415514

  20. Manipulation of environmental oxygen modifies reactive oxygen and nitrogen species generation during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Rachel; Pearson, Timothy; Vasilaki, Aphrodite

    2016-01-01

    Regulated changes in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) activities are important in maintaining the normal sequence and development of myogenesis. Both excessive formation and reduction in RONS have been shown to affect muscle differentiation in a negative way. Cultured cells are typically grown in 20% O2 but this is not an appropriate physiological concentration for a number of cell types, including skeletal muscle. The aim was to examine the generation of RONS in cultured skeletal muscle cells under a physiological oxygen concentration condition (6% O2) and determine the effect on muscle myogenesis. Primary mouse satellite cells were grown in 20% or 6% O2 environments and RONS activity was measured at different stages of myogenesis by real-time fluorescent microscopy using fluorescent probes with different specificities i.e. dihydroethidium (DHE), 4-amino-5-methylamino-2′,7′-difluorofluorescein diacetate (DAF-FM DA) and 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2′,7′ -dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (CM-DCFH-DA). Data demonstrate that satellite cell proliferation increased when cells were grown in 6% O2 compared with 20% O2. Myoblasts grown in 20% O2 showed an increase in DCF fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myoblasts grown at 6% O2. Myotubes grown in 20% O2 also showed an increase in DCF and DAF-FM fluorescence and DHE oxidation compared with myotubes grown in 6% O2. The catalase and MnSOD contents were also increased in myoblasts and myotubes that were maintained in 20% O2 compared with myoblasts and myotubes grown in 6% O2. These data indicate that intracellular RONS activities in myoblasts and myotubes at rest are influenced by changes in environmental oxygen concentration and that the increased ROS may influence myogenesis in a negative manner. PMID:26827127

  1. 78 FR 37962 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Reactive Blue 246 and Reactive Blue 247...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-25

    ...-propenoic)ester (C.I. Reactive Blue 247) as color additives in contact lenses. DATES: Effective date confirmed: May 2, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Regarding CAP 1C0291 (C.I. Reactive Blue 246... rule that published in the Federal Register of April 1, 2013 (78 FR 19413), and that amended the...

  2. Upsides and Downsides of Reactive Oxygen Species for Cancer: The Roles of Reactive Oxygen Species in Tumorigenesis, Prevention, and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Subash C.; Hevia, David; Patchva, Sridevi; Park, Byoungduck; Koh, Wonil

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Extensive research during the last quarter century has revealed that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in the body, primarily by the mitochondria, play a major role in various cell-signaling pathways. Most risk factors associated with chronic diseases (e.g., cancer), such as stress, tobacco, environmental pollutants, radiation, viral infection, diet, and bacterial infection, interact with cells through the generation of ROS. Recent Advances: ROS, in turn, activate various transcription factors (e.g., nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells [NF-κB], activator protein-1, hypoxia-inducible factor-1α, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3), resulting in the expression of proteins that control inflammation, cellular transformation, tumor cell survival, tumor cell proliferation and invasion, angiogenesis, and metastasis. Paradoxically, ROS also control the expression of various tumor suppressor genes (p53, Rb, and PTEN). Similarly, γ-radiation and various chemotherapeutic agents used to treat cancer mediate their effects through the production of ROS. Interestingly, ROS have also been implicated in the chemopreventive and anti-tumor action of nutraceuticals derived from fruits, vegetables, spices, and other natural products used in traditional medicine. Critical Issues: These statements suggest both “upside” (cancer-suppressing) and “downside” (cancer-promoting) actions of the ROS. Thus, similar to tumor necrosis factor-α, inflammation, and NF-κB, ROS act as a double-edged sword. This paradox provides a great challenge for researchers whose aim is to exploit ROS stress for the development of cancer therapies. Future Directions: The various mechanisms by which ROS mediate paradoxical effects are discussed in this article. The outstanding questions and future directions raised by our current understanding are discussed. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 16, 1295–1322. PMID:22117137

  3. [Generation of reactive oxygen species in water under exposure of visible or infrared irradiation at absorption band of molecular oxygen].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, S V; Karp, O E; Garmash, S A; Ivanov, V E; Chernikov, A V; Manokhin, A A; Astashev, M E; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Bruskov, V I

    2012-01-01

    It is found that in bidistilled water saturated with oxygen hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are formed under the influence of visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurs under the influence of both solar and artificial light sourses, including the coherent laser irradiation. The oxygen effect, i.e. the impact of dissolved oxygen concentration on production of hydrogen peroxide induced by light, is detected. It is shown that the visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen leads to the formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA in vitro. Physicochemical mechanisms of ROS formation in water when exposed to visible and infrared light are studied, and the involvement of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radicals in this process is shown.

  4. A comparative kinetic and mechanistic study between tetrahydrozoline and naphazoline toward photogenerated reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Criado, Susana; García, Norman A

    2010-01-01

    Kinetic and mechanistic aspects of the vitamin B2 (riboflavin [Rf])-sensitized photo-oxidation of the imidazoline derivates (IDs) naphazoline (NPZ) and tetrahydrozoline (THZ) were investigated in aqueous solution. The process appears as important on biomedical grounds, considering that the vitamin is endogenously present in humans, and IDs are active components of ocular medicaments of topical application. Under aerobic visible light irradiation, a complex picture of competitive interactions between sensitizer, substrates and dissolved oxygen takes place: the singlet and triplet ((3)Rf*) excited states of Rf are quenched by the IDs: with IDs concentrations ca. 5.0 mM and 0.02 mM Rf, (3)Rf* is quenched by IDs, in a competitive fashion with dissolved ground state oxygen. Additionally, the reactive oxygen species: O(2)((1)Delta(g)), O(2)(*-), HO(*) and H(2)O(2), generated from (3)Rf* and Rf(*-), were detected with the employment of time-resolved methods or specific scavengers. Oxygen uptake experiments indicate that, for NPZ, only H(2)O(2) was involved in the photo-oxidation. In the case of THZ, O(2)(*-), HO(*) and H(2)O(2) were detected, whereas only HO(*) was unambiguously identified as THZ oxidative agents. Upon direct UV light irradiation NPZ and THZ generate O(2)((1)Delta(g)), with quantum yields of 0.2 (literature value, employed as a reference) and 0.08, respectively, in acetonitrile.

  5. Cytotoxic and Antitumor Activity of Sulforaphane: The Role of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Sestili, Piero; Fimognari, Carmela

    2015-01-01

    According to recent estimates, cancer continues to remain the second leading cause of death and is becoming the leading one in old age. Failure and high systemic toxicity of conventional cancer therapies have accelerated the identification and development of innovative preventive as well as therapeutic strategies to contrast cancer-associated morbidity and mortality. In recent years, increasing body of in vitro and in vivo studies has underscored the cancer preventive and therapeutic efficacy of the isothiocyanate sulforaphane. In this review article, we highlight that sulforaphane cytotoxicity derives from complex, concurring, and multiple mechanisms, among which the generation of reactive oxygen species has been identified as playing a central role in promoting apoptosis and autophagy of target cells. We also discuss the site and the mechanism of reactive oxygen species' formation by sulforaphane, the toxicological relevance of sulforaphane-formed reactive oxygen species, and the death pathways triggered by sulforaphane-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26185755

  6. Solar light-induced production of reactive oxygen species by single walled carbon nanotubes in water

    EPA Science Inventory

    Photosensitizing processes of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) which include photo-induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) convert light energy into oxidizing chemical energy that mediates transformations of nanomaterials. The oxidative stress associated with ROS may p...

  7. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN HUMAN PLASMA AND BLOOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are commonly associated with diseased states (including asthma, cardiovascular disease, cancer) infections, and exposure to various toxicants in humans. It is of interest in epidemiology studies to characterize the association of oxidative stress in...

  8. Balancing the generation and elimination of reactive oxygen species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Rusty; Redman, Regina

    2005-01-01

    Fossil records suggest that bacteria developed the ability to photosynthesize ≈3,500 million years ago (mya), initiating a very slow accumulation of atmospheric oxygen (1). Recent geochemical models suggest that atmospheric oxygen did not accumulate to levels conducive for aerobic life until 500–1,000 mya (2, 3). The oxygenation of Earth's atmosphere resulted in the emergence of aerobic organisms followed by a great diversification of biological species and the eventual evolution of humans.

  9. 78 FR 42451 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Reactive Blue 246 and Reactive Blue 247...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 73 Listing of Color Additives Exempt From... color additive regulations in Sec. Sec. 73.3100 and 73.3106 (21 CFR 73.3100 and 73.3106), respectively... Blue 246), as color additives in contact lenses. We also corrected the nomenclature for Reactive...

  10. Endophytic Bacterium-Triggered Reactive Oxygen Species Directly Increase Oxygenous Sesquiterpenoid Content and Diversity in Atractylodes lancea

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jia-Yu; Yuan, Jie; Li, Xia; Ning, Yi-Fan

    2015-01-01

    Oxygenous terpenoids are active components of many medicinal plants. However, current studies that have focused on enzymatic oxidation reactions cannot comprehensively clarify the mechanisms of oxygenous terpenoid synthesis and diversity. This study shows that an endophytic bacterium can trigger the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that directly increase oxygenous sesquiterpenoid content and diversity in Atractylodes lancea. A. lancea is a famous but endangered Chinese medicinal plant that contains abundant oxygenous sesquiterpenoids. Geo-authentic A. lancea produces a wider range and a greater abundance of oxygenous sesquiterpenoids than the cultivated herb. Our previous studies have shown the mechanisms behind endophytic promotion of the production of sesquiterpenoid hydrocarbon scaffolds; however, how endophytes promote the formation of oxygenous sesquiterpenoids and their diversity is unclear. After colonization by Pseudomonas fluorescens ALEB7B, oxidative burst and oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation in A. lancea occur synchronously. Treatment with exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or singlet oxygen induces oxidative burst and promotes oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation in planta. Conversely, pretreatment of plantlets with the ROS scavenger ascorbic acid significantly inhibits the oxidative burst and oxygenous sesquiterpenoid accumulation induced by P. fluorescens ALEB7B. Further in vitro oxidation experiments show that several oxygenous sesquiterpenoids can be obtained from direct oxidation caused by H2O2 or singlet oxygen. In summary, this study demonstrates that endophytic bacterium-triggered ROS can directly oxidize oxygen-free sesquiterpenoids and increase the oxygenous sesquiterpenoid content and diversity in A. lancea, providing a novel explanation of the mechanisms of oxygenous terpenoid synthesis in planta and an essential complementarity to enzymatic oxidation reactions. PMID:26712554

  11. Investigation of oxygen states and reactivities on a nanostructured cupric oxide surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svintsitskiy, D. A.; Stadnichenko, A. I.; Demidov, D. V.; Koscheev, S. V.; Boronin, A. I.

    2011-08-01

    Nanostructured copper (II) oxide was formed on clean copper foil at room temperature using activated oxygen produced by RF discharge. CuO particles of approximately 10-20 nm were observed on the surface by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM). The copper states and oxygen species of the model cupric oxide were studied by means of X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS). These oxide particles demonstrated abnormally high reactivity with carbon monoxide (CO) at temperatures below 100 °C. The XPS data showed that the interaction of CO with the nanostructured cupric oxide resulted in reduction of the CuO particles to Cu 2O species. The reactivity of the nanostructured cupric oxide to CO was studied at 80 °C using XPS in step-by-step mode. The initial reactivity was estimated to be 5 × 10 -5 and was steadily reduced down to 5 × 10 -9 as the exposure was increased. O1s spectral analysis allowed us to propose that the high initial reactivity was caused by the presence of non-lattice oxygen states on the surface of the nanostructured CuO. We established that reoxidation of the partially reduced nanostructured cupric oxide by molecular oxygen O 2 restored the highly reactive oxygen form on the surface. These results allowed us to propose that the nanostructured cupric oxide could be used for low temperature catalytic CO oxidation. Some hypotheses concerning the nature of the non-lattice oxygen species with high reactivity are also discussed.

  12. Effect of ectomycorrhizal colonization and drought on reactive oxygen species metabolism of Nothofagus dombeyi roots.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Maricel; Huygens, Dries; Fernandez, Carlos; Gacitúa, Yessy; Olivares, Erick; Saavedra, Isabel; Alberdi, Miren; Valenzuela, Eduardo

    2009-08-01

    Infection with ectomycorrhizal fungi can increase the ability of plants to resist drought stress through morphophysiological and biochemical mechanisms. However, the metabolism of antioxidative enzyme activities in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis remains poorly understood. This study investigated biomass production, reactive oxygen metabolism (hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde concentration) and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase) in pure cultures of the ectomycorrhizal fungi Descolea antartica Sing. and Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch, and non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal roots of Nothofagus dombeyi (Mirb.) roots under well-watered conditions and drought conditions (DC). The studied ectomycorrhizal fungi regulated their antioxidative enzyme metabolism differentially in response to drought, resulting in cellular damage in D. antartica but not in P. tinctorius. Ectomycorrhizal inoculation and water treatment had a significant effect on all parameters studied, including relative water content of the plant. As such, N. dombeyi plants in symbiosis experienced a lower oxidative stress effect than non-mycorrhizal plants under DC. Additionally, ectomycorrhizal N. dombeyi roots showed a greater antioxidant enzyme activity relative to non-mycorrhizal roots, an effect which was further expressed under DC. The association between the non-specific P. tinctorius and N. dombeyi had a more effective reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism than the specific D. antartica-N. dombeyi symbiosis. We conclude that the combination of effective ROS prevention and ROS detoxification by ectomycorrhizal plants resulted in reduced cellular damage and increased plant growth relative to non-mycorrhizal plants under drought. PMID:19483186

  13. Effect of ectomycorrhizal colonization and drought on reactive oxygen species metabolism of Nothofagus dombeyi roots.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Maricel; Huygens, Dries; Fernandez, Carlos; Gacitúa, Yessy; Olivares, Erick; Saavedra, Isabel; Alberdi, Miren; Valenzuela, Eduardo

    2009-08-01

    Infection with ectomycorrhizal fungi can increase the ability of plants to resist drought stress through morphophysiological and biochemical mechanisms. However, the metabolism of antioxidative enzyme activities in the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis remains poorly understood. This study investigated biomass production, reactive oxygen metabolism (hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde concentration) and antioxidant enzyme activity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase) in pure cultures of the ectomycorrhizal fungi Descolea antartica Sing. and Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker & Couch, and non-mycorrhizal and mycorrhizal roots of Nothofagus dombeyi (Mirb.) roots under well-watered conditions and drought conditions (DC). The studied ectomycorrhizal fungi regulated their antioxidative enzyme metabolism differentially in response to drought, resulting in cellular damage in D. antartica but not in P. tinctorius. Ectomycorrhizal inoculation and water treatment had a significant effect on all parameters studied, including relative water content of the plant. As such, N. dombeyi plants in symbiosis experienced a lower oxidative stress effect than non-mycorrhizal plants under DC. Additionally, ectomycorrhizal N. dombeyi roots showed a greater antioxidant enzyme activity relative to non-mycorrhizal roots, an effect which was further expressed under DC. The association between the non-specific P. tinctorius and N. dombeyi had a more effective reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism than the specific D. antartica-N. dombeyi symbiosis. We conclude that the combination of effective ROS prevention and ROS detoxification by ectomycorrhizal plants resulted in reduced cellular damage and increased plant growth relative to non-mycorrhizal plants under drought.

  14. Flavonoids in Microheterogeneous Media, Relationship between Their Relative Location and Their Reactivity towards Singlet Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Günther, Germán; Berríos, Eduardo; Pizarro, Nancy; Valdés, Karina; Montero, Guillermo; Arriagada, Francisco; Morales, Javier

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the relationship between the molecular structure of three flavonoids (kaempferol, quercetin and morin), their relative location in microheterogeneous media (liposomes and erythrocyte membranes) and their reactivity against singlet oxygen was studied. The changes observed in membrane fluidity induced by the presence of these flavonoids and the influence of their lipophilicity/hydrophilicity on the antioxidant activity in lipid membranes were evaluated by means of fluorescent probes such as Laurdan and diphenylhexatriene (DPH). The small differences observed for the value of generalized polarization of Laurdan (GP) curves in function of the concentration of flavonoids, indicate that these three compounds promote similar alterations in liposomes and erythrocyte membranes. In addition, these compounds do not produce changes in fluorescence anisotropy of DPH, discarding their location in deeper regions of the lipid bilayer. The determined chemical reactivity sequence is similar in all the studied media (kaempferol < quercetin < morin). Morin is approximately 10 times more reactive than quercetin and 20 to 30 times greater than kaempferol, depending on the medium. PMID:26098745

  15. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling.

    PubMed

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2(.)) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling.

  16. Singlet oxygen treatment of tumor cells triggers extracellular singlet oxygen generation, catalase inactivation and reactivation of intercellular apoptosis-inducing signaling☆

    PubMed Central

    Riethmüller, Michaela; Burger, Nils; Bauer, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular singlet oxygen generation in photofrin-loaded cells caused cell death without discrimination between nonmalignant and malignant cells. In contrast, extracellular singlet oxygen generation caused apoptosis induction selectively in tumor cells through singlet oxygen-mediated inactivation of tumor cell protective catalase and subsequent reactivation of intercellular ROS-mediated apoptosis signaling through the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathway. Singlet oxygen generation by extracellular photofrin alone was, however, not sufficient for optimal direct inactivation of catalase, but needed to trigger the generation of cell-derived extracellular singlet oxygen through the interaction between H2O2 and peroxynitrite. Thereby, formation of peroxynitrous acid, generation of hydroxyl radicals and formation of perhydroxyl radicals (HO2.) through hydroxyl radical/H2O2 interaction seemed to be required as intermediate steps. This amplificatory mechanism led to the formation of singlet oxygen at a sufficiently high concentration for optimal inactivation of membrane-associated catalase. At low initial concentrations of singlet oxygen, an additional amplification step needed to be activated. It depended on singlet oxygen-dependent activation of the FAS receptor and caspase-8, followed by caspase-8-mediated enhancement of NOX activity. The biochemical mechanisms described here might be considered as promising principle for the development of novel approaches in tumor therapy that specifically direct membrane-associated catalase of tumor cells and thus utilize tumor cell-specific apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling. PMID:26225731

  17. The concept of reactive surface area applied to uncatalyzed and catalyzed carbon (char) gasification in carbon dioxide and oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Lizzio, A.A.

    1990-01-01

    The virtues of, and/or problems with, utilizing the concepts of total and active surface area to explain the reactivity profiles were evaluated and discussed. An alternative approach, involving the concept of reactive surface area (RSA), was introduced and results based on the direct measurement of RSA were presented. Here, reactive surface area is defined as the concentration of carbon atoms on which the carbon-oxygen C(O) surface intermediate forms and subsequently decomposes to give gaseous products. The transient kinetics (TK) approach gave a direct measurement of RSA for chars gasified in CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2}. A temperature-programmed desorption technique was also used to determine the amount of reactive surface intermediate formed on these chars during gasification. A comparison of turnover frequencies for different chars gasified in 1 atm CO{sub 2} suggested that char gasification mat be a structure sensitive reaction. The concept of RSA was also used to achieve a better quantitative understanding of catalyzed char reactivity variations with conversion in CO{sub 2}. For a calcium-exchanged lignite char gasified in 1 atm CO{sub 2}, a poor correlation was found between RSA and reactivity, suggesting that in addition to the direct decomposition of the reactive C(O) intermediate, other processes, e.g., oxygen spillover, contributed to the transient evolution of CO. An extensive study of Saran char loaded with calcium, potassium or nickel by impregnation to incipient wetness (IW) or ion exchange (IE) was undertaken. An excellent correlation was found between reactivity and RSA variations with conversion for both IW and IE K-catalyzed chars, suggesting that TK indeed titrates the reactive K-O-C complexes formed during gasification in CO{sub 2}.

  18. The Effect of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Valence State on Reactive Oxygen Species and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dunnick, Katherine M; Pillai, Rajalekshmi; Pisane, Kelly L; Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; Sabolsky, Edward M; Leonard, Stephen S

    2015-07-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles, which are used in a variety of products including solar cells, gas sensors, and catalysts, are expected to increase in industrial use. This will subsequently lead to additional occupational exposures, making toxicology screenings crucial. Previous toxicology studies have presented conflicting results as to the extent of CeO2 toxicity, which is hypothesized to be due to the ability of Ce to exist in both a +3 and +4 valence state. Thus, to study whether valence state and oxygen vacancy concentration are important in CeO2 toxicity, CeO2 nanoparticles were doped with gadolinium to adjust the cation (Ce, Gd) and anion (O) defect states. The hypothesis that doping would increase toxicity and decrease antioxidant abilities as a result of increased oxygen vacancies and inhibition of +3 to +4 transition was tested. Differences in toxicity and reactivity based on valence state were determined in RLE-6TN rat alveolar epithelial and NR8383 rat alveolar macrophage cells using enhanced dark field microscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and annexin V/propidium iodide cell viability stain. Results from EPR indicated that as doping increased, antioxidant potential decreased. Alternatively, doping had no effect on toxicity at 24 h. The present results imply that as doping increases, thus subsequently increasing the Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) ratio, antioxidant potential decreases, suggesting that differences in reactivity of CeO2 are due to the ability of Ce to transition between the two valence states and the presence of increased oxygen vacancies, rather than dependent on a specific valence state.

  19. 76 FR 25234 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Reactive Blue 69

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... (CAS Reg. No. 70209-99-3), also known as Reactive Blue 69, as a color additive in contact lenses. This... additive in contact lenses. The petition was filed under section 721 of the Federal Food, Drug, and... review of the safety of the use of Reactive Blue 69 pigment in contact lenses, the Agency considered...

  20. Higher respiratory activity decreases mitochondrial reactive oxygen release and increases life span in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Barros, Mario H; Bandy, Brian; Tahara, Erich B; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2004-11-26

    Increased replicative longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae because of calorie restriction has been linked to enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity. Here we have further investigated how mitochondrial respiration affects yeast life span. We found that calorie restriction by growth in low glucose increased respiration but decreased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production relative to oxygen consumption. Calorie restriction also enhanced chronological life span. The beneficial effects of calorie restriction on mitochondrial respiration, reactive oxygen species release, and replicative and chronological life span could be mimicked by uncoupling agents such as dinitrophenol. Conversely, chronological life span decreased in cells treated with antimycin (which strongly increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation) or in yeast mutants null for mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (which removes superoxide radicals) and for RTG2 (which participates in retrograde feedback signaling between mitochondria and the nucleus). These results suggest that yeast aging is linked to changes in mitochondrial metabolism and oxidative stress and that mild mitochondrial uncoupling can increase both chronological and replicative life span.

  1. The Effect of Manganese Additions on the Reactive Evaporation of Chromium in Ni-Cr Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Alman, David E.

    2004-10-20

    Chromium is used as an alloy addition in stainless steels and nickel-chromium alloys to form protective chromium oxide scales. Chromium oxide undergoes reactive evaporation in high temperature exposures in the presence of oxygen and/or water vapor. The deposition of gaseous chromium species onto solid oxide fuel cell electrodes can reduce the efficiency of the fuel cell. Manganese additions to the alloy can reduce the activity of chromium in the oxide, either from solid solution replacement of chromium with manganese (at low levels of manganese) or from the formation of manganese-chromium spinels (at high levels of manganese). This reduction in chromium activity leads to a predicted reduction in chromium evaporation by as much as a factor of 35 at 800 C and 55 at 700 C. The results of evaporation loss measurements on nickel-chromium-manganese alloys are compared with the predicted reduction. Quantifying the effects of manganese additions on chromium evaporation should aid alloy development of metallic interconnects and balance-of-plant alloys.

  2. Mold elicits atopic dermatitis by reactive oxygen species: Epidemiology and mechanism studies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Jung; Lee, Eun; Lee, Seung-Hwa; Kang, Mi-Jin; Hong, Soo-Jong

    2015-12-01

    Mold has been implicated in the development of atopic dermatitis (AD); however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of mold exposure in early life through epidemiologic and mechanistic studies in vivo and in vitro. Exposure to visible mold inside the home during the first year of life was associated with an increased risk for current AD by two population-based cross-sectional human studies. Children with the AG+GG genotype of GSTP1 showed increased risk for current AD when exposed to mold. In the mouse model, treatment with patulin induced and aggravated clinically significant AD and Th2-related inflammation of the affected mouse skin. Additionally, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were released in the mouse skin as well by human keratinocytes. In conclusions, mold exposure increases the risk for AD related to ROS generation mediated by Th2-promoting inflammatory cytokines.

  3. Symbiotic lactobacilli stimulate gut epithelial proliferation via Nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Luo, Liping; Ardita, Courtney S; Richardson, Arena N; Kwon, Young Man; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Alam, Ashfaqul; Gates, Cymone L; Wu, Huixia; Swanson, Phillip A; Lambeth, J David; Denning, Patricia W; Neish, Andrew S

    2013-11-27

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the metazoan gut elicits profound effects on the growth and development of the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic-eukaryotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unknown. It is increasingly recognized that physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signalling secondary messengers that influence cellular proliferation and differentiation in a variety of biological systems. Here, we report that commensal bacteria, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, can stimulate NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-dependent ROS generation and consequent cellular proliferation in intestinal stem cells upon initial ingestion into the murine or Drosophila intestine. Our data identify and highlight a highly conserved mechanism that symbiotic microorganisms utilize in eukaryotic growth and development. Additionally, the work suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may be assigned to specific bacterial taxa and may contribute to the identification of microbes with probiotic potential.

  4. The Injury and Therapy of Reactive Oxygen Species in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Looking at Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Jie; Chen, Weixiang; Hu, Rong; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage is an emerging major health problem often resulting in death or disability. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been identified as one of the major damaging factors in ischemic stroke. However, there is less discussion about ROS in hemorrhage stroke. Metabolic products of hemoglobin, excitatory amino acids, and inflammatory cells are all sources of ROS, and ROS harm the central nervous system through cell death and structural damage, especially disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We have considered the antioxidant system of the CNS itself and the drugs aiming to decrease ROS after ICH, and we find that mitochondria are key players in all of these aspects. Moreover, when the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opens, ROS-induced ROS release, which leads to extensive liberation of ROS and mitochondrial failure, occurs. Therefore, the mitochondrion may be a significant target for elucidating the problem of ROS in ICH; however, additional experimental support is required. PMID:27293511

  5. Auxin-induced reactive oxygen species production requires the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jung Hee; Yoo, Ho Jung; Hwang, Inhwan; Lee, June Seung; Nam, Kyoung Hee; Bae, Yun Soo

    2005-02-14

    We recently reported that production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is essential for auxin-induced gravitropic signaling. Here, we investigated the role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and its product, PtdIns(3)P, in auxin-mediated ROS production and the root gravitropic response. Pretreatment with LY294002, an inhibitor of PtdIns 3-kinase activity, blocked auxin-mediated ROS generation, and reduced the sensitivity of root tissue to gravistimulation. The amount of PtdIns(3)P increased in response to auxin, and this effect was abolished by pretreatment with LY294002. In addition, sequestration of PtdIns(3)P by transient expression of the endosome binding domain in protoplasts abrogated IAA-induced ROS accumulation. These results indicate that activation of PtdIns 3-kinase and its product PtdIns(3)P are required for auxin-induced production of ROS and root gravitropism. PMID:15710420

  6. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is not a promotor of taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qingrui; Chen, Tongsheng

    2009-02-01

    we have previously reported that taxol, a potent anticancer agent, induces caspase-independent cell death and cytoplasmic vacuolization in human lung adenocarcinoma (ASTC-a-1) cells. However, the mechanisms of taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization are poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been reported to be involved in the taxol-induced cell death. Here, we employed confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging to explore the role of ROS in taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization. We found that ROS inhibition by addition of N-acetycysteine (NAC), a total ROS scavenger, did not suppress these vacuolization but instead increased vacuolization. Take together, our results showed that ROS is not a promotor of the taxol-induced cytoplasmic vacuolization.

  7. Symbiotic lactobacilli stimulate gut epithelial proliferation via Nox-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Rheinallt M; Luo, Liping; Ardita, Courtney S; Richardson, Arena N; Kwon, Young Man; Mercante, Jeffrey W; Alam, Ashfaqul; Gates, Cymone L; Wu, Huixia; Swanson, Phillip A; Lambeth, J David; Denning, Patricia W; Neish, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    The resident prokaryotic microbiota of the metazoan gut elicits profound effects on the growth and development of the intestine. However, the molecular mechanisms of symbiotic prokaryotic–eukaryotic cross-talk in the gut are largely unknown. It is increasingly recognized that physiologically generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as signalling secondary messengers that influence cellular proliferation and differentiation in a variety of biological systems. Here, we report that commensal bacteria, particularly members of the genus Lactobacillus, can stimulate NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1)-dependent ROS generation and consequent cellular proliferation in intestinal stem cells upon initial ingestion into the murine or Drosophila intestine. Our data identify and highlight a highly conserved mechanism that symbiotic microorganisms utilize in eukaryotic growth and development. Additionally, the work suggests that specific redox-mediated functions may be assigned to specific bacterial taxa and may contribute to the identification of microbes with probiotic potential. PMID:24141879

  8. The Injury and Therapy of Reactive Oxygen Species in Intracerebral Hemorrhage Looking at Mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jie; Chen, Weixiang; Hu, Rong; Feng, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral hemorrhage is an emerging major health problem often resulting in death or disability. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been identified as one of the major damaging factors in ischemic stroke. However, there is less discussion about ROS in hemorrhage stroke. Metabolic products of hemoglobin, excitatory amino acids, and inflammatory cells are all sources of ROS, and ROS harm the central nervous system through cell death and structural damage, especially disruption of the blood-brain barrier. We have considered the antioxidant system of the CNS itself and the drugs aiming to decrease ROS after ICH, and we find that mitochondria are key players in all of these aspects. Moreover, when the mitochondrial permeability transition pore opens, ROS-induced ROS release, which leads to extensive liberation of ROS and mitochondrial failure, occurs. Therefore, the mitochondrion may be a significant target for elucidating the problem of ROS in ICH; however, additional experimental support is required.

  9. Polyglutamine expansion inhibits respiration by increasing reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria

    SciTech Connect

    Puranam, Kasturi L.; Wu, Guanghong; Strittmatter, Warren J.; Burke, James R. . E-mail: james.burke@duke.edu

    2006-03-10

    Huntington's disease results from expansion of the polyglutamine (PolyQ) domain in the huntingtin protein. Although the cellular mechanism by which pathologic-length PolyQ protein causes neurodegeneration is unclear, mitochondria appear central in pathogenesis. We demonstrate in isolated mitochondria that pathologic-length PolyQ protein directly inhibits ADP-dependent (state 3) mitochondrial respiration. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration by PolyQ protein is not due to reduction in the activities of electron transport chain complexes, mitochondrial ATP synthase, or the adenine nucleotide translocase. We show that pathologic-length PolyQ protein increases the production of reactive oxygen species in isolated mitochondria. Impairment of state 3 mitochondrial respiration by PolyQ protein is reversed by addition of the antioxidants N-acetyl-L-cysteine or cytochrome c. We propose a model in which pathologic-length PolyQ protein directly inhibits mitochondrial function by inducing oxidative stress.

  10. Reactive oxygen species and oxidative stress in osteoclastogenesis, skeletal aging and bone diseases.

    PubMed

    Callaway, Danielle A; Jiang, Jean X

    2015-07-01

    Osteoclasts are cells derived from bone marrow macrophages and are important in regulating bone resorption during bone homeostasis. Understanding what drives osteoclast differentiation and activity is important when studying diseases characterized by heightened bone resorption relative to formation, such as osteoporosis. In the last decade, studies have indicated that reactive oxygen species (ROS), including superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, are crucial components that regulate the differentiation process of osteoclasts. However, there are still many unanswered questions that remain. This review will examine the mechanisms by which ROS can be produced in osteoclasts as well as how it may affect osteoclast differentiation and activity through its actions on osteoclastogenesis signaling pathways. In addition, the contribution of ROS to the aging-associated disease of osteoporosis will be addressed and how targeting ROS may lead to the development of novel therapeutic treatment options.

  11. Oxygen reactivity of mammalian sulfite oxidase provides a concept for the treatment of sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Belaidi, Abdel A; Röper, Juliane; Arjune, Sita; Krizowski, Sabina; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Schwarz, Guenter

    2015-07-15

    Mammalian sulfite oxidase (SO) is a dimeric enzyme consisting of a molybdenum cofactor- (Moco) and haem-containing domain and catalyses the oxidation of toxic sulfite to sulfate. Following sulfite oxidation, electrons are passed from Moco via the haem cofactor to cytochrome c, the terminal electron acceptor. In contrast, plant SO (PSO) lacks the haem domain and electrons shuttle from Moco to molecular oxygen. Given the high similarity between plant and mammalian SO Moco domains, factors that determine the reactivity of PSO towards oxygen, remained unknown. In the present study, we generated mammalian haem-deficient and truncated SO variants and demonstrated their oxygen reactivity by hydrogen peroxide formation and oxygen-consumption studies. We found that intramolecular electron transfer between Moco and haem showed an inverse correlation to SO oxygen reactivity. Haem-deficient SO variants exhibited oxygen-dependent sulfite oxidation similar to PSO, which was confirmed further using haem-deficient human SO in a cell-based assay. This finding suggests the possibility to use oxygen-reactive SO variants in sulfite detoxification, as the loss of SO activity is causing severe neurodegeneration. Therefore we evaluated the potential use of PEG attachment (PEGylation) as a modification method for future enzyme substitution therapies using oxygen-reactive SO variants, which might use blood-dissolved oxygen as the electron acceptor. PEGylation has been shown to increase the half-life of other therapeutic proteins. PEGylation resulted in the modification of up to eight surface-exposed lysine residues of SO, an increased conformational stability and similar kinetic properties compared with wild-type SO. PMID:26171830

  12. Oxygen reactivity of mammalian sulfite oxidase provides a concept for the treatment of sulfite oxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Belaidi, Abdel A; Röper, Juliane; Arjune, Sita; Krizowski, Sabina; Trifunovic, Aleksandra; Schwarz, Guenter

    2015-07-15

    Mammalian sulfite oxidase (SO) is a dimeric enzyme consisting of a molybdenum cofactor- (Moco) and haem-containing domain and catalyses the oxidation of toxic sulfite to sulfate. Following sulfite oxidation, electrons are passed from Moco via the haem cofactor to cytochrome c, the terminal electron acceptor. In contrast, plant SO (PSO) lacks the haem domain and electrons shuttle from Moco to molecular oxygen. Given the high similarity between plant and mammalian SO Moco domains, factors that determine the reactivity of PSO towards oxygen, remained unknown. In the present study, we generated mammalian haem-deficient and truncated SO variants and demonstrated their oxygen reactivity by hydrogen peroxide formation and oxygen-consumption studies. We found that intramolecular electron transfer between Moco and haem showed an inverse correlation to SO oxygen reactivity. Haem-deficient SO variants exhibited oxygen-dependent sulfite oxidation similar to PSO, which was confirmed further using haem-deficient human SO in a cell-based assay. This finding suggests the possibility to use oxygen-reactive SO variants in sulfite detoxification, as the loss of SO activity is causing severe neurodegeneration. Therefore we evaluated the potential use of PEG attachment (PEGylation) as a modification method for future enzyme substitution therapies using oxygen-reactive SO variants, which might use blood-dissolved oxygen as the electron acceptor. PEGylation has been shown to increase the half-life of other therapeutic proteins. PEGylation resulted in the modification of up to eight surface-exposed lysine residues of SO, an increased conformational stability and similar kinetic properties compared with wild-type SO.

  13. Enhancing SNCR-aided combustion with oxygen addition

    DOEpatents

    Kobayashi, Hisashi; Wu, Kuang Tsai; Bool, III, Lawrence E.

    2004-03-09

    NOx emissions from combustion are reduced, NOx reduction efficiency by SNCR is improved, and other efficiencies are realized, by injecting oxygen into a fuel-rich combustion zone under controlled conditions.

  14. Effects of autoregulation and CO2 reactivity on cerebral oxygen transport.

    PubMed

    Payne, S J; Selb, J; Boas, D A

    2009-11-01

    Both autoregulation and CO(2) reactivity are known to have significant effects on cerebral blood flow and thus on the transport of oxygen through the vasculature. In this paper, a previous model of the autoregulation of blood flow in the cerebral vasculature is expanded to include the dynamic behavior of oxygen transport through binding with hemoglobin. The model is used to predict the transfer functions for both oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin in response to fluctuations in arterial blood pressure and arterial CO(2) concentration. It is shown that only six additional nondimensional groups are required in addition to the five that were previously found to characterize the cerebral blood flow response. A resonant frequency in the pressure-oxyhemoglobin transfer function is found to occur in the region of 0.1 Hz, which is a frequency of considerable physiological interest. The model predictions are compared with results from the published literature of phase angle at this frequency, showing that the effects of changes in breathing rate can significantly alter the inferred phase dynamics between blood pressure and hemoglobin. The question of whether dynamic cerebral autoregulation is affected under conditions of stenosis or stroke is then examined.

  15. Impact of carbon, oxygen and sulfur content of microscale zerovalent iron particles on its reactivity towards chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Velimirovic, Milica; Larsson, Per-Olof; Simons, Queenie; Bastiaens, Leen

    2013-11-01

    Zerovalent iron (ZVI) abiotically degrades several chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons (CAHs) via reductive dechlorination, which offers perspectives for in situ groundwater remediation applications. The difference in reactivity between ZVI particles is often linked with their specific surface area. However, other parameters may influence the reactivity as well. Earlier, we reported for a set of microscale zerovalent iron (mZVI) particles the disappearance kinetic of different CAHs which were collected under consistent experimental conditions. In the present study, these kinetic data were correlated with the carbon, oxygen and sulfur content of mZVI particles. It was confirmed that not only the specific surface area affects the disappearance kinetic of CAHs, but also the chemical composition of the mZVI particles. The chemical composition, in addition, influences CAHs removal mechanism inducing sorption onto mZVI particles instead of dechlorination. Generally, high disappearance kinetic of CAHs was observed for particles containing less oxygen. A high carbon content, on the other hand, induced nonreactive sorption of the contaminants on the mZVI particles. To obtain efficient remediation of CAHs by mZVI particles, this study suggested that the carbon and oxygen content should not exceed 0.5% and 1% respectively. Finally, the efficiency of the mZVI particles may be improved to some extent by enriching them with sulfur. However, the impact of sulfur content on the reactivity of mZVI particles is less pronounced than that of the carbon and oxygen content.

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species Generation by Lunar Simulants in Simulated Lung Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonen, M. A.; Kaur, J.; Rickman, D.

    2015-12-01

    The current interest in human exploration of the Moon and other airless planetary bodies has rekindled research into the harmful effects of Lunar dust on human health. Our team has evaluated the spontaneous formation of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS; hydroxyl radicals, superoxide, and hydrogen peroxide) of a suite of lunar simulants when dispersed in deionized water. Of these species, hydroxyl radical reacts almost immediately with any biomolecule leading to oxidative damage. Sustained production of OH radical as a result of mineral exposure can initiate or enhance disease. The results in deionized water indicate that mechanical stress and the absence of molecular oxygen and water, important environmental characteristics of the lunar environment, can lead to enhanced production of ROS in general. On the basis of the results with deionized water, a few of the simulants were selected for additional studies to evaluate the formation of hydrogen peroxide, a precursor of hydroxyl radical in Simulated Lung Fluid. These simulants dispersed in deionized water typically produce a maximum in H2O2 within 10 to 40 minutes. However, experiments in SLF show a slow steady increase in H2O2 concentration that has been documented to continue for as long as 7 hours. Control experiments with one simulant demonstrate that the rise in H2O2 depends on the availability of dissolved O2. We speculate that this continuous rise in oxygenated SLF might be a result of metal ion-mediated oxidation of organic components, such as glycine in SLF. Ion-mediated oxidation essentially allows dissolved molecular oxygen to react with dissolved organic compounds by forming a metal-organic complex. Results of separate experiments with dissolved Fe, Ni, and Cu and speciation calculations support this notion.

  17. The influence of bottom water oxygenation and reactive iron content on sulfur incorporation into bitumens from Jurassic marine shales

    SciTech Connect

    Raiswell, R.; Bottrell, S.H.; Al-Biatty, H.J.; Tan, M.MD. )

    1993-06-01

    Sulfur isotope studies of bitumens (dichloromethane- extractable) from jurassic marine shales indicate that most sulfur is derived, at least initially, from diagenetic sulfate reduction. Under euxinic or semi-euxinic conditions sulfur incorporation in the Jet Rock and Posidonienschiefer bitumens appears to post-date formation of most reactive syngenetic pyrite but occurs contemporaneously with the formation small concentrations of later pyrite, relatively depleted in [sup 32]S. The most reactive iron minerals were mainly pyritized before any significant incorporation of sulfur occurred, and subsequent solidification reactions only occurred in response to prolonged contact between dissolved sulfide and residual, poorly reactive iron minerals (forming in the later pyrite) and organic matter (incorporating sulfur into bitumen). In these circumstances, which are typical of most euxinic or semi-euxinic sediments, the abundance of reactive iron is not the main control on the incorporation of sulfur (0.8 wt percent in the Jet Rock, 1.5 wt percent in the Posidonienschiefer) into bitumen. Consistent with this, variable concentrations of bitumen S occur in the Alum Shales (2.48 and 0.86 wt percent) which have uniform reactive iron contents. In the Alum Shales, the weakly bioturbated and more oxygenated depositional environments appear to favor sulfur incorporation into bitumens, which may occur here via partially oxidized sulfur species. Bitumen compositions suggest that oxygen is eliminated as sulfur is incorporated, possibly due to the dehydration of polar compounds followed by nucleophilic addition of sulfur. 64 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jablonowski, H.; Bussiahn, R.; Hammer, M. U.; Weltmann, K.-D.; von Woedtke, Th.; Reuter, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100-400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10-200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH2O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O2•-) and hydroxyl radicals (•OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  19. Impact of plasma jet vacuum ultraviolet radiation on reactive oxygen species generation in bio-relevant liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Jablonowski, H.; Hammer, M. U.; Reuter, S.; Bussiahn, R.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Woedtke, Th. von

    2015-12-15

    Plasma medicine utilizes the combined interaction of plasma produced reactive components. These are reactive atoms, molecules, ions, metastable species, and radiation. Here, ultraviolet (UV, 100–400 nm) and, in particular, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV, 10–200 nm) radiation generated by an atmospheric pressure argon plasma jet were investigated regarding plasma emission, absorption in a humidified atmosphere and in solutions relevant for plasma medicine. The energy absorption was obtained for simple solutions like distilled water (dH{sub 2}O) or ultrapure water and sodium chloride (NaCl) solution as well as for more complex ones, for example, Rosewell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640) cell culture media. As moderate stable reactive oxygen species, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was studied. Highly reactive oxygen radicals, namely, superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup •−}) and hydroxyl radicals ({sup •}OH), were investigated by the use of electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. All species amounts were detected for three different treatment cases: Plasma jet generated VUV and UV radiation, plasma jet generated UV radiation without VUV part, and complete plasma jet including all reactive components additionally to VUV and UV radiation. It was found that a considerable amount of radicals are generated by the plasma generated photoemission. From the experiments, estimation on the low hazard potential of plasma generated VUV radiation is discussed.

  20. Impact reactivity of materials at very high oxygen pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connor, H. W.; Minchey, J. G.; Crowder, R.; Davidson, R.

    1983-01-01

    The requirements for impact testing of materials in an oxygen atmosphere at pressures from 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi) to 172 MPa (25,000 psi) were evaluated. The impact tester system was evaluated for potential pressure increases from 69 MPa (10,000 psi) to 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi). The low pressure oxygen and nitrogen systems, the impact tower, the impact test cell, and the high pressure oxygen system were evaluated individually. Although the structural integrity of the impact test cell and the compressor were sufficient for operation at 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi), studies revealed possible material incompatibility at that pressure and above. It was recommended that if a component should be replaced for 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi) operation the replacement should meet the final objectives of 172 MPa (25,000 psi). Recommended changes in the system include; use of Monel 400 for pressures above 82.7 MPa (12,000 psi), use of bellows to replace the seal in the impact tester, use of a sapphire window attached to a fiber optic for event sensing, and use of a three diaphragm compressor.

  1. Treatment of enterococcus faecalis bacteria by a helium atmospheric cold plasma brush with oxygen addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei; Huang, Jun; Du, Ning; Liu, Xiao-Di; Wang, Xing-Quan; Lv, Guo-Hua; Zhang, Guo-Ping; Guo, Li-Hong; Yang, Si-Ze

    2012-07-01

    An atmospheric cold plasma brush suitable for large area and low-temperature plasma-based sterilization is designed. Results demonstrate that the He/O2 plasma more effectively kills Enterococcus faecalis than the pure He plasma. In addition, the sterilization efficiency values of the He/O2 plasma depend on the oxygen fraction in Helium gas. The atmospheric cold plasma brush using a proper ratio of He/O2 (2.5%) reaches the optimum sterilization efficiency. After plasma treatment, the cell structure and morphology changes can be observed by the scanning electron microscopy. Optical emission measurements indicate that reactive species such as O and OH play a significant role in the sterilization process.

  2. Treatment of enterococcus faecalis bacteria by a helium atmospheric cold plasma brush with oxygen addition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Wei; Huang Jun; Wang Xingquan; Lv Guohua; Zhang Guoping; Du Ning; Liu Xiaodi; Guo Lihong; Yang Size

    2012-07-01

    An atmospheric cold plasma brush suitable for large area and low-temperature plasma-based sterilization is designed. Results demonstrate that the He/O{sub 2} plasma more effectively kills Enterococcus faecalis than the pure He plasma. In addition, the sterilization efficiency values of the He/O{sub 2} plasma depend on the oxygen fraction in Helium gas. The atmospheric cold plasma brush using a proper ratio of He/O{sub 2} (2.5%) reaches the optimum sterilization efficiency. After plasma treatment, the cell structure and morphology changes can be observed by the scanning electron microscopy. Optical emission measurements indicate that reactive species such as O and OH play a significant role in the sterilization process.

  3. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, Mark R.

    1994-01-01

    A furnace 10 for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron 20 is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance 40, through which a center stream of particulate coal 53 is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer 30. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon 51 enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen 52 is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream 51. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus 84 to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer 30, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace.

  4. Fuel and oxygen addition for metal smelting or refining process

    DOEpatents

    Schlichting, M.R.

    1994-11-22

    A furnace for smelting iron ore and/or refining molten iron is equipped with an overhead pneumatic lance, through which a center stream of particulate coal is ejected at high velocity into a slag layer. An annular stream of nitrogen or argon enshrouds the coal stream. Oxygen is simultaneously ejected in an annular stream encircling the inert gas stream. The interposition of the inert gas stream between the coal and oxygen streams prevents the volatile matter in the coal from combusting before it reaches the slag layer. Heat of combustion is thus more efficiently delivered to the slag, where it is needed to sustain the desired reactions occurring there. A second stream of lower velocity oxygen can be delivered through an outermost annulus to react with carbon monoxide gas rising from slag layer, thereby adding still more heat to the furnace. 7 figs.

  5. Decreased oxygen tension lowers reactive oxygen species and apoptosis and inhibits osteoblast matrix mineralization through changes in early osteoblast differentiation.

    PubMed

    Nicolaije, Claudia; Koedam, Marijke; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2012-04-01

    Accumulating data show that oxygen tension can have an important effect on cell function and fate. We used the human pre-osteoblastic cell line SV-HFO, which forms a mineralizing extracellular matrix, to study the effect of low oxygen tension (2%) on osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. Mineralization was significantly reduced by 60-70% under 2% oxygen, which was paralleled by lower intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. Following this reduction in ROS the cells switched to a lower level of protection by down-regulating their antioxidant enzyme expression. The downside of this is that it left the cells more vulnerable to a subsequent oxidative challenge. Total collagen content was reduced in the 2% oxygen cultures and expression of matrix genes and matrix-metabolizing enzymes was significantly affected. Alkaline phosphatase activity and RNA expression as well as RUNX2 expression were significantly reduced under 2% oxygen. Time phase studies showed that high oxygen in the first phase of osteoblast differentiation and prior to mineralization is crucial for optimal differentiation and mineralization. Switching to 2% or 20% oxygen only during mineralization phase did not change the eventual level of mineralization. In conclusion, this study shows the significance of oxygen tension for proper osteoblast differentiation, extra cellular matrix (ECM) formation, and eventual mineralization. We demonstrated that the major impact of oxygen tension is in the early phase of osteoblast differentiation. Low oxygen in this phase leaves the cells in a premature differentiation state that cannot provide the correct signals for matrix maturation and mineralization.

  6. NADPH Oxidase 1 and Its Derived Reactive Oxygen Species Mediated Tissue Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiu-Jun; Peng, Ying-Bo; Hu, Yi-Ping; Shi, You-Zhen; Yao, Min; Zhang, Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are mostly viewed to cause oxidative damage to various cells and induce organ dysfunction after ischemia-reperfusion injury. However, they are also considered as crucial molecules for cellular signal transduction in biology. NADPH oxidase, whose only function is reactive oxygen species production, has been extensively investigated in many cell types especially phagocytes. The deficiency of NADPH oxidase extends the process of inflammation and delays tissue repair, which causes chronic granulomatous disease in patients. NADPH oxidase 1, one member of the NADPH oxidase family, is not only constitutively expressed in a variety of tissues, but also induced to increase expression in both mRNA and protein levels under many circumstances. NADPH oxidase 1 and its derived reactive oxygen species are suggested to be able to regulate inflammation reaction, cell proliferation and migration, and extracellular matrix synthesis, which contribute to the processes of tissue injury and repair. PMID:24669283

  7. Up-regulation of alpha1-microglobulin by hemoglobin and reactive oxygen species in hepatoma and blood cell lines.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Magnus G; Allhorn, Maria; Olofsson, Tor; Akerström, Bo

    2007-03-15

    alpha(1)-Microglobulin is a 26-kDa glycoprotein synthesized in the liver, secreted to the blood, and rapidly distributed to the extravascular compartment of all tissues. Recent results show that alpha(1)-microglobulin has heme-binding and heme-degrading properties and it has been suggested that the protein is involved in the defense against oxidation by heme and reactive oxygen species. In the present study the influence of hemoglobin and reactive oxygen species (ROS) on the cellular expression of alpha(1)-microglobulin was investigated. Oxy- and methemoglobin, free heme, and Fenton reaction-induced hydroxyl radicals induced a dose-dependent up-regulation of alpha(1)-microglobulin on both mRNA and protein levels in hepatoma cells and an increased secretion of alpha(1)-microglobulin. The up-regulation was reversed by the addition of catalase and ascorbate, and by reacting hemoglobin with cyanide which prevents redox reactions. Furthermore, the blood cell lines U937 and K562 expressed alpha(1)-microglobulin at low levels, and this expression increased up to 11-fold by the addition of hemoglobin. These results suggest that alpha(1)-microglobulin expression is induced by ROS, arising from redox reactions of hemoglobin or from other sources and are consistent with the hypothesis that alpha(1)-microglobulin participates in the defense against oxidation by hemoglobin, heme, and reactive oxygen species.

  8. Intracellular reactive oxygen species activate Src tyrosine kinase during cell adhesion and anchorage-dependent cell growth.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Elisa; Buricchi, Francesca; Raugei, Giovanni; Ramponi, Giampietro; Chiarugi, Paola

    2005-08-01

    Src tyrosine kinases are central components of adhesive responses and are required for cell spreading onto the extracellular matrix. Among other intracellular messengers elicited by integrin ligation are reactive oxygen species, which act as synergistic mediators of cytoskeleton rearrangement and cell spreading. We report that after integrin ligation, the tyrosine kinase Src is oxidized and activated. Src displays an early activation phase, concurrent with focal adhesion formation and driven mainly by Tyr527 dephosphorylation, and a late phase, concomitant with reactive oxygen species production, cell spreading, and integrin-elicited kinase oxidation. In addition, our results suggest that reactive oxygen species are key mediators of in vitro and in vivo v-Src tumorigenic properties, as both antioxidant treatments and the oxidant-insensitive C245A and C487A Src mutants greatly decrease invasivity, serum-independent and anchorage-independent growth, and tumor onset. Therefore we propose that, in addition to the known phosphorylation/dephosphorylation circuitry, redox regulation of Src activity is required during both cell attachment to the extracellular matrix and tumorigenesis.

  9. Probing the magic numbers of aluminum-magnesium cluster anions and their reactivity toward oxygen.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhixun; Grover, Cameron J; Reber, Arthur C; Khanna, Shiv N; Castleman, A W

    2013-03-20

    We report a joint experimental and theoretical investigation into the geometry, stability, and reactivity with oxygen of alloy metal clusters Al(n)Mg(m)(-) (4 ≤ n+m ≤ 15; 0 ≤ m ≤ 3). Considering that Al and Mg possess three and two valence electrons, respectively, clusters with all possible valence electron counts from 11 to 46 are studied to probe the magic numbers predicted by the spherical jellium model, and to determine whether enhanced stability and reduced reactivity may be found for some Al(n)Mg(m)(-) at non-magic numbers. Al5Mg2(-) and Al11Mg3(-) exhibit enhanced stability corresponding to the expected magic numbers of 20 and 40 electrons, respectively; while Al7Mg3(-), Al11Mg(-), and Al11Mg2(-) turn out to be unexpectedly stable at electron counts of 28, 36, and 38, respectively. The enhanced stability at non-magic numbers is explained through a crystal-field-like splitting of degenerate shells by the geometrical distortions of the clusters. Al(n)Mg(m)(-) clusters appear to display higher oxidation than pure Al(n)(-) clusters, suggesting that the addition of Mg atoms enhances the combustion of pure aluminum clusters.

  10. Dental resin curing blue light induced oxidative stress with reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, Fumihiko; Yoshida, Ayaka; Okada, Eizo; Okada, Yasue; Maehata, Yojiro; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Kishimoto, Sachi; Otsuka, Takero; Nishimura, Tomoko; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2012-09-01

    Dental resin curing blue light has been used in the treatment of tooth bleaching and to restore teeth with resin-based composite fillings. However, there has been little consideration of its effect on oral tissues such as dental pulp and oral mucosa. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dental resin curing blue light irradiation affects the dental pulp, especially the blood vessels that are known as the first target of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which play an important role in vascular reactivity. We found that blue light irradiation increased the level of lipid peroxidation in isolated rat aorta blood vessels by measuring malondialdehyde. Furthermore, cell proliferative activity was decreased in a time-dependent manner and apoptosis of human aorta vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) was induced. These results indicated that (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals were generated in VSMCs by irradiation with blue light, and they induced cytotoxicity associated with oxidative stress, which increased lipid peroxidation and apoptosis. In addition, N-acetyl-l-cysteine, which is a typical intracellular antioxidant, protected VSMCs against cytotoxicity associated with oxidative stress. These findings suggested that antioxidants may be used to prevent oxidative stress in dental pulp by repeated and/or multiple treatments with blue light irradiation in future dental treatments.

  11. Exendin-4 Protects Mitochondria from Reactive Oxygen Species Induced Apoptosis in Pancreatic Beta Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhen; Zhou, Zhiguang; Huang, Gan; Hu, Fang; Xiang, Yufei; He, Lining

    2013-01-01

    Objective Mitochondrial oxidative stress is the basis for pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and a common pathway for numerous types of damage, including glucotoxicity and lipotoxicity. We cultivated mice pancreatic β-cell tumor Min6 cell lines in vitro and observed pancreatic β-cell apoptosis and changes in mitochondrial function before and after the addition of Exendin-4. Based on these observations, we discuss the protective role of Exendin-4 against mitochondrial oxidative damage and its relationship with Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2. Methods We established a pancreatic β-cell oxidative stress damage model using Min6 cell lines cultured in vitro with tert-buty1 hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide. We then added Exendin-4 to observe changes in the rate of cell apoptosis (Annexin-V-FITC-PI staining flow cytometry and DNA ladder). We detected the activity of the caspase 3 and 8 apoptotic factors, measured the mitochondrial membrane potential losses and reactive oxygen species production levels, and detected the expression of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO in the cytosol and mitochondria, mitochondrial Ca2-independent phospholipase A2 and Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 mRNA. Results The time-concentration curve showed that different percentages of apoptosis occurred at different time-concentrations in tert-buty1 hydroperoxide- and hydrogen peroxide-induced Min6 cells. Incubation with 100 µmol/l of Exendin-4 for 48 hours reduced the Min6 cell apoptosis rate (p<0.05). The mitochondrial membrane potential loss and total reactive oxygen species levels decreased (p<0.05), and the release of cytochrome c and Smac/DLAMO from the mitochondria was reduced. The study also showed that Ca2+-independent phospholipase A2 activity was positively related to Exendin-4 activity. Conclusion Exendin-4 reduces Min6 cell oxidative damage and the cell apoptosis rate, which may be related to Ca2-independent phospholipase A2. PMID:24204601

  12. [Measurement of reactive oxygen species in a biological system and its perspectives].

    PubMed

    Todoki, K; Lee, C; Okabe, E

    1996-12-01

    In recent years, reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the pathogenesis of a wide variety of disorders. Although the existence of reactive oxygen intermediates in drug metabolism can be inferred from end product analysis or from the effects of antioxidants or enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, only the technique of electron spin resonance (ESR) allows the direct detection of these highly reactive species. However, some free radical species cannot be detected by ESR due to their extremely short half-lives, which result in low steady-state concentrations of the radicals or to short radical relaxation times, which lead to a very broad line. These facts made recent development of spin-trapping and chemiluminescence techniques are widely used to detect free radicals. The goal of this paper is to introduce the various assays available for measurement of reactive oxygen species in biological models. This paper will focus on two topics: (1) the spin-trapping/ESR technique in vitro and vivo and (2) the chemiluminescence-optical biosensor application of this technique, a very sensitive method that has the advantage of being able to provide continuous, online, nondestructive monitoring of reactive oxygen species.

  13. Measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species with fluorescent probes: challenges and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Kalyanaraman, Balaraman; Darley-Usmar, Victor; Davies, Kelvin J.A.; Dennery, Phyllis A.; Forman, Henry Jay; Grisham, Matthew B.; Mann, Giovanni E.; Moore, Kevin; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this position paper is to present a critical analysis of the challenges and limitations of the most widely used fluorescent probes for detecting and measuring reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Where feasible, we have made recommendations for the use of alternate probes and appropriate analytical techniques that measure the specific products formed from the reactions between fluorescent probes and reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We have proposed guidelines that will help present and future researchers with regard to the optimal use of selected fluorescent probes and interpretation of results. PMID:22027063

  14. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in the UV-B damage to the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp.

    PubMed

    He, Yu Ying; Häder, Donat P

    2002-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved the damage of living organisms under environmental stress including UV radiation. Cyanobacteria, photoautotrophic prokaryotic organisms, also suffer from increasing UV-B due to the depletion of the stratospheric ozone layer. The increased UV-B induces the production of ROS in vivo detected by using the ROS-sensitive probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Ascorbic acid and N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) scavenged ROS effectively, while alpha-tocopherol acetate or pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC) did not. The presence of rose bengal and hypocrellin A increased the ROS level by photodynamic action in the visible light. The presence of the herbicide, 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea (DCMU), increased ROS production slightly, and ROS formation was greatly enhanced by the addition of methyl viologen due to the fact that this redox system diverts electrons from PSI to oxygen and thus forms ROS. UV-B induces ROS generation by photodynamic action and inhibition of the electron transport by damaging the electron receptors or enzymes associated with the electron transport chain during photosynthesis.

  15. The reactivity of α-oxoaldehyde with reactive oxygen species in diabetes complications

    PubMed Central

    Matsumura, Yuriko; Iwasawa, Atsuo; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Ozawa, Toshihiko; Kohno, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    The reactions of three α-oxoaldehydes (methylglyoxal, glyoxal, and pyruvic acid) with hydroxyl radicals generated by sonolysis of water were investigated using an electron spin resonance (electron paramagnetic resonance) spin-trapping method, and their reaction kinetics were investigated. It is apparent from our experimental results that methylglyoxal exhibits the highest reactivity of the three α-oxoaldehydes. These α-oxoaldehydes can react with hydroxyl radicals faster than other well-known antioxidants can. The reactivity of hydroxyl radicals is higher than that of hydrogen peroxides. PMID:23526048

  16. Role of reactive oxygen species and TRP channels in the cough reflex.

    PubMed

    Taylor-Clark, Thomas E

    2016-09-01

    The cough reflex is evoked by noxious stimuli in the airways. Although this reflex is essential for health, it can be triggered chronically in inflammatory and infectious airway disease. Neuronal transient receptor potential (TRP) channels such as ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) and vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) are polymodal receptors expressed on airway nociceptive afferent nerves. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and other reactive compounds are associated with inflammation, from either NADPH oxidase or mitochondria. These reactive compounds cause activation and hyperexcitability of nociceptive afferents innervating the airways, and evidence suggests key contributions of TRPA1 and TRPV1. PMID:27016063

  17. Reactive oxygen species regulate lovastatin biosynthesis in Aspergillus terreus during submerged and solid-state fermentations.

    PubMed

    Miranda, Roxana U; Gómez-Quiroz, Luis E; Mendoza, Mariel; Pérez-Sánchez, Ailed; Fierro, Francisco; Barrios-González, Javier

    2014-12-01

    In a previous work we detected an important increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentrations during idiophase in lovastatin fermentations. Hence, the objective of the present work was to determine if ROS contributes to the regulation of lovastatin biosynthesis. Exogenous antioxidants were used to reduce ROS accumulation. The addition of N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) decreased ROS accumulation and concurrent lovastatin production. In solid-state fermentation (SSF), the addition of 100 mM of NAC lowered ROS accumulation by 53%, together with a 79% decrease in lovastatin biosynthesis. A similarly, situation was observed in submerged fermentation (SmF). Decreased lovastatin production was due to a lower expression of the regulatory gene lovE, and gene lovF. Moreover, the addition of H2O2 to the culture caused precocious gene expression and lovastatin biosynthesis. These results indicate that ROS accumulation in idiophase contributes to the regulation of the biosynthetic genes. It was considered that Yap1 (Atyap1) could be a transcription factor linking ROS with lovastatin biosynthesis. In a Northern analysis, Aspergillus terreus yap1 gene (Atyap1) was highly expressed during trophophase but down regulated during idiophase. Conversely, expression pattern of srrA gene, suggested that SrrA could positively control lovastatin biosynthesis, and also explaining the characteristics of the biosynthesis in SSF.

  18. A dominant role of oxygen additive on cold atmospheric-pressure He + O{sub 2} plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Aijun; Liu, Dingxin E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Rong, Mingzhe; Wang, Xiaohua E-mail: xhw@mail.xjtu.edu.cn; Kong, Michael G.

    2014-08-15

    We present in this paper how oxygen additive impacts on the cold atmospheric-pressure helium plasmas by means of a one-dimensional fluid model. For the oxygen concentration [O{sub 2}] > ∼0.1%, the influence of oxygen on the electron characteristics and the power dissipation becomes important, e.g., the electron density, the electron temperature in sheath, the electron-coupling power, and the sheath width decreasing by 1.6 to 16 folds with a two-log increase in [O{sub 2}] from 0.1% to 10%. Also the discharge mode evolves from the γ mode to the α mode. The reactive oxygen species are found to peak in the narrow range of [O{sub 2}] = 0.4%–0.9% in the plasmas, similar to their power-coupling values. This applies to their wall fluxes except for those of O* and O{sub 2}{sup −}. These two species have very short lifetimes, thus only when generated in boundary layers within several micrometers next to the electrode can contribute to the fluxes. The dominant reactive oxygen species and the corresponding main reactions are schematically presented, and their relations are quantified for selected applications.

  19. 76 FR 59503 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Reactive Blue 69; Confirmation of Effective...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ...-sulphonate (CAS Reg. No. 70209-99- 3), also known as Reactive Blue 69, as a color additive in contact lenses... color additive in contact lenses. FDA gave interested persons until June 3, 2011, to file objections or... May 4, 2011 (76 FR 25234). The final rule amended the color additive regulations to provide for...

  20. Is sperm freezability related to the post-thaw lipid peroxidation and the formation of reactive oxygen species in boars?

    PubMed

    Gómez-Fernández, J; Gómez-Izquierdo, E; Tomás, C; Mocé, E; de Mercado, E

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) substances production and the levels of lipid peroxidation of the sperm membrane were related to the quality that the ejaculates exhibited after cryopreservation in boars. Ejaculates from 42 healthy boars were used in this study and they were cryopreserved with the lactose-egg yolk extender (LEY). Several sperm quality parameters were assessed by flow cytometry in samples incubated for 30 and 150 min at 37 °C after thawing: the percentage of sperm with intact plasma membrane (SIPM), intracellular reactive oxygen substances production through mean of DCF fluorescence intensity of total sperm (mean-DCF) and the percentage of viable and non-viable sperm containing oxidized BODIPY (VSOB and NVSOB). In addition, the percentages of total motile (TMS) and progressively motile sperm (PMS) were assessed at the same incubation times with a computer-assisted sperm analysis system. The classification of the ejaculates into good or bad freezers was performed through hierarchical cluster analysis from SIPM and TMS at 150 min post-thawing. The ejaculates of those males classified as good freezers exhibited higher (p < 0.05) SPIM, TMS and PMS than the bad freezers, although both groups presented similar (p > 0.05) VSOB, NVSOB and mean-DCF. Therefore, these results show that lipid peroxidation and the amount of reactive oxygen substances in the sperm after cryopreservation are similar between boars classified as good or bad freezers. PMID:22681414

  1. Is sperm freezability related to the post-thaw lipid peroxidation and the formation of reactive oxygen species in boars?

    PubMed

    Gómez-Fernández, J; Gómez-Izquierdo, E; Tomás, C; Mocé, E; de Mercado, E

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) substances production and the levels of lipid peroxidation of the sperm membrane were related to the quality that the ejaculates exhibited after cryopreservation in boars. Ejaculates from 42 healthy boars were used in this study and they were cryopreserved with the lactose-egg yolk extender (LEY). Several sperm quality parameters were assessed by flow cytometry in samples incubated for 30 and 150 min at 37 °C after thawing: the percentage of sperm with intact plasma membrane (SIPM), intracellular reactive oxygen substances production through mean of DCF fluorescence intensity of total sperm (mean-DCF) and the percentage of viable and non-viable sperm containing oxidized BODIPY (VSOB and NVSOB). In addition, the percentages of total motile (TMS) and progressively motile sperm (PMS) were assessed at the same incubation times with a computer-assisted sperm analysis system. The classification of the ejaculates into good or bad freezers was performed through hierarchical cluster analysis from SIPM and TMS at 150 min post-thawing. The ejaculates of those males classified as good freezers exhibited higher (p < 0.05) SPIM, TMS and PMS than the bad freezers, although both groups presented similar (p > 0.05) VSOB, NVSOB and mean-DCF. Therefore, these results show that lipid peroxidation and the amount of reactive oxygen substances in the sperm after cryopreservation are similar between boars classified as good or bad freezers.

  2. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species, Reactive Nitrogen Species, and Redox-Dependent Signaling in the Cardiovascular System: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association.

    PubMed

    Griendling, Kathy K; Touyz, Rhian M; Zweier, Jay L; Dikalov, Sergey; Chilian, William; Chen, Yeong-Renn; Harrison, David G; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species are biological molecules that play important roles in cardiovascular physiology and contribute to disease initiation, progression, and severity. Because of their ephemeral nature and rapid reactivity, these species are difficult to measure directly with high accuracy and precision. In this statement, we review current methods for measuring these species and the secondary products they generate and suggest approaches for measuring redox status, oxidative stress, and the production of individual reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. We discuss the strengths and limitations of different methods and the relative specificity and suitability of these methods for measuring the concentrations of reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species in cells, tissues, and biological fluids. We provide specific guidelines, through expert opinion, for choosing reliable and reproducible assays for different experimental and clinical situations. These guidelines are intended to help investigators and clinical researchers avoid experimental error and ensure high-quality measurements of these important biological species.

  3. Water-soluble fullerene materials for bioapplications: photoinduced reactive oxygen species generation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The photoinduced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation from several water-soluble fullerenes was examined. Macromolecular or small molecular water-soluble fullerene complexes/derivatives were prepared and their 1O2 and O2•- generation abilities were evaluated by EPR spin-trapping methods. As a r...

  4. ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    ARSENIC SPECIES CAUSE RELEASE OF IRON FROM FERRITIN GENERATING REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES

    Arsenic-associated cancer (lung, bladder, skin, liver, kidney) remains a significant world- wide public health problem (e.g., Taiwan, Chile, Bangladesh, India, China and Thailand). Rece...

  5. Reactive oxygen species production is increased in the peripheral blood monocytes of obese patients.

    PubMed

    Degasperi, Giovanna R; Denis, Raphael G P; Morari, Joseane; Solon, Carina; Geloneze, Bruno; Stabe, Christiane; Pareja, José Carlos; Vercesi, Aníbal E; Velloso, Lício A

    2009-08-01

    Infiltrating macrophages play an important role in the production of inflammatory mediators by the adipose tissue of obese subjects. To reach the adipose tissue, peripheral monocytes are recruited by locally produced chemoattractants. However, little is known about the activation of monocytes in the peripheral blood of obese subjects. The objective of this study was to determine reactive oxygen species and endoplasmic reticulum stress as early markers of monocytic commitment with an inflammatory phenotype in the peripheral blood of nondiabetic obese patients. Patients were recruited from an academic general hospital; controls were voluntary students. Seven lean controls and 6 nondiabetic obese patients were included in the study. Monocytes were prepared from peripheral blood. Immunoblot, flow cytometry, and polymerase chain reaction were used to determine reactive oxygen species and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Increased reactive oxygen species and activation of endoplasmic reticulum stress were detected in the monocytes from obese patients. Reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress with a chemical chaperone reversed monocytic activation, as determined by the reduction of reactive oxygen species production. Thus, monocytes from nondiabetic obese patients are already committed with an inflammatory phenotype in peripheral blood; and reducing endoplasmic reticulum stress negatively modulates their activation.

  6. Flaxseed oil increases aortic reactivity to phenylephrine through reactive oxygen species and the cyclooxygenase-2 pathway in rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Flaxseed oil has the highest concentration of omega-3 α-linolenic acid, which has been associated with cardiovascular benefit. However, the mechanism underlying the vascular effects induced through flaxseed oil is not well known. Thus, in the present study, we investigated the effects of flaxseed oil on vascular function in isolated rat aortic rings. Methods Wistar rats were treated daily with flaxseed oil or a control (mineral oil) intramuscular (i.m.) for fifteen days. Isolated aortic segments were used to evaluate cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) protein expression, superoxide anion levels and vascular reactivity experiments. Results Flaxseed oil treatment increased the vasoconstrictor response of aortic rings to phenylephrine. Endothelium removal increased the response to phenylephrine in aortic segments isolated from both groups, but the effect was smaller in the treated group. L-NAME incubation similarly increased the phenylephrine response in segments from both groups. The TXA2 synthase inhibitor furegrelate, the selective COX-2 inhibitor NS 398, the TP receptor antagonist SQ 29.548, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger apocynin, the superoxide anion scavengers tiron and the phospholipase A2 inhibitor dexamethasone partially reversed the flaxseed oil-induced increase in reactivity to phenylephrine. Conclusions These findings suggest that flaxseed oil treatment increased vascular reactivity to phenylephrine through an increase in ROS production and COX-2-derived TXA2 production. The results obtained in the present study provide new insight into the effects of flaxseed oil treatment (i.m.) on vascular function. PMID:24993607

  7. 30 CFR 77.102 - Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified... methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement. Notwithstanding the provisions of... and oxygen deficiency unless he has demonstrated to the satisfaction of an authorized...

  8. 30 CFR 77.102 - Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified... methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement. Notwithstanding the provisions of... and oxygen deficiency unless he has demonstrated to the satisfaction of an authorized...

  9. 30 CFR 77.102 - Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified... methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement. Notwithstanding the provisions of... and oxygen deficiency unless he has demonstrated to the satisfaction of an authorized...

  10. 30 CFR 77.102 - Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified... methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement. Notwithstanding the provisions of... and oxygen deficiency unless he has demonstrated to the satisfaction of an authorized...

  11. 30 CFR 77.102 - Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tests for methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified... methane; oxygen deficiency; qualified person, additional requirement. Notwithstanding the provisions of... and oxygen deficiency unless he has demonstrated to the satisfaction of an authorized...

  12. Reactive oxygen species are involved in BMP-induced dendritic growth in cultured rat sympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Lea, Charlotte; Sosa, Jose Carlo; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J

    2015-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, the downstream signaling molecules that mediate the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs are not well characterized. Here we test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling links BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth. In cultured rat sympathetic neurons, exposure to any of the three mechanistically distinct antioxidants, diphenylene iodinium (DPI), nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NGA) or desferroxamine (DFO), blocked de novo BMP-induced dendritic growth. Addition of DPI to cultures previously induced with BMP to extend dendrites caused dendritic retraction while DFO and NGA prevented further growth of dendrites. The inhibition of the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs by antioxidants was concentration-dependent and occurred without altering axonal growth or neuronal cell survival. Antioxidant treatment did not block BMP activation of SMAD 1,5 as determined by nuclear localization of these SMADs. While BMP treatment did not cause a detectable increase in intracellular ROS in cultured sympathetic neurons as assessed using fluorescent indicator dyes, BMP treatment increased the oxygen consumption rate in cultured sympathetic neurons as determined using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer, suggesting increased mitochondrial activity. In addition, BMPs upregulated expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and either pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of NOX2 significantly decreased BMP-7 induced dendritic growth. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that ROS are involved in the downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that ROS-mediated signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in peripheral neurons.

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species are involved in BMP-Induced Dendritic Growth in Cultured Rat Sympathetic Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Vidya; Lea, Charlotte; Sosa, Jose Carlo; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) promote dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons; however, the downstream signaling molecules that mediate the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs are not well characterized. Here we test the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling links BMP receptor activation to dendritic growth. In cultured rat sympathetic neurons, exposure to any of three mechanistically distinct antioxidants, diphenylene iodinium (DPI), nordihydroguiaretic acid (NGA) or desferroxamine (DFO), blocked de novo BMP-induced dendritic growth. Addition of DPI to cultures previously induced with BMP to extend dendrites caused dendritic retraction while DFO and NGA prevented further growth of dendrites. The inhibition of the dendrite promoting activity of BMPs by antioxidants was concentration-dependent and occurred without altering axonal growth or neuronal cell survival. Antioxidant treatment did not block BMP activation of SMAD 1,5 as determined by nuclear localization of these SMADs. While BMP treatment did not cause a detectable increase in intracellular ROS in cultured sympathetic neurons as assessed using fluorescent indicator dyes, BMP treatment increased the oxygen consumption rate in cultured sympathetic neurons as determined using the Seahorse XF24 Analyzer, suggesting increased mitochondrial activity. In addition, BMPs upregulated expression of NADPH oxidase 2 (NOX2) and either pharmacological inhibition or siRNA knockdown of NOX2 significantly decreased BMP-7 induced dendritic growth. Collectively, these data support the hypothesis that ROS are involved in the downstream signaling events that mediate BMP7-induced dendritic growth in sympathetic neurons, and suggest that ROS-mediated signaling positively modulates dendritic complexity in peripheral neurons. PMID:26079955

  14. Developing mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes relevant to reactive intermediates of biological oxidation reactions.

    PubMed

    Itoh, Shinobu

    2015-07-21

    Active-oxygen species generated on a copper complex play vital roles in several biological and chemical oxidation reactions. Recent attention has been focused on the reactive intermediates generated at the mononuclear copper active sites of copper monooxygenases such as dopamine β-monooxygenase (DβM), tyramine β-monooxygenase (TβM), peptidylglycine-α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM), and polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMO). In a simple model system, reaction of O2 and a reduced copper(I) complex affords a mononuclear copper(II)-superoxide complex or a copper(III)-peroxide complex, and subsequent H(•) or e(-)/H(+) transfer, which gives a copper(II)-hydroperoxide complex. A more reactive species such as a copper(II)-oxyl radical type species could be generated via O-O bond cleavage of the peroxide complex. However, little had been explored about the chemical properties and reactivity of the mononuclear copper-active-oxygen complexes due to the lack of appropriate model compounds. Thus, a great deal of effort has recently been made to develop efficient ligands that can stabilize such reactive active-oxygen complexes in synthetic modeling studies. In this Account, I describe our recent achievements of the development of a mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex using a simple tridentate ligand consisting of an eight-membered cyclic diamine with a pyridylethyl donor group. The superoxide complex exhibits a similar structure (four-coordinate tetrahedral geometry) and reactivity (aliphatic hydroxylation) to those of a proposed reactive intermediate of copper monooxygenases. Systematic studies based on the crystal structures of copper(I) and copper(II) complexes of the related tridentate supporting ligands have indicated that the rigid eight-membered cyclic diamine framework is crucial for controlling the geometry and the redox potential, which are prerequisites for the generation of such a unique mononuclear copper(II)-(end-on)superoxide complex

  15. An Inherited Heteroplasmic Mutation in Mitochondrial Gene COI in a Patient with Prostate Cancer Alters Reactive Oxygen, Reactive Nitrogen and Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Rebecca S.; Sun, Qian; Sun, Carrie Q.; Richards, Jendai C.; O'Hearn, Sean; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Wallace, Douglas C.; Petros, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in many cancers but the physiological derangements caused by such mutations have remained elusive. Prostate cancer is associated with both inherited and somatic mutations in the cytochrome c oxidase (COI) gene. We present a prostate cancer patient-derived rare heteroplasmic mutation of this gene, part of mitochondrial respiratory complex IV. Functional studies indicate that this mutation leads to the simultaneous decrease in cytochrome oxidation, increase in reactive oxygen, and increased reactive nitrogen. These data suggest that mitochondrial DNA mutations resulting in increased reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen generation may be involved in prostate cancer biology. PMID:23509693

  16. Reactive Oxygen Species on the Early Earth and Survival of Bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balk, Melikea; Mason, Paul; Stams, Alfons J. M.; Smidt, Hauke; Freund, Friedemann; Rothschild, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    An oxygen-rich atmosphere appears to have been a prerequisite for complex, multicellular life to evolve on Earth and possibly elsewhere in the Universe. However it remains unclear how free oxygen first became available on the early Earth. A potentially important, and as yet poorly constrained pathway, is the production of oxygen through the weathering of rocks and release into the near-surface environment. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), as precursors to molecular oxygen, are a key step in this process, and may have had a decisive impact on the evolution of life, present and past. ROS are generated from minerals in igneous rocks during hydrolysis of peroxy defects, which consist of pairs of oxygen anions oxidized to the valence state -1 and during (bio) transformations of iron sulphide minerals. ROS are produced and consumed by intracellular and extracellular reactions of Fe, Mn, C, N, and S species. We propose that, despite an overall reducing or neutral oxidation state of the macroenvironment and the absence of free O2 in the atmosphere, organisms on the early Earth had to cope with ROS in their microenvironments. They were thus under evolutionary pressure to develop enzymatic and other defences against the potentially dangerous, even lethal effects of oxygen and its derived ROS. Conversely it appears that microorganisms learned to take advantage of the enormous reactive potential and energy gain provided by nascent oxygen. We investigate how oxygen might be released through weathering. We test microorganisms in contact with rock surfaces and iron sulphides. We model bacteria such as Deionococcus radiodurans and Desulfotomaculum, Moorella and Bacillus species for their ability to grow or survive in the presence of ROS. We examine how early Life might have adapted to oxygen.

  17. Deoxyamphimedine, a pyridoacridine alkaloid, damages DNA via the production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kathryn M; Andjelic, Cynthia D; Tasdemir, Deniz; Concepción, Gisela P; Ireland, Chris M; Barrows, Louis R

    2009-01-01

    Marine pyridoacridines are a class of aromatic chemicals that share an 11H-pyrido[4,3,2-mn]acridine skeleton. Pyridoacridine alkaloids display diverse biological activities including cytotoxicity, fungicidal and bactericidal properties, production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and topoisomerase inhibition. These activities are often dependent on slight modifications to the pyridoacridine skeleton. Here we demonstrate that while structurally similar to neoamphimedine and amphimedine, the biological activity of deoxyamphimedine differs greatly. Deoxyamphimedine damages DNA in vitro independent of topoisomerase enzymes through the generation of reactive oxygen species. Its activity was decreased in low oxygen, with the removal of a reducing agent and in the presence of anti-oxidants. Deoxyamphimedine also showed enhanced toxicity in cells sensitive to single or double strand DNA breaks, consistent with the in vitro activity. PMID:19597581

  18. Loss of p53 causes mitochondrial DNA depletion and altered mitochondrial reactive oxygen species homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Lebedeva, Maria A.; Eaton, Jana S.; Shadel, Gerald S.

    2009-01-01

    In addition to its central role in cellular stress signaling, the tumor suppressor p53 modulates mitochondrial respiration through its nuclear transcription factor activity and localizes to mitochondria where it enhances apoptosis and suppresses mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutagenesis. Here we demonstrate a new conserved role for p53 in mtDNA copy number maintenance and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis. In mammals, mtDNA is present in thousands of copies per cell and is essential for normal development and cell function. We show that p53 null mouse and p53 knock-down human primary fibroblasts exhibit mtDNA depletion and decreased mitochondrial mass under normal culture growth conditions. This is accompanied by a reduction of the p53R2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase mRNA and protein and of mitochondrial transcription factor A (mtTFA) at the protein level only. Finally, p53-depleted cells exhibit significant disruption of cellular ROS homeostasis, characterized by reduced mitochondrial and cellular superoxide levels and increased cellular hydrogen peroxide. Altogether, these results elucidate additional mitochondria-related functions for p53 and implicate mtDNA depletion and ROS alterations as potentially relevant to cellular transformation, cancer cell phenotypes, and the Warburg Effect. PMID:19413947

  19. Impaired ADP channeling to mitochondria and elevated reactive oxygen species in hypertensive hearts.

    PubMed

    Power, Amelia S C; Pham, Toan; Loiselle, Denis S; Crossman, David H; Ward, Marie-Louise; Hickey, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Systemic hypertension initially promotes a compensatory cardiac hypertrophy, yet it progresses to heart failure (HF), and energetic deficits appear to be central to this failure. However, the transfer of energy between the mitochondria and the myofibrils is not often considered as part of the energetic equation. We compared hearts from old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar controls. SHR hearts showed a 35% depression in mitochondrial function, yet produced at least double the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in all respiration states in left ventricular (LV) homogenates. To test the connectivity between mitochondria and myofibrils, respiration was further tested in situ with LV permeabilized fibers by addition of multiple substrates and ATP, which requires hydrolysis to mediate oxidative phosphorylation. By trapping ADP using a pyruvate kinase enzyme system, we tested ADP channeling towards mitochondria, and this suppressed respiration and elevated ROS production more in the SHR fibers. The ADP-trapped state was also less relieved on creatine addition, likely reflecting the 30% depression in total CK activity in the SHR heart fibers. Confocal imaging identified a 34% longer distance between the centers of myofibril to mitochondria in the SHR hearts, which increases transverse metabolite diffusion distances (e.g., for ATP, ADP, and creatine phosphate). We propose that impaired connectivity between mitochondria and myofibrils may contribute to elevated ROS production. Impaired energy exchange could be the result of ultrastructural changes that occur with hypertrophy in this model of hypertension. PMID:27084386

  20. Novel probes for visualizing reactive oxygen species in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krumova, Katerina; Cosa, Gonzalo

    2010-04-01

    This work describes the rationale behind the preparation of fluorescent probes for imaging lipid peroxyl radicals within membranes of living cells (fluorescent lipophilic antioxidants). The new probes are based on BODIPY dyes tethered to phenol moieties. We discuss the spectroscopic properties of these novel probes, specifically the BODIPY-α-tocopherol analogue B-TOH, and present a molecular level explanation, based on photoinduced electron transfer, that accounts for the significant emission enhancement that the probe BTOH experiences upon reaction with peroxyl free radicals. In addition to the spectroscopy results in homogeneous media, we also describe studies performed in model lipid membranes which show that the sensitivity of BTOH towards lipid peroxyl radicals is somewhat reduced when the probe is membrane embedded. Solutions to increase the sensitivity of the free radical probes are discussed based on the redox potential of BODIPY dyes.

  1. On the oxygen reactivity of flavoprotein oxidases: an oxygen access tunnel and gate in brevibacterium sterolicum cholesterol oxidase.

    PubMed

    Piubelli, Luciano; Pedotti, Mattia; Molla, Gianluca; Feindler-Boeckh, Susanne; Ghisla, Sandro; Pilone, Mirella S; Pollegioni, Loredano

    2008-09-01

    The flavoprotein cholesterol oxidase from Brevibacterium sterolicum (BCO) possesses a narrow channel that links the active center containing the flavin to the outside solvent. This channel has been proposed to serve for the access of dioxygen; it contains at its "bottom" a Glu-Arg pair (Glu-475-Arg-477) that was found by crystallographic studies to exist in two forms named "open" and "closed," which in turn was suggested to constitute a gate functioning in the control of oxygen access. Most mutations of residues that flank the channel have minor effects on the oxygen reactivity. Mutations of Glu-311, however, cause a switch in the basic kinetic mechanism of the reaction of reduced BCO with dioxygen; wild-type BCO and most mutants show a saturation behavior with increasing oxygen concentration, whereas for Glu-311 mutants a linear dependence is found that is assumed to reflect a "simple" second order process. This is taken as support for the assumption that residue Glu-311 finely tunes the Glu-475-Arg-477 pair, forming a gate that functions in modulating the access/reactivity of dioxygen.

  2. Combined effect of protein and oxygen on reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the plasma treatment of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Nishtha; Szili, Endre J.; Oh, Jun-Seok; Hong, Sung-Ha; Michelmore, Andrew; Graves, David B.; Hatta, Akimitsu; Short, Robert D.

    2015-09-01

    The influence of protein and molecular, ground state oxygen (O2) on the plasma generation, and transport of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in tissue are investigated. A tissue target, comprising a 1 mm thick gelatin film (a surrogate for real tissue), is placed on top of a 96-well plate; each well is filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS, pH 7.4) containing one fluorescent or colorimetric reporter that is specific for one of three RONS (i.e., H2O2, NO2-, or OH•) or a broad spectrum reactive oxygen species reporter (2,7-dichlorodihydrofluorescein). A helium cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) jet contacts the top of the gelatin surface, and the concentrations of RONS generated in PBS are measured on a microplate reader. The data show that H2O2, NO2-, or OH• are generated in PBS underneath the target. Independently, measurements are made of the O2 concentration in the PBS with and without the gelatin target. Adding bovine serum albumin protein to the PBS or gelatin shows that protein either raises or inhibits RONS depending upon the O2 concentration. Our results are discussed in the context of plasma-soft tissue interactions that are important in the development of CAP technology for medicine, biology, and food manufacturing.

  3. Transcription factors that defend bacteria against reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Imlay, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria live in a toxic world in which their competitors excrete hydrogen peroxide or superoxide-generating redox-cycling compounds. They protect themselves by activating regulons controlled by the OxyR, PerR, and SoxR transcription factors. OxyR and PerR sense peroxide when it oxidizes key thiolate or iron moieties, respectively; they then induce overlapping sets of proteins that defend their vulnerable metalloenzymes. An additional role for OxyR in detecting electrophilic compounds is possible. In some non-enteric bacteria SoxR appears to control the synthesis and export of redox-cycling compounds, whereas in the enteric bacteria it defends the cell against the same agents. When these compounds oxidize its iron-sulfur cluster, SoxR induces proteins that exclude, excrete, or modify them. It also induces enzymes that defend the cell against the superoxide that such compounds make. Recent work has brought new insight to the biochemistry and physiology of these responses, and comparative studies have clarified their evolutionary histories. PMID:26070785

  4. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species by Eriobotrya japonica seed extract.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Junko; Takuma, Daisuke; Hamada, Atsuhide; Onogawa, Masahide; Yoshioka, Saburo; Kusunose, Masahiko; Miyamura, Mitsuhiko; Kyotani, Shojiro; Nishioka, Yutaka

    2006-03-01

    We have clarified that Eriobotrya japonica seed extract has strong antioxidative activity, and is effective for the prevention and treatment of various diseases, such as hepatopathy and nephropathy. In this study, to investigate the influences of components of Eriobotrya japonica seed extract on its antioxidative activity, extracts were prepared using various solvents (n-hexane (Hex), ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol (n-BuOH), methanol (MeOH) and H2O) and the antioxidative activity of the solvent fractions and components was evaluated based on the scavenging of various radicals (DPPH and O2(-)) measured by the ESR method and the inhibition of Fe3+-ADP induced NADPH dependent lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes. The radical scavenging activities and inhibitory activities on lipid peroxidation differed among the solvent fractions and components. In the n-BuOH, MeOH and H2O fractions, radical scavenging activity and inhibitory activity on lipid peroxidation were high. In addition, these fractions contained abundant polyphenols, and the radical scavenging activity increased with the polyphenol content. In the low-polar Hex and EtOAc fractions, the radical scavenging activity was low, but the lipid peroxidation inhibition activity was high. These fractions contained beta-sitosterol, and the inhibitory activity on lipid peroxidation was high. Based on these findings, the antioxidative activity of Eriobotrya japonica seed extract may be derived from many components involved in a complex mechanism, resulting in high activity.

  5. Benzene's metabolites alter c-MYB activity via reactive oxygen species in HD3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Joanne; Winn, Louise M. . E-mail: winnl@queensu.ca

    2007-07-15

    Benzene is a known leukemogen that is metabolized to form reactive intermediates and reactive oxygen species (ROS). The c-Myb oncoprotein is a transcription factor that has a critical role in hematopoiesis. c-Myb transcript and protein have been overexpressed in a number of leukemias and cancers. Given c-Myb's role in hematopoiesis and leukemias, it is hypothesized that benzene interferes with the c-Myb signaling pathway and that this involves ROS. To investigate our hypothesis, we evaluated whether benzene, 1,4-benzoquinone, hydroquinone, phenol, and catechol generated ROS in chicken erythroblast HD3 cells, as measured by 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate (DCFDA) and dihydrorhodamine-123 (DHR-123), and whether the addition of 100 U/ml of the antioxidating enzyme superoxide dismutase (SOD) could prevent ROS generation. Reduced to oxidized glutathione ratios (GSH:GSSG) were also assessed as well as hydroquinone and benzoquinone's effects on c-Myb protein levels and activation of a transiently transfected reporter construct. Finally we attempted to abrogate benzene metabolite mediated increases in c-Myb activity with the use of SOD. We found that benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol increased DCFDA fluorescence, increased DHR-123 fluorescence, decreased GSH:GSSG ratios, and increased reporter construct expression after 24 h of exposure. SOD was able to prevent DCFDA fluorescence and c-Myb activity caused by benzoquinone and hydroquinone only. These results are consistent with other studies, which suggest metabolite differences in benzene-mediated toxicity. More importantly, this study supports the hypothesis that benzene may mediate its toxicity through ROS-mediated alterations in the c-Myb signaling pathway.

  6. Involvement of reactive oxygen species in the mechanisms associated with cervical cancer specific treatment.

    PubMed

    Marinescu, S; Anghel, R; Gruia, M I; Beuran, M

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer represents a genuine health issue in Romania.The courses of treatment applied are complex, and the accompanying biochemical mechanisms are yet to be fully understood. Thus, radiotherapy, which induces reactive oxygen species, can lead to failure of treatment in hypoxic tissues,tissues which are difficult to identify due to the small quantity in which these cytotoxic species are produced. As a result, the aim of this paper is to identify the production and role of reactive oxygen species, as well as the manner of activation of endogenous antioxidant defense mechanisms in cervical cancer patients admitted to the Oncologic Institute of Bucharest. To this purpose the biochemical parameters of oxidative stress were identified in 30 patients with cervical tumour localization, prior to surgery. The results obtained have showed that a production of reactive oxygen species is identifiable in these patients, having lipids as a primary target and leading to their peroxidation. The extension of protein oxidative degradation takes place at a much lower value, as well as the activation of endogenous antioxidant defence systems, comparing to our expectations. To conclude,we consider that when the production of active oxygen metabolites takes place in small concentrations, associated with hypoxia, the signals transmitted are towards modifying the phenotype under anaerobic conditions into one activating neo vascularization, angiogenesis initiation, new cell growth and proliferation. The moment that this phase is overcome anew oxidative stress is installed, one potentially destructive for biomolecules essential to life, but also useful for further treatment, such as radiotherapy.

  7. Theoretical study on the reactivity of the surface of pure oxides: The Influence of the support and oxygen vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reimers, Walter G.; Baltanás, Miguel A.; Branda, María Marta

    2013-06-01

    The surface reactivity of three oxides widely used as heterogeneous catalysts, CeO2 (ceria), Ga2O3 (gallia), and ZnO, with CO, CO2, and H2 was investigated. The most stable perfect (dehydroxylated) oxide surfaces, surfaces that contain oxygen vacancies, and monolayers of Ga2O3 and ZnO epitaxially grown over CeO2(1 1 1) were investigated using DFT calculations. As expected, CO2 exhibited the highest adsorption energies on almost every surface. The only observed exceptions were the ZnO surfaces, viz., the ZnO(0 0 0 1) perfect surface and a ZnO monolayer grown on ceria, with which the CO molecule interacts more strongly and generates CO2 species. In contrast, H2 interacts weakly with the majority of the surfaces, with the exception of gallia/ceria, where this molecule dissociates. The oxides become considerably more reactive when oxygen vacancies are present on the surface. The reactivity of the CeO2(1 1 1) and Ga2O3(1 0 0) surfaces that contain oxygen vacancies increases up to ten-times with respect to the perfect surfaces. In addition, both Ga2O3 and ZnO also exhibit an important increase of their reactivity when they are supported on ceria. Thin films of these oxides that are epitaxially grown onto ceria surfaces have shown to be highly suitable catalysts for oxidizing CO and CO2 molecules and for dissociating the H2 molecule.

  8. Influence of particle size and reactive oxygen species on cobalt chrome nanoparticle-mediated genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Vijay Krishna; Devey, Michael; Hawkins, Sue; Hails, Lauren; Davis, Sean A; Mann, Stephen; Chang, Isaac T; Ingham, Eileen; Malhas, Ashraf; Vaux, David J; Lane, Jon D; Case, Charles P

    2013-05-01

    Patients with cobalt chrome (CoCr) metal-on-metal (MOM) implants may be exposed to a wide size range of metallic nanoparticles as a result of wear. In this study we have characterised the biological responses of human fibroblasts to two types of synthetically derived CoCr particles [(a) from a tribometer (30 nm) and (b) thermal plasma technology (20, 35, and 80 nm)] in vitro, testing their dependence on nanoparticle size or the generation of oxygen free radicals, or both. Metal ions were released from the surface of nanoparticles, particularly from larger (80 nm) particles generated by thermal plasma technology. Exposure of fibroblasts to these nanoparticles triggered rapid (2 h) generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that could be eliminated by inhibition of NADPH oxidase, suggesting that it was mediated by phagocytosis of the particles. The exposure also caused a more prolonged, MitoQ sensitive production of ROS (24 h), suggesting involvement of mitochondria. Consequently, we recorded elevated levels of aneuploidy, chromosome clumping, fragmentation of mitochondria and damage to the cytoskeleton particularly to the microtubule network. Exposure to the nanoparticles resulted in misshapen nuclei, disruption of mature lamin B1 and increased nucleoplasmic bridges, which could be prevented by MitoQ. In addition, increased numbers of micronuclei were observed and these were only partly prevented by MitoQ, and the incidence of micronuclei and ion release from the nanoparticles were positively correlated with nanoparticle size, although the cytogenetic changes, modifications in nuclear shape and the amount of ROS were not. These results suggest that cells exhibit diverse mitochondrial ROS-dependent and independent responses to CoCr particles, and that nanoparticle size and the amount of metal ion released are influential.

  9. Reactive oxygen species are involved in nickel inhibition of dna repair

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn, S.; Yew, F.H.; Chen, K.S.; Jan, K.Y.

    1997-06-01

    Nickel has been shown to inhibit DNA repair in a way that may play a role in its toxicity. Since nickel treatment increases cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), we have investigated the involvement of ROS in nickel inhibition of DNA repair. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis or catalase activity increased the enhancing effect of nickel on the cytotoxicity of ultraviolet (UV) light. Inhibition of catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities also enhanced the retardation effect of nickel on the rejoining of DNA strand breaks accumulated by hydroxyurea plus cytosine-{beta}-D-arabinofuranoside in UV-irradiated cells. Since DNA polymerization and ligation are involved in the DNA-break rejoining, we have investigated the effect of ROS on these two steps in an extract of Chinese hamster ovary cells. Nickel inhibition of the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)dTTP into the DNase l-activated calf thymus DNA was stronger than the ligation of poly(dA){center_dot}oligo(dT), whereas H{sub 2}O{sub 2} was more potent in inhibiting DNA ligation than DNA polymerization. Nickel, in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, exhibited a synergistic inhibition on both DNA polymerization and ligation and caused protein fragmentation. In addition, glutathione could completely recover the inhibition by nickel or H{sub 2}O{sub 2} alone but only partially recover the inhibition by nickel plus H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Therefore, nickel may bind to DNA-repair enzymes and generate oxygen-free radicals to cause protein degradation in situ. This irreversible damage to the proteins involved in DNA repair, replication, recombination, and transcription could be important for the toxic effects of nickel. 60 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. Reactivity of retinal blood flow to 100% oxygen breathing after lipopolysaccharide administration in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Kolodjaschna, Julia; Berisha, Fatmire; Lasta, Michael; Polska, Elzbieta; Fuchsjäger-Mayrl, Gabriele; Schmetterer, Leopold

    2008-08-01

    Administration of low doses of Escherichia coli endotoxin (LPS) to humans enables the study of inflammatory mechanisms. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the retinal vascular reactivity after LPS infusion. In a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over study, 18 healthy male volunteers received 20 IU/kg LPS or placebo as an intravenous bolus infusion. Outcome parameters were measured at baseline and 4h after LPS/placebo administration. At baseline and at 4h after administration a short period of 100% oxygen inhalation was used to assess retinal vasoreactivity to this stimulus. Perimacular white blood cell velocity, density and flux were assessed with the blue-field entoptic technique, retinal branch arterial and venous diameters were measured with a retinal vessel analyzer and red blood cell velocity in retinal branch veins was measured with laser Doppler velocimetry. LPS is associated with peripheral blood leukocytosis and increased white blood cell density in ocular microvessels (p<0.001). In addition, retinal arterial (p=0.02) and venous (p<0.01) diameters were increased. All retinal hemodynamic parameters showed a decrease during 100% oxygen breathing. This decrease was significantly blunted by LPS for all retinal outcome parameters except venous diameter (p=0.04 for white blood cell velocity, p=0.0002 for white blood cell density, p<0.0001 for white blood cell flux, p=0.01 for arterial diameter, p=0.02 for red blood cell velocity and p=0.006 for red blood cell flux). These data indicate that LPS-induced inflammation induces vascular dysregulation in the retina. This may provide a link between inflammation and vascular dysregulation. Further studies are warranted to investigate whether this model may be suitable to study inflammation induced vascular dysregulation in the eye.

  11. Phospholipase D signaling mediates reactive oxygen species-induced lung endothelial barrier dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Usatyuk, Peter V; Kotha, Sainath R; Parinandi, Narasimham L; Natarajan, Viswanathan

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have emerged as critical players in the pathophysiology of pulmonary disorders and diseases. Earlier, we have demonstrated that ROS stimulate lung endothelial cell (EC) phospholipase D (PLD) that generates phosphatidic acid (PA), a second messenger involved in signal transduction. In the current study, we investigated the role of PLD signaling in the ROS-induced lung vascular EC barrier dysfunction. Our results demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a typical physiological ROS, induced PLD activation and altered the barrier function in bovine pulmonary artery ECs (BPAECs). 1-Butanol, the quencher of PLD, generated PA leading to the formation of physiologically inactive phosphatidyl butanol but not its biologically inactive analog, 2-butanol, blocked the H2O2-mediated barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, cell permeable C2 ceramide, an inhibitor of PLD but not the C2 dihydroceramide, attenuated the H2O2-induced PLD activation and enhancement of paracellular permeability of Evans blue conjugated albumin across the BPAEC monolayers. In addition, transfection of BPAECs with adenoviral constructs of hPLD1 and mPLD2 mutants attenuated the H2O2-induced barrier dysfunction, cytoskeletal reorganization and distribution of focal adhesion proteins. For the first time, this study demonstrated that the PLD-generated intracellular bioactive lipid signal mediator, PA, played a critical role in the ROS-induced barrier dysfunction in lung vascular ECs. This study also underscores the importance of PLD signaling in vascular leak and associated tissue injury in the etiology of lung diseases among critically ill patients encountering oxygen toxicity and excess ROS production during ventilator-assisted breathing.

  12. Photo-irradiation of proanthocyanidin as a new disinfection technique via reactive oxygen species formation.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Keisuke; Shirato, Midori; Ikai, Hiroyo; Kanno, Taro; Sasaki, Keiichi; Kohno, Masahiro; Niwano, Yoshimi

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, the bactericidal effect of photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin was evaluated in relation to reactive oxygen species formation. Staphylococcus aureus suspended in proanthocyanidin aqueous solution was irradiated with light from a laser at 405 nm. The bactericidal effect of photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin depended on the concentration of proanthocyanidin, the laser irradiation time, and the laser output power. When proanthocyanidin was used at the concentration of 1 mg/mL, the laser irradiation of the bacterial suspension could kill the bacteria with a >5-log reduction of viable cell counts. By contrast, bactericidal effect was not observed when proanthocyanidin was not irradiated. In electron spin resonance analysis, reactive oxygen species, such as hydroxyl radicals, superoxide anion radicals, and hydrogen peroxide, were detected in the photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin aqueous solution. The yields of the reactive oxygen species also depended on the concentration of proanthocyanidin, the laser irradiation time, and the laser output power as is the case with the bactericidal assay. Thus, it is indicated that the bactericidal effect of photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin is exerted via the reactive oxygen species formation. The bactericidal effect as well as the yield of the oxygen radicals increased with the concentration of proanthocyanidin up to 4 mg/mL, and then decreased with the concentration. These findings suggest that the antioxidative activity of proanthocyanidin might prevail against the radical generation potency of photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin resulting in the decreased bactericidal effect when the concentration is over 4 mg/mL. The present study suggests that photo-irradiated proanthocyanidin whenever used in an optimal concentration range can be a new disinfection technique.

  13. Piperlongumine Blocks JAK2-STAT3 to Inhibit Collagen-Induced Platelet Reactivity Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species†

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hengjie; Houck, Katie L.; Tian, Ye; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Hull, Ken; Zhou, Zhou; Zhou, Mingzhao; Wu, Xiaoping; Tweardy, David J.; Romo, Daniel; Fu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Jianning; Dong, Jing-fei

    2015-01-01

    Background Piperlongumine (PL) is a compound isolated from the piper longum plant. It possesses anti-cancer activities through blocking the transcription factor STAT3 and by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer, but not normal cells. It also inhibits platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Objective We conducted in vitro experiments to test the hypothesis that PL regulates a non-transcriptional activity of STAT3 to specifically reduce the reactivity of human platelets to collagen. Results PL dose-dependently blocked collagen-induced platelet aggregation, calcium influx, CD62p expression and thrombus formation on collagen with a maximal inhibition at 100 μM. It reduced platelet microvesiculation induced by collagen. PL blocked the activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in collagen-stimulated platelets. This inhibitory effect was significantly reduced in platelets pretreated with a STAT3 inhibitor. Although PL induced ROS production in platelets; quenching ROS using excessive reducing agents: 20 μM GSH and 0.5 mM L-Cysteine, did not block the inhibitory effects. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor Apocynin also had no effect. Conclusions PL inhibited collagen-induced platelet reactivity by targeting the JAK2-STAT3 pathway. We also provide experimental evidence that PL and collagen induce different oxidants that have differential effects on platelets. Studying these differential effects may uncover new mechanisms of regulating platelet functions by oxidants in redox signals. PMID:26645674

  14. Enhancing intermolecular benzoyl-transfer reactivity in crystals by growing a "reactive" metastable polymorph by using a chiral additive.

    PubMed

    Murali, Chebrolu; Shashidhar, Mysore S; Gonnade, Rajesh G; Bhadbhade, Mohan M

    2009-01-01

    Racemic 2,4-di-O-benzoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoacetate, which normally crystallizes in a monoclinic form (form I, space group P2(1)/n) could be persuaded to crystallize out as a metastable polymorph (form II, space group C2/c) by using a small amount of either D- or L- 2,4-di-O-benzoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoformate as an additive in the crystallization medium. The structurally similar enantiomeric additive was chosen by the scrutiny of previous experimental results on the crystallization of racemic 2,4-di-O-benzoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoacetate. Form II crystals can be thermally transformed to form I crystals at about 145 degrees C. The relative organization of the molecules in these dimorphs vary slightly in terms of the helical assembly of molecules, that is, electrophile (El)...nucleophile (Nu) and C-H...pi interactions, but these minor variations have a profound effect on the facility and specificity of benzoyl-group-transfer reactivity in the two crystal forms. While form II crystals undergo a clean intermolecular benzoyl-group-transfer reaction, form I crystals are less reactive and undergo non-specific benzoyl-group transfer leading to a mixture of products. The role played by the additive in fine-tuning small changes that are required in the molecular packing opens up the possibility of creating new polymorphs that show varied physical and chemical properties. Crystals of D-2,6-di-O-benzoyl-myo-inositol-1,3,5-orthoformate (additive) did not show facile benzoyl-group-transfer reactivity (in contrast to the corresponding racemic compound) due to the lack of proper juxtaposition and assembly of molecules.

  15. Reactive oxygen species metabolism during the cadmium hyperaccumulation of a new hyperaccumulator Sedum alfredii (Crassulaceae).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhong-chun; Qiu, Bao-Sheng

    2007-01-01

    Sedum alfredii Hance, a newly discovered hyperaccumulator, could serve as a good material for phytoremediation of Cd polluted sites. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidases (catalase (CAT); superoxide dismutase (SOD); peroxidase (POD)) in the leaf were determined when S. alfredii was treated for 15 d with various CdCl2 concentrations ranging from 0 to 800 micromol/L. The results showed that the production rate of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein (DCF), which is an indicator of ROS level, reached up to the maximum at 400 micromol/L CdCl2 and then declined with the increase of CdCl2 concentration, while MDA accumulation tended to increase. CAT activity was significantly inhibited at all tested CdCl2 concentrations and SOD activity was sharply suppressed at 800 micromol/L CdCl2. However, the enhancement of POD activity was observed when CdCl2 concentration was higher than 400 micromol/L. In addition, its activity increased when treated with 600 micromol/L CdCl2 for more than 5 d. When sodium benzoate, a free radical scavenger, was added, S. alfredii was a little more sensitive to Cd toxicity than that exposed to Cd alone, and the Cd accumulation tended to decline with the increase of sodium benzoate concentration. It came to the conclusions that POD played an important role during Cd hyperaccumulation, and the accumulation of ROS induced by Cd treatment might be involved in Cd hyperaccumulation. PMID:18232224

  16. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles as radiosensitizer via enhanced reactive oxygen species formation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Stefanie; Sommer, Anja; Distel, Luitpold V.R.; Neuhuber, Winfried; Kryschi, Carola

    2012-08-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ultrasmall citrate-coated SPIONs with {gamma}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SPIONs uptaken by MCF-7 cells increase the ROS production for about 240%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The SPION induced ROS production is due to released iron ions and catalytically active surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Released iron ions and SPION surfaces initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray irradiation of internalized SPIONs leads to an increase of catalytically active surfaces. -- Abstract: Internalization of citrate-coated and uncoated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles by human breast cancer (MCF-7) cells was verified by transmission electron microscopy imaging. Cytotoxicity studies employing metabolic and trypan blue assays manifested their excellent biocompatibility. The production of reactive oxygen species in iron oxide nanoparticle loaded MCF-7 cells was explained to originate from both, the release of iron ions and their catalytically active surfaces. Both initiate the Fenton and Haber-Weiss reaction. Additional oxidative stress caused by X-ray irradiation of MCF-7 cells was attributed to the increase of catalytically active iron oxide nanoparticle surfaces.

  17. Redox cycling and generation of reactive oxygen species in commercial infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L; Crum, Andrea D

    2016-04-01

    Three nationally prominent commercial powdered infant formulas generated hydrogen peroxide, ranging from 10.46 to 11.62 μM, when prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. Treating infant formulas with the chelating agent diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) significantly reduced H2O2 generation. In contrast, the addition of disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) elevated the level of H2O2 generated in the same infant formulas by approximately 3- to 4-fold above the untreated infant formulas. The infant formulas contained ascorbate radicals ranging from about 138 nM to 40 nM. Treatment with catalase reduced the ascorbate radical contents by as much as 67%. Treatment with DTPA further reduced ascorbate radical signals to below quantifiable levels in most samples, further implicating the involvement of transition metal redox cycling in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Supportive evidence of the generation of ROS is provided using luminol-enhanced luminescence (LEL) in both model mixtures of ascorbic acid and in commercial infant formulas. PMID:26593482

  18. Mitohormesis: Promoting Health and Lifespan by Increased Levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)

    PubMed Central

    Ristow, Michael; Schmeisser, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS), consisting of superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and multiple others, do not only cause oxidative stress, but rather may function as signaling molecules that promote health by preventing or delaying a number of chronic diseases, and ultimately extend lifespan. While high levels of ROS are generally accepted to cause cellular damage and to promote aging, low levels of these may rather improve systemic defense mechanisms by inducing an adaptive response. This concept has been named mitochondrial hormesis or mitohormesis. We here evaluate and summarize more than 500 publications from current literature regarding such ROS-mediated low-dose signaling events, including calorie restriction, hypoxia, temperature stress, and physical activity, as well as signaling events downstream of insulin/IGF-1 receptors, AMP-dependent kinase (AMPK), target-of-rapamycin (TOR), and lastly sirtuins to culminate in control of proteostasis, unfolded protein response (UPR), stem cell maintenance and stress resistance. Additionally, consequences of interfering with such ROS signals by pharmacological or natural compounds are being discussed, concluding that particularly antioxidants are useless or even harmful. PMID:24910588

  19. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species: A double edged sword in ischemia/reperfusion vs preconditioning

    PubMed Central

    Kalogeris, Theodore; Bao, Yimin; Korthuis, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Reductions in the blood supply produce considerable injury if the duration of ischemia is prolonged. Paradoxically, restoration of perfusion to ischemic organs can exacerbate tissue damage and extend the size of an evolving infarct. Being highly metabolic organs, the heart and brain are particularly vulnerable to the deleterious effects of ischemia/reperfusion (I/R). While the pathogenetic mechanisms contributing to I/R-induced tissue injury and infarction are multifactorial, the relative importance of each contributing factor remains unclear. However, an emerging body of evidence indicates that the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by mitochondria plays a critical role in damaging cellular components and initiating cell death. In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the mechanisms whereby mitochondrial ROS generation occurs in I/R and contributes to myocardial infarction and stroke. In addition, mitochondrial ROS have been shown to participate in preconditioning by several pharmacologic agents that target potassium channels (e.g., ATP-sensitive potassium (mKATP) channels or large conductance, calcium-activated potassium (mBKCa) channels) to activate cell survival programs that render tissues and organs more resistant to the deleterious effects of I/R. Finally, we review novel therapeutic approaches that selectively target mROS production to reduce postischemic tissue injury, which may prove efficacious in limiting myocardial dysfunction and infarction and abrogating neurocognitive deficits and neuronal cell death in stroke. PMID:24944913

  20. Nicorandil prevents sirolimus-induced production of reactive oxygen species, endothelial dysfunction, and thrombus formation.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, Ken; Takahari, Youko; Higashijima, Naoko; Serizawa, Kenichi; Yogo, Kenji; Ishizuka, Nobuhiko; Endo, Koichi; Fukuyama, Naoto; Hirano, Katsuya; Ishida, Hideyuki

    2015-03-01

    Sirolimus (SRL) is widely used to prevent restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. However, its beneficial effect is hampered by complications of thrombosis. Several studies imply that reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in endothelial dysfunction and thrombus formation. The present study investigated the protective effect of nicorandil (NIC), an anti-angina agent, on SRL-associated thrombosis. In human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs), SRL stimulated ROS production, which was prevented by co-treatment with NIC. The preventive effect of NIC on ROS was abolished by 5-hydroxydecanoate but not by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one. NIC also inhibited SRL-induced up-regulation of NADPH oxidase subunit p22(phox) mRNA. Co-treatment with NIC and SRL significantly up-regulated superoxide dismutase 2. NIC treatment significantly improved SRL-induced decrease in viability of HCAECs. The functional relevance of the preventive effects of NIC on SRL-induced ROS production and impairment of endothelial viability was investigated in a mouse model of thrombosis. Pretreatment with NIC inhibited the SRL-induced acceleration of FeCl3-initiated thrombus formation and ROS production in the testicular arteries of mice. In conclusion, NIC prevented SRL-induced thrombus formation, presumably due to the reduction of ROS and to endothelial protection. The therapeutic efficacy of NIC could represent an additional option in the prevention of SRL-related thrombosis.

  1. Redox cycling and generation of reactive oxygen species in commercial infant formulas.

    PubMed

    Boatright, William L; Crum, Andrea D

    2016-04-01

    Three nationally prominent commercial powdered infant formulas generated hydrogen peroxide, ranging from 10.46 to 11.62 μM, when prepared according to the manufacturer's instructions. Treating infant formulas with the chelating agent diethylene triamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA) significantly reduced H2O2 generation. In contrast, the addition of disodium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) elevated the level of H2O2 generated in the same infant formulas by approximately 3- to 4-fold above the untreated infant formulas. The infant formulas contained ascorbate radicals ranging from about 138 nM to 40 nM. Treatment with catalase reduced the ascorbate radical contents by as much as 67%. Treatment with DTPA further reduced ascorbate radical signals to below quantifiable levels in most samples, further implicating the involvement of transition metal redox cycling in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Supportive evidence of the generation of ROS is provided using luminol-enhanced luminescence (LEL) in both model mixtures of ascorbic acid and in commercial infant formulas.

  2. Alliin Attenuated RANKL-Induced Osteoclastogenesis by Scavenging Reactive Oxygen Species through Inhibiting Nox1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yueqi; Sun, Jingjing; Dou, Ce; Li, Nan; Kang, Fei; Wang, Yuan; Cao, Zhen; Yang, Xiaochao; Dong, Shiwu

    2016-01-01

    The healthy skeleton requires a perfect coordination of the formation and degradation of bone. Metabolic bone disease like osteoporosis is resulted from the imbalance of bone formation and/or bone resorption. Osteoporosis also reflects lower level of bone matrix, which is contributed by up-regulated osteoclast-mediated bone resorption. It is reported that monocytes/macrophage progenitor cells or either hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) gave rise to multinucleated osteoclasts. Thus, inhibition of osteoclastic bone resorption generally seems to be a predominant therapy for treating osteoporosis. Recently, more and more natural compounds have been discovered, which have the ability of inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and fusion. Alliin (S-allyl-l-cysteine sulfoxides, SACSO) is the major component of aged garlic extract (AGE), bearing broad-spectrum natural antioxidant properties. However, its effects on bone health have not yet been explored. Hence, we designed the current study to explore its effects and role in receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast fusion and differentiation. It was revealed that alliin had an inhibitory effect in osteoclasteogenesis with a dose-dependent manner via blocking the c-Fos-NFATc1 signaling pathway. In addition, alliin decreased the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and down-regulated the expression of NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1). The overall results revealed that alliin could be a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:27657047

  3. Lanthanum regulates the reactive oxygen species in the roots of rice seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongwu; Zheng, Shengnan; Wang, Xue

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effects of La3+ on the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant metabolism were studied in the roots of rice (Oryza sativa L. cv Shengdao 16) exposed to increasing concentrations of La3+ (0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mM). The level of hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anion, and malondialdehyde was increased by 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 mM La3+, and the activity of catalase and peroxidase was increased by 0.05 and 0.1 mM La3+. However, La3+ treatments stimulated superoxide dismutase activity in the roots of rice seedlings at all tested concentrations. In addition, the probe 2′,7′-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (H2DCF-DA) was used to investigate the instantaneous change of ROS in the root cells with the laser-scanning confocal microscopy. The result indicated that ROS level was declined after treated with 0.05 mM La3+. The results showed that the appropriate concentration of La3+ decreased the level of ROS, and hormetic effects on the antioxidant metabolism were found in the roots of rice exposed to 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mM La3+. PMID:27546334

  4. Silver nanoparticle-algae interactions: oxidative dissolution, reactive oxygen species generation and synergistic toxic effects.

    PubMed

    He, Di; Dorantes-Aranda, Juan José; Waite, T David

    2012-08-21

    The short-term toxicity of citrate-stabilized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and ionic silver Ag(I) to the ichthyotoxic marine raphidophyte Chattonella marina has been examined using the fluorometric indicator alamarBlue. Aggregation and dissolution of AgNPs occurred after addition to GSe medium while uptake of dissolved Ag(I) occurred in the presence of C. marina. Based on total silver mass, toxicity was much higher for Ag(I) than for AgNPs. Cysteine, a strong Ag(I) ligand, completely removed the inhibitory effects of Ag(I) and AgNPs on the metabolic activity of C. marina, suggesting that the toxicity of AgNPs was due to the release of Ag(I). Synergistic toxic effects of AgNPs/Ag(I) and C. marina to fish gill cells were observed with these effects possibly attributable to enhancement in the generation of reactive oxygen species by C. marina on exposure of the organism to silver.

  5. Reactive oxygen species production in mitochondria of human gingival fibroblast induced by blue light irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ayaka; Yoshino, Fumihiko; Makita, Tetsuya; Maehata, Yojiro; Higashi, Kazuyoshi; Miyamoto, Chihiro; Wada-Takahashi, Satoko; Takahashi, Shun-suke; Takahashi, Osamu; Lee, Masaichi Chang-il

    2013-12-01

    In recent years, it has become well known that the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by blue-light irradiation causes adverse effects of photo-aging, such as age-related macular degeneration of the retina. Thus, orange-tinted glasses are used to protect the retina during dental treatment involving blue-light irradiation (e.g., dental resin restorations or tooth bleaching treatments). However, there are few studies examining the effects of blue-light irradiation on oral tissue. For the first time, we report that blue-light irradiation by quartz tungsten halogen lamp (QTH) or light-emitting diode (LED) decreased cell proliferation activity of human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) in a time-dependent manner (<5 min). Additionally, in a morphological study, the cytotoxic effect was observed in the cell organelles, especially the mitochondria. Furthermore, ROS generation induced by the blue-light irradiation was detected in mitochondria of HGFs using fluorimetry. In all analyses, the cytotoxicity was significantly higher after LED irradiation compared with cytotoxicity after QTH irradiation. These results suggest that blue light irradiation, especially by LED light sources used in dental aesthetic treatment, might have adverse effects on human gingival tissue. Hence, this necessitates the development of new dental aesthetic treatment methods and/or techniques to protect HGFs from blue light irradiation during dental therapy.

  6. Roles of reactive oxygen species and mitochondria in cadmium-induced injury of liver cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; He, Wenting; Yan, Chuan; Qi, Yongmei; Zhang, Yingmei

    2011-04-01

    The roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondrial damage in the cadmium (Cd)-induced injury of liver cells were studied by using N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) and acetyl-L-carnitine hydrochloride (ALCAR). After exposure of experimental rats to cadmium (Cd) for 16 h, mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), ROS production, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, glutathione (GSH) content, malondialdehyde (MDA) content and DNA single-strand break (DNA-SSB) were analyzed. Loss of MMP, increase of ROS production, inhibition of GSH-Px activity, elevation of GSH content, rise of MDA content and DNA-SSB level suggest the participation of ROS and mitochondrion in Cd-induced injury of liver cell. NAC pretreatment attenuated oxidative stress, reversed the decline in GSH-Px activity and reduced GSH and MDA levels significantly. However, Cd-induced loss in MMP was significantly exacerbated by NAC. For another, ALCAR did not perform as well as NAC in terms of reducing ROS production, restoring GSH-Px activity and reducing GSH content. Nevertheless, it significantly improved the recovery of MMP and reduction of MDA content. In addition, conspicuous DNA damage was observed in the samples treated with NAC or ALCAR, indicating Cd could attack DNA through other pathways. These results suggest that oxidative stress or mitochondrial impairment plays a main role in different injuries respectively.

  7. Negative Regulation of Autophagy by Sulfide Is Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; Romero, Luis C; Gotor, Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating experimental evidence in mammalian, and recently plant, systems has led to a change in our understanding of the role played by hydrogen sulfide in life processes. In plants, hydrogen sulfide mitigates stress and regulates important plant processes such as photosynthesis, stomatal movement, and autophagy, although the underlying mechanism is not well known. In this study, we provide new experimental evidence that, together with our previous findings, demonstrates the role of hydrogen sulfide in regulating autophagy. We used green fluorescent protein fluorescence associated with autophagic bodies and immunoblot analysis of the ATG8 protein to show that sulfide (and no other molecules such as sulfur-containing molecules or ammonium) was able to inhibit the autophagy induced in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots under nitrogen deprivation. Our results showed that sulfide was unable to scavenge reactive oxygen species generated by nitrogen limitation, in contrast to well-established reducers. In addition, reducers were unable to inhibit the accumulation of autophagic bodies and ATG8 protein forms to the same extent as sulfide. Therefore, we conclude that sulfide represses autophagy via a mechanism that is independent of redox conditions.

  8. Effects of reactive oxygen species on cellular wall disassembly of banana fruit during ripening.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Guiping; Duan, Xuewu; Shi, John; Lu, Wangjin; Luo, Yunbo; Jiang, Weibo; Jiang, Yueming

    2008-07-15

    Fruit softening is generally attributed to cell wall disassembly. Experiments were conducted to investigate effects of various reactive oxygen species (ROS) on in vitro cellular wall disassembly of harvested banana fruit. The alcohol-extracted insoluble residue (AEIR) was obtained from the pulp tissues of banana fruit at various ripening stages and then used to examine the disassembly of cellular wall polysaccharides in the presence of superoxide anion (O2(-)), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) or hydroxyl radical (OH) and their scavengers. The presence of OH accelerated significantly disassembly of cellular wall polysaccharides in terms of the increase in contents of total sugars released and uronic acid, and the decrease in molecular mass of soluble polysaccharides, using gel permeation chromatography. However, the treatment with H2O2 or O2(-) showed no significant effect on the disassembly of cellular wall polysaccharides. Furthermore, the degradation of the de-esterified AEIR was more susceptible to OH attack than the esterified AEIR. In addition, the effect of OH could be inhibited in the presence of OH scavenger. This study suggests that disassembly of cellular wall polysaccharides could be initiated by OH as the solublisation of the polysaccharides increased, which, in turn, accelerated fruit softening. PMID:26003353

  9. Role of NADPH Oxidase-Mediated Reactive Oxygen Species in Podocyte Injury

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shan; Meng, Xian-Fang; Zhang, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Proteinuria is an independent risk factor for end-stage renal disease (ESRD) (Shankland, 2006). Recent studies highlighted the mechanisms of podocyte injury and implications for potential treatment strategies in proteinuric kidney diseases (Zhang et al., 2012). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are cellular signals which are closely associated with the development and progression of glomerular sclerosis. NADPH oxidase is a district enzymatic source of cellular ROS production and prominently expressed in podocytes (Zhang et al., 2010). In the last decade, it has become evident that NADPH oxidase-derived ROS overproduction is a key trigger of podocyte injury, such as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation (Whaley-Connell et al., 2006), epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (Zhang et al., 2011), and inflammatory priming (Abais et al., 2013). This review focuses on the mechanism of NADPH oxidase-mediated ROS in podocyte injury under different pathophysiological conditions. In addition, we also reviewed the therapeutic perspectives of NADPH oxidase in kidney diseases related to podocyte injury. PMID:24319690

  10. Identification and biological activities of a new antiangiogenic small molecule that suppresses mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Park, Ju Yeol; Jung, Hye Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} YCG063 was screened as a new angiogenesis inhibitor which suppresses mitochondrial ROS generation in a phenotypic cell-based screening of a small molecule-focused library. {yields} The compound inhibited in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. {yields} This new small molecule tool will provide a basis for a better understanding of angiogenesis driven under hypoxic conditions. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with multiple cellular functions such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. In particular, high levels of mitochondrial ROS in hypoxic cells regulate many angiogenesis-related diseases, including cancer and ischemic disorders. Here we report a new angiogenesis inhibitor, YCG063, which suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation in a phenotypic cell-based screening of a small molecule-focused library with an ArrayScan HCS reader. YCG063 suppressed mitochondrial ROS generation under a hypoxic condition in a dose-dependent manner, leading to the inhibition of in vitro angiogenic tube formation and chemoinvasion as well as in vivo angiogenesis of the chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) at non-toxic doses. In addition, YCG063 decreased the expression levels of HIF-1{alpha} and its target gene, VEGF. Collectively, a new antiangiogenic small molecule that suppresses mitochondrial ROS was identified. This new small molecule tool will provide a basis for a better understanding of angiogenesis driven under hypoxic conditions.

  11. Endogenous reactive oxygen species content and modulation of tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    Donà, G; Fiore, C; Tibaldi, E; Frezzato, F; Andrisani, A; Ambrosini, G; Fiorentin, D; Armanini, D; Bordin, L; Clari, G

    2011-10-01

    Generation of controlled amounts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and phosphorylation of protein tyrosine (Tyr) residues are two main cellular changes involved in sperm capacitation. This study examined the relationship between tyrosine-phosphorylation (Tyr-P) and endogenous ROS production during sperm capacitation, and correlated them with both sperm motility and functionality expressed as acrosome-reacted cells. Immediate ROS generation was observed to peak after a 45-min incubation, followed by a rapid decrease in ROS content and successive regeneration of the ROS peak in 3 h and later. These two peaks were directly correlated with both the Tyr-P process involving sperm heads and tails, and the acrosome reaction (69 ± 8% and 65 ± 4%, respectively). The period of low-ROS content resulted in low Tyr-P patterns, located exclusively in the cell midpiece, and drastic reduction in acrosome-reacted cells. Ascorbic acid addition inhibited both Tyr-P patterns and acrosome reactions, whereas NADPH induced high ROS generation, with Tyr-P patterns located only on sperm tails, and prevented the acrosome reaction. Sperm hyperactivation was insensitive to ROS content. This is an important parameter for evaluation of sperm capacitation, which is achieved only when both ROS generation reaches a peak and Tyr-P involves the sperm head. PMID:20738429

  12. Reactive Oxygen Species Affect Transglutaminase Activity and Regulate Hematopoiesis in a Crustacean.

    PubMed

    Junkunlo, Kingkamon; Söderhäll, Kenneth; Söderhäll, Irene; Noonin, Chadanat

    2016-08-19

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) serve as a prime signal in the commitment to hematopoiesis in both mammals and Drosophila In this study, the potential function of ROS during hematopoiesis in the crayfish Pacifastacus leniusculus was examined. The antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was used to decrease ROS in both in vivo and in vitro experiments. An increase in ROS was observed in the anterior proliferation center (APC) after LPS injection. In the absence of NAC, the LPS-induced increase in ROS levels resulted in the rapid restoration of the circulating hemocyte number. In the presence of NAC, a delay in the recovery rate of the hemocyte number was observed. NAC treatment also blocked the spread of APC and other hematopoietic tissue (HPT) cells, maintaining these cells at an undifferentiated stage. Extracellular transglutaminase (TGase) has been shown previously to play a role in maintaining HPT cells in an undifferentiated form. In this study, we show that extracellular TGase activity increased when the ROS level in HPT or APC cells was reduced after NAC treatment. In addition, collagen, a major component of the extracellular matrix and a TGase substrate were co-localized on the HPT cell surface. Taken together, the results of this study show that ROS are involved in crayfish hematopoiesis, in which a low ROS level is required to maintain hematopoietic progenitor cells in the tissue and to reduce hemocyte release. The potential roles of TGase in this process are investigated and discussed. PMID:27339892

  13. Fosfomycin enhances phagocyte-mediated killing of Staphylococcus aureus by extracellular traps and reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Fengge; Tang, Xudong; Cheng, Wei; Wang, Yang; Wang, Chao; Shi, Xiaochen; An, Yanan; Zhang, Qiaoli; Liu, Mingyuan; Liu, Bo; Yu, Lu

    2016-01-01

    The successful treatment of bacterial infections is the achievement of a synergy between the host’s immune defences and antibiotics. Here, we examined whether fosfomycin (FOM) could improve the bactericidal effect of phagocytes, and investigated the potential mechanisms. FOM enhanced the phagocytosis and extra- or intracellular killing of S. aureus by phagocytes. And FOM enhanced the extracellular killing of S. aureus in macrophage (MФ) and in neutrophils mediated by extracellular traps (ETs). ET production was related to NADPH oxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS). Additionally, FOM increased the intracellular killing of S. aureus in phagocytes, which was mediated by ROS through the oxidative burst process. Our results also showed that FOM alone induced S. aureus producing hydroxyl radicals in order to kill the bacterial cells in vitro. In a mouse peritonitis model, FOM treatment increased the bactericidal extra- and intracellular activity in vivo, and FOM strengthened ROS and ET production from peritoneal lavage fluid ex vivo. An IVIS imaging system assay further verified the observed in vivo bactericidal effect of the FOM treatment. This work may provide a deeper understanding of the role of the host’s immune defences and antibiotic interactions in microbial infections. PMID:26778774

  14. Targeting mitochondrial reactive oxygen species as novel therapy for inflammatory diseases and cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    There are multiple sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cell. As a major site of ROS production, mitochondria have drawn considerable interest because it was recently discovered that mitochondrial ROS (mtROS) directly stimulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines and pathological conditions as diverse as malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and cardiovascular diseases all share common phenotype of increased mtROS production above basal levels. Several excellent reviews on this topic have been published, but ever-changing new discoveries mandated a more up-to-date and comprehensive review on this topic. Therefore, we update recent understanding of how mitochondria generate and regulate the production of mtROS and the function of mtROS both in physiological and pathological conditions. In addition, we describe newly developed methods to probe or scavenge mtROS and compare these methods in detail. Thorough understanding of this topic and the application of mtROS-targeting drugs in the research is significant towards development of better therapies to combat inflammatory diseases and inflammatory malignancies. PMID:23442817

  15. Reactive oxygen species scavenging activity of aminoderivatized chitosan with different degree of deacetylation.

    PubMed

    Je, Jae-Young; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2006-09-01

    Chitosans with different degree of deacetylation were prepared from crab shell chitin in the presence of alkali. Aminoderivatized chitosan derivatives were prepared in addition of amino functional groups at a hydroxyl site in the chitosan backbone. Six kinds of aminoderivatized chitosan such as aminoethyl-chitosan (AEC90), dimethylaminoethyl-chitosan (DMAEC90), and diethylaminoethyl-chitosan (DEAEC90), which were prepared from 90% deacetylated chitosan, and AEC50, DMAEC50 and DEAEC50, which were prepared from 50% deacetylated chitosan, were prepared and their reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging activities were investigated against hydroxyl radical, superoxide anion radical and hydrogen peroxide. The electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrum revealed that AEC90 showed the highest scavenging effects against hydroxyl and superoxide anion radical, the effects were 91.67% and 65.34% at 0.25 and 5 mg/mL, respectively. For hydrogen peroxide scavenging effect, DEAEC90 exhibited the strongest activity. These results suggest that the scavenging effect depends on their degree of deacetylation and substituted group.

  16. Role of Reactive Oxygen Species and Advanced Glycation End Products in the Malfunctioning of Dental Implants

    PubMed Central

    Guo, M; Liu, L; Zhang, J; Liu, M

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: In the last decade, dental implants have emerged as a crucial modality and serve as an individual form of therapy for dental failure. However, disparities in host responses have led to peri-implantitis and implant failure. The pathological mechanisms driving peri-implantitis remain largely unknown. In this study, we evaluated the role of oxidative stress and advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the progression of peri-implantitis and dental implants failure, compared with chronic periodontal disease. Subjects and Methods: Three patient groups (peri-implantitis, chronic periodontal disease and control), each with 10 subjects (7M/3F) and average age ranging from 40–60 years were selected for analysis. Salivary oxidative stress and tissue AGE levels were analysed by probing for reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Maillard reaction-related fluorescence, respectively. Results: We observed significant increase (> 2-fold) in oxidative stress and AGE levels in patients with peri-implantitis and chronic periodontal disease compared to controls, with chronic periodontal disease having the highest levels. In addition, we observed a strong positive correlation (r = 0.94) between oxidative stress and AGE levels in the patients. Conclusion: We propose that increased AGE levels and oxidative stress, although not the only pathway, are significant mediators in the pathogenesis of peri-implantitis. Altering them may potentially be used in combination with other modalities to manage peri-implantitis. PMID:26624598

  17. Negative Regulation of Autophagy by Sulfide Is Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species.

    PubMed

    Laureano-Marín, Ana M; Moreno, Inmaculada; Romero, Luis C; Gotor, Cecilia

    2016-06-01

    Accumulating experimental evidence in mammalian, and recently plant, systems has led to a change in our understanding of the role played by hydrogen sulfide in life processes. In plants, hydrogen sulfide mitigates stress and regulates important plant processes such as photosynthesis, stomatal movement, and autophagy, although the underlying mechanism is not well known. In this study, we provide new experimental evidence that, together with our previous findings, demonstrates the role of hydrogen sulfide in regulating autophagy. We used green fluorescent protein fluorescence associated with autophagic bodies and immunoblot analysis of the ATG8 protein to show that sulfide (and no other molecules such as sulfur-containing molecules or ammonium) was able to inhibit the autophagy induced in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) roots under nitrogen deprivation. Our results showed that sulfide was unable to scavenge reactive oxygen species generated by nitrogen limitation, in contrast to well-established reducers. In addition, reducers were unable to inhibit the accumulation of autophagic bodies and ATG8 protein forms to the same extent as sulfide. Therefore, we conclude that sulfide represses autophagy via a mechanism that is independent of redox conditions. PMID:27208225

  18. Reactive oxygen species in signalling the transcriptional activation of WIPK expression in tobacco.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Yang, Kwang-Yeol; Yoo, Seung Jin; Liu, Yidong; Ren, Dongtao; Zhang, Shuqun

    2014-07-01

    Plant mitogen-activated protein kinases represented by tobacco WIPK (wounding-induced protein kinase) and its orthologs in other species are unique in their regulation at transcriptional level in response to stress and pathogen infection. We previously demonstrated that transcriptional activation of WIPK is essential for induced WIPK activity, and activation of salicylic acid-induced protein kinase (SIPK) by the constitutively active NtMEK2(DD) is sufficient to induce WIPK gene expression. Here, we report that the effect of SIPK on WIPK gene expression is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Using a combination of pharmacological and gain-of-function transgenic approaches, we studied the relationship among SIPK activation, WIPK gene activation in response to fungal cryptogein, light-dependent ROS generation in chloroplasts, and ROS generated via NADPH oxidase. In the conditional gain-of-function GVG-NtMEK2(DD) transgenic tobacco, induction of WIPK expression is dependent on the ROS generation in chloroplasts. Consistently, methyl viologen, an inducer of ROS generation in chloroplasts, highly activated WIPK expression. In addition to chloroplast-originated ROS, H(2)O(2) generated from the cell-surface NADPH oxidase could also activate WIPK gene expression, and inhibition of cryptogein-induced ROS generation also abolished WIPK gene activation. Our data demonstrate that WIPK gene activation is mediated by ROS, which provides a mechanism by which ROS influence cellular signalling processes in plant stress/defence response.

  19. A role for reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and iron on neuronal synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, Cecilia; Carrasco, M Angélica; Muñoz, Pablo; Núñez, Marco T

    2007-02-01

    A great body of experimental evidence collected over many years indicates that calcium has a central role in a variety of neuronal functions. In particular, calcium participates in synaptic plasticity, a neuronal process presumably correlated with cognitive brain functions such as learning and memory. In contrast, only recently, evidence has begun to emerge supporting a physiological role of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species in synaptic plasticity. This subject will be the central topic of this review. The authors also present recent results showing that, in hippocampal neurons, ROS/RNS, including ROS generated by iron through the Fenton reaction, stimulate ryanodine receptor-mediated calcium release, and how the resulting calcium signals activate the signaling cascades that lead to the transcription of genes known to participate in synaptic plasticity. They discuss the possible participation of ryanodine receptors jointly stimulated by calcium and ROS/RNS in the normal signaling cascades needed for synaptic plasticity, and how too much ROS production may contribute to neurodegeneration via excessive calcium release. In addition, the dual role of iron as a necessary, but potentially toxic, element for normal neuronal function is discussed. PMID:17115937

  20. Xanthohumol induces generation of reactive oxygen species and triggers apoptosis through inhibition of mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Chu, Wei; Wei, Peng; Liu, Ying; Wei, Taotao

    2015-12-01

    Xanthohumol is a prenylflavonoid extracted from hops (Humulus lupulus). It possesses anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities in vitro and in vivo, and offers therapeutic benefits for treatment of metabolic syndromes. However, the precise mechanisms underlying its pharmacological effects remain to be elucidated, together with its cellular target. Here, we provide evidence that xanthohumol directly interacts with the mitochondrial electron transfer chain complex I (NADH dehydrogenase), inhibits the oxidative phosphorylation, triggers the production of reactive oxygen species, and induces apoptosis. In addition, we show that as a result of the inhibition of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, xanthohumol exposure causes a rapid decrease of mitochondrial transmembrane potential. Furthermore, we showed that xanthohumol up-regulates the glycolytic capacity in cells, and thus compensates cellular ATP generation. Dissection of the multiple steps of aerobic respiration by extracellular flux assays revealed that xanthohumol specifically inhibits the activity of mitochondrial complex I, but had little effect on that of complex II, III and IV. Inhibition of complex I by xanthohumol caused the overproduction of reactive oxygen species, which are responsible for the induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. We also found that isoxanthohumol, the structural isomer of xanthohumol, is inactive to cells, suggesting that the reactive 2-hydroxyl group of xanthohumol is crucial for its targeting to the mitochondrial complex I. Together, the remodeling of cell metabolism revealed here has therapeutic potential for the use of xanthohumol.

  1. Reactive Oxygen-Doped 3D Interdigital Carbonaceous Materials for Li and Na Ion Batteries.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ling; Lu, Bingan

    2016-05-01

    Carbonaceous materials as anodes usually exhibit low capacity for lithium ion batteries (LIBs) and sodium ion batteries (SIBs). Oxygen-doped carbonaceous materials have the potential of high capacity and super rate performance. However, up to now, the reported oxygen-doped carbonaceous materials usually exhibit inferior electrochemical performance. To overcome this problem, a high reactive oxygen-doped 3D interdigital porous carbonaceous material is designed and synthesized through epitaxial growth method and used as anodes for LIBs and SIBs. It delivers high reversible capacity, super rate performance, and long cycling stability (473 mA h g(-1) after 500 cycles for LIBs and 223 mA h g(-1) after 1200 cycles for SIBs, respectively, at the current density of 1000 mA g(-1) ), with a capacity decay of 0.0214% per cycle for LIBs and 0.0155% per cycle for SIBs. The results demonstrate that constructing 3D interdigital porous structure with reactive oxygen functional groups can significantly enhance the electrochemical performance of oxygen-doped carbonaceous material.

  2. Mutagenicity of arsenic in mammalian cells: role of reactive oxygen species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hei, T. K.; Liu, S. X.; Waldren, C.

    1998-01-01

    Arsenite, the trivalent form of arsenic present in the environment, is a known human carcinogen that lacked mutagenic activity in bacterial and standard mammalian cell mutation assays. We show herein that when evaluated in an assay (AL cell assay), in which both intragenic and multilocus mutations are detectable, that arsenite is in fact a strong dose-dependent mutagen and that it induces mostly large deletion mutations. Cotreatment of cells with the oxygen radical scavenger dimethyl sulfoxide significantly reduces the mutagenicity of arsenite. Thus, the carcinogenicity of arsenite can be explained at least in part by it being a mutagen that depends on reactive oxygen species for its activity.

  3. Plasma reactivity in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering through oxygen kinetics

    SciTech Connect

    Vitelaru, Catalin; Lundin, Daniel; Brenning, Nils; Minea, Tiberiu

    2013-09-02

    The atomic oxygen metastable dynamics in a Reactive High-Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (R-HiPIMS) discharge has been characterized using time-resolved diode laser absorption in an Ar/O{sub 2} gas mixture with a Ti target. Two plasma regions are identified: the ionization region (IR) close to the target and further out the diffusion region (DR), separated by a transition region. The μs temporal resolution allows identifying the main atomic oxygen production and destruction routes, which are found to be very different during the pulse as compared to the afterglow as deduced from their evolution in space and time.

  4. Lung cell hypoxia: role of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species signaling in triggering responses.

    PubMed

    Schumacker, Paul T

    2011-11-01

    Lung cells experience hypoxia during development, during travel to high altitude, and in acute and chronic lung diseases. The functional responses evoked by hypoxia are diverse and generally act to protect the cells from hypoxic injury, although some lung cell responses are counterproductive because they degrade normal function of the organ. The cellular O(2) sensor responsible for many of these responses involves the mitochondrial electron transport chain. Under hypoxic conditions, increased release of reactive oxygen species from the inner mitochondrial membrane to the intermembrane space leads to the activation of transcription factors, including hypoxia-inducible factor, activation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, activation of AMP-dependent protein kinase, and internalization of the membrane Na,K-ATPase from the basolateral membrane of alveolar epithelial cells. Although the specific targets of reactive oxygen species signals are not fully understood, this signaling pathway is critical for development and for normal lung responses in the newborn and the mature lung.

  5. Reactive oxygen species mediate pollen tube rupture to release sperm for fertilization in Arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Qiaohong; Kita, Daniel; Johnson, Eric A.; Aggarwal, Mini; Gates, Laura; Wu, Hen-Ming; Cheung, Alice Y.

    2014-01-01

    In flowering plants, sperm are transported inside pollen tubes to the female gametophyte for fertilization. The female gametophyte induces rupture of the penetrating pollen tube, resulting in sperm release and rendering them available for fertilization. Here we utilize the Arabidopsis FERONIA (FER) receptor kinase mutants, whose female gametophytes fail to induce pollen tube rupture, to decipher the molecular mechanism of this critical male-female interactive step. We show that FER controls the production of high levels of reactive oxygen species at the entrance to the female gametophyte to induce pollen tube rupture and sperm release. Pollen tube growth assays in vitro and in the pistil demonstrate that hydroxyl free radicals are likely the most reactive oxygen molecules, and they induce pollen tube rupture in a Ca2+-dependent process involving Ca2+ channel activation. Our results provide evidence for a RHO GTPase-based signalling mechanism to mediate sperm release for fertilization in plants.

  6. Selection of functional human sperm with higher DNA integrity and fewer reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Waseem; Velasco, Vanessa; Kingsley, James L.; Shoukat, Muhammad S.; Shafiee, Hadi; Anchan, Raymond M.; Mutter, George L.; Tüzel, Erkan; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Fertilization and reproduction are central to the survival and propagation of a species. Couples who cannot reproduce naturally have to undergo in vitro clinical procedures. An integral part of these clinical procedures includes isolation of healthy sperm from raw semen. Existing sperm sorting methods are not efficient and isolate sperm having high DNA fragmentation and reactive oxygen species, and suffer from multiple manual steps and variations between embryologists. Inspired by in vivo natural sperm sorting mechanisms where vaginal mucus becomes less viscous to form microchannels to guide sperm towards egg, we present a chip that efficiently sorts healthy, motile and morphologically normal sperm without centrifugation. Higher percentage of sorted sperm show significantly lesser reactive oxygen species and DNA fragmentation than the conventional swim-up method. The presented chip is an easy-to-use high throughput sperm sorter that provides standardized sperm sorting assay with less reliance on embryologist’s skills, facilitating reliable operational steps. PMID:24753434

  7. Regulation of signal transduction by reactive oxygen species in the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David I.; Griendling, Kathy K.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress has long been implicated in cardiovascular disease, but more recently, the role of reactive oxygen species in normal physiological signaling has been elucidated. Signaling pathways modulated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) are complex and compartmentalized, and we are only beginning to identify the molecular modifications of specific targets. Here we review the current literature regarding ROS signaling in the cardiovascular system, focusing on the role of ROS in normal physiology and how dysregulation of signaling circuits contributes to cardiovascular diseases including atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, we consider how ROS modulate signaling pathways related to phenotypic modulation, migration and adhesion, contractility, proliferation and hypertrophy, angiogenesis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis and senescence. Understanding the specific targets of ROS may guide the development of the next generation of ROS-modifying therapies to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with oxidative stress. PMID:25634975

  8. Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species at the Heart of the Matter: New Therapeutic Approaches for Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kornfeld, Opher S.; Hwang, Sunhee; Disatnik, Marie-Hélène; Chen, Che-Hong; Qvit, Nir; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in a variety of age-related diseases including multiple cardiovascular disorders. However, translation of ROS scavengers (anti-oxidants) into the clinic has not been successful. These anti-oxidants grossly reduce total levels of cellular ROS including ROS that participate in physiological signaling. In this review, we challenge the traditional anti-oxidant therapeutic approach that targets ROS directly with novel approaches that improve mitochondrial functions to more effectively treat cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25999419

  9. Biocompatible reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive nanoparticles as superior drug delivery vehicles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dinglin; Wei, Yanling; Chen, Kai; Zhang, Xiangjun; Xu, Xiaoqiu; Shi, Qing; Han, Songling; Chen, Xin; Gong, Hao; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianxiang

    2015-01-01

    A novel reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive nanoplatform can be successfully manufactured from a ROS-triggerable β-cyclodextrin material. Extensive in vitro and in vivo studies validate that this nanoscaled system may serve as a new drug delivery vehicle with well-defined ROS-sensitivity and superior biocompatibility. This nanocarrier can be used for ROS-triggered transport of diverse therapeutics and imaging agents.

  10. Bacteriochlorin Dyads as Solvent Polarity Dependent Near-Infrared Fluorophores and Reactive Oxygen Species Photosensitizers.

    PubMed

    Esemoto, Nopondo N; Yu, Zhanqian; Wiratan, Linda; Satraitis, Andrius; Ptaszek, Marcin

    2016-09-16

    Symmetrical, near-infrared absorbing bacteriochlorin dyads exhibit gradual reduction of their fluorescence (intensity and lifetime) and reactive oxygen species photosensitization efficiency (ROS) with increasing solvent dielectric constant ε. For the directly linked dyad, significant reduction is observed even in solvents of moderate ε, while for the dyad containing a 1,4-phenylene linker, reduction is more parallel to an increase in solvent ε. Bacteriochlorin dyads are promising candidates for development of environmentally responsive fluorophores and ROS sensitizers. PMID:27603934

  11. Reactive oxygen species-responsive protein modification and its intracellular delivery for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ming; Sun, Shuo; Neufeld, Caleb I; Perez-Ramirez, Bernardo; Xu, Qiaobing

    2014-12-01

    Herein we report a convenient chemical approach to reversibly modulate protein (RNase A) function and develop a protein that is responsive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) for targeted cancer therapy. The conjugation of RNase A with 4-nitrophenyl 4-(4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaborolan-2-yl) benzyl carbonate (NBC) blocks protein lysine and temporarily deactivates the protein. However, the treatment of RNase A-NBC with hydrogen peroxide (one major intracellular ROS) efficiently cleaves the NBC conjugation and restores the RNase A activity. Thus, RNase A-NBC can be reactivated inside tumor cells by high levels of intracellular ROS, thereby restoring the cytotoxicity of RNase A for cancer therapy. Due to higher ROS levels inside tumor cells compared to healthy cells, and the resulting different levels of RNase A-NBC reactivation, RNase A-NBC shows a significant specific cytotoxicity against tumor cells.

  12. Evidence for photochemical production of reactive oxygen species in desert soils.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Christos D; Sun, Henry J; McKay, Christopher P; Grintzalis, Konstantinos; Papapostolou, Ioannis; Zisimopoulos, Dimitrios; Panagiotidis, Konstantinos; Zhang, Gaosen; Koutsopoulou, Eleni; Christidis, George E; Margiolaki, Irene

    2015-05-11

    The combination of intense solar radiation and soil desiccation creates a short circuit in the biogeochemical carbon cycle, where soils release significant amounts of CO2 and reactive nitrogen oxides by abiotic oxidation. Here we show that desert soils accumulate metal superoxides and peroxides at higher levels than non-desert soils. We also show the photogeneration of equimolar superoxide and hydroxyl radical in desiccated and aqueous soils, respectively, by a photo-induced electron transfer mechanism supported by their mineralogical composition. Reactivity of desert soils is further supported by the generation of hydroxyl radical via aqueous extracts in the dark. Our findings extend to desert soils the photogeneration of reactive oxygen species by certain mineral oxides and also explain previous studies on desert soil organic oxidant chemistry and microbiology. Similar processes driven by ultraviolet radiation may be operating in the surface soils on Mars.

  13. In vitro scavenging capacity of annatto seed extracts against reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Chisté, Renan Campos; Mercadante, Adriana Zerlotti; Gomes, Ana; Fernandes, Eduarda; Lima, José Luís Fontes da Costa; Bragagnolo, Neura

    2011-07-15

    Bixa orellana L. (annatto), from Bixaceae family, is a native plant of tropical America, which accumulates several carotenoids (including bixin and norbixin), terpenoids, tocotrienols and flavonoids with potential antioxidant activity. In the present study, the in vitro scavenging capacity of annatto seed extracts against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) was evaluated and compared to the bixin standard. Annatto extracts were obtained using solvents with different polarities and their phenolic compounds and bixin levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detector. All annatto extracts were able to scavenge all the reactive species tested at the low μg/mL range, with the exception of superoxide radical. The ethanol:ethyl acetate and ethyl acetate extracts of annatto seeds, which presented the highest levels of hypolaetin and bixin, respectively, were the extracts with the highest antioxidant capacity, although bixin standard presented the lowest IC(50) values. PMID:23140681

  14. Evidence for photochemical production of reactive oxygen species in desert soils.

    PubMed

    Georgiou, Christos D; Sun, Henry J; McKay, Christopher P; Grintzalis, Konstantinos; Papapostolou, Ioannis; Zisimopoulos, Dimitrios; Panagiotidis, Konstantinos; Zhang, Gaosen; Koutsopoulou, Eleni; Christidis, George E; Margiolaki, Irene

    2015-01-01

    The combination of intense solar radiation and soil desiccation creates a short circuit in the biogeochemical carbon cycle, where soils release significant amounts of CO2 and reactive nitrogen oxides by abiotic oxidation. Here we show that desert soils accumulate metal superoxides and peroxides at higher levels than non-desert soils. We also show the photogeneration of equimolar superoxide and hydroxyl radical in desiccated and aqueous soils, respectively, by a photo-induced electron transfer mechanism supported by their mineralogical composition. Reactivity of desert soils is further supported by the generation of hydroxyl radical via aqueous extracts in the dark. Our findings extend to desert soils the photogeneration of reactive oxygen species by certain mineral oxides and also explain previous studies on desert soil organic oxidant chemistry and microbiology. Similar processes driven by ultraviolet radiation may be operating in the surface soils on Mars. PMID:25960012

  15. [Effects of allelochemical dibutyl phthalate on Gymnodinium breve reactive oxygen species].

    PubMed

    Bie, Cong-Cong; Li, Feng-Min; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Zhen-Yu

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of inhibitory action of dibutyl phthalate (DBP) on red tide algae Gymnodinium breve. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, contents of *OH and H2O2, and O2*(-) production rate were investigated, and also for the effects of electron transfer inhibitors on the ROS induction of DBP. The results showed that DBP triggered the synthesis of reactive oxygen species ROS, and with the increase of concentration of DBP, *OH and H2O2 contents in cells accumulated, as for the 3 mg x L(-1) DBP treated algae cultures, OH showed a peak of 33 U x mL(-1) at 48 h, which was about 2. 4 times higher than that in the controlled, and H2O2 contents was about 250 nmol x (10(7) cells)(-1) at 72 h, which was about 5 times higher and also was the highest during the whole culture. Rotenone (an inhibitor of complex I in the mitochondria electron transport chain) decreased the DBP induced ROS production, and dicumarol (an inhibitor of the redox enzyme system in the plasma membrane) stimulated the DBP induced ROS production. Taken all together, the results demonstrated DBP induced over production of reactive oxygen species in G. breve, which is the main inhibitory mechanism, and mitochondria and plasma membrane seem to be the main target site of DBP. These conclusions were of scientific meaning on uncovering the inhibitory mechanism of allelochemical on algae.

  16. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates non-freezing cold injury of rat sciatic nerve

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Zhiwei; Tong, Xiaoyan; Jia, Hongjuan

    2015-01-01

    Non-freezing cold injury is an injury characterized by neuropathy, developing when patients expose to cold environments. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been shown as a contributing factor for the non-freezing cold nerve injury. However, the detailed connections between non-freezing cold nerve injury and ROS have not been described. In order to investigate the relationship between non-freezing cold nerve injury and reactive oxygen species, we study the effects of two cooling methods-the continuous cooling and the intermittent cooling with warming intervals-on rat sciatic nerves. Specifically, we assess the morphological changes and ROS production of the sciatic nerves underwent different cooling treatments. Our data shows both types of cooling methods cause nerve injury and ROS production. However, despite of identical cooling degree and duration, the sciatic nerves processed by intermittent cooling with warming intervals present more ROS production, severer reperfusion injury and pathological destructions than the sciatic nerves processed by continuous cooling. This result indicates reactive oxygen species, as a product of reperfusion, facilitates non-freezing cold nerve injury. PMID:26629065

  17. Antimicrobial strategies centered around reactive oxygen species - bactericidal antibiotics, photodynamic therapy and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Vatansever, Fatma; de Melo, Wanessa C.M.A.; Avci, Pinar; Vecchio, Daniela; Sadasivam, Magesh; Gupta, Asheesh; Chandran, Rakkiyappan; Karimi, Mahdi; Parizotto, Nivaldo A; Yin, Rui; Tegos, George P; Hamblin, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can attack a diverse range of targets to exert antimicrobial activity, which accounts for their versatility in mediating host defense against a broad range of pathogens. Most ROS are formed by the partial reduction of molecular oxygen. Four major ROS are recognized comprising: superoxide (O2•−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), hydroxyl radical (•OH), and singlet oxygen (1O2), but they display very different kinetics and levels of activity. The effects of O2•− and H2O2 are less acute than those of •OH and 1O2, since the former are much less reactive and can be detoxified by endogenous antioxidants (both enzymatic and non-enzymatic) that are induced by oxidative stress. In contrast, no enzyme can detoxify •OH or 1O2, making them extremely toxic and acutely lethal. The present review will highlight the various methods of ROS formation and their mechanism of action. Antioxidant defenses against ROS in microbial cells and the use of ROS by antimicrobial host defense systems are covered. Antimicrobial approaches primarily utilizing ROS comprise both bactericidal antibiotics, and non-pharmacological methods such as photodynamic therapy, titanium dioxide photocatalysis, cold plasma and medicinal honey. A brief final section covers, reactive nitrogen species, and related therapeutics, such as acidified nitrite and nitric oxide releasing nanoparticles. PMID:23802986

  18. Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays, were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.

  19. Pathophysiological and pharmacological implications of mitochondria-targeted reactive oxygen species generation in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Jou, Mei-Jie

    2008-01-01

    Astrocytes, in addition to passively supporting neurons, have recently been shown to be actively involved in synaptic transmission and neurovascular coupling in the central nervous system (CNS). This review summarizes briefly our previous observations using fluorescent probes coupled with laser scanning digital imaging microscopy to visualize spatio-temporal alteration of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS) generation in intact astrocytes. mROS formation is enhanced by exogenous oxidants exposure, Ca2+ stress and endogenous pathological defect of mitochondrial respiratory complexes. In addition, mROS formation can be specifically stimulated by visible light or visible laser irradiation and can be augmented further by photodynamic coupling with photosensitizers, particularly with mitochondria-targeted photosensitizers. "Severe" oxidative insult often results in massive and homogeneous augmentation of mROS formation which causes cessation of mitochondrial movement, pathological fission and irreversible swelling of mitochondria and eventually apoptosis or necrosis of cells. Mitochondria-targeted antioxidants and protectors such as MitoQ, melatonin and nanoparticle C(60) effectively prevent "severe" mROS generation. Intriguingly, "minor" oxidative insults enhance heterogeneity of mROS and mitochondrial dynamics. "Minor" mROS formation-induced fission and fusion of mitochondria relocates mitochondrial network to form a mitochondria free gap, i.e., "firewall", which may play a crucial role in mROS-mediated protective "preconditioning" by preventing propagation of mROS during oxidative insults. These mROS-targeted strategies for either enhancement or prevention of mitochondrial oxidative stress in astrocytes may provide new insights for future development of therapeutic interventions in the treatment of cancer such as astrocytomas and gliomas and astrocyte-associated neurodegeneration, mitochondrial diseases and aging. PMID:18692534

  20. Photochemical transformation of carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes: role of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiaolei; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Li, Qilin

    2013-12-17

    The study investigated the photochemical transformation of carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs), an important environmental process affecting their physicochemical characteristics and hence fate and transport. UVA irradiation removed carboxyl groups from COOH-MWCNT surface while creating other oxygen-containing functional groups with an overall decrease in total surface oxygen content. This was attributed to reactions with photogenerated reactive oxygen species (ROS). COOH-MWCNTs generated singlet oxygen ((1)O2) and hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) under UVA light, which exhibited different reactivity toward the COOH-MWCNT surface. Inhibition experiments that isolate the effects of (•)OH and (1)O2 as well as experiments using externally generated (•)OH and (1)O2 separately revealed that (•)OH played an important role in the photochemical transformation of COOH-MWCNTs under UVA irradiation. The Raman spectroscopy and surface functional group analysis results suggested that (•)OH initially reacted with the surface carboxylated carbonaceous fragments, resulting in their degradation or exfoliation. Further reaction between (•)OH and the graphitic sidewall led to formation of defects including functional groups and vacancies. These reactions reduced the surface potential and colloidal stability of COOH-MWCNTs, and are expected to reduce their mobility in aquatic systems. PMID:24255932

  1. Comparison of sensitizers by detecting reactive oxygen species after photodynamic reaction in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kolarova, H; Bajgar, R; Tomankova, K; Nevrelova, P; Mosinger, J

    2007-10-01

    The production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has a crucial effect on the result of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Because of this fact, we examined the ROS formation by means of three porphyrin sensitizers (TPPS(4), ZnTPPS(4) and PdTPPS(4)) and compared their effectivity for induction of cell death in the G361 (human melanoma) cell line. The porphyrins used are very efficient water-soluble aromatic dyes with a potential application in photomedicine and have a high tendency to accumulate in the membranes of intracellular organelles such as lysosomes and mitochondria. Interaction between the triplet excited state of the sensitizer and molecular oxygen leads to the production singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species to induce cell death. Production of ROS was investigated by molecular probe CM-H(2)DCFDA. Our results demonstrated that ZnTPPS(4) induces the highest ROS production in the cell line compared to TPPS(4) and PdTPPS(4) at concentrations of 1, 10, and 100 microM and light dose of 1 J cm(-2). We also observed a consequence between ROS production and cell survival. In conclusion, these results demonstrate that photodynamic effect depends on sensitizer type, its concentration and light dose.

  2. Binding of oxygen on vacuum fractured pyrite surfaces: Reactivity of iron and sulfur surface sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlich, A. G.; Nesbitt, H. W.; Bancroft, G. M.; Szargan, R.

    2013-05-01

    Synchrotron radiation excited photoelectron spectroscopy (SXPS) has been used to study the interaction of oxygen with vacuum fractured pyrite surfaces. Especially valence band spectra obtained with 30 eV photon energy were analyzed to provide a mechanism of the incipient steps of pyrite oxidation. These spectra are far more sensitive to the oxidation than sulfur or iron core level spectra. It is shown that oxygen is adsorbed on Fe(II) surface sites restoring the octahedral coordination of the Fe(II) sites. This process leads to the removal of two surface states in the valence band which are located at the low and high binding energy sides of the outer valence band, respectively. The existence of these surface states which have been proposed by calculations is experimentally proven. Furthermore, it is shown, that the sulfur sites are more reactive than expected. Sulfite like species are already formed after the lowest oxygen exposure of 10 L. This oxidation occurs at sulfur sites neighboring the Fe(II) surface sites. Oxidation of the S2 - surface sites which were considered as the most reactive species in former studies is second. No iron(III) oxides are formed during oxygen exposure, supporting the assumption that water plays an important role in the oxidation mechanism of pyrite surfaces.

  3. Identification of Surface Reactivity Descriptor for Transition Metal Oxides in Oxygen Evolution Reaction.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hua Bing; Fang, Liwen; Chen, Jiazang; Yang, Hong Bin; Gao, Jiajian; Miao, Jianwei; Chen, Shengli; Liu, Bin

    2016-08-10

    A number of important reactions such as the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are catalyzed by transition metal oxides (TMOs), the surface reactivity of which is rather elusive. Therefore, rationally tailoring adsorption energy of intermediates on TMOs to achieve desirable catalytic performance still remains a great challenge. Here we show the identification of a general and tunable surface structure, coordinatively unsaturated metal cation (MCUS), as a good surface reactivity descriptor for TMOs in OER. Surface reactivity of a given TMO increases monotonically with the density of MCUS, and thus the increase in MCUS improves the catalytic activity for weak-binding TMOs but impairs that for strong-binding ones. The electronic origin of the surface reactivity can be well explained by a new model proposed in this work, wherein the energy of the highest-occupied d-states relative to the Fermi level determines the intermediates' bonding strength by affecting the filling of the antibonding states. Our model for the first time well describes the reactivity trends among TMOs, and would initiate viable design principles for, but not limited to, OER catalysts. PMID:27441842

  4. Mechanistic and kinetic study on the reactions of coumaric acids with reactive oxygen species: a DFT approach.

    PubMed

    Garzón, Andrés; Bravo, Iván; Barbero, Antonio J; Albaladejo, José

    2014-10-01

    The mechanism and kinetics of reactions between coumaric acids and a series of reactive oxygen species ((•)OX) was studied through the density functional theory (DFT). H atom abstraction from -OH and -COOH groups and addition to the nonaromatic double bond were the most representative reaction pathways chosen for which free energy barriers and rate constants were calculated within the transition state theory (TST) framework. From these calculations, it was estimated that (•)OH > (•)OCH3 > (•)OOH > (•)OOCH3 is the order of reactivity of (•)OX with any coumaric acid. The highest rate constant was estimated for p-coumaric acid + (•)OH reaction, whereas the rest of the (•)OX species are more reactive with o-coumaric acid. On the basis of the calculated rate constants, H abstraction from a -OH group should be the main mechanism for the reactions involving (•)OCH3, (•)OOH, and (•)OOCH3 radicals. Nevertheless, the addition mechanism, which sometimes is not considered in theoretical studies on reactions of phenolic compounds with electrophilic species, could play a relevant role in the global mechanism of coumaric acid + (•)OH reactions.

  5. Role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the vascular responses to inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kvietys, Peter R.; Granger, D. Neil

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex and potentially life-threatening condition that involves the participation of a variety of chemical mediators, signaling pathways, and cell types. The microcirculation, which is critical for the initiation and perpetuation of an inflammatory response, exhibits several characteristic functional and structural changes in response to inflammation. These include vasomotor dysfunction (impaired vessel dilation and constriction), the adhesion and transendothelial migration of leukocytes, endothelial barrier dysfunction (increased vascular permeability), blood vessel proliferation (angiogenesis), and enhanced thrombus formation. These diverse responses of the microvasculature largely reflect the endothelial cell dysfunction that accompanies inflammation and the central role of these cells in modulating processes as varied as blood flow regulation, angiogenesis, and thrombogenesis. The importance of endothelial cells in inflammation-induced vascular dysfunction is also predicated on the ability of these cells to produce and respond to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. Inflammation seems to upset the balance between nitric oxide and superoxide within (and surrounding) endothelial cells, which is necessary for normal vessel function. This review is focused on defining the molecular targets in the vessel wall that interact with reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide to produce the characteristic functional and structural changes that occur in response to inflammation. This analysis of the literature is consistent with the view that reactive oxygen and nitrogen species contribute significantly to the diverse vascular responses in inflammation and supports efforts that are directed at targeting these highly reactive species to maintain normal vascular health in pathological conditions that are associated with acute or chronic inflammation. PMID:22154653

  6. MINIMAL ROLE FOR REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN DICHLOROACETIC ACID-INDUCED DYSMORPHOLOGY IN MOUSE WHOLE EMBRYO CULTURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Administration of dichloroacetate (DCA) to pregnant rats produces craniofacial, heart and other defects in their offspring. Exposure of zebrafish to DCA induces malformations and increases superoxide and nitric oxide production suggesting that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are as...

  7. AMPK is involved in mediation of erythropoietin influence on metabolic activity and reactive oxygen species production in white adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li; Di, Lijun; Noguchi, Constance Tom

    2014-09-01

    Erythropoietin, discovered for its indispensable role during erythropoiesis, has been used in therapy for selected red blood cell disorders in erythropoietin-deficient patients. The biological activities of erythropoietin have been found in animal models to extend to non-erythroid tissues due to the expression of erythropoietin receptor. We previously demonstrated that erythropoietin promotes metabolic activity and white adipocytes browning to increase mitochondrial function and energy expenditure via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and Sirtuin1. Here we report that AMP-activated protein kinase was activated by erythropoietin possibly via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase in adipocytes as well as in white adipose tissue from diet induced obese mice. Erythropoietin increased cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide via increased AMP-activated protein kinase activity, possibly leading to Sirtuin1 activation. AMP-activated protein kinase knock down reduced erythropoietin mediated increase in cellular oxidative function including the increased oxygen consumption rate, fatty acid utilization and induction of key metabolic genes. Under hypoxia, adipocytes were found to generate more reactive oxygen species, and erythropoietin reduced the reactive oxygen species and increased antioxidant gene expression, suggesting that erythropoietin may provide protection from oxidative stress in adipocytes. Erythropoietin also reversed increased nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide by hypoxia via increased AMP-activated protein kinase. Additionally, AMP-activated protein kinase is found to be involved in erythropoietin stimulated increase in oxygen consumption rate, fatty acid oxidation and mitochondrial gene expression. AMP-activated protein kinase knock down impaired erythropoietin stimulated increases in antioxidant gene expression. Collectively, our findings identify the AMP-activated protein kinase involvement in erythropoietin signaling in

  8. Lactacystin requires reactive oxygen species and Bax redistribution to induce mitochondria-mediated cell death

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Alvarez, Sergio; Solesio, Maria E; Manzanares, Jorge; Jordán, Joaquín; Galindo, María F

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: The proteasome inhibitor model of Parkinson's disease (PD) appears to reproduce many of the important behavioural, imaging, pathological and biochemical features of the human disease. However, the mechanisms involved in the lactacystin-induced, mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway remain poorly defined. Experimental approach: We have used lactacystin as a specific inhibitor of the 20S proteasome in the dopaminergic neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y. We over-expressed a green fluorescent protein (GFP)–Bax fusion protein in these cells to study localization of Bax. Free radical scavengers were used to assess the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these pathways. Key results: Lactacystin triggered a concentration-dependent increase in cell death mediated by the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, and induced a change in mitochondrial membrane permeability accompanied by cytochrome c release. The participation of Bax protein was more critical than the formation of the permeability transition pore in mitochondria. GFP–Bax over-expression demonstrated Bax redistribution from the cytosol to mitochondria after the addition of lactacystin. ROS, but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, participated in lactacystin-induced mitochondrial Bax translocation. Lactacystin disrupted the intracellular redox state by increasing ROS production and depleting endogenous antioxidant systems such as glutathione (GSH). Pharmacological depletion of GSH, using l-buthionine sulphoxide, potentiated lactacystin-induced cell death. Lactacystin sensitized neuroblastoma cells to oxidative damage, induced by subtoxic concentrations of 6-hydroxydopamine. Conclusions and implications: The lactacystin-induced, mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic pathway involved interactions between ROS, GSH and Bax. Lactacystin could constitute a potential factor in the development of sporadic PD. PMID:19785649

  9. A High Precision Method for Quantitative Measurements of Reactive Oxygen Species in Frozen Biopsies

    PubMed Central

    Lindgren, Mikael; Gustafsson, Håkan

    2014-01-01

    Objective An electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique using the spin probe cyclic hydroxylamine 1-hydroxy-3-methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethylpyrrolidine (CMH) was introduced as a versatile method for high precision quantification of reactive oxygen species, including the superoxide radical in frozen biological samples such as cell suspensions, blood or biopsies. Materials and Methods Loss of measurement precision and accuracy due to variations in sample size and shape were minimized by assembling the sample in a well-defined volume. Measurement was carried out at low temperature (150 K) using a nitrogen flow Dewar. The signal intensity was measured from the EPR 1st derivative amplitude, and related to a sample, 3-carboxy-proxyl (CP•) with known spin concentration. Results The absolute spin concentration could be quantified with a precision and accuracy better than ±10 µM (k = 1). The spin concentration of samples stored at −80°C could be reproduced after 6 months of storage well within the same error estimate. Conclusion The absolute spin concentration in wet biological samples such as biopsies, water solutions and cell cultures could be quantified with higher precision and accuracy than normally achievable using common techniques such as flat cells, tissue cells and various capillary tubes. In addition; biological samples could be collected and stored for future incubation with spin probe, and also further stored up to at least six months before EPR analysis, without loss of signal intensity. This opens for the possibility to store and transport incubated biological samples with known accuracy of the spin concentration over time. PMID:24603936

  10. Antioxidant Enzymes Regulate Reactive Oxygen Species during Pod Elongation in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Nan; Lin, Zhifang; Guan, Lanlan; Gaughan, Gerald; Lin, Guizhu

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has focused on the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell wall loosening and cell extension in plant vegetative growth, but few studies have investigated ROS functions specifically in plant reproductive organs. In this study, ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were assessed in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis pods at five developmental stages. In juvenile pods, the high levels of O2.− and.OH indicates that they had functions in cell wall loosening and cell elongation. In later developmental stages, high levels of.OH were also related to increases in cell wall thickness in lignified tissues. Throughout pod development, most of the O2.− was detected on plasma membranes of parenchyma cells and outer epidermis cells of the mesocarp, while most of the H2O2 was detected on plasma membranes of most cells throughout the mesocarp. This suggests that these sites are presumably the locations of ROS generation. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) apparently contributed to ROS accumulation in pod wall tissues. Furthermore, specifically SOD and POD were found to be associated with pod growth through the regulation of ROS generation and transformation. Throughout pod development, O2.− decreases were associated with increased SOD activity, while changes in H2O2 accumulation were associated with changes in CAT and POD activities. Additionally, high POD activity may contribute to the generation of.OH in the early development of pods. It is concluded that the ROS are produced in different sites of plasma membranes with the regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and that substantial ROS generation and accumulation are evident in cell elongation and cell wall loosening in pod wall cells. PMID:24503564

  11. Scoparone attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclastic differentiation through controlling reactive oxygen species production and scavenging

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Jang, Hae-Dong

    2015-02-15

    Scoparone, one of the bioactive components of Artemisia capillaris Thunb, has various biological properties including immunosuppressive, hepatoprotective, anti-allergic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant effects. This study aims at evaluating the anti-osteoporotic effect of scoparone and its underlying mechanism in vitro. Scoparone demonstrated potent cellular antioxidant capacity. It was also found that scoparone inhibited the receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL)-induced osteoclast differentiation and suppressed cathepsin K and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) expression via c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/p38-mediated c-Fos–nuclear factor of activated T cells, cytoplasmic 1 (NFATc1) signaling pathway. During osteoclast differentiation, the production of general reactive oxygen species (ROS) and superoxide anions was dose-dependently attenuated by scoparone. In addition, scoparone diminished NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) oxidase 1 (Nox1) expression and activation via the tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6)–cSrc–phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3k) signaling pathway and prevented the disruption of mitochondrial electron transport chain system. Furthermore, scoparone augmented the expression of superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and catalase (CAT). The overall results indicate that the inhibitory effect of scoparone on RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation is attributed to the suppressive effect on ROS and superoxide anion production by inhibiting Nox1 expression and activation and protecting the mitochondrial electron transport chain system and the scavenging effect of ROS resulting from elevated SOD1 and CAT expression. - Highlights: • Scoparone dose-dependently inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. • Scoparone diminished general ROS and superoxide anions in a dose-dependent manner. • Scoparone inhibited Nox1 expression and

  12. Norepinephrine Reduces Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and DNA Damage in Ovarian Surface Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pooja R; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Theruvathu, Jacob; Mitra, Sankar A; Boldogh, Istvan; Sowers, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the role of norepinephrine (NE) on DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in ovarian surface epithelial cells. Method Non-tumorigenic, immortalized ovarian surface epithelial cells were treated with NE, bleomycin, and bleomycin followed by NE. The comet assay was performed on each treatment group to determine the amount of single and double-strand breaks induced by treatments. ROS levels for each treatment group were measured using the H2DCF-DA fluorescence assay. Finally, RNA transcripts were measured for each treatment group with regards to the expression of DNA repair and oxidative stress genes. Results The mean tail moment of untreated cells was significantly greater than that of cells treated with NE (p=0.02). The mean tail moment of cells treated with bleomycin was significantly greater than that of cells treated with bleomycin followed by NE (p<0.01). Treatment with NE resulted in significantly less ROS generation than in untreated cells (p<0.01). NE treatment after hydrogen peroxide treatment resulted in a noticeable decrease in ROS generation. Genes associated with oxidative stress were upregulated in cells treated with bleomycin, however this upregulation was blunted when bleomycin-treated cells were treated subsequently with NE. Conclusion NE is associated with decreased DNA damage and ROS production in ovarian surface epithelial cells. This effect is protective in the presence of the oxidative-damaging agent bleomycin. These results suggest an additional physiologic role for the stress hormone NE, in protecting ovarian surface epithelial cells from oxidative stress. PMID:26167254

  13. Reactive oxygen species are involved in regulation of pollen wall cytomechanics.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, A V; Matveyeva, N P; Yermakov, I P

    2014-01-01

    Production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in somatic plant cells is developmentally regulated and plays an important role in the modification of cell wall mechanical properties. Here we show that H2O2 and the hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) can regulate germination of tobacco pollen by modifying the mechanical properties of the pollen intine (inner layer of the pollen wall). Pollen germination was affected by addition of exogenous H2O2, (•)OH, and by antioxidants scavenging endogenous ROS: superoxide dismutase, superoxide dismutase/catalase mimic Mn-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)21H, 23H-porphin, or a spin-trap α-(4-pyridyl-1-oxide)-N-tert-butylnitrone, which eliminates (•)OH. The inhibiting concentrations of exogenous H2O2 and (•)OH did not decrease pollen viability, but influenced the mechanical properties of the wall. The latter were estimated by studying the resistance of pollen to hypo-osmotic shock. (•)OH caused excess loosening of the intine all over the surface of the pollen grain, disrupting polar growth induction. In contrast, H2O2, as well as partial removal of endogenous (•)OH, over-tightened the wall, impeding pollen tube emergence. Feruloyl esterase (FAE) was used as a tool to examine whether H2O2-inducible inter-polymer cross-linking is involved in the intine tightening. FAE treatment caused loosening of the intine and stimulated pollen germination and pollen tube growth, revealing ferulate cross-links in the intine. Taken together, the data suggest that pollen intine properties can be regulated differentially by ROS. (•)OH is involved in local loosening of the intine in the germination pore region, while H2O2 is necessary for intine strengthening in the rest of the wall through oxidative coupling of feruloyl polysaccharides.

  14. Trypanosoma cruzi Needs a Signal Provided by Reactive Oxygen Species to Infect Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Goes, Grazielle R.; Rocha, Peter S.; Diniz, Aline R. S.; Aguiar, Pedro H. N.; Machado, Carlos R.; Vieira, Leda Q.

    2016-01-01

    Background During Trypanosoma cruzi infection, macrophages produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in a process called respiratory burst. Several works have aimed to elucidate the role of ROS during T. cruzi infection and the results obtained are sometimes contradictory. T. cruzi has a highly efficiently regulated antioxidant machinery to deal with the oxidative burst, but the parasite macromolecules, particularly DNA, may still suffer oxidative damage. Guanine (G) is the most vulnerable base and its oxidation results in formation of 8-oxoG, a cellular marker of oxidative stress. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the contribution of ROS in T. cruzi survival and infection, we utilized mice deficient in the gp91phox (Phox KO) subunit of NADPH oxidase and parasites that overexpress the enzyme EcMutT (from Escherichia coli) or TcMTH (from T. cruzi), which is responsible for removing 8-oxo-dGTP from the nucleotide pool. The modified parasites presented enhanced replication inside murine inflammatory macrophages from C57BL/6 WT mice when compared with control parasites. Interestingly, when Phox KO macrophages were infected with these parasites, we observed a decreased number of all parasites when compared with macrophages from C57BL/6 WT. Scavengers for ROS also decreased parasite growth in WT macrophages. In addition, treatment of macrophages or parasites with hydrogen peroxide increased parasite replication in Phox KO mice and in vivo. Conclusions Our results indicate a paradoxical role for ROS since modified parasites multiply better inside macrophages, but proliferation is significantly reduced when ROS is removed from the host cell. Our findings suggest that ROS can work like a signaling molecule, contributing to T. cruzi growth inside the cells. PMID:27035573

  15. Antioxidant enzymes regulate reactive oxygen species during pod elongation in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Nan; Lin, Zhifang; Guan, Lanlan; Gaughan, Gerald; Lin, Guizhu

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has focused on the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cell wall loosening and cell extension in plant vegetative growth, but few studies have investigated ROS functions specifically in plant reproductive organs. In this study, ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activities were assessed in Pisum sativum and Brassica chinensis pods at five developmental stages. In juvenile pods, the high levels of O2.- and .OH indicates that they had functions in cell wall loosening and cell elongation. In later developmental stages, high levels of .OH were also related to increases in cell wall thickness in lignified tissues. Throughout pod development, most of the O2.- was detected on plasma membranes of parenchyma cells and outer epidermis cells of the mesocarp, while most of the H2O2 was detected on plasma membranes of most cells throughout the mesocarp. This suggests that these sites are presumably the locations of ROS generation. The antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT) apparently contributed to ROS accumulation in pod wall tissues. Furthermore, specifically SOD and POD were found to be associated with pod growth through the regulation of ROS generation and transformation. Throughout pod development, O2.- decreases were associated with increased SOD activity, while changes in H2O2 accumulation were associated with changes in CAT and POD activities. Additionally, high POD activity may contribute to the generation of(.)OH in the early development of pods. It is concluded that the ROS are produced in different sites of plasma membranes with the regulation of antioxidant enzymes, and that substantial ROS generation and accumulation are evident in cell elongation and cell wall loosening in pod wall cells.

  16. The phytoalexin camalexin mediates cytotoxicity towards aggressive prostate cancer cells via reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Basil A.; Neal, Corey L.; Chetram, Mahandranauth; Vo, BaoHan; Mezencev, Roman; Hinton, Cimona

    2013-01-01

    Camalexin is a phytoalexin that accumulates in various cruciferous plants upon exposure to environmental stress and plant pathogens. Besides moderate antibacterial and antifungal activity, camalexin was reported to also exhibit antiproliferative and cancer chemopreventive effects in breast cancer and leukemia. We studied the cytotoxic effects of camalexin treatment on prostate cancer cell lines and whether this was mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. As models, we utilized LNCaP and its aggressive subline, C4-2, as well as ARCaP cells stably transfected with empty vector (Neo) control or constitutively active Snail cDNA that represents an epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) model and displays increased cell migration and tumorigenicity. We confirmed previous studies showing that C4-2 and ARCaP-Snail cells express more ROS than LNCaP and ARCaP-Neo, respectively. Camalexin increased ROS, decreased cell proliferation, and increased apoptosis more significantly in C4-2 and ARCaP-Snail cells as compared to LNCaP and ARCaP-Neo cells, respectively, while normal prostate epithelial cells (PrEC) were unaffected. Increased caspase-3/7 activity and increased cleaved PARP protein shown by Western blot analysis was suggestive of increased apoptosis. The ROS scavenger N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) antagonized the effects of camalexin, whereas the addition of exogenous hydrogen peroxide potentiated the effects of camalexin, showing that camalexin is mediating its effects through ROS. In conclusion, camalexin is more potent in aggressive prostate cancer cells that express high ROS levels, and this phytoalexin has a strong potential as a novel therapeutic agent for the treatment of especially metastatic prostate cancer. PMID:23179315

  17. Testosterone improves erectile function through inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation in castrated rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Meng, Xianghu; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Tao; Yang, Jun; Niu, Yonghua; Cui, Kai; Wang, Shaogang

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is overwhelmingly important in regulating erectile physiology. However, the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects and mechanisms of testosterone in erectile dysfunction (ED) in castrated rats. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups (control, sham-operated, castration and castration-with-testosterone-replacement). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining. Erectile function was assessed by the recording of intracavernous pressure (ICP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Protein expression levels were examined by western blotting. We found that castration reduced erectile function and that testosterone restored it. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity was decrease in the castrated rats, and testosterone administration attenuated this decrease (each p < 0.05). The testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations were lower in the castrated rats, and testosterone restored these levels (each p < 0.05). Furthermore, the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS) expression levels and phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (p-eNOS, Ser1177)/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) ratio were reduced in the castrated rats compared with the controls (each p < 0.05). In addition, the p40phox and p67phox expression levels were increased in the castrated rats, and testosterone reversed these changes (each p < 0.05). Overall, our results demonstrate that testosterone ameliorates ED after castration by reducing ROS production and increasing the activity of the eNOS/cGMP and COX-2/PTGIS/cAMP signaling pathways. PMID:27168996

  18. Reactive oxygen species are involved in gibberellin/abscisic acid signaling in barley aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Tawaratsumida, Tomoya; Kondo, Koji; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2012-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signal molecules for a variety of processes in plants. However, many questions about the roles of ROS in plants remain to be clarified. Here, we report the role of ROS in gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone cells. The production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a type of ROS, was induced by GA in aleurone cells but suppressed by ABA. Furthermore, exogenous H2O2 appeared to promote the induction of α-amylases by GA. In contrast, antioxidants suppressed the induction of α-amylases. Therefore, H2O2 seems to function in GA and ABA signaling, and in regulation of α-amylase production, in aleurone cells. To identify the target of H2O2 in GA and ABA signaling, we analyzed the interrelationships between H2O2 and DELLA proteins Slender1 (SLN1), GA-regulated Myb transcription factor (GAmyb), and ABA-responsive protein kinase (PKABA) and their roles in GA and ABA signaling in aleurone cells. In the presence of GA, exogenous H2O2 had little effect on the degradation of SLN1, the primary transcriptional repressor mediating GA signaling, but it promoted the production of the mRNA encoding GAMyb, which acts downstream of SLN1 and involves induction of α-amylase mRNA. Additionally, H2O2 suppressed the production of PKABA mRNA, which is induced by ABA:PKABA represses the production of GAMyb mRNA. From these observations, we concluded that H2O2 released the repression of GAMyb mRNA by PKABA and consequently promoted the production of α-amylase mRNA, thus suggesting that the H2O2 generated by GA in aleurone cells is a signal molecule that antagonizes ABA signaling.

  19. Reactive Oxygen Species Contribute to the Bactericidal Effects of the Fluoroquinolone Moxifloxacin in Streptococcus pneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Ferrándiz, M. J.; Martín-Galiano, A. J.; Arnanz, C.; Zimmerman, T.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the transcriptomic response of Streptococcus pneumoniae to the fluoroquinolone moxifloxacin at a concentration that inhibits DNA gyrase. Treatment of the wild-type strain R6, at a concentration of 10× the MIC, triggered a response involving 132 genes after 30 min of treatment. Genes from several metabolic pathways involved in the production of pyruvate were upregulated. These included 3 glycolytic enzymes, which ultimately convert fructose 6-phosphate to pyruvate, and 2 enzymes that funnel phosphate sugars into the glycolytic pathway. In addition, acetyl coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) carboxylase was downregulated, likely leading to an increase in acetyl-CoA. When coupled with an upregulation in formate acetyltransferase, an increase in acetyl-CoA would raise the production of pyruvate. Since pyruvate is converted by pyruvate oxidase (SpxB) into hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), an increase in pyruvate would augment intracellular H2O2. Here, we confirm a 21-fold increase in the production of H2O2 and a 55-fold increase in the amount of hydroxyl radical in cultures treated during 4 h with moxifloxacin. This increase in hydroxyl radical through the Fenton reaction would damage DNA, lipids, and proteins. These reactive oxygen species contributed to the lethality of the drug, a conclusion supported by the observed protective effects of an SpxB deletion. These results support the model whereby fluoroquinolones cause redox alterations. The transcriptional response of S. pneumoniae to moxifloxacin is compared with the response to levofloxacin, an inhibitor of topoisomerase IV. Levofloxacin triggers the transcriptional activation of iron transport genes and also enhances the Fenton reaction. PMID:26525786

  20. Role of reactive oxygen species in cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum-induced cytotoxicity on bladder cancer cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miyajima, A.; Nakashima, J.; Yoshioka, K.; Tachibana, M.; Tazaki, H.; Murai, M.

    1997-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the intracellular induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum (CDDP) and the augmentation of their cytotoxicity in bladder cancer cells (KU7) by enhancement of ROS generation by the glutathione (GSH) depletors buthionine sulphoximine (BSO) and diethylmaleate (DEM). CDDP-induced cytotoxicity in KU7 cells and its modulation by GSH depletors were determined using spectrophotometric measurement with crystal violet staining. The effects of GSH depletors on intracellular GSH levels were confirmed using the GSH reductase-DTNB recycling method. Intracellular ROS generation induced by CDDP with or without GSH depletors was estimated from the amount of intracellular dichlorofluorescein (DCF), an oxidized product of dichlorofluorescein (DCFH), which was measured with an anchored cell analysis and sorting system. The cytotoxic effects of CDDP (IC50 15.0 +/- 2.5 microM) were significantly enhanced by BSO (IC50 9.3 +/- 2.6 microM, P < 0.01) and DEM (IC50 10.3 +/- 0.3 microM, P <0.01). BSO and DEM produced a significant depletion in intracellular GSH levels (9.6 +/- 0.4 nmol 10(-6) cells, 17.9 +/- 1.0 nmol 10(-6) cells) compared with the controls (30.5 +/- 0.6 nmol 10(-6) cells). Intracellular DCF production in KU7 cells treated with CDDP (1.35 +/- 0.33 microM) was significantly enhanced by the addition of BSO (4.43 +/- 0.33 microM) or DEM (3.12 +/- 0.22 microM) at 150 min. These results suggest that ROS may play a substantial role in CDDP-induced cytotoxicity and that GSH depletors augment its cytotoxicity through an enhancement of ROS generation in bladder cancer cells. PMID:9231920

  1. Reactive oxygen species promote heat shock protein 90-mediated HBV capsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon Sik Seo, Hyun Wook Jung, Guhung

    2015-02-13

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and has been associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). ROS are also an important factor in HCC because the accumulated ROS leads to abnormal cell proliferation and chromosome mutation. In oxidative stress, heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and glutathione (GSH) function as part of the defense mechanism. Hsp90 prevents cellular component from oxidative stress, and GSH acts as antioxidants scavenging ROS in the cell. However, it is not known whether molecules regulated by oxidative stress are involved in HBV capsid assembly. Based on the previous study that Hsp90 facilitates HBV capsid assembly, which is an important step for the packing of viral particles, here, we show that ROS enrich Hsp90-driven HBV capsid formation. In cell-free system, HBV capsid assembly was facilitated by ROS with Hsp90, whereas it was decreased without Hsp90. In addition, GSH inhibited the function of Hsp90 to decrease HBV capsid assembly. Consistent with the result of cell-free system, ROS and buthionine sulfoximine (BS), an inhibitor of GSH synthesis, increased HBV capsid formation in HepG2.2.15 cells. Thus, our study uncovers the interplay between ROS and Hsp90 during HBV capsid assembly. - Highlights: • We examined H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH modulate HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} facilitates HBV capsid assembly in the presence of Hsp90. • GSH inhibits function of Hsp90 in facilitating HBV capsid assembly. • H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and GSH induce conformation change of Hsp90.

  2. Relationship between reactive oxygen species and autophagy in dormant mouse blastocysts during delayed implantation

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyejin; Choi, Soyoung

    2014-01-01

    Objective Under estrogen deficiency, blastocysts cannot initiate implantation and enter dormancy. Dormant blastocysts live longer in utero than normal blastocysts, and autophagy has been suggested as a mechanism underlying the sustained survival of dormant blastocysts during delayed implantation. Autophagy is a cellular degradation pathway and a central component of the integrated stress response. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced within cells during normal metabolism, but their levels increase dramatically under stressful conditions. We investigated whether heightened autophagy in dormant blastocysts is associated with the increased oxidative stress under the unfavorable condition of delayed implantation. Methods To visualize ROS production, day 8 (short-term dormancy) and day 20 (long-term dormancy) dormant blastocysts were loaded with 1-µM 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2', 7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester (CM-H2DCFDA). To block autophagic activation, 3-methyladenine (3-MA) and wortmannin were used in vivo and in vitro, respectively. Results We observed that ROS production was not significantly affected by the status of dormancy; in other words, both dormant and activated blastocysts showed high levels of ROS. However, ROS production was higher in the dormant blastocysts of the long-term dormancy group than in those of the short-term group. The addition of wortmannin to dormant blastocysts in vitro and 3-MA injection in vivo significantly increased ROS production in the short-term dormant blastocysts. In the long-term dormant blastocysts, ROS levels were not significantly affected by the treatment of the autophagy inhibitor. Conclusion During delayed implantation, heightened autophagy in dormant blastocysts may be operative as a potential mechanism to reduce oxidative stress. Further, ROS may be one of the potential causes of compromised developmental competence of long-term dormant blastocysts after implantation. PMID:25309857

  3. Ethylene-induced flavonol accumulation in guard cells suppresses reactive oxygen species and moderates stomatal aperture.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Justin M; Hechler, Paul J; Muday, Gloria K

    2014-04-01

    Guard cell swelling controls the aperture of stomata, pores that facilitate gas exchange and water loss from leaves. The hormone abscisic acid (ABA) has a central role in regulation of stomatal closure through synthesis of second messengers, which include reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS accumulation must be minimized by antioxidants to keep concentrations from reaching damaging levels within the cell. Flavonols are plant metabolites that have been implicated as antioxidants; however, their antioxidant activity in planta has been debated. Flavonols accumulate in guard cells of Arabidopsis thaliana, but not surrounding pavement cells, as visualized with a flavonol-specific dye. The expression of a reporter driven by the promoter of CHALCONE SYNTHASE, a gene encoding a flavonol biosynthetic enzyme, in guard cells, but not pavement cells, suggests guard cell-specific flavonoid synthesis. Increased levels of ROS were detected using a fluorescent ROS sensor in guard cells of transparent testa4-2, which has a null mutation in CHALCONE SYNTHASE and therefore synthesizes no flavonol antioxidants. Guard cells of transparent testa4-2 show more rapid ABA-induced closure than the wild type, suggesting that flavonols may dampen the ABA-dependent ROS burst that drives stomatal closing. The levels of flavonols are positively regulated in guard cells by ethylene treatment in the wild type, but not in the ethylene-insensitive2-5 mutant. In addition, in both ethylene-overproducing1 and ethylene-treated wild-type plants, elevated flavonols lead to decreasing ROS and slower ABA-mediated stomatal closure. These results are consistent with flavonols suppressing ROS accumulation and decreasing the rate of ABA-dependent stomatal closure, with ethylene-induced increases in guard cell flavonols modulating these responses.

  4. Estrogen-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species as signal-transducing messengers.

    PubMed

    Felty, Quentin; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Sun, Dongmei; Sarkar, Shubhashish; Singh, Kamaleshwar P; Parkash, Jai; Roy, Deodutta

    2005-05-10

    We report here evidence in support of the role of 17beta-estradiol- (E2-) induced mitochondrial (mt) reactive oxygen species (ROS) as signal-transducing messengers. On the basis of monitoring the oxidation of 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin by spectrofluorometry, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy, we have identified that exposure of E2 triggers the immediate rapid production of intracellular ROS ranging from a 1- to severalfold increase in a variety of cells. E2-stimulated ROS production does not correlate with the activity of the estrogen receptor (ER) in the cells. The ROS is most likely hydrogen peroxide based on its inhibition by antioxidants and catalase and lack of any effects of E2 on O(2)(*)(-) or NO(*) formation. Confocal microscopy showed that ROS is localized in the perinuclear mitochondria. E2 through anchorage- and integrin-dependent signaling to mitochondria increased ROS generation. Increased intracellular ROS formation identified here for the first time may explain the mechanism of previously reported oxidative damage and subsequent genetic alterations including mutations produced by elevated concentrations of estrogens. The functional consequences of E2-induced ROS formation included the enhanced cell motility as shown by the increase in cdc42 and activation of Pyk2 and the increased phosphorylation of signaling proteins c-jun and CREB. E2-induced ROS activated the binding of three oxidant-sensitive transcription factors: AP-1, CREB, and nuclear respiratory factor 1. In addition to ERs as signaling molecules, our findings further revealed that E2-induced mt ROS also act as signal transducing messengers and suggest new targets for the development of antioxidant-based drugs or antioxidant gene therapy for the prevention and treatment of estrogen-dependent cancer.

  5. The role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the response of airway epithelium to particulates.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, L D; Krunkosky, T M; Dye, J A; Fischer, B M; Jiang, N F; Rochelle, L G; Akley, N J; Dreher, K L; Adler, K B

    1997-01-01

    Epidemiologic and occupational studies indicate adverse health effects due to inhalation of particulate air pollutants, but precise biologic mechanisms responsible have yet to be fully established. The tracheobronchial epithelium forms the body's first physiologic barrier to such airborne pollutants, where ciliary movement functions to remove the offending substances caught in the overlying mucus layer. Resident and infiltrating phagocytic cells also function in this removal process. In this paper, we examine the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the response of airway epithelium to particulates. Some particulates themselves can generate ROS, as can the epithelial cells, in response to appropriate stimulation. In addition, resident macrophages in the airways and the alveolar spaces can release ROS/RNS after phagocytosis of inhaled particles. These macrophages also release large amounts of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), a cytokine that can generate responses within the airway epithelium dependent upon intracellular generation of ROS/RNS. As a result, signal transduction pathways are set in motion that may contribute to inflammation and other pathobiology in the airway. Such effects include increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1, interleukin-6, cytosolic and inducible nitric oxide synthase, manganese superoxide dismutase, cytosolic phospholipase A2, and hypersecretion of mucus. Ultimately, ROS/RNS may play a role in the global response of the airway epithelium to particulate pollutants via activation of kinases and transcription factors common to many response genes. Thus, defense mechanisms involved in responding to offending particulates may result in a complex cascade of events that can contribute to airway pathology. PMID:9400742

  6. Reactive oxygen species are involved in gibberellin/abscisic acid signaling in barley aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Ishibashi, Yushi; Tawaratsumida, Tomoya; Kondo, Koji; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Zheng, Shao-Hui; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2012-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as signal molecules for a variety of processes in plants. However, many questions about the roles of ROS in plants remain to be clarified. Here, we report the role of ROS in gibberellin (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) signaling in barley (Hordeum vulgare) aleurone cells. The production of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a type of ROS, was induced by GA in aleurone cells but suppressed by ABA. Furthermore, exogenous H2O2 appeared to promote the induction of α-amylases by GA. In contrast, antioxidants suppressed the induction of α-amylases. Therefore, H2O2 seems to function in GA and ABA signaling, and in regulation of α-amylase production, in aleurone cells. To identify the target of H2O2 in GA and ABA signaling, we analyzed the interrelationships between H2O2 and DELLA proteins Slender1 (SLN1), GA-regulated Myb transcription factor (GAmyb), and ABA-responsive protein kinase (PKABA) and their roles in GA and ABA signaling in aleurone cells. In the presence of GA, exogenous H2O2 had little effect on the degradation of SLN1, the primary transcriptional repressor mediating GA signaling, but it promoted the production of the mRNA encoding GAMyb, which acts downstream of SLN1 and involves induction of α-amylase mRNA. Additionally, H2O2 suppressed the production of PKABA mRNA, which is induced by ABA:PKABA represses the production of GAMyb mRNA. From these observations, we concluded that H2O2 released the repression of GAMyb mRNA by PKABA and consequently promoted the production of α-amylase mRNA, thus suggesting that the H2O2 generated by GA in aleurone cells is a signal molecule that antagonizes ABA signaling. PMID:22291200

  7. Reactive oxygen species inhibit polycystin-2 (TRPP2) cation channel activity in term human syncytiotrophoblast.

    PubMed

    Montalbetti, N; Cantero, M R; Dalghi, M G; Cantiello, H F

    2008-06-01

    Pregnancy is often associated with oxidative stress (OS) and lower antioxidant defences, which are both implicated in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia, free radical-induced birth defects, and abortions, as well as gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), where products of lipid peroxidation are increased. The molecular target(s) of increased oxygen free radicals and consequent lipid peroxidation in the human placenta remains ill defined. The human syncytiotrophoblast (hST) expresses abundant polycystin-2 (PC2, TRPP2), a TRP-type Ca(2+)-permeable non-selective cation channel. Here, we explored the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on PC2 channel activity of term hST. Apical membranes of the hST were reconstituted in a lipid bilayer chamber. Addition of either hydrogen-peroxide (H(2)O(2)) or tert-butyl hydroperoxide (tBHP) to the cis chamber (intracellular side) rapidly and completely inhibited PC2-mediated cation channel activity in reconstituted hST vesicles. A dose-response titration with increasing concentrations of H(2)O(2) gave an IC(50)=131 nM. The effect of H(2)O(2) on the isolated protein from in vitro transcribed/translated material was significantly different. H(2)O(2) inhibited PC2 cation channel activity, with a much lower affinity (IC(50)=193 microM). To correlate these findings with H(2)O(2)-induced lipid peroxidation, TBARS where measured in hST apical membranes incubated with H(2)O(2). Increased TBARS by exposure of hST apical membranes to H(2)O(2) (625 microM) returned to control value in the presence of catalase (167 microg/ml). Taken together these data indicate that ROS affect PC2 channel function by targetting both membrane lipids and the channel protein. Thus, OS in human pregnancy may be linked to dysregulation of channels such as PC2, which allow the transport of Ca(2+) into the placenta. Oxidative complications in pregnancy may implicate dysfunctional cation transfer between mother and fetus. PMID:18417208

  8. Stimulation of aerobic degradation of bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop by oxygen addition to aquifer sediment.

    PubMed

    Levi, S; Hybel, A-M; Bjerg, P L; Albrechtsen, H-J

    2014-03-01

    In order to investigate aerobic degradation potential for the herbicides bentazone, mecoprop and dichlorprop, anaerobic groundwater samples from two monitoring and three drinking water wells near a drinking water abstraction field in Nybølle, Denmark, were screened for their degradation potential for the herbicides. In the presence of oxygen (14)C-labelled bentazone and mecoprop were removed significantly from the two monitoring wells' groundwater samples. Oxygen was added to microcosms in order to investigate whether different oxygen concentrations stimulate the biodegradation of the three herbicides in microcosms using groundwater and sandy aquifer materials. To maintain a certain oxygen concentration this level was measured from the outside of the bottles with a fibre oxygen meter using oxygen-sensitive luminescent sensor foil mounted inside the microcosm, to which supplementary oxygen was added. The highest oxygen concentrations (corresponding to 4-11 mg L(-1)) stimulated degradation (a 14-27% increase for mecoprop, 3-9% for dichlorprop and 15-20% for bentazone) over an experimental period of 200 days. Oxygen was required to biodegrade the herbicides, since no degradation was observed under anaerobic conditions. This is the first time bentazone degradation has been observed in aquifer material at low oxygen concentrations (2 mg L(-1)). The sediment had substantial oxygen consumption (0.92-1.45O2 g(-1)dw over 200 days) and oxygen was depleted rapidly in most incubations soon after its addition, which might be due to the oxidation of organic matter and other reduced species such as Fe(2+), S(2-) and Mn in sediment before the biodegradation of herbicides takes place. This study suggests that oxygen enhancement around a drinking water abstraction field could stimulate the bioremediation of diffuse source contamination.

  9. Palladium-Based Nanomaterials: A Platform to Produce Reactive Oxygen Species for Catalyzing Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Long, Ran; Huang, Hao; Li, Yaping; Song, Li; Xiong, Yujie

    2015-11-25

    Oxidation reactions by molecular oxygen (O2 ) over palladium (Pd)-based nanomaterials are a series of processes crucial to the synthesis of fine chemicals. In the past decades, investigations of related catalytic materials have mainly been focused on the synthesis of Pd-based nanomaterials from the angle of tailoring their surface structures, compositions and supporting materials, in efforts to improve their activities in organic reactions. From the perspective of rational materials design, it is imperative to address the fundamental issues associated with catalyst performance, one of which should be oxygen activation by Pd-based nanomaterials. Here, the fundamentals that account for the transformation from O2 to reactive oxygen species over Pd, with a focus on singlet O2 and its analogue, are introduced. Methods for detecting and differentiating species are also presented to facilitate future fundamental research. Key factors for tuning the oxygen activation efficiencies of catalytic materials are then outlined, and recent developments in Pd-catalyzed oxygen-related organic reactions are summarized in alignment with each key factor. To close, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for photocatalysis research at this unique intersection as well as the potential impact on other research fields.

  10. Characterization and Reactivity of a Terminal Nickel(III)-Oxygen Adduct

    DOE PAGES

    Pirovano, Paolo; Farquhar, Erik R.; Swart, Marcel; Fitzpatrick, Anthony J.; Morgan, Grace G.; McDonald, Aidan R.

    2015-01-22

    Here, high-valent terminal metal–oxygen adducts are hypothesized to be the potent oxidizing reactants in late transition metal oxidation catalysis. In particular, examples of high-valent terminal nickel–oxygen adducts are scarce, meaning there is a dearth in the understanding of such oxidants. A monoanionic NiII-bicarbonate complex has been found to react in a 1:1 ratio with the one-electron oxidant tris(4-bromophenyl)ammoniumyl hexachloroantimonate, yielding a thermally unstable intermediate in high yield (ca. 95%). Electronic absorption, electronic paramagnetic resonance, and X-ray absorption spectroscopies and density functional theory calculations confirm its description as a low-spin (S=1/2), square planar NiIII–oxygen adduct. Moreover, this rare example of amore » high-valent terminal nickel–oxygen complex performs oxidations of organic substrates, including 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol and triphenylphosphine, which are indicative of hydrogen atom abstraction and oxygen atom transfer reactivity, respectively.« less

  11. Characterization and Reactivity of a Terminal Nickel(III)-Oxygen Adduct

    SciTech Connect

    Pirovano, Paolo; Farquhar, Erik R.; Swart, Marcel; Fitzpatrick, Anthony J.; Morgan, Grace G.; McDonald, Aidan R.

    2015-01-22

    Here, high-valent terminal metal–oxygen adducts are hypothesized to be the potent oxidizing reactants in late transition metal oxidation catalysis. In particular, examples of high-valent terminal nickel–oxygen adducts are scarce, meaning there is a dearth in the understanding of such oxidants. A monoanionic NiII-bicarbonate complex has been found to react in a 1:1 ratio with the one-electron oxidant tris(4-bromophenyl)ammoniumyl hexachloroantimonate, yielding a thermally unstable intermediate in high yield (ca. 95%). Electronic absorption, electronic paramagnetic resonance, and X-ray absorption spectroscopies and density functional theory calculations confirm its description as a low-spin (S=1/2), square planar NiIIIoxygen adduct. Moreover, this rare example of a high-valent terminal nickel–oxygen complex performs oxidations of organic substrates, including 2,6-di-tert-butylphenol and triphenylphosphine, which are indicative of hydrogen atom abstraction and oxygen atom transfer reactivity, respectively.

  12. Palladium-Based Nanomaterials: A Platform to Produce Reactive Oxygen Species for Catalyzing Oxidation Reactions.

    PubMed

    Long, Ran; Huang, Hao; Li, Yaping; Song, Li; Xiong, Yujie

    2015-11-25

    Oxidation reactions by molecular oxygen (O2 ) over palladium (Pd)-based nanomaterials are a series of processes crucial to the synthesis of fine chemicals. In the past decades, investigations of related catalytic materials have mainly been focused on the synthesis of Pd-based nanomaterials from the angle of tailoring their surface structures, compositions and supporting materials, in efforts to improve their activities in organic reactions. From the perspective of rational materials design, it is imperative to address the fundamental issues associated with catalyst performance, one of which should be oxygen activation by Pd-based nanomaterials. Here, the fundamentals that account for the transformation from O2 to reactive oxygen species over Pd, with a focus on singlet O2 and its analogue, are introduced. Methods for detecting and differentiating species are also presented to facilitate future fundamental research. Key factors for tuning the oxygen activation efficiencies of catalytic materials are then outlined, and recent developments in Pd-catalyzed oxygen-related organic reactions are summarized in alignment with each key factor. To close, we discuss the challenges and opportunities for photocatalysis research at this unique intersection as well as the potential impact on other research fields. PMID:26422795

  13. The behaviour of negative oxygen ions in the afterglow of a reactive HiPIMS discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, M.; Bradley, J. W.

    2014-07-01

    Using a single Langmuir probe, the temporal evolution of the oxygen negative ion, n-, and electron, ne, densities in the afterglow of a reactive HiPIMS discharge operating in argon-oxygen gas mixtures have been determined. The magnetron was equipped with a titanium target and operated in ‘poisoned’ mode at a frequency of 100 Hz with a pulse width of 100 µs for a range of oxygen partial pressures, {p_{O_{2}}}/{p_{total}} = 0.0{{-}}0.5 . In the initial afterglow, the density of the principle negative ion in the discharge (O-) was of the order of 1016 m-3 for all conditions. The O- concentration was found to decay slowly with characteristic decay times between 585 µs and 1.2 ms over the oxygen partial pressure range. Electron densities were observed to fall more rapidly, resulting in long-lived highly electronegative afterglow plasmas where the ratio, α = n-/ne, was found to reach values up to 672 (±100) for the highest O2 partial pressure. By comparing results to a simple plasma-chemical model, we speculate that with increased {p_{O_{2}}}/{p_{total}} ratio, more O- ions are formed in the afterglow via dissociative electron attachment to highly excited metastable oxygen molecules, with the latter being formed during the active phase of the discharge. After approximately 2.5 ms into the off-time, the afterglow degenerates into an ion-ion plasma and negative ions are free to impinge upon the chamber walls and grounded substrates with flux densities of the order of 1018 m-2 s-1, which is around 10% of the positive ion flux measured during the on-time. This illustrates the potential importance of the long afterglow in reactive HiPIMS, which can act as a steady source of low energy O- ions to a growing thin film at the substrate during periods of reduced positive ion bombardment.

  14. Fundamental Role of Oxygen Stoichiometry in Controlling the Band Gap and Reactivity of Cupric Oxide Nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Fishman, Zachary S; Rudshteyn, Benjamin; He, Yulian; Liu, Bolun; Chaudhuri, Subhajyoti; Askerka, Mikhail; Haller, Gary L; Batista, Victor S; Pfefferle, Lisa D

    2016-08-31

    CuO is a nonhazardous, earth-abundant material that has exciting potential for use in solar cells, photocatalysis, and other optoelectronic applications. While progress has been made on the characterization of properties and reactivity of CuO, there remains significant controversy on how to control the precise band gap by tuning conditions of synthetic methods. Here, we combine experimental and theoretical methods to address the origin of the wide distribution of reported band gaps for CuO nanosheets. We establish reaction conditions to control the band gap and reactivity via a high-temperature treatment in an oxygen-rich environment. SEM, TEM, XRD, and BET physisorption reveals little to no change in nanostructure, crystal structure, or surface area. In contrast, UV-vis spectroscopy shows a modulation in the material band gap over a range of 330 meV. A similar trend is found in H2 temperature-programmed reduction where peak H2 consumption temperature decreases with treatment. Calculations of the density of states show that increasing the oxygen to copper coverage ratio of the surface accounts for most of the observed changes in the band gap. An oxygen exchange mechanism, supported by (18)O2 temperature-programmed oxidation, is proposed to be responsible for changes in the CuO nanosheet oxygen to copper stoichiometry. The changes induced by oxygen depletion/deposition serve to explain discrepancies in the band gap of CuO, as reported in the literature, as well as dramatic differences in catalytic performance.

  15. Binding of Reactive Oxygen Species at Fe-S Cubane Clusters.

    PubMed

    Bruska, Marta K; Stiebritz, Martin T; Reiher, Markus

    2015-12-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the biochemistry of the cell and occur in degenerative processes as well as in signal transduction. Iron-sulfur proteins are particularly oxygen-sensitive and their inorganic cofactors frequently undergo ROS-induced decomposition reactions. As experimental knowledge about these processes is still incomplete we present here a quantum chemical study of the relative energetics for the binding of the most relevant ROS to [Fe4S4] clusters. We find that cubane clusters with one uncoordinated Fe atom (as found, for instance, in aconitase) bind all oxygen derivatives considered, whereas activation of triplet O2 to singlet O2 is required for binding to valence-saturated iron centers in these clusters. The radicals NO and OH feature the most exothermic binding energies to Fe atoms. Direct sulfoxidation of coordinating cysteine residues is only possible by OH or H2O2 as attacking agents. The thermodynamic picture of ROS binding to iron-sulfur clusters established here can serve as a starting point for studying reactivity-modulating effects of the cluster-embedding protein environment on ROS-induced decomposition of iron-sulfur proteins. PMID:26585994

  16. Deconvoluting the role of reactive oxygen species and autophagy in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xin; Wu, Jinming; Wang, Fengtian; Liu, Bo; Huang, Canhua; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), chemically reactive molecules containing oxygen, can form as a natural byproduct of the normal metabolism of oxygen and also have their crucial roles in cell homeostasis. Of note, the major intracellular sources including mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (ER), peroxisomes and the NADPH oxidase (NOX) complex have been identified in cell membranes to produce ROS. Interestingly, autophagy, an evolutionarily conserved lysosomal degradation process in which a cell degrades long-lived proteins and damaged organelles, has recently been well-characterized to be regulated by different types of ROS. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that ROS-modulated autophagy has numerous links to a number of pathological processes, including cancer, ageing, neurodegenerative diseases, type-II diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, muscular disorders, hepatic encephalopathy and immunity diseases. In this review, we focus on summarizing the molecular mechanisms of ROS-regulated autophagy and their relevance to diverse diseases, which would shed new light on more ROS modulators as potential therapeutic drugs for fighting human diseases.

  17. Light-responsive polymer nanoreactors: a source of reactive oxygen species on demand.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Patric; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Onaca-Fischer, Ozana; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Palivan, Cornelia G

    2013-01-01

    Various domains present the challenges of responding to stimuli in a specific manner, with the desired sensitivity or functionality, and only when required. Stimuli-responsive systems that are appropriately designed can effectively meet these challenges. Here, we introduce nanoreactors that encapsulate photosensitizer-protein conjugates in polymer vesicles as a source of "on demand" reactive oxygen species. Vesicles made of poly(2-methyloxazoline)-poly(dimethylsiloxane)-poly(2-methyloxazoline) successfully encapsulated the photosensitizer Rose Bengal-bovine serum albumin conjugate (RB-BSA) during a self-assembly process, as demonstrated by UV-Vis spectroscopy. A combination of light scattering and transmission electron microscopy indicated that the nanoreactors are stable over time. They serve a dual role: protecting the photosensitizer in the inner cavity and producing in situ reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon irradiation with appropriate electromagnetic radiation. Illumination with appropriate wavelength light allows us to switch on/off and to control the production of ROS. Because of the oxygen-permeable nature of the polymer membrane of vesicles, ROS escape into the environment around vesicles, as established by electron paramagnetic resonance. The light-sensitive nanoreactor is taken up by HeLa cells in a Trojan horse fashion: it is nontoxic and, when irradiated with the appropriate laser light, produces ROS that induce cell death in a precise area corresponding to the irradiation zone. These nanoreactors can be used in theranostic approaches because they can be detected via the fluorescent photosensitizer signal and simultaneously produce ROS efficiently "on demand".

  18. Roles of reactive oxygen species and selected antioxidants in regulation of cellular metabolism.

    PubMed

    Stańczyk, Małgorzata; Gromadzińska, Jolanta; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2005-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential for life of aerobic organisms. They are produced in normal cells and formed as a result of exposure to numerous factors, both chemical and physical. In normal cells, oxygen derivatives are neutralized or eliminated owing to the presence of a natural defense mechanism that involves enzymatic antioxidants (glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase) and water or fat-soluble non-enzymatic antioxidants (vitamins C and E, glutathione, selenium). Under certain conditions, however, ROS production during cellular metabolism also stimulated by external agents may exceed the natural ability of cells to eliminate them from the organism. The disturbed balance leads to the state known as oxidative stress inducing damage of DNA, proteins, and lipids. An inefficient repair mechanism may finally trigger the process of neoplastic transformation or cell death. Reactive oxygen species are also an integral part of signal transduction essential for intercellular communication. The balance between pro- and antioxidative processes determines normal cellular metabolism manifested by genes activation and/or proteins expression in response to exo- and endogenous stimuli. PMID:16052887

  19. Redox and Reactive Oxygen Species Regulation of Mitochondrial Cytochrome c Oxidase Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bourens, Myriam; Fontanesi, Flavia; Soto, Iliana C.; Liu, Jingjing

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Cytochrome c oxidase (COX), the last enzyme of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, is the major oxygen consumer enzyme in the cell. COX biogenesis involves several redox-regulated steps. The process is highly regulated to prevent the formation of pro-oxidant intermediates. Recent Advances: Regulation of COX assembly involves several reactive oxygen species and redox-regulated steps. These include: (i) Intricate redox-controlled machineries coordinate the expression of COX isoenzymes depending on the environmental oxygen concentration. (ii) COX is a heme A-copper metalloenzyme. COX copper metallation involves the copper chaperone Cox17 and several other recently described cysteine-rich proteins, which are oxidatively folded in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Copper transfer to COX subunits 1 and 2 requires concomitant transfer of redox power. (iii) To avoid the accumulation of reactive assembly intermediates, COX is regulated at the translational level to minimize synthesis of the heme A-containing Cox1 subunit when assembly is impaired. Critical Issues: An increasing number of regulatory pathways converge to facilitate efficient COX assembly, thus preventing oxidative stress. Future Directions: Here we will review on the redox-regulated COX biogenesis steps and will discuss their physiological relevance. Forthcoming insights into the precise regulation of mitochondrial COX biogenesis in normal and stress conditions will likely open future perspectives for understanding mitochondrial redox regulation and prevention of oxidative stress. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1940–1952. PMID:22937827

  20. Reactive lattice oxygen sites for C sub 4 -hydrocarbon selective oxidation over. beta. -VOPO sub 4

    SciTech Connect

    Lashier, M.E.; Schrader, G.L. )

    1991-03-01

    The role of lattice oxygen species in the catalytic oxidation of n-butene to maleic anhydride has been investigated using {beta}-VOPO{sub 4} labeled with {sup 18}O. The catalyst was prepared by stoichiometric reaction of (VO){sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} with {sup 18}O{sub 2} using solid state preparation techniques. The {beta}-VOPO{sub 7/2} {sup 18}O{sub 1/2} was characterized using laser Raman and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies: preferential incorporation at P-O-V sites was observed. A pulse reactor was used to react n-butane, 1-butene, 1,3-butadiene, furan, {gamma}-butyrolactone, and maleic anhydride with the catalyst in the absence of gas-phase O{sub 2}. Incorporation of {sup 18}O into the products was monitored by mass spectrometry. Specific lattice oxygen sites could be associated with the reaction pathways for selective or nonselective oxidation. The results of this study also indicate that the initial interaction of n-butane with {beta}-VOPO{sub 4} is fundamentally different from the initial interaction of olefins or oxygenated species. The approach used in this research-referred to as Isotopic Reactive-Site Mapping-is a potentially powerful method for probing the reactive lattice sites of other selective oxidation catalysts.

  1. Cytotoxicity of InP/ZnS quantum dots related to reactive oxygen species generation.

    SciTech Connect

    Chibli, H.; Carlini, L.; Park, S.; Dimitrijevic, N. M.; Nadeau, J. L.

    2011-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) quantum dots (QDs) have emerged as a presumably less hazardous alternative to cadmium-based particles, but their cytotoxicity has not been well examined. Although their constituent elements are of very low toxicity to cells in culture, they nonetheless exhibit phototoxicity related to generation of reactive oxygen species by excited electrons and/or holes interacting with water and molecular oxygen. Using spin-trap electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy and reporter assays, we find a considerable amount of superoxide and a small amount of hydroxyl radical formed under visible illumination of biocompatible InP QDs with a single ZnS shell, comparable to what is seen with CdTe. A double thickness shell reduces the reactive oxygen species concentration approximately two-fold. Survival assays in five cell lines correspondingly indicate a distinct reduction in toxicity with the double-shell InP QDs. Toxicity varies significantly across cell lines according to the efficiency of uptake, being overall significantly less than what is seen with CdTe or CdSe/ZnS. This indicates that InP QDs are a useful alternative to cadmium-containing QDs, while remaining capable of electron-transfer processes that may be undesirable or which may be exploited for photosensitization applications.

  2. Procyanidins from Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn. Seedpod induce autophagy mediated by reactive oxygen species generation in human hepatoma G2 cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuqing; Xu, Hui; Luo, Xiaoping; Zhang, Haihui; He, Yuanqing; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2016-04-01

    In this study, autophagic effect of procyanidins from lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) seedpod (LSPCs) on human hepatoma G2 (HepG2) cells, and the inherent correlation between autophagic levels and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation were investigated. The results showed that LSPCs increased monodansylcadaverine (MDC) fluorescence intensity and LC3-I/LC3-II conversion in HepG2 cells. In addition, the typically autophagic characteristics (autophagosomes and autolysosomes) were observed in LSPCs-treated cells, but not found in the cells treated with autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). Furthermore, the elevated ROS level was in line with the increasing of autophagy activation caused by LSPCs, however, both 3-MA and the ROS scavenger N-acetylcyteine (NAC) inhibitors effectively suppressed the autophagy and ROS generation triggered by LSPCs. As a result, these results indicated that LSPCs induced HepG2 cell autophagy in a time- and dose-dependent manner, and promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation on HepG2 cells. Moreover, we found that LSPCs caused DNA damage, S phase arrest and the decrement of mitochondria membrane potential (MMP) which were associated with ROS generation. In summary, our findings demonstrated that the LSPCs-induced autophagy and autophagic cell death were triggered by the ROS generation in HepG2 cells, which might be associated with ROS generation through the mitochondria-dependent signaling way. PMID:27044822

  3. Induction of apoptosis by the plant alkaloid sampangine in human HL-60 leukemia cells is mediated by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kluza, Jérôme; Mazinghien, Romain; Degardin, Klara; Lansiaux, Amélie; Bailly, Christian

    2005-11-21

    Sampangine is a plant-derived copyrine alkaloid extracted from the stem bark of Cananga odorata. This azaoxoaporphine alkaloid primarily exhibits antifungal and antimycobacterial activities but also displays in vitro antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum and it is cytotoxic to human malignant melanoma cells. Recently, sampangine was described as a pro-apoptotic agent, but the biochemical pathway leading to cell death remained unclear. Considering that sampangine possesses an iminoquinone moiety, potentially functioning as an oxidizing agent, we have investigated the implication of an oxidant stress on sampangine-induced cytotoxicity. We show that the treatment of human HL-60 leukemia cells for 48 h with sampangine induced an important oxidative burst. Real time flow cytometry measurements indicated that the production of oxidative species is very rapid, within minutes following the drug addition. Quenching of reactive oxygen species by the antioxidants N-acetyl cystein, vitamin C and vitamin E abolishes the pro-apoptotic activity of sampangine. The drug-induced production of reactive oxygen species is associated with cell cycle perturbations and mitochondrial alterations. This study shed light on the mechanism of action of sampangine and provides novel opportunities to use azaoxoaporphine alkaloids as lead compounds for the design of pro-apoptotic anticancer agents. PMID:16289142

  4. PKD1 Protein Is Involved in Reactive Oxygen Species-mediated Mitochondrial Depolarization in Cooperation with Protein Kinase Cδ (PKCδ)*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Thianzhou; Sell, Philip; Braun, Ursula; Leitges, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we used gene targeting in mice to identify the in vivo functions of PKD1. In addition to phenotypically characterizing the resulting knock-out animals, we also used mouse embryonic fibroblasts to investigate the associated signaling pathways in detail. This study is the first to use genetic deletion to reveal that PKD1 is a key regulator involved in determining the threshold of mitochondrial depolarization that leads to the production of reactive oxygen species. In addition, we also provide clear evidence that PKCδ is upstream of PKD1 in this process and acts as the activating kinase of PKD1. Therefore, our in vivo data indicate that PKD1 functions not only in the context of aging but also during nutrient deprivation, which occurs during specific phases of tumor growth. PMID:25759386

  5. Defining the mechanisms by which the reactive oxygen species by-product, 4-hydroxynonenal, affects human sperm cell function.

    PubMed

    Baker, Mark A; Weinberg, Anita; Hetherington, Louise; Villaverde, Ana-Izabel; Velkov, Tony; Baell, Jonathan; Gordon, Christopher P

    2015-04-01

    Lipid peroxidation products such as the naturally occurring aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) are known to be cytotoxic toward different cell types, including spermatozoa. In order to understand this at the molecular level, we have employed a proteomic approach to characterize direct 4-HNE adducts on human spermatozoa. Several proteins were identified to be of particular interest, including aldehyde labeling of histone methyltransferase and dynein heavy chain. In addition, we found that 4-HNE bound to part of the activation segment, cysteine residue 199, of protein kinase A (PKA). Interestingly, at low levels, addition of 4-HNE had a stimulatory effect on PKA. However, this did not correlate to increased phosphotyrosine levels during capacitation. This data explains the link between reactive oxygen species and sperm toxicity. Given that epigenetic regulation is likely affected in oxidative-stressed spermatozoa, this data show that spermatozoa appear to shut down under these conditions before reaching the egg.

  6. Controlled intracellular generation of reactive oxygen species in human mesenchymal stem cells using porphyrin conjugated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavado, Andrea S.; Chauhan, Veeren M.; Alhaj Zen, Amer; Giuntini, Francesca; Jones, D. Rhodri E.; Boyle, Ross W.; Beeby, Andrew; Chan, Weng C.; Aylott, Jonathan W.

    2015-08-01

    Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and high numbers of irradiations of excitation light were found to generate greater amounts of ROS. A novel dye, which is transformed into fluorescent 7-hydroxy-4-trifluoromethyl-coumarin in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, provided an indirect indicator for cumulative ROS production. The mitochondrial membrane potential was monitored to investigate the destructive effect of increased intracellular ROS production. Flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle treated hMSCs suggested irradiation with excitation light signalled controlled apoptotic cell death, rather than uncontrolled necrotic cell death. Increased intracellular ROS production did not induce phenotypic changes in hMSC subcultures.Nanoparticles capable of generating controlled amounts of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), that advance the study of oxidative stress and cellular communication, were synthesized by functionalizing polyacrylamide nanoparticles with zinc(ii) porphyrin photosensitisers. Controlled ROS production was demonstrated in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) through (1) production of nanoparticles functionalized with varying percentages of Zn(ii) porphyrin and (2) modulating the number of doses of excitation light to internalized nanoparticles. hMSCs challenged with nanoparticles functionalized with increasing percentages of Zn

  7. Leukotoxicity of pyoverdin, production of reactive oxygen species, and effect of UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Becerra, C; Albesa, I; Eraso, A J

    2001-07-13

    Pyoverdin was purified by solvent extraction, gel filtration, and ionic exchange chromatography. Assays of cytotoxic of pyoverdin were done with human leukocytes and macrophages from the peritoneum of mice. Both cell quantities showed a significant reduction. Death was followed by lysis in a dose-dependent form. The mechanism of action of pyoverdin involved the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) measured by Nitroblue Tetrazolium (NBT) reaction and chemiluminescence (CL). UV radiation at 368 nm increased the leukotoxicity; expositions of 5 min were enough to photostimulate the effect of pyoverdin on cellular oxydative metabolism, which increased between 35.4 and 53.2%. Genestein, an inhibitor of tyrosine kinases, counteracted the ROS stimuli of pyoverdin, suggesting endocytic mechanism of action for this pigment. The little chloroquine interference on oxydative stress indicated that intraphagosomal pH and the stimuli of reactive nitrogen intermediaries (RNI) seem to be of less importance than ROS in pyoverdin action on leukocytes. PMID:11444858

  8. Modulation of macrophage-mediated cytotoxicity by kerosene soot: Possible role of reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Arif, J.M.; Khan, S.G.; Ashquin, M.; Rahman, Q. )

    1993-05-01

    The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the cytotoxicity of soot on rat alveolar macrophages has been postulated. A single intratracheal injection of soot (5 mg) in corn oil significantly induced the macrophage population, hydrogen peroxide (H[sub 2]O[sub 2]) generation, thiobarbituric acid (TBA)-reactive substanced of lipid peroxidation, and the activities of extracellular acid phosphatase (AP) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) at 1, 4, 8, and 16 days of postinoculation. The activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPX) and catalase (CAT) were significantly inhibited at all the stages, while glutathione reductase (GR) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) showed a different pattern. These results show that soot is cytotoxic to alveolar macrophages and suggest that ROS may play a primary role in the cytotoxic process. 28 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Elevated Cytoplasmic Free Zinc and Increased Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in the Context of Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Stork, Christian J; Li, Yang V

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular zinc release and the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been reported to be common ingredients in numerous toxic signaling mechanisms in neurons. A key source for intracellular zinc release is its liberation from metallothionein-III (MT-III). MT-III binds and regulates intracellular zinc levels under physiological conditions, but the zinc-binding thiols readily react with certain ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) to result in intracellular zinc liberation. Liberated zinc induces ROS and RNS generation by multiple mechanisms, including the induction of mitochondrial ROS production, and also promotes ROS formation outside the mitochondria by interaction with the enzymes NADPH oxidase and 12-lipoxygenase. Of particular relevance to neuronal injury in the context of ischemia and prolonged seizures, the positive feedback cycle between ROS/RNS generation and increasing zinc liberation will be examined.

  10. Repetitive Hyperbaric Oxygenation Attenuates Reactive Astrogliosis and Suppresses Expression of Inflammatory Mediators in the Rat Model of Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lavrnja, Irena; Parabucki, Ana; Dacic, Sanja; Savic, Danijela; Pantic, Igor; Stojiljkovic, Mirjana; Pekovic, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    The exact mechanisms by which treatment with hyperbaric oxygen (HBOT) exerts its beneficial effects on recovery after brain injury are still unrevealed. Therefore, in this study we investigated the influence of repetitive HBOT on the reactive astrogliosis and expression of mediators of inflammation after cortical stab injury (CSI). CSI was performed on male Wistar rats, divided into control, sham, and lesioned groups with appropriate HBO. The HBOT protocol was as follows: 10 minutes of slow compression, 2.5 atmospheres absolute (ATA) for 60 minutes, and 10 minutes of slow decompression, once a day for 10 consecutive days. Data obtained using real-time polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence analyses revealed that repetitive HBOT applied after the CSI attenuates reactive astrogliosis and glial scarring, and reduces expression of GFAP (glial fibrillary acidic protein), vimentin, and ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1) both at gene and tissue levels. In addition, HBOT prevents expression of CD40 and its ligand CD40L on microglia, neutrophils, cortical neurons, and reactive astrocytes. Accordingly, repetitive HBOT, by prevention of glial scarring and limiting of expression of inflammatory mediators, supports formation of more permissive environment for repair and regeneration. PMID:25972624

  11. Synthesis and reactivity of compounds containing ruthenium-carbon, -nitrogen, and -oxygen bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, J.F.

    1990-12-01

    The products and mechanisms of the thermal reactions of several complexes of the general structure (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(X)(Y) and (DMPM){sub 2}Ru(X)(Y) where X and Y are hydride, aryl, and benzyl groups, have been investigated. The mechanism of decomposition depends critically on the structure of the complex and the medium in which the thermolysis is carried out. The alkyl hydride complexes are do not react with alkane solvent, but undergo C-H activation processes with aromatic solvents by several different mechanisms. Thermolysis of (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph)(Me) or (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(Ph){sub 2} leads to the ruthenium benzyne complex (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru({eta}{sup 2}-C{sub 6}H{sub 4}) (1) by a mechanism which involves reversible dissociation of phosphine. In many ways its chemistry is analogous to that of early rather than late organo transition metal complexes. The synthesis, structure, variable temperature NMR spectroscopy and reactivity of ruthenium complexes containing aryloxide or arylamide ligands are reported. These complexes undergo cleavage of a P-C bond in coordinated trimethylphosphine, insertion of CO and CO{sub 2} and hydrogenolysis. Mechanistic studies on these reactions are described. The generation of a series of reactive ruthenium complexes of the general formula (PMe{sub 3}){sub 4}Ru(R)(enolate) is reported. Most of these enolates have been shown to bind to the ruthenium center through the oxygen atom. Two of the enolate complexes 8 and 9 exist in equilibrium between the O- and C-bound forms. The reactions of these compounds are reported, including reactions to form oxygen-containing metallacycles. The structure and reactivity of these ruthenium metallacycles is reported, including their thermal chemistry and reactivity toward protic acids, electrophiles, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and trimethylsilane. 243 refs., 10 tabs.

  12. Different tobacco retrotransposons are specifically modulated by the elicitor cryptogein and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Anca, Iulia-Andra; Fromentin, Jérôme; Bui, Quynh Trang; Mhiri, Corinne; Grandbastien, Marie-Angèle; Simon-Plas, Françoise

    2014-10-15

    Interactions of plant retrotransposons with different steps of biotic and abiotic stress-associated signaling cascades are still poorly understood. We perform here a finely tuned comparison of four tobacco retrotransposons (Tnt1, Tnt2, Queenti, and Tto1) responses to the plant elicitor cryptogein. We demonstrate that basal transcript levels in cell suspensions and plant leaves as well as the activation during the steps of defense signaling events are specific to each retrotransposon. Using antisense NtrbohD lines, we show that NtrbohD-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) production might act as negative regulator of retrotransposon activation. PMID:25128785

  13. Reactive oxygen species accelerate degradation of anion exchange membranes based on polyphenylene oxide in alkaline environments.

    PubMed

    Parrondo, Javier; Wang, Zhongyang; Jung, Min-Suk J; Ramani, Vijay

    2016-07-20

    Anion exchange membranes (AEM) based on polyphenylene oxide (PPO) suffered quaternary-ammonium-cation-site degradation in alkaline environments. Surprisingly, the degradation rate was considerably faster in the presence of molecular oxygen. We postulated that the AEM cation-site catalyzes the reduction of dioxygen by hydroxide ions to yield the superoxide anion radical and the highly reactive hydroxyl free radical. We substantiated our hypothesis by using a phosphorous-containing spin trap (5-diisopropoxy-phosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide) to detect the adducts for both free radicals in situ using (31)P-NMR spectroscopy. PMID:27381009

  14. NQO2 is a reactive oxygen species generating off-target for acetaminophen.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Björklund, Mikael

    2014-12-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic compound acetaminophen (paracetamol) is one of the most used drugs worldwide. Acetaminophen overdose is also the most common cause for acute liver toxicity. Here we show that acetaminophen and many structurally related compounds bind quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) in vitro and in live cells, establishing NQO2 as a novel off-target. NQO2 modulates the levels of acetaminophen derived reactive oxygen species, more specifically superoxide anions, in cultured cells. In humans, NQO2 is highly expressed in liver and kidney, the main sites of acetaminophen toxicity. We suggest that NQO2 mediated superoxide production may function as a novel mechanism augmenting acetaminophen toxicity.

  15. Function of reactive oxygen species during animal development: passive or active?

    PubMed

    Covarrubias, Luis; Hernández-García, David; Schnabel, Denhí; Salas-Vidal, Enrique; Castro-Obregón, Susana

    2008-08-01

    Oxidative stress is considered causal of aging and pathological cell death, however, very little is known about its function in the natural processes that support the formation of an organism. It is generally thought that cells must continuously protect themselves from the possible damage caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS) (passive ROS function). However, presently, ROS are recognized as physiologically relevant molecules that mediate cell responses to a variety of stimuli, and the activities of several molecules, some developmentally relevant, are directly or indirectly regulated by oxidative stress (active ROS function). Here we review recent data that are suggestive of specific ROS functions during development of animals, particularly mammals.

  16. Role of auxin-induced reactive oxygen species in root gravitropism.

    PubMed

    Joo, J H; Bae, Y S; Lee, J S

    2001-07-01

    We report our studies on root gravitropism indicating that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may function as a downstream component in auxin-mediated signal transduction. A transient increase in the intracellular concentration of ROS in the convex endodermis resulted from either gravistimulation or unilateral application of auxin to vertical roots. Root bending was also brought about by unilateral application of ROS to vertical roots pretreated with the auxin transport inhibitor N-1-naphthylphthalamic acid. Furthermore, the scavenging of ROS by antioxidants (N-acetylcysteine, ascorbic acid, and Trolox) inhibited root gravitropism. These results indicate that the generation of ROS plays a role in root gravitropism. PMID:11457956

  17. Beyond oxidative stress: an immunologist’s guide to reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Carl; Cunningham-Bussel, Amy

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) react preferentially with certain atoms to modulate functions ranging from cell homeostasis to cell death. Molecular actions include both inhibition and activation of proteins, mutagenesis of DNA and activation of gene transcription. Cellular actions include promotion or suppression of inflammation, immunity and carcinogenesis. ROS help the host to compete against microorganisms and are also involved in intermicrobial competition. ROS chemistry and their pleiotropy make them difficult to localize, to quantify and to manipulate — challenges we must overcome to translate ROS biology into medical advances. PMID:23618831

  18. Reactive oxygen species and antioxidant enzymes activity of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 (Cyanobacterium) under simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gen-bao; Liu, Yong-ding; Wang, Gao-hong; Song, Li-rong

    2004-12-01

    It was found that reactive oxygen species in Anabaena cells increased under simulated microgravity provided by clinostat. Activities of intracellular antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase were higher than those in the controlled samples during the 7 days' experiment. However, the contents of gluathione, an intracellular antioxidant, decreased in comparison with the controlled samples. The results suggested that microgravity provided by clinostat might break the oxidative/antioxidative balance. It indicated a protective mechanism in algal cells, that the total antioxidant system activity increased, which might play an important role for algal cells to adapt the environmental stress of microgravity.

  19. NQO2 Is a Reactive Oxygen Species Generating Off-Target for Acetaminophen

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The analgesic and antipyretic compound acetaminophen (paracetamol) is one of the most used drugs worldwide. Acetaminophen overdose is also the most common cause for acute liver toxicity. Here we show that acetaminophen and many structurally related compounds bind quinone reductase 2 (NQO2) in vitro and in live cells, establishing NQO2 as a novel off-target. NQO2 modulates the levels of acetaminophen derived reactive oxygen species, more specifically superoxide anions, in cultured cells. In humans, NQO2 is highly expressed in liver and kidney, the main sites of acetaminophen toxicity. We suggest that NQO2 mediated superoxide production may function as a novel mechanism augmenting acetaminophen toxicity. PMID:25313982

  20. Reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide mediate plasticity of neuronal calcium signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yermolaieva, Olena; Brot, Nathan; Weissbach, Herbert; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Hoshi, Toshinori

    2000-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) are important participants in signal transduction that could provide the cellular basis for activity-dependent regulation of neuronal excitability. In young rat cortical brain slices and undifferentiated PC12 cells, paired application of depolarization/agonist stimulation and oxidation induces long-lasting potentiation of subsequent Ca2+ signaling that is reversed by hypoxia. This potentiation critically depends on NO production and involves cellular ROS utilization. The ability to develop the Ca2+ signal potentiation is regulated by the developmental stage of nerve tissue, decreasing markedly in adult rat cortical neurons and differentiated PC12 cells.

  1. Surface-Selective Preferential Production of Reactive Oxygen Species on Piezoelectric Ceramics for Bacterial Killing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Guoxin; Wang, Shuangying; Zhu, Ye; Zhou, Lei; Yu, Peng; Wang, Xiaolan; He, Tianrui; Chen, Junqi; Mao, Chuanbin; Ning, Chengyun

    2016-09-21

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) can be used to kill bacterial cells, and thus the selective generation of ROS from material surfaces is an emerging direction in antibacterial material discovery. We found the polarization of piezoelectric ceramic causes the two sides of the disk to become positively and negatively charged, which translate into cathode and anode surfaces in an aqueous solution. Because of the microelectrolysis of water, ROS are preferentially formed on the cathode surface. Consequently, the bacteria are selectively killed on the cathode surface. However, the cell experiment suggested that the level of ROS is safe for normal mammalian cells. PMID:27599911

  2. Functional implications of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generated by oncogenic viruses

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young Bong; Harhaj, Edward William

    2014-01-01

    Between 15–20% of human cancers are associated with infection by oncogenic viruses. Oncogenic viruses, including HPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV-1, target mitochondria to influence cell proliferation and survival. Oncogenic viral gene products also trigger the production of reactive oxygen species which can elicit oxidative DNA damage and potentiate oncogenic host signaling pathways. Viral oncogenes may also subvert mitochondria quality control mechanisms such as mitophagy and metabolic adaptation pathways to promote virus replication. Here, we will review recent progress on viral regulation of mitophagy and metabolic adaptation and their roles in viral oncogenesis. PMID:25580106

  3. Redox state, reactive oxygen species and adaptive growth in colonial hydroids.

    PubMed

    Blackstone, N W

    2001-06-01

    Colonial metazoans often encrust surfaces over which the food supply varies in time or space. In such an environment, adaptive colony development entails adjusting the timing and spacing of feeding structures and gastrovascular connections to correspond to this variable food supply. To investigate the possibility of such adaptive growth, within-colony differential feeding experiments were carried out using the hydroid Podocoryna carnea. Indeed, such colonies strongly exhibited adaptive growth, developing dense arrays of polyps (feeding structures) and gastrovascular connections in areas that were fed relative to areas that were starved, and this effect became more consistent over time. To investigate mechanisms of signaling between the food supply and colony development, measurements were taken of metabolic parameters that have been implicated in signal transduction in other systems, particularly redox state and levels of reactive oxygen species. Utilizing fluorescence microscopy of P. carnea cells in vivo, simultaneous measurements of redox state [using NAD(P)H] and hydrogen peroxide (using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate) were taken. Both measures focused on polyp epitheliomuscular cells, since these exhibit the greatest metabolic activity. Colonies 3-5h after feeding were relatively oxidized, with low levels of peroxide, while colonies 24h after feeding were relatively reduced, with high levels of peroxide. The functional role of polyps in feeding and generating gastrovascular flow probably produced this dichotomy. Polyps 3-5h after feeding contract maximally, and this metabolic demand probably shifts the redox state in the direction of oxidation and diminishes levels of reactive oxygen species. In contrast, 24h after feeding, polyps are quiescent, and this lack of metabolic demand probably shifts the redox state in the direction of reduction and increases levels of reactive oxygen species. Within-colony differential feeding experiments were carried out on

  4. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-08-04

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials. 8 figs.

  5. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-01-01

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials.

  6. Reactive oxygen species and phosphatidylserine externalization in murine sickle red cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Tinku; Kuypers, Frans A

    2004-02-01

    Due to their role in oxygen transport and the presence of redox active haemoglobin molecules, red blood cells (RBC) generate relatively high levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). To counteract the potential deleterious effects of ROS, RBCs have a well-integrated network of anti-oxidant mechanisms to combat this oxidative stress. ROS formation is increased in sickle-cell disease (SCD) and our studies in a murine SCD model showed a significant increase in the generation of ROS when compared with normal mice. Our data also indicated that murine sickle RBCs exhibit a significantly increased ATP catabolism, partly due to the increased activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase to regenerate intracellular glutathione (GSH) levels to neutralize the adverse milieu of oxidative stress. Higher ATP consumption by the murine sickle RBCs, together with the increased ROS formation and impairment of the aminophospholipid translocase or flipase may underlie the exposure of phosphatidylserine on the surface of these cells.

  7. Single and double addition of oxygen atoms to propyne on surfaces at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Kimber, Helen J; Ennis, Courtney P; Price, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Experiments designed to simulate the low temperature surface chemistry occurring in interstellar clouds provide clear evidence of a reaction between oxygen atoms and propyne ice. The reactants are dosed onto a surface held at a fixed temperature between 14 and 100 K. After the dosing period, temperature programmed desorption (TPD), coupled with time-of-flight mass spectrometry, are used to identify two reaction products with molecular formulae C3H4O and C3H4O2. These products result from the addition of a single oxygen atom, or two oxygen atoms, to a propyne reactant. A simple model has been used to extract kinetic data from the measured yield of the single-addition (C3H4O) product at surface temperatures from 30-100 K. This modelling reveals that the barrier of the solid-state reaction between propyne and a single oxygen atom (160 +/- 10 K) is an order of magnitude less than that reported for the gas-phase reaction. In addition, estimates for the desorption energy of propyne and reaction rate coefficient, as a function of temperature, are determined for the single addition process from the modelling. The yield of the single addition product falls as the surface temperature decreases from 50 K to 30K, but rises again as the surface temperature falls below 30 K. This increase in the rate of reaction at low surface temperatures is indicative of an alternative, perhaps barrierless, pathway to the single addition product which is only important at low surface temperatures. The kinetic model has been further developed to characterize the double addition reaction, which appears to involve the addition of a second oxygen atom to C3H4O. This modelling indicates that this second addition is a barrierless process. The kinetic parameters we extract from our experiments indicate that the reaction between atomic oxygen and propyne could occur under on interstellar dust grains on an astrophysical time scale.

  8. Physical properties and band structure of reactive molecular beam epitaxy grown oxygen engineered HfO{sub 2{+-}x}

    SciTech Connect

    Hildebrandt, Erwin; Kurian, Jose; Alff, Lambert

    2012-12-01

    We have conducted a detailed thin film growth structure of oxygen engineered monoclinic HfO{sub 2{+-}x} grown by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. The oxidation conditions induce a switching between (111) and (002) texture of hafnium oxide. The band gap of oxygen deficient hafnia decreases with increasing amount of oxygen vacancies by more than 1 eV. For high oxygen vacancy concentrations, defect bands form inside the band gap that induce optical transitions and p-type conductivity. The resistivity changes by several orders of magnitude as a function of oxidation conditions. Oxygen vacancies do not give rise to ferromagnetic behavior.

  9. Photochemistry of Dissolved Black Carbon Released from Biochar: Reactive Oxygen Species Generation and Phototransformation.

    PubMed

    Fu, Heyun; Liu, Huiting; Mao, Jingdong; Chu, Wenying; Li, Qilin; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Qu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2016-02-01

    Dissolved black carbon (BC) released from biochar can be one of the more photoactive components in the dissolved organic matter (DOM) pool. Dissolved BC was mainly composed of aliphatics and aromatics substituted by aromatic C-O and carboxyl/ester/quinone moieties as determined by solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance. It underwent 56% loss of absorbance at 254 nm, almost complete loss of fluorescence, and 30% mineralization during a 169 h simulated sunlight exposure. Photoreactions preferentially targeted aromatic and methyl moieties, generating CH2/CH/C and carboxyl/ester/quinone functional groups. During irradiation, dissolved BC generated reactive oxygen species (ROS) including singlet oxygen and superoxide. The apparent quantum yield of singlet oxygen was 4.07 ± 0.19%, 2-3 fold higher than many well-studied DOM. Carbonyl-containing structures other than aromatic ketones were involved in the singlet oxygen sensitization. The generation of superoxide apparently depended on electron transfer reactions mediated by silica minerals in dissolved BC, in which phenolic structures served as electron donors. Self-generated ROS played an important role in the phototransformation. Photobleaching of dissolved BC decreased its ability to further generate ROS due to lower light absorption. These findings have significant implications on the environmental fate of dissolved BC and that of priority pollutants. PMID:26717492

  10. Evaluation of Additively Manufactured Metals for Use in Oxygen Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan; Cooper, Ken; Peralta, Stephen; Wilcutt, Terrence; Hughitt, Brian; Generazio, Edward

    2016-01-01

    Space Launch System, Commercial Resupply, and Commercial Crew programs have published intent to use additively manufactured (AM) components in propulsion systems and are likely to include various life support systems in the future. Parts produced by these types of additive manufacturing techniques have not been fully evaluated for use in oxygen systems and the inherent risks have not been fully identified. Some areas of primary concern in the SLS process with respect to oxygen compatibility may be the porosity of the printed parts, fundamental differences in microstructure of an AM part as compared to traditional materials, or increased risk of shed metal particulate into an oxygen system. If an ignition were to occur the printed material could be more flammable than components manufactured from a traditional billet of raw material and/or present a significant hazards if not identified and rigorously studied in advance of implementation into an oxygen system.

  11. Biochemical behaviour of norbixin during in vitro DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Kovary, K; Louvain, T S; Costa e Silva, M C; Albano, F; Pires, B B; Laranja, G A; Lage, C L; Felzenszwalb, I

    2001-04-01

    Naturally occurring antioxidants such as carotenoids are extensively studied for their potential in reducing the risk for cancer and other chronic diseases. In the present study, the radical-scavenger activity of the food additive norbixin, a water-soluble carotenoid extracted from Bixa orellana seeds and commercialized as annatto, was evaluated under conditions of DNA damage induced by reactive oxygen species, particularly by hydroxyl radicals. The cell-free scavenger activity of norbixin was evaluated using plasmid DNA as target molecule and Sn2+ or Fe2+ as oxidant. The addition of H2O2 enhanced DNA breakage induced by metal ions, particularly Fe2+. Under these conditions, norbixin started to protect plasmid DNA against single- and double-strand breakage at a metal:norbixin ratio of 1:1 (Sn2+) and 1:10 (Fe2+). However, at lower ratios to Sn2+, norbixin enhanced Sn2+-induced DNA breakage (P < 0.05). The ability of norbixin to protect genomic DNA against oxidative damage was assessed in murine fibroblasts submitted to H2O2-induced oxidative stress and the results were evaluated by the comet assay. Under low serum conditions (2 % fetal bovine serum (FBS)), a protective effect of norbixin against H2O2-induced DNA breakage was inversely related to its concentration, a protection ranging from 41 % (10 microm) to 21 % (50 microm). At higher concentrations of norbixin, however, oxidative DNA breakage was still enhanced, even in the presence of a high serum concentration (10 % FBS). Under normal conditions, norbixin per se has no detectable genotoxic or cytotoxic effects on murine fibroblasts. The antimutagenic potential of norbixin against oxidative mutagens was also evaluated by the Salmonella typhimurium assay, with a maximum inhibition of 87 % against the mutagenicity induced by H2O2. Although plasmid DNA and Ames data indicated that norbixin can protect DNA against oxidative damage, it seems to be a risky guardian of genomic DNA as it can also increase the extent of

  12. Contribution of reactive oxygen species to (+)-catechin-mediated bacterial lethality.

    PubMed

    Ajiboye, T O; Aliyu, M; Isiaka, I; Haliru, F Z; Ibitoye, O B; Uwazie, J N; Muritala, H F; Bello, S A; Yusuf, I I; Mohammed, A O

    2016-10-25

    The contribution of reactive oxygen species to (+)-catechin-mediated bacterial lethality was investigated. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of (+)-catechin against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus were investigated using 96-well microtitre plate. MIC and MBC of (+)-catechin against E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus are 600 and 700; 600 and 800; 600 and 800 μg/mL respectively. The optical densities and colony forming units of (+)-catechin-treated bacteria decreased. (+)-Catechin (4× MIC) significantly increased the superoxide anion content of E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus compared to DMSO. Superoxide dismutase and catalase in (+)-catechin treated E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus increased significantly. Conversely, level of reduced glutathione in (+)-catechin-treated E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus decreased significantly while glutathione disulfide increased significantly. Furthermore, malondialdehyde and fragmented DNA increased significantly following exposure to (+)-catechin. From the above findings, (+)-catechin enhanced the generation of reactive oxygen species (superoxide anion radical and hydroxyl radical) in E. coli, P. aeruginosa and S. aureus, possibly by autoxidation, Fenton chemistry and inhibiting electron transport chain resulting into lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation and consequentially bacterial cell death. PMID:27634360

  13. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Paraventricular Nucleus of the Hypothalamus Alter Sympathetic Activity During Metabolic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Josiane C; Flôr, Atalia F L; França-Silva, Maria S; Balarini, Camille M; Braga, Valdir A

    2015-01-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) contains heterogeneous populations of neurons involved in autonomic and neuroendocrine regulation. The PVN plays an important role in the sympathoexcitatory response to increasing circulating levels of angiotensin II (Ang-II), which activates AT1 receptors in the circumventricular organs (OCVs), mainly in the subfornical organ (SFO). Circulating Ang-II induces a de novo synthesis of Ang-II in SFO neurons projecting to pre-autonomic PVN neurons. Activation of AT1 receptors induces intracellular increases in reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to increases in sympathetic nerve activity (SNA). Chronic sympathetic nerve activation promotes a series of metabolic disorders that characterizes the metabolic syndrome (MetS): dyslipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance, hyperleptinemia and elevated plasma hormone levels, such as noradrenaline, glucocorticoids, leptin, insulin, and Ang-II. This review will discuss the contribution of our laboratory and others regarding the sympathoexcitation caused by peripheral Ang-II-induced reactive oxygen species along the subfornical organ and paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. We hypothesize that this mechanism could be involved in metabolic disorders underlying MetS. PMID:26779026

  14. Berberine-induced apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells is initiated by reactive oxygen species generation

    SciTech Connect

    Meeran, Syed M.; Katiyar, Suchitra; Katiyar, Santosh K.

    2008-05-15

    Phytochemicals show promise as potential chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic agents against various cancers. Here we report the chemotherapeutic effects of berberine, a phytochemical, on human prostate cancer cells. The treatment of human prostate cancer cells (PC-3) with berberine induced dose-dependent apoptosis but this effect of berberine was not seen in non-neoplastic human prostate epithelial cells (PWR-1E). Berberine-induced apoptosis was associated with the disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of apoptogenic molecules (cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO) from mitochondria and cleavage of caspase-9,-3 and PARP proteins. This effect of berberine on prostate cancer cells was initiated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) irrespective of their androgen responsiveness, and the generation of ROS was through the increased induction of xanthine oxidase. Treatment of cells with allopurinol, an inhibitor of xanthine oxidase, inhibited berberine-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells. Berberine-induced apoptosis was blocked in the presence of antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine, through the prevention of disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential and subsequently release of cytochrome c and Smac/DIABLO. In conclusion, the present study reveals that the berberine-mediated cell death of human prostate cancer cells is regulated by reactive oxygen species, and therefore suggests that berberine may be considered for further studies as a promising therapeutic candidate for prostate cancer.

  15. Extensive Dark Biological Production of Reactive Oxygen Species in Brackish and Freshwater Ponds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong; Hansel, Colleen M; Voelker, Bettina M; Lamborg, Carl H

    2016-03-15

    Within natural waters, photodependent processes are generally considered the predominant source of reactive oxygen species (ROS), a suite of biogeochemically important molecules. However, recent discoveries of dark particle-associated ROS production in aquatic environments and extracellular ROS production by various microorganisms point to biological activity as a significant source of ROS in the absence of light. Thus, the objective of this study was to explore the occurrence of dark biological production of the ROS superoxide (O2(-)) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in brackish and freshwater ponds. Here we show that the ROS superoxide and hydrogen peroxide were present in dark waters at comparable concentrations as in sunlit waters. This suggests that, at least for the short-lived superoxide species, light-independent processes were an important control on ROS levels in these natural waters. Indeed, we demonstrated that dark biological production of ROS extensively occurred in brackish and freshwater environments, with greater dark ROS production rates generally observed in the aphotic relative to the photic zone. Filtering and formaldehyde inhibition confirmed the biological nature of a majority of this dark ROS production, which likely involved phytoplankton, particle-associated heterotrophic bacteria, and NADH-oxidizing enzymes. We conclude that biological ROS production is widespread, including regions devoid of light, thereby expanding the relevance of these reactive molecules to all regions of our oxygenated global habit.

  16. Reactive oxygen species exacerbate autoimmune hemolytic anemia in New Zealand Black mice.

    PubMed

    Konno, Tasuku; Otsuki, Noriyuki; Kurahashi, Toshihiro; Kibe, Noriko; Tsunoda, Satoshi; Iuchi, Yoshihito; Fujii, Junichi

    2013-12-01

    Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative damage occur in the red blood cells (RBCs) of SOD1-deficient C57BL/6 mice. This leads to autoimmune responses against RBCs in aged mice that are similar to autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA). We examined whether a SOD1 deficiency and/or the human SOD1 transgene (hSOD1) would affect phenotypes of AIHA-prone New Zealand Black (NZB) mice by establishing three congenic strains: those lacking SOD1, those expressing hSOD1 under a GATA-1 promoter, and those lacking mouse SOD1 but expressing hSOD1. Levels of intracellular ROS and oxidative stress markers increased, and the severity of the AIHA phenotype was aggravated by a SOD1 deficiency. In contrast, the transgenic expression of hSOD1 in an erythroid cell-specific manner averted most of the AIHA phenotype evident in the SOD1-deficient mice and also ameliorated the AIHA phenotype in the mice possessing intrinsic SOD1. These data suggest that oxidative stress in RBCs may be an underlying mechanism for autoimmune responses in NZB mice. These results were consistent with the hypothetical role of reactive oxygen species in triggering the autoimmune reaction in RBCs and may provide a novel approach to mitigating the progression of AIHA by reducing oxidative stress.

  17. Seed birth to death: dual functions of reactive oxygen species in seed physiology

    PubMed Central

    Jeevan Kumar, S. P.; Rajendra Prasad, S.; Banerjee, Rintu; Thammineni, Chakradhar

    2015-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are considered to be detrimental to seed viability. However, recent studies have demonstrated that ROS have key roles in seed germination particularly in the release of seed dormancy and embryogenesis, as well as in protection from pathogens. Scope This review considers the functions of ROS in seed physiology. ROS are present in all cells and at all phases of the seed life cycle. ROS accumulation is important in breaking seed dormancy, and stimulating seed germination and protection from pathogens. However, excessive ROS accumulation can be detrimental. Therefore, knowledge of the mechanisms by which ROS influence seed physiology will provide insights that may not only allow the development of seed quality markers but also help us understand how dormancy can be broken in several recalcitrant species. Conclusions Reactive oxygen species have a dual role in seed physiology. Understanding the relative importance of beneficial and detrimental effects of ROS provides great scope for the improvement and maintenance of seed vigour and quality, factors that may ultimately increase crop yields. PMID:26271119

  18. Effect of reactive oxygen and carbonyl species on crucial cellular antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lesgards, Jean-François; Gauthier, Cyrielle; Iovanna, Juan; Vidal, Nicolas; Dolla, Alain; Stocker, Pierre

    2011-03-15

    Numerous reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS) issuing from lipid and sugar oxidation are known to damage a large number of proteins leading to enzyme inhibition and alteration of cellular functions. Whereas studies in literature only focus on the reactivity of one or two of these compounds, we aimed at comparing in the same conditions of incubations (4 and 24h at 37°C) the effects of both various RCS (4-hydroxynonenal, 4-hydroxyhexenal, acrolein, methylglyoxal, glyoxal, malondialdehyde) and ROS (H₂O₂, AAPH) on the activity of key enzymes involved in cellular oxidative stress: superoxide dismutase (Cu,Zn-SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). This was realized both in vitro on purified proteins and MIAPaCa-2 cells. Incubation of these enzymes with RCS resulted in a significant time- and concentration-dependent inhibition for both pure enzymes and in cell lysates. Among all RCS and ROS, hydroxynonenal (HNE) was observed as the most toxic for all studied enzymes except for SOD and is followed by hydrogen peroxide. At 100μM, HNE resulted in a 50% reduction of GPx, 56% of GST, 65% of G6PDH, and only 10% of Cu,Zn-SOD. Meanwhile it seems that concentrations used in our study are closer to biological conditions for ROS than for RCS. H₂O₂ and AAPH-induced peroxyl radicals may be probably more toxic towards the studied enzymes in vivo.

  19. Oxygen precursor to the reactive intermediate in methanol synthesis by Cu-ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Pieter J; Hadt, Ryan G; Woertink, Julia S; Vanelderen, Pieter; Schoonheydt, Robert A; Sels, Bert F; Solomon, Edward I

    2010-10-27

    The reactive oxidizing species in the selective oxidation of methane to methanol in oxygen activated Cu-ZSM-5 was recently defined to be a bent mono(μ-oxo)dicopper(II) species, [Cu(2)O](2+). In this communication we report the formation of an O(2)-precursor of this reactive site with an associated absorption band at 29,000 cm(-1). Laser excitation into this absorption feature yields a resonance Raman (rR) spectrum characterized by (18)O(2) isotope sensitive and insensitive vibrations, νO-O and νCu-Cu, at 736 (Δ(18)O(2) = 41 cm(-1)) and 269 cm(-1), respectively. These define the precursor to be a μ-(η(2):η(2)) peroxo dicopper(II) species, [Cu(2)(O(2))](2+). rR experiments in combination with UV-vis absorption data show that this [Cu(2)(O(2))](2+) species transforms directly into the [Cu(2)O](2+) reactive site. Spectator Cu(+) sites in the zeolite ion-exchange sites provide the two electrons required to break the peroxo bond in the precursor. O(2)-TPD experiments with (18)O(2) show the incorporation of the second (18)O atom into the zeolite lattice in the transformation of [Cu(2)(O(2))](2+) into [Cu(2)O](2+). This study defines the mechanism of oxo-active site formation in Cu-ZSM-5.

  20. The chemistry of cell signaling by reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and 4-hydroxynonenal.

    PubMed

    Forman, Henry Jay; Fukuto, Jon M; Miller, Tom; Zhang, Hongqiao; Rinna, Alessandra; Levy, Smadar

    2008-09-15

    During the past several years, major advances have been made in understanding how reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitrogen species (RNS) participate in signal transduction. Identification of the specific targets and the chemical reactions involved still remains to be resolved with many of the signaling pathways in which the involvement of reactive species has been determined. Our understanding is that ROS and RNS have second messenger roles. While cysteine residues in the thiolate (ionized) form found in several classes of signaling proteins can be specific targets for reaction with H(2)O(2) and RNS, better understanding of the chemistry, particularly kinetics, suggests that for many signaling events in which ROS and RNS participate, enzymatic catalysis is more likely to be involved than non-enzymatic reaction. Due to increased interest in how oxidation products, particularly lipid peroxidation products, also are involved with signaling, a review of signaling by 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) is included. This article focuses on the chemistry of signaling by ROS, RNS, and HNE and will describe reactions with selected target proteins as representatives of the mechanisms rather attempt to comprehensively review the many signaling pathways in which the reactive species are involved.

  1. Nonmetal haptens induce ATP release from keratinocytes through opening of pannexin hemichannels by reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Onami, Kaoru; Kimura, Yutaka; Ito, Yumiko; Yamauchi, Takeshi; Yamasaki, Kenshi; Aiba, Setsuya

    2014-07-01

    Although extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (eATP) has a crucial role in the sensitization phase of contact hypersensitivity (CHS), the mechanism by which hapten causes keratinocyte cell death and ATP release is unknown. We examined the time course of cell death, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and ATP release in HaCaT cells and in normal human keratinocytes after exposure to nonmetal haptens, NiCl2, or irritants. Both haptens and irritants caused cell death of keratinocytes but with different time courses. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) significantly reduced only nonmetal hapten-induced cell death as assessed by propidium iodide exclusion. We examined the effects of antioxidants and pannexin (Panx) inhibitors on cell death, ROS production, and ATP release by chemical-treated HaCaT cells. Nonmetal hapten-induced cell death, but not NiCl2- or irritant-related cell death, was dependent on reactivity to thiol residues in the cells. NAC reduced cell death and ATP release, whereas antioxidants and Panx inhibitors did not inhibit cell death but significantly attenuated ATP release. Panx1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) also suppressed ATP release from hapten-exposed HaCaT cells. Intraperitoneal injection of a Panx1 inhibitor attenuated murine CHS. These findings suggest that nonmetal hapten reactivity to thiol residues causes membrane disruption of keratinocytes and ROS production that leads to ATP release through opening of Panx hemichannels. PMID:24531690

  2. Novel insights into the pathophysiology of varicocele and its association with reactive oxygen species and sperm DNA fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chak-Lam; Esteves, Sandro C; Agarwal, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Varicocele has been associated with reduced male reproductive potential. With the advances in biomolecular techniques, it has been possible to better understand the mechanisms involved in testicular damage provoked by varicocele. Current evidence suggests the central role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the resultant oxidative stress (OS) in the pathogenesis of varicocele-associated male subfertility although the mechanisms have not yet been fully described and it is likely to be multifactorial. Excessive ROS is associated with sperm DNA fragmentation, which may mediate the clinical manifestation of poor sperm function and fertilization outcome related to varicocele. Testing of ROS/OS and DNA fragmentation has the potential to provide additional diagnostic and prognostic information compared to conventional semen analysis and may guide therapeutic management strategies in individual patient. PMID:26732105

  3. NRROS Negatively Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation by Inhibiting RANKL-Mediated NF-N:B and Reactive Oxygen Species Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Seong, Semun; Kim, Nacksung

    2015-10-01

    Negative regulator of reactive oxygen species (NRROS) is known to repress ROS generation in phagocytes. In this study, we examined the roles of NRROS in both osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Our results demonstrate that NRROS negatively regulates the differentiation of osteoclasts, but not osteoblasts. Further, overexpression of NRROS in osteoclast precursor cells attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. Conversely, osteoclast differentiation is enhanced upon siRNA-mediated knockdown of NRROS. Additionally, NRROS attenuates RANKL-induced NF-N:B activation, as well as degradation of the NOX1 and NOX2 proteins, which are required for ROS generation. Based on our observations, we present NRROS as a novel negative regulator of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis.

  4. NRROS Negatively Regulates Osteoclast Differentiation by Inhibiting RANKL-Mediated NF-κB and Reactive Oxygen Species Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung Ha; Kim, Kabsun; Kim, Inyoung; Seong, Semun; Kim, Nacksung

    2015-01-01

    Negative regulator of reactive oxygen species (NRROS) is known to repress ROS generation in phagocytes. In this study, we examined the roles of NRROS in both osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Our results demonstrate that NRROS negatively regulates the differentiation of osteoclasts, but not osteoblasts. Further, overexpression of NRROS in osteoclast precursor cells attenuates RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation. Conversely, osteoclast differentiation is enhanced upon siRNA-mediated knockdown of NRROS. Additionally, NRROS attenuates RANKL-induced NF-κB activation, as well as degradation of the NOX1 and NOX2 proteins, which are required for ROS generation. Based on our observations, we present NRROS as a novel negative regulator of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. PMID:26442864

  5. Light-responsive polymer nanoreactors: a source of reactive oxygen species on demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Patric; Balasubramanian, Vimalkumar; Onaca-Fischer, Ozana; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Palivan, Cornelia G.

    2012-12-01

    Various domains present the challenges of responding to stimuli in a specific manner, with the desired sensitivity or functionality, and only when required. Stimuli-responsive systems that are appropriately designed can effectively meet these challenges. Here, we introduce nanoreactors that encapsulate photosensitizer-protein conjugates in polymer vesicles as a source of ``on demand'' reactive oxygen species. Vesicles made of poly(2-methyloxazoline)-poly(dimethylsiloxane)-poly(2-methyloxazoline) successfully encapsulated the photosensitizer Rose Bengal-bovine serum albumin conjugate (RB-BSA) during a self-assembly process, as demonstrated by UV-Vis spectroscopy. A combination of light scattering and transmission electron microscopy indicated that the nanoreactors are stable over time. They serve a dual role: protecting the photosensitizer in the inner cavity and producing in situ reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon irradiation with appropriate electromagnetic radiation. Illumination with appropriate wavelength light allows us to switch on/off and to control the production of ROS. Because of the oxygen-permeable nature of the polymer membrane of vesicles, ROS escape into the environment around vesicles, as established by electron paramagnetic resonance. The light-sensitive nanoreactor is taken up by HeLa cells in a Trojan horse fashion: it is nontoxic and, when irradiated with the appropriate laser light, produces ROS that induce cell death in a precise area corresponding to the irradiation zone. These nanoreactors can be used in theranostic approaches because they can be detected via the fluorescent photosensitizer signal and simultaneously produce ROS efficiently ``on demand''.Various domains present the challenges of responding to stimuli in a specific manner, with the desired sensitivity or functionality, and only when required. Stimuli-responsive systems that are appropriately designed can effectively meet these challenges. Here, we introduce nanoreactors that

  6. Detection of irradiation induced reactive oxygen species production in live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Bo; Zhu, Debin

    2006-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play an important role in cell signaling of apoptosis, necrosis, and proliferation. Light irradiation increases mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and mediates its intracellular signaling by adjusting the redox potential in tumor cells. Mitochondria are the main source of ROS in the living cell. Superoxide anions (0 II - are likely the first ROS generated in the mitochondria following radiation damage, and then convert to hydrogen peroxide (H II0 II), hydroxyl radical (•OH), and singlet oxygen (10 II), etc. Conventional methods for research ROS production in mitochondria mostly use isolated mitochondria rather than mitochondria in living cells. In this study, a highly selective probe to detect mitochondrial 0 II - in live cells, MitoSOX TM Red, was applied to quantify the mitochondrial ROS production in human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) with laser scanning microscope (LSM) after ultraviolet C (UVC) and He-Ne laser irradiation. Dichiorodihydrofluoresein diacetate (DCFHDA), a common used fluorescent probe for ROS detection without specificity, were used as a comparison to image the ROS production. The fluorescent image of MItoSOX TM Red counterstained with MitoTracker Deep Red 633, a mitochondria selective probe, shows that the mitochondrial ROS production increases distinctly after UVC and He-Ne laser irradiation. DCFH-DA diffuses labeling throughout the cell though its fluorescence increases markedly too. In conclusion, the fluorescent method with MitoSOX TM Red reagent is proved to be a promising technique to research the role of ROS in radiation induced apoptosis.

  7. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Matheus P; Correa Soares, Juliana B R; Oliveira, Marcus F

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  8. Sexual Preferences in Nutrient Utilization Regulate Oxygen Consumption and Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Schistosoma mansoni: Potential Implications for Parasite Redox Biology

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Matheus P.; Correa Soares, Juliana B. R.; Oliveira, Marcus F.

    2016-01-01

    Schistosoma mansoni, one of the causative agents of human schistosomiasis, has a unique antioxidant network that is key to parasite survival and a valuable chemotherapeutic target. The ability to detoxify and tolerate reactive oxygen species increases along S. mansoni development in the vertebrate host, suggesting that adult parasites are more exposed to redox challenges than young stages. Indeed, adult parasites are exposed to multiple redox insults generated from blood digestion, activated immune cells, and, potentially, from their own parasitic aerobic metabolism. However, it remains unknown how reactive oxygen species are produced by S. mansoni metabolism, as well as their biological effects on adult worms. Here, we assessed the contribution of nutrients and parasite gender to oxygen utilization pathways, and reactive oxygen species generation in whole unpaired adult S. mansoni worms. We also determined the susceptibilities of both parasite sexes to a pro-oxidant challenge. We observed that glutamine and serum importantly contribute to both respiratory and non-respiratory oxygen utilization in adult worms, but with different proportions among parasite sexes. Analyses of oxygen utilization pathways revealed that respiratory rates were high in male worms, which contrast with high non-respiratory rates in females, regardless nutritional sources. Interestingly, mitochondrial complex I-III activity was higher than complex IV specifically in females. We also observed sexual preferences in substrate utilization to sustain hydrogen peroxide production towards glucose in females, and glutamine in male worms. Despite strikingly high oxidant levels and hydrogen peroxide production rates, female worms were more resistant to a pro-oxidant challenge than male parasites. The data presented here indicate that sexual preferences in nutrient metabolism in adult S. mansoni worms regulate oxygen utilization and reactive oxygen species production, which may differently contribute

  9. Reactive oxygen species do not cause arsine-induced hemoglobin damage

    SciTech Connect

    Hatlelid, K.M.; Carter, D.E.

    1997-04-11

    Previous work suggested that arsine- (AsH{sub 3}-) induced hemoglobin (HbO{sub 2}) damage may lead to hemolysis (Hatlelid et al., 1996). The purpose of the work presented here was to determine whether reactive oxygen species are formed by AsH{sub 3} in solution, in hemoglobin solutions, or in intact red blood cells, and, if so, to determine whether these species are responsible for the observed hemoglobin damage. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was detected in aqueous solutions containing AsH{sub 3} and HbO{sub 2} or AsH{sub 3} alone but not in intact red blood cells or lysates. Additionally, high-activity catalase (19,200 U/ml) or glutathione peroxidase (68 U/ml) added to solutions of HbO{sub 2} and AsH{sub 3} had only a minor protective effect against AsH{sub 3}-induced damage. Further, the differences between the visible spectra of AsH{sub 3}-treated HbO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-treated HbO{sub 2} indicate that two different degradative processes occur. The presence of superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) was measured by O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} -dependent reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT). The results were negative for O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}. Exogenous superoxide dismutase (100 {mu}g/ml) did not affect AsH{sub 3}-induced HbO{sub 2} spectral changes, nor did the hydroxyl radical scavengers, mannitol, and DMSO (20mM each). The general antioxidants ascorbate ({le} 10 mM) and glutathione ({le}1 mM) also had no effect. These results indicate that the superoxide anion and the hydroxyl radical (OH) are not involved in the mechanism of AsH{sub 3}-induced HbO{sub 2} damage. The results also indicate that although AsH{sub 3} contributes to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} production in vitro, cellular defenses are adequate to detoxify the amount formed. An alternative mechanism by which an arsenic species is the hemolytic agent is proposed. 16 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Detection and quantification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in indoor air.

    PubMed

    Montesinos, V Nahuel; Sleiman, Mohamad; Cohn, Sebastian; Litter, Marta I; Destaillats, Hugo

    2015-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as free radicals and peroxides, are environmental trace pollutants potentially associated with asthma and airways inflammation. These compounds are often not detected in indoor air due to sampling and analytical limitations. This study developed and validated an experimental method to sample, identify and quantify ROS in indoor air using fluorescent probes. Tests were carried out simultaneously using three different probes: 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin (DCFH) to detect a broad range of ROS, Amplex ultra Red® (AuR) to detect peroxides, and terephthalic acid (TPA) to detect hydroxyl radicals (HO(•)). For each test, air samples were collected using two impingers in series kept in an ice bath, containing each 10 mL of 50 mM phosphate buffer at pH 7.2. In tests with TPA, that probe was also added to the buffer prior to sampling; in the other two tests, probes and additional reactants were added immediately after sampling. The concentration of fluorescent byproducts was determined fluorometrically. Calibration curves were developed by reacting DCFH and AuR with known amounts of H2O2, and using known amounts of 2-hydroxyterephthalic acid (HTPA) for TPA. Low detection limits (9-13 nM) and quantification limits (18-22 nM) were determined for all three probes, which presented a linear response in the range 10-500 nM for AuR and TPA, and 100-2000 nM for DCFH. High collection efficiency (CE) and recovery efficiency (RE) were observed for DCFH (CE=RE=100%) and AuR (CE=100%; RE=73%) by sampling from a laboratory-developed gas phase H2O2 generator. Interference of co-occurring ozone was evaluated and quantified for the three probes by sampling from the outlet of an ozone generator. The method was demonstrated by sampling air emitted by two portable air cleaners: a strong ozone generator (AC1) and a plasma generator (AC2). High ozone levels emitted by AC1 did not allow for simultaneous determination of ROS levels due to high background levels

  11. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species by a glycolipid fraction of Mycobacterium avium serovar 2.

    PubMed

    Scherer, T A; Lauredo, I T; Abraham, W M

    1997-01-01

    Previous experiments indicated that MIF-A3, a peptidoglycolipid extracted from Mycobacterium avium serovar 2 (Mycobacterium paratuberculosis 18), inhibits the killing of Candida albicans by activated bovine peripheral blood-derived macrophages and murine thioglycollate-elicited peritoneal macrophages in vitro. Subsequent in vitro data from our laboratory indicated that this reduction in killing may be related to the ability of MIF-A3 to scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study we examined this hypothesis directly by determining if MIF-A3 reduced exogenous H2O2-induced candidacidal activity. When Candida albicans was incubated with H2O2 (4 mM) alone, colony-forming units/ml x 10(4) (CFU/ml) were 0.4 +/- 0.1 (mean +/- SE, n = 4) as compared to 11.3 +/- 2.0 CFU/ml in control (untreated) cultures (p < .05). The addition of catalase at concentrations > or = 6.8 U/ml, completely blocked the fungicidal effect of H2O2. However, reducing the amount of catalase from 6.8 U/ml to 3.4 U/ml resulted in a loss of scavenging activity, which was associated with a 50% increase in H2O2-mediated killing. Substituting MIF-A3 (400 micrograms/ml) for catalase, also reduced H2O2-induced fungicidal activity. In the absence of MIF-A3, H2O2 reduced Candida albicans to less than 10(3) CFU/ml. However, in the presence of MIF-A3 the CFU/ml of Candida albicans increased 7.5-fold. Based on concentration-response curves of H2O2 inhibition vs. increasing amounts of catalase we determined that the relative inhibitory capacity of the MIF-A3 (400 micrograms/ml) was approximately 1.0 U/ml "catalase equivalents." These findings provide direct evidence that MIF-A3 can scavenge H2O2, and reduce H2O2-induced killing of Candida albicans. PMID:8981049

  12. Species-level variability in extracellular production rates of reactive oxygen species by diatoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Robin; Roe, Kelly; Hansel, Colleen; Voelker, Bettina

    2016-03-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 x 10-16 mol cell-1 hr-1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O¬2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2 . T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94-100% H2O2; 10-80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65-95% H2O2; 10-50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even between those that are

  13. Species-Level Variability in Extracellular Production Rates of Reactive Oxygen Species by Diatoms.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Robin J; Roe, Kelly L; Hansel, Colleen M; Voelker, Bettina M

    2016-01-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O[Formula: see text]) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O[Formula: see text] were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O[Formula: see text] and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O[Formula: see text] and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O[Formula: see text] production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 × 10(-16) mol cell(-1) h(-1), while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 × 10(-16) mol cell(-1) h(-1). Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O[Formula: see text] in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O[Formula: see text] is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O2 to O[Formula: see text] production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O[Formula: see text] for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O[Formula: see text]. T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94-100% H2O2; 10-80% O[Formula: see text]) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65-95% H2O2; 10-50% O[Formula: see text]). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O

  14. Species-Level Variability in Extracellular Production Rates of Reactive Oxygen Species by Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Robin J.; Roe, Kelly L.; Hansel, Colleen M.; Voelker, Bettina M.

    2016-01-01

    Biological production and decay of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and superoxide (O2-) likely have significant effects on the cycling of trace metals and carbon in marine systems. In this study, extracellular production rates of H2O2 and O2- were determined for five species of marine diatoms in the presence and absence of light. Production of both ROS was measured in parallel by suspending cells on filters and measuring the ROS downstream using chemiluminescence probes. In addition, the ability of these organisms to break down O2- and H2O2 was examined by measuring recovery of O2- and H2O2 added to the influent medium. O2- production rates ranged from undetectable to 7.3 × 10−16 mol cell−1 h−1, while H2O2 production rates ranged from undetectable to 3.4 × 10−16 mol cell−1 h−1. Results suggest that extracellular ROS production occurs through a variety of pathways even amongst organisms of the same genus. Thalassiosira spp. produced more O2- in light than dark, even when the organisms were killed, indicating that O2- is produced via a passive photochemical process on the cell surface. The ratio of H2O2 to O2- production rates was consistent with production of H2O2 solely through dismutation of O2- for T. oceanica, while T. pseudonana made much more H2O2 than O2-. T. weissflogii only produced H2O2 when stressed or killed. P. tricornutum cells did not make cell-associated ROS, but did secrete H2O2-producing substances into the growth medium. In all organisms, recovery rates for killed cultures (94–100% H2O2; 10–80% O2-) were consistently higher than those for live cultures (65–95% H2O2; 10–50% O2-). While recovery rates for killed cultures in H2O2 indicate that nearly all H2O2 was degraded by active cell processes, O2- decay appeared to occur via a combination of active and passive processes. Overall, this study shows that the rates and pathways for ROS production and decay vary greatly among diatom species, even

  15. Occurrence, pathways and implications of biological production of reactive oxygen species in natural waters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, T.; Hansel, C. M.; Voelker, B. M.; Lamborg, C. H.

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) play a critical role in the redox cycling of both toxic (e.g., Hg) and nutrient (e.g., Fe) metals. Despite the discovery of extracellular ROS production in various microbial cultures, including fungi, algae and bacteria, photo-dependent processes are generally considered as the predominant source of ROS in natural waters. Here we show that biological production of ROS is ubiquitous and occurs at a significant rate in freshwater and brackish water environments. Water samples were collected from three freshwater and one brackish water ponds in Cape Cod, Massachusetts, USA, periodically from 2012 to 2014. Production of O2- and H2O2 were measured in dark incubations of natural water using a chemiluminescent and a colorimetric probe, respectively. Rates of biological ROS production were obtained by comparing unfiltered with 0.2-μm filtered samples. The role of biological activity in ROS production was confirmed by the cessation of ROS production upon addition of formaldehyde. In surface water, production rates of O2- ranged from undetectable to 96.0 ± 30.0 nmol L-1 h-1, and production rates of H2O2 varied between 9.9 ± 1.3 nmol L-1 h-1 and 145.6 ± 11.2 nmol L-1 h-1. The maximum production rates of both ROS were observed in mid-summer 2013, which coincides with peak biological activity. ROS production in the water from aphotic zone was greater than in the water from photic zone. Thus, non-light dependent biological processes are likely the major contributors to ROS production in this system. Moreover, O2- production appeared to be enhanced by NADH and inhibited by proteinase-K, suggesting the possible involvement of NADH oxidoreductases in this process. The potential role of different microbial communities in ROS production, and the implications of biological ROS production for mercury speciation will also be discussed.

  16. Production of reactive oxygen species after photodynamic therapy by porphyrin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Kolarova, H; Nevrelova, P; Tomankova, K; Kolar, P; Bajgar, R; Mosinger, J

    2008-06-01

    The objectives of this study was to investigate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after photodynamic therapy (PDT) in vitro. We examined second generation sensitizers, porphyrines (TPPS4, ZnTPPS4 and PdTPPS4) and compared their effectivity on ROS generation in G361 cell line. Used porphyrines are very efficient water-soluble aromatic dyes with potential to use in photomedicine and have a high propensity to accumulate in the membranes of intracellular organelles like lysosomes and mitochondria. Interaction between the triplet excited state of the sensitizer and molecular oxygen leads to produce singlet oxygen and other ROS to induce cell death. Production of ROS was verificated by molecular probe CM-H2DCFDA and viability of cells was determined by MTT assay. Our results demonstrated that ZnTPPS4 induces the highest ROS production in cell line compared to TPPS4 and PdTPPS4 at each used concentration and light dose. These results consist with a fact that photodynamic effect depends on sensitizer type, its concentration and light dose.

  17. Iron-induced tissue damage and cancer: the role of reactive oxygen species-free radicals.

    PubMed

    Okada, S

    1996-05-01

    Oxygen is poisonous, but we cannot live without it. The high oxidizing potential of oxygen molecules (dioxygen) is a valuable source of energy for the organism and its reactivity is low; that is, spin forbidden. However, the dioxygen itself is a 'free radical' and, especially in the presence of transition metals, it is a major promoter of radical reactions in the cell. Humans survive only by virtue of their elaborate defense mechanisms against oxygen toxicity. Iron is the most abundant transition metal in the human body. Because iron shows wide variation in redox potential with different co-ordination ligands, it may be used as a redox intermediate in many biological mechanism. However, it is precisely this redox activeness that makes iron a key participant in free radical production. The current research on the relationship between iron and cancer is briefly reviewed. Research results are reported here which indicate that iron, when bound to certain ligands, can cause free-radical mediated tissue damage and become carcinogenic. The present study also suggests that iron may also have a significant role in spontaneous human cancer. PMID:8809878

  18. Mitochondrial respiration deficits driven by reactive oxygen species in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; Fulton, Ruth; Shimizu, Takahiko; Day, Brian; Patel, Manisha

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic alterations have been implicated in the etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but whether or not they have a functional impact on cellular energy producing pathways (glycolysis and/or oxidative phosphorylation) is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine if alterations in cellular bioenergetics occur using real-time analysis of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates in an animal model of TLE. We hypothesized that increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiated by epileptogenic injury result in impaired mitochondrial respiration. We established methodology for assessment of bioenergetic parameters in isolated synaptosomes from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at various times in the kainate (KA) model of TLE. Deficits in indices of mitochondrial respiration were observed at time points corresponding with the acute and chronic phases of epileptogenesis. We asked if mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction occurred as a result of increased mitochondrial ROS and if it could be attenuated in the KA model by pharmacologically scavenging ROS. Increased steady-state ROS in mice with forebrain-specific conditional deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2(fl/fl)NEX(Cre/Cre)) in mice resulted in profound deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Pharmacological scavenging of ROS with a catalytic antioxidant restored mitochondrial respiration deficits in the KA model of TLE. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial respiration deficits occur in experimental TLE and ROS mechanistically contribute to these deficits. Furthermore, this study provides novel methodology for assessing cellular metabolism during the entire time course of disease development.

  19. Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation by N-Methyl-N’-Nitro-N-Nitrosoguanidine

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-Yen; Fang, Chih-Yeu; Wu, Chung-Chun; Tsai, Ching-Hwa; Lin, Su-Fang; Chen, Jen-Yang

    2013-01-01

    N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation have been suggested to play a role in the development of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Although chemicals have been shown to be a risk factor contributing to the carcinogenesis of NPC, the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. We demonstrated recently that N-methyl-N’-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) enhances the genomic instability and tumorigenicity of NPC cells via induction of EBV reactivation. However, the mechanisms that trigger EBV reactivation from latency remain unclear. Here, we address the role of ROS in induction of EBV reactivation under MNNG treatment. EBV reactivation was induced in over 70% of EBV-positive NA cells and the promoter of Rta (Rp) was activated after MNNG treatment. Inhibitor experiments revealed ATM, p38 MAPK and JNK were activated by ROS and involved in MNNG-induced EBV reactivation. Significantly, ROS scavengers N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), catalase and reduced glutathione inhibited EBV reactivation under MNNG and H2O2 treatment, suggesting ROS mediate EBV reactivation. The p53 was essential for EBV reactivation and the Rp activation by MNNG. Moreover, the p53 was phosphorylated, translocated into nucleus, and bound to Rp following ROS stimulation. The results suggest ROS play an important role in initiation of EBV reactivation by MNNG through a p53-dependent mechanism. Our findings demonstrate novel signaling mechanisms used by NOCs to induce EBV reactivation and provide a novel insight into NOCs link the EBV reactivation in the contribution to the development of NPC. Notably, this study indicates that antioxidants might be effective for inhibiting N-nitroso compound-induced EBV reactivation and therefore could be promising preventive and therapeutic agents for EBV reactivation-associated malignancies. PMID:24376853

  20. 75 FR 39629 - Use of One Additional Portable Oxygen Concentrator Device on Board Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... Devices Onboard Aircraft'' (70 FR 40156). SFAR 106 is the result of a notice the FAA published in July 2004 (69 FR 42324) to address the needs of passengers who ] must travel with medical oxygen. Before.... SFAR 106 was amended on September 12, 2006, (71 FR 53954) to add three additional POC devices,...

  1. [Reactive oxygen species are triggers and mediators of an increase in cardiac tolerance to impact of ischemia-reperfusion].

    PubMed

    Maslov, L N; Naryzhnaia, N V; Podoksenov, Iu K; Prokudina, E S; Gorbunov, A S; Zhang, I; Peĭ, Zh-M

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are triggers of ischemic preconditioning (IP). On the role of intracellular messengers of such cardioprotective effect of preconditioning claim: O2*, H2O2, OH*. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that other reactive oxygen metabolites also involved in the IP. Presented data suggest that IP enhances the production of ROS. The source of ROS may be mitochondrial respiratory chain and NADPH oxidase. Exogenous reactive oxygen species (O2*, H2O2) mimic the cardioprotective effect of preconditioning. Preconditioning prevents free radical damage of the heart during ischemia-reperfusion. The protective effect of IP is the consequence of reducing the production of ROS or the result of increased formation of endogenous antioxidants. Antioxidant enzymes are not involved in the protective effect of IP. Cardioprotective effect of many compounds (bradykinin, opioids, acetylcholine, phenylephrine, tumor necrosis factor-α, volatile anesthetics, protonophores, diazoxide, angiotensin II) depends on the increased production of ROS. PMID:25868322

  2. Reactive oxygen species contribute to TRAIL receptors upregulation; the mechanism for PH II-7 augmenting TRAIL induced apoptosis in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hongwei; Yuan, Xiangfei; Luo, Shiwen; Li, Fei; Wei, Xiaohua; Ye, Zhou; Xiong, Dongsheng

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) can selectively induce apoptosis in cancer cells and is verified to be effective in various cancers. However, a variety of cancer cells are found to be resistant to TRAIL and the mechanisms are largely unknown. Moreover, multidrug resistance to traditional chemotherapeutic agents still remains a tough problem in clinical practice. Fortunately, our previous work proved the ability of PH II-7 in overcoming MDR phenotype through reactive oxygen species production in K562 and its MDR counterpart K562/A02 cells. Additionally, we further explored its potential in augmenting TRAIL induced apoptosis in cancer cells with various tissue origins. Our results showed PH II-7 up-regulated DR4/DR5 expression and augment TRAIL cytotoxicity through reactive oxygen species production, which provide a solid foundation for TRAIL in combination with PH II-7 in future clinical application. PMID:25446561

  3. Psidium cattleianum fruit extracts are efficient in vitro scavengers of physiologically relevant reactive oxygen and nitrogen species.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Alessandra Braga; Chisté, Renan Campos; Freitas, Marisa; da Silva, Alex Fiori; Visentainer, Jesuí Vergílio; Fernandes, Eduarda

    2014-12-15

    Psidium cattleianum, an unexploited Brazilian native fruit, is considered a potential source of bioactive compounds. In the present study, the in vitro scavenging capacity of skin and pulp extracts from P. cattleianum fruits against reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) was evaluated by in vitro screening assays. Additionally, the composition of phenolic compounds and carotenoids in both extracts was determined by LC-MS/MS. The major phenolic compounds identified and quantified (dry matter) in the skin and pulp extracts of P. cattleianum were ellagic acid (2213-3818 μg/g extracts), ellagic acid deoxyhexoside (1475-2,070 μg/g extracts) and epicatechin gallate (885-1,603 μg/g extracts); while all-trans-lutein (2-10 μg/g extracts), all-trans-antheraxanthin (1.6-9 μg/g extracts) and all-trans-β-carotene (4-6 μg/g extracts) were the major carotenoids identified in both extracts. P. cattleianum pulp extract showed higher scavenging capacity than skin extract for all tested ROS and RNS. Considering the potential beneficial effects to human health, P. cattleianum may be considered as a good source of natural antioxidants and may be useful for the food and phytopharmaceutical industry.

  4. Simultaneous removal of SO{sub 2} and NO from flue gas using 'oxygen-enriched' highly reactive absorbent

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Y.; Sun, X.J.; Fang, H.; Liu, F.

    2007-04-15

    Fly ash, industry-grade lime, and an additive, MnO{sub 2} (M), were used to prepare an 'oxygen-enriched' highly reactive absorbent. Experiments of simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification were carried in a flue gas circulating fluidized bed (CFB). The effects of influencing factors were also investigated on the removal efficiencies of desulfurization and denitrification. Removal efficiencies of 95.5% for SO{sub 2} and 64.8% for NO were obtained respectively under the optimal experimental conditions. The component of the spent absorbent was analyzed with chemical analysis methods. The results indicated that more nitrogen species appeared in the spent absorbent except sulfur species. A scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an accessory X-ray energy spectrometer (EDS) were used to observe microproperties of the samples, including fly ash, oxidizing highly reactive absorbent, and spent absorbent. The simultaneous removal mechanism of SO{sub 2} and NO based on this absorbent was proposed according to the experimental results.

  5. Ototoxicity and noise trauma: electron transfer, reactive oxygen species, cell signaling, electrical effects, and protection by antioxidants: practical medical aspects.

    PubMed

    Kovacic, Peter; Somanathan, Ratnasamy

    2008-01-01

    Ototoxins are substances of various structures and classes. This review provides extensive evidence for involvement of electron transfer (ET), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress (OS) as a unifying theme. Successful application is made to the large majority of ototoxins, as well as noise trauma. We believe it is not coincidental that these toxins generally incorporate ET functionalities (quinone, metal complex, ArNO(2), or conjugated iminium) either per se or in metabolites, potentially giving rise to ROS by redox cycling. Some categories, e.g., peroxides and noise, appear to operate via non-ET routes in generating OS. These highly reactive entities can then inflict injury via OS upon various constituents of the ear apparatus. The theoretical framework is supported by the extensive literature on beneficial effects of antioxidants, both for toxins and noise. Involvement of cell signaling and electrical effects are discussed. This review is the first comprehensive one based on a unified mechanistic approach. Various practical medical aspects are also addressed. There is extensive documentation for beneficial effects of antioxidants whose use might be recommended clinically for prevention of ototoxicity and noise trauma. Recent research indicates that catalytic antioxidants may be more effective. In addition to ototoxicity, a widespread problem consists of ear infections by bacteria which are demonstrating increasing resistance to conventional therapies. A recent, novel approach to improved drugs involves use of agents which inhibit quorum sensors that play important roles in bacterial functioning. Prevention of ear injury by noise trauma is also discussed, along with ear therapeutics.

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species and Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 Activation in Diabetic Nephropathy: A Hidden Target

    PubMed Central

    Abdo, Shaaban; Zhang, Shao-Ling; Chan, John S.D.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperglycemia, oxidative stress and renin-angiotensin system (RAS) dysfunction have been implicated in diabetic nephropathy (DN) progression, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are far from being fully understood. In addition to the systemic RAS, the existence of a local intrarenal RAS in renal proximal tubular cells has been recognized. Angiotensinogen is the sole precursor of all angiotensins (Ang). Intrarenal reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, Ang II level and RAS gene expression are up-regulated in diabetes, indicating that intrarenal ROS and RAS activation play an important role in DN. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway is one of the major protective processes that occurs in response to intracellular oxidative stress. Nrf2 stimulates an array of antioxidant enzymes that convert excessive ROS to less reactive or less damaging forms. Recent studies have, however, revealed that Nrf2 activation might have other undesirable effects in diabetic animals and in diabetic patients with chronic kidney disease. This mini-review summarizes current knowledge of the relationship between ROS, Nrf2 and intra renal RAS activation in DN progression as well as possible novel target(s) for DN treatment. PMID:26213634

  7. Oxidative addition of hydrogen halides and dihalogens to Pd. Trends in reactivity and relativistic effects.

    PubMed

    de Jong, G Theodoor; Kovacs, Attila; Bickelhaupt, F Matthias

    2006-06-29

    We have theoretically studied the oxidative addition of HX and X(2) to palladium for X = F, Cl, Br, I and At, using both nonrelativistic and ZORA-relativistic density functional theory at BLYP/QZ4P. The purpose is 3-fold: (i) to obtain a set of consistent potential energy surfaces (PESs) to infer accurate trends in reactivity for simple, archetypal oxidative addition reactions; (ii) to assess how relativistic effects modify these trends along X = F, Cl, Br, I and At; and (iii) to rationalize the trends in reactivity in terms of the reactants' molecular-orbital (MO) electronic structure and the H-X and X-X bond strengths. For the latter, we provide full Dirac-Coulomb CCSD(T) benchmarks. All oxidative additions to Pd are exothermic and have a negative overall barrier, except that of HF which is approximately thermoneutral and has a positive overall barrier. The activation barriers of the HX oxidative additions decrease systematically as X descends in group 17 of the periodic table; those of X(2) first increase, from F to Cl, but then also decrease further down group 17. On the other hand, HX and X(2) show clearly opposite trends regarding the heat of reaction: that of HX becomes more exothermic and that of X(2) less exothermic as X descends in group 17. Relativistic effects can be as large as 15-20 kcal/mol but they do not change the qualitative trends. Interestingly, the influence of relativistic effects on activation barriers and heats of reaction decreases for the heavier halogens due to counteracting relativistic effects in palladium and the halogens. PMID:16789784

  8. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Regulation of Stomatal Movements1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sierla, Maija; Waszczak, Cezary; Vahisalu, Triin

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomatal pores that optimize photosynthetic carbon dioxide uptake with minimal water loss. Stomatal movements are controlled by complex signaling networks that respond to environmental and endogenous signals. Regulation of stomatal aperture requires coordinated activity of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-generating enzymes, signaling proteins, and downstream executors such as ion pumps, transporters, and plasma membrane channels that control guard cell turgor pressure. Accumulation of ROS in the apoplast and chloroplasts is among the earliest hallmarks of stomatal closure. Subsequent increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration governs the activity of multiple kinases that regulate the activity of ROS-producing enzymes and ion channels. In parallel, ROS directly regulate the activity of multiple proteins via oxidative posttranslational modifications to fine-tune guard cell signaling. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the role of ROS in stomatal closure and discuss the importance of ROS in regulation of signal amplification and specificity in guard cells. PMID:27208297

  9. Reactive oxygen species and glutathione dual redox-responsive micelles for selective cytotoxicity of cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Yi-Ting; Yen, Yu-Wei; Lo, Chun-Liang

    2015-08-01

    This study developed reactive oxygen species (ROS) and glutathione (GSH) dual redox-responsive micelles, which encapsulate anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT), protect CPT activity, and trigger CPT release in cancer cell H2O2- or GSH-rich surroundings. Experimental results show that CPT-loaded dual redox-responsive micelles remain stable at low levels of ROS and GSH in blood circulation, have high redox sensitivities needed to CPT release in cancer cells with high ROS or GSH (e.g., lung, gastric, and colon cancer cells), and prevent undersigned CPT toxicity in ROS/GSH balanced normal cells (e.g., fibroblast cells, etc.) or normal organs (e.g., liver, kidney, etc.). The CPT-loaded dual redox-responsive micelles also had high in vivo antitumor efficacy. This study demonstrates that ROS and GSH dual redox-responsive micelles have potential use as anticancer therapeutic nanomedicine in various cancer therapies.

  10. Tks5-dependent, Nox-mediated Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species is Necessary for Invadopodia Formation*

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Begoña; Shani, Gidon; Pass, Ian; Anderson, Diana; Quintavalle, Manuela; Courtneidge, Sara A.

    2009-01-01

    Invadopodia are actin-rich membrane protrusions of cancer cells which facilitate pericellular proteolysis and invasive behavior. We show here that reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by the NADPH oxidase (Nox) system are necessary for invadopodia formation and function. The invadopodia protein Tks5 is structurally related to p47phox, a Nox component in phagocytic cells. Knockdown of Tks5 reduces total ROS levels in cancer cells. Furthermore, Tks5 and p22phox can associate with each other, suggesting that Tks5 is part of the Nox complex. Tyrosine phosphorylation of Tks5 and Tks4, but not other Src substrates, is reduced by Nox inhibition. We propose that Tks5 facilitates the production of ROS necessary for invadopodia formation, and that in turn ROS modulates Tks5 tyrosine phosphorylation in a positive feedback loop. PMID:19755709

  11. UVB Dependence of Quantum Dot Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Common Skin Cell Models.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Luke J; Faulknor, Renea; Ravichandran, Supriya; Zheng, Hong; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2015-09-01

    Studies have shown that UVB can slightly increase the penetration of nanoparticles through skin and significantly alter skin cell biology, thus it is important to understand if and how UVB may impact subsequent nanoparticle skin cell interactions. The research presented herein evaluates the effect of UVB on quantum dot (QD) uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in primary keratinocytes, primary melanocytes, and related cell lines. QD exposure induced cell type dependent ROS responses increased by pre-exposing cells to UVB and correlated with the level of QD uptake. Our results suggest that keratinocytes may be at greater risk for QD induced ROS generation than melanocytes, and raise awareness about the differential cellular effects that topically applied nanomaterials may have on UVB exposed skin.

  12. Specific Cancer Cytosolic Drug Delivery Triggered by Reactive Oxygen Species-Responsive Micelles.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lu-Yi; Su, Geng-Min; Chen, Chi-Kang; Chiang, Yi-Ting; Lo, Chun-Liang

    2016-09-12

    Cytosolic drug delivery, a major route in cancer therapy, is limited by the lack of efficient and safe endosomal escape techniques. Herein, we demonstrate a reactive oxygen species (ROS)-responsive micelle composed of methoxy polyethylene glycol-b-poly(diethyl sulfide) (mPEG-PS) copolymers which can induce specific endosome escape in cancer cells by changes in the hydrophobicity of copolymers. Owing to the more ROS levels in cancer cells than normal cells, the copolymers can be converted into more hydrophilic and insert into and destabilize the cancer intracellular endosome membrane after cellular uptake. More importantly, we show that acid-intolerant drugs successfully maintain their bioactivity and cause selective cytotoxicity for cancer cells over normal cells. Our results suggest that the endosomal escape induced by hydrophobic-hydrophilic exchange of copolymers has great potential to locally and efficiently deliver biological agents (e.g., proteins and genes) in the cancer cell cytosol. PMID:27536957

  13. Fundamental roles of reactive oxygen species and protective mechanisms in the female reproductive system

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Junichi; Iuchi, Yoshihito; Okada, Futoshi

    2005-01-01

    Controlled oxidation, such as disulfide bond formation in sperm nuclei and during ovulation, plays a fundamental role in mammalian reproduction. Excess oxidation, however, causes oxidative stress, resulting in the dysfunction of the reproductive process. Antioxidation reactions that reduce the levels of reactive oxygen species are of prime importance in reproductive systems in maintaining the quality of gametes and support reproduction. While anti-oxidative enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase and peroxidase, play a central role in eliminating oxidative stress, reduction-oxidation (redox) systems, comprised of mainly glutathione and thioredoxin, function to reduce the levels of oxidized molecules. Aldo-keto reductase, using NADPH as an electron donor, detoxifies carbonyl compounds resulting from the oxidation of lipids and proteins. Thus, many antioxidative and redox enzyme genes are expressed and aggressively protect gametes and embryos in reproductive systems. PMID:16137335

  14. Hemoglobin fructation promotes heme degradation through the generation of endogenous reactive oxygen species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodarzi, M.; Moosavi-Movahedi, A. A.; Habibi-Rezaei, M.; Shourian, M.; Ghourchian, H.; Ahmad, F.; Farhadi, M.; Saboury, A. A.; Sheibani, N.

    2014-09-01

    Protein glycation is a cascade of nonenzymatic reactions between reducing sugars and amino groups of proteins. It is referred to as fructation when the reducing monosaccharide is fructose. Some potential mechanisms have been suggested for the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by protein glycation reactions in the presence of glucose. In this state, glucose autoxidation, ketoamine, and oxidative advance glycation end products (AGEs) formation are considered as major sources of ROS and perhaps heme degradation during hemoglobin glycation. However, whether fructose mediated glycation produces ROS and heme degradation is unknown. Here we report that ROS (H2O2) production occurred during hemoglobin fructation in vitro using chemiluminescence methods. The enhanced heme exposure and degradation were determined using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectrophotometry. Following accumulation of ROS, heme degradation products were accumulated reaching a plateau along with the detected ROS. Thus, fructose may make a significant contribution to the production of ROS, glycation of proteins, and heme degradation during diabetes.

  15. Development of a Sensitive Bioluminogenic Probe for Imaging Highly Reactive Oxygen Species in Living Rats.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Ryosuke; Takakura, Hideo; Kamiya, Mako; Kobayashi, Eiji; Komatsu, Toru; Ueno, Tasuku; Terai, Takuya; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Nagano, Tetsuo; Urano, Yasuteru

    2015-12-01

    A sensitive bioluminogenic probe for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS), SO3 H-APL, was developed based on the concept of dual control of bioluminescence emission by means of bioluminescent enzyme-induced electron transfer (BioLeT) and modulation of cell-membrane permeability. This probe enables non-invasive visualization of physiologically relevant amounts of hROS generated deep inside the body of living rats for the first time. It is expected to serve as a practical analytical tool for investigating a wide range of biological functions of hROS in vivo. The design concept should be applicable to other in vivo bioluminogenic probes. PMID:26474404

  16. Reactive oxygen species-related activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides.

    PubMed

    Wu, Haohao; Yin, Jun-Jie; Wamer, Wayne G; Zeng, Mingyong; Lo, Y Martin

    2014-03-01

    Nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides are among the most widely used engineered and naturally occurring nanostructures, and the increasing incidence of biological exposure to these nanostructures has raised concerns about their biotoxicity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced oxidative stress is one of the most accepted toxic mechanisms and, in the past decades, considerable efforts have been made to investigate the ROS-related activities of iron nanostructures. In this review, we summarize activities of nano-iron metal and nano-iron oxides in ROS-related redox processes, addressing in detail the known homogeneous and heterogeneous redox mechanisms involved in these processes, intrinsic ROS-related properties of iron nanostructures (chemical composition, particle size, and crystalline phase), and ROS-related bio-microenvironmental factors, including physiological pH and buffers, biogenic reducing agents, and other organic substances.

  17. INTERACTIONS BETWEEN CALCIUM AND REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY ARTERIAL SMOOTH MUSCLE RESPONSES TO HYPOXIA

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A.; Undem, Clark

    2010-01-01

    In contrast to the systemic vasculature, where hypoxia causes vasodilation, pulmonary arteries constrict in response to hypoxia. The mechanisms underlying this unique response have been the subject of investigation for over 50 years, and still remain a topic of great debate. Over the last 20 years, there has emerged a general consensus that both increases in intracellular calcium concentration and changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation play key roles in the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia. Controversy exists, however, regarding whether ROS increase or decrease during hypoxia, the source of ROS, and the mechanisms by which changes in ROS might impact intracellular calcium, and vice versa. This review will discuss the mechanisms regulating [Ca2+]i and ROS in PASMCs, and the interaction between ROS and Ca2+ signaling during exposure to acute hypoxia. PMID:20801238

  18. Fast, Ultrasensitive Detection of Reactive Oxygen Species Using a Carbon Nanotube Based-Electrocatalytic Intracellular Sensor

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report a highly sensitive electrocatalytic sensor-cell construct that can electrochemically communicate with the internal environment of immune cells (e.g., macrophages) via the selective monitoring of a particular reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide. The sensor, which is based on vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with an osmium electrocatalyst, enabled the unprecedented detection of a local intracellular “pulse” of ROS on a short second time scale in response to bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide-LPS) stimulation. Our studies have shown that this initial pulse of ROS is dependent on NADPH oxidase (NOX) and toll like receptor 4 (TLR4). The results suggest that bacteria can induce a rapid intracellular pulse of ROS in macrophages that initiates the classical innate immune response of these cells to infection. PMID:26438964

  19. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species regulate the strength of inhibitory GABA-mediated synaptic transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accardi, Michael V.; Daniels, Bryan A.; Brown, Patricia M. G. E.; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Tyagarajan, Shiva K.; Bowie, Derek

    2014-01-01

    Neuronal communication imposes a heavy metabolic burden in maintaining ionic gradients essential for action potential firing and synaptic signalling. Although cellular metabolism is known to regulate excitatory neurotransmission, it is still unclear whether the brain’s energy supply affects inhibitory signalling. Here we show that mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species (mROS) regulate the strength of postsynaptic GABAA receptors at inhibitory synapses of cerebellar stellate cells. Inhibition is strengthened through a mechanism that selectively recruits α3-containing GABAA receptors into synapses with no discernible effect on resident α1-containing receptors. Since mROS promotes the emergence of postsynaptic events with unique kinetic properties, we conclude that newly recruited α3-containing GABAA receptors are activated by neurotransmitter released onto discrete postsynaptic sites. Although traditionally associated with oxidative stress in neurodegenerative disease, our data identify mROS as a putative homeostatic signalling molecule coupling cellular metabolism to the strength of inhibitory transmission.

  20. Ionized gas (plasma) delivery of reactive oxygen species (ROS) into artificial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sung-Ha; Szili, Endre J.; Jenkins, A. Toby A.; Short, Robert D.

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to enhance our understanding of how reactive oxygen species (ROS), generated ex situ by ionized gas (plasma), can affect the regulation of signalling processes within cells. A model system, comprising of a suspension of phospholipid vesicles (cell mimics) encapsulating a ROS reporter, was developed to study the plasma delivery of ROS into cells. For the first time it was shown that plasma unequivocally delivers ROS into cells over a sustained period and without compromising cell membrane integrity. An important consideration in cell and biological assays is the presence of serum, which significantly reduced the transfer efficiency of ROS into the vesicles. These results are key to understanding how plasma treatments can be tailored for specific medical or biotechnology applications. Further, the phospholipid vesicle ROS reporter system may find use in other studies involving the application of free radicals in biology and medicine.

  1. Pharmacology of Free Radicals and the Impact of Reactive Oxygen Species on the Testis

    PubMed Central

    Aprioku, Jonah Sydney

    2013-01-01

    The role of free radicals in normal cellular functions and different pathological conditions has been a focus of pharmacological studies in the recent past. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals in general are essential for cell signaling and other vital physiological functions; however, excessive amounts can cause alteration in cellular reduction-oxidation (redox) balance, and disrupt normal biological functions. When there is an imbalance between activities of ROS and antioxidant/scavenging defense systems, oxidative stress (OS) occurs. A good number of studies have shown OS is involved in the development of several disease conditions, including male infertility. In the present article, generation of free radicals and their effects, as well as the mechanisms of antioxidant/scavenging defense systems are discussed, with particular focus on the testis. The review also discusses the contribution of OS on testicular dysfunction and briefly focuses on some OS-induced conditions that will alter testicular function. PMID:24551570

  2. The Role of Heme and Reactive Oxygen Species in Proliferation and Survival of Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Paes, Marcia Cristina; Cosentino-Gomes, Daniela; de Souza, Cíntia Fernandes; Nogueira, Natália Pereira de Almeida; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the protozoan responsible for Chagas disease, has a complex life cycle comprehending two distinct hosts and a series of morphological and functional transformations. Hemoglobin degradation inside the insect vector releases high amounts of heme, and this molecule is known to exert a number of physiological functions. Moreover, the absence of its complete biosynthetic pathway in T. cruzi indicates heme as an essential molecule for this trypanosomatid survival. Within the hosts, T. cruzi has to cope with sudden environmental changes especially in the redox status and heme is able to increase the basal production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can be also produced as byproducts of the parasite aerobic metabolism. In this regard, ROS sensing is likely to be an important mechanism for the adaptation and interaction of these organisms with their hosts. In this paper we discuss the main features of heme and ROS susceptibility in T. cruzi biology. PMID:22007287

  3. The Roles of Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species in Cellular Signaling and Stress Response in Plants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shaobai; Van Aken, Olivier; Schwarzländer, Markus; Belt, Katharina; Millar, A Harvey

    2016-07-01

    Mitochondria produce ATP via respiratory oxidation of organic acids and transfer of electrons to O2 via the mitochondrial electron transport chain. This process produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) at various rates that can impact respiratory and cellular function, affecting a variety of signaling processes in the cell. Roles in redox signaling, retrograde signaling, plant hormone action, programmed cell death, and defense against pathogens have been attributed to ROS generated in plant mitochondria (mtROS). The shortcomings of the black box-idea of mtROS are discussed in the context of mechanistic considerations and the measurement of mtROS The overall aim of this update is to better define our current understanding of mtROS and appraise their potential influence on cellular function in plants. Furthermore, directions for future research are provided, along with suggestions to increase reliability of mtROS measurements.

  4. Zinc Induces Apoptosis of Human Melanoma Cells, Increasing Reactive Oxygen Species, p53 and FAS Ligand.

    PubMed

    Provinciali, Mauro; Pierpaoli, Elisa; Bartozzi, Beatrice; Bernardini, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the in vitro effect of zinc on the apoptosis of human melanoma cells, by studying the zinc-dependent modulation of intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and of p53 and FAS ligand proteins. We showed that zinc concentrations ranging from 33.7 μM to 75 μM Zn(2+) induced apoptosis in the human melanoma cell line WM 266-4. This apoptosis was associated with an increased production of intracellular ROS, and of p53 and FAS ligand protein. Treatment of tumor cells with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine was able to prevent Zn(2+)-induced apoptosis, as well as the increase of p53 and FAS ligand protein induced by zinc. Zinc induces apoptosis in melanoma cells by increasing ROS and this effect may be mediated by the ROS-dependent induction of p53 and FAS/FAS ligand.

  5. Reciprocal regulation of TGF-β and reactive oxygen species: A perverse cycle for fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui-Ming; Desai, Leena P.

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is the most potent pro-fibrogenic cytokine and its expression is increased in almost all of fibrotic diseases. Although signaling through Smad pathway is believed to play a central role in TGF-β's fibrogenesis, emerging evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulate TGF-β's signaling through different pathways including Smad pathway. TGF-β1 increases ROS production and suppresses antioxidant enzymes, leading to a redox imbalance. ROS, in turn, induce/activate TGF-β1 and mediate many of TGF-β's fibrogenic effects, forming a vicious cycle (see graphic flow chart on the right). Here, we review the current knowledge on the feed-forward mechanisms between TGF-β1 and ROS in the development of fibrosis. Therapeutics targeting TGF-β-induced and ROS-dependent cellular signaling represents a novel approach in the treatment of fibrotic disorders. PMID:26496488

  6. Reactive oxygen species involved in regulating fruit senescence and fungal pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Shiping; Qin, Guozheng; Li, Boqiang

    2013-08-01

    Senescence is a vital aspect of fruit life cycles, and directly affects fruit quality and resistance to pathogens. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), as the primary mediators of oxidative damage in plants, are involved in senescence. Mitochondria are the main ROS and free radical source. Oxidative damage to mitochondrial proteins caused by ROS is implicated in the process of senescence, and a number of senescence-related disorders in a variety of organisms. However, the specific sites of ROS generation in mitochondria remain largely unknown. Recent discoveries have ascertained that fruit senescence is greatly related to ROS and incidental oxidative damage of mitochondrial protein. Special mitochondrial proteins involved in fruit senescence have been identified as the targets of ROS. We focus in discussion on our recent advances in exploring the mechanisms of how ROS regulate fruit senescence and fungal pathogenicity.

  7. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration. PMID:26853930

  8. Current progress in Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Responsive materials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sue Hyun; Gupta, Mukesh K; Bang, Jae Beum; Bae, Hojae; Sung, Hak-Joon

    2013-01-01

    Recently, significant progress has been made in developing “stimuli-sensitive” biomaterials as a new therapeutic approach to interact with dynamic physiological conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production has been implicated in important pathophysiological events, such as atherosclerosis,aging, and cancer. ROS are often overproduced locally in diseased cells and tissues, and they individually and synchronously contribute to many of the abnormalities associated with local pathogenesis. Therefore, the advantages of developing ROS-responsive materials extend beyond site-specific targeting of therapeutic delivery, and potentially include navigating,sensing, and repairing the cellular damages via programmed changes in material properties. Here we review the mechanism and development of biomaterials with ROS-induced solubility switch or degradation, as well as their performance and potential for future biomedical applications.

  9. The regulatory roles of ethylene and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant salt stress responses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Smith, J Andrew C; Harberd, Nicholas P; Jiang, Caifu

    2016-08-01

    Soil salinity is one of the most commonly encountered environmental stresses affecting plant growth and crop productivity. Accordingly, plants have evolved a variety of morphological, physiological and biochemical strategies that enable them to adapt to saline growth conditions. For example, it has long been known that salinity-stress increases both the production of the gaseous stress hormone ethylene and the in planta accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there has been significant progress in understanding how the fine-tuning of ethylene biosynthesis and signaling transduction can promote salinity tolerance, and how salinity-induced ROS accumulation also acts as a signal in the mediation of salinity tolerance. Furthermore, recent advances have indicated that ethylene signaling modulates salinity responses largely via regulation of ROS-generating and ROS-scavenging mechanisms. This review focuses on these recent advances in understanding the linked roles of ethylene and ROS in salt tolerance. PMID:27233644

  10. Reactive oxygen species production and antioxidant enzyme activity during epididymal sperm maturation in Corynorhinus mexicanus bats.

    PubMed

    Arenas-Ríos, Edith; Rosado García, Adolfo; Cortés-Barberena, Edith; Königsberg, Mina; Arteaga-Silva, Marcela; Rodríguez-Tobón, Ahiezer; Fuentes-Mascorro, Gisela; León-Galván, Miguel Angel

    2016-03-01

    Prolonged sperm storage in the epididymis of Corynorhinus mexicanus bats after testicular regression has been associated with epididymal sperm maturation in the caudal region, although the precise factors linked with this phenomenon are unknown. The aim of this work is to determine the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and changes in antioxidant enzymatic activity occurring in the spermatozoa and epididymal fluid over time, in sperm maturation and storage in the caput, corpus and cauda of the bat epididymis. Our data showed that an increment in ROS production coincided with an increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in epididymal fluid and with a decrease in glutathione peroxidase (GPX) activity in the spermatozoa in at different time points and epididymal regions. The increase in ROS production was not associated with oxidative damage measured by lipid peroxidation. The results of the current study suggest the existence of a shift in the redox balance, which might be associated with sperm maturation and storage.

  11. Protective mechanisms of helminths against reactive oxygen species are highly promising drug targets.

    PubMed

    Perbandt, Markus; Ndjonka, Dieudonne; Liebau, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Helminths that are the causative agents of numerous neglected tropical diseases continue to be a major problem for human global health. In the absence of vaccines, control relies solely on pharmacoprophylaxis and pharmacotherapy to reduce transmission and to relieve symptoms. There are only a few drugs available and resistance in helminths of lifestock has been observed to the same drugs that are also used to treat humans. Clearly there is an urgent need to find novel antiparasitic compounds. Not only are helminths confronted with their own metabolically derived toxic and redox-active byproducts but also with the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by the host immune system, adding to the overall oxidative burden of the parasite. Antioxidant enzymes of helminths have been identified as essential proteins, some of them biochemically distinct to their host counterpart and thus appealing drug targets. In this review we have selected a few enzymatic antioxidants of helminths that are thought to be druggable.

  12. Baicalin Scavenged Reactive Oxygen Species and Protected Human Keratinocytes Against UVB-induced Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Wen-Shin; Lin, En-Yuan; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Hu, Pei-Shin; Chuang, Chin-Liang; Liao, Cheng-Hsi; Fu, Chun-Kai; Su, Chung-Hao; Gong, Chi-Li; Hsiao, Chieh-Lun; Bau, DA-Tian; Tsai, Chia-Wen

    Ultraviolet B (UVB), with a wavelength of 280-320 nm, represents one of the most important environmental factors for skin disorders, including sunburn, hyperpigmentation, solar keratosis, solar elastosis and skin cancer. Therefore, protection against excessive UVA-induced damage is useful for prevention of sunburn and other human diseases. Baicalin, a major component of traditional Chinese medicine Scutellaria baicalensis, has been reported to possess antioxidant and cytostatic capacities. In this study, we examined whether baicalin is also capable of protecting human keratinocytes from UVB irradiation. The results showed that baicalin effectively scavenged reactive oxygen species (ROS) elevated within 4 h after UVB radiation and reversed the UVB-suppressed cell viability and UVB-induced apoptosis after 24 h. Our results demonstrated the utility of baicalin to complement the contributions of traditional Chinese medicine in UVB-induced damage to skin and suggested their potential application as pharmaceutical agents in long-term sun-shining injury prevention. PMID:27566079

  13. Reactive oxygen species, redox signaling and neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease: the NF-κB connection.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Upinder; Banerjee, Priyanjalee; Bir, Aritri; Sinha, Maitrayee; Biswas, Atanu; Chakrabarti, Sasanka

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are important elements of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis, but the role of redox signaling cascade and its cross-talk with inflammatory mediators have not been elucidated in details in this disorder. The review summarizes the facts about redox-signaling cascade in the cells operating through an array of kinases, phosphatases and transcription factors and their downstream components. The biology of NF-κB and its activation by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and proinflammatory cytokines in the pathogenesis of AD have been specially highlighted citing evidence both from post-mortem studies in AD brain and experimental research in animal or cell-based models of AD. The possibility of identifying new disease-modifying drugs for AD targeting NF-κBsignaling cascade has been discussed in the end. PMID:25620241

  14. Regulation of signal transduction by reactive oxygen species in the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Brown, David I; Griendling, Kathy K

    2015-01-30

    Oxidative stress has long been implicated in cardiovascular disease, but more recently, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in normal physiological signaling has been elucidated. Signaling pathways modulated by ROS are complex and compartmentalized, and we are only beginning to identify the molecular modifications of specific targets. Here, we review the current literature on ROS signaling in the cardiovascular system, focusing on the role of ROS in normal physiology and how dysregulation of signaling circuits contributes to cardiovascular diseases, including atherosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury, cardiomyopathy, and heart failure. In particular, we consider how ROS modulate signaling pathways related to phenotypic modulation, migration and adhesion, contractility, proliferation and hypertrophy, angiogenesis, endoplasmic reticulum stress, apoptosis, and senescence. Understanding the specific targets of ROS may guide the development of the next generation of ROS-modifying therapies to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with oxidative stress.

  15. Early Increase of Reactive Oxygen Species in Pea Seedling Roots Under Hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadko, Sergiy; Syvash, Alexander; Klymchuk, Dmytro

    Early increase of intensity of peroxidation and formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plant cells take place under various impacts. The ROS can act as second messengers in mechanism of cell responses (Mittler et al 2006; Jadko et al 2007). Early stages of ROS content (chemiluminescence, ChL) in pea root cells under 3, 5, 10 and 15g during centrifugation have been investigated. After 30 min of centrifugation, especially under 10 and 15g, the intensity of ChL increased and was higher on 40-50% comparing to controls. Than the ChL slowly decreased and reached the controls in 1 hour. The changes of the ChL depend on both the dose and the duration of centrifugation. The role of ROS in mechanism of cell response to hypergravity is discussed.

  16. Chemical reactivity of hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen atoms at temperatures below 100 k

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgee, H. A., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The synthesis of unusual compounds by techniques employing cryogenic cooling to retard their very extreme reactivity was investigated. Examples of such species that were studied are diimide (N2H2), cyclobutadiene (C4H4), cyclopropanone (C3H4O), oxirene (C2H2O), and many others. Special purpose cryogenically cooled inlet arrangements were designed such that the analyses incurred no warm-up of the cold, and frequently explosively unstable, compounds. Controlled energy electron impact techniques were used to measure critical potentials and to develop the molecular energetics and thermodynamics of these molecules and to gain some insight into their kinetic characteristics as well. Three and four carbon strained ring molecules were studied. Several reactions of oxygen and hydrogen atoms with simple molecules of H, N, C, and O in hard quench configurations were studied. And the quench stabilization of BH3 was explored as a model system in cryochemistry.

  17. Mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity action: induction of reactive oxygen species and cell death in lettuce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Dan; Ding, Lan; Cui, Hai-Yan; Jin, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jian-She; Qin, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin has been recognized as an allelochemical that inhibits growth of several plant species. However, its mode of action is not well clarified. In this study, the mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity on lettuce seedlings was investigated. Root and shoot elongation of lettuce seedlings were inhibited by artemisinin in a concentration-dependent manner. The compound effectively arrested cell division and caused loss of cell viability in root tips of lettuce. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced by artemisinin. Lipid peroxidation, proline overproduction and reduction of chlorophyll content in lettuce seedlings were found after treatments. These results suggested that artemisinin could induce ROS overproduction, which caused membrane lipids peroxidation and cell death, and impacted mitosis and physiological processes, resulting in growth inhibition of receptor plants. PMID:25658194

  18. UVB Dependence of Quantum Dot Reactive Oxygen Species Generation in Common Skin Cell Models.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, Luke J; Faulknor, Renea; Ravichandran, Supriya; Zheng, Hong; DeLouise, Lisa A

    2015-09-01

    Studies have shown that UVB can slightly increase the penetration of nanoparticles through skin and significantly alter skin cell biology, thus it is important to understand if and how UVB may impact subsequent nanoparticle skin cell interactions. The research presented herein evaluates the effect of UVB on quantum dot (QD) uptake and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in primary keratinocytes, primary melanocytes, and related cell lines. QD exposure induced cell type dependent ROS responses increased by pre-exposing cells to UVB and correlated with the level of QD uptake. Our results suggest that keratinocytes may be at greater risk for QD induced ROS generation than melanocytes, and raise awareness about the differential cellular effects that topically applied nanomaterials may have on UVB exposed skin. PMID:26485933

  19. Evidence that reactive oxygen species do not mediate NF-κB activation

    PubMed Central

    Hayakawa, Makio; Miyashita, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Isao; Kitagawa, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Yasuda, Hideyo; Karin, Michael; Kikugawa, Kiyomi

    2003-01-01

    It has been postulated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) may act as second messengers leading to nuclear factor (NF)-κB activation. This hypothesis is mainly based on the findings that N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), compounds recognized as potential antioxidants, can inhibit NF-κB activation in a wide variety of cell types. Here we reveal that both NAC and PDTC inhibit NF-κB activation independently of antioxidative function. NAC selectively blocks tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced signaling by lowering the affinity of receptor to TNF. PDTC inhibits the IκB–ubiquitin ligase activity in the cell-free system where extracellular stimuli-regulated ROS production does not occur. Furthermore, we present evidence that endogenous ROS produced through Rac/NADPH oxidase do not mediate NF-κB signaling, but instead lower the magnitude of its activation. PMID:12839997

  20. Modulation of Crassostrea virginica hemocyte reactive oxygen species production by Listonella anguillarum.

    PubMed

    Bramble, L; Anderson, R S

    1997-01-01

    Luminol- and lucigenin-augmented chemiluminescence (CL) were used to evaluate the ability of Listonella (formerly Vibrio) anguillarum to stimulate the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by Crassostrea virginica hemocytes. Whereas heat-killed L. anguillarum stimulated hemocyte CL in the lucigenin system, viable L. anguillarum did not. Neither viable nor heat-killed bacteria stimulated hemocyte production of luminol CL. Metabolically active L. anguillarum generated ROS, as indicated by luminol and lucigenin CL. It is proposed that bacterial catalase suppressed hemocyte-derived luminol CL. L. anguillarum, which possesses the antioxidant enzyme catalase, suppressed luminol CL generated by zymosan-stimulated hemocytes. Conversely, the catalase negative bacterium Carnobacterium piscicola had no effect on hemocyte-derived luminol CL elicited by zymosan. The inability of viable L. anguillarum to stimulate hemocyte ROS production, as measured by CL, does not support the proposed role for ROS in hemocyte-mediated bactericidal activity. PMID:9303272

  1. Reactive oxygen species generated from skeletal muscles are required for gecko tail regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing; Wang, Yingjie; Man, Lili; Zhu, Ziwen; Bai, Xue; Wei, Sumei; Liu, Yan; Liu, Mei; Wang, Xiaochuan; Gu, Xiaosong; Wang, Yongjun

    2016-02-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) participate in various physiological and pathological functions following generation from different types of cells. Here we explore ROS functions on spontaneous tail regeneration using gecko model. ROS were mainly produced in the skeletal muscle after tail amputation, showing a temporal increase as the regeneration proceeded. Inhibition of the ROS production influenced the formation of autophagy in the skeletal muscles, and as a consequence, the length of the regenerating tail. Transcriptome analysis has shown that NADPH oxidase (NOX2) and the subunits (p40(phox) and p47(phox)) are involved in the ROS production. ROS promoted the formation of autophagy through regulation of both ULK and MAPK activities. Our results suggest that ROS produced by skeletal muscles are required for the successful gecko tail regeneration.

  2. Regulatory volume decrease in cardiomyocytes is modulated by calcium influx and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Rivera, Diego; Díaz-Elizondo, Jessica; Parra, Valentina; Salas, Daniela; Contreras, Ariel; Toro, Barbra; Chiong, Mario; Olea-Azar, Claudio; Lavandero, Sergio

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the role of Ca(2+) in generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by hyposmotic stress (Hypo) and its relationship to regulatory volume decrease (RVD) in cardiomyocytes. Hypo-induced increases in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca(2+). Nifedipine (Nife) inhibited both Hypo-induced Ca(2+) and ROS increases. Overexpression of catalase (CAT) induced RVD and a decrease in Hypo-induced blebs. Nife prevented CAT-dependent RVD activation. These results show a dual role of Hypo-induced Ca(2+) influx in the control of cardiomyocyte viability. Hypo-induced an intracellular Ca(2+) increase which activated RVD and inhibited necrotic blebbing thus favoring cell survival, while simultaneously increasing ROS generation, which in turn inhibited RVD and induced necrosis.

  3. Reactive oxygen species as transducers of sphinganine-mediated cell death pathway

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo-García, Mariana; González-Solís, Ariadna; Rodríguez-Mejía, Priscila; de Jesús Olivera-Flores, Teresa; Vázquez-Santana, Sonia; Cahoon, Edgar B

    2011-01-01

    Long chain bases or sphingoid bases are building blocks of complex sphingolipids that display a signaling role in programmed cell death in plants. So far, the type of programmed cell death in which these signaling lipids have been demonstrated to participate is the cell death that occurs in plant immunity, known as the hypersensitive response. The few links that have been described in this pathway are: MPK6 activation, increased calcium concentrations and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The latter constitute one of the more elusive loops because of the chemical nature of ROS, the multiple possible cell sites where they can be formed and the ways in which they influence cell structure and function. PMID:21921699

  4. Fast, Ultrasensitive Detection of Reactive Oxygen Species Using a Carbon Nanotube Based-Electrocatalytic Intracellular Sensor.

    PubMed

    Rawson, Frankie J; Hicks, Jacqueline; Dodd, Nicholas; Abate, Wondwossen; Garrett, David J; Yip, Nga; Fejer, Gyorgy; Downard, Alison J; Baronian, Kim H R; Jackson, Simon K; Mendes, Paula M

    2015-10-28

    Herein, we report a highly sensitive electrocatalytic sensor-cell construct that can electrochemically communicate with the internal environment of immune cells (e.g., macrophages) via the selective monitoring of a particular reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide. The sensor, which is based on vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes functionalized with an osmium electrocatalyst, enabled the unprecedented detection of a local intracellular "pulse" of ROS on a short second time scale in response to bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide-LPS) stimulation. Our studies have shown that this initial pulse of ROS is dependent on NADPH oxidase (NOX) and toll like receptor 4 (TLR4). The results suggest that bacteria can induce a rapid intracellular pulse of ROS in macrophages that initiates the classical innate immune response of these cells to infection. PMID:26438964

  5. Current Progress in Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Responsive Materials for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sue Hyun; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Bang, Jae Beum; Bae, Hojae

    2013-01-01

    Recently, significant progress has been made in developing “stimuli-sensitive” biomaterials as a new therapeutic approach to interact with dynamic physiological conditions. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production has been implicated in important pathophysiological events, such as atherosclerosis, aging, and cancer. ROS are often overproduced locally in diseased cells and tissues, and they individually and synchronously contribute to many of the abnormalities associated with local pathogenesis. Therefore, the advantages of developing ROS-responsive materials extend beyond site-specific targeting of therapeutic delivery, and potentially include navigating, sensing, and repairing the cellular damages via programmed changes in material properties. Here we review the mechanism and development of biomaterials with ROS-induced solubility switch or degradation, as well as their performance and potential for future biomedical applications. PMID:25136729

  6. Reactive oxygen species production in single cells following laser irradiation (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duquette, Michelle L.; Kim, Justine; Shi, Linda Z.; Berns, Michael W.

    2015-08-01

    Region specific DNA breaks can be created in single cells using laser light that damages DNA but does not directly generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have examined the cellular response to directly generated DNA breaks in single cells. Using a combination of ROS specific dyes and oxidase inhibitors we have found that the oxidase and chromatin remodeling protein Lysine demethylase I (LSD1) generates detectable ROS as a byproduct of its chromatin remodeling activity during the initial DNA damage response. ROS is produced at detectable amounts primarily within the first 3 minutes post irradiation. LSD1 activity has been previously associated with transcriptional regulation therefore these findings have implications for regulation of gene expression following DNA damage particularly in cells with altered redox states.

  7. Juglone induces cell death of Acanthamoeba through increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jha, Bijay Kumar; Jung, Hui-Jung; Seo, Incheol; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2015-12-01

    Juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a major chemical constituent of Juglans mandshruica Maxim. Recent studies have demonstrated that juglone exhibits anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-parasitic properties. However, its effect against Acanthamoeba has not been defined yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of juglone on Acanthamoeba. We demonstrate that juglone significantly inhibits the growth of Acanthamoeba castellanii at 3-5 μM concentrations. Juglone increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caused cell death of A. castellanii. Inhibition of ROS by antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) restored the cell viability. Furthermore, our results show that juglone increased the uptake of mitochondrial specific dye. Collectively, these results indicate that ROS played a significant role in the juglone-induced cell death of Acanthamoeba.

  8. Behind the scenes: the roles of reactive oxygen species in guard cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuwei; Miao, Yuchen; Song, Chun-Peng

    2014-03-01

    Guard cells regulate stomatal pore size through integration of both endogenous and environmental signals; they are widely recognized as providing a key switching mechanism that maximizes both the efficient use of water and rates of CO₂ exchange for photosynthesis; this is essential for the adaptation of plants to water stress. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are widely considered to be an important player in guard cell signalling. In this review, we focus on recent progress concerning the role of ROS as signal molecules in controlling stomatal movement, the interaction between ROS and intrinsic and environmental response pathways, the specificity of ROS signalling, and how ROS signals are sensed and relayed. However, the picture of ROS-mediated signalling is still fragmented and the issues of ROS sensing and the specificity of ROS signalling remain unclear. Here, we review some recent advances in our understanding of ROS signalling in guard cells, with an emphasis on the main players known to interact with abscisic acid signalling.

  9. Evaluation of denture base resin after disinfection method using reactive oxygen species (ROS).

    PubMed

    Odagiri, Ken; Sawada, Tomofumi; Hori, Norio; Seimiya, Kazuhide; Otsuji, Takeshi; Hamada, Nobushiro; Kimoto, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The effects of certain disinfectants on the stability of a polymethyl methacrylate denture base resin were investigated, including those of a novel disinfection method using reactive oxygen species (ROS). The surface roughness and flexural strength were analyzed to assess the effects of the disinfectants on material properties. The following disinfectants were tested: 5% sodium hypochlorite, 70% alcohol, and ROS. Furthermore, the attachment of Candida albicans to the resin surface was investigated. The disinfection method using sodium hypochlorite significantly increased the surface roughness and decreased flexural strength. The surface roughness and flexural strength of the ROS-treated specimens did not significantly differ from those of the control specimens, and the ROS-treated specimens exhibited diminished Candida attachment. These results demonstrate that the ROS disinfection method preserves acceptable material stability levels in polymethyl methacrylate resins.

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species and Autophagy Modulation in Non-Marine Drugs and Marine Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Fayyaz, Sundas; Hou, Ming-Feng; Li, Kun-Tzu; Tang, Jen-Yang; Chang, Hsueh-Wei

    2014-01-01

    It is becoming more understandable that an existing challenge for translational research is the development of pharmaceuticals that appropriately target reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated molecular networks in cancer cells. In line with this approach, there is an overwhelmingly increasing list of many non-marine drugs and marine drugs reported to be involved in inhibiting and suppressing cancer progression through ROS-mediated cell death. In this review, we describe the strategy of oxidative stress-based therapy and connect the ROS modulating effect to the regulation of apoptosis and autophagy. Finally, we focus on exploring the function and mechanism of cancer therapy by the autophagy modulators including inhibitors and inducers from non-marine drugs and marine drugs. PMID:25402829

  11. Generation of reactive oxygen species by lethal attacks from competing microbes

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Tao G.; Dong, Shiqi; Catalano, Christy; Moore, Richard; Liang, Xiaoye; Mekalanos, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Whether antibiotics induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that contribute to cell death is an important yet controversial topic. Here, we report that lethal attacks from bacterial and viral species also result in ROS production in target cells. Using soxS as an ROS reporter, we found soxS was highly induced in Escherichia coli exposed to various forms of attacks mediated by the type VI secretion system (T6SS), P1vir phage, and polymyxin B. Using a fluorescence ROS probe, we found enhanced ROS levels correlate with induced soxS in E. coli expressing a toxic T6SS antibacterial effector and in E. coli treated with P1vir phage or polymyxin B. We conclude that both contact-dependent and contact-independent interactions with aggressive competing bacterial species and viruses can induce production of ROS in E. coli target cells. PMID:25646446

  12. Temperature controls oxidative phosphorylation and reactive oxygen species production through uncoupling in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Woyda-Ploszczyca, Andrzej; Koziel, Agnieszka; Majerczak, Joanna; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory and phosphorylation activities, mitochondrial uncoupling, and hydrogen peroxide formation were studied in isolated rat skeletal muscle mitochondria during experimentally induced hypothermia (25 °C) and hyperthermia (42 °C) compared to the physiological temperature of resting muscle (35 °C). For nonphosphorylating mitochondria, increasing the temperature from 25 to 42 °C led to a decrease in membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide production, and quinone reduction levels. For phosphorylating mitochondria, no temperature-dependent changes in these mitochondrial functions were observed. However, the efficiency of oxidative phosphorylation decreased, whereas the oxidation and phosphorylation rates and oxidative capacities of the mitochondria increased, with increasing assay temperature. An increase in proton leak, including uncoupling protein-mediated proton leak, was observed with increasing assay temperature, which could explain the reduced oxidative phosphorylation efficiency and reactive oxygen species production.

  13. Role of reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase in gibberellin biosynthesis during barley seed germination.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kyohei; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Watabe, Gaku; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Ishibashi, Yushi

    2016-05-01

    NADPH oxidase catalyzes the production of the superoxide anion (O2(-)), a reactive oxygen species (ROS), and regulates the germination of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) chloride, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, delayed barley germination, and exogenous H2O2 (an ROS) partially rescued it. Six enzymes, ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS), ent-kaurene synthase (KS), ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO), GA20-oxidase (GA20ox) and GA3-oxidase (GA3ox), catalyze the transformation of trans-geranylgeranyl diphosphate to active gibberellin, which promotes germination. Exogenous H2O2 promoted the expressions of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1 in barley embryos. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidase are involved in gibberellin biosynthesis through the regulation of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1.

  14. Signaling Networks Involving Reactive Oxygen Species and Ca2+ in Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuchitsu, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Although plants never evolved central information processing organs such as brains, plants have evolved distributed information processing systems and are able to sense various environmental changes and reorganize their body plan coordinately without moving. Recent molecular biological studies revealed molecular bases for elementary processes of signal transduction in plants. Though reactive oxygen species (ROS) are highly toxic substances produced through aerobic respiration and photosynthesis, plants possess ROS-producing enzymes whose activity is highly regulated by binding of Ca2+. In turn, Ca2+- permeable channel proteins activated by ROS are shown to be localized to the cell membrane. These two components are proposed to constitute a positive feedback loop to amplify cellular signals. Such molecular physiological studies should be important steps to understand information processing systems in plants and future application for technology related to environmental, energy and food sciences.

  15. Role of reactive oxygen species produced by NADPH oxidase in gibberellin biosynthesis during barley seed germination.

    PubMed

    Kai, Kyohei; Kasa, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Masatsugu; Aoki, Nozomi; Watabe, Gaku; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari; Ishibashi, Yushi

    2016-05-01

    NADPH oxidase catalyzes the production of the superoxide anion (O2(-)), a reactive oxygen species (ROS), and regulates the germination of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) chloride, an NADPH oxidase inhibitor, delayed barley germination, and exogenous H2O2 (an ROS) partially rescued it. Six enzymes, ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase (CPS), ent-kaurene synthase (KS), ent-kaurene oxidase (KO), ent-kaurenoic acid oxidase (KAO), GA20-oxidase (GA20ox) and GA3-oxidase (GA3ox), catalyze the transformation of trans-geranylgeranyl diphosphate to active gibberellin, which promotes germination. Exogenous H2O2 promoted the expressions of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1 in barley embryos. These results suggest that ROS produced by NADPH oxidase are involved in gibberellin biosynthesis through the regulation of HvKAO1 and HvGA3ox1. PMID:27110861

  16. High fluence laser irradiation induces reactive oxygen species generation in human lung adenocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fang; Xing, Da; Chen, Tong-Sheng

    2006-09-01

    Low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) has been used for therapies such as curing spinal cord injury, healing wound et al. Yet, the mechanism of LPLI remains unclear. Our previous study showed that low fluences laser irradiation induces human lung adenocarcinoma cells (ASTC-a-1) proliferation, but high fluences induced apoptosis and caspase-3 activation. In order to study the mechanism of apoptosis induced by high fluences LPLI further, we have measured the dynamics of generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) using H IIDCFDA fluorescence probes during this process. ASTC-a-1 cells apoptosis was induced by He-Ne laser irradiation at high fluence of 120J/cm2. A confocal laser scanning microscope was used to perform fluorescence imaging. The results demonstrated that high fluence LPLI induced the increase of mitochondria ROS. Our studies contribute to clarify the biological mechanism of high fluence LPLI-induced cell apoptosis.

  17. Juglone induces cell death of Acanthamoeba through increased production of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Jha, Bijay Kumar; Jung, Hui-Jung; Seo, Incheol; Suh, Seong-Il; Suh, Min-Ho; Baek, Won-Ki

    2015-12-01

    Juglone (5-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone) is a major chemical constituent of Juglans mandshruica Maxim. Recent studies have demonstrated that juglone exhibits anti-cancer, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, and anti-parasitic properties. However, its effect against Acanthamoeba has not been defined yet. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of juglone on Acanthamoeba. We demonstrate that juglone significantly inhibits the growth of Acanthamoeba castellanii at 3-5 μM concentrations. Juglone increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and caused cell death of A. castellanii. Inhibition of ROS by antioxidant N-acetyl-l-cysteine (NAC) restored the cell viability. Furthermore, our results show that juglone increased the uptake of mitochondrial specific dye. Collectively, these results indicate that ROS played a significant role in the juglone-induced cell death of Acanthamoeba. PMID:26358271

  18. Regulatory volume decrease in cardiomyocytes is modulated by calcium influx and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Rojas-Rivera, Diego; Díaz-Elizondo, Jessica; Parra, Valentina; Salas, Daniela; Contreras, Ariel; Toro, Barbra; Chiong, Mario; Olea-Azar, Claudio; Lavandero, Sergio

    2009-11-01

    We investigated the role of Ca(2+) in generating reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by hyposmotic stress (Hypo) and its relationship to regulatory volume decrease (RVD) in cardiomyocytes. Hypo-induced increases in cytoplasmic and mitochondrial Ca(2+). Nifedipine (Nife) inhibited both Hypo-induced Ca(2+) and ROS increases. Overexpression of catalase (CAT) induced RVD and a decrease in Hypo-induced blebs. Nife prevented CAT-dependent RVD activation. These results show a dual role of Hypo-induced Ca(2+) influx in the control of cardiomyocyte viability. Hypo-induced an intracellular Ca(2+) increase which activated RVD and inhibited necrotic blebbing thus favoring cell survival, while simultaneously increasing ROS generation, which in turn inhibited RVD and induced necrosis. PMID:19818777

  19. Mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity action: induction of reactive oxygen species and cell death in lettuce seedlings.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhi-Qiang; Wang, Dan-Dan; Ding, Lan; Cui, Hai-Yan; Jin, Hui; Yang, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Jian-She; Qin, Bo

    2015-03-01

    Artemisinin has been recognized as an allelochemical that inhibits growth of several plant species. However, its mode of action is not well clarified. In this study, the mechanism of artemisinin phytotoxicity on lettuce seedlings was investigated. Root and shoot elongation of lettuce seedlings were inhibited by artemisinin in a concentration-dependent manner. The compound effectively arrested cell division and caused loss of cell viability in root tips of lettuce. Overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was induced by artemisinin. Lipid peroxidation, proline overproduction and reduction of chlorophyll content in lettuce seedlings were found after treatments. These results suggested that artemisinin could induce ROS overproduction, which caused membrane lipids peroxidation and cell death, and impacted mitosis and physiological processes, resulting in growth inhibition of receptor plants.

  20. A photo-triggered layered surface coating producing reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Doris; Monteiro, Isa P; Huang, David; Langer, Robert; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-12-01

    We report a photoactive surface coating which produces cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon irradiation with near infrared (NIR) light. The coating is assembled layer-by-layer, and consists of cross-linked hyaluronic acid (HA) and poly-l-lysine (PLL) modified with the photoactive molecule pheophorbide a. Pheophorbide a loading can be fine-tuned by varying the number of bilayers, yielding stable materials with the capacity to generate repeated and/or prolonged light-triggered ROS release. Light irradiation of the photoactive surface coatings provides a versatile platform for the spatiotemporal control of events at the material-tissue interface, such as bacterial colonization, platelet adhesion, and mammalian cell attachment.

  1. Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key factor for stimulation of macrophage proliferation by ceramide 1-phosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Arana, Lide; Gangoiti, Patricia; Ouro, Alberto; Rivera, Io-Guane; Ordonez, Marta; Trueba, Miguel; Lankalapalli, Ravi S.; Bittman, Robert; Gomez-Munoz, Antonio

    2012-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) is mitogenic for fibroblasts and macrophages. However, the mechanisms involved in this action were only partially described. Here, we demonstrate that C1P stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in primary bone marrow-derived macrophages, and that ROS are required for the mitogenic effect of C1P. ROS production was dependent upon prior activation of NADPH oxidase by C1P, which was determined by measuring phosphorylation of the p40phox subunit and translocation of p47phox from the cytosol to the plasma membrane. In addition, C1P activated cytosolic calcium-dependent phospholipase A{sub 2} and protein kinase C-{alpha}, and NADPH oxidase activation was blocked by selective inhibitors of these enzymes. These inhibitors, and inhibitors of ROS production, blocked the mitogenic effect of C1P. By using BHNB-C1P (a photolabile caged-C1P analog), we demonstrate that all of these C1P actions are caused by intracellular C1P. It can be concluded that the enzyme responsible for C1P-stimulated ROS generation in bone marrow-derived macrophages is NADPH oxidase, and that this enzyme is downstream of PKC-{alpha} and cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} in this pathway. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ceramide 1-phosphate (C1P) stimulates reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The enzyme responsible for ROS generation by C1P in macrophages is NADPH oxidase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NADPH oxidase lies downstream of cPLA{sub 2}-{alpha} and PKC-{alpha} in this pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ROS generation is essential for the stimulation of macrophage proliferation by C1P.

  2. Microcystin-LR Induced Reactive Oxygen Species Mediate Cytoskeletal Disruption and Apoptosis of Hepatocytes in Cyprinus carpio L.

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Jinlin; Shan, Zhengjun; Xu, Weili; Wang, Xiaorong; Zhou, Junying; Kong, Deyang; Xu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Microcystins (MCs) are a group of cyclic hepatotoxic peptides produced by cyanobacteria. Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) contains Leucine (L) and Arginine (R) in the variable positions, and is one of the most common and potently toxic peptides. MC-LR can inhibit protein phosphatase type 1 and type 2A (PP1 and PP2A) activities and induce excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The underlying mechanism of the inhibition of PP1 and PP2A has been extensively studied. The over-production of ROS is considered to be another main mechanism behind MC-LR toxicity; however, the detailed toxicological mechanism involved in over-production of ROS in carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) remains largely unclear. In our present study, the hydroxyl radical (•OH) was significantly induced in the liver of carp after a relatively short-term exposure to MC-LR. The elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production may play an important role in the disruption of microtubule structure. Pre-injection of the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) provided significant protection to the cytoskeleton, however buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) exacerbated cytoskeletal destruction. In addition, the elevated ROS formation induced the expression of apoptosis-related genes, including p38, JNKa, and bcl-2. A significant increase in apoptotic cells was observed at 12 - 48 hours. Our study further supports evidence that ROS are involved in MC-LR induced damage to liver cells in carp, and indicates the need for further study of the molecular mechanisms behind MC-LR toxicity. PMID:24376844

  3. Protective effects of myricitrin against osteoporosis via reducing reactive oxygen species and bone-resorbing cytokines

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Qiang; Gao, Bo; Wang, Long; Hu, Ya-Qian; Lu, Wei-Guang; Yang, Liu; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Liu, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Oxidative stress is a crucial pathogenic factor in the development of osteoporosis. Myricitrin, isolated from Myrica cerifera, is a potent antioxidant. We hypothesized that myricitrin possessed protective effects against osteoporosis by partially reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and bone-resorbing cytokines in osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells and human bone marrow stromal cells (hBMSCs). We investigated myricitrin on osteogenic differentiation under oxidative stress. Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was used to establish an oxidative cell injury model. Our results revealed that myricitrin significantly improved some osteogenic markers in these cells. Myricitrin decreased lipid production and reduced peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma-2 (PPARγ2) expression in hBMSCs. Moreover, myricitrin reduced the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and IL-6 and partially suppressed ROS production. In vivo, we established a murine ovariectomized (OVX) osteoporosis model. Our results demonstrated that myricitrin supplementation reduced serum malondialdehyde (MDA) activity and increased reduced glutathione (GSH) activity. Importantly, it ameliorated the micro-architecture of trabecular bones in the 4th lumbar vertebrae (L4) and distal femur. Taken together, these results indicated that the protective effects of myricitrin against osteoporosis are linked to a reduction in ROS and bone-resorbing cytokines, suggesting that myricitrin may be useful in bone metabolism diseases, particularly osteoporosis. - Highlights: • Myricitrin protects MC3T3-E1 cells and hBMSCs from oxidative stress. • It is accompanied by a decrease in oxidative stress and bone-resorbing cytokines. • Myricitrin decreases serum reactive oxygen species to some degree. • Myricitrin partly reverses ovariectomy effects in vivo. • Myricitrin may represent a beneficial anti-osteoporosis treatment method.

  4. Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species Contributes to the Development of Carbon Black Cytotoxicity to Vascular Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Gwan; Noh, Won Jun; Kim, Hwa

    2011-01-01

    Carbon black, a particulate form of pure elemental carbon, is an industrial chemical with the high potential of occupational exposure. Although the relationship between exposure to particulate matters (PM) and cardiovascular diseases is well established, the cardiovascular risk of carbon black has not been characterized clearly. In this study, the cytotoxicity of carbon black to vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells were examined to investigate the potential vascular toxicity of carbon black. Carbon black with distinct particle size, N330 (primary size, 28~36 nm) and N990 (250~350 nm) were treated to A-10, rat aortic smooth muscle cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cell line, ECV304, and cell viability was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage assay. Treatment of carbon black N990 resulted in the significant reduction of viability in A-10 cells at 100 μg/ml, the highest concentration tested, while N330 failed to cause cell death. Cytotoxicity to ECV304 cells was induced only by N330 at higher concentration, 200 μg/ml, suggesting that ECV304 cells were relatively resistant to carbon black. Treatment of 100 μg/ml N990 led to the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) detected by dichlorodihydrofluorescein (DCF) in A-10 cells. Pretreatment of antioxidants, N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and sulforaphane restored decreased viability of N990-treated A-10 cells, and N-acetylcysteine, but not sulforaphane, attenuated N990-induced ROS generation in A-10 cells. Taken together, present study shows that carbon black is cytotoxic to vascular cells, and the generation of reactive oxygen contributes to the development of cytotoxicity. ROS scavenging antioxidant could be a potential strategy to attenuate the toxicity induced by carbon black exposure. PMID:24278567

  5. Iron induces protection and necrosis in cultured cardiomyocytes: Role of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Juan Pablo; Chiong, Mario; García, Lorena; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Toro, Barbra; Pedrozo, Zully; Diaz-Elizondo, Jessica; Salas, Daniela; Parra, Valentina; Núñez, Marco T; Hidalgo, Cecilia; Lavandero, Sergio

    2010-02-15

    We investigate here the role of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide in iron-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy or cell death. Cultured rat cardiomyocytes incubated with 20 microM iron (added as FeCl(3)-Na nitrilotriacetate, Fe-NTA) displayed hypertrophy features that included increased protein synthesis and cell size, plus realignment of F-actin filaments along with sarcomeres and activation of the atrial natriuretic factor gene promoter. Incubation with higher Fe-NTA concentrations (100 microM) produced cardiomyocyte death by necrosis. Incubation for 24 h with Fe-NTA (20-40 microM) or the nitric oxide donor Delta-nonoate increased iNOS mRNA but decreased iNOS protein levels; under these conditions, iron stimulated the activity and the dimerization of iNOS. Fe-NTA (20 microM) promoted short- and long-term generation of reactive oxygen species, whereas preincubation with l-arginine suppressed this response. Preincubation with 20 microM Fe-NTA also attenuated the necrotic cell death triggered by 100 microM Fe-NTA, suggesting that these preincubation conditions have cardioprotective effects. Inhibition of iNOS activity with 1400 W enhanced iron-induced ROS generation and prevented both iron-dependent cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and cardioprotection. In conclusion, we propose that Fe-NTA (20 microM) stimulates iNOS activity and that the enhanced NO production, by promoting hypertrophy and enhancing survival mechanisms through ROS reduction, is beneficial to cardiomyocytes. At higher concentrations, however, iron triggers cardiomyocyte death by necrosis. PMID:19969068

  6. A mutation in the mitochondrial protein UQCRB promotes angiogenesis through the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Chang, Junghwa; Jung, Hye Jin; Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2014-12-12

    Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase binding protein (UQCRB) is one of the subunits of mitochondrial complex III and is a target protein of the natural anti-angiogenic small molecule terpestacin. Previously, the biological role of UQCRB was thought to be limited to the maintenance of complex III. However, the identification and validation of UQCRB as a target protein of terpestacin enabled the role of UQCRB in oxygen sensing and angiogenesis to be elucidated. To explore the biological role of this protein further, UQCRB mutant stable cell lines were generated on the basis of a human case report. We demonstrated that these cell lines exhibited glycolytic and pro-angiogenic activities via mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS)-mediated HIF1 signal transduction. Furthermore, a morphological abnormality in mitochondria was detected in UQCRB mutant stable cell lines. In addition, the proliferative effect of the UQCRB mutants was significantly regulated by the UQCRB inhibitors terpestacin and A1938. Collectively, these results provide a molecular basis for UQCRB-related biological processes and reveal potential key roles of UQCRB in angiogenesis and mitochondria-mediated metabolic disorders.

  7. A mutation in the mitochondrial protein UQCRB promotes angiogenesis through the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Junghwa; Jung, Hye Jin; Jeong, Seung Hun; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin; Kwon, Ho Jeong

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • We constructed mitochondrial protein UQCRB mutant stable cell lines on the basis of a human case report. • These mutant cell lines exhibit pro-angiogenic activity with enhanced VEGF expression. • Proliferation of mutant cell lines was regulated by UQCRB inhibitors. • UQCRB may have a functional role in angiogenesis. - Abstract: Ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase binding protein (UQCRB) is one of the subunits of mitochondrial complex III and is a target protein of the natural anti-angiogenic small molecule terpestacin. Previously, the biological role of UQCRB was thought to be limited to the maintenance of complex III. However, the identification and validation of UQCRB as a target protein of terpestacin enabled the role of UQCRB in oxygen sensing and angiogenesis to be elucidated. To explore the biological role of this protein further, UQCRB mutant stable cell lines were generated on the basis of a human case report. We demonstrated that these cell lines exhibited glycolytic and pro-angiogenic activities via mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mROS)-mediated HIF1 signal transduction. Furthermore, a morphological abnormality in mitochondria was detected in UQCRB mutant stable cell lines. In addition, the proliferative effect of the UQCRB mutants was significantly regulated by the UQCRB inhibitors terpestacin and A1938. Collectively, these results provide a molecular basis for UQCRB-related biological processes and reveal potential key roles of UQCRB in angiogenesis and mitochondria-mediated metabolic disorders.

  8. Biological Activities of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species: Oxidative Stress versus Signal Transduction.

    PubMed

    Weidinger, Adelheid; Kozlov, Andrey V

    2015-01-01

    In the past, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) were shown to cause oxidative damage to biomolecules, contributing to the development of a variety of diseases. However, recent evidence has suggested that intracellular RONS are an important component of intracellular signaling cascades. The aim of this review was to consolidate old and new ideas on the chemical, physiological and pathological role of RONS for a better understanding of their properties and specific activities. Critical consideration of the literature reveals that deleterious effects do not appear if only one primary species (superoxide radical, nitric oxide) is present in a biological system, even at high concentrations. The prerequisite of deleterious effects is the formation of highly reactive secondary species (hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite), emerging exclusively upon reaction with another primary species or a transition metal. The secondary species are toxic, not well controlled, causing irreversible damage to all classes of biomolecules. In contrast, primary RONS are well controlled (superoxide dismutase, catalase), and their reactions with biomolecules are reversible, making them ideal for physiological/pathophysiological intracellular signaling. We assume that whether RONS have a signal transducing or damaging effect is primarily defined by their quality, being primary or secondary RONS, and only secondly by their quantity. PMID:25884116

  9. Inelastic and reactive scattering of hyperthermal atomic oxygen from amorphous carbon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, Timothy K.; Nelson, Christine M.; Brinza, David E.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1991-01-01

    The reaction of hyperthermal oxygen atoms with an amorphous carbon-13 surface was studied using a modified universal crossed molecular beams apparatus. Time-of-flight distributions of inelastically scattered O-atoms and reactively scattered CO-13 and CO2-13 were measured with a rotatable mass spectrometer detector. Two inelastic scattering channels were observed, corresponding to a direct inelastic process in which the scattered O-atoms retain 20 to 30 percent of their initial kinetic energy and to a trapping desorption process whereby O-atoms emerge from the surface at thermal velocities. Reactive scattering data imply the formation of two kinds of CO products, slow products whose translational energies are determined by the surface temperature and hyperthermal (Approx. 3 eV) products with translational energies comprising roughly 30 percent of the total available energy (E sub avl), where E sub avl is the sum of the collision energy and the reaction exothermicity. Angular data show that the hyperthermal CO is scattered preferentially in the specular direction. CO2 product was also observed, but at much lower intensities than CO and with only thermal velocities.

  10. Mechanisms Underlying Interferon-γ-Induced Priming of Microglial Reactive Oxygen Species Production.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Nicholas G; Schilling, Tom; Miralles, Francesc; Eder, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Microglial priming and enhanced reactivity to secondary insults cause substantial neuronal damage and are hallmarks of brain aging, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. It is, thus, of particular interest to identify mechanisms involved in microglial priming. Here, we demonstrate that priming of microglia with interferon-γ (IFN γ) substantially enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following stimulation of microglia with ATP. Priming of microglial ROS production was substantially reduced by inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with SB203580, by increases in intracellular glutathione levels with N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, by blockade of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 activity with gp91ds-tat or by inhibition of nitric oxide production with L-NAME. Together, our data indicate that priming of microglial ROS production involves reduction of intracellular glutathione levels, upregulation of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 and increases in nitric oxide production, and suggest that these simultaneously occurring processes result in enhanced production of neurotoxic peroxynitrite. Furthermore, IFNγ-induced priming of microglial ROS production was reduced upon blockade of Kir2.1 inward rectifier K+ channels with ML133. Inhibitory effects of ML133 on microglial priming were mediated via regulation of intracellular glutathione levels and nitric oxide production. These data suggest that microglial Kir2.1 channels may represent novel therapeutic targets to inhibit excessive ROS production by primed microglia in brain pathology. PMID:27598576

  11. Production characteristics of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species in water using atmospheric pressure discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Kohki; Itoh, Hidenori; Kawaguchi, Hideki; Timoshkin, Igor; Given, Martin; MacGregor, Scott

    2016-07-01

    A pulsed discharge, a DC corona discharge, and a plasma jet are separately generated above a water surface, and reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) in the water are investigated. ROS/RNS in water after the sparging of the off-gas of a packed-bed dielectric barrier discharge (PB-DBD) are also investigated. H2O2, NO2 -, and NO3 - are detected after plasma exposure and only NO3 - after off-gas sparging. Short-lifetime species in plasma are found to play an important role in H2O2 and NO2 - production and long-lifetime species in NO3 - production. NO x may inhibit H2O2 production through OH consumption to produce HNO2 and HNO3. O3 does not contribute to ROS/RNS production. The pulsed plasma exposure is found to be effective for the production of H2O2 and NO2 -, and the off-gas sparging of the PB-DBD for the production of NO3 -.

  12. Mechanisms Underlying Interferon-γ-Induced Priming of Microglial Reactive Oxygen Species Production

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Nicholas G.; Schilling, Tom; Miralles, Francesc; Eder, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Microglial priming and enhanced reactivity to secondary insults cause substantial neuronal damage and are hallmarks of brain aging, traumatic brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases. It is, thus, of particular interest to identify mechanisms involved in microglial priming. Here, we demonstrate that priming of microglia with interferon-γ (IFN γ) substantially enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) following stimulation of microglia with ATP. Priming of microglial ROS production was substantially reduced by inhibition of p38 MAPK activity with SB203580, by increases in intracellular glutathione levels with N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, by blockade of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 activity with gp91ds-tat or by inhibition of nitric oxide production with L-NAME. Together, our data indicate that priming of microglial ROS production involves reduction of intracellular glutathione levels, upregulation of NADPH oxidase subunit NOX2 and increases in nitric oxide production, and suggest that these simultaneously occurring processes result in enhanced production of neurotoxic peroxynitrite. Furthermore, IFNγ-induced priming of microglial ROS production was reduced upon blockade of Kir2.1 inward rectifier K+ channels with ML133. Inhibitory effects of ML133 on microglial priming were mediated via regulation of intracellular glutathione levels and nitric oxide production. These data suggest that microglial Kir2.1 channels may represent novel therapeutic targets to inhibit excessive ROS production by primed microglia in brain pathology. PMID:27598576

  13. Methylglyoxal Induces Apoptosis Mediated by Reactive Oxygen Species in Bovine Retinal Pericytes

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jang-Won; Lee, Jeong-An; Oh, Yeon-Sahng; Shinn, Soon-Hyun

    2004-01-01

    One of the histopathologic hallmarks of early diabetic retinopathy is the loss of pericytes. Evidences suggest that the pericyte loss in vivo is mediated by apoptosis. However, the underlying cause of pericyte apoptosis is not fully understood. This study investigated the influence of methylglyoxal (MGO), a reactive α-dicarbonyl compound of glucose metabolism, on apoptotic cell death in bovine retinal pericytes. Analysis of internucleosomal DNA fragmentation by ELISA showed that MGO (200 to 800 µM) induced apoptosis in a concentration-dependent manner. Intracellular reactive oxygen species were generated earlier and the antioxidant, N-acetyl cysteine, inhibited the MGO-induced apoptosis. NF-κB activation and increased caspase-3 activity were detected. Apoptosis was also inhibited by the caspase-3 inhibitor, Z-DEVD-fmk, or the NF-κB inhibitor, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate. These data suggest that elevated MGO levels observed in diabetes may cause apoptosis in bovine retinal pericytes through an oxidative stress mechanism and suggests that the nuclear activation of NF-κB are involved in the apoptotic process. PMID:14966349

  14. Anchoring PEG-oleate to cell membranes stimulates reactive oxygen species production.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Nomura, Koujiro; Mochizuki, Kei; Taya, Masahito

    2016-11-01

    Polyethylene glycol (PEG) derivatives possessing oleyl and reactive groups for conjugating functional substrates, such as proteins and quantum dots, are useful materials for cell-surface engineering and cell immobilization onto substrates. The reagent is known as a biocompatible anchor for cell membranes (BAM). Here, BAM-anchoring on cell membranes is reported to stimulate reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in those cells. Significant increases in ROS production and release to the surrounding environment were detected in mouse fibroblast cell line 10T1/2 when soaked in a solution containing BAM conjugated with 1/10mol/mol bovine serum albumin at 1.5μM-protein. ROS production stimulation was confirmed to be independent of the protein crosslinked with BAM and of cell type. Similar stimulation was detected for BAMs conjugated with ovalbumin and casein, in human hepatoma cell line HepG2, and human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Considering the effects of ROS on a variety of cellular processes, these results demonstrated the necessity for focusing attention on the effects of generated and released ROS on the behaviors of cells in the studies applying BAM to cells.

  15. Chemical mechanisms of the toxicological properties of nanomaterials: generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Yan, Liang; Gu, Zhanjun; Zhao, Yuliang

    2013-10-01

    As more and more nanomaterials with novel physicochemical properties or new functions are created and used in different research fields and industrial sectors, the scientific and public concerns about their toxic effects on human health and the environment are also growing quickly. In the past decade, the study of the toxicological properties of nanomaterials/nanoparticles has formed a new research field: nanotoxicology. However, most of the data published relate to toxicological phenomena and there is less understanding of the underlying mechanism for nanomaterial-induced toxicity. Nanomaterial-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a key role in cellular and tissue toxicity. Herein, we classify the pathways for intracellular ROS production by nanomaterials into 1) the direct generation of ROS through nanomaterial-catalyzed free-radical reactions in cells, and 2) the indirect generation of ROS through disturbing the inherent biochemical equilibria in cells. We also discuss the chemical mechanisms associated with above pathways of intracellular ROS generation, from the viewpoint of the high reactivity of atoms on the nanosurface. We hope to aid in the understanding of the chemical origin of nanotoxicity to provide new insights for chemical and material scientists for the rational design and creation of safer and greener nanomaterials.

  16. Biological Activities of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species: Oxidative Stress versus Signal Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Weidinger, Adelheid; Kozlov, Andrey V.

    2015-01-01

    In the past, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) were shown to cause oxidative damage to biomolecules, contributing to the development of a variety of diseases. However, recent evidence has suggested that intracellular RONS are an important component of intracellular signaling cascades. The aim of this review was to consolidate old and new ideas on the chemical, physiological and pathological role of RONS for a better understanding of their properties and specific activities. Critical consideration of the literature reveals that deleterious effects do not appear if only one primary species (superoxide radical, nitric oxide) is present in a biological system, even at high concentrations. The prerequisite of deleterious effects is the formation of highly reactive secondary species (hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrite), emerging exclusively upon reaction with another primary species or a transition metal. The secondary species are toxic, not well controlled, causing irreversible damage to all classes of biomolecules. In contrast, primary RONS are well controlled (superoxide dismutase, catalase), and their reactions with biomolecules are reversible, making them ideal for physiological/pathophysiological intracellular signaling. We assume that whether RONS have a signal transducing or damaging effect is primarily defined by their quality, being primary or secondary RONS, and only secondly by their quantity. PMID:25884116

  17. A novel biointerface that suppresses cell morphological changes by scavenging excess reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Yutaka; Yoshinari, Tomoki; Nagasaki, Yukio

    2015-09-01

    During cell cultivation on conventional culture dishes, various events results in strong stresses that lead to the production of bioactive species such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide. These reactive species cause variable damage to cells and stimulate cellular responses. Here, we report the design of a novel biocompatible surface that decreases stress by not only morphologically modifying the dish surface by using poly(ethylene glycol) tethered chains, but also actively scavenging oxidative stress by using our novel nitroxide radical-containing polymer. A block copolymer, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly[(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-N-oxyl)aminomethylstyrene] (PEG-b-PMNT) was used to coat the surface of a dish. Differentiation of undifferentiated human leukemia (HL-60) cells was found to be suppressed on the polymer-coated dish. Notably, HL-60 cell cultivation caused apoptosis under high-density conditions, while spontaneous apoptosis was suppressed in cells plated on the PEG-b-PMNT-modified surface, because a healthy mitochondrial membrane potential was maintained. In contrast, low molecular weight antioxidants did not have apparent effects on the maintenance of mitochondria. We attribute this to the lack of cellular internalization of our immobilized polymer and selective scavenging of excessive ROS generated outside of cells. These results demonstrate the utility of our novel biocompatible material for actively scavenging ROS and thus maintaining cellular morphology. PMID:25691268

  18. Prussian Blue Nanoparticles as Multienzyme Mimetics and Reactive Oxygen Species Scavengers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Hu, Sunling; Yin, Jun-Jie; He, Weiwei; Lu, Wei; Ma, Ming; Gu, Ning; Zhang, Yu

    2016-05-11

    The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is an important mechanism of nanomaterial toxicity. We found that Prussian blue nanoparticles (PBNPs) can effectively scavenge ROS via multienzyme-like activity including peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Instead of producing hydroxyl radicals (•OH) through the Fenton reaction, PBNPs were shown to be POD mimetics that can inhibit •OH generation. We theorized for the first time that the multienzyme-like activities of PBNPs were likely caused by the abundant redox potentials of their different forms, making them efficient electron transporters. To study the ROS scavenging ability of PBNPs, a series of in vitro ROS-generating models was established using chemicals, UV irradiation, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, high glucose contents, and oxygen glucose deprivation and reperfusion. To demonstrate the ROS scavenging ability of PBNPs, an in vivo inflammation model was established using lipoproteins in Institute for Cancer Research (ICR) mice. The results indicated that PBNPs hold great potential for inhibiting or relieving injury induced by ROS in these pathological processes.

  19. The mechanism of cell-damaging reactive oxygen generation by colloidal fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Markovic, Zoran; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana; Kleut, Duska; Nikolic, Nadezda; Vranjes-Djuric, Sanja; Misirkic, Maja; Vucicevic, Ljubica; Janjetovic, Kristina; Isakovic, Aleksandra; Harhaji, Ljubica; Babic-Stojic, Branka; Dramicanin, Miroslav; Trajkovic, Vladimir

    2007-12-01

    Because of the ability to induce cell death in certain conditions, the fullerenes (C(60)) are potential anticancer and toxic agents. The colloidal suspension of crystalline C(60) (nano-C(60), nC(60)) is extremely toxic, but the mechanisms of its cytotoxicity are not completely understood. By combining experimental analysis and mathematical modelling, we investigate the requirements for the reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated cytotoxicity of different nC(60) suspensions, prepared by solvent exchange method in tetrahydrofuran (THF/nC(60)) and ethanol (EtOH/nC(60)), or by extended mixing in water (aqu/nC(60)). With regard to their capacity to generate ROS and cause mitochondrial depolarization followed by necrotic cell death, the nC(60) suspensions are ranked in the following order: THF/nC(60)>EtOH/nC(60)>aqu/nC(60). Mathematical modelling of singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) generation indicates that the (1)O(2)-quenching power (THF/nC(60)

  20. Ultraviolet Irradiation-Dependent Fluorescence Enhancement of Hemoglobin Catalyzed by Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Leiting; Wang, Xiaoxu; Yang, Shuying; Wu, Xian; Lee, Imshik; Zhang, Xinzheng; Rupp, Romano A.; Xu, Jingjun

    2012-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has a potent effect on biological organisms. Hemoglobin, an oxygen-transport protein, plays an irreplaceable role in sustaining life of all vertebrates. In this study we scrutinize the effects of ultraviolet irradiation (UVI) as well as visible irradiation on the fluorescence characteristics of bovine hemoglobin (BHb) in vitro. Data show that UVI results in fluorescence enhancement of BHb in a dose-dependant manner. Furthermore, UVI-induced fluorescence enhancement is significantly increased when BHb is pretreated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a type of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Meanwhile, The water-soluble antioxidant vitamin C suppresses this UVI-induced fluorescence enhancement. In contrast, green light irradiation does not lead to fluorescence enhancement of BHb no matter whether H2O2 is acting on the BHb solution or not. Taken together, these results indicate that catalysis of ROS and UVI-dependent irradiation play two key roles in the process of UVI-induced fluorescence enhancement of BHb. PMID:22952902

  1. Oxidative Stress in the Developing Rat Brain due to Production of Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen Species

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Jiří; Vytášek, Richard; Uhlík, Jiří; Vajner, Luděk

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress after birth led us to localize reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) production in the developing rat brain. Brains were assessed a day prenatally and on postnatal days 1, 2, 4, 8, 14, 30, and 60. Oxidation of dihydroethidium detected superoxide; 6-carboxy-2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate revealed hydrogen peroxide; immunohistochemical proof of nitrotyrosine and carboxyethyllysine detected peroxynitrite formation and lipid peroxidation, respectively. Blue autofluorescence detected protein oxidation. The foetuses showed moderate RONS production, which changed cyclically during further development. The periods and sites of peak production of individual RONS differed, suggesting independent generation. On day 1, neuronal/glial RONS production decreased indicating that increased oxygen concentration after birth did not cause oxidative stress. Dramatic changes in the amount and the sites of RONS production occurred on day 4. Nitrotyrosine detection reached its maximum. Day 14 represented other vast alterations in RONS generation. Superoxide production in arachnoidal membrane reached its peak. From this day on, the internal elastic laminae of blood vessels revealed the blue autofluorescence. The adult animals produced moderate levels of superoxide; all other markers reached their minimum. There was a strong correlation between detection of nitrotyrosine and carboxyethyllysine probably caused by lipid peroxidation initiated with RONS. PMID:27190574

  2. Reactive oxygen species mediate cognitive deficits in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Jennifer N.; Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; White, Andrew M.; Day, Brian J.; Patel, Manisha

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is an important comorbidity of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). However, no targeted therapies are available and the mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment, specifically deficits in learning and memory associated with TLE remain unknown. Oxidative stress is known to occur in the pathogenesis of TLE but its functional role remains to be determined. Here, we demonstrate that oxidative stress and resultant processes contribute to cognitive decline associated with epileptogenesis. Using a synthetic catalytic antioxidant, we show that pharmacological removal of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevents 1) oxidative stress, 2) deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates, 3) hippocampal neuronal loss and 4) cognitive dysfunction without altering the intensity of the initial status epilepticus (SE) or epilepsy development in a rat model of SE-induced TLE. Moreover, the effects of the catalytic antioxidant on cognition persisted beyond the treatment period suggestive of disease-modification. The data implicate oxidative stress as a novel mechanism by which cognitive dysfunction can arise during epileptogenesis and suggest a potential disease-modifying therapeutic approach to target it. PMID:26184893

  3. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity and Memory

    PubMed Central

    Klann, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The brain is a metabolically active organ exhibiting high oxygen consumption and robust production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The large amounts of ROS are kept in check by an elaborate network of antioxidants, which sometimes fail and lead to neuronal oxidative stress. Thus, ROS are typically categorized as neurotoxic molecules and typically exert their detrimental effects via oxidation of essential macromolecules such as enzymes and cytoskeletal proteins. Most importantly, excessive ROS are associated with decreased performance in cognitive function. However, at physiological concentrations, ROS are involved in functional changes necessary for synaptic plasticity and hence, for normal cognitive function. The fine line of role reversal of ROS from good molecules to bad molecules is far from being fully understood. This review focuses on identifying the multiple sources of ROS in the mammalian nervous system and on presenting evidence for the critical and essential role of ROS in synaptic plasticity and memory. The review also shows that the inability to restrain either age- or pathology-related increases in ROS levels leads to opposite, detrimental effects that are involved in impairments in synaptic plasticity and memory function. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 2013–2054. PMID:20649473

  4. Action of reactive oxygen species in the antifungal mechanism of gemini-pyridinium salts against yeast.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Ueta, Shouko; Maseda, Hideaki; Kourai, Hiroki; Omasa, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    We previously found that the gemini quaternary salt (gemini-QUAT) containing two pyridinium residues per molecule, 3,3'- (2,7-dioxaoctane) bis (1-decylpyridinium bromide) (3DOBP-4,10) , exerted fungicidal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and caused respiration inhibition and the cytoplasmic leakage of ATP, magnesium, and potassium ions. Here, we investigated how the gemini-QUAT, 3DOBP-4,10, exerts more powerful antimicrobial activity than the mono-QUAT N-cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and examined the association between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the antimicrobial mechanism. Antifungal assays showed that the activity of 3DOBP-4,10 against two yeasts, S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans, was significantly elevated under aerobic conditions, and largely reduced under anaerobic conditions (nitrogen atmosphere) . Adding radical scavengers such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and potassium iodide (KI) also decreased the fungicidal activity of 3DOBP-4,10 but negligibly affected that of CPC. We measured survival under static conditions and found that the rapid fungicidal profile of 3DOBP-4,10 was lost, whereas that of CPC was slightly affected in the presence of KI. Our results suggest that 3DOBP-4,10 exerts powerful antimicrobial activity by penetrating the cell wall and membrane, which then allows oxygen to enter the cells, where it participates in the generation of intracellular ROS. The activity could thus be attributable to a synergic antimicrobial combination of the disruption of organelle membranes by the QUAT and oxidative stress imposed by ROS.

  5. The role of metals in production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species in photosystem II.

    PubMed

    Pospíšil, Pavel

    2014-07-01

    Metal ions play a crucial role in enzymatic reactions in all photosynthetic organisms such as cyanobacteria, algae and plants. It well known that metal ions maintain the binding of substrate in the active site of the metalloenzymes and control the redox activity of the metalloenzyme in the enzymatic reaction. A large pigment-protein complex, PSII, known to serve as a water-plastoquinone oxidoreductase, contains three metal centers comprising non-heme iron, heme iron of Cyt b559 and the water-splitting manganese complex. Metal ions bound to PSII proteins maintain the electron transport from water to plastoquinone and regulate the pro-oxidant and antioxidant activity in PSII. In this review, attention is focused on the role of PSII metal centers in (i) the formation of superoxide anion and hydroxyl radicals by sequential one-electron reduction of molecular oxygen and the formation of hydrogen peroxide by incomplete two-electron oxidation of water; and (ii) the elimination of superoxide anion radical by one-electron oxidation and reduction (superoxide dismutase activity) and of hydrogen peroxide by two-electron oxidation and reduction (catalase activity). The balance between the formation and elimination of reactive oxygen species by PSII metal centers is discussed as an important aspect in the prevention of photo-oxidative damage of PSII proteins and lipids.

  6. Reactive oxygen species and the bacteriostatic and bactericidal effects of isoconazole nitrate.

    PubMed

    Czaika, Viktor A; Siebenbrock, Jan; Czekalla, Frank; Zuberbier, Torsten; Sieber, Martin A

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial superinfections often occur in dermatomycoses, resulting in greatly inflamed or eczematous skin. The objective of this study was to evaluate the antibacterial efficacy of isoconazole nitrate (ISN), a broad-spectrum antimicrobial imidazole, commonly used to treat dermatomycoses. Several gram-positive bacteria minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for ISN (ISN solution or ISN-containing creams: Travogen or corticosteroid-containing Travocort) and ampicillin were obtained using the broth-dilution method. Speed of onset of the bactericidal effect was determined with bacterial killing curves. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) were visualised by staining cells with singlet oxygen detector stain. Compared with ampicillin MICs, ISN MICs for Bacillus cereus, Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus hominis were lower and ISN MICs for Corynebacterium tuberculostearicum and Streptococcus salivarius were similar. Incubation with ISN led to a 50% kill rate for Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant strains (MRSA). Post-ISN incubation, 36% (30 min) and 90% (60 min) of S. aureus cells were positive for ROS. Isoconazole nitrate has a broad bacteriostatic and bactericidal action, also against a MRSA strain that was not reduced by the corticosteroid in the Travocort cream. Data suggest that the antibacterial effect of ISN may be ROS dependent. An antifungal agent with robust antibacterial activity can provide a therapeutic advantage in treating dermatomycoses with suspected bacterial superinfections.

  7. Reactive oxygen species mediate cognitive deficits in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jennifer N; Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; White, Andrew M; Day, Brian J; Patel, Manisha

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is an important comorbidity of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). However, no targeted therapies are available and the mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment, specifically deficits in learning and memory associated with TLE remain unknown. Oxidative stress is known to occur in the pathogenesis of TLE but its functional role remains to be determined. Here, we demonstrate that oxidative stress and resultant processes contribute to cognitive decline associated with epileptogenesis. Using a synthetic catalytic antioxidant, we show that pharmacological removal of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevents 1) oxidative stress, 2) deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates, 3) hippocampal neuronal loss and 4) cognitive dysfunction without altering the intensity of the initial status epilepticus (SE) or epilepsy development in a rat model of SE-induced TLE. Moreover, the effects of the catalytic antioxidant on cognition persisted beyond the treatment period suggestive of disease-modification. The data implicate oxidative stress as a novel mechanism by which cognitive dysfunction can arise during epileptogenesis and suggest a potential disease-modifying therapeutic approach to target it.

  8. Reactive oxygen species mediate cognitive deficits in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Jennifer N; Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; White, Andrew M; Day, Brian J; Patel, Manisha

    2015-10-01

    Cognitive dysfunction is an important comorbidity of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). However, no targeted therapies are available and the mechanisms underlying cognitive impairment, specifically deficits in learning and memory associated with TLE remain unknown. Oxidative stress is known to occur in the pathogenesis of TLE but its functional role remains to be determined. Here, we demonstrate that oxidative stress and resultant processes contribute to cognitive decline associated with epileptogenesis. Using a synthetic catalytic antioxidant, we show that pharmacological removal of reactive oxygen species (ROS) prevents 1) oxidative stress, 2) deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates, 3) hippocampal neuronal loss and 4) cognitive dysfunction without altering the intensity of the initial status epilepticus (SE) or epilepsy development in a rat model of SE-induced TLE. Moreover, the effects of the catalytic antioxidant on cognition persisted beyond the treatment period suggestive of disease-modification. The data implicate oxidative stress as a novel mechanism by which cognitive dysfunction can arise during epileptogenesis and suggest a potential disease-modifying therapeutic approach to target it. PMID:26184893

  9. Peroxisome Proliferation in Foraminifera Inhabiting the Chemocline: An Adaptation to Reactive Oxygen Species Exposure?1

    PubMed Central

    BERNHARD, JOAN M.; BOWSER, SAMUEL S.

    2009-01-01

    Certain foraminiferal species are abundant within the chemocline of marine sediments. Ultrastructurally, most of these species possess numerous peroxisomes complexed with the endoplasmic reticulum; mitochondria are often interspersed among these complexes. In the Santa Barbara Basin, pore-water bathing Foraminifera and co-occurring sulfur-oxidizing microbial mats had micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide, a reactive oxygen species that can be detrimental to biological membranes. Experimental results indicate that adenosine triphosphate concentrations are significantly higher in Foraminifera incubated in 16 μM H2O2 than in specimens incubated in the absence of H2O2. New ultrastructural and experimental observations, together with published results, lead us to propose that foraminiferans can utilize oxygen derived from the breakdown of environmentally and metabolically produced H2O2. Such a capability could explain foraminiferal adaptation to certain chemically inhospitable environments; it would also force us to reassess the role of protists in biogeochemistry, especially with respect to hydrogen and iron. The ecology of these protists also appears to be tightly linked to the sulfur cycle. Finally, given that some Foraminifera bearing peroxisome-endoplasmic reticulum complexes belong to evolutionarily basal groups, an early acquisition of the capability to use environmental H2O2 could have facilitated diversification of foraminiferans during the Neoproterozoic. PMID:18460150

  10. Photolysis of atrazine in aqueous solution: role of process variables and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Silva, Marcela Prado; Batista, Ana Paula dos Santos; Borrely, Sueli Ivone; Silva, Vanessa Honda Ogihara; Teixeira, Antonio Carlos Silva Costa

    2014-11-01

    Photochemical advanced oxidation processes have been considered for the treatment of water and wastewater containing the herbicide atrazine (ATZ), a possible human carcinogen and endocrine disruptor. In this study, we investigated the effects of the photon emission rate and initial concentration on ATZ photolysis at 254 nm, an issue not usually detailed in literature. Moreover, the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is discussed. Photon emission rates in the range 0.87 × 10(18)-3.6 × 10(18) photons L(-1) s(-1) and [ATZ]0 = 5 and 20 mg L(-1) were used. The results showed more than 65 % of ATZ removal after 30 min. ATZ photolysis followed apparent first-order kinetics with k values and percent removals decreasing with increasing herbicide initial concentration. A fivefold linear increase in specific degradation rate constants with photon emission rate was observed. Also, regardless the presence of persistent degradation products, toxicity was efficiently removed after 60-min exposure to UV radiation. Experiments confirmed a noticeable contribution of singlet oxygen and radical species to atrazine degradation during photolysis. These results may help understand the behavior of atrazine in different UV-driven photochemical degradation treatment processes.

  11. Peroxisome proliferation in Foraminifera inhabiting the chemocline: an adaptation to reactive oxygen species exposure?

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Joan M; Bowser, Samuel S

    2008-01-01

    Certain foraminiferal species are abundant within the chemocline of marine sediments. Ultrastructurally, most of these species possess numerous peroxisomes complexed with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER); mitochondria are often interspersed among these complexes. In the Santa Barbara Basin, pore-water bathing Foraminifera and co-occurring sulfur-oxidizing microbial mats had micromolar levels of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), a reactive oxygen species that can be detrimental to biological membranes. Experimental results indicate that adenosine triphosphate concentrations are significantly higher in Foraminifera incubated in 16 microM H(2)O(2) than in specimens incubated in the absence of H(2)O(2). New ultrastructural and experimental observations, together with published results, lead us to propose that foraminiferans can utilize oxygen derived from the breakdown of environmentally and metabolically produced H(2)O(2). Such a capability could explain foraminiferal adaptation to certain chemically inhospitable environments; it would also force us to reassess the role of protists in biogeochemistry, especially with respect to hydrogen and iron. The ecology of these protists also appears to be tightly linked to the sulfur cycle. Finally, given that some Foraminifera bearing peroxisome-ER complexes belong to evolutionarily basal groups, an early acquisition of the capability to use environmental H(2)O(2) could have facilitated diversification of foraminiferans during the Neoproterozoic.

  12. Vitamin B1 as a scavenger of reactive oxygen species photogenerated by vitamin B2.

    PubMed

    Natera, José; Massad, Walter A; García, Norman A

    2011-01-01

    Kinetics and mechanism of photoprocesses generated by visible light-irradiation of the system riboflavin (Rf, vitamin B2) plus Thiamine (Th) and Thiamine pyrophosphate (ThDP), representing vitamin B1, was studied in pH 7 water. A weak dark complex vitamin B2-vitamin B1, with a mean value of 4 ± 0.4 M(-1) is formed. An intricate mechanism of competitive reactions operates upon photoirradiation, being the light only absorbed by Rf. Th and ThDP quench excited singlet and triplet states of Rf, with rate constants in the order of 10(9) and 10(6 ) M(-1 ) s(-1), respectively. With Vitamin B1 in a concentration similar to that of dissolved molecular oxygen in water, the quenching of triplet excited Rf by the latter is highly predominant, resulting in the generation of O(2)((1)Δ(g)). Superoxide radical anion was not detected under work conditions. A relatively slow O(2)((1)Δ(g))-mediated photodegradation of Th and ThDP was observed. Nevertheless, Th and especially ThDP behave as efficient physical deactivators of O(2)((1)Δ(g)). The thiazol structure in vitamin B1 appears as a good scavenger of this reactive oxygen species. This characteristic, that presents at vitamin B1 as a potential photoprotector of biological entities against O(2)((1)Δ(g)) attack, was been experimentally confirmed employing the protein lisozime as a photo-oxidizable target.

  13. Redox- and Reactive Oxygen Species-Dependent Signaling into and out of the Photosynthesizing Chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef; Turkan, Ismail; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2016-07-01

    Photosynthesis is a high-rate redox metabolic process that is subjected to rapid changes in input parameters, particularly light. Rapid transients of photon capture, electron fluxes, and redox potentials during photosynthesis cause reactive oxygen species (ROS) to be released, including singlet oxygen, superoxide anion radicals, and hydrogen peroxide. Thus, the photosynthesizing chloroplast functions as a conditional source of important redox and ROS information, which is exploited to tune processes both inside the chloroplast and, following retrograde release or processing, in the cytosol and nucleus. Analyses of mutants and comparative transcriptome profiling have led to the identification of these processes and associated players and have allowed the specificity and generality of response patterns to be defined. The release of ROS and oxidation products, envelope permeabilization (for larger molecules), and metabolic interference with mitochondria and peroxisomes produce an intricate ROS and redox signature, which controls acclimation processes. This photosynthesis-related ROS and redox information feeds into various pathways (e.g. the mitogen-activated protein kinase and OXI1 signaling pathways) and controls processes such as gene expression and translation. PMID:27255485

  14. Synergistic photogeneration of reactive oxygen species by dissolved organic matter and C60 in aqueous phase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Niu, Junfeng; Shang, Enxiang; Crittenden, John Charles

    2015-01-20

    We investigated the photogeneration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by C60 under UV irradiation, when humic acid (HA) or fulvic acid (FA) is present. When C60 and dissolved organic matter (DOM) were present as a mixture, singlet oxygen ((1)O2) generation concentrations were 1.2–1.5 times higher than the sum of (1)O2 concentrations that were produced when C60 and DOM were present in water by themselves. When C60 and HA were present as a mixture, superoxide radicals (O2(•–)) were 2.2–2.6 times more than when C60 and HA were present in water by themselves. A synergistic ROS photogeneration mechanism involved in energy and electron transfer between DOM and C60 was proposed. Enhanced (1)O2 generation in the mixtures was partly due to (3)DOM* energy transfer to O2. However, it was mostly due to (3)DOM* energy transfer to C60 producing (3)C60*. (3)C60* has a prolonged lifetime (>4 μs) in the mixture and provides sufficient time for energy transfer to O2, which produces (1)O2. The enhanced O2(•–) generation for HA/C60 mixture was because (3)C60* mediated electron transfer from photoionized HA to O2. This study demonstrates the importance of considering DOM when investigating ROS production by C60.

  15. Action of reactive oxygen species in the antifungal mechanism of gemini-pyridinium salts against yeast.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Akihiro; Ueta, Shouko; Maseda, Hideaki; Kourai, Hiroki; Omasa, Takeshi

    2012-06-01

    We previously found that the gemini quaternary salt (gemini-QUAT) containing two pyridinium residues per molecule, 3,3'- (2,7-dioxaoctane) bis (1-decylpyridinium bromide) (3DOBP-4,10) , exerted fungicidal activity against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and caused respiration inhibition and the cytoplasmic leakage of ATP, magnesium, and potassium ions. Here, we investigated how the gemini-QUAT, 3DOBP-4,10, exerts more powerful antimicrobial activity than the mono-QUAT N-cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and examined the association between reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the antimicrobial mechanism. Antifungal assays showed that the activity of 3DOBP-4,10 against two yeasts, S. cerevisiae and Candida albicans, was significantly elevated under aerobic conditions, and largely reduced under anaerobic conditions (nitrogen atmosphere) . Adding radical scavengers such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and potassium iodide (KI) also decreased the fungicidal activity of 3DOBP-4,10 but negligibly affected that of CPC. We measured survival under static conditions and found that the rapid fungicidal profile of 3DOBP-4,10 was lost, whereas that of CPC was slightly affected in the presence of KI. Our results suggest that 3DOBP-4,10 exerts powerful antimicrobial activity by penetrating the cell wall and membrane, which then allows oxygen to enter the cells, where it participates in the generation of intracellular ROS. The activity could thus be attributable to a synergic antimicrobial combination of the disruption of organelle membranes by the QUAT and oxidative stress imposed by ROS. PMID:22790843

  16. Morphology-dependent interplay of reduction behaviors, oxygen vacancies and hydroxyl reactivity of CeO2 nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuxian; Li, Rongtan; Chen, Shilong; Luo, Liangfeng; Cao, Tian; Huang, Weixin

    2015-12-21

    Reduction behaviors, oxygen vacancies and hydroxyl groups play decisive roles in the surface chemistry and catalysis of oxides. Employing isothermal H2 reduction we simultaneously reduced CeO2 nanocrystals with different morphologies, created oxygen vacancies and produced hydroxyl groups. The morphology of CeO2 nanocrystals was observed to strongly affect the reduction process and the resultant oxygen vacancy structure. The resultant oxygen vacancies are mainly located on the surfaces of CeO2 cubes and rods but in the subsurface/bulk of CeO2 octahedra. The reactivity of isolated bridging hydroxyl groups on CeO2 nanocrystals was found to depend on the local oxygen vacancy concentration, in which they reacted to produce water at low local oxygen vacancy concentrations but to produce both water and hydrogen with increasing local oxygen vacancy concentration. These results reveal a morphology-dependent interplay among the reduction behaviors, oxygen vacancies and hydroxyl reactivity of CeO2 nanocrystals, which deepens the fundamental understanding of the surface chemistry and catalysis of CeO2.

  17. Growth properties and reactivity of oxygen phases on platinum (111) and palladiium (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devarajan, Sunil Poondi

    Oxidation reactions of Pt and Pd under lean burn or oxygen rich conditions are crucial to heterogeneous catalysis systems used in oxidation of hydrocarbons, fabrication of specialty chemicals, power generation through catalytic oxidation, fuel cells and most significantly pollution control through remediation of industrial and automotive exhaust. In spite of their tremendous appeal and widespread use in many important applications, knowledge used to formulate catalytic systems based on the transition metals has chiefly been derived from empirical data, because of their low reactivity towards molecular oxygen under experimental conditions of Ultra High Vacuum (UHV). Thanks to recent advances in surface science techniques, path breaking research through innovative experimental methods coupled with a renewed vigor towards computational ab-initio simulations, have opened avenues for fundamental understanding of this important class of reactions. We utilized strong oxidizing agents like nitrogen di-oxide and atomic oxygen beams to grow oxygen phases on platinum and palladium single crystals and studied their characteristics using various surface analytic techniques. Our STM work on Pt(111), ends a long standing debate on whether the oxygen atoms continue filling up fcc hollow sites or start filling up hcp hollow sites beyond the well understood 0.25 ML coverage. We also present evidence to demonstrate formation of a Pt oxide chain compound which appears as protrusions on the surface and arrange themselves into a well networked superstructure during initial oxidation. Our work on Pd(111) using TPRS, reveals for the first time that C-H bond cleavage of propane occurs on a PdO(101) thin film at temperatures below 200 K under UHV conditions. It is also observed that the hydrogen, and propyl fragments resulting from the bond cleavage react with the thin film oxide to undergo complete oxidation releasing H2O and CO2 at higher temperatures. The C-H bond cleavage occurs only

  18. Individuals with higher metabolic rates have lower levels of reactive oxygen species in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Salin, Karine; Auer, Sonya K.; Rudolf, Agata M.; Anderson, Graeme J.; Cairns, Andrew G.; Mullen, William; Hartley, Richard C.; Selman, Colin; Metcalfe, Neil B.

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the effect of energy metabolism on oxidative stress, but much ambiguity over the relationship between the rate of oxygen consumption and the generation of