Science.gov

Sample records for addition sensitivity studies

  1. Sensitization to Food Additives in Patients with Allergy: A Study Based on Skin Test and Open Oral Challenge.

    PubMed

    Moghtaderi, Mozhgan; Hejrati, Zinatosadat; Dehghani, Zahra; Dehghani, Faranak; Kolahi, Niloofar

    2016-06-01

    There has been a great increase in the consumption of various food additives in recent years. The purpose of this study was to identify the incidence of sensitization to food additives by using skin prick test in patients with allergy and to determine the concordance rate between positive skin tests and oral challenge in hypersensitivity to additives. This cross-sectional study included 125 (female 71, male 54) patients aged 2-76 years with allergy and 100 healthy individuals. Skin tests were performed in both patient and control groups with 25 fresh food additives. Among patients with allergy, 22.4% showed positive skin test at least to one of the applied materials. Skin test was negative to all tested food additives in control group. Oral food challenge was done in 28 patients with positive skin test, in whom 9 patients showed reaction to culprit (Concordance rate=32.1%). The present study suggested that about one-third of allergic patients with positive reaction to food additives showed positive oral challenge; it may be considered the potential utility of skin test to identify the role of food additives in patients with allergy. PMID:27424134

  2. Revealing Additional Dimensions of Globalisation and Cultural Hegemony: A Response to Roland S. Persson's Call for Cultural Sensitivity in Gifted Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambrose, Don

    2012-01-01

    In this commentary, the author finds the interdisciplinary approach of Roland S. Persson's (2012a) target article refreshing. Persson's (2012a) additional emphases on ethnocentricity, cultural bias and strong threads of influence from the global economy also are helpful. They shed light on some strong contextual influences that shape the…

  3. Surveillance Metrics Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bierbaum, R; Hamada, M; Robertson, A

    2011-11-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  4. Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.

    SciTech Connect

    Hamada, Michael S.; Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Robertson, Alix A.

    2011-09-01

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  5. Nitrogen Addition Enhances Drought Sensitivity of Young Deciduous Tree Species

    PubMed Central

    Dziedek, Christoph; Härdtle, Werner; von Oheimb, Goddert; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how trees respond to global change drivers is central to predict changes in forest structure and functions. Although there is evidence on the mode of nitrogen (N) and drought (D) effects on tree growth, our understanding of the interplay of these factors is still limited. Simultaneously, as mixtures are expected to be less sensitive to global change as compared to monocultures, we aimed to investigate the combined effects of N addition and D on the productivity of three tree species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Pseudotsuga menziesii) in relation to functional diverse species mixtures using data from a 4-year field experiment in Northwest Germany. Here we show that species mixing can mitigate the negative effects of combined N fertilization and D events, but the community response is mainly driven by the combination of certain traits rather than the tree species richness of a community. For beech, we found that negative effects of D on growth rates were amplified by N fertilization (i.e., combined treatment effects were non-additive), while for oak and fir, the simultaneous effects of N and D were additive. Beech and oak were identified as most sensitive to combined N+D effects with a strong size-dependency observed for beech, suggesting that the negative impact of N+D becomes stronger with time as beech grows larger. As a consequence, the net biodiversity effect declined at the community level, which can be mainly assigned to a distinct loss of complementarity in beech-oak mixtures. This pattern, however, was not evident in the other species-mixtures, indicating that neighborhood composition (i.e., trait combination), but not tree species richness mediated the relationship between tree diversity and treatment effects on tree growth. Our findings point to the importance of the qualitative role (‘trait portfolio’) that biodiversity play in determining resistance of diverse tree communities to environmental changes. As such, they provide

  6. Nitrogen Addition Enhances Drought Sensitivity of Young Deciduous Tree Species.

    PubMed

    Dziedek, Christoph; Härdtle, Werner; von Oheimb, Goddert; Fichtner, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how trees respond to global change drivers is central to predict changes in forest structure and functions. Although there is evidence on the mode of nitrogen (N) and drought (D) effects on tree growth, our understanding of the interplay of these factors is still limited. Simultaneously, as mixtures are expected to be less sensitive to global change as compared to monocultures, we aimed to investigate the combined effects of N addition and D on the productivity of three tree species (Fagus sylvatica, Quercus petraea, Pseudotsuga menziesii) in relation to functional diverse species mixtures using data from a 4-year field experiment in Northwest Germany. Here we show that species mixing can mitigate the negative effects of combined N fertilization and D events, but the community response is mainly driven by the combination of certain traits rather than the tree species richness of a community. For beech, we found that negative effects of D on growth rates were amplified by N fertilization (i.e., combined treatment effects were non-additive), while for oak and fir, the simultaneous effects of N and D were additive. Beech and oak were identified as most sensitive to combined N+D effects with a strong size-dependency observed for beech, suggesting that the negative impact of N+D becomes stronger with time as beech grows larger. As a consequence, the net biodiversity effect declined at the community level, which can be mainly assigned to a distinct loss of complementarity in beech-oak mixtures. This pattern, however, was not evident in the other species-mixtures, indicating that neighborhood composition (i.e., trait combination), but not tree species richness mediated the relationship between tree diversity and treatment effects on tree growth. Our findings point to the importance of the qualitative role ('trait portfolio') that biodiversity play in determining resistance of diverse tree communities to environmental changes. As such, they provide further

  7. Addition polyimide end cap study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    The characterization of addition polyimides with various end caps for adhesive applications at 120-250 C environments is discussed. Oligometric polyimides were prepared from 3,3',4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and 3,3'-methylenedianiline which were end-capped with functionally reactive moities which cause crosslinking when the oligomers are heated to 200-400 C. The syntheses of the oligomers are outlined. The thermolysis of the oligomers was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and the resulting polymers were characterized by differential thermal analysis and adhesive performance. The adhesive data include lap shear strengths on titanium 6-4 adherends both before and after aging for 1000 hours at 121 C and/or 232 C.

  8. Sensitivity analysis of geometric errors in additive manufacturing medical models.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jose Miguel; Arrieta, Cristobal; Andia, Marcelo E; Uribe, Sergio; Ramos-Grez, Jorge; Vargas, Alex; Irarrazaval, Pablo; Tejos, Cristian

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) models are used in medical applications for surgical planning, prosthesis design and teaching. For these applications, the accuracy of the AM models is essential. Unfortunately, this accuracy is compromised due to errors introduced by each of the building steps: image acquisition, segmentation, triangulation, printing and infiltration. However, the contribution of each step to the final error remains unclear. We performed a sensitivity analysis comparing errors obtained from a reference with those obtained modifying parameters of each building step. Our analysis considered global indexes to evaluate the overall error, and local indexes to show how this error is distributed along the surface of the AM models. Our results show that the standard building process tends to overestimate the AM models, i.e. models are larger than the original structures. They also show that the triangulation resolution and the segmentation threshold are critical factors, and that the errors are concentrated at regions with high curvatures. Errors could be reduced choosing better triangulation and printing resolutions, but there is an important need for modifying some of the standard building processes, particularly the segmentation algorithms. PMID:25649961

  9. Additional Investigations of Ice Shape Sensitivity to Parameter Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean R.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Langhals, Tammy J.

    2006-01-01

    A second parameter sensitivity study was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) using a 36 in. chord (0.91 m) NACA-0012 airfoil. The objective of this work was to further investigate the feasibility of using ice shape feature changes to define requirements for the simulation and measurement of SLD and appendix C icing conditions. A previous study concluded that it was feasible to use changes in ice shape features (e.g., ice horn angle, ice horn thickness, and ice shape mass) to detect relatively small variations in icing spray condition parameters (LWC, MVD, and temperature). The subject of this current investigation extends the scope of this previous work, by also examining the effect of icing tunnel spray-bar parameter variations (water pressure, air pressure) on ice shape feature changes. The approach was to vary spray-bar water pressure and air pressure, and then evaluate the effects of these parameter changes on the resulting ice shapes. This paper will provide a description of the experimental method, present selected experimental results, and conclude with an evaluation of these results.

  10. LOX/GOX sensitivity of fluoroelastomers. [effect of formulation components and addition of fire retardants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirshen, N.; Mill, T.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of formulation components and the addition of fire retardants on the impact sensitivity of Viton B fluoroelastomer in liquid oxygen was studied with the objective of developing a procedure for reliably reducing this sensitivity. Component evaluation, carried out on more than 40 combinations of components and cure cycles, showed that almost all the standard formulation agents, including carbon, MgO, Diak-3, and PbO2, will sensitize the Viton stock either singly or in combinations, some combinations being much more sensitive than others. Cure and postcure treatments usually reduced the sensitivity of a given formulation, often dramatically, but no formulated Viton was as insensitive as the pure Viton B stock. Coating formulated Viton with a thin layer of pure Viton gave some indication of reduced sensitivity, but additional tests are needed. It is concluded that sensitivity in formulated Viton arises from a variety of sources, some physical and some chemical in origin. Elemental analyses for all the formulated Vitons are reported as are the results of a literature search on the subject of LOX impact sensitivity.

  11. Additional EIPC Study Analysis. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W; Gotham, Douglas J.; Luciani, Ralph L.

    2014-12-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 14 topics was developed for further analysis. This paper brings together the earlier interim reports of the first 13 topics plus one additional topic into a single final report.

  12. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  13. Effect of basic additives on sensitivity and diffusion of acid in chemical amplification resists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asakawa, Koji; Ushirogouchi, Tohru; Nakase, Makoto

    1995-06-01

    The effect of amine additives in chemical amplification resists is discussed. Phenolic amines such as 4-aminophenol and 2-(4-aminophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propane were investigated as model compounds from the viewpoint of sensitivity, diffusion and resolution. Equal molar amounts of acid and amine deactivated at the very beginning of post-exposure bake, and could not participate in decomposing the inhibitor as a catalyst. Only the acid which survived from the deactivation diffuses in the resist, decomposing the inhibitors from the middle to late stage of PEB. The basic additives reduce the diffusion range of the acid, especially for long-range diffusion, resulting in higher contrast at the interfaces between the exposed and unexposed areas. In addition, the amine concentration required is found to be less than the concentration which causes the resist sensitivity to start decreasing.

  14. Sensitivity Tuning through Additive Heterogeneous Plasmon Coupling between 3D Assembled Plasmonic Nanoparticle and Nanocup Arrays.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sujin; Zhou, Xiangfei; Liu, Gang Logan

    2016-07-01

    Plasmonic substrates have fixed sensitivity once the geometry of the structure is defined. In order to improve the sensitivity, significant research effort has been focused on designing new plasmonic structures, which involves high fabrication costs; however, a method is reported for improving sensitivity not by redesigning the structure but by simply assembling plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) near the evanescent field of the underlying 3D plasmonic nanostructure. Here, a nanoscale Lycurgus cup array (nanoLCA) is employed as a base colorimetric plasmonic substrate and an assembly template. Compared to the nanoLCA, the NP assembled nanoLCA (NP-nanoLCA) exhibits much higher sensitivity for both bulk refractive index sensing and biotin-streptavidin binding detection. The limit of detection of the NP-nanoLCA is at least ten times smaller when detecting biotin-streptavidin conjugation. The numerical calculations confirm the importance of the additive plasmon coupling between the NPs and the nanoLCA for a denser and stronger electric field in the same 3D volumetric space. Tunable sensitivity is accomplished by controlling the number of NPs in each nanocup, or the number density of the hot spots. This simple yet scalable and cost-effective method of using additive heterogeneous plasmon coupling effects will benefit various chemical, medical, and environmental plasmon-based sensors. PMID:27206214

  15. Controlling the Electrostatic Discharge Ignition Sensitivity of Composite Energetic Materials Using Carbon Nanotube Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Kade H. Poper; Eric S. Collins; Michelle L. Pantoya; Michael Daniels

    2014-10-01

    Powder energetic materials are highly sensitive to electrostatic discharge (ESD) ignition. This study shows that small concentrations of carbon nanotubes (CNT) added to the highly reactive mixture of aluminum and copper oxide (Al + CuO) significantly reduces ESD ignition sensitivity. CNT act as a conduit for electric energy, bypassing energy buildup and desensitizing the mixture to ESD ignition. The lowest CNT concentration needed to desensitize ignition is 3.8 vol.% corresponding to percolation corresponding to an electrical conductivity of 0.04 S/cm. Conversely, added CNT increased Al + CuO thermal ignition sensitivity to a hot wire igniter.

  16. Carbon flux from plants to soil microbes is highly sensitive to nitrogen addition and biochar amendment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, C.; Solaiman, Z. M.; Kilburn, M. R.; Clode, P. L.; Fuchslueger, L.; Koranda, M.; Murphy, D. V.

    2012-04-01

    The release of carbon through plant roots to the soil has been recognized as a governing factor for soil microbial community composition and decomposition processes, constituting an important control for ecosystem biogeochemical cycles. Moreover, there is increasing awareness that the flux of recently assimilated carbon from plants to the soil may regulate ecosystem response to environmental change, as the rate of the plant-soil carbon transfer will likely be affected by increased plant C assimilation caused by increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. What has received less attention so far is how sensitive the plant-soil C transfer would be to possible regulations coming from belowground, such as soil N addition or microbial community changes resulting from anthropogenic inputs such as biochar amendments. In this study we investigated the size, rate and sensitivity of the transfer of recently assimilated plant C through the root-soil-mycorrhiza-microbial continuum. Wheat plants associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were grown in split-boxes which were filled either with soil or a soil-biochar mixture. Each split-box consisted of two compartments separated by a membrane which was penetrable for mycorrhizal hyphae but not for roots. Wheat plants were only grown in one compartment while the other compartment served as an extended soil volume which was only accessible by mycorrhizal hyphae associated with the plant roots. After plants were grown for four weeks we used a double-labeling approach with 13C and 15N in order to investigate interactions between C and N flows in the plant-soil-microorganism system. Plants were subjected to an enriched 13CO2 atmosphere for 8 hours during which 15NH4 was added to a subset of split-boxes to either the root-containing or the root-free compartment. Both, 13C and 15N fluxes through the plant-soil continuum were monitored over 24 hours by stable isotope methods (13C phospho-lipid fatty acids by GC-IRMS, 15N/13C in bulk plant

  17. Jerusalem artichoke and chungkookjang additively improve insulin secretion and sensitivity in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Dae Young; Kim, Min Jung; Kang, Suna; Kim, Da Sol; Park, Sunmin

    2012-01-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus Linne, HTL) and chungkookjang (CKJ; fermented soybeans) both modulate energy and glucose metabolism. However, the mechanism and their additive effects are unknown. We investigated whether the consumption of HTL and CKJ altered insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion capacity and β-cell survival in type 2 diabetic animals. Rats were divided into partially pancreatectomized (Px) diabetic rats, and sham operated non-diabetic control rats and all fed high fat diets. Diabetic rats were sub-divided into an untreated diabetic control group and those fed 5% HTL, 5% CKJ or 5% HTL+5% CKJ for 8 weeks. HTL+CKJ treatment reduced visceral fat without modulating energy intake compared to the diabetic-control. Glucose tolerance was improved in an ascending order of diabetic-control, CKJ, HTL, HTL+CKJ, and normal-control, but by different mechanisms. CKJ and CKJ+HTL, but not HTL, increased first and second phase insulin secretion in comparison to the diabetic-control at hyperglycemic clamp. However, glucose infusion rates (mg/kg bw/min) were increased by and CKJ+HTL (13.5), but not HTL (9.4) or CKJ (9.5) alone, and HTL and CKJ+ HTL decreased hepatic glucose compared to diabetic-control during the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic study and were associated with decreased triglyceride accumulation and increased glycogen storage. The improved hepatic insulin sensitivity by HTL and CKJ+HTL was explained by potentiated insulin signaling (tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 2→phosphorylation of Akt) and phosphorylation of AMPK→phosphorykation of acetyl Co carboxlase in comparison to diabetic-control and decreased PEPCK expression. Absolute β-cell mass was increased by CKJ (23.4mg) and CKJ+HTL (26.3 mg) by increasing proliferation compared to the diabetic-control (21.26 mg). Although HTL lowered β-cell apoptosis, it did not increase β-cell mass (20.8 mg). In conclusions, HTL and CKJ enhanced glucose tolerance in different

  18. Jerusalem artichoke and chungkookjang additively improve insulin secretion and sensitivity in diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus Linne, HTL) and chungkookjang (CKJ; fermented soybeans) both modulate energy and glucose metabolism. However, the mechanism and their additive effects are unknown. We investigated whether the consumption of HTL and CKJ altered insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion capacity and β-cell survival in type 2 diabetic animals. Rats were divided into partially pancreatectomized (Px) diabetic rats, and sham operated non-diabetic control rats and all fed high fat diets. Diabetic rats were sub-divided into an untreated diabetic control group and those fed 5% HTL, 5% CKJ or 5% HTL+5% CKJ for 8 weeks. HTL+CKJ treatment reduced visceral fat without modulating energy intake compared to the diabetic-control. Glucose tolerance was improved in an ascending order of diabetic-control, CKJ, HTL, HTL+CKJ, and normal-control, but by different mechanisms. CKJ and CKJ+HTL, but not HTL, increased first and second phase insulin secretion in comparison to the diabetic-control at hyperglycemic clamp. However, glucose infusion rates (mg/kg bw/min) were increased by and CKJ+HTL (13.5), but not HTL (9.4) or CKJ (9.5) alone, and HTL and CKJ+ HTL decreased hepatic glucose compared to diabetic-control during the hyperinsulinemic euglycemic study and were associated with decreased triglyceride accumulation and increased glycogen storage. The improved hepatic insulin sensitivity by HTL and CKJ+HTL was explained by potentiated insulin signaling (tyrosine phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate 2→phosphorylation of Akt) and phosphorylation of AMPK→phosphorykation of acetyl Co carboxlase in comparison to diabetic-control and decreased PEPCK expression. Absolute β-cell mass was increased by CKJ (23.4mg) and CKJ+HTL (26.3 mg) by increasing proliferation compared to the diabetic-control (21.26 mg). Although HTL lowered β-cell apoptosis, it did not increase β-cell mass (20.8 mg). In conclusions, HTL and CKJ enhanced glucose tolerance in different

  19. Sensitivity alteration of fiber Bragg grating sensors with additive micro-scale bi-material coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xixi; Alemohammad, Hamidreza; Toyserkani, Ehsan

    2013-02-01

    This paper describes a combined fabrication method for creating a bi-material micro-scale coating on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) optical sensors using laser-assisted maskless microdeposition (LAMM) and electroless nickel plating. This bi-material coating alters the sensitivity of the sensor where it also acts as a protective layer. LAMM is used to coat bare FBGs with a 1-2 µm thick conductive silver layer followed by the electroless nickel plating process to increase layer thickness to a desired level ranging from 1 to 80 µm. To identify an optimum coating thickness and predict its effect on the sensor's sensitivity to force and temperature, an optomechanical model is developed in this study. According to the model if the thickness of the Ni layer is 30-50 µm, maximum temperature sensitivity is achieved. Our analytical and experimental results suggest that the temperature sensitivity of the coated FBG with 1 µm Ag and 33 µm Ni is almost doubled compared to a bare FBG with sensitivity of 0.011 ± 0.001 nm °C-1. In contrast, the force sensitivity is decreased; however, this sensitivity reduction is less than the values reported in the literature.

  20. Sensitized Liquid Hydrazine Detonation Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathgeber, K. A.; Keddy, C. P.; Bunker, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Vapor-phase hydrazine (N2H4) is known to be very sensitive to detonation while liquid hydrazine is very insensitive to detonation, theoretically requiring extremely high pressures to induce initiation. A review of literature on solid and liquid explosives shows that when pure explosive substances are infiltrated with gas cavities, voids, and/or different phase contaminants, the energy or shock pressure necessary to induce detonation can decrease by an order of magnitude. Tests were conducted with liquid hydrazine in a modified card-gap configuration. Sensitization was attempted by bubbling helium gas through and/or suspending ceramic microspheres in the liquid. The hydrazine was subjected to the shock pressure from a 2 lb (0.9 kg) Composition C-4 explosive charge. The hydrazine was contained in a 4 in. (10.2 cm) diameter stainless steel cylinder with a 122 in(sup 3) (2 L) volume and sealed with a polyethylene cap. Blast pressures from the events were recorded by 63 high speed pressure transducers located on three radial legs extending from 4 to 115 ft (1.2 to 35.1 in) from ground zero. Comparison of the neat hydrazine and water baseline tests with the "sensitized" hydrazine tests indicates the liquid hydrazine did not detonate under these conditions.

  1. Sensitivity to food additives, vaso-active amines and salicylates: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Skypala, Isabel J; Williams, M; Reeves, L; Meyer, R; Venter, C

    2015-01-01

    Although there is considerable literature pertaining to IgE and non IgE-mediated food allergy, there is a paucity of information on non-immune mediated reactions to foods, other than metabolic disorders such as lactose intolerance. Food additives and naturally occurring 'food chemicals' have long been reported as having the potential to provoke symptoms in those who are more sensitive to their effects. Diets low in 'food chemicals' gained prominence in the 1970s and 1980s, and their popularity remains, although the evidence of their efficacy is very limited. This review focuses on the available evidence for the role and likely adverse effects of both added and natural 'food chemicals' including benzoate, sulphite, monosodium glutamate, vaso-active or biogenic amines and salicylate. Studies assessing the efficacy of the restriction of these substances in the diet have mainly been undertaken in adults, but the paper will also touch on the use of such diets in children. The difficulty of reviewing the available evidence is that few of the studies have been controlled and, for many, considerable time has elapsed since their publication. Meanwhile dietary patterns and habits have changed hugely in the interim, so the conclusions may not be relevant for our current dietary norms. The conclusion of the review is that there may be some benefit in the removal of an additive or a group of foods high in natural food chemicals from the diet for a limited period for certain individuals, providing the diagnostic pathway is followed and the foods are reintroduced back into the diet to assess for the efficacy of removal. However diets involving the removal of multiple additives and food chemicals have the very great potential to lead to nutritional deficiency especially in the paediatric population. Any dietary intervention, whether for the purposes of diagnosis or management of food allergy or food intolerance, should be adapted to the individual's dietary habits and a suitably

  2. Influence of electrolyte co-additives on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stergiopoulos, Thomas; Rozi, Evangelia; Karagianni, Chaido-Stefania; Falaras, Polycarpos

    2011-12-01

    The presence of specific chemical additives in the redox electrolyte results in an efficient increase of the photovoltaic performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). The most effective additives are 4- tert-butylpyridine (TBP), N-methylbenzimidazole (NMBI) and guanidinium thiocyanate (GuNCS) that are adsorbed onto the photoelectrode/electrolyte interface, thus shifting the semiconductor's conduction band edge and preventing recombination with triiodides. In a comparative work, we investigated in detail the action of TBP and NMBI additives in ionic liquid-based redox electrolytes with varying iodine concentrations, in order to extract the optimum additive/I2 ratio for each system. Different optimum additive/I2 ratios were determined for TBP and NMBI, despite the fact that both generally work in a similar way. Further addition of GuNCS in the optimized electrolytic media causes significant synergistic effects, the action of GuNCS being strongly influenced by the nature of the corresponding co-additive. Under the best operation conditions, power conversion efficiencies as high as 8% were obtained.

  3. Structure Property Studies for Additively Manufactured Parts

    SciTech Connect

    Milenski, Helen M; Schmalzer, Andrew Michael; Kelly, Daniel

    2015-08-17

    Since the invention of modern Additive Manufacturing (AM) processes engineers and designers have worked hard to capitalize on the unique building capabilities that AM allows. By being able to customize the interior fill of parts it is now possible to design components with a controlled density and customized internal structure. The creation of new polymers and polymer composites allow for even greater control over the mechanical properties of AM parts. One of the key reasons to explore AM, is to bring about a new paradigm in part design, where materials can be strategically optimized in a way that conventional subtractive methods cannot achieve. The two processes investigated in my research were the Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) process and the Direct Ink Write (DIW) process. The objectives of the research were to determine the impact of in-fill density and morphology on the mechanical properties of FDM parts, and to determine if DIW printed samples could be produced where the filament diameter was varied while the overall density remained constant.

  4. Additives and salts for dye-sensitized solar cells electrolytes: what is the best choice?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, Federico; Sacco, Adriano; Pugliese, Diego; Laurenti, Marco; Bianco, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    A multivariate chemometric approach is proposed for the first time for performance optimization of I-/I3- liquid electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Over the years the system composed by iodide/triiodide redox shuttle dissolved in organic solvent has been enriched with the addition of different specific cations and chemical compounds to improve the photoelectrochemical behavior of the cell. However, usually such additives act favorably with respect to some of the cell parameters and negatively to others. Moreover, the combined action of different compounds often yields contradictory results, and from the literature it is not possible to identify an optimal recipe. We report here a systematic work, based on a multivariate experimental design, to statistically and quantitatively evaluate the effect of different additives on the photovoltaic performances of the device. The effect of cation size in iodine salts, the iodine/iodide ratio in the electrolyte and the effect of type and concentration of additives are mutually evaluated by means of a Design of Experiment (DoE) approach. Through this statistical method, the optimization of the overall parameters is demonstrated with a limited number of experimental trials. A 25% improvement on the photovoltaic conversion efficiency compared with that obtained with a commercial electrolyte is demonstrated.

  5. Icing Encounter Duration Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Addy, Harold E., Jr.; Lee, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a study performed to investigate how aerodynamic performance degradation progresses with time throughout an exposure to icing conditions. It is one of the first documented studies of the effects of ice contamination on aerodynamic performance at various points in time throughout an icing encounter. Both a 1.5 and 6 ft chord, two-dimensional, NACA-23012 airfoils were subjected to icing conditions in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel for varying lengths of time. At the end of each run, lift, drag, and pitching moment measurements were made. Measurements with the 1.5 ft chord model showed that maximum lift and pitching moment degraded more rapidly early in the exposure and degraded more slowly as time progressed. Drag for the 1.5 ft chord model degraded more linearly with time, although drag for very short exposure durations was slightly higher than expected. Only drag measurements were made with the 6 ft chord airfoil. Here, drag for the long exposures was higher than expected. Novel comparison of drag measurements versus an icing scaling parameter, accumulation parameter times collection efficiency was used to compare the data from the two different size model. The comparisons provided a means of assessing the level of fidelity needed for accurate icing simulation.

  6. Enhanced photovoltaic properties of modified redox electrolyte in dye-sensitized solar cells using tributyl phosphate as additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afrooz, Malihe; Dehghani, Hossein

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we report the influence of a phosphate additive on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on 2-cyano-3-(4-(diphenylamino)phenyl)acrylic acid (TPA) as sensitizer. The DSSCs are fabricated by incorporating tributyl phosphate (TBPP) as an additive in the electrolyte and is attained an efficiency of about 3.03% under standard air mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5G) simulated sunlight, corresponding to 35% efficiency increment compare to the standard liquid electrolyte. An improvement in both open circuit voltage (Voc) and short circuit current (Jsc) obtains by adjusting the concentration of TBPP in the electrolyte, which attributes to enlarge energy difference between the Fermi level (EF) of TiO2 and the redox potential of electrolyte and suppression of charge recombination from the conduction band (CB) of TiO2 to the oxidized ions in the redox electrolyte. Electrochemical impedance analyses (EIS) reveals a dramatic increase in charge transfer resistance at the dyed-TiO2/electrolyte interface and the electron density in the CB of TiO2 that the more prominent photoelectric conversion efficiency (η) improvement with TBPP additive results by the efficient inhibition of recombination processes. This striking result leads to use a family of electron donor groups in many compounds as highly efficient additive.

  7. Additive toxicity of herbicide mixtures and comparative sensitivity of tropical benthic microalgae.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Marie; Heimann, Kirsten; Quayle, Pamela; Negri, Andrew P

    2010-11-01

    Natural waters often contain complex mixtures of unknown contaminants potentially posing a threat to marine communities through chemical interactions. Here, acute effects of the photosystem II-inhibiting herbicides diuron, tebuthiuron, atrazine, simazine, and hexazinone, herbicide breakdown products (desethyl-atrazine (DEA) and 3,4-dichloroaniline (3,4-DCA)) and binary mixtures, were investigated using three tropical benthic microalgae; Navicula sp. and Cylindrotheca closterium (Ochrophyta) and Nephroselmis pyriformis (Chlorophyta), and one standard test species, Phaeodactylum tricornutum (Ochrophyta), in a high-throughput Maxi-Imaging-PAM bioassay (Maxi-IPAM). The order of toxicity was; diuron > hexazinone > tebuthiuron > atrazine > simazine > DEA > 3,4-DCA for all species. The tropical green alga N. pyriformis was up to 10-fold more sensitive than the diatoms tested here and reported for coral symbionts, and is recommended as a standard tropical test species for future research. All binary mixtures exhibited additive toxicity, and the use of herbicide equivalents (HEq) is therefore recommended in order to incorporate total-maximum-load measures for environmental regulatory purposes. PMID:20800855

  8. Lunar magnetic permeability studies and magnetometer sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    A regression of quiet magnetic field components simultaneously measured by the two Explorer 35 magnetometers reveals uncertainties in effective sensitivity factors of up to a few percent in one or both of these instruments. Given this, the validity of previous lunar permeability studies based on Explorer 35/ALSEP regressions, wherein inferences are drawn from regression line slopes differing from unity by the order of one percent, is called into question. We emphasize the need to critically address the question of small deviations in magnetometer sensitivity factors from nominal values as a part of any two-magnetometer lunar permeability study.

  9. Anxiety Sensitivity and Panic Attacks: A 1-Year Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wen; Zinbarg, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that anxiety sensitivity (AS) is a risk factor for panic genesis has obtained compelling support, but the clinical/practical importance of AS in panic genesis has been questioned. In addition, the association between panic experience and AS increase has not been clearly demonstrated. Through this 1-year longitudinal study among…

  10. Variable Temperature Stress in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Maupas) and Its Implications for Sensitivity to an Additional Chemical Stressor

    PubMed Central

    Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J.

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of studies has investigated how chemical sensitivity is affected by temperature, however, almost always under different constant rather than more realistic fluctuating regimes. Here we compared how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to copper at constant temperatures (8–24°C) and under fluctuation conditions of low (±4°C) and high (±8°C) amplitude (averages of 12, 16, 20°C and 16°C respectively). The DEBkiss model was used to interpret effects on energy budgets. Increasing constant temperature from 12–24°C reduced time to first egg, life-span and population growth rates consistent with temperature driven metabolic rate change. Responses at 8°C did not, however, accord with this pattern (including a deviation from the Temperature Size Rule), identifying a cold stress effect. High amplitude variation and low amplitude variation around a mean temperature of 12°C impacted reproduction and body size compared to nematodes kept at the matching average constant temperatures. Copper exposure affected reproduction, body size and life-span and consequently population growth. Sensitivity to copper (EC50 values), was similar at intermediate temperatures (12, 16, 20°C) and higher at 24°C and especially the innately stressful 8°C condition. Temperature variation did not increase copper sensitivity. Indeed under variable conditions including time at the stressful 8°C condition, sensitivity was reduced. DEBkiss identified increased maintenance costs and increased assimilation as possible mechanisms for cold and higher copper concentration effects. Model analysis of combined variable temperature effects, however, demonstrated no additional joint stressor response. Hence, concerns that exposure to temperature fluctuations may sensitise species to co-stressor effects seem unfounded in this case. PMID:26784453

  11. Variable Temperature Stress in the Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (Maupas) and Its Implications for Sensitivity to an Additional Chemical Stressor.

    PubMed

    Cedergreen, Nina; Nørhave, Nils Jakob; Svendsen, Claus; Spurgeon, David J

    2016-01-01

    A wealth of studies has investigated how chemical sensitivity is affected by temperature, however, almost always under different constant rather than more realistic fluctuating regimes. Here we compared how the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans responds to copper at constant temperatures (8-24°C) and under fluctuation conditions of low (±4°C) and high (±8°C) amplitude (averages of 12, 16, 20°C and 16°C respectively). The DEBkiss model was used to interpret effects on energy budgets. Increasing constant temperature from 12-24°C reduced time to first egg, life-span and population growth rates consistent with temperature driven metabolic rate change. Responses at 8°C did not, however, accord with this pattern (including a deviation from the Temperature Size Rule), identifying a cold stress effect. High amplitude variation and low amplitude variation around a mean temperature of 12°C impacted reproduction and body size compared to nematodes kept at the matching average constant temperatures. Copper exposure affected reproduction, body size and life-span and consequently population growth. Sensitivity to copper (EC50 values), was similar at intermediate temperatures (12, 16, 20°C) and higher at 24°C and especially the innately stressful 8°C condition. Temperature variation did not increase copper sensitivity. Indeed under variable conditions including time at the stressful 8°C condition, sensitivity was reduced. DEBkiss identified increased maintenance costs and increased assimilation as possible mechanisms for cold and higher copper concentration effects. Model analysis of combined variable temperature effects, however, demonstrated no additional joint stressor response. Hence, concerns that exposure to temperature fluctuations may sensitise species to co-stressor effects seem unfounded in this case. PMID:26784453

  12. Additional Treatments Offer Little Benefit for Pancreatic Cancer: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... 158633.html Additional Treatments Offer Little Benefit for Pancreatic Cancer: Study Neither extra chemotherapy drug nor add-on ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Additional treatments for locally advanced pancreatic cancer don't appear to boost survival, a new ...

  13. Seasonality, Rather than Nutrient Addition or Vegetation Types, Influenced Short-Term Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Organic Carbon Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yu-Qi; He, Feng-Peng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The response of microbial respiration from soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition to environmental changes plays a key role in predicting future trends of atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, it remains uncertain whether there is a universal trend in the response of microbial respiration to increased temperature and nutrient addition among different vegetation types. In this study, soils were sampled in spring, summer, autumn and winter from five dominant vegetation types, including pine, larch and birch forest, shrubland, and grassland, in the Saihanba area of northern China. Soil samples from each season were incubated at 1, 10, and 20°C for 5 to 7 days. Nitrogen (N; 0.035 mM as NH4NO3) and phosphorus (P; 0.03 mM as P2O5) were added to soil samples, and the responses of soil microbial respiration to increased temperature and nutrient addition were determined. We found a universal trend that soil microbial respiration increased with increased temperature regardless of sampling season or vegetation type. The temperature sensitivity (indicated by Q10, the increase in respiration rate with a 10°C increase in temperature) of microbial respiration was higher in spring and autumn than in summer and winter, irrespective of vegetation type. The Q10 was significantly positively correlated with microbial biomass and the fungal: bacterial ratio. Microbial respiration (or Q10) did not significantly respond to N or P addition. Our results suggest that short-term nutrient input might not change the SOC decomposition rate or its temperature sensitivity, whereas increased temperature might significantly enhance SOC decomposition in spring and autumn, compared with winter and summer. PMID:27070782

  14. Seasonality, Rather than Nutrient Addition or Vegetation Types, Influenced Short-Term Temperature Sensitivity of Soil Organic Carbon Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    He, Feng-Peng; Wang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The response of microbial respiration from soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition to environmental changes plays a key role in predicting future trends of atmospheric CO2 concentration. However, it remains uncertain whether there is a universal trend in the response of microbial respiration to increased temperature and nutrient addition among different vegetation types. In this study, soils were sampled in spring, summer, autumn and winter from five dominant vegetation types, including pine, larch and birch forest, shrubland, and grassland, in the Saihanba area of northern China. Soil samples from each season were incubated at 1, 10, and 20°C for 5 to 7 days. Nitrogen (N; 0.035 mM as NH4NO3) and phosphorus (P; 0.03 mM as P2O5) were added to soil samples, and the responses of soil microbial respiration to increased temperature and nutrient addition were determined. We found a universal trend that soil microbial respiration increased with increased temperature regardless of sampling season or vegetation type. The temperature sensitivity (indicated by Q10, the increase in respiration rate with a 10°C increase in temperature) of microbial respiration was higher in spring and autumn than in summer and winter, irrespective of vegetation type. The Q10 was significantly positively correlated with microbial biomass and the fungal: bacterial ratio. Microbial respiration (or Q10) did not significantly respond to N or P addition. Our results suggest that short-term nutrient input might not change the SOC decomposition rate or its temperature sensitivity, whereas increased temperature might significantly enhance SOC decomposition in spring and autumn, compared with winter and summer. PMID:27070782

  15. A Study of Additional Costs of Second Language Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwen, Nelly

    A study was conducted whose primary aim was to identify and explain additional costs incurred by Alberta, Canada school jurisdictions providing second language instruction in 1980. Additional costs were defined as those which would not have been incurred had the second language program not been in existence. Three types of additional costs were…

  16. Chemical feedbacks in climate sensitivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietmüller, Simone; Ponater, Michael; Sausen, Robert

    2013-04-01

    Interactively coupled climate chemistry models extend the number of feedback mechanisms in climate change simulations by allowing a variation of several radiatively actice chemical tracers that are prescribed in conventional climate models. Different perturbation experiments including chemical feedbacks were performed using the chemistry-climate model system EMAC coupled to the mixed layer ocean model MLO. The influence of the chemical feedbacks O3, CH4 and N2O on climate response and climate sensitivity is quantified for a series of CO2-perturbation simulations: Equilibrium climate sensitivity is dampened, if chemical feedbacks are included. In case of a CO2 doubling simulation chemical feedbacks decrease climate sensitivity by -3.6% and in case of a 4*CO2 simulation by -8.1%. Analysis of the chemical feedbacks reveals, that the negative feedback of ozone, mainly the feedback of stratospheric ozone, is responsible for this dampening. The radiative feedbacks of CH4 and N2O are negligible, mainly because the model system does not allow interactive emission feedbacks at the Earth's surface for these gases. The feedback of physical parameters is significantly modified by the presence of chemical feedbacks. In case of the CO2-perturbation experiments the negative stratospheric ozone feedback is accompanied by a negative stratospheric H2O feedback change of the same order of magnitude. So the dampening effect of the direct O3 radiative feedback is enhanced. A non-linearity in the damping is found with increasing CO2 concentrations. Reasons are the nonlinear feedbacks of ozone, temperature, and stratospheric water vapor. Additional 6*CO2 simulations with and without chemical feedbacks included show, that the presence of chemic feedbacks helps to prevent a runaway greenhouse effect, as the O3 distribution can react to the upward shift of the tropopause. Also experiments driven by anthropogenic NOx- and CO-emissions were performed, where chemically active trace gases act

  17. Urea as a long-term stable alternative to guanidium thiocyanate additive in dye-sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mi-Jeong; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2012-09-01

    Photovoltaic performance of 0.05 M urea-contained redox electrolyte is compared to that of 0.05 M guanidinium thiocyanate (GSCN)-contained one in dye-sensitized solar cell. No significant difference in the initial photovoltaic performance is observed, which means that the role of urea additive is similar to that of GSCN. Initial solar-to-electrical conversion efficiency of the device containing GSCN shows 7% that is diminished to 5.8% after 40 days, whereas the device containing urea exhibits stable photovoltaic performance showing that initial efficiency of 7.2% is almost remained unchanged after 40 days (7.1%). The lowered efficiency of the GSCN-contained device is mainly due to the decreased photocurrent density, which is ascribed to the formation of needle-shaped crystals on TiO2 layer. Infrared spectroscopic study confirms that the crystals are dye analogue, which is indicative of dye desorption in the presence of GSCN. On the other hand, no crystals are formed in the urea-contained electrolyte, which implies that dye desorption is negligible. Urea additive is thus found to be less reactive in dye desorption than GSCN, leading to long-term stability.

  18. Advanced protein crystal growth programmatic sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define the costs of various APCG (Advanced Protein Crystal Growth) program options and to determine the parameters which, if changed, impact the costs and goals of the programs and to what extent. This was accomplished by developing and evaluating several alternate programmatic scenarios for the microgravity Advanced Protein Crystal Growth program transitioning from the present shuttle activity to the man tended Space Station to the permanently manned Space Station. These scenarios include selected variations in such sensitivity parameters as development and operational costs, schedules, technology issues, and crystal growth methods. This final report provides information that will aid in planning the Advanced Protein Crystal Growth Program.

  19. Turbulence sensitivity study in the IBI region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reffray, G.; Chanut, J.; Cailleau, S.; Levier, B.

    2009-04-01

    In the framework of building a high resolution operational system covering the IBI area (Iberian Biscay Irish), a turbulence sensitivity study is carried out to improve the results of the NEMO model. This is particularly important on the shelf where the mixing is very strong and mainly induced by the intense tidal currents. The investigated work is to test some parameterizations more sophisticated (for ex: stability functions from Canuto (2001) or surface boundary conditions including wave effects from Mellor and Blumberg 2003) and to note if the biases with the observations are reduced as expected. To make this numerical study easier, the Generic Length Scale model (Umlauf and Burchard, 2003) has been implemented. The choice of the dissipation rate as turbulent scale has been done because this closure is well documented and contrary to the Mellor-Yamada turbulent scale, this equation does not need any wall function to provide results physically relevant.

  20. Ramp Compression Experiments - a Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, M; Reisman, D

    2007-02-26

    We present the first sensitivity study of the material isentropes extracted from ramp compression experiments. We perform hydrodynamic simulations of representative experimental geometries associated with ramp compression experiments and discuss the major factors determining the accuracy of the equation of state information extracted from such data. In conclusion, we analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively the major experimental factors that determine the accuracy of equations of state extracted from ramp compression experiments. Since in actual experiments essentially all the effects discussed here will compound, factoring out individual signatures and magnitudes, as done in the present work, is especially important. This study should provide some guidance for the effective design and analysis of ramp compression experiments, as well as for further improvements of ramp generators performance.

  1. Nano-morphology induced additional surface plasmon resonance enhancement of SERS sensitivity in Ag/GaN nanowall network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharvani, S.; Upadhayaya, Kishor; Kumari, Gayatri; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2015-11-01

    The GaN nanowall network, formed by opening the screw dislocations by kinetically controlled MBE growth, possesses a large surface and high conductivity. Sharp apexed nanowalls show higher surface electron concentration in the band-tail states, in comparison to blunt apexed nanowalls. Uncapped silver nanoparticles are vapor deposited on the blunt and sharp GaN nanowall networks to study the morphological dependence of band-edge plasmon-coupling. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies performed with a rhodamine 6G analyte on these two configurations clearly show that the sharp nanowall morphology with smaller Ag nanoparticles shows higher enhancement of the Raman signal. A very large enhancement factor of 2.8 × 107 and a very low limit of detection of 10-10 M is observed, which is attributed to the surface plasmon resonance owing to the high surface electron concentration on the GaN nanowall in addition to that of the Ag nanoparticles. The significantly higher sensitivity with same-sized Ag nanoparticles confirms the unconventional role of morphology-dependent surface charge carrier concentration of GaN nanowalls in the enhancement of Raman signals.

  2. Nano-morphology induced additional surface plasmon resonance enhancement of SERS sensitivity in Ag/GaN nanowall network.

    PubMed

    Sharvani, S; Upadhayaya, Kishor; Kumari, Gayatri; Narayana, Chandrabhas; Shivaprasad, S M

    2015-11-20

    The GaN nanowall network, formed by opening the screw dislocations by kinetically controlled MBE growth, possesses a large surface and high conductivity. Sharp apexed nanowalls show higher surface electron concentration in the band-tail states, in comparison to blunt apexed nanowalls. Uncapped silver nanoparticles are vapor deposited on the blunt and sharp GaN nanowall networks to study the morphological dependence of band-edge plasmon-coupling. Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy studies performed with a rhodamine 6G analyte on these two configurations clearly show that the sharp nanowall morphology with smaller Ag nanoparticles shows higher enhancement of the Raman signal. A very large enhancement factor of 2.8 × 10(7) and a very low limit of detection of 10(-10) M is observed, which is attributed to the surface plasmon resonance owing to the high surface electron concentration on the GaN nanowall in addition to that of the Ag nanoparticles. The significantly higher sensitivity with same-sized Ag nanoparticles confirms the unconventional role of morphology-dependent surface charge carrier concentration of GaN nanowalls in the enhancement of Raman signals. PMID:26502004

  3. Role of sulfite additives in wine induced asthma: single dose and cumulative dose studies

    PubMed Central

    Vally, H; Thompson, P

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Wine appears to be a significant trigger for asthma. Although sulfite additives have been implicated as a major cause of wine induced asthma, direct evidence is limited. Two studies were undertaken to assess sulfite reactivity in wine sensitive asthmatics. The first study assessed sensitivity to sulfites in wine using a single dose sulfited wine challenge protocol followed by a double blind, placebo controlled challenge. In the second study a cumulative dose sulfited wine challenge protocol was employed to establish if wine sensitive asthmatics as a group have an increased sensitivity to sulfites.
METHODS—In study 1, 24 asthmatic patients with a strong history of wine induced asthma were screened. Subjects showing positive responses to single blind high sulfite (300 ppm) wine challenge were rechallenged on separate days in a double blind, placebo controlled fashion with wines of varying sulfite levels to characterise their responses to these drinks. In study 2, wine sensitive asthmatic patients (n=12) and control asthmatics (n=6) were challenged cumulatively with wine containing increasing concentrations of sulfite in order to characterise further their sensitivity to sulfites in wine.
RESULTS—Four of the 24 self-reporting wine sensitive asthmatic patients were found to respond to sulfite additives in wine when challenged in a single dose fashion (study 1). In the double blind dose-response study all four had a significant fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) (>15% from baseline) following exposure to wine containing 300 ppm sulfite, but did not respond to wines containing 20, 75 or 150 ppm sulfite. Responses were maximal at 5 minutes (mean (SD) maximal decline in FEV1 28.7 (13)%) and took 15-60 minutes to return to baseline levels. In the cumulative dose-response study (study 2) no significant difference was observed in any of the lung function parameters measured (FEV1, peak expiratory flow (PEF), mid phase forced expiratory

  4. Modifying structure-sensitive reactions by addition of Zn to Pd

    SciTech Connect

    Childers, David J.; Schweitzer, Neil M.; Kamali Shahari, Seyed Mehdi; Rioux, Robert M.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Meyer, Randall J.

    2014-10-01

    Silica-supported Pd and PdZn nanoparticles of a similar size were evaluated for neopentane hydrogenolysis/isomerization and propane hydrogenolysis/dehydrogenation. Monometallic Pd showed high neopentane hydrogenolysis selectivity. Addition of small amounts of Zn to Pd lead Pd–Zn scatters in the EXAFS spectrum and an increase in the linear bonded CO by IR. In addition, the neopentane turnover rate decreased by nearly 10 times with little change in the selectivity. Increasing amounts of Zn lead to greater Pd–Zn interactions, higher linear-to-bridging CO ratios by IR and complete loss of neopentane conversion. Pd NPs also had high selectivity for propane hydrogenolysis and thus were poorly selective for propylene. The PdZn bimetallic catalysts, however, were able to preferentially catalyze dehydrogenation, were not active for propane hydrogenolysis, and thus were highly selective for propylene formation. The decrease in hydrogenolysis selectivity was attributed to the isolation of active Pd atoms by inactive metallic Zn,demonstrating that hydrogenolysis requires a particular reactive ensemble whereas propane dehydrogenation does not.

  5. Effects of Taiwan Roselle anthocyanin treatment and single-walled carbon nanotube addition on the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C. S.; Tsai, P. J.; Wu, P.; Shu, G. G.; Huang, Y. H.; Chen, Y. S.

    2014-04-01

    This study investigates the relationship between the performance of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) sensitized by a natural sensitizer of Taiwan Roselle anthocyanin (TRA) and fabrication process conditions of the DSSC. A set of systematic experiments has been carried out at various soaking temperatures, soaking periods, sensitizer concentrations, pH values, and additions of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT). An absorption peak (520 nm) is found for TRA, and it is close to that of the N719 dye (518 nm). At a fixed concentration of TRA and a fixed soaking period, a lower pH of the extract or a lower soaking temperature is found favorable to the formation of pigment cations, which leads to an enhanced power conversion efficiency (η) of DSSC. For instance, by applying 17.53 mg/100ml TRA at 30 for 10 h, as the pH of the extract decreases to 2.00 from 2.33 (the original pH of TRA), the η of DSSC with TiO2+SWCNT electrode increases to 0.67% from 0.11% of a traditional DSSC with TiO2 electrode. This performance improvement can be explained by the combined effect of the pH of sensitizer and the additions of SWCNT, a first investigation in DSSC using the natural sensitizer with SWCNT.

  6. Sensitivity of Arctic Permafrost Carbon in the Mackenzie River Basin: A substrate addition and incubation experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedgpeth, A.; Beilman, D.; Crow, S. E.

    2014-12-01

    Arctic soil organic matter (SOM) mineralization processes are fundamental to the functioning of high latitude soils in relation to nutrients, stability, and feedbacks to atmospheric CO2 and climate. The arctic permafrost zone covers 25% of the northern hemisphere and contains 1672Pg of soil carbon (C). 88% of this C currently resides in frozen soils that are vulnerable to environmental change. For instance, arctic growing seasons may be lengthened, resulting in an increase in plant productivity and rate of below ground labile C inputs as root exudates. Understanding controls on Arctic SOM dynamics requires recognition that labile C inputs have the potential to significantly affect mineralization of previously stable SOM, also known as 'priming effects'. We conducted a substrate addition incubation experiment to quantify and compare respiration in highly organic (42-48 %C) permafrost soils along a north-south transect in western Canada. Near surface soils (10-20 cm) were collected from permafrost peatland sites in the Mackenzie River Basin from 69.2-62.6°N. The surface soils are fairly young (Δ14C values > -140.0) and can be assumed to contain relatively reactive soil carbon. To assess whether addition of labile substrate alters SOM decomposition dynamics, 4.77-11.75 g of permafrost soil were spiked with 0.5 mg D-glucose g-1 soil and incubated at 5°C. A mass balance approach was used to determin substrate-induced respiration and preliminary results suggest a potential for positive priming in these C-rich soils. Baseline respiration rates from the three sites were similar (0.067-0.263 mg CO2 g-1 soil C) yet show some site-specific trends. The rate at which added substrate was utilized within these soils suggests that other factors besides temperature and soil C content are controlling substrate consumption and its effect on SOM decomposition. Microbial activity can be stimulated by substrate addition to such an extent that SOM turnover is enhanced, suggesting that

  7. Additional EIPC Study Analysis: Interim Report on High Priority Topics

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Stanton W

    2013-11-01

    Between 2010 and 2012 the Eastern Interconnection Planning Collaborative (EIPC) conducted a major long-term resource and transmission study of the Eastern Interconnection (EI). With guidance from a Stakeholder Steering Committee (SSC) that included representatives from the Eastern Interconnection States Planning Council (EISPC) among others, the project was conducted in two phases. Phase 1 involved a long-term capacity expansion analysis that involved creation of eight major futures plus 72 sensitivities. Three scenarios were selected for more extensive transmission- focused evaluation in Phase 2. Five power flow analyses, nine production cost model runs (including six sensitivities), and three capital cost estimations were developed during this second phase. The results from Phase 1 and 2 provided a wealth of data that could be examined further to address energy-related questions. A list of 13 topics was developed for further analysis; this paper discusses the first five.

  8. Influence of Si Addition on Quenching Sensitivity and Formation of Nano-Precipitate in Al-Mg-Si Alloys.

    PubMed

    Kim, JaeHwang; Hayashi, Minoru; Kobayashi, Equo; Sato, Tatsuo

    2016-02-01

    The age-hardening is enhanced with the high cooling rate since more vacancies are formed during quenching, whereas the stable beta phase is formed with the slow cooling rate just after solid solution treatment resulting in lower increase of hardness during aging. Meanwhile, the nanoclusters are formed during natural aging in Al-Mg-Si alloys. The formation of nanoclusters is enhanced with increasing the Si amount. High quench sensitivity based on mechanical property changes was confirmed with increasing the Si amount. Moreover, the nano-size beta" phase, main hardening phase, is more formed by the Si addition resulting in enhancement of the age-hardening. The quench sensitivity and the formation behavior of precipitates are discussed based on the age-hardening phenomena. PMID:27433677

  9. Electrostatic Levitation for Studies of Additive Manufactured Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    SanSoucie, Michael P.; Rogers, Jan R.; Tramel, Terri

    2014-01-01

    The electrostatic levitation (ESL) laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center is a unique facility for investigators studying high temperature materials. The laboratory boasts two levitators in which samples can be levitated, heated, melted, undercooled, and resolidified. Electrostatic levitation minimizes gravitational effects and allows materials to be studied without contact with a container or instrumentation. The lab also has a high temperature emissivity measurement system, which provides normal spectral and normal total emissivity measurements at use temperature. The ESL lab has been instrumental in many pioneering materials investigations of thermophysical properties, e.g., creep measurements, solidification, triggered nucleation, and emissivity at high temperatures. Research in the ESL lab has already led to the development of advanced high temperature materials for aerospace applications, coatings for rocket nozzles, improved medical and industrial optics, metallic glasses, ablatives for reentry vehicles, and materials with memory. Modeling of additive manufacturing materials processing is necessary for the study of their resulting materials properties. In addition, the modeling of the selective laser melting processes and its materials property predictions are also underway. Unfortunately, there is very little data for the properties of these materials, especially of the materials in the liquid state. Some method to measure thermophysical properties of additive manufacturing materials is necessary. The ESL lab is ideal for these studies. The lab can provide surface tension and viscosity of molten materials, density measurements, emissivity measurements, and even creep strength measurements. The ESL lab can also determine melting temperature, surface temperatures, and phase transition temperatures of additive manufactured materials. This presentation will provide background on the ESL lab and its capabilities, provide an approach to using the ESL

  10. BIG FROG WILDERNESS STUDY AREA AND ADDITIONS, TENNESSEE AND GEORGIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, John F.; Gazdik, Gertrude C.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral-resource survey was made of the Big Frog Wilderness Study Area and additions, Tennessee-Georgia. Geochemical sampling found traces of gold, zinc, copper, and arsenic in rocks, stream sediments, and panned concentrates, but not in sufficient quantities to indicate the presence of deposits of these metals. The results of the survey indicate that there is little promise for the occurrence of metallic mineral deposits within the study area. The only apparent resources are nonmetallic commodities including rock suitable for construction materials, and small amounts of sand and gravel; however, these commodities are found in abundance outside the study area. A potential may exist for oil and natural gas at great depths, but this cannot be evaluated by the present study.

  11. Recommended Protocol for Round Robin Studies in Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Moylan, Shawn; Brown, Christopher U.; Slotwinski, John

    2016-01-01

    One way to improve confidence and encourage proliferation of additive manufacturing (AM) technologies and parts is by generating more high quality data describing the performance of AM processes and parts. Many in the AM community see round robin studies as a way to generate large data sets while distributing the cost among the participants, thereby reducing the cost to individual users. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has conducted and participated in several of these AM round robin studies. While the results of these studies are interesting and informative, many of the lessons learned in conducting these studies concern the logistics and methods of the study and unique issues presented by AM. Existing standards for conducting interlaboratory studies of measurement methods, along with NIST’s experience, form the basis for recommended protocols for conducting AM round robin studies. The role of round robin studies in AM qualification, some of the limitations of round robin studies, and the potential benefit of less formal collaborative experiments where multiple factors, AM machine being only one, are varied simultaneously are also discussed. PMID:27274602

  12. Genotoxicity studies of the food additive ester gum.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, A; Agarwal, K; Chakrabarti, J

    1992-07-01

    Ester gum (EG) is used in citrus oil-based beverage flavourings as a weighting or colouring agent. In the present study, concentrations of 50, 100 and 150 mg/kg body weight were administered orally to male Swiss albino mice, and sister chromatid exchange and chromosomal aberration were used as the cytogenetic endpoints to determine the genotoxic and clastogenic potential of the food additive. Although EG was weakly clastogenic and could induce a marginal increase in sister chromatid exchange frequencies, it was not a potential health hazard at the doses tested. PMID:1521837

  13. Making intelligent systems team players: Additional case studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schreckenghost, Debra L.; Rhoads, Ron W.

    1993-01-01

    Observations from a case study of intelligent systems are reported as part of a multi-year interdisciplinary effort to provide guidance and assistance for designers of intelligent systems and their user interfaces. A series of studies were conducted to investigate issues in designing intelligent fault management systems in aerospace applications for effective human-computer interaction. The results of the initial study are documented in two NASA technical memoranda: TM 104738 Making Intelligent Systems Team Players: Case Studies and Design Issues, Volumes 1 and 2; and TM 104751, Making Intelligent Systems Team Players: Overview for Designers. The objective of this additional study was to broaden the investigation of human-computer interaction design issues beyond the focus on monitoring and fault detection in the initial study. The results of this second study are documented which is intended as a supplement to the original design guidance documents. These results should be of interest to designers of intelligent systems for use in real-time operations, and to researchers in the areas of human-computer interaction and artificial intelligence.

  14. RAMSEYS DRAFT WILDERNESS STUDY AREA AND ADDITION, VIRGINIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lesure, Frank G.; Mory, Peter C.

    1984-01-01

    Mineral-resource surveys of the Ramseys Draft Wilderness Study Area and adjoining roadless area addition in George Washington National Forest in the western valley and ridge province, Augusta and Highland Counties, Virginia, were done. The surveys outlined three small areas containing anomalous amounts of copper, lead, and zinc related to stratabound red-bed copper mineralization, but these occurrences are not large and are not considered as having mineral-resource potential. The area contains abundant sandstone suitable for construction materials and shale suitable for making brick, tile, and other low-grade ceramic products, but these commodities occur in abundance outside the wilderness study area. Structural conditions are probably favorable for the accumulation of natural gas, but exploratory drilling has not been done sufficiently near the area to evaluate the gas potential.

  15. Sensitivity Studies for Assimilated Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stajner, Ivanka; Winslow, Nathan; Wargan, Krzysztof; Rood, Richard; Pawson, Steven

    2002-01-01

    An ozone data assimilation system at the NASA/Goddard Data Assimilation Office (DAO) produces three-dimensional global ozone fields. They are obtained by assimilating ozone retrieved from the Solar Backscatter UltraViolet/2 (SBUV/2) instrument and the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP TOMS) measurements into an off-line parameterized chemistry and transport model. In this talk we focus on the quality of lower stratospheric assimilated ozone profiles. Ozone in the lower stratosphere plays a key role in the forcing of climate. A biased ozone field in this region will adversely impact calculations of the stratosphere-troposphere exchange and, when used as a first guess in retrievals, the values determined from satellite observations. The SBUV/2 ozone data have a coarse vertical resolution with increased uncertainty below the ozone maximum, and TOMS provides only total ozone columns. Thus, the assimilated ozone profiles in the lower stratosphere are only weakly constrained by the incoming SBUV and TOMS data. Consequently, the assimilated ozone distribution should be sensitive to changes in inputs to the statistical analysis scheme. We investigate the sensitivity of assimilated ozone profiles to changes in a variety of system inputs: TOMS and SBUV/2 data selection, forecast and observations error covariance models, inclusion or omission of a parameterized chemistry model, and different versions of DAO assimilated wind fields used to drive the transport model. Comparisons of assimilated ozone fields with independent observations, primarily ozone sondes, are used to determine the impact of each of these changes.

  16. Sensitivity study of a dynamic thermodynamic sea ice model

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, D.M.; Mysak, L.A.; Manak, D.K. )

    1993-02-15

    A numerical simulation of the seasonal sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean and the Greenland, Iceland, and Norwegian seas is presented. The sea ice model is extracted from Oberhuber's (1990) coupled sea ice-mixed layer-isopycnal general circulation model and is written in spherical coordinates. The advantage of such a model over previous sea ice models is that it can be easily coupled to either global atmospheric or ocean general circulation models written in spherical coordinates. In this model, the thermodynamics are a modification of that of Parkinson and Washington, while the dynamics use the full Hibler viscous-plastic rheology. Monthly thermodynamic and dynamic forcing fields for the atmosphere and ocean are specified. The simulations of the seasonal cycle of ice thickness, compactness, and velocity, for a control set of parameters, compare favorably with the known seasonal characteristics of these fields. A sensitivity study of the control simulation of the seasonal sea ice cover is presented. The sensitivity runs are carried out under three different themes, namely, numerical conditions, parameter values, and physical processes. This last theme refers to experiments in which physical processes are either newly added or completely removed from the model. Approximately 80 sensitivity runs have been performed in which a change from the control run environment has been implemented. Comparisons have been made between the control run and a particular sensitivity run based on time series of the seasonal cycle of the domain-averaged ice thickness, compactness, areal coverage, and kinetic energy. In addition, spatially varying fields of ice thickness, compactness, velocity, and surface temperature for each season are presented for selected experiments. A brief description and discussion of the more interesting experiments are presented. The simulation of the seasonal cycle of Arctic sea ice cover is shown to be robust. 31 refs., 20 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Effect of sodium acetate additive in successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction on the performance of CdS quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, I.-Ping; Chen, Liang-Yih; Lee, Yuh-Lang

    2016-09-01

    Sodium acetate (NaAc) is utilized as an additive in cationic precursors of the successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) process to fabricate CdS quantum-dot (QD)-sensitized photoelectrodes. The effects of the NaAc concentration on the deposition rate and distribution of QDs in mesoporous TiO2 films, as well as on the performance of CdS-sensitized solar cells are studied. The experimental results show that the presence of NaAc can significantly accelerate the deposition of CdS, improve the QD distribution across photoelectrodes, and thereby, increase the performance of solar cells. These results are mainly attributed to the pH-elevation effect of NaAc to the cationic precursors which increases the electrostatic interaction of the TiO2 film to cadmium ions. The light-to-energy conversion efficiency of the CdS-sensitized solar cell increases with increasing concentration of the NaAc and approaches a maximum value (3.11%) at 0.05 M NaAc. Additionally, an ionic exchange is carried out on the photoelectrode to transform the deposited CdS into CdS1-xSex ternary QDs. The light-absorption range of the photoelectrode is extended and an exceptional power conversion efficiency of 4.51% is achieved due to this treatment.

  18. HCIT Broadband Contrast Performance Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2012-01-01

    One of the important milestones of the TPF Coronagraph project is to demonstrate the ability to predict the performance sensitivities of the system at levels consistent with exo-planet detection requirement. We want to gain some general understanding about the potentials and the limitations of the current single-Deformable-Mirror (DM) High-contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) system through modeling and simulations. Specifically, we want to understand the effects of some common errors on the EFC-based control of e-field over a half dark-hole region and broadband contrast. Investigated errors include: (1) Absorbing particles on a flat-mirror (2) Defects on the Occulter surface (3) Dead actuators on the DM. We also investigated the effects of control bandwidth on the broadband contrast. We used a MACOS-based simulation algorithm which (1) combines a ray trace, diffraction model, & a broadband wavefront control algorithm (2) is capable of performing full three-dimensional near-field diffraction analysis

  19. Experimental Study of Additives on Viscosity biodiesel at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fajar, Berkah; Sukarno

    2015-09-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to find out the viscosity of additive and biodiesel fuel mixture in the temperature range from 283 K to 318 K. Solutions to reduce the viscosity of biodiesel is to add the biodiesel with some additive. The viscosity was measured using a Brookfield Rheometer DV-II. The additives were the generic additive (Diethyl Ether/DDE) and the commercial additive Viscoplex 10-330 CFI. Each biodiesel blends had a concentration of the mixture: 0.0; 0.25; 0.5; 0.75; 1.0; and 1.25% vol. Temperature of biodiesel was controlled from 40°C to 0°C. The viscosity of biodiesel and additive mixture at a constant temperature can be approximated by a polynomial equation and at a constant concentration by exponential equation. The optimum mixture is at 0.75% for diethyl ether and 0.5% for viscoplex.

  20. Parameter Sensitivity Study of the Wall Interference Correction System (WICS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Eric L.; Everhart, Joel L.; Iyer, Venkit

    2001-01-01

    An off-line version of the Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) has been implemented for the "NASA Langley National Transonic Facility. The correction capability is currently restricted to corrections for solid wall interference in the model pitch plane for Mach numbers, less than 0.45 due to a limitation in tunnel calibration data. A study to assess output sensitivity to the aerodynamic parameters of Reynolds number and Mach number was conducted on this code to further ensure quality during the correction process. In addition, this paper includes all investigation into possible correction due to a semispan test technique using a non metric standoff and all improvement to the standard data rejection algorithm.

  1. Tropical cirrus cloud radiative forcing: Sensitivity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, E.J.; Kinne, S.; Toon, O.B.

    1994-09-01

    We have performed one dimensional radiative transfer calculations to evaluate the impact of cirrus clouds on the tropical radiation budget. We investigate the sensitivity of solar and infrared fluxes to cloud optical depth, particle size distributions, and cloud height. If the observed solar cloud forcing in excess of 100 W/sq m is to be attributed to cirrus anvils alone, then the optical depth of these anvils must be at least 5 (assuming 50% cloud cover and an ice crystal effective radius of 15 microns). The net radiative forcing of cirrus near the tropical tropopause is positive (heating) for cloud optical depths less than about 16 and negative (cooling) for larger optical depths. If cirrus clouds alone are responsible for the equal and opposite shortwave and longwave cloud forcing in excess of 100 W/sq m observed by Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE), then the cirrus must typically take the form of deep, optically thick clouds with relatively small particles (radii of 10-20 microns) and cloud-tops well below the tropopause. The maintenance of this balance on monthly time scales can be attributed to a variety of correlations: The cloud cover of optically thick cirrus or thin cirrus overlying low-level stratus clouds could vary; or cirrus anvil height cloud increase along with a decrease in the ice crystal effective radius and an increase in optical depth. It would be of great interest to determine observationally which of these correlations is responsible for the observed lack of variation in cloud forcing.

  2. Additive Manufacturing in Production: A Study Case Applying Technical Requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ituarte, Iñigo Flores; Coatanea, Eric; Salmi, Mika; Tuomi, Jukka; Partanen, Jouni

    Additive manufacturing (AM) is expanding the manufacturing capabilities. However, quality of AM produced parts is dependent on a number of machine, geometry and process parameters. The variability of these parameters affects the manufacturing drastically and therefore standardized processes and harmonized methodologies need to be developed to characterize the technology for end use applications and enable the technology for manufacturing. This research proposes a composite methodology integrating Taguchi Design of Experiments, multi-objective optimization and statistical process control, to optimize the manufacturing process and fulfil multiple requirements imposed to an arbitrary geometry. The proposed methodology aims to characterize AM technology depending upon manufacturing process variables as well as to perform a comparative assessment of three AM technologies (Selective Laser Sintering, Laser Stereolithography and Polyjet). Results indicate that only one machine, laser-based Stereolithography, was feasible to fulfil simultaneously macro and micro level geometrical requirements but mechanical properties were not at required level. Future research will study a single AM system at the time to characterize AM machine technical capabilities and stimulate pre-normative initiatives of the technology for end use applications.

  3. Developing a temperature sensitive tool for studying spin dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickey, Kurtis Jon

    Measuring the thermodynamic properties of nanoscale structures is becoming increasingly important as heterostructures and devices shrink in size. For example, recent discoveries of spin thermal effects such as spin Seebeck and spin Peltier show that thermal gradients can manipulate spin systems and vice versa. However, the relevant interactions occur within a spin diffusion length of a spin active interface, making study of these spin thermal effects challenging. In addition, recent ferromagnetic resonance studies of spatially confined nanomagnets have shown unique magnon modes in arrays and lines which may give rise to unique magnon-phonon interactions. In this case, the small volume of magnetic material presents a challenge to measurement and as a result the bulk of the work is done on arrays with measurements of the magnetization of individual particles possible through various microscopies but limited access to thermal properties. As a result, tools capable of measuring the thermal properties of nanoscale structures are required to fully explore this emerging science. One approach to addressing this challenge is the use of microscale suspended platforms that maximize their sensitivity to these spin thermal interactions through thermal isolation from their surroundings. Combining this thermal decoupling with sensitive thermometry allows for the measurement of nanojoule heat accumulations, such as those resulting from the small heat flows associated with spin transport and spin relaxation. As these heat flows may manifest themselves in a variety of spin-thermal effects, the development of measurement platforms that can be tailored to optimize their sensitivity to specific thermal measurements is essential. To address these needs, I have fabricated thermally isolated platforms using a unique focused ion beam (FIB) machining that allow for flexible geometries as well as a wide choice of material systems. The thermal characteristics of these platforms were

  4. A study of eigenvalue sensitivity for hydrodynamic stability operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmid, Peter J.; Henningson, Dan S.; Khorrami, Mehdi R.; Malik, Mujeeb R.

    1993-01-01

    The eigenvalue sensitivity for hydrodynamic stability operators is investigated. Classical matrix perturbation techniques as well as the concept of epsilon-pseudospectra are applied to show that parts of the spectrum are highly sensitive to small perturbations. Applications are drawn from incompressible plane Couette flow, trailing line vortex flow, and compressible Blasius boundary-layer flow. Parameter studies indicate a monotonically increasing effect of the Reynolds number on the sensitivity. The phenomenon of eigenvalue sensitivity is due to the nonnormality of the operators and their discrete matrix analogs and may be associated with large transient growth of the corresponding initial value problem.

  5. Oral Toxicity Study and Skin Sensitization Test of a Cricket.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Lee, Somin; Ahn, Kyu Sup; Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Sang Sik; Ko, Hyuk Ju; Lee, Jin Kyu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Eun Mi; Lim, Jeong Ho; Song, Kyung Seuk

    2016-04-01

    Crickets have been attracting considerable interest in the field of nutrition and toxicology due to the global exhaustion of food resulting from a growing population. The cricket is normally eaten in several countries after roasting, similar to the grasshopper; however, safety evaluation data on cricket powder is limited. Here, we performed general toxicity studies of cricket powder including a single, 2-week repeated dose range evaluation test, a 13-week repeated oral dose toxicity test in Sprague-Dawley rats, a single oral dose toxicity test in Beagle dogs, and a skin sensitization test in guinea pigs following the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guidelines 406 and 408 in addition to Good Laboratory Practice. To investigate the NOAEL and target organs of cricket powder, Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 4 groups: vehicle control, 1,250 mg/kg, 2,500 mg/kg, 5,000 mg/kg dose test groups and cricket powder was administered over 13 weeks after single dose and dose range finding studies in rats based on the results of the single oral administration toxicity study in rats and Beagle dogs. The results of the study showed that the NOAEL of cricket powder was over 5,000 mg/kg for both sexes of rats without adverse effects in a 13-week repeated oral toxicity study and there was no skin hypersensitivity reaction. Therefore, our results reveal that crickets can be widely used as a new substitute food or nutrient resource. PMID:27123167

  6. Oral Toxicity Study and Skin Sensitization Test of a Cricket

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Hyeon Yeol; Lee, Somin; Ahn, Kyu Sup; Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Sang Sik; Ko, Hyuk Ju; Lee, Jin Kyu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Ahn, Mi Young; Kim, Eun Mi; Lim, Jeong Ho; Song, Kyung Seuk

    2016-01-01

    Crickets have been attracting considerable interest in the field of nutrition and toxicology due to the global exhaustion of food resulting from a growing population. The cricket is normally eaten in several countries after roasting, similar to the grasshopper; however, safety evaluation data on cricket powder is limited. Here, we performed general toxicity studies of cricket powder including a single, 2-week repeated dose range evaluation test, a 13-week repeated oral dose toxicity test in Sprague-Dawley rats, a single oral dose toxicity test in Beagle dogs, and a skin sensitization test in guinea pigs following the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development test guidelines 406 and 408 in addition to Good Laboratory Practice. To investigate the NOAEL and target organs of cricket powder, Sprague-Dawley rats were allocated to 4 groups: vehicle control, 1,250 mg/kg, 2,500 mg/kg, 5,000 mg/kg dose test groups and cricket powder was administered over 13 weeks after single dose and dose range finding studies in rats based on the results of the single oral administration toxicity study in rats and Beagle dogs. The results of the study showed that the NOAEL of cricket powder was over 5,000 mg/kg for both sexes of rats without adverse effects in a 13-week repeated oral toxicity study and there was no skin hypersensitivity reaction. Therefore, our results reveal that crickets can be widely used as a new substitute food or nutrient resource. PMID:27123167

  7. Measuring chemical sensitivity prevalence: a questionnaire for population studies.

    PubMed Central

    Kipen, H M; Hallman, W; Kelly-McNeil, K; Fiedler, N

    1995-01-01

    Because no information exists on the prevalence of chemical sensitivity syndromes such as multiple chemical sensitivities, a questionnaire for use in population studies was developed and tested to assess the presence or absence of chemical sensitivity. Seven hundred five individuals attending clinics answered a questionnaire asking whether each of 122 common substances caused symptoms. Results showed that patients with multiple chemical sensitivities and asthma had average total scores that were significantly different from each other and from those of each of the other diagnostic categories. Higher total scores were also reported by female patients. The instrument described here may facilitate meaningful prevalence studies of multiple chemical sensitivities. It will also allow study of chemically induced symptoms in other conditions such as asthma. PMID:7702128

  8. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of Cu-based metal-organic frameworks sensitized solar cell by addition of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Deok Yeon; Shin, Chan Yong; Yoon, Seog Joon; Lee, Haw Young; Lee, Wonjoo; Shrestha, Nabeen K.; Lee, Joong Kee; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2014-01-01

    In the present work, TiO2 nanoparticle and multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite powder is prepared hydrothermally. After doctor blading the paste from composite powder, the resulted composite film is sensitized with Cu-based metal-organic frameworks using a layer-by-layer deposition technique and the film is characterized using FE-SEM, EDX, XRD, UV/Visible spectrophotometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of the carbon nanotubes in photovoltaic performance is studied by constructing a Grätzel cell with I3−/I− redox couple containing electrolyte. The results demonstrate that the introduction of carbon nanotubes accelerates the electron transfer, and thereby enhances the photovoltaic performance of the cell with a nearly 60% increment in power conversion efficiency. PMID:24488110

  9. Enhanced photovoltaic performance of Cu-based metal-organic frameworks sensitized solar cell by addition of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Deok Yeon; Shin, Chan Yong; Yoon, Seog Joon; Lee, Haw Young; Lee, Wonjoo; Shrestha, Nabeen K.; Lee, Joong Kee; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2014-02-01

    In the present work, TiO2 nanoparticle and multi-walled carbon nanotubes composite powder is prepared hydrothermally. After doctor blading the paste from composite powder, the resulted composite film is sensitized with Cu-based metal-organic frameworks using a layer-by-layer deposition technique and the film is characterized using FE-SEM, EDX, XRD, UV/Visible spectrophotometry and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The influence of the carbon nanotubes in photovoltaic performance is studied by constructing a Grätzel cell with I3-/I- redox couple containing electrolyte. The results demonstrate that the introduction of carbon nanotubes accelerates the electron transfer, and thereby enhances the photovoltaic performance of the cell with a nearly 60% increment in power conversion efficiency.

  10. Sensitivity Study for Long Term Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Allan L.

    2008-01-01

    This paper illustrates using Markov models to establish system and maintenance requirements for small electronic controllers where the goal is a high probability of continuous service for a long period of time. The system and maintenance items considered are quality of components, various degrees of simple redundancy, redundancy with reconfiguration, diagnostic levels, periodic maintenance, and preventive maintenance. Markov models permit a quantitative investigation with comparison and contrast. An element of special interest is the use of conditional probability to study the combination of imperfect diagnostics and periodic maintenance.

  11. Grid Sensitivity Study for Slat Noise Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockard, David P.; Choudhari, Meelan M.; Buning, Pieter G.

    2014-01-01

    The slat noise from the 30P/30N high-lift system is being investigated through computational fluid dynamics simulations in conjunction with a Ffowcs Williams-Hawkings acoustics solver. Many previous simulations have been performed for the configuration, and the case was introduced as a new category for the Second AIAA workshop on Benchmark problems for Airframe Noise Configurations (BANC-II). However, the cost of the simulations has restricted the study of grid resolution effects to a baseline grid and coarser meshes. In the present study, two different approaches are being used to investigate the effect of finer resolution of near-field unsteady structures. First, a standard grid refinement by a factor of two is used, and the calculations are performed by using the same CFL3D solver employed in the majority of the previous simulations. Second, the OVERFLOW code is applied to the baseline grid, but with a 5th-order upwind spatial discretization as compared with the second-order discretization used in the CFL3D simulations. In general, the fine grid CFL3D simulation and OVERFLOW calculation are in very good agreement and exhibit the lowest levels of both surface pressure fluctuations and radiated noise. Although the smaller scales resolved by these simulations increase the velocity fluctuation levels, they appear to mitigate the influence of the larger scales on the surface pressure. These new simulations are used to investigate the influence of the grid on unsteady high-lift simulations and to gain a better understanding of the physics responsible for the noise generation and radiation.

  12. Health studies indicate MTBE is safe gasoline additive

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E.V.

    1993-09-01

    Implementation of the oxygenated fuels program by EPA in 39 metropolitan areas, including Fairbanks and Anchorage, Alaska, in the winter of 1992, encountered some unexpected difficulties. Complaints of headaches, dizziness, nausea, and irritated eyes started in Fairbanks, jumped to Anchorage, and popped up in various locations in the lower 48 states. The suspected culprit behind these complaints was the main additive for oxygenation of gasoline is methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). A test program, hastily organized in response to these complaints, has indicated that MTBE is a safe gasoline additive. However, official certification of the safety of MTBE is still awaited.

  13. HCIT Broadband Contrast Performance Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2012-01-01

    The High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory employs a broadband wavefront correction algorithm called Electric Field Conjugation (EFC) to obtain the required 10-10 contrast. This algorithm works with one deformable mirror (DM) to estimate the electric-field to be controlled, and with one or multiple DM's to create a "darkhole" in a predefined region of the image plane where terrestrial planets would be found. We have investigated the effects of absorbing dust particles on a flat optic, absorbing spots on the occulting mask, dead actuators on the DM, and the effects of control bandwidth on the efficiency of the EFC algorithm in a Lyot coronagraph configuration. The structural design of the optical system as well as the parameters of various optical elements used in the analysis is drawn from those of the HCIT system that have been implemented with one DM. The simulation takes into account the surface errors of various optical elements. Results of some of these studies have been verified by actual measurements.

  14. Shuttle filter study. Volume 2: Contaminant generation and sensitivity studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Contaminant generation studies were conducted at the component level using two different methods, radioactive tracer technique and gravimetric analysis test procedure. Both of these were reduced to practice during this program. In the first of these methods, radioactively tagged components typical of those used in spacecraft were studied to determine their contaminant generation characteristics under simulated operating conditions. Because the purpose of the work was: (1) to determine the types and quantities of contaminants generated; and (2) to evaluate improved monitoring and detection schemes, no attempt was made to evaluate or qualify specific components. The components used in this test program were therefore not flight hardware items. Some of them had been used in previous tests; some were obsolete; one was an experimental device. In addition to the component tests, various materials of interest to contaminant and filtration studies were irradiated and evaluated for use as autotracer materials. These included test dusts, plastics, valve seat materials, and bearing cage materials.

  15. Identification of carbonates as additives in pressure-sensitive adhesive tape substrate with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and its application in three explosive cases.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jungang; Feng, Jimin; Zhang, Wen; Shi, Rongguang; Liu, Yong; Wang, Zhaohong; Zhao, Meng

    2013-01-01

    Pressure-sensitive tape is often used to bind explosive devices. It can become important trace evidence in many cases. Three types of calcium carbonate (heavy, light, and active CaCO(3)), which were widely used as additives in pressure-sensitive tape substrate, were analyzed with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) in this study. A Spectrum GX 2000 system with a diamond anvil cell and a deuterated triglycine sulfate detector was employed for IR observation. Background was subtracted for every measurement, and triplicate tests were performed. Differences in positions of main peaks and the corresponding functional groups were investigated. Heavy CaCO(3) could be identified from the two absorptions near 873 and 855/cm, while light CaCO(3) only has one peak near 873/cm because of the low content of aragonite. Active CaCO(3) could be identified from the absorptions in the 2800-2900/cm region because of the existence of organic compounds. Tiny but indicative changes in the 878-853/cm region were found in the spectra of CaCO(3) with different content of aragonite and calcite. CaCO(3) in pressure-sensitive tape, which cannot be differentiated by scanning electron microscope/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer and thermal analysis, can be easily identified using FTIR. The findings were successfully applied to three specific explosive cases and would be helpful in finding the possible source of explosive devices in future cases. PMID:22724657

  16. Additional Treatments Offer Little Benefit for Pancreatic Cancer: Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... of gastroenterology-pancreatology at Beaujon Hospital, in Clichy, France. The study was funded by the pharmaceutical company ... D., department of gastroenterology-pancreatology, Beaujon Hospital, Clichy, France; Deborah Schrag, M.D., M.P.H., chief ...

  17. NMR relaxometry study of plaster mortar with polymer additives

    SciTech Connect

    Jumate, E.; Manea, D.; Moldovan, D.; Fechete, R.

    2013-11-13

    The cement mixed with water forms a plastic paste or slurry which stiffness in time and finally hardens into a resistant stone. The addition of sand aggregates, polymers (Walocel) and/or calcium carbonate will modify dramatically the final mortar mechanic and thermal properties. The hydration processes can be observed using the 1D NMR measurements of transverse T{sub 2} relaxation times distributions analysed by a Laplace inversion algorithm. These distributions were obtained for mortar pasta measured at 2 hours after preparation then at 3, 7 and 28 days after preparation. Multiple components are identified in the T{sub 2} distributions. These can be associated with the proton bounded chemical or physical to the mortar minerals characterized by a short T{sub 2} relaxation time and to water protons in pores with three different pore sizes as observed from SEM images. The evaporation process is faster in the first hours after preparation, while the mortar hydration (bonding of water molecules to mortar minerals) can be still observed after days or months from preparation. Finally, the mechanic resistance was correlated with the transverse T{sub 2} relaxation rates corresponding to the bound water.

  18. Intercultural Sensitivity through Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Melanie; Miranda, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    One of the foremost-cited rationales for study abroad during college is the development of a global perspective and intercultural sensitivity. Although this argument is mentioned frequently in promotional materials for study abroad, it has not yet been backed by research based on the outcomes of students' study abroad experiences. As more…

  19. Effects of zinc additions on the stress corrosion crack growth rate of sensitized stainless steel, Alloy 600 and Alloy 182 weld metal in 288 C water

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, P.L.; Angeliu, T.M.

    1995-09-01

    ZnO additions to boiling water reactor (BWR) water have been the focus of recent interest, primarily because of their beneficial influence in reducing buildup of radioactive species such as Co{sup 60} in the oxide film of structural components, e.g., stainless steel piping. The effect of ZnO additions on stress corrosion crack growth rates were studied using 1T CT fracture mechanics specimens of sensitized type 304 stainless steel, sensitized Alloy 600, and Alloy 182 weld metal exposed to {approx}288 C water containing various levels of dissolved oxygen and impurities. Zn levels of 5 to 100 ppb Zn{sup 2+} were evaluated and found to reduce crack growth rates for all materials and in all water chemistries. Many Zn tests involved long term exposure and were performed at somewhat reduced corrosion potential (e.g., from {approx}+200 to 0 {minus}+50 mV{sub she}); variations in corrosion potential from +200, to +50, to {minus}50 mV{sub she} clearly had an important effect. The benefit of Zn appeared to be most pronounced when the growth rate was decreased (e.g., by corrosion potential). This was consistent with the findings of mechanistic studies, which showed that Zn decreased the repassivation response at times >10{sup 4} s, which is associated with low crack tip strain rates, i.e., low growth rates. Reduced corrosion potentials are also expected to directly effect Zn, since high (crack mouth) corrosion potentials inhibit the transport of Zn{sup 2+} into the crack. Zn also increased the fracture strain of the oxide on stainless steel, and may also reduce crack growth rates by increasing the pH in the crack. Similar benefits are expected for other structural materials, such as nonsensitized or irradiated stainless steel, carbon steel, low alloy steel, and other nickel alloys.

  20. Sensitivity study for s process nucleosynthesis in AGB stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koloczek, A.; Thomas, B.; Glorius, J.; Plag, R.; Pignatari, M.; Reifarth, R.; Ritter, C.; Schmidt, S.; Sonnabend, K.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a large-scale sensitivity study of reaction rates in the main component of the s process. The aim of this study is to identify all rates, which have a global effect on the s process abundance distribution and the three most important rates for the production of each isotope. We have performed a sensitivity study on the radiative 13C-pocket and on the convective thermal pulse, sites of the s process in AGB stars. We identified 22 rates, which have the highest impact on the s-process abundances in AGB stars.

  1. Sensitivity study on durability variables of marine concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin'gang; Li, Kefei

    2013-06-01

    In order to study the influence of parameters on durability of marine concrete structures, the parameter's sensitivity analysis was studied in this paper. With the Fick's 2nd law of diffusion and the deterministic sensitivity analysis method (DSA), the sensitivity factors of apparent surface chloride content, apparent chloride diffusion coefficient and its time dependent attenuation factor were analyzed. The results of the analysis show that the impact of design variables on concrete durability was different. The values of sensitivity factor of chloride diffusion coefficient and its time dependent attenuation factor were higher than others. Relative less error in chloride diffusion coefficient and its time dependent attenuation coefficient induces a bigger error in concrete durability design and life prediction. According to probability sensitivity analysis (PSA), the influence of mean value and variance of concrete durability design variables on the durability failure probability was studied. The results of the study provide quantitative measures of the importance of concrete durability design and life prediction variables. It was concluded that the chloride diffusion coefficient and its time dependent attenuation factor have more influence on the reliability of marine concrete structural durability. In durability design and life prediction of marine concrete structures, it was very important to reduce the measure and statistic error of durability design variables.

  2. Aspartame Sensitivity? A Double Blind Randomised Crossover Study

    PubMed Central

    Sathyapalan, Thozhukat; Thatcher, Natalie J.; Hammersley, Richard; Rigby, Alan S.; Pechlivanis, Alexandros; Gooderham, Nigel J.; Holmes, Elaine; le Roux, Carel W.; Atkin, Stephen L.; Courts, Fraser

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspartame is a commonly used intense artificial sweetener, being approximately 200 times sweeter than sucrose. There have been concerns over aspartame since approval in the 1980s including a large anecdotal database reporting severe symptoms. The objective of this study was to compare the acute symptom effects of aspartame to a control preparation. Methods This was a double-blind randomized cross over study conducted in a clinical research unit in United Kingdom. Forty-eight individual who has self reported sensitivity to aspartame were compared to 48 age and gender matched aspartame non-sensitive individuals. They were given aspartame (100mg)-containing or control snack bars randomly at least 7 days apart. The main outcome measures were acute effects of aspartame measured using repeated ratings of 14 symptoms, biochemistry and metabonomics. Results Aspartame sensitive and non-sensitive participants differed psychologically at baseline in handling feelings and perceived stress. Sensitive participants had higher triglycerides (2.05 ± 1.44 vs. 1.26 ± 0.84mmol/L; p value 0.008) and lower HDL-C (1.16 ± 0.34 vs. 1.35 ± 0.54 mmol/L; p value 0.04), reflected in 1H NMR serum analysis that showed differences in the baseline lipid content between the two groups. Urine metabonomic studies showed no significant differences. None of the rated symptoms differed between aspartame and control bars, or between sensitive and control participants. However, aspartame sensitive participants rated more symptoms particularly in the first test session, whether this was placebo or control. Aspartame and control bars affected GLP-1, GIP, tyrosine and phenylalanine levels equally in both aspartame sensitive and non-sensitive subjects. Conclusion Using a comprehensive battery of psychological tests, biochemistry and state of the art metabonomics there was no evidence of any acute adverse responses to aspartame. This independent study gives reassurance to both regulatory bodies

  3. Fundamental studies of nanoarchitectured dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhenzhen

    2011-12-01

    lifetime due to the short electron transport distance. Apparently, in contrast to the surface roughness factor of a TiO 2 nanoparticulate film, typically well above 1000, the surface roughness factor of our Zn-microtip|ZnO-nanotip electrode is still very low. Thus, we integrated the above idea in the conventional TiO2-based DSSCs such that the advantage of high surface roughness in conventional NP-based DSSC can be retained. We designed and fabricated an array of metal micropillars by a lithographic method as additional electron collection pathways on a planar TCO anode. The surface roughness is distributed between the collecting electrode and the semiconductor layer. The electron transport kinetics was insightfully studied by electrochemical impedance technique, which suggests that the charge collection efficiency can be enhanced without sacrificing the thickness of TiO2 nanoparticle layer. Furthermore, novel TCO nanoarchitectures were explored by converting the 2-D planar TCO to 3-D structure with intentional incorporation of functional optical structures, e.g., photonic crystals in the cell, to synergistically enhance light harvesting efficiency by light trapping effect, while still keep the short charge transport path length at the TCO/semiconductor interface. A novel 3-D nanophotonic crystal TCO electrode was synthesized using a 3-D template-assisted and solution-chemistry-based method. The optical and electrical properties of the 3-D photonic crystal FTO electrodes are studied by UV-Vis transmittance spectroscopy, Hall effect and sheet resistance measurement. In addition, an ultrathin TiO2 layer is coated on all surfaces of the IO-FTO electrodes using the atomic layer deposition technique. Cyclic voltammetry study indicates that the resulting TiO2-coated 3-D FTO shows excellent potentials as electrodes for electrolyte-based DSSCs.

  4. Comparative study of normal and sensitive skin aerobic bacterial populations

    PubMed Central

    Hillion, Mélanie; Mijouin, Lily; Jaouen, Thomas; Barreau, Magalie; Meunier, Pauline; Lefeuvre, Luc; Lati, Elian; Chevalier, Sylvie; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if the sensitive skin syndrome, a frequent skin disorder characterized by abnormal painful reactions to environmental factors in the absence of visible inflammatory response, could be linked to a modification in the skin bacterial population. A total of 1706 bacterial isolates was collected at the levels of the forehead, cheekbone, inner elbow, and lower area of the scapula on the skin of normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers of both sexes and of different ages. Among these isolates, 21 strains were randomly selected to validate in a first step the Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI)-Biotyper process as an efficient identification tool at the group and genus levels, by comparison to API® strips and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing identification techniques. In a second step, identification of the skin microbiota isolates by the MALDI-Biotyper tool allowed to pinpoint some differences in terms of bacterial diversity with regard to the collection area, and the volunteer's age and gender. Finally, comparison of the skin microbiota from normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers pointed out gender-related variations but no detectable correlation between a phylum, a genus or a dominant bacterial species and the sensitive skin phenotype. This study reveals that there is no dysbiosis of aerobic cultivable bacteria associated with the sensitive skin syndrome and further demonstrates that the MALDI-Biotyper is a powerful technique that can be efficiently employed to the study of cultivable human skin bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on bacteria in the sensitive skin syndrome. These results are of potential importance for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, which are looking for new strategies to treat this multiparametric disorder. PMID:24151137

  5. Comparative study of normal and sensitive skin aerobic bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Hillion, Mélanie; Mijouin, Lily; Jaouen, Thomas; Barreau, Magalie; Meunier, Pauline; Lefeuvre, Luc; Lati, Elian; Chevalier, Sylvie; Feuilloley, Marc G J

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate if the sensitive skin syndrome, a frequent skin disorder characterized by abnormal painful reactions to environmental factors in the absence of visible inflammatory response, could be linked to a modification in the skin bacterial population. A total of 1706 bacterial isolates was collected at the levels of the forehead, cheekbone, inner elbow, and lower area of the scapula on the skin of normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers of both sexes and of different ages. Among these isolates, 21 strains were randomly selected to validate in a first step the Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI)-Biotyper process as an efficient identification tool at the group and genus levels, by comparison to API(®) strips and 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing identification techniques. In a second step, identification of the skin microbiota isolates by the MALDI-Biotyper tool allowed to pinpoint some differences in terms of bacterial diversity with regard to the collection area, and the volunteer's age and gender. Finally, comparison of the skin microbiota from normal and sensitive skin syndrome-suffering volunteers pointed out gender-related variations but no detectable correlation between a phylum, a genus or a dominant bacterial species and the sensitive skin phenotype. This study reveals that there is no dysbiosis of aerobic cultivable bacteria associated with the sensitive skin syndrome and further demonstrates that the MALDI-Biotyper is a powerful technique that can be efficiently employed to the study of cultivable human skin bacteria. To our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on bacteria in the sensitive skin syndrome. These results are of potential importance for pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, which are looking for new strategies to treat this multiparametric disorder. PMID:24151137

  6. Sensitivity and uncertainty studies of the CRAC2 computer code.

    PubMed

    Kocher, D C; Ward, R C; Killough, G G; Dunning, D E; Hicks, B B; Hosker, R P; Ku, J Y; Rao, K S

    1987-12-01

    We have studied the sensitivity of health impacts from nuclear reactor accidents, as predicted by the CRAC2 computer code, to the following sources of uncertainty: (1) the model for plume rise, (2) the model for wet deposition, (3) the meteorological bin-sampling procedure for selecting weather sequences with rain, (4) the dose conversion factors for inhalation as affected by uncertainties in the particle size of the carrier aerosol and the clearance rates of radionuclides from the respiratory tract, (5) the weathering half-time for external ground-surface exposure, and (6) the transfer coefficients for terrestrial foodchain pathways. Predicted health impacts usually showed little sensitivity to use of an alternative plume-rise model or a modified rain-bin structure in bin-sampling. Health impacts often were quite sensitive to use of an alternative wet-deposition model in single-trial runs with rain during plume passage, but were less sensitive to the model in bin-sampling runs. Uncertainties in the inhalation dose conversion factors had important effects on early injuries in single-trial runs. Latent cancer fatalities were moderately sensitive to uncertainties in the weathering half-time for ground-surface exposure, but showed little sensitivity to the transfer coefficients for terrestrial foodchain pathways. Sensitivities of CRAC2 predictions to uncertainties in the models and parameters also depended on the magnitude of the source term, and some of the effects on early health effects were comparable to those that were due only to selection of different sets of weather sequences in bin-sampling. PMID:3444936

  7. Sensitivity study on hydraulic well testing inversion using simulated annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Shinsuke; Najita, J.; Karasaki, Kenzi

    1997-11-01

    For environmental remediation, management of nuclear waste disposal, or geothermal reservoir engineering, it is very important to evaluate the permeabilities, spacing, and sizes of the subsurface fractures which control ground water flow. Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing has been used as an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models of fractured formations based on transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes an aperture of cluster of fracture elements, which are chosen randomly from a list of discrete apertures, to improve the match to observed pressure transients. The size of the clusters is held constant throughout the iterations. Sensitivity studies using simple fracture models with eight wells show that, in general, it is necessary to conduct interference tests using at least three different wells as pumping well in order to reconstruct the fracture network with a transmissivity contrast of one order of magnitude, particularly when the cluster size is not known a priori. Because hydraulic inversion is inherently non-unique, it is important to utilize additional information. The authors investigated the relationship between the scale of heterogeneity and the optimum cluster size (and its shape) to enhance the reliability and convergence of the inversion. It appears that the cluster size corresponding to about 20--40 % of the practical range of the spatial correlation is optimal. Inversion results of the Raymond test site data are also presented and the practical range of spatial correlation is evaluated to be about 5--10 m from the optimal cluster size in the inversion.

  8. Ethical problems and moral sensitivity in physiotherapy: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Kulju, Kati; Suhonen, Riitta; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2013-08-01

    This study identified and described ethical problems encountered by physiotherapists in their practice and physiotherapists' moral sensitivity in ethical situations. A questionnaire-based survey was constructed to identify ethical problems, and the Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire Revised version was used to measure moral sensitivity. Physiotherapists (n = 116) working in public health services responded to the questionnaire. Based on the results, most of the physiotherapists encounter ethical problems weekly. They concern mainly financial considerations, equality and justice, professionalism, unethical conduct of physiotherapists or other professions and patients' self-determination. The dimension of moral strength was emphasised in physiotherapists' self-evaluations of their moral sensitivity. As a conclusion, ethical problems do occur not only at individual level but also at organisational and society level. Physiotherapists seem to have moral strength for speaking on behalf of the patient. Scarce resources make them feel insufficient but much could still be done to provide quality care in co-operation with other health-care professionals. PMID:23329778

  9. Studies on the effect of plasticiser and addition of toluene diisocyanate at different temperatures in composite propellant formulations.

    PubMed

    Jawalkar, S N; Mehilal; Ramesh, K; Radhakrishnan, K K; Bhattacharya, B

    2009-05-30

    Different composite propellant mixtures have been prepared using ammonium perchlorate, aluminium powder and hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene by varying the percentage of plasticiser and addition of toluene diisocyanate at different temperatures, and studied their different properties such as viscosity build-up, mechanical and ballistic properties and sensitivity. The data on different plasticiser level indicate that on decreasing the plasticiser content, there is a significant enhancement in end of mix viscosity, tensile strength and modulus while elongation decreases drastically. The data on sensitivity of the studied mixtures reveal that on decreasing the percentage of plasticiser, the sensitivity increases, accordingly. Further, the data on the effect of addition of TDI at different temperatures (35-60 degrees C) infer that on increasing the addition temperature of TDI there is a decrease in end of mix viscosity i.e. 800Pas at 35 degrees C to 448Pas at 60 degrees C. Moreover, there is no effect on mechanical and ballistic properties on higher temperature addition of TDI was observed. PMID:18835097

  10. Toxicogenomics concepts and applications to study hepatic effects of food additives and chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Stierum, Rob . E-mail: stierum@voeding.tno.nl; Heijne, Wilbert; Kienhuis, Anne; Ommen, Ben van; Groten, John

    2005-09-01

    Transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics are genomics technologies with great potential in toxicological sciences. Toxicogenomics involves the integration of conventional toxicological examinations with gene, protein or metabolite expression profiles. An overview together with selected examples of the possibilities of genomics in toxicology is given. The expectations raised by toxicogenomics are earlier and more sensitive detection of toxicity. Furthermore, toxicogenomics will provide a better understanding of the mechanism of toxicity and may facilitate the prediction of toxicity of unknown compounds. Mechanism-based markers of toxicity can be discovered and improved interspecies and in vitro-in vivo extrapolations will drive model developments in toxicology. Toxicological assessment of chemical mixtures will benefit from the new molecular biological tools. In our laboratory, toxicogenomics is predominantly applied for elucidation of mechanisms of action and discovery of novel pathway-supported mechanism-based markers of liver toxicity. In addition, we aim to integrate transcriptome, proteome and metabolome data, supported by bioinformatics to develop a systems biology approach for toxicology. Transcriptomics and proteomics studies on bromobenzene-mediated hepatotoxicity in the rat are discussed. Finally, an example is shown in which gene expression profiling together with conventional biochemistry led to the discovery of novel markers for the hepatic effects of the food additives butylated hydroxytoluene, curcumin, propyl gallate and thiabendazole.

  11. Beta-carotene suppression of benzophenone-sensitized lipid peroxidation in hexane through additional chain-breaking activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetković, Dragan; Marković, Dejan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this work is to estimate the antioxidant activity of β-carotene in the presence of two different mixtures of phospholipids in hexane solution, under continuous UV-irradiation from three different ranges (UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C). β-Carotene is employed to control lipid peroxidation process generated by UV-irradiation, in the presence and in the absence of selected photosensitizer, benzophenone, by scavenging the involved, created free radicals. The results show that β-carotene undergoes to a substantial, probably structural dependent destruction (bleaching), highly dependent on UV-photons energy input, more expressed in the presence than in the absence of benzophenone. The additional bleaching is synchronized with the further increase in β-carotene antioxidant activity in the presence of benzophenone, implying the same cause: increase in (phospholipids peroxidation) chain-breaking activities.

  12. Impact of contacting study authors to obtain additional data for systematic reviews: diagnostic accuracy studies for hepatic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Seventeen of 172 included studies in a recent systematic review of blood tests for hepatic fibrosis or cirrhosis reported diagnostic accuracy results discordant from 2 × 2 tables, and 60 studies reported inadequate data to construct 2 × 2 tables. This study explores the yield of contacting authors of diagnostic accuracy studies and impact on the systematic review findings. Methods Sixty-six corresponding authors were sent letters requesting additional information or clarification of data from 77 studies. Data received from the authors were synthesized with data included in the previous review, and diagnostic accuracy sensitivities, specificities, and positive and likelihood ratios were recalculated. Results Of the 66 authors, 68% were successfully contacted and 42% provided additional data for 29 out of 77 studies (38%). All authors who provided data at all did so by the third emailed request (ten authors provided data after one request). Authors of more recent studies were more likely to be located and provide data compared to authors of older studies. The effects of requests for additional data on the conclusions regarding the utility of blood tests to identify patients with clinically significant fibrosis or cirrhosis were generally small for ten out of 12 tests. Additional data resulted in reclassification (using median likelihood ratio estimates) from less useful to moderately useful or vice versa for the remaining two blood tests and enabled the calculation of an estimate for a third blood test for which previously the data had been insufficient to do so. We did not identify a clear pattern for the directional impact of additional data on estimates of diagnostic accuracy. Conclusions We successfully contacted and received results from 42% of authors who provided data for 38% of included studies. Contacting authors of studies evaluating the diagnostic accuracy of serum biomarkers for hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis in hepatitis C patients

  13. Pain sensitivity and opioid analgesia: a pharmacogenomic twin study.

    PubMed

    Angst, Martin S; Phillips, Nicholas G; Drover, David R; Tingle, Martha; Ray, Amrita; Swan, Gary E; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Clark, J David

    2012-07-01

    Opioids are the cornerstone medication for the management of moderate to severe pain. Unfortunately, vast inter-individual differences in dose requirements complicate their effective and safe clinical use. Mechanisms underlying such differences are incompletely understood, are likely multifactorial, and include genetic and environmental contributions. While accumulating evidence suggests that variants of several genes account for some of the observed response variance, the relative contribution of these factors remains unknown. This study used a twin paradigm to provide a global estimate of the genetic and environmental contributions to inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity and analgesic opioid effects. Eighty one monozygotic and 31 dizygotic twin pairs successfully underwent a computer-controlled infusion with the μ-opioid agonist alfentanil in a single occasion, randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled study design. Pain sensitivity and analgesic effects were assessed with experimental heat and cold pressor pain models along with important covariates including demographic factors, depression, anxiety, and sleep quality. Significant heritability was detected for cold pressor pain tolerance and opioid-mediated elevations in heat and cold pressor pain thresholds. Genetic effects accounted for 12-60% of the observed response variance. Significant familial effects accounting for 24-32% of observed variance were detected for heat and cold pressor pain thresholds and opioid-mediated elevation in cold pressor pain tolerance. Significant covariates included age, gender, race, education, and anxiety. Results provide a strong rationale for more detailed molecular genetic studies to elucidate mechanisms underlying inter-individual differences in pain sensitivity and analgesic opioid responses. Such studies will require careful consideration of the studied pain phenotype. PMID:22444188

  14. Contamination sensitivity of typical mirror coatings - A parametric study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osantowski, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    Contamination budgeting for space optical systems basically starts at understanding the sensitivity of component performance, e.g. mirror reflectance, window transmittance, etc., to surface deposits. To evaluate contamination sensitivity for mirror coatings, eight types representative of those used in the vacuum ultraviolet, visible, and infrared were modeled assuming that the contaminant is uniformly deposited on the mirror surface. Parametric studies over a range of complex refractive indices combined with an examination of optical data available for several organic materials suggested division of the contaminant layer index into three categories, N = 1.5 + 0.1i, N = 1.5 + 0.5i, and N = 1.5 + 2.0i. Contaminant thickness sensitivity curves were then calculated for each of the selected mirror coatings. For comparative purposes, critical thicknesses for each type were extracted, assuming a reflectance loss of 10 percent was allowable. Critical thicknesses ranged from about 10 A to 1000 A depending on the specifics of coating design and spectral region.

  15. Image quality and dose efficiency of high energy phase sensitive x-ray imaging: Phantom studies

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Molly Donovan; Wu, Xizeng; Liu, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this preliminary study was to perform an image quality comparison of high energy phase sensitive imaging with low energy conventional imaging at similar radiation doses. The comparison was performed with the following phantoms: American College of Radiology (ACR), contrast-detail (CD), acrylic edge and tissue-equivalent. Visual comparison of the phantom images indicated comparable or improved image quality for all phantoms. Quantitative comparisons were performed through ACR and CD observer studies, both of which indicated higher image quality in the high energy phase sensitive images. The results of this study demonstrate the ability of high energy phase sensitive imaging to overcome existing challenges with the clinical implementation of phase contrast imaging and improve the image quality for a similar radiation dose as compared to conventional imaging near typical mammography energies. In addition, the results illustrate the capability of phase sensitive imaging to sustain the image quality improvement at high x-ray energies and for – breast – simulating phantoms, both of which indicate the potential to benefit fields such as mammography. Future studies will continue to investigate the potential for dose reduction and image quality improvement provided by high energy phase sensitive contrast imaging. PMID:24865208

  16. Mass sensitivity studies for an inductively driven railgun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, J. J., III; Young, A. F.

    1991-01-01

    Those areas which result in substantial system mass reductions for an HPG (homopolar generator) driven EML (electromagnetic launcher) are identified. Sensitivity studies are performed by varying launch mass, peak acceleration, launcher efficiency, inductance gradient, injection velocity, barrel mass per unit length, fuel tankage and pump estimates, and component energy and power densities. Two major contributors to the system mass are the allowed number of shots per barrel versus the number required for the mission, and the barrel length. The effects of component performance parameters, such as friction coefficient, injection velocity, ablation coefficient, rail resistivity, armature voltage, peak acceleration, and inductance gradient on these two areas, are addressed.

  17. Physics sensitivity studies of Fine-Grained Tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Xinchun; Mishra, Sanjib R.; Petti, Roberto; Hongyue, Duyang

    2015-10-15

    The reference design of the near detector for the LBNE experiment is a high-resolution Fine-Grained Tracker (FGT). We performed sensitivity studies – critical to constraining the systematics in oscillation searches – of measurements of (1) the absolute neutrino flux, (2) neutrino-nucleon quasi-elastic (QE) and (3) resonance (Res) interactions. In QE and Res emphasis is laid in identifying in situ measurables that help constrain nuclear effects such as initial state pair wise correlations and final state interactions.

  18. Rapid and sensitive LC-MS-MS determination of 2-mercaptobenzothiazole, a rubber additive, in human urine.

    PubMed

    Gries, Wolfgang; Küpper, Katja; Leng, Gabriele

    2015-05-01

    2-Mercaptobenzothiazole (MBT) is one of the most important vulcanization accelerators in the industrial production of rubber, especially car tires. Given its wide use in household articles and industrial rubber products it has a high potential to migrate into the environment. Humans can be exposed by dermal, oral, or inhalative routes. Incorporated MBT is excreted in urine, mainly as conjugates to glucuronide, sulfate, and mercapturic acid. On the basis of these facts MBT has been selected as a substance of high interest in the large scale 10-year German project on human biomonitoring (HBM); a cooperation between the German Federal Ministry for the Environment (BMUB) and the German Chemical Industry Association (VCI) with the objective of developing new analytical methods for relevant chemicals. The presented method was developed to determine MBT in human urine to reliably investigate the internal human MBT dose. Total MBT is measured after enzymatic hydrolysis followed by application of high-pressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS-MS) in positive-electrospray-ionization mode (ESI+) using isotope-dilution quantification. High sample throughput could be obtained by use of the column-switching technique. Optimization yielded an analytical method with a low and reproducible limit of detection (LOD) of 0.4 μg L(-1) and a limit of quantification (LOQ) of 1 μg L(-1), and low relative standard deviations in the range 1.6-5.8 %. A small biomonitoring study covering unexposed humans and occupationally exposed workers was performed to establish the feasibility and reliability of the method. MBT was found in only one urine sample from the unexposed humans, at a value of 10.8 μg MBT per liter, whereas it was found in all samples from the tested workers at values of up to 6210 μg MBT per liter. PMID:25701422

  19. Study of the Intergranular Corrosion of Sensitized UNS S31803 Stainless Steel in Transpassive Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morshed Behbahani, Khashayar; Najafisayar, Pooria; Pakshir, Mahmoud

    2016-06-01

    In this study, intergranular corrosion behavior of UNS S31803 duplex stainless steel was investigated using conventional potentiodynamic polarization, double loop electrochemical potentiokinetic reactivation (DLEPR), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique carried out at different potentials in the transpassive region. Different types of heat treatments were used to obtain samples with different degrees of sensitization. The results of the DLEPR tests showed that the solution-annealed sample and that was sensitized for half an hour would be considered as nonsensitized ones. Moreover, the sample that was sensitized for 24 h exhibits the highest value of the degree of sensitization. Polarization test results showed a typical active-passive behavior from which the transpassive potential range was determined and used as the range of the applied DC bias in the EIS experiments. Three different AC responses (including capacitive and inductive responses) were observed depending on the value of applied DC bias in the EIS experiments. In addition, it was observed that the presence of the second inductive loop at high applied DC bias is due to the adsorption of nonsoluble corrosion products on the surface of the samples. Moreover, the fitted values to the charge transfer and polarization resistances (R ct and R P) decreased as the sensitization time increased from 30 min to 24 h. Such observations were in good accordance with the metallographic examination of the corroded surfaces, carried out by optical and scanning electron microscopy techniques, revealing discontinuous grain boundary attack in nonsensitized samples and a continuous network of grain boundary attack in the case of sensitized ones. Moreover, as the applied DC bias increases the ferrite phase attack also occurs in the sensitized samples. In addition, approximately no pitting corrosion was observed on the surface of the corroded samples which is in accordance with their respective cyclic

  20. Risk of sensitization and allergy in Ragweed workers – a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Due to its high allergenic potential Ambrosia artemisiifolia has become a health threat in many European countries during the last few decades. Hence, several cities and communities initiated ragweed eradication campaigns. In Berlin, Germany, so-called Ambrosia scouts are being assigned the task of finding and eliminating this weed. We sought to evaluate the potential risk of sensitization and allergy in these individuals. Findings In order to assess the risk of sensitization and allergy, we followed-up 20 Ambrosia scouts by skin-prick test with inhalant allergens, immunoserological and pulmonary function tests. Additionally, medical conditions were evaluated by a questionnaire especially designed for this study. Despite close contact to ragweed over a median duration of 13.8 months, none of the participants became sensitized or allergic to ragweed. One individual developed a clinical non-relevant sensitization towards the taxiconomically-related plant mugwort. A decline in relative FEV1 was most probably due to heavy smoking. Conclusions Our surprising findings suggest that intensive contact and exposure to high ragweed pollen concentrations do not necessarily result in sensitization and/or allergy, meaning that the allergenic potential of this weed might be lower than hitherto expected. However, it is also conceivable that continuous exposure to high allergen levels induced tolerance in the ragweed workers. Due to the relatively small number of subjects studied, our results might be biased and therefore investigations on larger study groups are needed. PMID:25147570

  1. Sensitivity Studies of Sea Ice Formation In The Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, U.; Harms, I.; Backhaus, J. O.

    Sea ice formation is an important process in Arctic shelf seas because it determines environmental conditions in the whole Arctic, in particular at the coasts. Arctic shelf seas receive large amounts of freshwater which has a significant impact on ice forma- tion and which could be affected by climate change. In order to study the direct and indirect influence of river runoff on sea ice formation, a high resolution baroclinic 3-d circulation and sea ice model is applied to the Kara Sea. The model is forced with realistic atmospheric winds, surface heat fluxes, river runoff and tides. A vertical adaptive grid is used which provides high resolution in critical areas such as shallow estuaries, slopes or topographic obstacles. The surface following boundary layer is resolved uniformly in 4 m intervals in order to resolve the strong vertical stratification. The simulated melting rates are sensitive to the penetration depth of shortwave radia- tion into the water column. Peak runoff rates in the Kara Sea in spring might exceed 100.000 m3/s which causes high suspended loads in the water column and reduces the shortwave penetration depth considerably compared to ambient Arctic waters. As a result, coastal sea surface temperatures rise and ice melting is significantly enhanced. Our sensitivity studies show, that the indirect influence of river runoff on ice melting could play an important role in future studies on climate variability in the Arctic.

  2. Increasing the sensitivity of PCR detection in bovine preputial smegma spiked with Tritrichomonas foetus by the addition of agar and resin.

    PubMed

    Chen, X G; Li, J

    2001-07-01

    Methods for the extraction of DNA from the preputial smegma of cattle infected with Tritrichomonas foetus for the purposes of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection are usually time-consuming, relatively insensitive and require hazardous chemicals. In order to solve these problems, we have developed a rapid, sensitive and harmless method to extract quality DNA from preputial smegma spiked with T. foetus. Results indicate that the addition of 5% Chelex-100 resin and 0.05% agar solution to the spiked smegma before the process of DNA extraction by the boiling method can significantly increase the sensitivity of PCR detection. This improved method may be suitable for routine DNA extraction for the diagnosis of cattle and even human trichomoniasis by PCR. PMID:11484853

  3. Computational studies of quantum dot sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesov, Grigory

    This thesis presents a computational study of quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells. First part deals with the non-equilibrium many-body theory or non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) theory. In this approach I study electron dynamics in the quantum-dot sensitized solar cell subjected to time-dependent fields. NEGF theory, because it does not impose any conditions on a perturbation, is the fundamental one to describe ultrafast processes in small, strongly correlated systems and/or in strong fields. In this research I do not only perform analytical derivation, but also design and implement spectral numerical solution for the resulting complex system of partial integrodifferential equations. This numerical solution yielded an order of magnitude speedup over the methods used previously in the field. The forth chapter of this thesis deals with calculation of optical properties and the ground state configuration of Zn2SnO4 (ZTO). ZTO is used by experimentalists in UW to grow nanorods which are then sensitized by QDs. ZTO is a challenging material for computational analysis because of its inverse spinel structure; thus it has an immense number of configurations matching the X-ray diffraction experiments. I've applied a cluster expansion method and have found the ground state configuration and phase diagram for ZTO. Calculations of optical properties of ground state bulk ZTO were done with a recently developed DFT functional. The optical band gap obtained in these calculations matched the experimental value. The last chapter describes development of the general simulator for interdigitated array electrodes. The application of this simulation together with the experiments may lead to understanding of reaction parameters and mechanisms important for development of electrochemical solar cells.

  4. Sensitivity studies for a space-based methane lidar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Ehret, G.; Amediek, A.; Fix, A.; Wirth, M.

    2011-10-01

    Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after water vapour and carbon dioxide. A major handicap to quantify the emissions at the Earth's surface in order to better understand biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes and potential climate feedbacks is the lack of accurate and global observations of methane. Space-based integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar has potential to fill this gap, and a Methane Remote Lidar Mission (MERLIN) on a small satellite in polar orbit was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. System simulations are used to identify key performance parameters and to find an advantageous instrument configuration, given the environmental, technological, and budget constraints. The sensitivity studies use representative averages of the atmospheric and surface state to estimate the measurement precision, i.e. the random uncertainty due to instrument noise. Key performance parameters for MERLIN are average laser power, telescope size, orbit height, surface reflectance, and detector noise. A modest-size lidar instrument with 0.45 W average laser power and 0.55 m telescope diameter on a 506 km orbit could provide 50-km averaged methane column measurement along the sub-satellite track with a precision of about 1% over vegetation. The use of a methane absorption trough at 1.65 μm improves the near-surface measurement sensitivity and vastly relaxes the wavelength stability requirement that was identified as one of the major technological risks in the pre-phase A studies for A-SCOPE, a space-based IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide at the European Space Agency. Minimal humidity and temperature sensitivity at this wavelength position will enable accurate measurements in tropical wetlands, key regions with largely uncertain methane emissions. In contrast to actual passive remote sensors, measurements in Polar Regions will be possible and biases due to aerosol layers and thin

  5. Sensitivity studies for a space-based methane lidar mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Ehret, G.; Amediek, A.; Fix, A.; Wirth, M.

    2011-06-01

    Methane is the third most important greenhouse gas in the atmosphere after water vapour and carbon dioxide. A major handicap to quantify the emissions at the Earth's surface in order to better understand biosphere-atmosphere exchange processes and potential climate feedbacks is the lack of accurate and global observations of methane. Space-based integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar has potential to fill this gap, and a Methane Remote Lidar Mission (MERLIN) on a small satellite in Polar orbit was proposed by DLR and CNES in the frame of a German-French climate monitoring initiative. System simulations are used to identify key performance parameters and to find an advantageous instrument configuration, given the environmental, technological, and budget constraints. The sensitivity studies use representative averages of the atmospheric and surface state to estimate the measurement precision, i.e. the random uncertainty due to instrument noise. Key performance parameters for MERLIN are average laser power, telescope size, orbit height, surface reflectance, and detector noise. A modest-size lidar instrument with 0.45 W average laser power and 0.55 m telescope diameter on a 506 km orbit could provide 50-km averaged methane column measurement along the sub-satellite track with a precision of about 1 % over vegetation. The use of a methane absorption trough at 1.65 μm improves the near-surface measurement sensitivity and vastly relaxes the wavelength stability requirement that was identified as one of the major technological risks in the pre-phase A studies for A-SCOPE, a space-based IPDA lidar for carbon dioxide at the European Space Agency. Minimal humidity and temperature sensitivity at this wavelength position will enable accurate measurements in tropical wetlands, key regions with largely uncertain methane emissions. In contrast to actual passive remote sensors, measurements in Polar Regions will be possible and biases due to aerosol layers and thin

  6. Sensitivity analysis in multiple imputation in effectiveness studies of psychotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Crameri, Aureliano; von Wyl, Agnes; Koemeda, Margit; Schulthess, Peter; Tschuschke, Volker

    2015-01-01

    The importance of preventing and treating incomplete data in effectiveness studies is nowadays emphasized. However, most of the publications focus on randomized clinical trials (RCT). One flexible technique for statistical inference with missing data is multiple imputation (MI). Since methods such as MI rely on the assumption of missing data being at random (MAR), a sensitivity analysis for testing the robustness against departures from this assumption is required. In this paper we present a sensitivity analysis technique based on posterior predictive checking, which takes into consideration the concept of clinical significance used in the evaluation of intra-individual changes. We demonstrate the possibilities this technique can offer with the example of irregular longitudinal data collected with the Outcome Questionnaire-45 (OQ-45) and the Helping Alliance Questionnaire (HAQ) in a sample of 260 outpatients. The sensitivity analysis can be used to (1) quantify the degree of bias introduced by missing not at random data (MNAR) in a worst reasonable case scenario, (2) compare the performance of different analysis methods for dealing with missing data, or (3) detect the influence of possible violations to the model assumptions (e.g., lack of normality). Moreover, our analysis showed that ratings from the patient's and therapist's version of the HAQ could significantly improve the predictive value of the routine outcome monitoring based on the OQ-45. Since analysis dropouts always occur, repeated measurements with the OQ-45 and the HAQ analyzed with MI are useful to improve the accuracy of outcome estimates in quality assurance assessments and non-randomized effectiveness studies in the field of outpatient psychotherapy. PMID:26283989

  7. Sensitivity studies for the weak r process: neutron capture rates

    SciTech Connect

    Surman, R.; Mumpower, M.; Sinclair, R.; Jones, K. L.; Hix, W. R.; McLaughlin, G. C.

    2014-04-15

    Rapid neutron capture nucleosynthesis involves thousands of nuclear species far from stability, whose nuclear properties need to be understood in order to accurately predict nucleosynthetic outcomes. Recently sensitivity studies have provided a deeper understanding of how the r process proceeds and have identified pieces of nuclear data of interest for further experimental or theoretical study. A key result of these studies has been to point out the importance of individual neutron capture rates in setting the final r-process abundance pattern for a ‘main’ (A ∼ 130 peak and above) r process. Here we examine neutron capture in the context of a ‘weak’ r process that forms primarily the A ∼ 80 r-process abundance peak. We identify the astrophysical conditions required to produce this peak region through weak r-processing and point out the neutron capture rates that most strongly influence the final abundance pattern.

  8. Verification, Validation and Sensitivity Studies in Computational Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Andrew E.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Computational techniques and software for the analysis of problems in mechanics have naturally moved from their origins in the traditional engineering disciplines to the study of cell, tissue and organ biomechanics. Increasingly complex models have been developed to describe and predict the mechanical behavior of such biological systems. While the availability of advanced computational tools has led to exciting research advances in the field, the utility of these models is often the subject of criticism due to inadequate model verification and validation. The objective of this review is to present the concepts of verification, validation and sensitivity studies with regard to the construction, analysis and interpretation of models in computational biomechanics. Specific examples from the field are discussed. It is hoped that this review will serve as a guide to the use of verification and validation principles in the field of computational biomechanics, thereby improving the peer acceptance of studies that use computational modeling techniques. PMID:17558646

  9. Study of wood plastic composite in the presence of nitrogen containing additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, K. M. Idriss; Khan, Mubarak A.; Husain, M. M.

    1994-10-01

    Effect of nitrogen-containing additives in the study of wood plastic composites of MMA with simul and mango wood of Bangladesh has been investigated. Nine different additives were used and the additives containing carboamide group induce the highest tensile strength to the composite.

  10. STUDIES ON THE SENSITIZATION OF ANIMALS WITH SIMPLE CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Landsteiner, K.; Di Somma, A. A.

    1938-01-01

    With the view of making new types of chemicals accessible for investigations on drug hypersensitiveness, methods have been devised for sensitizing animals with diazomethane and mustard oil, two non-aromatic compounds. Guinea pigs have been sensitized to diazomethane, a substance of high reactivity and known to cause severe allergic effects in man. With the second substance, allylisothiocyanate, likewise capable of forming conjugates with substances in the animal body, sensitization effects have been obtained in man and in hogs. Sensitization in human beings was successful with one out of six individuals treated. The observations indicate species and individual differences as regards the ability to become sensitized to various chemical compounds. PMID:19870801

  11. Mass sensitivity studies for an inductively driven railgun

    SciTech Connect

    Scanlon, J.J. ); Young, A.F. )

    1991-01-01

    One of the primary system constructs for an Electromagnetic Launcher (EML) System consists of a homopolar generator (HPG) driven by a hot hydrogen multi-stage turbine/nuclear reactor. The HPG is used to charge an inductive energy store. A key evaluation criterion for determining the viability of an EML is system mass. The objective of this paper is to identify those areas which result in substantial system mass reductions for an HPG driven EML. Sensitivity studies are performed by varying launch mass peak acceleration, launcher efficiency, inductance gradient (L{prime}), injection velocity, barrel mass per unit length, fuel tankage and pump estimates, and component energy and power densities. Two major contributors to the system mass are the allowed number of shots per barrel versus the number required for the mission, and the barrel length.

  12. Maternal sensitivity, infant limbic structure volume and functional connectivity: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Rifkin-Graboi, A; Kong, L; Sim, L W; Sanmugam, S; Broekman, B F P; Chen, H; Wong, E; Kwek, K; Saw, S-M; Chong, Y-S; Gluckman, P D; Fortier, M V; Pederson, D; Meaney, M J; Qiu, A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the profound parental effects on cognitive, emotional and social development in humans remain poorly understood. Studies with nonhuman models suggest variations in parental care affect the limbic system, influential to learning, autobiography and emotional regulation. In some research, nonoptimal care relates to decreases in neurogenesis, although other work suggests early-postnatal social adversity accelerates the maturation of limbic structures associated with emotional learning. We explored whether maternal sensitivity predicts human limbic system development and functional connectivity patterns in a small sample of human infants. When infants were 6 months of age, 20 mother-infant dyads attended a laboratory-based observational session and the infants underwent neuroimaging at the same age. After considering age at imaging, household income and postnatal maternal anxiety, regression analyses demonstrated significant indirect associations between maternal sensitivity and bilateral hippocampal volume at six months, with the majority of associations between sensitivity and the amygdala demonstrating similar indirect, but not significant results. Moreover, functional analyses revealed direct associations between maternal sensitivity and connectivity between the hippocampus and areas important for emotional regulation and socio-emotional functioning. Sensitivity additionally predicted indirect associations between limbic structures and regions related to autobiographical memory. Our volumetric results are consistent with research indicating accelerated limbic development in response to early social adversity, and in combination with our functional results, if replicated in a larger sample, may suggest that subtle, but important, variations in maternal care influence neuroanatomical trajectories important to future cognitive and emotional functioning. PMID:26506054

  13. Maternal sensitivity, infant limbic structure volume and functional connectivity: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Rifkin-Graboi, A; Kong, L; Sim, L W; Sanmugam, S; Broekman, B F P; Chen, H; Wong, E; Kwek, K; Saw, S-M; Chong, Y-S; Gluckman, P D; Fortier, M V; Pederson, D; Meaney, M J; Qiu, A

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying the profound parental effects on cognitive, emotional and social development in humans remain poorly understood. Studies with nonhuman models suggest variations in parental care affect the limbic system, influential to learning, autobiography and emotional regulation. In some research, nonoptimal care relates to decreases in neurogenesis, although other work suggests early-postnatal social adversity accelerates the maturation of limbic structures associated with emotional learning. We explored whether maternal sensitivity predicts human limbic system development and functional connectivity patterns in a small sample of human infants. When infants were 6 months of age, 20 mother–infant dyads attended a laboratory-based observational session and the infants underwent neuroimaging at the same age. After considering age at imaging, household income and postnatal maternal anxiety, regression analyses demonstrated significant indirect associations between maternal sensitivity and bilateral hippocampal volume at six months, with the majority of associations between sensitivity and the amygdala demonstrating similar indirect, but not significant results. Moreover, functional analyses revealed direct associations between maternal sensitivity and connectivity between the hippocampus and areas important for emotional regulation and socio-emotional functioning. Sensitivity additionally predicted indirect associations between limbic structures and regions related to autobiographical memory. Our volumetric results are consistent with research indicating accelerated limbic development in response to early social adversity, and in combination with our functional results, if replicated in a larger sample, may suggest that subtle, but important, variations in maternal care influence neuroanatomical trajectories important to future cognitive and emotional functioning. PMID:26506054

  14. A New Approach for Coupled GCM Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirtman, B. P.; Duane, G. S.

    2011-12-01

    A new multi-model approach for coupled GCM sensitivity studies is presented. The purpose of the sensitivity experiments is to understand why two different coupled models have such large differences in their respective climate simulations. In the application presented here, the differences between the coupled models using the Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies (COLA) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) atmospheric general circulation models (AGCMs) are examined. The intent is to isolate which component of the air-sea fluxes is most responsible for the differences between the coupled models and for the errors in their respective coupled simulations. The procedure is to simultaneously couple the two different atmospheric component models to a single ocean general circulation model (OGCM), in this case the Modular Ocean Model (MOM) developed at the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL). Each atmospheric component model experiences the same SST produced by the OGCM, but the OGCM is simultaneously coupled to both AGCMs using a cross coupling strategy. In the first experiment, the OGCM is coupled to the heat and fresh water flux from the NCAR AGCM (Community Atmospheric Model; CAM) and the momentum flux from the COLA AGCM. Both AGCMs feel the same SST. In the second experiment, the OGCM is coupled to the heat and fresh water flux from the COLA AGCM and the momentum flux from the CAM AGCM. Again, both atmospheric component models experience the same SST. By comparing these two experimental simulations with control simulations where only one AGCM is used, it is possible to argue which of the flux components are most responsible for the differences in the simulations and their respective errors. Based on these sensitivity experiments we conclude that the tropical ocean warm bias in the COLA coupled model is due to errors in the heat flux, and that the erroneous westward shift in the tropical Pacific cold tongue minimum in the NCAR model is

  15. Dynamics within alkylsiloxane SAMs studied by sensitive dielectric spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Mary; Stevens, Derrick; Bochinski, Jason; Clarke, Laura

    2009-03-01

    Self assembled monolayers (SAMs) are a ubiquitous tool in modern research and their static structure has been extensively studied. Fewer investigations have addressed dynamics within these systems; however, such motions within SAMs will affect surface properties such as friction and blocking ability (permeability). In this study, sensitive, dielectric spectroscopy over a broad temperature range (4-400 K) has been employed to study relaxations within planar alkylsiloxane SAMs[1] . Highly disordered SAMs of varying density were grown by vapor deposition. Two dielectric relaxations were observed. The first, a polyethylene-like relaxation similar to that previously reported in phase-segregated alkyl side-chain polymers, is observed for all films with alkyl chains containing four or more carbons. This is an interacting or glassy relaxation. The second motion, which is observable only at high film densities, is a local mode, which follows an Arrhenius dependence on temperature, and has been previously assigned to a sub-chain rotation. [1] M.C. Scott, D.R. Stevens, J.R. Bochinski, L.I. Clarke, ACS Nano. DOI: 10.1021/nn800543j.

  16. A Novel Touch-Sensitive Apparatus for Behavioral Studies in Unrestrained Squirrel Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Kangas, Brian D.; Bergman, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increasing sophistication and affordability of touch-sensitive technology, its use in the behavioral sciences has been limited. The present paper describes the design and empirical validation of a novel touch-sensitive operant conditioning chamber for use with unrestrained squirrel monkeys. In addition, results from a variant of a commonly employed animal model of learning, the repeated acquisition task, demonstrated the effectiveness of this chamber in programming an assay of complex behavior. Finally, results from a study with Δ9-tetrahyrdrocannabinol, the active ingredient in marijuana, showed that its effects in this novel touchscreen chamber were consistent with its dose-related effects on learning using more conventional approaches. Overall, these studies indicate the touchscreen apparatus provides effective means for programming complex behavioral tasks to assess the effects of pharmacological agents on cognitive function. PMID:22790109

  17. Sensitivity of Rooftop PV Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market Assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2013-01-01

    The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The SolarDS model was used to simulate rooftop PV demand for this study, based on several PV market assumptions--future electricity rates, customer access to financing, and others--in addition to the SunShot PV price projections. This paper finds that modeled PV demand is highly sensitive to several non-price market assumptions, particularly PV financing parameters.

  18. A near-infrared spectroscopic study of young field ultracool dwarfs: additional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allers, K. N.; Liu, M. C.

    We present additional analysis of the classification system presented in \\citet{allers13}. We refer the reader to \\citet{allers13} for a detailed discussion of our near-IR spectral type and gravity classification system. Here, we address questions and comments from participants of the Brown Dwarfs Come of Age meeting. In particular, we examine the effects of binarity and metallicity on our classification system. We also present our classification of Pleiades brown dwarfs using published spectra. Lastly, we determine SpTs and calculate gravity-sensitive indices for the BT-Settl atmospheric models and compare them to observations.

  19. Implications of recent multimodel attribution studies for climate sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Nicholas

    2016-03-01

    Equilibrium climate sensitivity (ECS) is inferred from estimates of instrumental-period warming attributable solely to greenhouse gases (AW), as derived in two recent multi-model detection and attribution (D&A) studies that apply optimal fingerprint methods with high spatial resolution to 3D global climate model simulations. This approach minimises the key uncertainty regarding aerosol forcing without relying on low-dimensional models. The "observed" AW distributions from the D&A studies together with an observationally-based estimate of effective planetary heat capacity (EHC) are applied as observational constraints in (AW, EHC) space. By varying two key parameters—ECS and effective ocean diffusivity—in an energy balance model forced solely by greenhouse gases, an invertible map from the bivariate model parameter space to (AW, EHC) space is generated. Inversion of the constrained (AW, EHC) space through a transformation of variables allows unique recovery of the observationally-constrained joint distribution for the two model parameters, from which the marginal distribution of ECS can readily be derived. The method is extended to provide estimated distributions for transient climate response (TCR). The AW distributions from the two D&A studies produce almost identical results. Combining the two sets of results provides best estimates (5-95 % ranges) of 1.66 (0.7-3.2) K for ECS and 1.37 (0.65-2.2) K for TCR, in line with those from several recent studies based on observed warming from all causes but with tighter uncertainty ranges than for some of those studies. Almost identical results are obtained from application of an alternative profile likelihood statistical methodology.

  20. Intra-Articular Corticosteroids in Addition to Exercise for Reducing Pain Sensitivity in Knee Osteoarthritis: Exploratory Outcome from a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Maldonado, Alberto; Klokker, Louise; Bartholdy, Cecilie; Bandak, Elisabeth; Ellegaard, Karen; Bliddal, Henning; Henriksen, Marius

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the effects of one intra-articular corticosteroid injection two weeks prior to an exercise-based intervention program for reducing pain sensitivity in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA). Design Randomized, masked, parallel, placebo-controlled trial involving 100 participants with clinical and radiographic knee OA that were randomized to one intra-articular injection on the knee with either 1 ml of 40 mg/ml methylprednisolone (corticosteroid) dissolved in 4 ml lidocaine (10 mg/ml) or 1 ml isotonic saline (placebo) mixed with 4 ml lidocaine (10 mg/ml). Two weeks after the injections all participants undertook a 12-week supervised exercise program. Main outcomes were changes from baseline in pressure-pain sensitivity (pressure-pain threshold [PPT] and temporal summation [TS]) assessed using cuff pressure algometry on the calf. These were exploratory outcomes from a randomized controlled trial. Results A total of 100 patients were randomized to receive either corticosteroid (n = 50) or placebo (n = 50); 45 and 44, respectively, completed the trial. Four participants had missing values for PPT and one for TS at baseline; thus modified intention-to-treat populations were analyzed. The mean group difference in changes from baseline at week 14 was 0.6 kPa (95% CI: -1.7 to 2.8; P = 0.626) for PPT and 384 mm×sec (95% CI: -2980 to 3750; P = 0.821) for TS. Conclusions These results suggest that adding intra-articular corticosteroid injection 2 weeks prior to an exercise program does not provide additional benefits compared to placebo in reducing pain sensitivity in patients with knee OA. Trial Registration EU clinical trials (EudraCT): 2012-002607-18 PMID:26871954

  1. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253 Engineering... engineering and cost studies as specified by RUS. The studies shall cover a period from the beginning of...

  2. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253 Engineering... engineering and cost studies as specified by RUS. The studies shall cover a period from the beginning of...

  3. Numerical study of the effect of water addition on gas explosion.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yuntao; Zeng, Wen

    2010-02-15

    Through amending the SENKIN code of CHEMKIN III chemical kinetics package, a computational model of gas explosion in a constant volume bomb was built, and the detailed reaction mechanism (GRI-Mech 3.0) was adopted. The mole fraction profiles of reactants, some selected free radicals and catastrophic gases in the process of gas explosion were analyzed by this model. Furthermore, through the sensitivity analysis of the reaction mechanism of gas explosion, the dominant reactions that affect gas explosion and the formation of catastrophic gases were found out. At the same time, the inhibition mechanisms of water on gas explosion and the formation of catastrophic gases were analyzed. The results show that the induced explosion time is prolonged, and the mole fractions of reactant species such as CH(4), O(2) and catastrophic gases such as CO, CO(2) and NO are decreased as water is added to the mixed gas. With the water fraction in the mixed gas increasing, the sensitivities of the dominant reactions contributing to CH(4), CO(2) are decreased and the sensitivity coefficients of CH(4), CO and NO mole fractions are also decreased. The inhibition of gas explosion with water addition can be ascribed to the significant decrease of H, O and OH in the process of gas explosion due to the water presence. PMID:19811873

  4. Study of Nonclassical Fields in Phase-Sensitive Reservoirs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Myung Shik; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    1996-01-01

    We show that the reservoir influence can be modeled by an infinite array of beam splitters. The superposition of the input fields in the beam splitter is discussed with the convolution laws for their quasiprobabilities. We derive the Fokker-Planck equation for the cavity field coupled with a phase-sensitive reservoir using the convolution law. We also analyze the amplification in the phase-sensitive reservoir with use of the modified beam splitter model. We show the similarities and differences between the dissipation and amplification models. We show that a super-Poissonian input field cannot become sub-Poissonian by the phase-sensitive amplification.

  5. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: nuclear masses

    SciTech Connect

    Aprahamian, A.; Mumpower, M.; Bentley, I.; Surman, R.

    2014-04-15

    The site of the rapid neutron capture process (r process) is one of the open challenges in all of physics today. The r process is thought to be responsible for the creation of more than half of all elements beyond iron. The scientific challenges to understanding the origin of the heavy elements beyond iron lie in both the uncertainties associated with astrophysical conditions that are needed to allow an r process to occur and a vast lack of knowledge about the properties of nuclei far from stability. One way is to disentangle the nuclear and astrophysical components of the question. On the nuclear physics side, there is great global competition to access and measure the most exotic nuclei that existing facilities can reach, while simultaneously building new, more powerful accelerators to make even more exotic nuclei. On the astrophysics side, various astrophysical scenarios for the production of the heaviest elements have been proposed but open questions remain. This paper reports on a sensitivity study of the r process to determine the most crucial nuclear masses to measure using an r-process simulation code, several mass models (FRDM, Duflo-Zuker, and HFB-21), and three potential astrophysical scenarios.

  6. Sensitivity study of SMILES-2 for chemical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Makoto; Manago, Naohiro; Ozeki, Hiroyuki; Ochiai, Satoshi; Baron, Philippe

    2015-10-01

    Sensitivity studies of temperature and chemical species (Observed by ISS/JEM/SMILES: O3, HCl, ClO, HO2, BrO, HNO3, CH3CN, and Not observed by SMILES: Temperature, H2O, N2O, NO2, NO, CH3Cl, CO, H2CO, OH and O-atom) was carried out for the SMILES-2 proposal, a sub-mm and THz observation of limb emission from space over the spectral region from 400 GHz to 2.5 THz. Tentative but optimal candidate of frequency bands to cover these species was selected with 3 SIS (Superconductor-Insulator-Superconductor) mixers; SIS-1 (485-489 GHz + 523-527 GHz), SIS-2 (623-627 GHz + 648-652 GHz), SIS-3 (557 GHz + 576.3 GHz) and 2 HEB (Hot Electron Bolometer); HEB-1 (1.8 THz OH) and HEB-2 (2.06 THz O-atom). Temperature can be retrieved with 1 K precision and 1 km vertical resolution from 15 to 120 km. Other chemical species also showed very high single scan precision (random error) comparable to statistical standard error of previous satellite measurements.

  7. Assessment of thermal sensitivity of CT during heating of liver: an ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Pandeya, G D; Greuter, M J W; Schmidt, B; Flohr, T; Oudkerk, M

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to assess the thermal sensitivity of CT during heating of ex-vivo animal liver. Methods Pig liver was indirectly heated from 20 to 90 °C by passage of hot air through a plastic tube. The temperature in the heated liver was measured using calibrated thermocouples. In addition, image acquisition was performed with a multislice CT scanner before and during heating of the liver sample. The reconstructed CT images were then analysed to assess the change of CT number as a function of temperature. Results During heating, a decrease in CT numbers was observed as a hypodense area on the CT images. In addition, the hypodense area extended outward from the heat source during heating. The analysis showed a linear decrease of CT number as a function of temperature. From this relationship, we derived a thermal sensitivity of CT for pig liver tissue of −0.54±0.03 HU °C−1 with an r2 value of 0.91. Conclusions The assessment of the thermal sensitivity of CT in ex-vivo pig liver tissue showed a linear dependency on temperature ≤90 °C. This result may be beneficial for the application of isotherms or thermal maps in CT images of liver tissue. PMID:22919016

  8. Scintillating screens sensitivity and resolution studies for low energy, low intensity beam diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Harasimowicz, Janusz; Cosentino, Luigi; Finocchiaro, Paolo; Pappalardo, Alfio; Welsch, Carsten P

    2010-10-01

    In order to investigate the limits of scintillating screens for beam profile monitoring in the ultra-low energy, ultra-low intensity regime, CsI:Tl, YAG:Ce, and a Tb glass-based scintillating fiber optic plate (SFOP) were tested. The screens response to 200 and 50 keV proton beams with intensities ranging from a few picoampere down to the subfemtoampere region was examined. In the following paper, the sensitivity and resolution studies are presented in detail for CsI:Tl and the SFOP, the two most sensitive screens. In addition, a possible use of scintillators for ultra-low energy antiproton beam monitoring is discussed. PMID:21034082

  9. STUDIES ON THE SENSITIZATION OF ANIMALS WITH SIMPLE CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Henry C.; Chase, Merrill W.

    1972-01-01

    A method of establishing regular and intense sensitivity to picric acid is described, based upon an initial sensitization by a "split-adjuvant" technique in which the intradermal injection of mycobacteria in paraffin oil precedes or follows the administration of allergen to the same sites. When subsequent contact applications of picric acid are later made, the degree of sensitivity rises in steps such that reactivity occurs in tests made with low concentrations of picric acid, in the range of 0.06–0.006% but varying somewhat from one experiment to another. This heightening of picric acid reactivity represents an anamnestic response in the area of delayed hypersensitivity. The characteristics of contact reactions to the weak allergen, picric acid, differ from those encountered with covalently binding haptens, PCI and DNCB. A slow evolution from an initial micropapular reaction to full reaction requires about 3 days, leading often to a micaceous scale, with histological evidence of vesiculation even while the reaction is still feeble, and to an infiltrate containing a significant number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Substitution of an emulsion of picric acid in complete Freund's adjuvant as a priming experience proved to be much less efficient. The split-adjuvant technique offers a general plan for sensitizing with weak allergens. Indeed, technically, sensitization can be acquired even when, for priming, the allergen is applied topically over intradermal depots of mycobacteria in paraffin oil. Compatibility between sensitizer and adjuvant is not required. PMID:5060294

  10. Enhanced reward sensitivity and decreased loss sensitivity in Internet addicts: an fMRI study during a guessing task.

    PubMed

    Dong, Guangheng; Huang, Jie; Du, Xiaoxia

    2011-11-01

    As the world's fastest growing "addiction", Internet addiction should be studied to unravel the potential heterogeneity. The present study is set to examine reward and punishment processing in Internet addicts as compared to healthy controls while they subjectively experience monetary gain and loss during the performance of a guessing task. The results showed that Internet addicts associated with increased activation in orbitofrontal cortex in gain trials and decreased anterior cingulate activation in loss trials than normal controls. The results suggested that Internet addicts have enhanced reward sensitivity and decreased loss sensitivity than normal comparisons. PMID:21764067

  11. Cisapride a green analytical reagent for rapid and sensitive determination of bromate in drinking water, bread and flour additives by oxidative coupling spectrophotometric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Okab, Riyad Ahmed

    2013-02-01

    Green analytical methods using Cisapride (CPE) as green analytical reagent was investigated in this work. Rapid, simple, and sensitive spectrophotometric methods for the determination of bromate in water sample, bread and flour additives were developed. The proposed methods based on the oxidative coupling between phenoxazine and Cisapride in the presence of bromate to form red colored product with max at 520 nm. Phenoxazine and Cisapride and its reaction products were found to be environmentally friendly under the optimum experimental condition. The method obeys beers law in concentration range 0.11-4.00 g ml-1 and molar absorptivity 1.41 × 104 L mol-1 cm-1. All variables have been optimized and the presented reaction sequences were applied to the analysis of bromate in water, bread and flour additive samples. The performance of these method was evaluated in terms of Student's t-test and variance ratio F-test to find out the significance of proposed methods over the reference method. The combination of pharmaceutical drugs reagents with low concentration create some unique green chemical analyses.

  12. Cisapride a green analytical reagent for rapid and sensitive determination of bromate in drinking water, bread and flour additives by oxidative coupling spectrophotometric methods.

    PubMed

    Al Okab, Riyad Ahmed

    2013-02-15

    Green analytical methods using Cisapride (CPE) as green analytical reagent was investigated in this work. Rapid, simple, and sensitive spectrophotometric methods for the determination of bromate in water sample, bread and flour additives were developed. The proposed methods based on the oxidative coupling between phenoxazine and Cisapride in the presence of bromate to form red colored product with max at 520 nm. Phenoxazine and Cisapride and its reaction products were found to be environmentally friendly under the optimum experimental condition. The method obeys beers law in concentration range 0.11-4.00 g ml(-1) and molar absorptivity 1.41 × 10(4) L mol(-1)cm(-1). All variables have been optimized and the presented reaction sequences were applied to the analysis of bromate in water, bread and flour additive samples. The performance of these method was evaluated in terms of Student's t-test and variance ratio F-test to find out the significance of proposed methods over the reference method. The combination of pharmaceutical drugs reagents with low concentration create some unique green chemical analyses. PMID:23261631

  13. Sensitivity Studies of the Radar-Rainfall Error Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarini, G.; Krajewski, W. F.; Ciach, G. J.

    2007-12-01

    It is well acknowledged that there are large uncertainties associated with the operational quantitative precipitation estimates produced by the U.S. national network of WSR-88D radars. These errors are due to the measurement principles, parameter estimation, and not fully understood physical processes. Comprehensive quantitative evaluation of these uncertainties is still at an early stage. The authors proposed an empirically-based model in which the relation between true rainfall (RA) and radar-rainfall (RR) could be described as the product of a deterministic distortion function and a random component. However, how different values of the parameters in the radar-rainfall algorithms used to create these products impact the model results still remains an open question. In this study, the authors investigate the effects of different exponents in the Z-R relation (Marshall- Palmer, NEXRAD, and tropical) and of an anomalous propagation (AP) removal algorithm. Additionally, they generalize the model to describe the radar-rainfall uncertainties in the additive form. This approach is fully empirically based and rain gauge estimates are considered as an approximation of the true rainfall. The proposed results are based on a large sample (six years) of data from the Oklahoma City radar (KTLX) and processed through the Hydro-NEXRAD software system. The radar data are complemented with the corresponding rain gauge observations from the Oklahoma Mesonet, and the Agricultural Research Service Micronet.

  14. A direct anatomical study of additional renal arteries in a Colombian mestizo population.

    PubMed

    Saldarriaga, B; Pérez, A F; Ballesteros, L E

    2008-05-01

    Traditional anatomy describes each kidney as receiving irrigation from a single renal artery. However, current literature reports great variability in renal blood supply, the number of renal arteries mentioned being the most frequently found variation. Such variation has great implications when surgery is indicated, such as in renal transplants, uroradiological procedures, renovascular hypertension, renal trauma and hydronephrosis. This article pretends to determine the frequency of additional renal arteries and their morphological expression in Colombian population in a cross-sectional study. A total of 196 of renal blocks were analysed from autopsies carried out in the Bucaramanga Institute of Forensic Medicine, Colombia; these renal blocks were processed by the injection- corrosion technique. The average age of the people being studied was 33.8 +/- 15.6 years; 85.4% of them were male and the rest female. An additional renal artery was found in 22.3% of the whole population and two additional ones were found in 2.6% of the same sample. The additional renal artery was most frequently found on the left side. The additional artery arose from the aorta's lateral aspect (52.4%); these additional arteries usually entered the renal parenchyma through the hilum. No difference was established according to gender. Nearly a third of the Colombian population presents one additional renal artery and about 3% of the same population presents two additional renal arteries. Most of them reached the kidney through its hilar region. PMID:18521812

  15. Paleozoic ice sheet inception; a study of paleogeographic sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, D. E.; Poulsen, C. J.; Torsvik, T. H.

    2011-12-01

    Large-scale continental glaciation is thought to have been episodic throughout the Paleozoic era. Evidence of short-lived glaciation in the Ordovician, a period of questionable glaciation in the Devonian, and extensive glaciation in the Permo-Carboniferous are variously supported by the geologic record. The climatic conditions that allowed Earth to descend into icehouse conditions during these periods are not well understood. Traditionally, Paleozoic glaciation was thought to be driven by the drift of continents over the austral pole, yet a myriad of other factors play a role in global mean temperatures and the ability of an icehouse climate to initiate. In this sensitivity study we utilize a coupled GCM-ice sheet-biome model in conjunction with updated paleogeographic reconstructions to examine ice sheet initiation at 30 million year time slices throughout the Paleozoic. Each time slice is subjected to an ice-favorable orbital alignment and a range of atmospheric pCO2 concentrations in an effort to determine the influence of continent distribution and greenhouse gas concentration on ice sheet initiation. Our modeling results demonstrate that both continental configuration and atmospheric pCO2 concentration play a significant role in ice sheet initiation, ice sheet areal extent, and ice sheet volume. Our results indicate that the geographic configurations most conducive to continental glaciation occurred from the mid-Devonian to the early Carboniferous, a result that is inconsistent with the geologic record and suggests that continental drift wasn't the sole driving force behind the occurrence of Paleozoic ice ages.

  16. Additional short-term plutonium urinary excretion data from the 1945-1947 plutonium injection studies

    SciTech Connect

    Moss, W.D.; Gautier, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The amount of plutonium excreted per day following intravenous injection was shown to be significantly higher than predicted by the Langham power function model. Each of the Los Alamos National Laboratory notebooks used to record the original analytical data was studied for details that could influence the findings. It was discovered there were additional urine excretion data for case HP-3. This report presents the additional data, as well as data on case HP-6. (ACR)

  17. A SEARCH FOR ADDITIONAL PLANETS IN FIVE OF THE EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS STUDIED BY THE NASA EPOXI MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Ballard, Sarah; Charbonneau, David; Holman, Matthew J.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; Deming, Drake; Barry, Richard K.; Kuchner, Marc J.; Livengood, Timothy A.; Hewagama, Tilak; Hampton, Don L.; Lisse, Carey M.; Seager, Sara; Veverka, Joseph F.

    2011-05-01

    We present time series photometry and constraints on additional planets in five of the exoplanetary systems studied by the EPOCh (Extrasolar Planet Observation and Characterization) component of the NASA EPOXI mission: HAT-P-4, TrES-3, TrES-2, WASP-3, and HAT-P-7. We conduct a search of the high-precision time series for photometric transits of additional planets. We find no candidate transits with significance higher than our detection limit. From Monte Carlo tests of the time series using putative periods from 0.5 days to 7 days, we demonstrate the sensitivity to detect Neptune-sized companions around TrES-2, sub-Saturn-sized companions in the HAT-P-4, TrES-3, and WASP-3 systems, and Saturn-sized companions around HAT-P-7. We investigate in particular our sensitivity to additional transits in the dynamically favorable 3:2 and 2:1 exterior resonances with the known exoplanets: if we assume coplanar orbits with the known planets, then companions in these resonances with HAT-P-4b, WASP-3b, and HAT-P-7b would be expected to transit, and we can set lower limits on the radii of companions in these systems. In the nearly grazing exoplanetary systems TrES-3 and TrES-2, additional coplanar planets in these resonances are not expected to transit. However, we place lower limits on the radii of companions that would transit if the orbits were misaligned by 2.{sup 0}0 and 1.{sup 0}4 for TrES-3 and TrES-2, respectively.

  18. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity. 1710.253 Section 1710.253 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued... TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND GUARANTEES Construction Work Plans and Related Studies § 1710.253...

  19. Evaluating Drugs and Food Additives for Public Use: A Case Studies Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merritt, Sheridan V.

    1980-01-01

    Described is a case study used in an introductory college biology course that provides a basis for generating debate on an issue concerning the regulation of controversial food additives and prescription drugs. The case study contained within this article deals with drug screening, specifically with information related to thalidomide. (CS)

  20. The simulated Indian monsoon: A GCM sensitivity study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fennessy, M. J.; Kinter, J. L., III; Kirtman, B.; Marx, L.; Nigam, S.; Schneider, E.; Shukla, J.; Straus, D.; Vernekar, A.; Xue, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A series of sensitivity experiments are conducted in an attempt to understand and correct deficiencies in the simulation of the seasonal mean Indian monsoon with a global atmospheric general circulation model. The seasonal mean precipitation is less than half that observed. This poor simulation in seasonal integrations is independent of the choice of initial conditions and global sea surface temperature data used. Experiments are performed to test the sensitivity of the Indian monsoon simulation to changes in orography, vegetation, soil, wetness, and cloudiness. The authors find that the deficiency of the model precipitation simulation may be attributed to the use of an enhanced orography in the integrations. Replacement of this orography with a mean orography results in a much more realistic simulation of Indian monsoon circulation and rainfall. Experiments with a linear primitive equation model on the sphere suggest that this striking improvement is due to modulations of the orographically forced waves in the lower troposphere. This improvement in the monsoon simulation is due to the kinematic and dynamical effects of changing the topography, rather than the thermal effects, which were minimal. The magnitude of the impact on the Indian monsoon of the other sensitivity experiments varied considerably, but was consistently less than the impact of using the mean orography. However, results from the soil moisture sensitivity experiments suggest a possibly important role for soil moisture in simulating tropical precipitation, including that associated with the Indian monsoon.

  1. Fitting additive hazards models for case-cohort studies: a multiple imputation approach.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jinhyouk; Harel, Ofer; Kang, Sangwook

    2016-07-30

    In this paper, we consider fitting semiparametric additive hazards models for case-cohort studies using a multiple imputation approach. In a case-cohort study, main exposure variables are measured only on some selected subjects, but other covariates are often available for the whole cohort. We consider this as a special case of a missing covariate by design. We propose to employ a popular incomplete data method, multiple imputation, for estimation of the regression parameters in additive hazards models. For imputation models, an imputation modeling procedure based on a rejection sampling is developed. A simple imputation modeling that can naturally be applied to a general missing-at-random situation is also considered and compared with the rejection sampling method via extensive simulation studies. In addition, a misspecification aspect in imputation modeling is investigated. The proposed procedures are illustrated using a cancer data example. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26194861

  2. [TG-FTIR study on pyrolysis of wheat-straw with abundant CaO additives].

    PubMed

    Han, Long; Wang, Qin-Hui; Yang, Yu-Kun; Yu, Chun-Jiang; Fang, Meng-Xiang; Luo, Zhong-Yang

    2011-04-01

    Biomass pyrolysis in presence of abundant CaO additives is a fundamental process prior to CaO sorption enhanced gasification in biomass-based zero emission system. In the present study, thermogravimetric Fourier transform infrared (TG-FTIR) analysis was adopted to examine the effects of CaO additives on the mass loss process and volatiles evolution of wheat-straw pyrolysis. Observations from TG and FTIR analyses simultaneously demonstrated a two-stage process for CaO catalyzed wheat-straw pyrolysis, different from the single stage process for pure wheat-straw pyrolysis. CaO additives could not only absorb the released CO2 but also reduce the yields of tar species such as toluene, phenol, and formic acid in the first stage, resulting in decreased mass loss and maximum mass loss rate in this stage with an increase in CaO addition. The second stage was attributed to the CaCO3 decomposition and the mass loss and maximum mass loss rate increased with increasing amount of CaO additives. The results of the present study demonstrated the great potential of CaO additives to capture CO2 and reduce tars yields in biomass-based zero emission system. The gasification temperature in the system should be lowered down to avoid CaCO3 decomposition. PMID:21714234

  3. SHEEP MOUNTAIN WILDERNESS STUDY AREA AND CUCAMONGA WILDERNESS AND ADDITIONS, CALIFORNIA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Evans, James G.; Ridenour, James

    1984-01-01

    The Sheep Mountain Wilderness Study Area and Cucamonga Wilderness and additions encompass approximately 104 sq mi of the eastern San Gabriel Mountains, Los Angeles and San Bernardino Counties, California. A mineral survey indicates areas of probable and substantiated tungsten and gold resource potential for parts of the Sheep Mountain Wilderness Study Area and an area of probable tungsten and gold resource potential in the Cucamonga Wilderness and additions. The rugged topography, withdrawal of lands from mineral entry to protect watershed, and restricted entry of lands during periods of high fire danger have contributed to the continuing decline in mineral exploration. The geologic setting precludes the presence of energy resources.

  4. Influence of Polarization on Carbohydrate Hydration: A Comparative Study Using Additive and Polarizable Force Fields.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Poonam; Mallajosyula, Sairam S

    2016-07-14

    Carbohydrates are known to closely modulate their surrounding solvent structures and influence solvation dynamics. Spectroscopic investigations studying far-IR regions (below 1000 cm(-1)) have observed spectral shifts in the libration band (around 600 cm(-1)) of water in the presence of monosaccharides and polysaccharides. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations to gain atomistic insight into carbohydrate-water interactions and to specifically highlight the differences between additive (nonpolarizable) and polarizable simulations. A total of six monosaccharide systems, α and β anomers of glucose, galactose, and mannose, were studied using additive and polarizable Chemistry at HARvard Macromolecular Mechanics (CHARMM) carbohydrate force fields. Solvents were modeled using three additive water models TIP3P, TIP4P, and TIP5P in additive simulations and polarizable water model SWM4 in polarizable simulations. The presence of carbohydrate has a significant effect on the microscopic water structure, with the effects being pronounced for proximal water molecules. Notably, disruption of the tetrahedral arrangement of proximal water molecules was observed due to the formation of strong carbohydrate-water hydrogen bonds in both additive and polarizable simulations. However, the inclusion of polarization resulted in significant water-bridge occupancies, improved ordered water structures (tetrahedral order parameter), and longer carbohydrate-water H-bond correlations as compared to those for additive simulations. Additionally, polarizable simulations also allowed the calculation of power spectra from the dipole-dipole autocorrelation function, which corresponds to the IR spectra. From the power spectra, we could identify spectral signatures differentiating the proximal and bulk water structures, which could not be captured from additive simulations. PMID:27266974

  5. Further study on highly sensitive AMS measurement of 53Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kejun, Dong; Hao, Hu; Xianggao, Wang; Chaoli, Li; Ming, He; Zhenyu, Li; Shaoyong, Wu; Jiancheng, Liu; Guowen, Zheng; Heng, Li; Zhigang, Chen; Guangshan, Liu; Jian, Yuan; Shan, Jiang

    2012-08-01

    The AMS facility at China Institute of Atomic Energy has been equipped with a ΔE-Q3D detection system for the measurements of 53Mn. While the sample material of MnO2 and the extraction ions of MnO- were used previously in AMS measurement of 53Mn with fairly good results, a method has recently been developed with the extraction of MnF- from ion source using MnF2 and MnO2 + PbF2 as sample materials. As a result, a sensitivity of 10-14 (53Mn/Mn) has been achieved. Compared with the original MnO-/MnO2 approach, the method of MnF- extraction, combined with ΔE-Q3D detection technique, demonstrated an improved sensitivity for AMS measurement of 53Mn.

  6. Oxidation phenomena: MAAP4 sensitivity studies using CORA-13 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Luche, J.; Jacqmin, L.G.

    1996-12-31

    In France, both Electricite de France and Framatome are using the modular accident analysis program (MAAP) version 4 code for severe accident scenario analyses. Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, in collaboration with them, is investigating the code prediction capabilities on hydrogen production. The purpose of this work is to evaluate the fuel-clad oxidation model on the CORA-13 test results and to find the most sensitive parameters to this reaction, especially during reflooding.

  7. Generating Scenarios of Addition and Subtraction: A Study of Japanese University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinda, Shigehiro

    2013-01-01

    Students are presented with problems involving three scenario types of addition and subtraction in elementary mathematics: one dynamic ("Change") and two static ("Combine, Compare"). Previous studies have indicated that the dynamic type is easier for school children, whereas the static types are more difficult and comprehended only gradually…

  8. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity. 1710.253 Section 1710.253 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL AND PRE-LOAN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES COMMON TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND...

  9. 7 CFR 1710.253 - Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Engineering and cost studies-addition of generation capacity. 1710.253 Section 1710.253 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL AND PRE-LOAN POLICIES AND PROCEDURES COMMON TO ELECTRIC LOANS AND...

  10. Experimental study of combustion of decane, dodecane and hexadecane with polymeric and nano-particle additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamari, Mohsen; Ratner, Albert

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that adding combustible nano-particles could have promising effects on increasing burning rate of liquid fuels. Combustible nano-particles could enhance the heat conduction and mixing within the droplet. Polymers have also higher burning rate than regular hydrocarbon fuels because of having the flame closer to the droplet surface. Therefore adding polymeric additive could have the potential to increase the burning rate. In this study, combustion of stationary fuel droplets of n-Decane, n-Dodecane and n-Hexadecane doped with different percentages of a long chain polymer and also a very fine nano carbon was examined and compared with the pure hydrocarbon behavior. In contrast with hydrocarbon droplets with no polymer addition, several zones of combustion including a slow and steady burning zone, a strong swelling zone and a final fast and fairly steady combustion zone were also detected. In addition, increasing polymer percentage resulted in a more extended swelling zone and shorter slow burning zone in addition to a shorter total burning time. Addition of nano-particles also resulted in an overall increased burning rate and shortened burning time which is due to enhanced heat conduction within the droplet.

  11. Structural sensitivity studies of ethylene hydrogenation on platinum and rhodium surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, M.A. |

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene and hydrogen on the well characterized surfaces of the noble metals platinum and rhodium has been studied for the purposes of determining the relative activity of these two substrates as well as the degree of structure sensitivity. The Pt(111) and the Rh(755) single crystal surfaces,as well as Pt and Rh foils, were employed as substrates to study the effect of surface step structure on reactivity. In addition, vibrational spectroscopy studies were performed for ethylene adsorption on the stepped Rh(755) surface. The catalytic reaction were obtained using a combined ultrahigh vacuum chamber coupled with an atmospheric pressure reaction chamber that functioned as a batch reactor. Samples could be prepared using standard surface science techniques and characterized for surface composition and geometry using Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Low Energy Electron Diffraction. A comparison of the reactivity of Rh(111) with the results from this study on Rh(755) allows a direct determination of the effect of step structure on ethylene hydrogenation activity. Structure sensitivity is expected to exhibit orders of magnitude differences in rate as surface orientation is varied. In this case, no significant differences were found, confirming the structure insensitivity of this reaction over this metal. The turnover frequency of the Rh(111) surface, 5 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1}, is in relatively good agreement with the turnover frequency of 9 {times} 10{sup 1} s{sup {minus}1} measured for the Rh(755) surface. Rate measurements made on the Pt(111) surface and the Pt foil are in excellent agreement, both measuring 3 {times} 10{sup 2} s{sup minus}1. Likewise, it is concluded that no strong structure sensitivity for the platinum surfaces exists. High Resolution Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy studies of adsorbed ethylene on the Rh(755) surface compare favorably with the ethylidyne spectra obtained on the Rh(111) and Rh(100) surfaces.

  12. A Sensitivity Study of Commercial Aircraft Engine Response for Emergency Situations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Csank, Jeffrey T.; May, Ryan D.; Litt, Jonathan S.; Guo, Ten-Huei

    2011-01-01

    This paper contains the details of a sensitivity study in which the variation in a commercial aircraft engine's outputs is observed for perturbations in its operating condition inputs or control parameters. This study seeks to determine the extent to which various controller limits can be modified to improve engine performance, while capturing the increased risk that results from the changes. In an emergency, the engine may be required to produce additional thrust, respond faster, or both, to improve the survivability of the aircraft. The objective of this paper is to propose changes to the engine controller and determine the costs and benefits of the additional capabilities produced by the engine. This study indicates that the aircraft engine is capable of producing additional thrust, but at the cost of an increased risk of an engine failure due to higher turbine temperatures and rotor speeds. The engine can also respond more quickly to transient commands, but this action reduces the remaining stall margin to possibly dangerous levels. To improve transient response in landing scenarios, a control mode known as High Speed Idle is proposed that increases the responsiveness of the engine and conserves stall margin

  13. HCIT Contrast Performance Sensitivity Studies: Simulation Versus Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidick, Erkin; Shaklan, Stuart; Krist, John; Cady, Eric J.; Kern, Brian; Balasubramanian, Kunjithapatham

    2013-01-01

    Using NASA's High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, we have experimentally investigated the sensitivity of dark hole contrast in a Lyot coronagraph for the following factors: 1) Lateral and longitudinal translation of an occulting mask; 2) An opaque spot on the occulting mask; 3) Sizes of the controlled dark hole area. Also, we compared the measured results with simulations obtained using both MACOS (Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical Systems) and PROPER optical analysis programs with full three-dimensional near-field diffraction analysis to model HCIT's optical train and coronagraph.

  14. Gas Sensitivity Study of Polypyrrole Decorated Graphene Oxide Thick Film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Pritam; Gaikwad, Ganesh; Patil, Devidas Ramrao; Naik, Jitendra

    2016-04-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) and graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposites were prepared by in situ polymerization method. The synthesized nanocomposites were characterized for current-voltage characteristic, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy, which gave the evidence of the strong interaction between PPy nanofibers and GO nanosheets. The PPy/GO nanocomposites were used for the sensing of H2S, LPG, CO2 and NH3 gases respectively at room temperature. It was observed that PPy/GO nanocomposites with different GO weight ratios (5, 10 and 20 %) had better selectivity and sensitivity towards NH3 at room temperature.

  15. Cascade sensitivity studies for KM3NeT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fusco, Luigi Antonio

    2016-07-01

    KM3NeT is a future research infrastructure in the deep seas of the Mediterranean housing a large scale neutrino telescope. The first phase of construction of the telescope has started. Next step is an intermediate phase realising a detector volume of about one-third of the final detector volume. We report on calculations of the sensitivity of the KM3NeT detector to showering neutrino events, the strategy to optimise the detector to a cosmic neutrino flux analogous to the one reported by the IceCube Collaboration and the results of this strategy applied to the intermediate phase detector.

  16. An Initial Study of the Sensitivity of Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) Spacing Sensitivity to Weather and Configuration Input Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, Stephen E.; Hinton, David A.

    2000-01-01

    A study has been performed on a computer code modeling an aircraft wake vortex spacing system during final approach. This code represents an initial engineering model of a system to calculate reduced approach separation criteria needed to increase airport productivity. This report evaluates model sensitivity toward various weather conditions (crosswind, crosswind variance, turbulent kinetic energy, and thermal gradient), code configurations (approach corridor option, and wake demise definition), and post-processing techniques (rounding of provided spacing values, and controller time variance).

  17. Sensitizing the sensitizer: the synthesis and photophysical study of bodipy-Pt(II)(diimine)(dithiolate) conjugates.

    PubMed

    Lazarides, Theodore; McCormick, Theresa M; Wilson, Kristina C; Lee, Soohyun; McCamant, David W; Eisenberg, Richard

    2011-01-19

    The dyads 3, 4, and 6, combining the Bodipy chromophore with a Pt(bpy)(bdt) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine, bdt = 1,2-benzenedithiolate, 3 and 6) or a Pt(bpy)(mnt) (mnt = maleonitriledithiolate, 4) moiety, have been synthesized and studied by UV-vis steady-state absorption, transient absorption, and emission spectroscopies and cyclic voltammetry. Comparison of the absorption spectra and cyclic voltammograms of dyads 3, 4, and 6 and those of their model compounds 1a, 2, 5, and 7 shows that the spectroscopic and electrochemical properties of the dyads are essentially the sum of their constituent chromophores, indicating negligible interaction of the constituent chromophores in the ground state. However, emission studies on 3 and 6 show a complete absence of both Bodipy-based fluorescence and the characteristic luminescence of the Pt(bpy)(bdt) unit. Dyad 4 shows a weak Pt(mnt)-based emission. Transient absorption studies show that excitation of the dyads into the Bodipy-based (1)ππ* excited state is followed by singlet energy transfer (SEnT) to the Pt(dithiolate)-based (1)MMLL'CT (mixed metal-ligand to ligand charge transfer) excited state (τ(SEnT)(3) = 0.6 ps, τ(SEnT)(4) = 0.5 ps, and τ(SEnT)(6) = 1.6 ps), which undergoes rapid intersystem crossing to the (3)MMLL'CT state due to the heavy Pt(II) ion. The (3)MMLL'CT state is then depopulated by triplet energy transfer (TEnT) to the low-lying Bodipy-based (3)ππ* excited state (τ(SEnT)(3) = 8.2 ps, τ(SEnT)(4) = 5 ps, and τ(SEnT)(6) = 160 ps). The transition assignments are supported by TD-DFT calculations. Both energy-transfer processes are shown to proceed via a Dexter electron exchange mechanism. The much longer time constants for dyad 6 relative to 3 are attributed to the significantly poorer coupling and resonance of charge-separated species that are intermediates in the electron exchange process. PMID:21175161

  18. Anatomically ordered tapping interferes more with one-digit addition than two-digit addition: a dual-task fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Firat; Newman, Sharlene D

    2016-02-01

    Fingers are used as canonical representations for numbers across cultures. In previous imaging studies, it was shown that arithmetic processing activates neural resources that are known to participate in finger movements. Additionally, in one dual-task study, it was shown that anatomically ordered finger tapping disrupts addition and subtraction more than multiplication, possibly due to a long-lasting effect of early finger counting experiences on the neural correlates and organization of addition and subtraction processes. How arithmetic task difficulty and tapping complexity affect the concurrent performance is still unclear. If early finger counting experiences have bearing on the neural correlates of arithmetic in adults, then one would expect anatomically and non-anatomically ordered tapping to have different interference effects, given that finger counting is usually anatomically ordered. To unravel these issues, we studied how (1) arithmetic task difficulty and (2) the complexity of the finger tapping sequence (anatomical vs. non-anatomical ordering) affect concurrent performance and use of key neural circuits using a mixed block/event-related dual-task fMRI design with adult participants. The results suggest that complexity of the tapping sequence modulates interference on addition, and that one-digit addition (fact retrieval), compared to two-digit addition (calculation), is more affected from anatomically ordered tapping. The region-of-interest analysis showed higher left angular gyrus BOLD response for one-digit compared to two-digit addition, and in no-tapping conditions than dual tapping conditions. The results support a specific association between addition fact retrieval and anatomically ordered finger movements in adults, possibly due to finger counting strategies that deploy anatomically ordered finger movements early in the development. PMID:26410214

  19. Determinant for β-subunit regulation in high-conductance voltage-activated and Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels: An additional transmembrane region at the N terminus

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Martin; Meera, Pratap; Toro, Ligia

    1996-01-01

    The pore-forming α subunit of large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive K (MaxiK) channels is regulated by a β subunit that has two membrane-spanning regions separated by an extracellular loop. To investigate the structural determinants in the pore-forming α subunit necessary for β-subunit modulation, we made chimeric constructs between a human MaxiK channel and the Drosophila homologue, which we show is insensitive to β-subunit modulation, and analyzed the topology of the α subunit. A comparison of multiple sequence alignments with hydrophobicity plots revealed that MaxiK channel α subunits have a unique hydrophobic segment (S0) at the N terminus. This segment is in addition to the six putative transmembrane segments (S1–S6) usually found in voltage-dependent ion channels. The transmembrane nature of this unique S0 region was demonstrated by in vitro translation experiments. Moreover, normal functional expression of signal sequence fusions and in vitro N-linked glycosylation experiments indicate that S0 leads to an exoplasmic N terminus. Therefore, we propose a new model where MaxiK channels have a seventh transmembrane segment at the N terminus (S0). Chimeric exchange of 41 N-terminal amino acids, including S0, from the human MaxiK channel to the Drosophila homologue transfers β-subunit regulation to the otherwise unresponsive Drosophila channel. Both the unique S0 region and the exoplasmic N terminus are necessary for this gain of function. PMID:8962157

  20. Determinant for beta-subunit regulation in high-conductance voltage-activated and Ca(2+)-sensitive K+ channels: an additional transmembrane region at the N terminus.

    PubMed

    Wallner, M; Meera, P; Toro, L

    1996-12-10

    The pore-forming alpha subunit of large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-sensitive K (MaxiK) channels is regulated by a beta subunit that has two membrane-spanning regions separated by an extracellular loop. To investigate the structural determinants in the pore-forming alpha subunit necessary for beta-subunit modulation, we made chimeric constructs between a human MaxiK channel and the Drosophila homologue, which we show is insensitive to beta-subunit modulation, and analyzed the topology of the alpha subunit. A comparison of multiple sequence alignments with hydrophobicity plots revealed that MaxiK channel alpha subunits have a unique hydrophobic segment (S0) at the N terminus. This segment is in addition to the six putative transmembrane segments (S1-S6) usually found in voltage-dependent ion channels. The transmembrane nature of this unique S0 region was demonstrated by in vitro translation experiments. Moreover, normal functional expression of signal sequence fusions and in vitro N-linked glycosylation experiments indicate that S0 leads to an exoplasmic N terminus. Therefore, we propose a new model where MaxiK channels have a seventh transmembrane segment at the N terminus (S0). Chimeric exchange of 41 N-terminal amino acids, including S0, from the human MaxiK channel to the Drosophila homologue transfers beta-subunit regulation to the otherwise unresponsive Drosophila channel. Both the unique S0 region and the exoplasmic N terminus are necessary for this gain of function. PMID:8962157

  1. The highly sensitive brain: an fMRI study of sensory processing sensitivity and response to others' emotions

    PubMed Central

    Acevedo, Bianca P; Aron, Elaine N; Aron, Arthur; Sangster, Matthew-Donald; Collins, Nancy; Brown, Lucy L

    2014-01-01

    Background Theory and research suggest that sensory processing sensitivity (SPS), found in roughly 20% of humans and over 100 other species, is a trait associated with greater sensitivity and responsiveness to the environment and to social stimuli. Self-report studies have shown that high-SPS individuals are strongly affected by others' moods, but no previous study has examined neural systems engaged in response to others' emotions. Methods This study examined the neural correlates of SPS (measured by the standard short-form Highly Sensitive Person [HSP] scale) among 18 participants (10 females) while viewing photos of their romantic partners and of strangers displaying positive, negative, or neutral facial expressions. One year apart, 13 of the 18 participants were scanned twice. Results Across all conditions, HSP scores were associated with increased brain activation of regions involved in attention and action planning (in the cingulate and premotor area [PMA]). For happy and sad photo conditions, SPS was associated with activation of brain regions involved in awareness, integration of sensory information, empathy, and action planning (e.g., cingulate, insula, inferior frontal gyrus [IFG], middle temporal gyrus [MTG], and PMA). Conclusions As predicted, for partner images and for happy facial photos, HSP scores were associated with stronger activation of brain regions involved in awareness, empathy, and self-other processing. These results provide evidence that awareness and responsiveness are fundamental features of SPS, and show how the brain may mediate these traits. PMID:25161824

  2. A synchrotron study of microstructure gradient in laser additively formed epitaxial Ni-based superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; Li, Yao; Qian, Dan; Wan, Jingchun; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2015-10-01

    Laser additive forming is considered to be one of the promising techniques to repair single crystal Ni-based superalloy parts to extend their life and reduce the cost. Preservation of the single crystalline nature and prevention of thermal mechanical failure are two of the most essential issues for the application of this technique. Here we employ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction to evaluate the quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect distribution of a Ni-based superalloy DZ125L directly formed by a laser additive process rooted from a single crystalline substrate of the same material. We show that a disorientation gradient caused by a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations and resultant subgrains exists in the interfacial region between the epitaxial and stray grains. This creates a potential relationship of stray grain formation and defect accumulation. The observation offers new directions on the study of performance control and reliability of the laser additive manufactured superalloys.

  3. Microstructural Study Of Zinc Hot Dip Galvanized Coatings with Titanium Additions In The Zinc Melt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konidaris, S.; Pistofidis, N.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, E.; Stergiou, A.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.

    2007-04-01

    Zinc hot-dip galvanizing is a method for protecting iron and steel against corrosion. Galvanizing with pure Zn or Zn with additions like Ni, Al, Pb and Bi has been extensively studied, but there is a lack of scientific information about other additions. The present work examines the effect of a 0.5 wt% Ti addition in the Zn melt. The samples were exposed to accelerated corrosion in a salt spray chamber (SSC). The microstructure and chemical composition of the coatings were determined by Optical Microscopy, XRD and SEM associated with an EDS Analyzer. The results indicate that the coatings have a typical morphology, while Zn-Ti phases were also detected.

  4. A synchrotron study of microstructure gradient in laser additively formed epitaxial Ni-based superalloy

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; Li, Yao; Qian, Dan; Wan, Jingchun; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Laser additive forming is considered to be one of the promising techniques to repair single crystal Ni-based superalloy parts to extend their life and reduce the cost. Preservation of the single crystalline nature and prevention of thermal mechanical failure are two of the most essential issues for the application of this technique. Here we employ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction to evaluate the quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect distribution of a Ni-based superalloy DZ125L directly formed by a laser additive process rooted from a single crystalline substrate of the same material. We show that a disorientation gradient caused by a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations and resultant subgrains exists in the interfacial region between the epitaxial and stray grains. This creates a potential relationship of stray grain formation and defect accumulation. The observation offers new directions on the study of performance control and reliability of the laser additive manufactured superalloys. PMID:26446425

  5. A synchrotron study of microstructure gradient in laser additively formed epitaxial Ni-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; Li, Yao; Qian, Dan; Wan, Jingchun; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2015-10-08

    Laser additive forming is considered to be one of the promising techniques to repair single crystal Ni-based superalloy parts to extend their life and reduce the cost. Preservation of the single crystalline nature and prevention of thermal mechanical failure are two of the most essential issues for the application of this technique. Here we employ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction to evaluate the quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect distribution of a Ni-based superalloy DZ125L directly formed by a laser additive process rooted from a single crystalline substrate of the same material. We show that a disorientation gradient caused by a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations and resultant subgrains exists in the interfacial region between the epitaxial and stray grains. This creates a potential relationship of stray grain formation and defect accumulation. In conclusion, the observation offers new directions on the study of performance control and reliability of the laser additive manufactured superalloys.

  6. Genome-wide association study identifies a potent locus associated with human opioid sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Nishizawa, D; Fukuda, K; Kasai, S; Hasegawa, J; Aoki, Y; Nishi, A; Saita, N; Koukita, Y; Nagashima, M; Katoh, R; Satoh, Y; Tagami, M; Higuchi, S; Ujike, H; Ozaki, N; Inada, T; Iwata, N; Sora, I; Iyo, M; Kondo, N; Won, M-J; Naruse, N; Uehara-Aoyama, K; Itokawa, M; Koga, M; Arinami, T; Kaneko, Y; Hayashida, M; Ikeda, K

    2014-01-01

    Opioids, such as morphine and fentanyl, are widely used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. In addition, the opioid system has a key role in the rewarding effects of morphine, ethanol, cocaine and various other drugs. Although opioid sensitivity is well known to vary widely among individual subjects, several candidate genetic polymorphisms reported so far are not sufficient for fully understanding the wide range of interindividual differences in human opioid sensitivity. By conducting a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) in healthy subjects, we found that genetic polymorphisms within a linkage disequilibrium block that spans 2q33.3–2q34 were strongly associated with the requirements for postoperative opioid analgesics after painful cosmetic surgery. The C allele of the best candidate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2952768, was associated with more analgesic requirements, and consistent results were obtained in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. In addition, carriers of the C allele in this SNP exhibited less vulnerability to severe drug dependence in patients with methamphetamine dependence, alcohol dependence, and eating disorders and a lower ‘Reward Dependence' score on a personality questionnaire in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the C/C genotype of this SNP was significantly associated with the elevated expression of a neighboring gene, CREB1. These results show that SNPs in this locus are the most potent genetic factors associated with human opioid sensitivity known to date, affecting both the efficacy of opioid analgesics and liability to severe substance dependence. Our findings provide valuable information for the personalized treatment of pain and drug dependence. PMID:23183491

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies a potent locus associated with human opioid sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, D; Fukuda, K; Kasai, S; Hasegawa, J; Aoki, Y; Nishi, A; Saita, N; Koukita, Y; Nagashima, M; Katoh, R; Satoh, Y; Tagami, M; Higuchi, S; Ujike, H; Ozaki, N; Inada, T; Iwata, N; Sora, I; Iyo, M; Kondo, N; Won, M-J; Naruse, N; Uehara-Aoyama, K; Itokawa, M; Koga, M; Arinami, T; Kaneko, Y; Hayashida, M; Ikeda, K

    2014-01-01

    Opioids, such as morphine and fentanyl, are widely used as effective analgesics for the treatment of acute and chronic pain. In addition, the opioid system has a key role in the rewarding effects of morphine, ethanol, cocaine and various other drugs. Although opioid sensitivity is well known to vary widely among individual subjects, several candidate genetic polymorphisms reported so far are not sufficient for fully understanding the wide range of interindividual differences in human opioid sensitivity. By conducting a multistage genome-wide association study (GWAS) in healthy subjects, we found that genetic polymorphisms within a linkage disequilibrium block that spans 2q33.3-2q34 were strongly associated with the requirements for postoperative opioid analgesics after painful cosmetic surgery. The C allele of the best candidate single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs2952768, was associated with more analgesic requirements, and consistent results were obtained in patients who underwent abdominal surgery. In addition, carriers of the C allele in this SNP exhibited less vulnerability to severe drug dependence in patients with methamphetamine dependence, alcohol dependence, and eating disorders and a lower 'Reward Dependence' score on a personality questionnaire in healthy subjects. Furthermore, the C/C genotype of this SNP was significantly associated with the elevated expression of a neighboring gene, CREB1. These results show that SNPs in this locus are the most potent genetic factors associated with human opioid sensitivity known to date, affecting both the efficacy of opioid analgesics and liability to severe substance dependence. Our findings provide valuable information for the personalized treatment of pain and drug dependence. PMID:23183491

  8. Effects of the colour additive caramel colour III on the immune system: a study with human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Houben, G F; Abma, P M; van den Berg, H; van Dokkum, W; van Loveren, H; Penninks, A H; Seinen, W; Spanhaak, S; Vos, J G; Ockhuizen, T

    1992-09-01

    Administration of the colour additive Caramel Colour III to rats has been associated with decreased numbers of lymphocytes and several other changes in the immune system, as well as in immune function parameters, specifically in animals fed a diet with a relatively low vitamin B6 content. The effects are caused by the imidazole derivative 2-acetyl-4(5)-tetrahydroxybutylimidazole (THI). Caramel Colour III is commonly used in food products such as bakery products, soya-bean sauces, brown sauces, gravies, soup aromas, brown (dehydrated) soups, brown malt caramel blend for various applications, vinegars and beers, and effects in humans on dietary intake cannot be excluded. Elderly male volunteers with a marginal deficit in vitamin B6 were considered a relevant and potentially sensitive group to study possible effects of Caramel Colour III on blood lymphocyte numbers (total and within subsets) or on proliferative responses of lymphocytes to mitogenic stimulation. In addition, several other haematological parameters, as well as serum immunoglobulin levels and immunoglobulin production in vitro by pokeweed mitogen-stimulated mononuclear blood cells were studied. The results of this double-blind intervention study demonstrated that in a selected test group of apparently healthy elderly male volunteers with a biochemically marginally deficient vitamin B6 status, Caramel Colour III containing 23 (commercial sample) or 143 (research sample) ppm THI and administered at the level of the current acceptable daily intake of 200 mg/kg body weight/day for 7 days did not affect any of the factors investigated. PMID:1427513

  9. A piecewise modeling approach for climate sensitivity studies: Tests with a shallow-water model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Aimei; Qiu, Chongjian; Niu, Guo-Yue

    2015-10-01

    In model-based climate sensitivity studies, model errors may grow during continuous long-term integrations in both the "reference" and "perturbed" states and hence the climate sensitivity (defined as the difference between the two states). To reduce the errors, we propose a piecewise modeling approach that splits the continuous long-term simulation into subintervals of sequential short-term simulations, and updates the modeled states through re-initialization at the end of each subinterval. In the re-initialization processes, this approach updates the reference state with analysis data and updates the perturbed states with the sum of analysis data and the difference between the perturbed and the reference states, thereby improving the credibility of the modeled climate sensitivity. We conducted a series of experiments with a shallow-water model to evaluate the advantages of the piecewise approach over the conventional continuous modeling approach. We then investigated the impacts of analysis data error and subinterval length used in the piecewise approach on the simulations of the reference and perturbed states as well as the resulting climate sensitivity. The experiments show that the piecewise approach reduces the errors produced by the conventional continuous modeling approach, more effectively when the analysis data error becomes smaller and the subinterval length is shorter. In addition, we employed a nudging assimilation technique to solve possible spin-up problems caused by re-initializations by using analysis data that contain inconsistent errors between mass and velocity. The nudging technique can effectively diminish the spin-up problem, resulting in a higher modeling skill.

  10. Summary of Previous Chamber or Controlled Anthrax Studies and Recommendations for Possible Additional Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Morrow, Jayne B.

    2010-12-29

    This report and an associated Excel file(a) summarizes the investigations and results of previous chamber and controlled studies(b) to characterize the performance of methods for collecting, storing and/or transporting, extracting, and analyzing samples from surfaces contaminated by Bacillus anthracis (BA) or related simulants. This report and the Excel are the joint work of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) for the Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate. The report was originally released as PNNL-SA-69338, Rev. 0 in November 2009 with limited distribution, but was subsequently cleared for release with unlimited distribution in this Rev. 1. Only minor changes were made to Rev. 0 to yield Rev. 1. A more substantial update (including summarizing data from other studies and more condensed summary tables of data) is underway

  11. Studies of levels of biogenic amines in meat samples in relation to the content of additives.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska, Aneta; Kowalska, Sylwia; Szłyk, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The impact of meat additives on the concentration of biogenic amines and the quality of meat was studied. Fresh white and red meat samples were fortified with the following food additives: citric and lactic acids, disodium diphosphate, sodium nitrite, sodium metabisulphite, potassium sorbate, sodium chloride, ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, propyl 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoate (propyl gallate) and butylated hydroxyanisole. The content of spermine, spermidine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, tryptamine and 2-phenylethylamine was determined by capillary isotachophoretic methods in meat samples (fresh and fortified) during four days of storage at 4°C. The results were applied to estimate the impact of the tested additives on the formation of biogenic amines in white and red meat. For all tested meats, sodium nitrite, sodium chloride and disodium diphosphate showed the best inhibition. However, cadaverine and putrescine were characterised by the biggest changes in concentration during the storage time of all the additives. Based on the presented data for the content of biogenic amines in meat samples analysed as a function of storage time and additives, we suggest that cadaverine and putrescine have a significant impact on meat quality. PMID:26515667

  12. Aerodynamic parameter studies and sensitivity analysis for rotor blades in axial flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiu, Y. Danny; Peters, David A.

    1991-01-01

    The analytical capability is offered for aerodynamic parametric studies and sensitivity analyses of rotary wings in axial flight by using a 3-D undistorted wake model in curved lifting line theory. The governing equations are solved by both the Multhopp Interpolation technique and the Vortex Lattice method. The singularity from the bound vortices is eliminated through the Hadamard's finite part concept. Good numerical agreement between both analytical methods and finite differences methods are found. Parametric studies were made to assess the effects of several shape variables on aerodynamic loads. It is found, e.g., that a rotor blade with out-of-plane and inplane curvature can theoretically increase lift in the inboard and outboard regions respectively without introducing an additional induced drag.

  13. a Study on the Role of Sintering Additives for Fabrication of sic Ceramic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Han Ki; Lee, Young Ju; Cho, Ho Jun; Kim, Tae Gyu

    Silicon carbide (SiC) materials have been extensively studied for high temperature components in advanced energy system and advanced gas turbine. The SiC ceramics have been fabricated by a NITE (Nano Infiltration Transient Eutectic Phase) Process, using Nano-SiC powder. The sintering additives used for forming liquid phase under sintering process, used the sintering additives ratios were an Al2O3-Y2O3 system or add SiO2 contents. A major R&D focus for the SiC ceramics is the production to obtain high purity SiC ceramics. In this study, we investigated roles of the sintering additives(Al2O3:Y2O3) to fabrication of the SiC ceramics. The effects of SiO2 contents and density properties of the SiC ceramics were also investigated. To investigate the effects of SiO2, Al2O3/Y2O3 composition were fixed and then SiO2 ratios were changed as several kinds, and to confirm the effects of sintering additives ratios (Al2O3:Y2O3) they were changed between 4:6 and 6:4 in x wt.%.

  14. Using epidemiology to regulate food additives: saccharin case-control studies.

    PubMed

    Cordle, F; Miller, S A

    1984-01-01

    The increasing use of nonnutritive sweeteners and the widely publicized 1969 ban on cyclamate led to additional investigations in rodents of the carcinogenic potential of saccharin. Preliminary results of a long-term feeding study indicated formation of bladder tumors in rodents, and collective experimental evidence has demonstrated that high doses of the synthetic sweetener saccharin can cause bladder cancer in rodents. Based on the results of that and other rodent studies indicating an increased risk of bladder cancer associated with saccharin, the Commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration announced the agency's intention to propose a ban on saccharin. This intention was made known in April 1977 under the Delaney Clause of the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The clause essentially states that no additive shall be deemed safe if it is found to induce cancer in man or animals, or if it is found, after tests appropriate for the evaluation of the safety of food additives, to induce cancer in man or animals. Also in 1977, a group of epidemiologists began to assess the available epidemiologic information to determine the potential human risk. This report describes the assessment of several human epidemiologic studies available then and the results of more recent epidemiologic studies. PMID:6431484

  15. Concept Study: Exploration and Production in Environmentally Sensitive Arctic Areas

    SciTech Connect

    Shirish Patil; Rich Haut; Tom Williams; Yuri Shur; Mikhail Kanevskiy; Cathy Hanks; Michael Lilly

    2008-12-31

    The Alaska North Slope offers one of the best prospects for increasing U.S. domestic oil and gas production. However, this region faces some of the greatest environmental and logistical challenges to oil and gas production in the world. A number of studies have shown that weather patterns in this region are warming, and the number of days the tundra surface is adequately frozen for tundra travel each year has declined. Operators are not allowed to explore in undeveloped areas until the tundra is sufficiently frozen and adequate snow cover is present. Spring breakup then forces rapid evacuation of the area prior to snowmelt. Using the best available methods, exploration in remote arctic areas can take up to three years to identify a commercial discovery, and then years to build the infrastructure to develop and produce. This makes new exploration costly. It also increases the costs of maintaining field infrastructure, pipeline inspections, and environmental restoration efforts. New technologies are needed, or oil and gas resources may never be developed outside limited exploration stepouts from existing infrastructure. Industry has identified certain low-impact technologies suitable for operations, and has made improvements to reduce the footprint and impact on the environment. Additional improvements are needed for exploration and economic field development and end-of-field restoration. One operator-Anadarko Petroleum Corporation-built a prototype platform for drilling wells in the Arctic that is elevated, modular, and mobile. The system was tested while drilling one of the first hydrate exploration wells in Alaska during 2003-2004. This technology was identified as a potentially enabling technology by the ongoing Joint Industry Program (JIP) Environmentally Friendly Drilling (EFD) program. The EFD is headed by Texas A&M University and the Houston Advanced Research Center (HARC), and is co-funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EFD

  16. Study of asphalt/asphaltene precipitation during addition of solvents to West Sak crude

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, J.C.; Patil, S.L.; Kamath, V.A. )

    1990-07-01

    In this study, experimental data on the amount of asphalt and asphaltene precipitation due to addition of solvents to West Sak crude were gathered. The first set of tests were conducted for two types of West Sak stock tank oils. Solvents used include: ethane, carbon dioxide, propane, n-butane, n-pentane, n-heptane, Prudhoe Bay natural gas (PBG) and natural gas liquids (NGL). Effect of solvent to oil dilution ratio on the amount of precipitation was studied. Alteration of crude oil composition due to asphalt precipitation was measured using gas-liquid chromatography. A second set of experiments were conducted to measure asphaltene precipitation due to addition of CO{sub 2} to live (recombined) West Sak crude.

  17. A Study of Aluminum Combustion in Solids, Powders, Foams, Additively-Manufactured Lattices, and Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Black, James; Trammell, Norman; Batteh, Jad; Curran, Nicholas; Rogers, John; Littrell, Donald

    2015-06-01

    This study examines the fireball characteristics, blast parameters, and combustion efficiency of explosively-shocked aluminum-based materials. The materials included structural and non-structural aluminum forms - such as solid cylinders, foams, additively-manufactured lattices, and powders - and some polytetrafluoroethylene-aluminum (PTFE-Al) composites. The materials were explosively dispersed in a small blast chamber, and the blast properties and products were measured with pressure transducers, thermocouples, slow and fast ultraviolet/visible spectrometers, and high-speed video.

  18. Spectra-temporal patterns underlying mental addition: an ERP and ERD/ERS study.

    PubMed

    Ku, Yixuan; Hong, Bo; Gao, Xiaorong; Gao, Shangkai

    2010-03-12

    Functional neuroimaging data have shown that mental calculation involves fronto-parietal areas that are composed of different subsystems shared with other cognitive functions such as working memory and language. Event-related potential (ERP) analysis has also indicated sequential information changes during the calculation process. However, little is known about the dynamic properties of oscillatory networks in this process. In the present study, we applied both ERP and event-related (de-)synchronization (ERS/ERD) analyses to EEG data recorded from normal human subjects performing tasks for sequential visual/auditory mental addition. Results in the study indicate that the late positive components (LPCs) can be decomposed into two separate parts. The earlier element LPC1 (around 360ms) reflects the computing attribute and is more prominent in calculation tasks. The later element LPC2 (around 590ms) indicates an effect of number size and appears larger only in a more complex 2-digit addition task. The theta ERS and alpha ERD show modality-independent frontal and parietal differential patterns between the mental addition and control groups, and discrepancies are noted in the beta ERD between the 2-digit and 1-digit mental addition groups. The 2-digit addition (both visual and auditory) results in similar beta ERD patterns to the auditory control, which may indicate a reliance on auditory-related resources in mental arithmetic, especially with increasing task difficulty. These results coincide with the theory of simple calculation relying on the visuospatial process and complex calculation depending on the phonological process. PMID:20105450

  19. Prospective multicentre study of the U-SENS test method for skin sensitization testing.

    PubMed

    Alépée, N; Piroird, C; Aujoulat, M; Dreyfuss, S; Hoffmann, S; Hohenstein, A; Meloni, M; Nardelli, L; Gerbeix, C; Cotovio, J

    2015-12-25

    The U-SENS™ is a test method based on the human myeloid U937 cell line to assess the skin sensitisation potential of substances. To demonstrate its robustness, a multicentre validation study with four laboratories testing 24 coded substances has been conducted according to internationally agreed principles. The primary objective of the study was to enlarge the U-SENS™'s reproducibility database. Secondary objectives were to provide additional evidence on its transferability and its predictive capability. Reproducibility within laboratories was approximately 92%, while the reproducibility between laboratories was 87.5%. Predictivity for the 24 validation substances was high, with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy being on average at least 93.8%. Similar performances are obtained for 38 substances when combining the study results with those of an earlier multicentre study, as well as with an automated version of the U-SENS™. With reliability and relevance similar to comparable non-animal skin sensitisation test methods, which have achieved regulatory acceptance, it is concluded that the U-SENS™ is a well reproducible and predictive test method. This profiles the U-SENS™ as a valuable addition to the suite of non-animal testing methods for skin sensitisation with the potential to significantly contribute to the development of integrated testing strategies. PMID:26439184

  20. Identification of seismically risk-sensitive systems and components in nuclear power plants: feasibility study. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Azarm, M; Boccio, J; Farahzad, P

    1983-06-01

    An approach for the identification of risk-sensitive components in a nuclear power plant during and after a seismic event is described. Application of the methodology to two hypothetical power plants - a Boiling Water Reactor and a Pressurized Water Reactor - are presented and the results are given in tabular and graphical form. Conclusions drawn and lessons learned through the course of this study, based on the relative importance of various accident scenarios and sensitivity analyses, are discussed. In addition, the areas that may need further investigation are identified.

  1. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: β-decay rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mumpower, M.; Cass, J.; Passucci, G.; Aprahamian, A.; Surman, R.

    2014-04-15

    The pattern of isotopic abundances produced in rapid neutron capture, or r-process, nucleosynthesis is sensitive to the nuclear physics properties of thousands of unstable neutron-rich nuclear species that participate in the process. It has long been recognized that the some of the most influential pieces of nuclear data for r-process simulations are β-decay lifetimes. In light of experimental advances that have pushed measurement capabilities closer to the classic r-process path, we revisit the role of individual β-decay rates in the r process. We perform β-decay rate sensitivity studies for a main (A > 120) r process in a range of potential astrophysical scenarios. We study the influence of individual rates during (n, γ)-(γ, n) equilibrium and during the post-equilibrium phase where material moves back toward stability. We confirm the widely accepted view that the most important lifetimes are those of nuclei along the r-process path for each astrophysical scenario considered. However, we find in addition that individual β-decay rates continue to shape the final abundance pattern through the post-equilibrium phase, for as long as neutron capture competes with β decay. Many of the lifetimes important for this phase of the r process are within current or near future experimental reach.

  2. Mesoscale Assimilation of TMI Rainfall Data with 4DVAR: Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2003-01-01

    Sensitivity studies are performed on the assimilation of TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission) Microwave Imager (TMI) derived rainfall data into a mesoscale model using a four-dimensional variational data assimilation (4DVAR) technique. A series of numerical experiments is conducted to evaluate the impact of TMI rainfall data on the numerical simulation of Hurricane Bonnie (1998). The results indicate that rainfall data assimilation is sensitive to the error characteristics of the data and the inclusion of physics in the adjoint and forward models. In addition, assimilating the rainfall data alone is helpful for producing a more realistic eye and rain bands in the hurricane but does not ensure improvements in hurricane intensity forecasts. Further study indicated that it is necessary to incorporate TMI rainfall data together with other types of data such as wind data into the model, in which case the inclusion of the rainfall data further improves the intensity forecast of the hurricane. This implies that proper constraints may be needed for rainfall assimilation.

  3. Development of a sensitive mid-infrared spectrometer for the study of cooled molecular ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porambo, Michael W.

    The study of molecular ions is relevant to many areas of scientific interest. Mid-infrared laser spectroscopy functions as a useful tool for understanding the role of molecular ions in these areas. To this end, a broadly tunable mid-infrared difference frequency generation noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE-OHMS) system has been developed and characterized through rovibrational spectroscopy of methane. In addition, an attempt was made to use this spectrometer to probe molecular ions focused into an ion beam. Challenges inherent to laboratory molecular ion spectroscopy, such as quantum dilution at high internal temperatures and low ion number density, have been addressed through the development of an instrument that produces rotationally cooled molecular ions coupled to the highly sensitive spectroscopic technique NICE-OHMS. The instrument was first explored as an extension of an ion beam spectrometer by the integration of a continuous supersonic expansion discharge source for the production of the cooled molecular ions. Issues with the implementation led to the re- design of the instrument for spectroscopically probing a supersonic expansion discharge directly with NICE-OHMS. After implementing discharge modulation of the supersonic expansion source, spectra of rotationally cooled H(3/+) and HN(+/2) were acquired. This instrumental development and preliminary spectroscopy has paved the way for a new method for the sensitive spectroscopic study of cooled molecular ions that will aid further insight into these chemical species in many fields.

  4. Design tradeoff studies and sensitivity analysis, appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Further work was performed on the Near Term Hybrid Passenger Vehicle Development Program. Fuel economy on the order of 2 to 3 times that of a conventional vehicle, with a comparable life cycle cost, is possible. The two most significant factors in keeping the life cycle cost down are the retail price increment and the ratio of battery replacement cost to battery life. Both factors can be reduced by reducing the power rating of the electric drive portion of the system relative to the system power requirements. The type of battery most suitable for the hybrid, from the point of view of minimizing life cycle cost, is nickel-iron. The hybrid is much less sensitive than a conventional vehicle is, in terms of the reduction in total fuel consumption and resultant decreases in operating expense, to reductions in vehicle weight, tire rolling resistance, etc., and to propulsion system and drivetrain improvements designed to improve the brake specific fuel consumption of the engine under low road load conditions. It is concluded that modifications to package the propulsion system and battery pack can be easily accommodated within the confines of a modified carryover body such as the Ford Ltd.

  5. Sensitivity Studies of Air Ingress Acidents in Modular HTGRs

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, Sydney J; Richards, Matt; Shepelev, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    Postulated air ingress accidents, while of very low probability in a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), are of considerable interest to the plant designer, operator, and regulator because of the possibility that the core could sustain significant damage under some circumstances. Sensitivity analyses are described that cover a wide spectrum of conditions affecting outcomes of the postulated accident sequences, for both prismatic and pebble-bed core designs. The major factors affecting potential core damage are the size and location of primary system leaks, flow path resistances, the core temperature distribution, and the long-term availability of oxygen in the incoming gas from a confinement building. Typically, all the incoming oxygen entering the core area is consumed within the reactor vessel, so it is more a matter of where, not whether, oxidation occurs. An air ingress model with example scenarios and means for mitigating damage are described. Representative designs of modular HTGRs included here are a 400-MW(th) pebble-bed reactor (PBR), and a 600-MW(th) prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR) design such as the gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR).

  6. Mineral resources of the Buffalo Hump and Sand Dunes Addition Wilderness Study Areas, Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, A.B.; Barbon, H.N.; Kulik, D.M. ); McDonnell, J.R. Jr. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a study to assess the potential for undiscovered mineral resources and appraise the identified resources of the Buffalo Hump and Sand Dunes Addition Wilderness Study Areas, southwestern Wyoming, There are no mines, prospects, or mineralized areas nor any producing oil or gas wells; however, there are occurrences of coal, claystone and shale, and sand. There is a moderate resource potential for oil shale and natural gas and a low resource potential for oil, for metals, including uranium, and for geothermal sources.

  7. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurement of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 microns. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the radiance signal or sensitivity to CO2 change near the surface is not significantly diminished even in the presence of aerosols and/or thin cirrus clouds in the atmosphere; (c) the modification of sunlight path length by scattering of aerosols and cirrus clouds could lead to large systematic errors in the retrieval; therefore, ancillary aerosol/cirrus cloud data are important to reduce retrieval errors; (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, must be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  8. Sensitivity Studies for Space-based Measurements of Atmospheric Total Column Carbon Dioxide Using Reflected Sunlight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jianping; Kawa, S. Randolph

    2003-01-01

    A series of sensitivity studies is carried out to explore the feasibility of space-based global carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for global and regional carbon cycle studies. The detection method uses absorption of reflected sunlight in the CO2 vibration-rotation band at 1.58 micron. The sensitivities of the detected radiances are calculated using the line-by-line model (LBLRTM), implemented with the DISORT (Discrete Ordinates Radiative Transfer) model to include atmospheric scattering in this band. The results indicate that (a) the small (approx.1%) changes in CO2 near the Earth's surface are detectable in this CO2 band provided adequate sensor signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution are achievable; (b) the effects of other interfering constituents, such as water vapor, aerosols and cirrus clouds, on the radiance are significant but the overall effects of the modification of light path length on total back-to-space radiance sensitivity to CO2 change are minor for general cases, which means that generally the total column CO2 can be derived in high precision from the ratio of the on-line center to off-line radiances; (c) together with CO2 gas absorption aerosol/cirrus cloud layer has differential scattering which may result in the modification of on-line to off-line radiance ratio which could lead a large bias in the total column CO2 retrieval. Approaches to correct such bias need further investigation. (d) CO2 retrieval requires good knowledge of the atmospheric temperature profile, e.g. approximately 1K RMS error in layer temperature, which is achievable from new atmospheric sounders in the near future; (e) the atmospheric path length, over which the CO2 absorption occurs, should be known in order to correctly interpret horizontal gradients of CO2 from the total column CO2 measurement; thus an additional sensor for surface pressure measurement needs to be attached for a complete measurement package.

  9. Additional Treatment Services in a Cocaine Treatment Study: Level of Services Obtained and Impact on Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Worley, Matthew; Gallop, Robert; Gibbons, Mary Beth Connolly; Ring-Kurtz, Sarah; Present, Julie; Weiss, Roger D.; Crits-Christoph, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the level of additional treatment services obtained by patients enrolled in the NIDA Cocaine Collaborative Study, a multi-center efficacy trial of four treatments for cocaine dependence, and to determine whether these services impact treatment outcome. Cocaine-dependent patients (N = 487) were recruited at five sites and randomly assigned to six months of one of four psychosocial treatments. Assessments were made at baseline, monthly during treatment, and at follow-ups at 9, 12, 15, and 18 months post-randomization. On average, patients received little or no additional treatment services during active treatment (first 6 months), but the rate of obtaining most services increased during the follow-up phase (month 7 to 18). In general, the treatment groups did not differ in the rates of obtaining non-protocol services. For all treatment groups, patients with greater psychiatric severity received more medical and psychiatric services during active treatment and follow-up. Use of treatment services was unrelated to drug use outcomes during active treatment. However, during the follow-up period, increased use of psychiatric medication, 12-step attendance, and 12-step participation was related to less drug use. The results suggest that during uncontrolled follow-up phases, additional non-protocol services may potentially confound the interpretation of treatment group comparisons in drug use outcomes. PMID:18463998

  10. First clinical pilot study with intravascular polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villiger, Martin; Karanasos, Antonios; Ren, Jian; Lippok, Norman; Shishkov, Milen; Daemen, Joost; Van Mieghem, Nicolas; Diletti, Roberto; Valgimigli, Marco; van Geuns, Robert-Jan; de Jaegere, Peter; Zijlstra, Felix; van Soest, Gijs; Nadkarni, Seemantini; Regar, Evelyn; Bouma, Brett E.

    2016-02-01

    Polarization sensitive (PS) OCT measures the polarization states of the light backscattered by tissue and provides measures of tissue birefringence and depolarization in addition to the structural OCT signal. Ex vivo studies have demonstrated that birefringence is increased in tissue rich in collagen and with elevated smooth muscle cell content. Preliminary data further suggests that depolarization can identify regions of macrophage infiltration, lipid, and irregularly arranged collagen fibers. These are important aspects of the mechanical integrity and vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. To evaluate the potential of PS-OCT in the clinical setting, we combined our custom PS-OCT system with commercially available OCT catheters (Fastview, Terumo Corporation) and performed a pilot study in 30 patients, scheduled to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) on the grounds of stable or unstable angina. A total of 82 pullbacks in 39 vessels were performed, either in the native coronary arteries or post procedure. Comparing consecutive pullbacks of the same coronary artery, we found excellent agreement between the polarization features in the repeat pullbacks, validating the repeatability and robustness of PS-OCT in the clinical in vivo setting. In addition we observed that the birefringence and depolarization features vary significantly across lesions with identical structural OCT appearance, suggesting morphological subtypes. This first human pilot study proved the feasibility and robustness of intravascular PS-OCT. PS-OCT achieves improved tissue characterization and may help in identifying high-risk plaques, with the potential to ultimately improve risk stratification and help guiding PCI.

  11. Assisted Sonication vs Conventional Transesterification Numerical Simulation and Sensitivity Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janajreh, Isam; Noorul Hussain, Mohammed; El Samad, Tala

    2015-10-01

    Transeterification is known as slow reaction that can take over several hours to complete as the two immiscible liquid reactants combine to form biodiesel and the less favorable glycerol. The quest of finding the perfect catalyst, optimal operational conditions, and reactor configuration to accelerate the reaction in mere few minutes that ensures high quality biodiesel, in economically viable way is coming along with sonication. This drastic reduction is a key enabler for the development of a continuous processing that otherwise is fairly costly and low throughput using conventional method. The reaction kinetics of sonication assisted as inferred by several authors is several time faster and this work implements these rates in a high fidelity numerical simulation model. This flow model is based on Navier-Stokes equations coupled with energy equation for non-isothermal flow and the transport equations of the multiple reactive species. The model is initially validated against experimental data from previous work of the authors using an annular reactor configuration. Following the validation, comparison of the reaction rate is shown to gain more insight to the distribution of the reaction and its attained rates. The two models (conventional and sonication) then compared on the basis of their sensitivity to the methane to oil molar ratio as the most pronounced process parameter. Both the exit reactor yield and the distribution of the species are evaluated with favorable yield under sonication process. These results pave the way to build a more robust process intensified reactor having an integrated selective heterogeneous catalyst to steer the reaction. This can avoid the downstream cleaning processes, cutting reaction time, and render economic benefit to the process.

  12. Regional Sensitivity to Neuroinflammation: In Vivo and In Vitro Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Liraz-Zaltsman, S.; Biegon, A.; Liraz-Zaltsman, S.; Alexandrovich, A.G.; Trembovler, V.; Fishbein, I.; Yaka, R.; Shohami, E.; Biegon, A.

    2010-11-23

    Neuroinflammation is involved in several acute-onset neuropathologies such as meningitis, encephalitis, stroke, and traumatic brain injury as well as in neurodegenerative diseases. All of these patholologies are associated with cognitive deficits. Using a model of pure neuroinflammation (intracisternal injection of endotoxin in mice), we tested the hypothesis that brain regions involved in cognition are the most vulnerable to inflammatory insults, and this vulnerability is an inherent property of neocortical neurons. Mice (n = 10/group) injected with endotoxin (LPS) or saline in the cisterna magna underwent neurobehavioral and cognitive testing followed by quantitative autoradiographic assessment of regional neuroinflammation with [3H]PK11195, an established marker of microgliosis. In parallel, cocultures of cortical and striatal neurons taken from embryonic day 19 rat embryos or postnatal day 1 mice expressing green fluorescent protein were exposed for 24 h to the proinflammatory cytokine TNFalpha, glutamate, or a combination of the two agents. LPS-treated mice exhibited significant deficits in memory and significant increases in specific PK11195 binding in cortical and hippocampal regions, but not in striatum. Cultured neurons of cortical origin showed significantly lower survival rate relative to striatal neurons in response to TNFalpha, glutamate, or a combination of the two agents. Furthermore, TNFalpha exerted neuroprotective rather than neurotoxic effects in the striatal but not in the cortical neurons. These results suggest that the cortex is inherently more sensitive than the striatum to the deleterious effects of neuroinflammation, and may offer an explanation for the preponderance of cognitive deficits in neuropathologies with a neuroinflammatory component.

  13. Does a Culturally Sensitive Smoking Prevention Program Reduce Smoking Intentions among Aboriginal Children? A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKennitt, Daniel W.; Currie, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if a culturally sensitive smoking prevention program would have short-term impacts on smoking intentions among Aboriginal children. Two schools with high Aboriginal enrollment were selected for the study. A grade 4 classroom in one school was randomly assigned to receive the culturally sensitive smoking…

  14. A Study of Young Children's Aesthetic Sensitivity to Drawing and Painting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golomb, Claire; Helmund, Judith

    This study examines the emergence of aesthetic sensitivity in the young child as a maker of art and as a critic of the work of peers. Two studies were designed to explore the child's own, mostly implicit, assumptions about child art, sensitivity to stylistic and drawing system differences, and to compositional patterns that characterize the work…

  15. The sensitivity of the KeratinoSens™ assay to evaluate plant extracts: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Andres, Eric; Sá-Rocha, Vanessa M; Barrichello, Carla; Haupt, Tina; Ellis, Graham; Natsch, Andreas

    2013-06-01

    Several tests to assess skin sensitization hazard are in peer-review for pre-validation. These tests, as well as the animal tests they aim to replace, were developed (and validated) for the testing of pure substances. However, in the cosmetic field, active ingredients are often mixtures from natural sources. It is therefore important to understand which tests could be used to evaluate their safety. Here we describe a proof-of-concept study to test whether the KeratinoSens(™) assay is able to detect sensitizing constituents within botanical mixtures. Four extracts were spiked with different doses of the sensitizers citral, cinnamic aldehyde and isoeugenol. The tested extracts were negative in the test whereas they became positive in most cases when spiked with the sensitizers. Analysis of the results from the samples spiked with different doses allowed the determination of the minimal level of sensitizers being detectable. The contribution to sensitization potential of doses of 2% and above of the spiked sensitizers were reliably detected. There were limitations for an extract with high cytotoxicity, in which case detection of the artificially spiked sensitizers proved difficult. This study gives a proof of principle for testing of mixtures in the KeratinoSens(™) assay and indicates how sensitive the assay is to detect minor components with sensitizing potential. PMID:23428960

  16. A synchrotron study of microstructure gradient in laser additively formed epitaxial Ni-based superalloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; Li, Yao; Qian, Dan; Wan, Jingchun; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2015-10-08

    Laser additive forming is considered to be one of the promising techniques to repair single crystal Ni-based superalloy parts to extend their life and reduce the cost. Preservation of the single crystalline nature and prevention of thermal mechanical failure are two of the most essential issues for the application of this technique. Here we employ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction to evaluate the quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect distribution of a Ni-based superalloy DZ125L directly formed by a laser additive process rooted from a single crystalline substrate of the same material. We show that a disorientation gradient caused bymore » a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations and resultant subgrains exists in the interfacial region between the epitaxial and stray grains. This creates a potential relationship of stray grain formation and defect accumulation. In conclusion, the observation offers new directions on the study of performance control and reliability of the laser additive manufactured superalloys.« less

  17. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS AND THE DESIGN OF GAS UPTAKE INHALATION STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas uptake studies analyzed by physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models have been used to estimate metabolic parameters for many volatiles. he metabolic constants Vmax, Km, and Kf are typically inferred from the decline in chemical concentration observed in closed cham...

  18. Isomeric Selective Studies of the Dominant Addition Channel in OH Initiated Oxidation of Isoprene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, B.; Bugarin, A.; Connell, B.; North, S. W.

    2009-12-01

    We report the first isomeric selective study of the dominant isomeric pathway in the OH initiated oxidation of isoprene in the presence of O2 and NO using the Laser Photolysis-Laser Induced Fluorescence (LP-LIF) technique. The photolysis of monodeuterated/non deuterated 2-iodo-2-methyl-but-3-en-1-ol results exclusively in the dominant OH-isoprene addition product, providing important insight into the oxidation mechanism. Based on kinetic analysis of OH cycling experiments we have determined the rate constant for O2 addition to the hydroxy alkyl radical to be (1.0±0.5) × 10^(-12) cm^(3) s^(-1) and we find a value of (8.05±2.3) × 10^(-12) cm^(3) s^(-1) for the overall reaction rate constant of the hydroxy peroxy radical with NO. We also report the first clear experimental evidence of the (E-) form of the δ-hydroxyalkoxy channel through isotopic labeling experiments and quantify its branching ratio to be 0.1±0.025. Since it corresponds to missing carbon balance in isoprene oxidation, we have been able to identify some of the missing carbon balance. Since our measured isomeric selective rate constants for the dominant outer channel in OH initiated isoprene chemistry are similar to the overall rate constants derived from non isomeric kinetics, we predict that the remaining outer addition channel will have similar reactivity. We have extended this study to the OH initiated oxidation of 1,3-butadiene. We have obtained isomeric selective rate constants on the dominant channel of the butadiene oxidation chemistry and measured the branching ratio for the δ-hydroxyalkoxy channel. These results on butadiene studies will be discussed.

  19. Sensitivity study on hydraulic well testing inversion using simulated annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Nakao, Shinsuke; Najita, J.; Karasaki, Kenzi

    1999-10-01

    Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing has been used as an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models of fractured formations based on transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes element apertures for a cluster of fracture elements in order to improve the match to observed pressure transients. Aperture size is chosen randomly from a list of discrete apertures. The cluster size is held constant through the iterations. Since hydraulic inversion is inherently nonunique, it is important to use additional information. The authors investigated the relationship between the scale of heterogeneity and the optimal cluster size and shape to enhance convergence of the inversion and improve the results. In a spatially correlated transmissivity field, a cluster size corresponding to about 20% to 40% of the practical range of the spatial correlation is optimal. Inversion results of the Raymond test site data are also presented and based on an optimal cluster size; the practical range of the spatial correlation is estimated to be 5 to 10 m.

  20. Sensitivity study on hydraulic well testing inversion using simulated annealing.

    PubMed

    Nakao, S; Najita, J; Karasaki, K

    1999-01-01

    Cluster variable aperture (CVA) simulated annealing has been used as an inversion technique to construct fluid flow models of fractured formations based on transient pressure data from hydraulic tests. A two-dimensional fracture network system is represented as a filled regular lattice of fracture elements. The algorithm iteratively changes element apertures for a cluster of fracture elements in order to improve the match to observed pressure transients. Aperture size is chosen randomly from a list of discrete apertures. The cluster size is held constant throughout the iterations. Since hydraulic inversion is inherently nonunique, it is important to use additional information. We investigated the relationship between the scale of heterogeneity and the optimal cluster size and shape to enhance convergence of the inversion and improve the results. In a spatially correlated transmissivity field, a cluster size corresponding to about 20 % to 40 % of the practical range of the spatial correlation is optimal. Inversion results of the Raymond test site data are also presented and based on an optimal cluster size; the practical range of the spatial correlation is estimated to be 5 to 10 m. PMID:19125927

  1. Immunotoxic effects of the color additive caramel color III: immune function studies in rats.

    PubMed

    Houben, G F; Penninks, A H; Seinen, W; Vos, J G; Van Loveren, H

    1993-01-01

    Administration of the color additive caramel color III (AC) may cause a reduction in total white blood cell counts in rats due to reduced lymphocyte counts. Beside lymphopenia, several other effects in rat have been described. The effects are caused by the imidazole derivative 2-acetyl-4(5)-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxybutyl)imidazole (THI) and occur in rats fed a diet low in vitamin B6. In the present paper, immune function studies on AC and THI with rats fed a diet low, but not deficient in vitamin B6 are presented and discussed. Rats were exposed to 0.4 or 4% AC or to 5.72 ppm THI in drinking water during and for 28 days prior to the start of immune function assays. Resistance to Trichinella spiralis was examined in an oral infection model and clearance of Listeria monocytogenes upon an intravenous infection was studied. In addition, natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity of splenic and nonadherent peritoneal cells and the antibody response to sheep red blood cells were studied. From the results it is concluded that exposure of rats to AC or THI influenced various immune function parameters. Thymus-dependent immunity was suppressed, while parameters of the nonspecific resistance were also affected, as shown by a decreased natural cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the spleen and an enhanced clearance of L. monocytogenes. PMID:8432426

  2. Improving wound care simulation with the addition of odor: a descriptive, quasi-experimental study.

    PubMed

    Roberson, Donna W; Neil, Janice A; Bryant, Elizabeth T

    2008-08-01

    Improving problem-solving skills and expertise in complex clinical care provision requires engaging students in the learning process--a challenging goal when clinical practicums and supervisors are limited. High-fidelity simulation has created many new opportunities for educating healthcare professionals. Because addressing malodorous wounds is a common problem that may be difficult to "teach," a descriptive, quasi-experimental simulation study was conducted. Following completion of a wound care simulation and Laerdal's Simulation Experience Evaluation Tool by 137 undergraduate nursing students, 50 control subjects were randomly selected and 49 volunteer students (experimental group) participated in a wound care simulation after one of three cheeses with a strong odor was added to simulate a malodorous wound. Compared to the control group, study group responses were significantly better (P <0.001) for eight of the 12 survey variables tested and indicated the addition of odor was beneficial in enhancing the perceived realism and value of the simulation. Students responded that the addition of odor in the simulation laboratory improved realism and they felt better prepared to handle malodorous wounds in a clinical setting. An unanticipated outcome was the enhanced feeling of involvement associated with paired care teams as opposed to working in larger groups. The results of this study indicate that wound care education outcomes improve when nursing students are able to practice using a multi-sensorial wound care simulation model. PMID:18716340

  3. Preliminary studies of combustor sensitivity to alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humenik, F. M.

    1980-01-01

    Combustion problems associated with using alternative fuels ground power and aeropropulsion applications were studied. Rectangular sections designed to simulate large annular combustor test conditions were examined. The effects of using alternative fuels with reduced hydrogen content, increased aromatic content, and a broad variation in fuel property characteristics were also studied. Data of special interest were collected which include: flame radiation characteristics in the various combustor zones; the correponding increase in liner temperature from increased radiant heat flux; the effect of fuel bound nitrogen on oxides of nitrogen (NO sub x) emissions; and the overall total effect of fuel variations on exhaust emissions.

  4. Host Language Proficiency, Intercultural Sensitivity, and Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Jane

    2011-01-01

    The number of foreign language students who join study abroad programs continues to increase annually, especially those who take part in short-term sojourns lasting eight weeks or less. What can be accomplished in such a short stay in the host culture? Is it possible for sojourners to enhance their proficiency in the host language and…

  5. Mars-GRAM: Increasing the Precision of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM's perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. A comparison study between Mars atmospheric density estimates from Mars-GRAM and measurements by Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) has been undertaken for locations of varying latitudes, Ls, and LTST on Mars. The preliminary results from this study have validated the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) limb data. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear=0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. To solve this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with TES observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. The addition of these density factors to Mars-GRAM will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  6. A water soluble additive to suppress respirable dust from concrete-cutting chainsaws: a case study.

    PubMed

    Summers, Michael P; Parmigiani, John P

    2015-01-01

    Respirable dust is of particular concern in the construction industry because it contains crystalline silica. Respirable forms of silica are a severe health threat because they heighten the risk of numerous respirable diseases. Concrete cutting, a common work practice in the construction industry, is a major contributor to dust generation. No studies have been found that focus on the dust suppression of concrete-cutting chainsaws, presumably because, during normal operation water is supplied continuously and copiously to the dust generation points. However, there is a desire to better understand dust creation at low water flow rates. In this case study, a water-soluble surfactant additive was used in the chainsaw's water supply. Cutting was performed on a free-standing concrete wall in a covered outdoor lab with a hand-held, gas-powered, concrete-cutting chainsaw. Air was sampled at the operator's lapel, and around the concrete wall to simulate nearby personnel. Two additive concentrations were tested (2.0% and 0.2%), across a range of fluid flow rates (0.38-3.8 Lpm [0.1-1.0 gpm] at 0.38 Lpm [0.1 gpm] increments). Results indicate that when a lower concentration of additive is used exposure levels increase. However, all exposure levels, once adjusted for 3 hours of continuous cutting in an 8-hour work shift, are below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 5 mg/m(3). Estimates were made using trend lines to predict the fluid flow rates that would cause respirable dust exposure to exceed both the OSHA PEL and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH®) threshold limit value (TLV). PMID:25714034

  7. Augmenting a Waste Glass Mixture Experiment Study with Additional Glass Components and Experimental Runs

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, Gregory F. ); Cooley, Scott K. ); Peeler, David K.; Vienna, John D. ); Edwards, Tommy B.

    2002-01-01

    A glass composition variation study (CVS) for high-level waste (HLW) stored in Idaho is being statistically designed and performed in phases over several years. The purpose of the CVS is to investigate and model how HLW-glass properties depend on glass composition. The resulting glass property-composition models will be used to develop desirable glass formulations and for other purposes. Phases 1 and 2 of the CVS have been completed and are briefly described. This paper focuses on the CVS Phase 3 experimental design, which was chosen to augment the Phase 1 and 2 data with additional data points, as well as to account for additional glass components not studied in Phases 1 and/or 2. In total, 16 glass components were varied in the Phase 3 experimental design. The paper describes how these Phase 3 experimental design augmentation challenges were addressed using the previous data, preliminary property-composition models, and statistical mixture experiment and optimal experimental design methods and software.

  8. Characterization studies on the additives mixed L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haja Hameed, A. S.; Karthikeyan, C.; Ravi, G.; Rohani, S.

    2011-04-01

    L-arginine phosphate monohydrate (LAP), potassium thiocyanate (KSCN) mixed LAP (LAP:KSCN) and sodium sulfite (Na 2SO 3) mixed LAP (LAP:Na 2SO 3) single crystals were grown by slow cooling technique. The effect of microbial contamination and coloration on the growth solutions was studied. The crystalline powders of the grown crystals were examined by X-ray diffraction and the lattice parameters of the crystals were estimated. From the FTIR spectroscopic analysis, various functional group frequencies associated with the crystals were assigned. Vickers microhardness studies were done on {1 0 0} faces for pure and additives mixed LAP crystals. From the preliminary surface second harmonic generation (SHG) results, it was found that the SHG intensity at (1 0 0) face of LAP:KSCN crystal was much stronger than that of pure LAP.

  9. The guanidine and maleic acid (1:1) complex. The additional theoretical and experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozd, Marek; Dudzic, Damian

    2012-04-01

    On the basis of experimental literature data the theoretical studies for guanidinium and maleic acid complex with using DFT method are performed. In these studies the experimental X-ray data for two different forms of investigated crystal were used. During the geometry optimization process one equilibrium structure was found, only. According to this result the infrared spectrum for one theoretical molecule was calculated. On the basis of potential energy distribution (PED) analysis the clear-cut assignments of observed bands were performed. For the calculated molecule with energy minimum the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) were obtained and graphically illustrated. The energy difference (GAP) between HOMO and LUMO was analyzed. Additionally, the nonlinear properties of this molecule were calculated. The α and β (first and second order) hyperpolarizability values are obtained. On the basis of these results the title crystal was classified as new second order NLO generator.

  10. Prazosin addition to fluvoxamine: A preclinical study and open clinical trial in OCD.

    PubMed

    Feenstra, Matthijs G P; Klompmakers, André; Figee, Martijn; Fluitman, Sjoerd; Vulink, Nienke; Westenberg, Herman G M; Denys, Damiaan

    2016-02-01

    The efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in psychiatric disorders may be "augmented" through the addition of atypical antipsychotic drugs. A synergistic increase in dopamine (DA) release in the prefrontal cortex has been suggested to underlie this augmentation effect, though the mechanism of action is not clear yet. We used in vivo microdialysis in rats to study DA release following the administration of combinations of fluvoxamine (10 mg/kg) and quetiapine (10 mg/kg) with various monoamine-related drugs. The results confirmed that the selective 5-HT1A antagonist WAY-100635 (0.05 mg/kg) partially blocked the fluvoxamine-quetiapine synergistic effect (maximum DA increase dropped from 325% to 214%). A novel finding is that the α1-adrenergic blocker prazosin (1 mg/kg), combined with fluvoxamine, partially mimicked the effect of augmentation (maximum DA increase 205%; area-under-the-curve 163%). As this suggested that prazosin augmentation might be tested in a clinical study, we performed an open clinical trial of prazosin 20 mg addition to SRI in therapy-resistant patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder applying for neurosurgery. A small, non-significant reduction in Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (Y-BOCS) scores was observed in 10 patients and one patient was classified as a responder with a reduction in Y-BOCS scores of more than 25%. We suggest that future clinical studies augmenting SRIs with an α1-adrenergic blocker in less treatment resistant cases should be considered. The clinical trial "Prazosin in combination with a serotonin reuptake inhibitor for patients with Obsessive Compulsive disorder: an open label study" was registered at 24/05/2011 under trial number ISRCTN61562706: http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN61562706. PMID:26712326

  11. Evaluation of the Use of Team Teaching for Delivering Sensitive Content: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerridge, Joanna; Kyle, Gaye; Marks-Maran, Diane

    2009-01-01

    Many programmes in further and higher education contain sensitive areas of content, such as diversity, racism, power and privilege, breaking bad news, counselling, sex education and ethical decision making. Team teaching may be a useful method for delivering sensitive areas of course content. This article presents a pilot study that was undertaken…

  12. Teaching Strategies and Practices that Promote a Culturally Sensitive Nursing Education: A Delphi Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewald, Robin J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore teaching strategies that promote a culturally sensitive nursing education and culturally sensitive nursing. The diversity of Americans has increased. Thus, the nursing student population and patient population have both become more diverse. Nursing education programs, therefore, need to know the best…

  13. Observed Sensitivity during Family Interactions and Cumulative Risk: A Study of Multiple Dyads per Family

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Dillon T.; Leckie, George; Prime, Heather; Perlman, Michal; Jenkins, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    The present study sought to investigate the family, individual, and dyad-specific contributions to observed cognitive sensitivity during family interactions. Moreover, the influence of cumulative risk on sensitivity at the aforementioned levels of the family was examined. Mothers and 2 children per family were observed interacting in a round robin…

  14. A Taxometric Study of the Latent Structure of Disgust Sensitivity: Converging Evidence for Dimensionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Broman-Fulks, Joshua J.

    2007-01-01

    Disgust sensitivity has recently been implicated as a specific vulnerability factor for several anxiety-related disorders. However, it is not clear whether disgust sensitivity is a dimensional or categorical phenomenon. The present study examined the latent structure of disgust by applying three taxometric procedures (maximum eigenvalue, mean…

  15. An avionics sensitivity study. Volume 1: Operational considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, R. W.; Mcconkey, E. D.

    1976-01-01

    Equipment and operational concepts affecting aircraft in the terminal area are reported. Curved approach applications and modified climb and descent procedures for minimum fuel consumption are considered. The curved approach study involves the application of MLS guidance to enable execution of the current visual approach to Washington National Airport under instrument flight conditions. The operational significance and the flight path control requirements involved in the application of curved approach paths to this situation are considered. Alternative flight path control regimes are considered to achieve minimum fuel consumption subject to constraints related to air traffic control requirements, flight crew and passenger reactions, and airframe and powerplant limitations.

  16. Mass analysis addition to the Differential Ion Flux Probe (DIFP) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H., Jr.; Jolley, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a technique to measure the characteristics of space plasmas under highly disturbed conditions; e.g., non-Maxwellian plasmas with strong drifting populations and plasmas contaminated by spacecraft outgassing. The approach, conducted in conjunction with current MSFC activities, is to extend the capabilities of the Differential Ion Flux Probe (DIFP) to include a high throughput mass measurement that does not require either high voltage or contamination sensitive devices such as channeltron electron multipliers or microchannel plates. This will significantly reduce the complexity and expense of instrument fabrication, testing, and integration of flight hardware compared to classical mass analyzers. The feasibility of the enhanced DIFP has been verified by using breadboard test models in a controlled plasma environment. The ability to manipulate particles through the instrument regardless of incident angle, energy, or ionic component has been amply demonstrated. The energy analysis mode is differential and leads directly to a time-of-flight mass measurement. With the new design, the DIFP will separate multiple ion streams and analyze each stream independently for ion flux intensity, velocity (including direction of motion), mass, and temperature (or energy distribution). In particular, such an instrument will be invaluable on follow-on electrodynamic TSS missions and, possibly, for environmental monitoring on the space station.

  17. A pseudo-state sensitivity study on hydrogenic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballance, C. P.; Badnell, N. R.; Smyth, E. S.

    2003-09-01

    An electron-impact excitation study of light hydrogenic ions has been carried out to quantify the effects of coupling to high bound/continuum states utilizing the R-matrix with pseudo-states method. As the ionization stage increases, the neglect of loss of flux into high-lying excitation/ionization channels impacts less upon excitation between the bound terms explicitly included within our close coupling expansion. C5+ is used as our benchmark study. The differences in Maxwell averaged collision strengths between a standard R-matrix calculation and those of a similar pseudo-state model across a range of temperatures shall be our criteria for judging differences. We carried out calculations for He+, Li2+, Be3+, B4+, C5+, O7+ and Ne9+ so as to provide excitation data amongst terms up to n = 5. Pseudo-state calculations were carried out for the first five ions, following a similar model to earlier neutral hydrogen work, whilst non-pseudo-state calculations sufficed for the remaining two ions. The results of these seven calculations will enhance existing excitation data sets for use in the modelling of controlled nuclear fusion plasma experiments.

  18. Requirement sensitivity studies for a future Landsat sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zhaoyu; Montanaro, Matthew; Gerace, Aaron; Schott, John R.; Markham, Brian

    2015-09-01

    The Landsat program has collected imagery of the Earth for the past 40 years. Although both Landsat 7 and 8 are currently operating on-orbit, the next generation Landsat mission is already being planned. Concept studies for this mission include reproducing the Landsat 8 design (mainly push-broom imaging architecture). The definition of science requirements is an important step towards the development of instrument specifications. At this early stage, a re-evaluation of the Landsat requirements is beneficial since they might be flexible enough to relax in some areas to possibly save on manufacturing costs or may need to be tightened in other areas to produce better science products. The investigations presented here focused on spatial aliasing and spectral banding effects. The specifications of these two key performance requirements were taken from the Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) sensor as a starting point for the analyses. They were then adjusted to determine their effects on the final image products through the use of standard radiometry equations and synthetic Earth scene data. The results of the modeling efforts for these two requirements concepts are presented here and could be used as a template for future instrument studies.

  19. A retrospective evaluation of species-specific sensitivity for neurological signs in toxicological studies: Is the dog more sensitive than the non-human primate?

    PubMed

    Backes, Kathrin; Lorenz, Helga; Laplanche, Loic; Hudzik, Thomas J; Potschka, Heidrun; Hempel, Katja

    2016-01-22

    Selection of the appropriate non-rodent species in preclinical programs is crucial for good translatability and human safety. There is no data available in the literature which provides exact comparison of dog and non-human primate (NHP) sensitivity regarding neurological signs in toxicological studies. We performed a retrospective analysis of 174 toxicity studies with 15 neuroscience substances. Neurological signs in dogs and NHPs were evaluated in correlation to exposure data. Overall incidence of substance induced convulsions was similar in both species and no gender differences were observed. The reported liability of beagles to spontaneous convulsions was not confirmed in our studies. The symptom tremor showed the best inter-species translatability. The current toxicological study design does not include exposure assessment at the time-point of neurological signs, therefore, we propose to include additional toxicokinetic samples. Our analysis revealed factors including housing, handling, and behavior, which prevents direct species comparison. In addition only one non-rodent species is routinely tested in development programs, therefore data for both species is rare. We however, had sufficient data which enabled comparison for one compound. In the spirit of 3Rs further examples should be evaluated. PMID:26732424

  20. A combined toxicity study of zinc oxide nanoparticles and vitamin C in food additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yanli; Yuan, Lulu; Yao, Chenjie; Ding, Lin; Li, Chenchen; Fang, Jie; Sui, Keke; Liu, Yuanfang; Wu, Minghong

    2014-11-01

    At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the cytotoxicity significantly compared with that of the ZnO only NPs. When the cells were exposed to ZnO NPs at a concentration less than 15 mg L-1, or to Vc at a concentration less than 300 mg L-1, there was no significant cytotoxicity, both in the case of gastric epithelial cell line (GES-1) and neural stem cells (NSCs). However, when 15 mg L-1 of ZnO NPs and 300 mg L-1 of Vc were introduced to cells together, the cell viability decreased sharply indicating significant cytotoxicity. Moreover, the significant increase in toxicity was also shown in the in vivo experiments. The dose of the ZnO NPs and Vc used in the in vivo study was calculated according to the state of food and nutrition enhancer standard. After repeated oral exposure to ZnO NPs plus Vc, the injury of the liver and kidneys in mice has been indicated by the change of these indices. These findings demonstrate that the synergistic toxicity presented in a complex system is essential for the toxicological evaluation and safety assessment of nanofood.At present, safety evaluation standards for nanofood additives are made based on the toxic effects of a single additive. Since the size, surface properties and chemical nature influence the toxicity of nanomaterials, the toxicity may have dramatically changed when nanomaterials are used as food additives in a complex system. Herein, we investigated the combined toxicity of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) and vitamin C (Vc, ascorbic acid). The results showed that Vc increased the

  1. Modeling and sensitivity study of the dual-chamber SMART (SMA ReseTtable) lift device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luntz, Jonathan E.; Young, Jonathan R.; Brei, Diann; Radice, Joshua; Strom, Kenneth A.

    2007-04-01

    Morphing structures for applications such as impact mitigation is a challenging problem due to the speed and repeatability requirements that limit the viable actuation approaches. This paper examines a promising stored-energy, active-release approach that can be deployed quickly (~40 ms), is reusable/resetable and can be tuned in the field for changing conditions such as additional mass, temperature compensation or platform changes. The Dual-Chamber SMART (SMA ReseTtable) Lift is a pneumatic air spring controlled via an ultra-fast SMA actuated valve. This paper presents the modeling, sensitivity analysis and experimental validation of this new technology. A control-volume based analytical model was derived that employs compressible, sonic flow and thermodynamic relations to provide a set of differential equations that relate the design parameters (cylinder and valve geometry), application parameters (deployed mass), and operational parameters (pressure, temperature and SMA valve actuation profile), to the deployment performance (deploy time, profile, position, etc.). The model was exercised to explore the sensitivity of the performance with regards to these parameters and explore the off-line and on-line adjustability of the device's performance to compensate for cross platform applications and uncontrolled environmental effects such as temperature and added mass. As proof-of-concept, a full-scale prototype was designed via the model, built and experimentally characterized across several of the parameters for the real case-study of automotive pedestrian protection. The prototype performance agreed closely with model predictions and met the rigorous specifications of the case study with in-situ tailoring which is applicable to a wide range of morphing applications beyond this case study.

  2. A study of pyrazines in cigarettes and how additives might be used to enhance tobacco addiction

    PubMed Central

    Alpert, Hillel R; Agaku, Israel T; Connolly, Gregory N

    2016-01-01

    Background Nicotine is known as the drug that is responsible for the addicted behaviour of tobacco users, but it has poor reinforcing effects when administered alone. Tobacco product design features enhance abuse liability by (A) optimising the dynamic delivery of nicotine to central nervous system receptors, and affecting smokers’ withdrawal symptoms, mood and behaviour; and (B) effecting conditioned learning, through sensory cues, including aroma, touch and visual stimulation, to create perceptions of pending nicotine reward. This study examines the use of additives called ‘pyrazines’, which may enhance abuse potential, their introduction in ‘lights’ and subsequently in the highly market successful Marlboro Lights (Gold) cigarettes and eventually many major brands. Methods We conducted internal tobacco industry research using online databases in conjunction with published scientific literature research, based on an iterative feedback process. Results Tobacco manufacturers developed the use of a range of compounds, including pyrazines, in order to enhance ‘light’ cigarette products’ acceptance and sales. Pyrazines with chemosensory and pharmacological effects were incorporated in the first ‘full-flavour, low-tar’ product achieving high market success. Such additives may enhance dependence by helping to optimise nicotine delivery and dosing and through cueing and learned behaviour. Conclusions Cigarette additives and ingredients with chemosensory effects that promote addiction by acting synergistically with nicotine, increasing product appeal, easing smoking initiation, discouraging cessation or promoting relapse should be regulated by the US Food and Drug Administration. Current models of tobacco abuse liability could be revised to include more explicit roles with regard to non-nicotine constituents that enhance abuse potential. PMID:26063608

  3. Additional follow-up telephone counselling and initial smoking relapse: a longitudinal, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; He, Yao; Jiang, Bin; Zuo, Fang; Liu, Qinghui; Zhang, Li; Zhou, Changxi

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Smoking cessation services can help smokers to quit; however, many smoking relapse cases occur over time. Initial relapse prevention should play an important role in achieving the goal of long-term smoking cessation. Several studies have focused on the effect of extended telephone support in relapse prevention, but the conclusions remain conflicting. Design and setting From October 2008 to August 2013, a longitudinal, controlled study was performed in a large general hospital of Beijing. Participants The smokers who sought treatment at our smoking cessation clinic were non-randomised and divided into 2 groups: face-to-face individual counselling group (FC group), and face-to-face individual counselling plus telephone follow-up counselling group (FCF group). No pharmacotherapy was offered. Outcomes The timing of initial smoking relapse was compared between FC and FCF groups. Predictors of initial relapse were investigated during the first 180 days, using the Cox proportional hazards model. Results Of 547 eligible male smokers who volunteered to participate, 457 participants (117 in FC group and 340 in FCF group) achieved at least 24 h abstinence. The majority of the lapse episodes occurred during the first 2 weeks after the quit date. Smokers who did not receive the follow-up telephone counselling (FC group) tended to relapse to smoking earlier than those smokers who received the additional follow-up telephone counselling (FCF group), and the log-rank test was statistically significant (p=0.003). A Cox regression model showed that, in the FCF group, being married, and having a lower Fagerström test score, normal body mass index and doctor-diagnosed tobacco-related chronic diseases, were significantly independent protective predictors of smoking relapse. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that additional follow-up telephone counselling might be an effective strategy in preventing relapse. Further research is still

  4. A Mechanistic Study of Halogen Addition and Photoelimination from π-Conjugated Tellurophenes.

    PubMed

    Carrera, Elisa I; Lanterna, Anabel E; Lough, Alan J; Scaiano, Juan C; Seferos, Dwight S

    2016-03-01

    The ability to drive reactivity using visible light is of importance for many disciplines of chemistry and has significant implications for sustainable chemistry. Identifying photochemically active compounds and understanding photochemical mechanisms is important for the development of useful materials for synthesis and catalysis. Here we report a series of photoactive diphenyltellurophene compounds bearing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating substituents synthesized by alkyne coupling/ring closing or palladium-catalyzed ipso-arylation chemistry. The redox chemistry of these compounds was studied with respect to oxidative addition and photoelimination of bromine, which is of importance for energy storage reactions involving X2. The oxidative addition reaction mechanism was studied using density functional theory, the results of which support a three-step mechanism involving the formation of an initial η(1) association complex, a monobrominated intermediate, and finally the dibrominated product. All of the tellurophene derivatives undergo photoreduction using 430, 447, or 617 nm light depending on the absorption properties of the compound. Compounds bearing electron-withdrawing substituents have the highest photochemical quantum efficiencies in the presence of an alkene trap, with efficiencies of up to 42.4% for a pentafluorophenyl-functionalized tellurophene. The photoelimination reaction was studied in detail through bromine trapping experiments and laser flash photolysis, and a mechanism is proposed. The photoreaction, which occurs by release of bromine radicals, is competitive with intersystem crossing to the triplet state of the brominated species, as evidenced by the formation of singlet oxygen. These findings should be useful for the design of new photochemically active compounds supported by main-group elements. PMID:26853739

  5. Study of mandible reconstruction using a fibula flap with application of additive manufacturing technology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to establish surgical guiding techniques for completing mandible lesion resection and reconstruction of the mandible defect area with fibula sections in one surgery by applying additive manufacturing technology, which can reduce the surgical duration and enhance the surgical accuracy and success rate. Methods A computer assisted mandible reconstruction planning (CAMRP) program was used to calculate the optimal cutting length and number of fibula pieces and design the fixtures for mandible cutting, registration, and arrangement of the fibula segments. The mandible cutting and registering fixtures were then generated using an additive manufacturing system. The CAMRP calculated the optimal fibula cutting length and number of segments based on the location and length of the defective portion of the mandible. The mandible cutting jig was generated according to the boundary surface of the lesion resection on the mandible STL model. The fibular cutting fixture was based on the length of each segment, and the registered fixture was used to quickly arrange the fibula pieces into the shape of the defect area. In this study, the mandibular lesion was reconstructed using registered fibular sections in one step, and the method is very easy to perform. Results and conclusion The application of additive manufacturing technology provided customized models and the cutting fixtures and registered fixtures, which can improve the efficiency of clinical application. This study showed that the cutting fixture helped to rapidly complete lesion resection and fibula cutting, and the registered fixture enabled arrangement of the fibula pieces and allowed completion of the mandible reconstruction in a timely manner. Our method can overcome the disadvantages of traditional surgery, which requires a long and different course of treatment and is liable to cause error. With the help of optimal cutting planning by the CAMRP and the 3D printed mandible resection jig and

  6. Water isotopes and the Eocene. A tectonic sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legrande, A. N.; Roberts, C. D.; Tripati, A.; Schmidt, G. A.

    2009-04-01

    The early Eocene (54 Million years ago) is one of the warmest periods in the last 65 Million years. Its climate is postulated to have been the result of enhanced greenhouse gas concentration, with CO2 roughly 4 times pre-industrial and methane 7 times pre-industrial concentrations. One interesting feature of this period to emerge recently is the intermittent presence of fossilized Azolla, a type of freshwater fern, in the Arctic Ocean. Synchronous (within dating error) with this appearance were major changes in the restriction of the Arctic Ocean and the other global oceans. We investigate this time period using the Goddard Institute for Space Studies ModelE-R, a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model that incorporates water isotopes throughout the hydrologic cycle, making it an ideal model to test hypotheses of past climate change and to compare to paleoclimate proxy data. We assess the impact of tectonic variability by using minimal and maximal levels of restriction for the Arctic Ocean seaways. We find that the modulation of connectivity of these basins dramatically alters global salinity distribution, leading to large changes in ocean circulation. Greater restriction of the Arctic Basin is associated with fresh and relatively warmer conditions. The same mechanisms responsible for this redistribution of salt also change the global distribution of water isotopes, and can alias (water isotope) proxy climate signals of warmth.

  7. A sensitivity study of storm cyclones with a mesoscale model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, K. S.; Tetzlaff, G.

    2003-04-01

    Extra tropical storms caused noticeable damages in the last decades. The evolution of strong cyclones is investigated by simulations with the nonhydrostatic limited area model 'Lokal Modell' (LM) of the German Weather Service (DWD). Which Conditions become important to distinguish an common cyclone from an storm-cyclone? Intense cyclones are mostly characterised by two typical large-scale features: high baroclinicity along the track of the low pressure system and a region of high equivalent potential temperature. For this purpose the observed values of the horizontal temperature gradient and the distribution of air moisture are varied and were used as forcing data, in such a way the development of storms was modified. The forcing data for the LM were generated by the global model of the DWD. Therefore data of real cyclones, such as the low Ginger, which occurred in 2000, were used. As the LM simulates only a limited area, the lateral bounds become problematic because of the manipulated forcing data. A procedure is tested, in order to prevent these problems. In this manner ensembles of storm scenarios were produced. The effects of various conditions were studied. Here in particular the changes in the surface velocity field were of interest. In the case of Ginger, an increase of the temperature gradient about 10 K causes an increasing of the maximum velocity about 3 m/s.

  8. Resources allocation in healthcare for cancer: a case study using generalised additive mixed models.

    PubMed

    Musio, Monica; Sauleau, Erik A; Augustin, Nicole H

    2012-11-01

    Our aim is to develop a method for helping resources re-allocation in healthcare linked to cancer, in order to replan the allocation of providers. Ageing of the population has a considerable impact on the use of health resources because aged people require more specialised medical care due notably to cancer. We propose a method useful to monitor changes of cancer incidence in space and time taking into account two age categories, according to healthcar general organisation. We use generalised additive mixed models with a Poisson response, according to the methodology presented in Wood, Generalised additive models: an introduction with R. Chapman and Hall/CRC, 2006. Besides one-dimensional smooth functions accounting for non-linear effects of covariates, the space-time interaction can be modelled using scale invariant smoothers. Incidence data collected by a general cancer registry between 1992 and 2007 in a specific area of France is studied. Our best model exhibits a strong increase of the incidence of cancer along time and an obvious spatial pattern for people more than 70 years with a higher incidence in the central band of the region. This is a strong argument for re-allocating resources for old people cancer care in this sub-region. PMID:23242683

  9. Covalent binding of aniline to humic substances. 2. 15N NMR studies of nucleophilic addition reactions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorn, K.A.; Pettigrew, P.J.; Goldenberg, W.S.; Weber, E.J.

    1996-01-01

    Aromatic amines are known to undergo covalent binding with humic substances in the environment. Although previous studies have examined reaction conditions and proposed mechanisms, there has been no direct spectroscopic evidence for the covalent binding of the amines to the functional groups in humic substances. In order to further elucidate the reaction mechanisms, the Suwannee River and IHSS soil fulvic and humic acids were reacted with 15N-labeled aniline at pH 6 and analyzed using 15N NMR spectrometry. Aniline underwent nucleophilic addition reactions with the quinone and other carbonyl groups in the samples and became incorporated in the form of anilinohydroquinone, anilinoquinone, anilide, imine, and heterocyclic nitrogen, the latter comprising 50% or more of the bound amine. The anilide and anilinohydroquinone nitrogens were determined to be susceptible to chemical exchange by ammonia. In the case of Suwannee River fulvic acid, reaction under anoxic conditions and pretreatment with sodium borohydride or hydroxylamine prior to reaction under oxic conditions resulted in a decrease in the proportion of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen incorporated. The relative decrease in the incorporation of anilinohydroquinone nitrogen with respect to anilinoquinone nitrogen under anoxic conditions suggested that inter- or intramolecular redox reactions accompanied the nucleophilic addition reactions.

  10. Assessment of Nano Cellulose from Peach Palm Residue as Potential Food Additive: Part II: Preliminary Studies.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Dayanne Regina Mendes; Mendonça, Márcia Helena; Helm, Cristiane Vieira; Magalhães, Washington L E; de Muniz, Graciela Ines Bonzon; Kestur, Satyanarayana G

    2015-09-01

    High consumption of dietary fibers in the diet is related to the reduction of the risk of non-transmitting of chronic diseases, prevention of the constipation etc. Rich diets in dietary fibers promote beneficial effects for the metabolism. Considering the above and recognizing the multifaceted advantages of nano materials, there have been many attempts in recent times to use the nano materials in the food sector including as food additive. However, whenever new product for human and animal consumption is developed, it has to be tested for their effectiveness regarding improvement in the health of consumers, safety aspects and side effects. However, before it is tried with human beings, normally such materials would be assessed through biological tests on a living organism to understand its effect on health condition of the consumer. Accordingly, based on the authors' finding reported in a previous paper, this paper presents body weight, biochemical (glucose, cholesterol and lipid profile in blood, analysis of feces) and histological tests carried out with biomass based cellulose nano fibrils prepared by the authors for its possible use as food additive. Preliminary results of the study with mice have clearly brought out potential of these fibers for the said purpose. PMID:26344977

  11. Spectrally resolved and phase-sensitive far-field measurement for the coherent addition of laser pulses in a tiled grating compressor.

    PubMed

    Hornung, Marco; Bödefeld, Ragnar; Kessler, Alexander; Hein, Joachim; Kaluza, Malte C

    2010-06-15

    We describe a method that can be used for the coherent addition of laser pulses. As different laser pulses are initially generated in a laser-pulse compressor equipped with a tiled grating, such a coherent addition is indispensable in order to maximize the intensity in the laser far field. We present measurements in this context where, up to now, an unavoidable difference in the grating constants between the phased gratings reduced the maximum achievable intensity. The method significantly facilitates the high-precision alignment of a tiled grating compressor and could also be used for a coherent addition of laser pulses. PMID:20548390

  12. Microbeam studies of the sensitivity of structures within living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braby, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    Determining the biological effects of low doses of radiation with high linear energy transfer (LET) is complicated by the stochastic nature of charged-particle interactions. Populations of cells exposed to very low radiation doses contain a few cells which have been hit by a charged particle, while the majority of the cells receive no radiation damage. At somewhat higher doses, a few cells receive two or more events. Because the effects of damage produced by separate events can interact in the cell, we have had to make assumptions about the nature of these interactions in order to interpret the results of the experiments. Many of those assumptions can be tested if we can be sure of the number of charged-particle events which occur in individual cells, and correlate this number with the biological effect. We have developed a special irradiation facility at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to control the actual number of charged particle tracks that pass through cell nuclei. The beam from a 2 MeV tandem accelerator is collimated to approximately 5 microns. Cells, grown in special dishes with 1.5 microns thick plastic bottoms, are positioned so that the desired portion of the cell aligns with the collimator. A shutter in the beam line is opened and closed after the desired number of particle tracks has been counted. This approach can be used to investigate the effects of the interaction between irradiated and unirradiated cells in an organized system, as well as to study the effects of spatial and temporal distribution of radiation damage within single cells.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  13. Lidar studies on climate sensitivity characteristics of tropical cirrus clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motty, G. S.; Jayeshlal, G. S.; Satyanarayana, Malladi; Mahadevan Pillai, V. P.

    2016-05-01

    The cirrus clouds play an important role in the Earth's radiation budget due to their high frequency of occurrence, non-spherical ice crystal formations, and variability in the scattering/absorption characteristics. Mostly, the tropical cirrus clouds are considered as greenhouse modulators. Thus the parameterization of tropical cirrus clouds in terms of the micro- physical properties and the corresponding radiative effects are highly important for the climate studies. For characterizing the radiative properties of cirrus clouds, which depend on the size, shape and number of the ice crystals, the knowledge of extinction coefficient (σ) and optical depth (τ) are necessary. The σ provides information needed for understanding the influence of the scatterers on the radiative budget whereas the τ gives an indication on the composition and thickness of the cloud. Extensive research on the tropical cirrus clouds has been carried out by using a ground based and satellite based lidar systems. In this work, the characteristics of tropical cirrus cloud derived by using the data from the ground based lidar system over the tropical site Gadanki [13.5°N, 79.2°E], India during 2010 are presented. Some of the results are compared with those obtained by us from satellite based CALIOP lidar observations of the CALIPSO mission. It is observed that there is a strong dependence of the some of the physical properties such as occurrence height, cloud temperature and the geometrical thickness on the microphysical parameters in terms of extinction coefficient and optical depth. The correlation of both the σ and τ with temperature is also observed.

  14. A taxometric study of the latent structure of disgust sensitivity: converging evidence for dimensionality.

    PubMed

    Olatunji, Bunmi O; Broman-Fulks, Joshua J

    2007-12-01

    Disgust sensitivity has recently been implicated as a specific vulnerability factor for several anxiety-related disorders. However, it is not clear whether disgust sensitivity is a dimensional or categorical phenomenon. The present study examined the latent structure of disgust by applying three taxometric procedures (maximum eigenvalue, mean above minus below a cut, and latent-mode factor analysis) to data collected from 2 large nonclinical samples on 2 different measures of disgust sensitivity. Disgust sensitivity in the first sample (n=1,153) was operationalized by disgust reactions to food, animals, body products, sex, body envelope violations, death, hygiene, and sympathetic magic, as assessed by the Disgust Sensitivity Scale (J. Haidt, C. McCauley, & P. Rozin, 1994). Disgust Sensitivity Scale indicators of core, animal reminder, and contamination disgust were also examined in the 1st sample. Disgust sensitivity in the 2nd independent sample (n=1,318) was operationalized by disgust reactions to animals, injections and blood draws, mutilation and death, rotting foods, and odors, as assessed by the Disgust Emotion Scale (R. A. Kleinknecht, E. E. Kleinknecht, & R. M. Thorndike, 1997). Results across both samples provide converging evidence that disgust sensitivity is best conceptualized as a dimensional construct, present to a greater or lesser extent in all individuals. These findings are discussed in relation to the conceptualization and assessment of disgust sensitivity as a specific dimensional vulnerability for certain anxiety and related disorders. PMID:18085936

  15. Spectral sensitivity studies on the visual system of the praying mantis, Tenodera sinensis.

    PubMed

    Sontag, C

    1971-01-01

    In these studies a constant ERG response was used as a measure of visual sensitivity to different wavelengths of light. The dark-adapted compound eye of Tenodera sinensis is dominated by a single class of photoreceptors. with a major peak of sensitivity at about 510-520 nm, and with a minor peak of sensitivity in the near-ultraviolet region at about 370 nm. The dark-adapted dorsal ocellus does not contain a homogeneous population of sensory receptors. The sensitivity function of the dark-adapted ocellus to longer wavelength light (yellow and red) is determined by a single receptor with a major peak of sensitivity in the green at 510-520 nm with some sensitivity in the near-ultraviolet. Sensitivity at shorter wavelengths (near-ultraviolet and blue), however, involves the stimulation of both this and a near-ultraviolet-sensitive receptor with a maximum sensitivity at about 370 nm. Anatomically, the sensory cells of the dorsal ocellus of Tenodera were determined histologically to be grouped into two distinct regions, each group making its own separate contribution to the ocellar nerve. This may represent the separation of two different photoreceptor types in the ocellus of the mantis. PMID:5539340

  16. CRETACEOUS CLIMATE SENSITIVITY STUDY USING DINOSAUR & PLANT PALEOBIOGEOGRAPHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, A.; Main, D. J.; Noto, C. R.; Moore, T. L.; Scotese, C.

    2009-12-01

    differed markedly from the present. Studies of past biotas and their changes may elucidate the role of climatic and geographic factors in driving changes in species distributions, ecosystem organization, and evolutionary dynamics over time.

  17. Dentine sensitivity risk factors: A case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Mafla, Ana Cristina; Lopez-Moncayo, Luis Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the clinical and psychological risk factors associated with dentine hypersensitivity (DH) in order to provide an early diagnosis and preventive therapy. Materials and Methods: A nested case–control study was design between 2011 and 2012. A total of 61 DH cases and 122 controls participated in this investigation. Cases and controls were matched for sex, group of age and socioeconomic status in a ratio of 1:2. DH to different stimuli such as cold, heat, acid, and sweet was asked in patient interviews, and dental examinations were used to detect DH. Clinical and psychological risk factors such as dental hygiene, periodontal disease, acid diet, alcohol consumption, psychological stress, and psychopathological symptoms were inquired. Psychological stress was measured through the PSS-10 and psychopathological symptoms were evaluated by SCL-90-R in Spanish. Descriptive and univariate binary logistic regression analysis were performed to estimate the association between clinical and psychological risk factors and the presence of DH. Results: Toothpaste abrasivity (odds ratio [OR] 1.881, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.010–3.502, P = 0.045), gingival recession (OR 2.196, 95% CI 1.020–4.728, P = 0.041), and periodontal therapy (OR 5.357, 95% CI 2.051–13.993, P < 0.001) were associated with DH. Subjects with perceived stress (OR 1.211, 95%, CI 0.518–2.833, P = 0.658), obsessive-compulsive (OR 1.266, 95%, CI 0.494–3.240, P = 0.623) and hostility (OR 1.235, 95%, CI 0.507–3.007, P = 0.642) symptoms had a clinical greater odd of DH. Conclusion: Oral hygiene products and periodontal conditions are important risk factors for DH. Individuals with perceived stress, obsessive-compulsive, and hostility symptoms may increase a clinical risk for this entity. Targeting to dental counseling focused on oral hygiene products, periodontal therapy and a psychological evaluation may be promising in DH prevention. PMID:27011732

  18. Comparative study of dimensional accuracy of different impression techniques using addition silicone impression material.

    PubMed

    Penaflor, C F; Semacio, R C; De Las Alas, L T; Uy, H G

    1998-01-01

    This study compared dimensional accuracy of the single, double with spacer, double with cut-out and double mix impression technique using addition silicone impression material. A typhodont containing Ivorine teeth model with six (6) full-crown tooth preparations were used as the positive control. Two stone replication models for each impression technique were made as test materials. Accuracy of the techniques were assessed by measuring four dimensions on the stone dies poured from the impression of the Ivorine teeth model. Results indicated that most of the measurements for the height, width and diameter slightly decreased and a few increased compared with the Ivorine teeth model. The double with cut-out and double mix technique presents the least difference from the master model as compared to the two latter impression techniques. PMID:10202524

  19. Spectroscopic studies of nucleic acid additions during seed-mediated growth of gold nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Tapp, Maeling; Sullivan, Rick; Dennis, Patrick; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of adding nucleic acids to gold seeds during the growth stage of either nanospheres or nanorods was investigated using UV-Vis spectroscopy to reveal any oligonucleotide base or structure-specific effects on nanoparticle growth kinetics or plasmonic signatures. Spectral data indicate that the presence of DNA duplexes during seed ageing drastically accelerated nanosphere growth while the addition of single-stranded polyadenine at any point during seed ageing induces nanosphere aggregation. For seeds added to a gold nanorod growth solution, single-stranded polythymine induces a modest blue-shift in the longitudinal peak wavelength. Moreover, a particular sequence comprised of 50% thymine bases was found to induce a faster, more dramatic blue-shift in the longitudinal peak wavelength compared to any of the homopolymer incubation cases. Monomeric forms of the nucleic acids, however, do not yield discernable spectral differences in any of the gold suspensions studied. PMID:25960601

  20. Study on Friction and Wear Properties of Silver Matrix Brush Material with Different Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaoli; Wang, Wenfang; Hong, Yu; Wu, Yucheng

    2013-07-01

    Friction and wear processes of AgCuX (G, CF and AlN) composites-CuAgV alloy friction pair and effects of different additive content in silver based composite on friction and wear behavior are studied in this paper. The microstructure of the brush wear surface is observed by SEM. The results show that when graphite content is up to 9 wt.%, Ag-Cu-CF-G composite exhibits the best wear properties; when the content of aluminum nitride is up to 0.5 wt.%, Ag-Cu-AlN-G composites has the most comprehensive performance. The wear loss of both composites arises with the increase of both pressure and speed, but when speed reaches a critical value, the increased amplitude of wear loss tends to be steady.

  1. Genetic assessment of additional endophenotypes from the Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Tiffany A; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Calkins, Monica E; Freedman, Robert; Green, Michael F; Gur, Raquel E; Gur, Ruben C; Light, Gregory A; Nuechterlein, Keith H; Olincy, Ann; Radant, Allen D; Seidman, Larry J; Siever, Larry J; Silverman, Jeremy M; Stone, William S; Sugar, Catherine A; Swerdlow, Neal R; Tsuang, Debby W; Tsuang, Ming T; Turetsky, Bruce I; Braff, David L

    2016-01-01

    The Consortium on the Genetics of Schizophrenia Family Study (COGS-1) has previously reported our efforts to characterize the genetic architecture of 12 primary endophenotypes for schizophrenia. We now report the characterization of 13 additional measures derived from the same endophenotype test paradigms in the COGS-1 families. Nine of the measures were found to discriminate between schizophrenia patients and controls, were significantly heritable (31 to 62%), and were sufficiently independent of previously assessed endophenotypes, demonstrating utility as additional endophenotypes. Genotyping via a custom array of 1536 SNPs from 94 candidate genes identified associations for CTNNA2, ERBB4, GRID1, GRID2, GRIK3, GRIK4, GRIN2B, NOS1AP, NRG1, and RELN across multiple endophenotypes. An experiment-wide p value of 0.003 suggested that the associations across all SNPs and endophenotypes collectively exceeded chance. Linkage analyses performed using a genome-wide SNP array further identified significant or suggestive linkage for six of the candidate endophenotypes, with several genes of interest located beneath the linkage peaks (e.g., CSMD1, DISC1, DLGAP2, GRIK2, GRIN3A, and SLC6A3). While the partial convergence of the association and linkage likely reflects differences in density of gene coverage provided by the distinct genotyping platforms, it is also likely an indication of the differential contribution of rare and common variants for some genes and methodological differences in detection ability. Still, many of the genes implicated by COGS through endophenotypes have been identified by independent studies of common, rare, and de novo variation in schizophrenia, all converging on a functional genetic network related to glutamatergic neurotransmission that warrants further investigation. PMID:26597662

  2. Updating Mars-GRAM to Increase the Accuracy of Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hiliary L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) is an engineering-level atmospheric model widely used for diverse mission applications. Mars-GRAM s perturbation modeling capability is commonly used, in a Monte-Carlo mode, to perform high fidelity engineering end-to-end simulations for entry, descent, and landing (EDL). During the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process, it was discovered that Mars-GRAM, when used for sensitivity studies for MapYear=0 and large optical depth values such as tau=3, is less than realistic. From the surface to 80 km altitude, Mars-GRAM is based on the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM). MGCM results that were used for Mars-GRAM with MapYear set to 0 were from a MGCM run with a fixed value of tau=3 for the entire year at all locations. This has resulted in an imprecise atmospheric density at all altitudes. As a preliminary fix to this pressure-density problem, density factor values were determined for tau=0.3, 1 and 3 that will adjust the input values of MGCM MapYear 0 pressure and density to achieve a better match of Mars-GRAM MapYear 0 with Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) observations for MapYears 1 and 2 at comparable dust loading. Currently, these density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls. Results will be presented from work being done to derive better multipliers by including variation with latitude and/or Ls by comparison of MapYear 0 output directly against TES limb data. The addition of these more precise density factors to Mars-GRAM 2005 Release 1.4 will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths.

  3. Serum Potassium and Glucose Regulation in the ADDITION-Leicester Screening Study

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Patrice; Bodicoat, Danielle H.; Quinn, Lauren M.; Zaccardi, Francesco; Webb, David R.; Khunti, Kamlesh; Davies, Melanie J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Previous observational studies have shown conflicting results between plasma K+ concentrations and risk of type 2 diabetes. To help clarify the evidence we aimed to determine whether an association existed between serum K+ and glucose regulation within a UK multiethnic population. Methods. Participants were recruited as part of the ADDITION Leicester study, a population based screening study. Individuals from primary care between the age of 40 and 75 years if White European or 25 and 75 years if South Asian or Afro Caribbean were recruited. Tests for associations between baseline characteristics and K+ quartiles were conducted using linear regression models. Results. Data showed individuals in the lowest K+ quartile had significantly greater 2-hour glucose levels (0.53 mmol/L, 95% CI: 0.36 to 0.70, P ≤ 0.001) than those in the highest K+ quartile. This estimation did not change with adjustment for potential confounders. Conversely, participants in the lowest K+ quartile had a 0.14% lower HbA1c (95% CI −0.19 to −0.10: P ≤ 0.001) compared to those in the highest K+ quartile. Conclusion. This cross-sectional analysis demonstrated that lower K+ was associated with greater 2 hr glucose. The data supports the possibility that K+ may influence glucose regulation and further research is warranted. PMID:25883988

  4. Study of triallyl phosphate as an electrolyte additive for high voltage lithium-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, J.; Madec, L.; Ma, L.; Ellis, L. D.; Qiu, W.; Nelson, K. J.; Lu, Z.; Dahn, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    The role of triallyl phosphate as an electrolyte additive in Li(Ni0.42Mn0.42Co0.16)O2/graphite pouch cells was studied using ex-situ gas measurements, ultra high precision coulometry, automated storage experiments, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, long-term cycling and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cells containing triallyl phosphate produced less gas during formation, cycling and storage than control cells. The use of triallyl phosphate led to higher coulombic efficiency and smaller charge endpoint capacity slippage during ultra high precision charger testing. Cells containing triallyl phosphate showed smaller potential drop during 500 h storage at 40 °C and 60 °C and the voltage drop decreased as the triallyl phosphate content in the electrolyte increased. However, large amounts of triallyl phosphate (>3% by weight in the electrolyte) led to large impedance after cycling and storage. Symmetric cell studies showed large amounts of triallyl phosphate (5% or more) led to significant impedance increase at both negative and positive electrodes. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies suggested that the high impedance came from the polymerization of triallyl phosphate molecules which formed thick solid electrolyte interphase films at the surfaces of both negative and positive electrodes. An optimal amount of 2%-3% triallyl phosphate led to better capacity retention during long term cycling.

  5. A five-year study of the impact of nitrogen addition on methane uptake in alpine grassland

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Ping; Li, Kaihui; Gong, Yanming; Hu, Yukun; Mohammat, Anwar; Christie, Peter; Liu, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    It remains unclear how nitrogen (N) deposition affects soil methane (CH4) uptake in semiarid and arid zones. An in situ field experiment was conducted from 2010 to 2014 to systematically study the effect of various N application rates (0, 10, 30, and 90 kg N ha−1 yr−1) on CH4 flux in alpine grassland in the Tianshan Mountains. No significant influence of N addition on CH4 uptake was found. Initially the CH4 uptake rate increased with increasing N application rate by up to 11.5% in 2011 and then there was gradual inhibition by 2014. However, the between-year variability in CH4 uptake was very highly significant with average uptake ranging from 52.9 to 106.6 μg C m−2 h−1 and the rate depended largely on seasonal variability in precipitation and temperature. CH4 uptake was positively correlated with soil temperature, air temperature and to a lesser extent with precipitation, and was negatively correlated with soil moisture and NO3−-N content. The results indicate that between-year variability in CH4 uptake was impacted by precipitation and temperature and was not sensitive to elevated N deposition in alpine grassland. PMID:27571892

  6. A five-year study of the impact of nitrogen addition on methane uptake in alpine grassland.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ping; Li, Kaihui; Gong, Yanming; Hu, Yukun; Mohammat, Anwar; Christie, Peter; Liu, Xuejun

    2016-01-01

    It remains unclear how nitrogen (N) deposition affects soil methane (CH4) uptake in semiarid and arid zones. An in situ field experiment was conducted from 2010 to 2014 to systematically study the effect of various N application rates (0, 10, 30, and 90 kg N ha(-1) yr(-1)) on CH4 flux in alpine grassland in the Tianshan Mountains. No significant influence of N addition on CH4 uptake was found. Initially the CH4 uptake rate increased with increasing N application rate by up to 11.5% in 2011 and then there was gradual inhibition by 2014. However, the between-year variability in CH4 uptake was very highly significant with average uptake ranging from 52.9 to 106.6 μg C m(-2) h(-1) and the rate depended largely on seasonal variability in precipitation and temperature. CH4 uptake was positively correlated with soil temperature, air temperature and to a lesser extent with precipitation, and was negatively correlated with soil moisture and NO3(-)-N content. The results indicate that between-year variability in CH4 uptake was impacted by precipitation and temperature and was not sensitive to elevated N deposition in alpine grassland. PMID:27571892

  7. Experimental Study of Disruption of Columnar Grains During Rapid Solidification in Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manogharan, Guha; Yelamanchi, Bharat; Aman, Ronald; Mahbooba, Zaynab

    2016-03-01

    Over the years, many studies have been conducted to study and analyze the grain structures of metal alloys during additive manufacturing to improve mechanical properties. In particular, columnar grains are observed predominantly during rapid solidification of molten metal. This leads to lower mechanical properties and requires expensive secondary heat-treatment processes. This study is aimed at disrupting the formation of columnar grain growth during rapid solidification using ultrasonic vibration and analyzes the effects on grain structure and mechanical properties. A gas-metal arc welder mounted on a Rep-Rap-based low-cost metal 3 Dimension printer was used to deposit ER70S-6 mild steel layers on a plate. A contact-type ultrasonic transducer with a control system to vary the frequency and power of the vibration was used. The effects of ultrasonic vibration were determined from the statistical analysis of microstructure and micro-indentation techniques on the deposited layer and heat-affected zone. It was found that both frequency and interaction between frequency and power had significant impact on the refinement of average grain size up to 10.64% and increased the number of grains by approximately 41.78%. Analysis of micro-indentation tests showed that there was an increase of approximately 14.30% in micro-hardness due to the applied frequency during rapid solidification. A pole diagram shows that application of vibration causes randomization of grain orientation. Along with the results from this study, further efforts in modeling and experimentation of multi-directional vibrations would lead to a better understanding of disrupting columnar grains in applications that use mechanical vibrations, such as welding, directed energy deposition, brazing, etc.

  8. Synthesis, Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and DNA Interaction Studies of Copper Complex Containing Food Additive Carmoisine Dye.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Akbari, Alireza; Jamshidbeigi, Mina; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-06-01

    A copper complex of carmoisine dye; [Cu(carmoisine)2(H2O)2]; was synthesized and characterized by using physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding of this complex with calf thymus (ct) DNA was investigated by circular dichroism, absorption studies, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. UV-vis results confirmed that the Cu complex interacted with DNA to form a ground-state complex and the observed binding constant (2× 10(4) M(-1)) is more in keeping with the groove bindings with DNA. Furthermore, the viscosity measurement result showed that the addition of complex causes no significant change on DNA viscosity and it indicated that the intercalation mode is ruled out. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played major roles in the reaction. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that the complex can change the conformation of DNA from B-like form toward A-like conformation. The cytotoxicity studies of the carmoisine dye and its copper complex indicated that both of them had anticancer effects on HT-29 (colon cancer) cell line and they may be new candidates for treatment of the colon cancer. PMID:27152751

  9. Percutaneous Dorsal Instrumentation of Vertebral Burst Fractures: Value of Additional Percutaneous Intravertebral Reposition—Cadaver Study

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Antonio; Schmuck, Maya; Noriega, David C.; Ruchholtz, Steffen; Baroud, Gamal; Oberkircher, Ludwig

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The treatment of vertebral burst fractures is still controversial. The aim of the study is to evaluate the purpose of additional percutaneous intravertebral reduction when combined with dorsal instrumentation. Methods. In this biomechanical cadaver study twenty-eight spine segments (T11-L3) were used (male donors, mean age 64.9 ± 6.5 years). Burst fractures of L1 were generated using a standardised protocol. After fracture all spines were allocated to four similar groups and randomised according to surgical techniques (posterior instrumentation; posterior instrumentation + intravertebral reduction device + cement augmentation; posterior instrumentation + intravertebral reduction device without cement; and intravertebral reduction device + cement augmentation). After treatment, 100000 cycles (100–600 N, 3 Hz) were applied using a servohydraulic loading frame. Results. Overall anatomical restoration was better in all groups where the intravertebral reduction device was used (p < 0.05). In particular, it was possible to restore central endplates (p > 0.05). All techniques decreased narrowing of the spinal canal. After loading, clearance could be maintained in all groups fitted with the intravertebral reduction device. Narrowing increased in the group treated with dorsal instrumentation. Conclusions. For height and anatomical restoration, the combination of an intravertebral reduction device with dorsal instrumentation showed significantly better results than sole dorsal instrumentation. PMID:26137481

  10. Density functional theory study of the effects of alloying additions on sulfur adsorption on nickel surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malyi, Oleksandr I.; Chen, Zhong; Kulish, Vadym V.; Bai, Kewu; Wu, Ping

    2013-01-01

    Reactions of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with Nickel/Ytrria-doped zirconia (Ni/YDZ) anode materials might cause degradation of the performance of solid oxide fuel cells when S containing fuels are used. In this paper, we employ density functional theory to investigate S adsorption on metal (M)-doped and undoped Ni(0 0 1) and Ni(1 1 1) surfaces. Based on the performed calculations, we analyze the effects of 12 alloying additions (Ag, Au, Al, Bi, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Sn, Sb, V, and Zn) on the temperature of transition between clean (S atoms do not adsorb on the surfaces) and contaminated (S atoms can adsorb on the surfaces spontaneously) M-doped Ni surfaces for different concentrations of H2S in the fuel. Predicted results are consistent with many experimental studies relevant to S poisoning of both Ni/YDZ and M-doped Ni/YDZ anode materials. This study is important to understand S poisoning phenomena and to develop new S tolerant anode materials.

  11. Evidence of Rapidly Warming Rivers in the UK from an Extensive Additive Modelling Study at the National Scale Using R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpson, G. L.

    2011-12-01

    River water temperature data exhibit non-linear behaviour over the past 50 or so years. Standard techniques for identifying and quantifying trends have centred around the use of linear regression and Mann-Kendall and Thiel-Sen procedures. Observational data from UK rivers suggest that temperatures are far more variable then assumed under these statistical models. In a national-scale assessment of the response of riverine systems to global climatic change, an additive model framework was employed to model patterns in water temperatures from a large database of temporal observational data. Models were developed using R, which allowed for the deployment of cutting-edge additive modelling techniques to describe trends at 2773 sites across England and Wales, UK. At a subset of sites, additive models were used to model long-term trends, trends within seasons and the long-term variation in the seasonal pattern of water temperatures. Changes in water temperature have important consequences for aquatic ecology, with some species being particularly sensitive even to small shifts in temperature during some or all of their lifecycle. While there are many studies reporting increasing regional and global air temperatures, evidence for changes in river water temperature has thus far been site specific and/or from sites heavily influenced by human activities that could themselves lead to warming. Here I present selected results from a national-scale assessment of changing river water temperatures, covering the whole of England and Wales, comprising data from 2,773 locations. Positive trends in water temperature were observed at 86% of sites. At a subset of sites, seasonal trend models were developed, which showed that 90% of locations demonstrated statistically significant increases in water temperature during Autumn and Winter periods. Multivariate smoothers, that allow for within-year and longer-term trend interactions in time, suggest that periods of warmer waters now extend

  12. Telomere Shortening Sensitizes Cancer Cells to Selected Cytotoxic Agents: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies and Putative Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Uziel, Orit; Beery, Einat; Dronichev, Vladimir; Samocha, Katty; Gryaznov, Sergei; Weiss, Lola; Slavin, Shimon; Kushnir, Michal; Nordenberg, Yardena; Rabinowitz, Claudette; Rinkevich, Baruch; Zehavi, Tania; Lahav, Meir

    2010-01-01

    Background Telomere/telomerase system has been recently recognized as an attractive target for anticancer therapy. Telomerase inhibition results in tumor regression and increased sensitivity to various cytotoxic drugs. However, it has not been fully established yet whether the mediator of these effects is telomerase inhibition per se or telomere shortening resulting from inhibition of telomerase activity. In addition, the characteristics and mechanisms of sensitization to cytotoxic drugs caused by telomerase inhibition has not been elucidated in a systematic manner. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we characterized the relative importance of telomerase inhibition versus telomere shortening in cancer cells. Sensitization of cancer cells to cytotoxic drugs was achieved by telomere shortening in a length dependent manner and not by telomerase inhibition per se. In our system this sensitization was related to the mechanism of action of the cytotoxic drug. In addition, telomere shortening affected also other cancer cell functions such as migration. Telomere shortening induced DNA damage whose repair was impaired after administration of cisplatinum while doxorubicin or vincristine did not affect the DNA repair. These findings were verified also in in vivo mouse model. The putative explanation underlying the phenotype induced by telomere shortening may be related to changes in expression of various microRNAs triggered by telomere shortening. Conclusions/Significance To our best knowledge this is the first study characterizing the relative impact of telomerase inhibition and telomere shortening on several aspects of cancer cell phenotype, especially related to sensitivity to cytotoxic drugs and its putative mechanisms. The microRNA changes in cancer cells upon telomere shortening are novel information. These findings may facilitate the development of telomere based approaches in treatment of cancer. PMID:20161752

  13. Using laser diagnostics for studying the injection of a dry additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokunov, Iu. M.; Zhilin, V. G.; Liuliukin, V. I.; Mostinskii, I. L.; Putin, Iu. A.

    1987-02-01

    In MHD generators using an ionizing additive, the uniform injection of the additive into the combustion chamber and the dispersity of the injected particles are important. Some of the problems associated with the injection of an ionizing additive can be alleviated by using dry additives. In the experiment reported here, an He-Ne laser was used to monitor the injection of potash powder with an average size of 40 microns. It is shown that laser diagnostics can be successfully used to determine the mean particle diameter and variation of the powder flow rate with time.

  14. Evaluation of additional head of biceps brachii: a study with autopsy material.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros, L E; Forero, P L; Buitrago, E R

    2014-05-01

    Additional head of the biceps brachii (AHBB) has been reported in different population groups with a frequency of 1-25%. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and morphologic expression of the AHBB as determined in a sample of the Colombian population. An exploration was conducted with 106 arms corresponding to unclaimed corpses autopsied at Institute of Legal and Forensic Medicine of Bucaramanga, Colombia. Using medial incision involvingskin, subcutaneous tissue, and brachial fascia, the heads of the biceps and their innervating branches were visualised. One AHBB was observed in 21 (19.8%) of the arms evaluated, with non-significant difference (p = 0.568) per side of presentation: 11 (52.4%) cases on the right side and 10 (47.6%) on the left side. All AHBBs were originated in the infero-medial segment of the humerus, with a mean thickness of 17.8 ± 6.8 mm. In 4 (19%) cases the fascicle was thin, less than 10 mm; in 7 (33.3%) cases it was of medium thickness, between 11 and 20 mm, whereas in 47.6% it was longer than 20 mm. The length of the AHBB was 118.3 ± 26.8 mm; its motor point supplied by the musculocutaneous nerve was located at 101.3 ± 20.9 mm of the bi-epicondylar line. The incidence of AHBB in this study is located at the upper segment of what has been reportedin the literature and could be a morphologic trait of the Colombian population; in agreement with prior studies, the origin was the infero-medial surface of the humerus. PMID:24902098

  15. A parametric sensitivity study for single-stage-to-orbit hypersonic vehicles using trajectory optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, T. Alan; Schmidt, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    The class of hypersonic vehicle configurations with single stage-to-orbit (SSTO) capability reflect highly integrated airframe and propulsion systems. These designs are also known to exhibit a large degree of interaction between the airframe and engine dynamics. Consequently, even simplified hypersonic models are characterized by tightly coupled nonlinear equations of motion. In addition, hypersonic SSTO vehicles present a major system design challenge; the vehicle's overall mission performance is a function of its subsystem efficiencies including structural, aerodynamic, propulsive, and operational. Further, all subsystem efficiencies are interrelated, hence, independent optimization of the subsystems is not likely to lead to an optimum design. Thus, it is desired to know the effect of various subsystem efficiencies on overall mission performance. For the purposes of this analysis, mission performance will be measured in terms of the payload weight inserted into orbit. In this report, a trajectory optimization problem is formulated for a generic hypersonic lifting body for a specified orbit-injection mission. A solution method is outlined, and results are detailed for the generic vehicle, referred to as the baseline model. After evaluating the performance of the baseline model, a sensitivity study is presented to determine the effect of various subsystem efficiencies on mission performance. This consists of performing a parametric analysis of the basic design parameters, generating a matrix of configurations, and determining the mission performance of each configuration. Also, the performance loss due to constraining the total head load experienced by the vehicle is evaluated. The key results from this analysis include the formulation of the sizing problem for this vehicle class using trajectory optimization, characteristics of the optimal trajectories, and the subsystem design sensitivities.

  16. Validation of FSP Reactor Design with Sensitivity Studies of Beryllium-Reflected Critical Assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall

    2013-02-01

    The baseline design for space nuclear power is a fission surface power (FSP) system: sodium-potassium (NaK) cooled, fast spectrum reactor with highly-enriched-uranium (HEU)-O2 fuel, stainless steel (SS) cladding, and beryllium reflectors with B4C control drums. Previous studies were performed to evaluate modeling capabilities and quantify uncertainties and biases associated with analysis methods and nuclear data. Comparison of Zero Power Plutonium Reactor (ZPPR)-20 benchmark experiments with the FSP design indicated that further reduction of the total design model uncertainty requires the reduction in uncertainties pertaining to beryllium and uranium cross-section data. Further comparison with three beryllium-reflected HEU-metal benchmark experiments performed at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) concluded the requirement that experimental validation data have similar cross section sensitivities to those found in the FSP design. A series of critical experiments was performed at ORCEF in the 1960s to support the Medium Power Reactor Experiment (MPRE) space reactor design. The small, compact critical assembly (SCCA) experiments were graphite- or beryllium-reflected assemblies of SS-clad, HEU-O2 fuel on a vertical lift machine. All five configurations were evaluated as benchmarks. Two of the five configurations were beryllium reflected, and further evaluated using the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis capabilities of SCALE 6.1. Validation of the example FSP design model was successful in reducing the primary uncertainty constituent, the Be(n,n) reaction, from 0.28 %dk/k to 0.0004 %dk/k. Further assessment of additional reactor physics measurements performed on the SCCA experiments may serve to further validate FSP design and operation.

  17. Increased Risk of Additional Cancers Among Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James D.; Ma, Grace L.; Baumgartner, Joel M.; Madlensky, Lisa; Burgoyne, Adam M.; Tang, Chih-Min; Martinez, Maria Elena; Sicklick, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are considered non-hereditary or sporadic. However, single-institution studies suggest that GIST patients develop additional malignancies with increased frequencies. We hypothesized that we could gain greater insight into possible associations between GIST and other malignancies using a national cancer database inquiry. Methods Patients diagnosed with GIST (2001–2011) in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database were included. Standardized prevalence ratios (SPRs) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to quantify cancer risks incurred by GIST patients before and after GIST diagnoses, respectively, when compared with the general U.S. population. Results Of 6,112 GIST patients, 1,047 (17.1%) had additional cancers. There were significant increases in overall cancer rates: 44% (SPR=1.44) before diagnosis and 66% (SIR=1.66) after GIST diagnoses. Malignancies with significantly increased occurrence both before/after diagnoses included other sarcomas (SPR=5.24/SIR=4.02), neuroendocrine-carcinoid tumors (SPR=3.56/SIR=4.79), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (SPR=1.69/SIR=1.76), and colorectal adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.51/SIR=2.16). Esophageal adenocarcinoma (SPR=12.0), bladder adenocarcinoma (SPR=7.51), melanoma (SPR=1.46), and prostate adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.20) were significantly more common only before GIST. Ovarian carcinoma (SIR=8.72), small intestine adenocarcinoma (SIR=5.89), papillary thyroid cancer (SIR=5.16), renal cell carcinoma (SIR=4.46), hepatobiliary adenocarcinomas (SIR=3.10), gastric adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.70), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.03), uterine adenocarcinoma (SIR=1.96), non-small cell lung cancer (SIR=1.74), and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (SIR=1.65) were significantly more common only after GIST. Conclusion This is the first population-based study to characterize the associations and temporal relationships between GIST and other cancers, both by site and

  18. Mathematical modelling and study of the encoding readout scheme for position sensitive detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Xiaoguang; Zeng, Ming; Zeng, Zhi; Wang, Yi; Wang, Xuewu; Zhao, Ziran; Cheng, Jianping; Kang, Kejun

    2016-04-01

    Encoding readout methods based on different schemes have been successfully developed and tested with different types of position-sensitive detectors with strip-readout structures. However, how to construct an encoding scheme in a more general and systematic way is still under study. In this paper, we present a graph model for the encoding scheme. With this model, encoding schemes can be studied in a more systematic way. It is shown that by using an encoding readout method, a maximum of n (n - 1)/2 + 1 strips can be processed with n channels if n is odd, while a maximum of n (n - 2)/2 + 2 strips can be processed with n channels if n is even. Furthermore, based on the model, the encoding scheme construction problem can be translated into a problem in graph theory, the aim of which is to construct an Eulerian trail such that the length of the shortest subcycle is as long as possible. A more general approach to constructing the encoding scheme is found by solving the associated mathematical problem. In addition, an encoding scheme prototype has been constructed, and verified with MRPC detectors.

  19. Observed sensitivity during family interactions and cumulative risk: A study of multiple dyads per family.

    PubMed

    Browne, Dillon T; Leckie, George; Prime, Heather; Perlman, Michal; Jenkins, Jennifer M

    2016-07-01

    The present study sought to investigate the family, individual, and dyad-specific contributions to observed cognitive sensitivity during family interactions. Moreover, the influence of cumulative risk on sensitivity at the aforementioned levels of the family was examined. Mothers and 2 children per family were observed interacting in a round robin design (i.e., mother-older sibling, mother younger-sibling and sibling-dyad, N = 385 families). Data were dyadic, in that there were 2 directional scores per interaction, and were analyzed using a multilevel formulation of the Social Relations Model. Variance partitioning revealed that cognitive sensitivity is simultaneously a function of families, individuals and dyads, though the importance of these components varies across family roles. Cognitive sensitivity for mothers was primarily attributable to individual differences, whereas cognitive sensitivity for children was predominantly attributable to family and dyadic differences, especially for youngest children. Cumulative risk explained family and individual variance in cognitive sensitivity, particularly when actors were older or in a position of relative competence or authority (i.e., mother to children, older to younger siblings). Overall, this study demonstrates that cognitive sensitivity operates across levels of family organization, and is negatively impacted by psychosocial risk. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27337515

  20. Additional Language Teaching within the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lebreton, Marlène

    2014-01-01

    The International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme supports the learning of languages and cultures, but the role of the additional language within this programme is often unclear. There remains a great variability in schools regarding the frequency of lessons and the way that the additional language is taught within the Primary Years…

  1. Beyond the Call of Duty: A Qualitative Study of Teachers' Additional Responsibilities Related to Sexuality Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eisenberg, Marla E.; Madsen, Nikki; Oliphant, Jennifer A.; Resnick, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Seven focus groups were conducted with sexuality educators in Minnesota to explore ways that teaching sexuality education differs from teaching other health education content and to determine if additional supports or resources are needed for sexuality educators. Teachers described many specific additional responsibilities or concerns related to…

  2. Experimental study of combustion characteristics of nanoscale metal and metal oxide additives in biofuel (ethanol)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the combustion behavior of nano-aluminum (n-Al) and nano-aluminum oxide (n-Al2O3) particles stably suspended in biofuel (ethanol) as a secondary energy carrier was conducted. The heat of combustion (HoC) was studied using a modified static bomb calorimeter system. Combustion element composition and surface morphology were evaluated using a SEM/EDS system. N-Al and n-Al2O3 particles of 50- and 36-nm diameters, respectively, were utilized in this investigation. Combustion experiments were performed with volume fractions of 1, 3, 5, 7, and 10% for n-Al, and 0.5, 1, 3, and 5% for n-Al2O3. The results indicate that the amount of heat released from ethanol combustion increases almost linearly with n-Al concentration. N-Al volume fractions of 1 and 3% did not show enhancement in the average volumetric HoC, but higher volume fractions of 5, 7, and 10% increased the volumetric HoC by 5.82, 8.65, and 15.31%, respectively. N-Al2O3 and heavily passivated n-Al additives did not participate in combustion reactively, and there was no contribution from Al2O3 to the HoC in the tests. A combustion model that utilized Chemical Equilibrium with Applications was conducted as well and was shown to be in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:21711760

  3. A theoretical study of wave dispersion and thermal conduction for HMX/additive interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yao; Chen, Jun

    2014-04-01

    The wave dispersion rule for non-uniform material is useful for ultrasonic inspection and engine life prediction, and also is key in achieving an understanding of the energy dissipation and thermal conduction properties of solid material. On the basis of linear response theory and molecular dynamics, we derive a set of formulas for calculating the wave dispersion rate of interface systems, and study four kinds of interfaces inside plastic bonded explosives: HMX/{HMX, TATB, F2312, F2313}. (HMX: octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine; TATB: 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene; F2312, F2313: fluoropolymers). The wave dispersion rate is obtained over a wide frequency range from kHz to PHz. We find that at low frequency, the rate is proportional to the square of the frequency, and at high frequency, the rate couples with the molecular vibration modes at the interface. By using the results, the thermal conductivities of HMX/additive interfaces are derived, and a physical model is built for describing the total thermal conductivity of mixture explosives, including HMX multi-particle systems and {TATB, F2312, F2313}-coated HMX.

  4. Addition reaction of alkyl radical to C60 fullerene: Density functional theory study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto; Kawabata, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    Functionalized fullerenes are known as a high-performance molecules. In this study, the alkyl-functionalized fullerenes (denoted by R-C60) have been investigated by means of the density functional theory (DFT) method to elucidate the effects of functionalization on the electronic states of fullerene. Also, the reaction mechanism of alkyl radicals with C60 was investigated. The methyl, ethyl, propyl, and butyl radicals (denoted by n = 1-4, where n means the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl radical) were examined as alkyl radicals. The DFT calculation showed that the alkyl radical binds to the carbon atom of C60 at the on-top site, and a strong C-C single bond is formed. The binding energies of alkyl radicals to C60 were distributed in the range of 31.8-35.1 kcal mol-1 at the CAM-B3LYP/6-311G(d,p) level. It was found that the activation barrier exists before alkyl addition, the barrier heights were calculated to be 2.1-2.8 kcal mol-1. The electronic states of R-C60 complexes were discussed on the basis of the theoretical results.

  5. Ecological Optimization and Parametric Study of an Irreversible Regenerative Modified Brayton Cycle with Isothermal Heat Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Sudhir K.; Kaushik, Subhash C.; Tiwari, Vivek

    2003-12-01

    An ecological optimization along with a detailed parametric study of an irreversible regenerative Brayton heat engine with isothermal heat addition have been carried out with external as well as internal irreversibilities. The ecological function is defined as the power output minus the power loss (irreversibility) which is ambient temperature times the entropy generation rate. The external irreversibility is due to finite temperature difference between the heat engine and the external reservoirs while the internal irreversibilities are due to nonisentropic compression and expansion processes in the compressor and the turbine respectively and the regenerative heat loss. The ecological function is found to be an increasing function of the isothermal-, sink- and regenerative-side effectiveness, isothermal-side inlet temperature, component efficiencies and sink-side temperature while it is found to be a decreasing function of the isobaric-side temperature and effectiveness and the working fluid heat capacitance rate. The effects of the isobaric-side effectiveness are found to be more than those of the other parameters and the effects of turbine efficiency are found to be more than those of the compressor efficiency on all the performance parameters of the cycle.

  6. Theoretical study of addition reactions of carbene, silylene, and germylene to carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ying-Ying; Su, Ming-Der

    2004-08-01

    A theoretical study of the mechanism of the reaction of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) with carbene (H 2C), silylene (H 2Si), and germylene (H 2Ge) has been carried out using a two-layered ONIOM(B3LYP/6-311G ∗:PM3) approach. The main findings are as follows: (1) The computational results based on the method used in this work are in good agreement with recent theoretical findings [Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 41 (2002) 1853]. That is, SWCNTs with H 2C, H 2Si, and H 2Ge addends favor opened structures rather than three-membered rings. (2) The greater the atomic number of the carbene center, the larger the activation energy and the less exothermic (or the more endothermic) the cycloaddition reaction becomes. Therefore, addition to the C dbnd C bond of a SWCNT is more difficult the heavier the carbene center. (3) The theoretical observations suggest that the singlet-triplet splitting of a carbene can be used as a guide to its reactivity during the SWCNT cycloaddition process.

  7. Sensitivity study of ice crystal optical properties in the 874 GHz submillimeter band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Guanglin; Yang, Ping; Wu, Dong L.

    2016-07-01

    Testing of an 874 GHz submillimeter radiometer on meteorological satellites is being planned to improve ice water content retrievals. In this paper we study the optical properties of ice cloud particles in the 874 GHz band. The results show that the bulk scattering and absorption coefficients of an ensemble of ice cloud particles are sensitive to the particle shape and effective diameter, whereas the latter is also sensitive to temperature. The co-polar back scattering cross-section is not sensitive to particle shape, temperature, and the effective diameter in the range of 50-200 μm.

  8. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  9. Neural correlates of anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder: A functional magnetic resonance imaging study.

    PubMed

    Poletti, Sara; Radaelli, Daniele; Cucchi, Michele; Ricci, Liana; Vai, Benedetta; Smeraldi, Enrico; Benedetti, Francesco

    2015-08-30

    Panic disorder has been associated with dysfunctional neuropsychological dimensions, including anxiety sensitivity. Brain-imaging studies of the neural correlates of emotional processing have identified a network of structures that constitute the neural circuitry for emotions. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) and insula, which are part of this network, are also involved in the processing of threat-related stimuli. The aim of the study was to investigate if neural activity in response to emotional stimuli in the cortico-limbic network is associated to anxiety sensitivity in panic disorder. In a sample of 18 outpatients with panic disorder, we studied neural correlates of implicit emotional processing of facial affect expressions with a face-matching paradigm; correlational analyses were performed between brain activations and anxiety sensitivity. The correlational analyses performed showed a positive correlation between anxiety sensitivity and brain activity during emotional processing in regions encompassing the PFC, ACC and insula. Our data seem to confirm that anxiety sensitivity is an important component of panic disorder. Accordingly, the neural underpinnings of anxiety sensitivity could be an interesting focus for treatment and further research. PMID:26071623

  10. A retrospective study of peanut and tree nut allergy: Sensitization and correlations with clinical manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lihua; Clements, Stacy

    2015-01-01

    Peanut (PN) and tree nut (TN) allergies are among the leading causes of fatal food-induced anaphylaxis and are increasing in prevalence, especially in children. Their cosensitization and concurrent clinical allergy have been understudied. This retrospective study investigated the correlation between PN and TN allergy, both in terms of in vitro sensitization (IVS) and clinical allergic manifestations. We conducted a retrospective medical record review at the Allergy Clinic at University Hospital of Brooklyn. Fourteen hundred six charts were reviewed, of which 76 (5.4%) had documented relevant clinical allergy: PN allergy but not TN allergy (n = 29) or TN allergy but not PN allergy (n = 11) or both (n = 30). Six patients with PN allergy but no TN exposure history were not included in the analysis. The majority of patients (67/76, 88.1%) had a concurrent history of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, or AD. Sensitivity of TN IVS predicting PN IVS was 38/39 (97%). Similarly, sensitivity of PN IVS predicting TN IVS was 38/42 (91%). Sensitivity of TN clinical allergy predicting PN allergy was 30/59 (51%). Sensitivity of PN clinical allergy predicting TN allergy was 30/41 (73%). The total number of organ systems involved in reported clinical reactions correlated with IVS to TN (p = 0.004) but not IVS to PN (p = 0.983). In summary, we found PN sensitization predicts TN sensitization in vitro, with lower predictability for clinical reactions. PMID:25860169

  11. Fortification of yogurts with different antioxidant preservatives: A comparative study between natural and synthetic additives.

    PubMed

    Caleja, Cristina; Barros, Lillian; Antonio, Amilcar L; Carocho, Márcio; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2016-11-01

    Consumers demand more and more so-called "natural" products and, therefore, the aim of this work was to compare the effects of natural versus synthetic antioxidant preservatives in yogurts. Matricaria recutita L. (chamomile) and Foeniculum vulgare Mill. (fennel) decoctions were tested as natural additives, while potassium sorbate (E202) was used as a synthetic additive. The fortification of yogurts with natural and synthetic antioxidants did not cause significant changes in the yoghurt pH and nutritional value, in comparison with control samples (yogurt without any additive). However, the fortified yogurts showed higher antioxidant activity, mainly the yogurts with natural additives (and among these, the ones with chamomile decoction). Overall, it can be concluded that plant decoctions can be used to develop novel yogurts, by replacing synthetic preservatives and improving the antioxidant properties of the final product, without changing the nutritional profile. PMID:27211646

  12. ALUM ADDITION AND STEP-FEED STUDIES IN OXYGEN-ACTIVATED SLUDGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A plug flow, O2-activated sludge process was operated with alum addition to remove phosphorus and with lime addition to prevent the process pH from decreasing below 6.4. The O2 reactor was operated at F/M ratios between 0.18 to 0.24 gm of BOD5/gm of MLVSS/day in a typical co-curr...

  13. Chemostat Studies of TCE-Dehalogenating Anaerobic Consortia under Excess and Limited Electron Donor Addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semprini, L.; Azizian, M.; Green, J.; Mayer-Blackwell, K.; Spormann, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    Two cultures - the Victoria Strain (VS) and the Evanite Strain (EV), enriched with the organohalide respiring bacteria Dehalococcoides mccartyi - were grown in chemostats for more than 4 years at a mean cell residence time of 50 days. The slow doubling rate represents growth likely experienced in the subsurface. The chemostats were fed formate as an electron donor and trichloroethene (TCE) as the terminal electron acceptor. Under excess formate conditions, stable operation was observed with respect to TCE transformation, steady-state hydrogen (H2) concentrations (40 nM), and the structure of the dehalogenating community. Both cultures completely transformed TCE to ethene, with minor amounts of vinyl chloride (VC) observed, along with acetate formation. When formate was limited, TCE was transformed incompletely to ethene (40-60%) and VC (60- 40%), and H2 concentrations ranged from 1 to 3 nM. The acetate concentration dropped below detection. Batch kinetic studies of TCE transformation with chemostat harvested cells found transformation rates of c-DCE and VC were greatly reduced when the cells were grown with limited formate. Upon increasing formate addition to the chemostats, from limited to excess, essentially complete transformation of TCE to ethene was achieved. The increase in formate was associated with an increase in H2 concentration and the production of acetate. Results of batch kinetic tests showed increases in transformation rates for TCE and c-DCE by factors of 3.5 and 2.5, respectively, while VC rates increased by factors of 33 to 500, over a six month period. Molecular analysis of chemostat samples is being performed to quantify the changes in copy numbers of reductase genes and to determine whether shifts in the strains of Dehalococcoides mccartyi where responsible for the observed rate increases. The results demonstrate the importance of electron donor supply for successful in-situ remediation.

  14. A study of the electrochemistry of nickel hydroxide electrodes with various additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wen-Hua; Ke, Jia-Jun; Yu, Hong-Mei; Zhang, Deng-Jun

    Nickel composite electrodes (NCE) with various additives are prepared by a chemical impregnation method from nitrate solutions on sintered porous plaques. The electrochemical properties, such as utilization of active material, swelling and the discharge potential of the nickel oxide electrode (NOE) are determined mainly through the composition of the active material and the characteristics of nickel plaques. Most additives (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba, Zn, Cd, Co, Li and Al hydroxide) exert effects on the discharge potential and swelling of the NOE. Chemical co-precipitation with the addition of calcium, zinc, magnesium and barium hydroxide increases the discharge potential by more than 20 mV, but that with zinc hydroxide results in an obvious decrease of active-material utilization and that with calcium and magnesium hydroxide produces a larger increase of electrode thickness. The effects of anion additives are also examined. Less than 1% mol of NiS in the active material increases the discharge potential. Cadmium, cobalt and zinc hydroxide are excellent additives for preventing swelling of the NCE. Slow voltammetry (0.2 mV s -1) in 6 M KOH is applied to characterize the oxygen-evolving potential of the NCE. The difference between the oxygen-evolution potential and the potential of the oxidation peak for the NCE with additives of calcium, lithium, barium and aluminium hydroxide is at least + 60 mV.

  15. Comparative study of inversion methods of three-dimensional NMR and sensitivity to fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maojin; Wang, Peng; Mao, Keyu

    2014-04-01

    Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (3D NMR) logging can simultaneously measure transverse relaxation time (T2), longitudinal relaxation time (T1), and diffusion coefficient (D). These parameters can be used to distinguish fluids in the porous reservoirs. For 3D NMR logging, the relaxation mechanism and mathematical model, Fredholm equation, are introduced, and the inversion methods including Singular Value Decomposition (SVD), Butler-Reeds-Dawson (BRD), and Global Inversion (GI) methods are studied in detail, respectively. During one simulation test, multi-echo CPMG sequence activation is designed firstly, echo trains of the ideal fluid models are synthesized, then an inversion algorithm is carried on these synthetic echo trains, and finally T2-T1-D map is built. Futhermore, SVD, BRD, and GI methods are respectively applied into a same fluid model, and the computing speed and inversion accuracy are compared and analyzed. When the optimal inversion method and matrix dimention are applied, the inversion results are in good aggreement with the supposed fluid model, which indicates that the inversion method of 3D NMR is applieable for fluid typing of oil and gas reservoirs. Additionally, the forward modeling and inversion tests are made in oil-water and gas-water models, respectively, the sensitivity to the fluids in different magnetic field gradients is also examined in detail. The effect of magnetic gradient on fluid typing in 3D NMR logging is stuied and the optimal manetic gradient is choosen.

  16. PGSE, OGSE, and sensitivity to axon diameter in diffusion MRI: Insight from a simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hui; Ianuş, Andrada; Kaden, Enrico; Alexander, Daniel C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To identify optimal pulsed gradient spin‐echo (PGSE) and oscillating gradient spin‐echo (OGSE) sequence settings for maximizing sensitivity to axon diameter in idealized and practical conditions. Methods Simulations on a simple two‐compartment white matter model (with nonpermeable cylinders) are used to investigate a wide space of clinically plausible PGSE and OGSE sequence parameters with trapezoidal diffusion gradient waveforms. Signal sensitivity is measured as a derivative of the signal with respect to axon diameter. Models of parallel and dispersed fibers are investigated separately to represent idealized and practical conditions. Results Simulations show that, for the simple case of gradients perfectly perpendicular to straight parallel fibers, PGSE always gives maximum sensitivity. However, in real‐world scenarios where fibers have unknown and dispersed orientation, low‐frequency OGSE provides higher sensitivity. Maximum sensitivity results show that on current clinical scanners (G max = 60 mT/m, signal to noise ratio (SNR) = 20) axon diameters below 6 µm are indistinguishable from zero. Scanners with stronger gradient systems such as the Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) Connectom scanner (G max = 300 mT/m) can extend this sensitivity limit down to 2–3 µm, probing a much greater proportion of the underlying axon diameter distribution. Conclusion Low‐frequency OGSE provides additional sensitivity to PGSE in practical situations. OGSE is particularly advantageous for systems with high performance gradients. Magn Reson Med 75:688–700, 2016. © 2015 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. PMID:25809657

  17. A Sensitivity Study for the Wavelength Calibration of GeoTASO for KORUS-AQ Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M.; Ahn, M. H.; Liu, X.; Kim, J.; Jeong, U.; Park, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    The cooperative field campaign for KOREA-US Air Quality (KORUS-AQ) study is under preparation. For the success of campaign, Megacity Air Pollution Studies-SEOUL (MAPS-SEOUL) as a preliminary study is now going on. The major objective of MAPS is the trial run of the laboratory and airborne measurement and the preparation for the sensor calibration. From these campaigns, it is possible to increase the accuracy of air quality model and also to assess the retrieval algorithm for Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS). The Geostationary Trace-gas and Aerosol Sensor Optimization (GEO-TASO) instrument which will be onboard aircraft utilizes Offner spectrometer with a 4 mirror telescope. For the data processing, we plan to develop the wavelength calibration algorithm for the raw measurements from this airborne hyperspectral sensor. The important parameters considered in spectral calibration of radiance spectra are absorption of ozone and ring effect. We would adapt the similar process with the heritage programs such as OMI, GOME and OMPS and so on. However, the airborne flying environment in troposphere would be different compared to GEMS's geostationary orbit. Therefore, the parameters which cause wavelength change could be different. For example, the variation of aircraft altitude would bring additional uncertainties in wavelength change. Here, the GEMS prototype algorithm is applied to Geo-TASO measurement to derive slit functions and check wavelength shift. And the algorithm sensitivity to each parameter will be examined. Through these tests, the characteristics of each parameter and their correlation will be used to refine the GEMS algorithm and to futher KORUS-AQ study.

  18. Sensitive periods differentiate processing of open- and closed-class words: an ERP study of bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Weber-Fox, C; Neville, H J

    2001-12-01

    The goal of this study was to test the hypothesis that neural processes for language are heterogeneous in their adaptations to maturation and experience. This study examined whether the neural processes for open- and closed-class words are differentially affected by delays in second-language immersion. In English, open-class words primarily convey referential meaning, whereas closed-class words are primarily related to grammatical information in sentence processing. Previous studies indicate that event-related brain potentials (ERPs) elicited by these word classes display nonidentical distributions and latencies, show different developmental time courses, and are differentially affected by early language experience in Deaf individuals. In this study, ERPs were recorded from 10 monolingual English speakers and 53 Chinese-English bilingual speakers who were grouped according to their age of immersion in English: 1-3, 4-6, 7-10, 11-13, and >15 years of age. Closed-class words elicited an N280 that was largest over left anterior electrode sites for all groups. However, the peak latency was later (>35 ms) in bilingual speakers immersed in English after 7 years of age. In contrast, the latencies and distributions of the N350 elicited by open-class words were similar in all groups. In addition, the N400, elicited by semantic anomalies (open-class words that violated semantic expectation), displayed increased peak latencies for only the later-learning bilingual speakers (>11 years). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that language subprocesses are differentially sensitive to the timing of second-language experience. PMID:11776369

  19. 78 FR 68461 - Guidance for Industry: Studies To Evaluate the Utility of Anti-Salmonella Chemical Food Additives...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... Guidance for Industry: Studies to Evaluate the Utility of Anti-Salmonella Chemical Food Additives in Feeds... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry: Studies To Evaluate the Utility of Anti- Salmonella Chemical Food Additives in Feeds; Request for Comments AGENCY: Food and...

  20. Nursing students’ understanding of factors influencing ethical sensitivity: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Mohsenpour, Mohaddeseh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ethical sensitivity is considered as a component of professional competency of nurses. Its effects on improvement of nurses’ ethical performance and the therapeutic relationship between nurses and patients have been reported. However, very limited studies have evaluated ethical sensitivity. Since no previous Iranian research has been conducted in this regard, the present study aimed to review nursing students’ understanding of effective factors on ethical sensitivity. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was performed in Kerman, Iran, during 2009. It used semi-structured individual interviews with eight MSc nursing students to assess their viewpoints. It also included two focus groups. Purposive sampling was continued until data saturation. Data were analyzed using manifest content analysis. Results: The students’ understanding of factors influencing ethical sensitivity were summarized in five main themes including individual and spiritual characteristics, education, mutual understanding, internal and external controls, and experience of an immoral act. Conclusions: The findings of this study create a unique framework for sensitization of nurses in professional performance. The application of these factors in human resource management is reinforcement of positive aspects and decrease in negative aspects, in education can use for educational objectives setting, and in research can designing studies based on this framework and making related tools. It is noteworthy that presented classification was influenced by students themselves and mentioned to a kind of learning activity by them. PMID:24403928

  1. Study of the Sensitization on the Grain Boundary in Austenitic Stainless Steel Aisi 316

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocsisová, Edina; Dománková, Mária; Slatkovský, Ivan; Sahul, Martin

    2014-12-01

    Intergranular corrosion (IGC) is one of the major problems in austenitic stainless steels. This type of corrosion is caused by precipitation of secondary phases on grain boundaries (GB). Precipitation of the secondary phases can lead to formation of chromium depleted zones in the vicinity of grain boundaries. Mount of the sensitization of material is characterized by the degree of sensitization (DOS). Austenitic stainless steel AISI 316 as experimental material had been chosen. The samples for the study of sensitization were solution annealed on 1100 °C for 60 min followed by water quenching and then sensitization by isothermal annealing on 700 °C and 650 °C with holding time from 15 to 600 min. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used for identification of secondary phases. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) was applied for characterization of grain boundary structure as one of the factors which influences on DOS.

  2. Maltreated children's representations of mother and an additional caregiver: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Manashko, Shany; Besser, Avi; Priel, Beatriz

    2009-04-01

    In the current longitudinal investigation, we explored the continuity of and changes in the mental representations of the mother and an additional caregiver among forty-five 9- to 11-year-old children who had been severely maltreated and subsequently placed in long-term residential care as well as the relationships between the content and structure of these representations and teacher's assessments of the child's externalizing and internalizing symptoms. At Time 1, a nonmaltreated comparison group was assessed concomitantly. Compared to nonmaltreated children, maltreated children scored higher for externalizing and internalizing symptoms, and their maternal representations were found to be significantly less benevolent and integrated and more punitive. In addition, among the maltreated children, the additional caregiver representations were found to be more benevolent and integrated, and less punitive, than the maternal representations. After 30 months, the maltreated children's levels of externalizing and internalizing symptoms diminished, their maternal representations become more benevolent and less punitive, and the additional caregiver representations became less benevolent. Moreover, the Benevolence of the additional caregiver representation was found to predict these children's changes in externalizing symptoms beyond the effects of their symptomatology and its associations with the Benevolence of these representations at Time 1. PMID:19220720

  3. A highly sensitive method for analysis of 7-dehydrocholesterol for the study of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome[S

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Xu, Libin; Lamberson, Connor; Haas, Dorothea; Korade, Zeljka; Porter, Ned A.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a highly sensitive method for the detection of 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC), the biosynthetic precursor of cholesterol, based on its reactivity with 4-phenyl-1,2,4-triazoline-3,5-dione (PTAD) in a Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction. Samples of biological tissues and fluids with added deuterium-labeled internal standards were derivatized with PTAD and analyzed by LC-MS. This protocol permits fast processing of samples, short chromatography times, and high sensitivity. We applied this method to the analysis of cells, blood, and tissues from several sources, including human plasma. Another innovative aspect of this study is that it provides a reliable and highly reproducible measurement of 7-DHC in 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase (Dhcr7)-HET mouse (a model for Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome) samples, showing regional differences in the brain tissue. We found that the levels of 7-DHC are consistently higher in Dhcr7-HET mice than in controls, with the spinal cord and peripheral nerve showing the biggest differences. In addition to 7-DHC, sensitive analysis of desmosterol in tissues and blood was also accomplished with this PTAD method by assaying adducts formed from the PTAD “ene” reaction. The method reported here may provide a highly sensitive and high throughput way to identify at-risk populations having errors in cholesterol biosynthesis. PMID:24259532

  4. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, L.; Mekonnen, M. M.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a quickly growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of water footprint estimates to changes in important input variables and quantifies the size of uncertainty in water footprint estimates. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat in the Yellow River Basin in the period 1996-2005. A grid-based daily water balance model at a 5 by 5 arcmin resolution was applied to compute green and blue water footprints of the four crops in the Yellow River Basin in the period considered. The sensitivity and uncertainty analysis focused on the effects on water footprint estimates at basin level (in m3 t-1) of four key input variables: precipitation (PR), reference evapotranspiration (ET0), crop coefficient (Kc), and crop calendar. The one-at-a-time method was carried out to analyse the sensitivity of the water footprint of crops to fractional changes of individual input variables. Uncertainties in crop water footprint estimates were quantified through Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the water footprint of crops is most sensitive to ET0 and Kc, followed by crop calendar and PR. Blue water footprints were more sensitive to input variability than green water footprints. The smaller the annual blue water footprint, the higher its sensitivity to changes in PR, ET0, and Kc. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop due to combined uncertainties in climatic inputs (PR and ET0) were about ±20% (at 95% confidence interval). The effect of uncertainties in ET0 was dominant compared to that of precipitation. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop as a result of combined key input uncertainties were on average ±26% (at 95% confidence level). The sensitivities and uncertainties differ across crop types, with highest sensitivities

  5. Mechanical characterization of filler sandcretes with rice husk ash additions. Study applied to Senegal

    SciTech Connect

    Cisse, I.K.; Laquerbe, M.

    2000-01-01

    To capitalize on the local materials of Senegal (agricultural and industrial wastes, residual fines from crushing process, sands from dunes, etc.), rise husk ash and residues of industrial and agricultural wastes have been used as additions in sandcretes. The mechanical resistance of sandcrete blocks obtained when unground ash (and notably the ground ash) is added reveals that there is an increase in performance over the classic mortar blocks. In addition, the use of unground rice husk ash enables production of a lightweight sandcrete with insulating properties, at a reduced cost. The ash pozzolanic reactivity explains the high strengths obtained.

  6. Formation pathways of DMSO(2) in the addition channel of the OH-initiated DMS oxidation: A theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Anguita, Juan M; González-Lafont, Angels; Lluch, José M

    2009-07-15

    The production of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and dimethyl sulfone (DMSO(2)) in the dimethyl sulfide (DMS) degradation scheme initiated by the hydroxyl (OH) radical has been shown to be very sensitive to nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) levels. In the present work we have explored the potential energy surfaces corresponding to several reaction pathways which yield DMSO(2) from the CH(3)S(O)(OH)CH(3) adduct [including the formation of CH(3)S(O)(OH)CH(3) from the reaction of DMSO with OH] and the reaction channels that yield DMSO or/and DMSO(2) from the CH(3)S(O(2))(OH)CH(3) adduct are also studied. The formation of the CH(3)S(O(2))(OH)CH(3) adduct from CH(3)S(OH)CH(3) (DMS-OH) and O(2) was analyzed in our previous work. All these pathways due to the presence of NO(x) (NO and NO(2)) and also due to the reactions with O(2), OH and HO(2) are compared with the objective of inferring their kinetic relevance in the laboratory experiments that measure DMSO(2) (and DMSO) formation yields. In particular, our theoretical results clearly show the existence of NO(x)-dependent pathways leading to the formation of DMSO(2), which could explain some of these experimental results in comparison with experimental measurements carried out in NO(x)-free conditions. Our results indicate that the relative importance of the addition channel in the DMS oxidation process can be dependent on the NO(x) content of chamber experiments and of atmospheric conditions. PMID:19072765

  7. Does Sensitivity to Orthographic Regularities Influence Reading and Spelling Acquisition? A 1-Year Prospective Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rothe, Josefine; Schulte-Körne, Gerd; Ise, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies focused on the influence of orthographic processing on reading and spelling performance. It was found that orthographic processing is an independent predictor of reading and spelling performance in different languages and children of different ages. This study investigated sensitivity to orthographic regularities in German-speaking…

  8. Perinatal undernutrition facilitates morphine sensitization and cross-sensitization to cocaine in adult rats: a behavioral and neurochemical study.

    PubMed

    Velazquez, E E; Valdomero, A; Orsingher, O A; Cuadra, G R

    2010-01-20

    The development of sensitization to the locomotor effects of morphine and cross-sensitization between morphine and cocaine were evaluated in adult rats submitted to a protein malnutrition schedule from the 14th day of gestation up to 30 days of age (D-rats), and compared with well-nourished animals (C-rats). Dose-response curves to morphine-induced locomotor activity (5, 7.5, 10 or 15 mg/kg, i.p., every other day for 5 days) revealed a shift to the left in D-rats compared to C-rats. This implies that D-rats showed behavioral sensitization to the lower dose of morphine used (5 mg/kg), which was ineffective in C-rats. Furthermore, when a cocaine challenge (10 mg/kg, i.p) was given 48 h after the last morphine administration, only D-rats exhibited cross-sensitization in morphine-pretreated animals (7.5 and 10 mg/kg). In order to correlate the differential response observed with the functioning of the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system, extracellular dopamine (DA) levels were measured in the nucleus accumbens (core and shell) and the dorsal caudate-putamen. A challenge with cocaine in morphine pre-exposed animals produced an increase in DA release, but only in the nucleus accumbens "core" of D-rats. Similar DA levels were found in the nucleus accumbens "shell" and in the dorsal caudate-putamen of both groups. Finally, these results demonstrate that D-rats had a lower threshold for developing both a progressive behavioral sensitization to morphine and a cross-sensitization to cocaine. In accordance with these behavioral findings, a higher responsiveness of the nucleus accumbens core, expressed by increased DA levels, both basal and after cocaine challenge, was observed in D-rats. PMID:19892003

  9. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines

    PubMed Central

    Seddiqzai, Meriam; Dahmen, Tobias; Sure, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Summary The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol−1 and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG ‡ and ΔG R) are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically. PMID:24062821

  10. Study on automatic optical element addition or deletion in lens optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xuemin; Wang, Yongtian; Hao, Qun

    2002-09-01

    Two lens form parameters, quantifying the symmetry of the optical system and the optical power distribution among the individual lens elements, are used as the criteria for automatic element addition or deletion in lens optimization. The scheme based on the criteria is described in this paper. Design examples are provided, which demonstrate that the scheme is practicable.

  11. Teaching Young Children Decomposition Strategies to Solve Addition Problems: An Experimental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Zi-Juan

    2012-01-01

    The ability to count has traditionally been considered an important milestone in children's development of number sense. However, using counting (e.g., counting on, counting all) strategies to solve addition problems is not the best way for children to achieve their full mathematical potential and to prepare them to develop more complex and…

  12. Computational study of the rate constants and free energies of intramolecular radical addition to substituted anilines.

    PubMed

    Gansäuer, Andreas; Seddiqzai, Meriam; Dahmen, Tobias; Sure, Rebecca; Grimme, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    The intramolecular radical addition to aniline derivatives was investigated by DFT calculations. The computational methods were benchmarked by comparing the calculated values of the rate constant for the 5-exo cyclization of the hexenyl radical with the experimental values. The dispersion-corrected PW6B95-D3 functional provided very good results with deviations for the free activation barrier compared to the experimental values of only about 0.5 kcal mol(-1) and was therefore employed in further calculations. Corrections for intramolecular London dispersion and solvation effects in the quantum chemical treatment are essential to obtain consistent and accurate theoretical data. For the investigated radical addition reaction it turned out that the polarity of the molecules is important and that a combination of electrophilic radicals with preferably nucleophilic arenes results in the highest rate constants. This is opposite to the Minisci reaction where the radical acts as nucleophile and the arene as electrophile. The substitution at the N-atom of the aniline is crucial. Methyl substitution leads to slower addition than phenyl substitution. Carbamates as substituents are suitable only when the radical center is not too electrophilic. No correlations between free reaction barriers and energies (ΔG (‡) and ΔG R) are found. Addition reactions leading to indanes or dihydrobenzofurans are too slow to be useful synthetically. PMID:24062821

  13. Vector generalized additive models for extreme rainfall data analysis (study case rainfall data in Indramayu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utami, Eka Putri Nur; Wigena, Aji Hamim; Djuraidah, Anik

    2016-02-01

    Rainfall pattern are good indicators for potential disasters. Global Circulation Model (GCM) contains global scale information that can be used to predict the rainfall data. Statistical downscaling (SD) utilizes the global scale information to make inferences in the local scale. Essentially, SD can be used to predict local scale variables based on global scale variables. SD requires a method to accommodate non linear effects and extreme values. Extreme value Theory (EVT) can be used to analyze the extreme value. One of methods to identify the extreme events is peak over threshold that follows Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD). The vector generalized additive model (VGAM) is an extension of the generalized additive model. It is able to accommodate linear or nonlinear effects by involving more than one additive predictors. The advantage of VGAM is to handle multi response models. The key idea of VGAM are iteratively reweighted least square for maximum likelihood estimation, penalized smoothing, fisher scoring and additive models. This works aims to analyze extreme rainfall data in Indramayu using VGAM. The results show that the VGAM with GPD is able to predict extreme rainfall data accurately. The prediction in February is very close to the actual value at quantile 75.

  14. Studies on the Food Additive Propyl Gallate: Synthesis, Structural Characterization, and Evaluation of the Antioxidant Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrido, Jorge; Garrido, E. Manuela; Borges, Fernanda

    2012-01-01

    Antioxidants are additives largely used in industry for delaying, retarding, or preventing the development of oxidative deterioration. Propyl gallate (E310) is a phenolic antioxidant extensively used in the food, cosmetics, and pharmaceutical industries. A series of lab experiments have been developed to teach students about the importance and…

  15. An internet-based study on the relation between disgust sensitivity and emetophobia.

    PubMed

    van Overveld, Mark; de Jong, Peter J; Peters, Madelon L; van Hout, Wiljo J P J; Bouman, Theo K

    2008-01-01

    In the etiology of disgust-relevant psychopathology, such as emetophobia (fear of vomiting), two factors may be important: disgust propensity, i.e., how quickly the individual experiences disgust, and disgust sensitivity, i.e., how negatively does the individual evaluate this disgust experience [van Overveld, W. J. M., de Jong, P. J., Peters, M. L., Cavanagh, K., & Davey, G. C. L. (2006). Disgust propensity and disgust sensitivity: separate constructs that are differentially related to specific fears. Personality and Individual Differences, 41, 1241-1252]. Hence, the current study examines whether emetophobic participants display elevated levels of disgust propensity and sensitivity, and whether these factors are differentially related to emetophobia. A group of emetophobic members of a Dutch website on emetophobia (n=172), and a control group (n=39) completed an internet survey containing the Emetophobia Questionnaire, Disgust Propensity and Sensitivity Scale-Revised, Disgust Scale, and Disgust Questionnaire. Results showed that the emetophobic group displayed significantly elevated levels of both disgust propensity and disgust sensitivity compared to the control group. Most importantly, disgust sensitivity consistently was the best predictor of emetophobic complaints. PMID:17517487

  16. Study sensitivity: Evaluating the ability to detect effects in systematic reviews of chemical exposures.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Glinda S; Lunn, Ruth M; Ågerstrand, Marlene; Glenn, Barbara S; Kraft, Andrew D; Luke, April M; Ratcliffe, Jennifer M

    2016-01-01

    A critical step in systematic reviews of potential health hazards is the structured evaluation of the strengths and weaknesses of the included studies; risk of bias is a term often used to represent this process, specifically with respect to the evaluation of systematic errors that can lead to inaccurate (biased) results (i.e. focusing on internal validity). Systematic review methods developed in the clinical medicine arena have been adapted for use in evaluating environmental health hazards; this expansion raises questions about the scope of risk of bias tools and the extent to which they capture the elements that can affect the interpretation of results from environmental and occupational epidemiology studies and in vivo animal toxicology studies, (the studies typically available for assessment of risk of chemicals). One such element, described here as "sensitivity", is a measure of the ability of a study to detect a true effect or hazard. This concept is similar to the concept of the sensitivity of an assay; an insensitive study may fail to show a difference that truly exists, leading to a false conclusion of no effect. Factors relating to study sensitivity should be evaluated in a systematic manner with the same rigor as the evaluation of other elements within a risk of bias framework. We discuss the importance of this component for the interpretation of individual studies, examine approaches proposed or in use to address it, and describe how it relates to other evaluation components. The evaluation domains contained within a risk of bias tool can include, or can be modified to include, some features relating to study sensitivity; the explicit inclusion of these sensitivity criteria with the same rigor and at the same stage of study evaluation as other bias-related criteria can improve the evaluation process. In some cases, these and other features may be better addressed through a separate sensitivity domain. The combined evaluation of risk of bias and

  17. Theoretica Study of Asymmetric Double D-π-A Organic Sensitizers for Efficient Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Dong Yuel; Lee, Gun Hyung; Kim, Young Sik

    2015-03-01

    Three novel dye sensitizers that were based on asymmetric double D-π-A chains with phenoxazine (POZ) and diphenylamine (DPA) as electron donors and cyanoacetic acid (CA) and 2-(1,1- dicyanomethylene) rhodanine (RD) as electron acceptors (DCPR, DRPC, DRPR) were designed, theoretically investigated, and compared with the reference dye based on asymmetric double D-π-A chains (DCPC). Using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations, we gained insight into the factors responsible for the photovoltaic properties of the dye sensitizers. Due to the different HOMO levels of each donor and the different LUMO levels of each acceptor, the absorption spectrum of each dye showed different shapes. Among the dyes, DRPR showed a broader and more bathochromically shifted absorption band than the other dies. It also showed a higher molar extinction coefficient than that of the reference dye (DCPC). This work suggests optimizing the chain of electron donors and acceptors in dye sensitizers based on asymmetric double D-π-A chains would produce good photovoltaic properties for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). PMID:26413690

  18. A laboratory study of the perceived benefit of additional noise attenuation by houses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flindell, I. H.

    1983-01-01

    Two Experiments were conducted to investigate the perceived benefit of additional house attenuation against aircraft flyover noise. First, subjects made annoyance judgments in a simulated living room while an operative window with real and dummy storm windows was manipulated in full view of those subjects. Second, subjects made annoyance judgments in an anechoic audiometric test chamber of frequency shaped noise signals having spectra closely matched to those of the aircraft flyover noises reproduced in the first experiment. These stimuli represented the aircraft flyover noises in levels and spectra but without the situational and visual cues present in the simulated living room. Perceptual constancy theory implies that annoyance tends to remain constant despite reductions in noise level caused by additional attenuation of which the subjects are fully aware. This theory was supported when account was taken for a reported annoyance overestimation for certain spectra and for a simulated condition cue overreaction.

  19. Enhanced flux pinning in MOCVD-YBCO films through Zr-additions:Systematic feasibility studies

    SciTech Connect

    Aytug, Tolga; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Specht, Eliot D; Kim, Kyunghoon; Zhang, Yifei; Cantoni, Claudia; Zuev, Yuri L; Goyal, Amit; Christen, David K; Maroni, Victor A.

    2009-01-01

    Systematic effects of Zr additions on the structural and flux pinning properties of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) films deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been investigated. Detailed characterization, conducted by coordinated transport, x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy analyses, and imaging Raman microscopy have revealed trends in the resulting property/performance correlations of these films with respect to varying mole percentages (mol%) of added Zr. For compositions {le} 7.5 mol%, Zr additions lead to improved in-field critical current density, as well as extra correlated pinning along the c-axis direction of the YBCO films via the formation of columnar, self-assembled stacks of BaZrO{sub 3} nanodots.

  20. Enhanced flux pinning in MOCVD-YBCO films through Zr additions : systematic feasibility studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Aytug, T.; Paranthaman, M.; Specht, E. D.; Zhang, Y.; Kim, K.; Zuev, Y. L.; Cantoni, C.; Goyal, A.; Christen, D. K.; Maroni, V. A.; Chen, Y.; Selvamanickam, V.; ORNL; SuperPower, Inc.

    2010-01-01

    Systematic effects of Zr additions on the structural and flux pinning properties of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-{delta}} (YBCO) films deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) have been investigated. Detailed characterization, conducted by coordinated transport, x-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy analyses, and imaging Raman microscopy have revealed trends in the resulting property/performance correlations of these films with respect to varying mole percentages (mol%) of added Zr. For compositions {le} 7.5 mol%, Zr additions lead to improved in-field critical current density, as well as extra correlated pinning along the c-axis direction of the YBCO films via the formation of columnar, self-assembled stacks of BaZrO{sub 3} nanodots.

  1. Indolyne Experimental and Computational Studies: Synthetic Applications and Origins of Selectivities of Nucleophilic Additions

    PubMed Central

    Im, G-Yoon J.; Bronner, Sarah M.; Goetz, Adam E.; Paton, Robert S.; Cheong, Paul H.-Y.; Houk, K. N.; Garg, Neil K.

    2010-01-01

    Efficient syntheses of 4,5-, 5,6-, and 6,7-indolyne precursors beginning from commercially available hydroxyindole derivatives are reported. The synthetic routes are versatile and allow access to indolyne precursors that remain unsubstituted on the pyrrole ring. Indolynes can be generated under mild fluoride-mediated conditions, trapped by a variety of nucleophilic reagents, and used to access a number of novel substituted indoles. Nucleophilic addition reactions to indolynes proceed with varying degrees of regioselectivity; distortion energies control regioselectivity and provide a simple model to predict the regioselectivity in the nucleophilic additions to indolynes and other unsymmetrical arynes. This model has led to the design of a substituted 4,5-indolyne that exhibits enhanced nucleophilic regioselectivity. PMID:21114321

  2. Structural changes in gluten protein structure after addition of emulsifier. A Raman spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, Evelina G.; Gómez, Analía V.; Añón, María C.; Puppo, María C.

    2011-06-01

    Food protein product, gluten protein, was chemically modified by varying levels of sodium stearoyl lactylate (SSL); and the extent of modifications (secondary and tertiary structures) of this protein was analyzed by using Raman spectroscopy. Analysis of the Amide I band showed an increase in its intensity mainly after the addition of the 0.25% of SSL to wheat flour to produced modified gluten protein, pointing the formation of a more ordered structure. Side chain vibrations also confirmed the observed changes.

  3. A design study for the addition of higher order parametric discrete elements to NASTRAN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, E. L.

    1972-01-01

    The addition of discrete elements to NASTRAN poses significant interface problems with the level 15.1 assembly modules and geometry modules. Potential problems in designing new modules for higher-order parametric discrete elements are reviewed in both areas. An assembly procedure is suggested that separates grid point degrees of freedom on the basis of admissibility. New geometric input data are described that facilitate the definition of surfaces in parametric space.

  4. Load bearing and stiffness tailored NiTi implants produced by additive manufacturing: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmanian, Rasool; Shayesteh Moghaddam, Narges; Haberland, Christoph; Dean, David; Miller, Michael; Elahinia, Mohammad

    2014-03-01

    Common metals for stable long-term implants (e.g. stainless steel, Titanium and Titanium alloys) are much stiffer than spongy cancellous and even stiffer than cortical bone. When bone and implant are loaded this stiffness mismatch results in stress shielding and as a consequence, degradation of surrounding bony structure can lead to disassociation of the implant. Due to its lower stiffness and high reversible deformability, which is associated with the superelastic behavior, NiTi is an attractive biomaterial for load bearing implants. However, the stiffness of austenitic Nitinol is closer to that of bone but still too high. Additive manufacturing provides, in addition to the fabrication of patient specific implants, the ability to solve the stiffness mismatch by adding engineered porosity to the implant. This in turn allows for the design of different stiffness profiles in one implant tailored to the physiological load conditions. This work covers a fundamental approach to bring this vision to reality. At first modeling of the mechanical behavior of different scaffold designs are presented as a proof of concept of stiffness tailoring. Based on these results different Nitinol scaffolds can be produced by additive manufacturing.

  5. Magnetic Force Microscopy Study of Zr2Co11 -Based Nanocrystalline Materials: Effect of Mo Addition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Yue, Lanping; Jin, Yunlong; Zhang, Wenyong; Sellmyer, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he addition of Molybdenum was used to modify the nanostructure and enhance coercivity of rare-earth-free Zr2Co11-based nanocrystalline permanent magnets. he effect of Mo addition on magnetic domain structures of melt spun nanocrystalline Zr16Co84-xMox(x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0) ribbons has been investigated. It was found that magnetic properties and local domain structures are strongly influenced by Mo doping. he coercivity of the samples increases with the increase in Mo content (x≤1.5). he maximum energy product(BH)maxincreases with increasingxfrom 0.5 MGOe forx=0to a maximum value of 4.2 MGOe forx=1.5. he smallest domain size with a relatively short magnetic correlation length of 128 nm and largest root-mean-square phase shiftΦrmsvalue of 0.66° are observed for thex=1.5. he optimal Mo addition promotes magnetic domain structure refinement and thus leads to a significant increase in coercivity and energy product in this sample.« less

  6. Importance analysis for Hudson River PCB transport and fate model parameters using robust sensitivity studies

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S.; Toll, J.; Cothern, K.

    1995-12-31

    The authors have performed robust sensitivity studies of the physico-chemical Hudson River PCB model PCHEPM to identify the parameters and process uncertainties contributing the most to uncertainty in predictions of water column and sediment PCB concentrations, over the time period 1977--1991 in one segment of the lower Hudson River. The term ``robust sensitivity studies`` refers to the use of several sensitivity analysis techniques to obtain a more accurate depiction of the relative importance of different sources of uncertainty. Local sensitivity analysis provided data on the sensitivity of PCB concentration estimates to small perturbations in nominal parameter values. Range sensitivity analysis provided information about the magnitude of prediction uncertainty associated with each input uncertainty. Rank correlation analysis indicated which parameters had the most dominant influence on model predictions. Factorial analysis identified important interactions among model parameters. Finally, term analysis looked at the aggregate influence of combinations of parameters representing physico-chemical processes. The authors scored the results of the local and range sensitivity and rank correlation analyses. The authors considered parameters that scored high on two of the three analyses to be important contributors to PCB concentration prediction uncertainty, and treated them probabilistically in simulations. They also treated probabilistically parameters identified in the factorial analysis as interacting with important parameters. The authors used the term analysis to better understand how uncertain parameters were influencing the PCB concentration predictions. The importance analysis allowed us to reduce the number of parameters to be modeled probabilistically from 16 to 5. This reduced the computational complexity of Monte Carlo simulations, and more importantly, provided a more lucid depiction of prediction uncertainty and its causes.

  7. Parameters and pitfalls to consider in the conduct of food additive research, Carrageenan as a case study.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Myra L

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides guidance on the conduct of new in vivo and in vitro studies on high molecular weight food additives, with carrageenan, the widely used food additive, as a case study. It is important to understand the physical/chemical properties and to verify the identity/purity, molecular weight and homogeneity/stability of the additive in the vehicle for oral delivery. The strong binding of CGN to protein in rodent chow or infant formula results in no gastrointestinal tract exposure to free CGN. It is recommended that doses of high Mw non-caloric, non-nutritive additives not exceed 5% by weight of total solid diet to avoid potential nutritional effects. Addition of some high Mw additives at high concentrations to liquid nutritional supplements increases viscosity and may affect palatability, caloric intake and body weight gain. In in vitro studies, the use of well-characterized, relevant cell types and the appropriate composition of the culture media are necessary for proper conduct and interpretation. CGN is bound to media protein and not freely accessible to cells in vitro. Interpretation of new studies on food additives should consider the interaction of food additives with the vehicle components and the appropriateness of the animal or cell model and dose-response. PMID:26615870

  8. Early Additional Immune-Modulators for Mycoplasma pneumoniae Pneumonia in Children: An Observation Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sung-Churl; Rhim, Jung-Woo; Shin, Myung-Seok; Kang, Jin-Han

    2014-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae (MP) pneumonia is a self-limiting disease, but some patients complain of progressive pneumonia, despite of appropriate antibiotic treatment. We aimed to introduce the role of immune-modulators (corticosteroid and/or intravenous immunoglobulin, IVIG) treatment for childhood MP pneumonia based on previous our experiences. Materials and Methods A retrospective case series analysis for 183 children with MP pneumonia was performed. MP pneumonia patients were diagnosed by two Immunoglobulin M (IgM) tests: the micro-particle agglutination method (≥1:40) and the cold agglutination test (≥1:4), and were examined twice at the initial admission and at discharge. Among 183 MP pneumonia patients, 90 patients with persistent fever for over 48 hours after admission or those with severe respiratory symptoms and signs received additional prednisolone (82 patients, 1 mg/kg/day) or intravenous methylprednisolone (8 patients, 5-10 mg/kg/day) with antibiotics. Four patients with aggravated clinical symptoms and chest radiographic findings after corticosteroid treatment received IVIG (1 g/kg/day, 1-2 doses). Results Mean age of 183 patients was 5.5 ± 3.2 years (6 months-15 years), and the male: female ratio was 1.1:1 (96:87). Fifty-seven patients (31%) were seroconverters and 126 seropositive patients showed increased diagnostic IgM antibody titres during admission (over 4 folds). The majority of the patients who received corticosteroids (86/90 cases) showed rapid defervescence within 48 hours with improved clinical symptoms, regardless of the used antibiotics. Also, 4 patients who received additional IVIG improved both clinically and radiographically within 2 days without adverse reaction. Conclusions In the era of macrolide-resistant MP strains, early additional immune-modulator therapy with antibiotics might prevent from the disease progression and reduce the disease morbidity without adverse reaction. PMID:25566403

  9. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S.

    1994-11-01

    This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

  10. Potential of coculture in vitro models to study inflammatory and sensitizing effects of particles on the lung.

    PubMed

    Klein, Sebastian G; Hennen, Jenny; Serchi, Tommaso; Blömeke, Brunhilde; Gutleb, Arno C

    2011-12-01

    Exposure to particulate matter (PM) like nanoparticles (NPs) has increased in the last century due to increased combustion processes, road traffic, etc. In addition, the progress in chemical and cosmetic industry led to many new compounds, e.g. fragrances, which humans are exposed to every day. Many chemicals are known to act as contact and some as respiratory sensitizers, causing allergic reactions. Exposure to small particles of less than 100 nm in diameter is linked with an increased risk of respiratory diseases, such as asthma or rhinitis. To date already more than 1000 customer products contain eNPs without knowing much about the health effects. In comparison to chemicals, the mechanisms by which PM and eNPs can cause sensitization are still not fully understood. Validated and regulatory accepted in vitro models to assess this hazard in its full range are still missing. While a huge number of animal studies contributed to our knowledge about sensitization processes, knowledge on involved cellular mechanisms is still limited. In this review relevant in vitro models to study and elucidate these mechanisms in more detail are presented and their potential to serve as part of a tiered testing strategy is discussed. PMID:21963807

  11. Adjoint sensitivity studies of loop current and eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, Ganesh; Cornuelle, Bruce D.; Hoteit, Ibrahim

    2013-07-01

    Adjoint model sensitivity analyses were applied for the loop current (LC) and its eddy shedding in the Gulf of Mexico (GoM) using the MIT general circulation model (MITgcm). The circulation in the GoM is mainly driven by the energetic LC and subsequent LC eddy separation. In order to understand which ocean regions and features control the evolution of the LC, including anticyclonic warm-core eddy shedding in the GoM, forward and adjoint sensitivities with respect to previous model state and atmospheric forcing were computed using the MITgcm and its adjoint. Since the validity of the adjoint model sensitivities depends on the capability of the forward model to simulate the real LC system and the eddy shedding processes, a 5 year (2004-2008) forward model simulation was performed for the GoM using realistic atmospheric forcing, initial, and boundary conditions. This forward model simulation was compared to satellite measurements of sea-surface height (SSH) and sea-surface temperature (SST), and observed transport variability. Despite realistic mean state, standard deviations, and LC eddy shedding period, the simulated LC extension shows less variability and more regularity than the observations. However, the model is suitable for studying the LC system and can be utilized for examining the ocean influences leading to a simple, and hopefully generic LC eddy separation in the GoM. The adjoint sensitivities of the LC show influences from the Yucatan Channel (YC) flow and Loop Current Frontal Eddy (LCFE) on both LC extension and eddy separation, as suggested by earlier work. Some of the processes that control LC extension after eddy separation differ from those controlling eddy shedding, but include YC through-flow. The sensitivity remains stable for more than 30 days and moves generally upstream, entering the Caribbean Sea. The sensitivities of the LC for SST generally remain closer to the surface and move at speeds consistent with advection by the high-speed core of

  12. The influence of bioaugmentation and biosurfactant addition on bioremediation efficiency of diesel-oil contaminated soil: feasibility during field studies.

    PubMed

    Szulc, Alicja; Ambrożewicz, Damian; Sydow, Mateusz; Ławniczak, Łukasz; Piotrowska-Cyplik, Agnieszka; Marecik, Roman; Chrzanowski, Łukasz

    2014-01-01

    The study focused on assessing the influence of bioaugmentation and addition of rhamnolipids on diesel oil biodegradation efficiency during field studies. Initial laboratory studies (measurement of emitted CO2 and dehydrogenase activity) were carried out in order to select the consortium for bioaugmentation as well as to evaluate the most appropriate concentration of rhamnolipids. The selected consortium consisted of following bacterial taxa: Aeromonas hydrophila, Alcaligenes xylosoxidans, Gordonia sp., Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Rhodococcus equi, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Xanthomonas sp. It was established that the application of rhamnolipids at 150 mg/kg of soil was most appropriate in terms of dehydrogenase activity. Based on the obtained results, four treatment methods were designed and tested during 365 days of field studies: I) natural attenuation; II) addition of rhamnolipids; III) bioaugmentation; IV) bioaugmentation and addition of rhamnolipids. It was observed that bioaugmentation contributed to the highest diesel oil biodegradation efficiency, whereas the addition of rhamnolipids did not notably influence the treatment process. PMID:24291585

  13. Kaolinite flocculation induced by smectite addition - a transmission X-ray microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Zbik, Marek S; Song, Yen-Fang; Frost, Ray L

    2010-09-01

    The influence of smectite addition on kaolinite suspensions in water was investigated by transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Sedimentation test screening was also conducted. Micrographs were processed by the STatistic IMage Analysing (STIMAN) program and structural parameters were calculated. From the results of the sedimentation tests important influences of small smectite additions to about 3wt.% on kaolinite suspension flocculation has been found. In order to determine the reason for this smectite impact on kaolinite suspension, macroscopic behaviour micro-structural examination using Transmission X-ray Microscope (TXM) and SEM has been undertaken. TXM & SEM micrographs of freeze-dried kaolinite-smectite suspensions with up to 20% smectite showed a high degree of orientation of the fabric made of highly oriented particles and greatest density when 3wt.% of smectite was added to the 10wt.% dense kaolinite suspension. In contrast, suspensions containing pure kaolinite do not show such platelet mutual orientation but homogenous network of randomly oriented kaolinite platelets. This suggests that in kaolinite-smectite suspensions, smectite forms highly oriented basic framework into which kaolinite platelets may bond in face to face preferential contacts strengthening structure and allowing them to show plastic behaviour which is cause of platelets orientation. PMID:20621806

  14. HIGH-LEVEL WASTE GLASS FORMULATION MODEL SENSITIVITY STUDY 2009 GLASS FORMULATION MODEL VERSUS 1996 GLASS FORMULATION MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    BELSHER JD; MEINERT FL

    2009-12-07

    This document presents the differences between two HLW glass formulation models (GFM): The 1996 GFM and 2009 GFM. A glass formulation model is a collection of glass property correlations and associated limits, as well as model validity and solubility constraints; it uses the pretreated HLW feed composition to predict the amount and composition of glass forming additives necessary to produce acceptable HLW glass. The 2009 GFM presented in this report was constructed as a nonlinear optimization calculation based on updated glass property data and solubility limits described in PNNL-18501 (2009). Key mission drivers such as the total mass of HLW glass and waste oxide loading are compared between the two glass formulation models. In addition, a sensitivity study was performed within the 2009 GFM to determine the effect of relaxing various constraints on the predicted mass of the HLW glass.

  15. Sensitivity study of the wet deposition schemes in the modelling of the Fukushima accident.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quérel, Arnaud; Quélo, Denis; Roustan, Yelva; Mathieu, Anne; Kajino, Mizuo; Sekiyama, Thomas; Adachi, Kouji; Didier, Damien; Igarashi, Yasuhito

    2016-04-01

    The Fukushima-Daiichi release of radioactivity is a relevant event to study the atmospheric dispersion modelling of radionuclides. Actually, the atmospheric deposition onto the ground may be studied through the map of measured Cs-137 established consecutively to the accident. The limits of detection were low enough to make the measurements possible as far as 250km from the nuclear power plant. This large scale deposition has been modelled with the Eulerian model ldX. However, several weeks of emissions in multiple weather conditions make it a real challenge. Besides, these measurements are accumulated deposition of Cs-137 over the whole period and do not inform of deposition mechanisms involved: in-cloud, below-cloud, dry deposition. A comprehensive sensitivity analysis is performed in order to understand wet deposition mechanisms. It has been shown in a previous study (Quérel et al, 2016) that the choice of the wet deposition scheme has a strong impact on the assessment of the deposition patterns. Nevertheless, a "best" scheme could not be highlighted as it depends on the selected criteria: the ranking differs according to the statistical indicators considered (correlation, figure of merit in space and factor 2). A possibility to explain the difficulty to discriminate between several schemes was the uncertainties in the modelling, resulting from the meteorological data for instance. Since the move of the plume is not properly modelled, the deposition processes are applied with an inaccurate activity in the air. In the framework of the SAKURA project, an MRI-IRSN collaboration, new meteorological fields at higher resolution (Sekiyama et al., 2013) were provided and allows to reconsider the previous study. An updated study including these new meteorology data is presented. In addition, a focus on several releases causing deposition in located areas during known period was done. This helps to better understand the mechanisms of deposition involved following the

  16. Study of glass transition temperature (Tg) of novel stress-sensitive composites using molecular dynamic simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, B.; Liu, Y.; Zou, J.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Dai, L. L.

    2014-09-01

    This study investigates the glass transition temperature (Tg) of novel stress-sensitive composites capable of detecting a damage precursor using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The molecular structures of a cross-linked epoxy network (which consist of epoxy resin, hardener and stress-sensitive material) have been simulated and experimentally validated. The chemical constituents of the molecular structures are di-glycidyl ether of bisphenol F (DGEBF: epoxy resin), di-ethylene tri-amine (DETA: hardener) and tris-(cinnamoyloxymethyl)-ethane (TCE: stress-sensitive material). The cross-linking degree is varied by manipulating the number of covalent bonds through tuning a cutoff distance between activated DGEBF and DETA during the non-equilibrium MD simulation. A relationship between the cross-linking degree and Tgs has been studied numerically. In order to validate a proposed MD simulation framework, MD-predicted Tgs of materials used in this study have been compared to the experimental results obtained by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Two molecular models have been constructed for comparative study: (i) neat epoxy (epoxy resin with hardener) and (ii) smart polymer (neat epoxy with stress-sensitive material). The predicted Tgs show close agreement with the DSC results.

  17. Aggressive Behavior between Siblings and the Development of Externalizing Problems: Evidence from a Genetically Sensitive Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natsuaki, Misaki N.; Ge, Xiaojia; Reiss, David; Neiderhiser, Jenae M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the prospective links between sibling aggression and the development of externalizing problems using a multilevel modeling approach with a genetically sensitive design. The sample consisted of 780 adolescents (390 sibling pairs) who participated in 2 waves of the Nonshared Environment in Adolescent Development project.…

  18. The Effect of Nature Documentaries on Students' Environmental Sensitivity: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barbas, Tasos A.; Paraskevopoulos, Stefanos; Stamou, Anastasia G.

    2009-01-01

    Despite the potential educational value of nature documentaries, the contribution of such films to environmental education is largely unknown. In the present study, we attempt to delineate the role of nature documentaries to the environmental sensitivity of students when the films are simply introduced to the class. More specifically, the present…

  19. Maternal Sensitivity and Child Secure Base Use in Early Childhood: Studies in Different Cultural Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posada, German; Trumbell, Jill; Noblega, Magaly; Plata, Sandra; Peña, Paola; Carbonell, Olga A.; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether maternal sensitivity and child security are related during early childhood and whether such an association is found in different cultural and social contexts. Mother-child dyads (N = 237) from four different countries (Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and the United States) were observed in naturalistic settings when children were…

  20. Predicting Changes in Cultural Sensitivity among Students of Spanish during Short-Term Study Abroad

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinsen, Rob

    2011-01-01

    Short-term study abroad programs of less than a semester are becoming increasingly popular among undergraduate students in the United States. However, little research has examined the changes in students' cultural sensitivity through their participation in such programs or what factors may predict growth and improvement in such areas. This study…

  1. A comparative study of glycoproteomes in androgen-sensitive and -independent prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Drabik, Anna; Ciołczyk-Wierzbicka, Dorota; Dulińska-Litewka, Joanna; Bodzoń-Kułakowska, Anna; Suder, Piotr; Silberring, Jerzy; Laidler, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most common malignancies in men and is predicted to be the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths. After 6-18 months, hormone ablation treatment results in androgen-independent growth of cancer cells, metastasis and progression. The mechanism of androgen-independent growth of prostatic carcinoma cells is still unknown. Identification of factors that facilitate the transition from androgen-dependent to independent states is crucial in designing future diagnostics and medication strategies. To understand the biochemical meaning of hormone dependency deprivation, glycoproteins enriched profiles were compared between DU145 (hormone non-responding) and LNCaP (hormone responding) prostate cancer cells. These results allow for anticipation on the important role of glycosylation in malignant transformation. Both Tn antigen and complex antennary N-oligosaccharides were recognized. Their occurrence might be involved in the development and progression of tumor, and failure of hormone ablation therapy. Among identified proteins in androgen-sensitive cells nucleolin (P19338) was found that is widely described as apoptosis inhibitor, and also transporter of molecules from the membrane to the cytoplasm or nucleus. In addition, 14-3-3 protein family (P27348, P31946, P61981, P63104, P62258, Q04917, and P31947) was investigated across available databases as it forms stable complexes with glycoproteins. Our studies indicate that isoforms: sigma and eta were found in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells, while other isoforms were present in androgen non-responding cells. 14-3-3 binding partners are involved in cancer pathogenesis. These findings may contribute to a better understanding of prostate cancer tumorigenesis and to a more efficient prognosis and individual therapy in a future. However, it still remains to be revealed how important those changes are for androgen dependency loss in prostate cancer patients carried out on clinically

  2. Particle scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients: An in situ closure and sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wex, Heike; Neusüß, Christian; Wendisch, Manfred; Stratmann, Frank; Koziar, Christian; Keil, Andreas; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Ebert, Martin

    2002-11-01

    Comparisons between measured and calculated aerosol scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients were made based on in situ, ground-based measurements during the Melpitz INTensive (MINT) and Lindenberg Aerosol Characterization Experiment 1998 (LACE 98) field studies. Furthermore, airborne measurements made with the same type of instruments are reviewed and compared with the ground-based measurements. Agreement between measured and calculated values is on the order of ±20% for scattering and backscattering coefficients. A sensitivity analysis showed a large influence on the calculated particle scattering and backscattering coefficients resulting from sizing uncertainties in the measured number size distributions. Measured absorption coefficients were significantly smaller than the corresponding calculated values. The largest uncertainty for the calculated absorption coefficients resulted from the size-dependent fraction of elemental carbon (EC) of the aerosol. A correction for the measured fractions of EC could significantly improve the agreement between measured and calculated absorption coefficients. The overall uncertainty of the calculated values was investigated with a Monte Carlo method by simultaneously and randomly varying the input parameters of the calculations, where the variation of each parameter was bounded by its uncertainty. The measurements were mostly found to be within the range of uncertainties of the calculations, with uncertainties for the calculated scattering and backscattering coefficients of about ±20% and for the absorption coefficients of about ±30%. Thus, to increase the accuracy of calculated scattering, backscattering, and absorption coefficients, it is crucial to further reduce the error in particle number size distribution measurement techniques. In addition, further improvement of the techniques for measuring absorption coefficients and further investigation of the measurement of the fraction of EC of the aerosol is

  3. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2010-01-01

    The poster provides an overview of techniques to improve the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) sensitivity. It has been discovered during the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) site selection process that the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM) when used for sensitivity studies for TES MapYear = 0 and large optical depth values such as tau = 3 is less than realistic. A preliminary fix has been made to Mars-GRAM by adding a density factor value that was determined for tau = 0.3, 1 and 3.

  4. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justh, Hilary L.; Justus, Carl G.; Badger, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    at comparable dust loading. Currently, these density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls. Results will be presented of the work underway to derive better multipliers by including possible variation with latitude and/or Ls. This is achieved by comparison of Mars-GRAM MapYear=0 output with TES limb data. The addition of these density factors to Mars-GRAM will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths. Answers may also be provided to the issues raised in a recent study by Desai(2008). Desai has shown that the actual landing sites of Mars Pathfinder, the Mars Exploration Rovers and the Phoenix Mars Lander have been further downrange than predicted by models prior to landing. Desai s reconstruction of their entries into the Martian atmosphere showed that the models consistently predicted higher densities than those found upon EDL. The solution of this problem would be important to the Mars Program since future exploration of Mars by landers and rovers will require more accurate landing capabilities, especially for the proposed Mars Sample Return mission.

  5. Strategies to Improve the Accuracy of Mars-GRAM Sensitivity Studies at Large Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justh, H. L.; Justus, C. G.; Badger, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    at comparable dust loading. Currently, these density factors are fixed values for all latitudes and Ls. Results will be presented of the work underway to derive better multipliers by including possible variation with latitude and/or Ls. This is achieved by comparison of Mars-GRAM MapYear=0 output with TES limb data. The addition of these density factors to Mars-GRAM will improve the results of the sensitivity studies done for large optical depths. Answers may also be provided to the issues raised in a recent study by Desai(2008). Desai has shown that the actual landing sites of Mars Pathfinder, the Mars Exploration Rovers and the Phoenix Mars Lander have been further downrange than predicted by models prior to landing. Desai’s reconstruction of their entries into the Martian atmosphere showed that the models consistently predicted higher densities than those found upon EDL. The solution of this problem would be important to the Mars Program since future exploration of Mars by landers and rovers will require more accurate landing capabilities, especially for the proposed Mars Sample Return mission.

  6. Study of node and mass sensitivity of resonant mode based cantilevers with concentrated mass loading

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kewei Chai, Yuesheng; Fu, Jiahui

    2015-12-15

    Resonant-mode based cantilevers are an important type of acoustic wave based mass-sensing devices. In this work, the governing vibration equation of a bi-layer resonant-mode based cantilever attached with concentrated mass is established by using a modal analysis method. The effects of resonance modes and mass loading conditions on nodes and mass sensitivity of the cantilever were theoretically studied. The results suggested that the node did not shift when concentrated mass was loaded on a specific position. Mass sensitivity of the cantilever was linearly proportional to the square of the point displacement at the mass loading position for all the resonance modes. For the first resonance mode, when mass loading position x{sub c} satisfied 0 < x{sub c} < ∼ 0.3l (l is the cantilever beam length and 0 represents the rigid end), mass sensitivity decreased as the mass increasing while the opposite trend was obtained when mass loading satisfied ∼0.3l ≤ x{sub c} ≤ l. Mass sensitivity did not change when concentrated mass was loaded at the rigid end. This work can provide scientific guidance to optimize the mass sensitivity of a resonant-mode based cantilever.

  7. First Study on Phosphonite-Coordinated Ruthenium Sensitizers for Efficient Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    PubMed

    Swetha, T; Mondal, Indranil; Bhanuprakash, K; Pal, Ujjwal; Singh, Surya Prakash

    2015-09-01

    For the first time we report the design and syntheses of phosphonite coordinated ruthenium(II) sensitizers bearing ĈN̂N ligand and/or terpyridine derivatives carboxylate anchor (GS11, GS12. and GS13) and its application for hydrogen production over Pt-TiO2 system. These heteroleptic complexes exhibit broad metal-to-ligand charge transfer transition band over the whole visible regime extending up to 900 nm. DFT calculations of these complexes show that the HOMO is distributed over the Ru and Cl atom whereas; LUMO is localized on the polypyridile ligand, which are anchored on TiO2 surface. Among the sensitizers tested for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution, GS12 exhibited a maximum turnover number (TON) 8605 (for 8 h), which is very high compared to the reference sensitizer (N719) with TON 163 under similar evaluation condition. The dependence of the hydrogen evolution rate at different pH using GS11, GS12, GS13, and DX-1-sensitized Pt-TiO2 has been studied and the maximum H2 production yield was obtained at pH 7 for all sensitizers. PMID:26280353

  8. Professional Competence Development of the Social Work Specialists in the Period of Study in the System of Additional Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davletkaliev, Denis Kuanyshevich; Zueva, Natalia Konstantinovna; Lebedeva, Natalya Vasilevna; Mkrtumova, Irina Vladimirovna; Timofeeva, Olga

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this work is the study of psychological-pedagogical approaches to the understanding of the idea of professional competence of social work specialists as well as the role of study in the system of additional educations in professional-personal development of the listeners. In the process of study of this problem we define main…

  9. Preliminary study of neutron absorption by concrete with boron carbide addition

    SciTech Connect

    Abdullah, Yusof Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Yazid, Hafizal; Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul; Ahmad, Sahrim; Hamid, Roszilah; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz

    2014-02-12

    Concrete has become a conventional material in construction of nuclear reactor due to its properties like safety and low cost. Boron carbide was added as additives in the concrete construction as it has a good neutron absorption property. The sample preparation for concrete was produced with different weight percent of boron carbide powder content. The neutron absorption rate of these samples was determined by using a fast neutron source of Americium-241/Be (Am-Be 241) and detection with a portable backscattering neutron detector. Concrete with 20 wt % of boron carbide shows the lowest count of neutron transmitted and this indicates the most neutrons have been absorbed by the concrete. Higher boron carbide content may affect the concrete strength and other properties.

  10. A study of the effects of an additional sound source on RASS performance

    SciTech Connect

    Coulter, R.L.

    1998-12-31

    The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Program continuously operates a nine panel 915 MHz wind profiler with Radio Acoustic Sounding System (RASS), measuring wind profiles for 50 minutes and virtual temperature profiles for the remaining 10 minutes during each hour. It is well recognized that one of the principal limits on RASS performance is high horizontal wind speed that moves the acoustic wave front sufficiently to prevent the microwave energy produced by the radar and scattered from the acoustic wave from being reflected back t the radar antenna. With this limitation in mind, the ARM program purchased an additional, portable acoustic source that could be mounted on a small trailer and placed in strategic locations to enhance the RASS performance (when it was not being used for spare parts). A test of the resulting improvement in RASS performance was performed during the period 1995--1997.

  11. Additive Manufacturing of a Microbial Fuel Cell—A detailed study

    PubMed Central

    Calignano, Flaviana; Tommasi, Tonia; Manfredi, Diego; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary society we observe an everlasting permeation of electron devices, smartphones, portable computing tools. The tiniest living organisms on Earth could become the key to address this challenge: energy generation by bacterial processes from renewable stocks/waste through devices such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, the application of this solution was limited by a moderately low efficiency. We explored the limits, if any, of additive manufacturing (AM) technology to fabricate a fully AM-based powering device, exploiting low density, open porosities able to host the microbes, systems easy to fuel continuously and to run safely. We obtained an optimal energy recovery close to 3 kWh m−3 per day that can power sensors and low-power appliances, allowing data processing and transmission from remote/harsh environments. PMID:26611142

  12. THERMODYNAMIC STUDY OF THE NICKEL ADDITION IN ZINC HOT-DIP GALVANIZING BATHS

    SciTech Connect

    Pistofidis, N.; Vourlias, G.

    2010-01-21

    A usual practice during zinc hot-dip galvanizing is the addition of nickel in the liquid zinc which is used to inhibit the Sandelin effect. Its action is due to the fact that the zeta(zeta) phase of the Fe-Zn system is replaced by the TAU(tau) phase of the Fe-Zn-Ni system. In the present work an attempt is made to explain the formation of the TAU phase with thermodynamics. For this reason the Gibbs free energy changes for TAU and zeta phases were calculated. The excess free energy for the system was calculated with the Redlich-Kister polyonyme. From this calculation it was deduced that the Gibbs energy change for the tau phase is negative. As a result its formation is spontaneous.

  13. Preliminary study of neutron absorption by concrete with boron carbide addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Yusof; Ariffin, Fatin Nabilah Tajul; Hamid, Roszilah; Yusof, Mohd Reusmaazran; Zali, Nurazila Mat; Ahmad, Megat Harun Al Rashid Megat; Yazid, Hafizal; Ahmad, Sahrim; Mohamed, Abdul Aziz

    2014-02-01

    Concrete has become a conventional material in construction of nuclear reactor due to its properties like safety and low cost. Boron carbide was added as additives in the concrete construction as it has a good neutron absorption property. The sample preparation for concrete was produced with different weight percent of boron carbide powder content. The neutron absorption rate of these samples was determined by using a fast neutron source of Americium-241/Be (Am-Be 241) and detection with a portable backscattering neutron detector. Concrete with 20 wt % of boron carbide shows the lowest count of neutron transmitted and this indicates the most neutrons have been absorbed by the concrete. Higher boron carbide content may affect the concrete strength and other properties.

  14. Sulphur diffusion in β-NiAl and effect of Pt additive: an ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuiying

    2016-02-01

    Diffusivities of detrimental impurity sulfur (S) in stoichiometric and Pt doped β-NiAl were evaluated using density functional theory calculations. The apparent activation energy and the pre-exponential factor of diffusivity via the next nearest neighbour (NNN) and interstitial jumps were evaluated to identify possible preferred diffusion mechanism(s). By calculating the electron localization function (ELF), the bonding characteristics of S with its surrounding atoms were assessed for the diffusion process. By comparison with the experimental results, the S diffusion through the NNN vacancy-mediated mechanism is found to be favoured. Addition of Pt in β-NiAl was found to significantly reduce the S diffusivity, and an associated electronic effect was explored. The elucidation of the above mechanisms may shed light on the development of new Pt-modified doped β-NiAl bond coats that can extend the life of oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings.

  15. Additive Manufacturing of a Microbial Fuel Cell--A detailed study.

    PubMed

    Calignano, Flaviana; Tommasi, Tonia; Manfredi, Diego; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    In contemporary society we observe an everlasting permeation of electron devices, smartphones, portable computing tools. The tiniest living organisms on Earth could become the key to address this challenge: energy generation by bacterial processes from renewable stocks/waste through devices such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, the application of this solution was limited by a moderately low efficiency. We explored the limits, if any, of additive manufacturing (AM) technology to fabricate a fully AM-based powering device, exploiting low density, open porosities able to host the microbes, systems easy to fuel continuously and to run safely. We obtained an optimal energy recovery close to 3 kWh m(-3) per day that can power sensors and low-power appliances, allowing data processing and transmission from remote/harsh environments. PMID:26611142

  16. Additive Manufacturing of a Microbial Fuel Cell—A detailed study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calignano, Flaviana; Tommasi, Tonia; Manfredi, Diego; Chiolerio, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    In contemporary society we observe an everlasting permeation of electron devices, smartphones, portable computing tools. The tiniest living organisms on Earth could become the key to address this challenge: energy generation by bacterial processes from renewable stocks/waste through devices such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, the application of this solution was limited by a moderately low efficiency. We explored the limits, if any, of additive manufacturing (AM) technology to fabricate a fully AM-based powering device, exploiting low density, open porosities able to host the microbes, systems easy to fuel continuously and to run safely. We obtained an optimal energy recovery close to 3 kWh m-3 per day that can power sensors and low-power appliances, allowing data processing and transmission from remote/harsh environments.

  17. Sensitivity studies of the new Coastal Surge and Inundation Prediction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condon, A. J.; Veeramony, J.

    2012-12-01

    This paper details the sensitivity studies involved in the validation of a coastal storm surge and inundation prediction system for operational use by the United States Navy. The system consists of the Delft3D-FLOW model coupled with the Delft3D-WAVE model. This dynamically coupled system will replace the current operational system, PC-Tides which does not include waves or other global ocean circulation. The Delft3D modeling system uses multiple nests to capture large, basin-scale circulation as well as coastal circulation and tightly couples waves and circulation at all scales. An additional benefit in using the presented system is that the Delft Dashboard, a graphical user interface product, can be used to simplify the set-up of Delft3D features such as the grid, elevation data, boundary forcing, and nesting. In this way less man-hours and training will be needed to perform inundation forecasts. The new coupled system is used to model storm surge and inundation produced by Hurricane Ike (2008) along the Gulf of Mexico coast. Due to the time constraints in an operational forecasting environment, storm simulations must be as streamlined as possible. Many factors such as model resolution, elevation data sets, parametrization of bottom friction, frequency of coupling between hydrodynamic and wave components, and atmospheric forcing among others can influence the run times and results of the simulations. To assess the sensitivity of the modeling system to these various components a "best" simulation was first developed. The best simulation consists of reanalysis atmospheric forcing in the form of Oceanweather wind and pressure fields. Further the wind field is modified by applying a directional land-masking to account for changes in land-roughness in the coastal zone. A number of air-sea drag coefficient formulations were tested to find the best match with observed results. An analysis of sea-level trends for the region reveals a seasonal trend of elevated sea level

  18. Incidence and determinants of IgE-mediated sensitization in apprentices. A prospective study.

    PubMed

    Gautrin, D; Ghezzo, H; Infante-Rivard, C; Malo, J L

    2000-10-01

    We investigated prospectively the incidence and determinants of work-related specific skin sensitization in a cohort of 769 apprentices, including 417 in animal health technology, 230 in pastry-making, and 122 in dental-hygiene technology. Subjects were recruited when starting exposure to laboratory animals, flour, or latex. A questionnaire and skin-prick tests with common and work-related allergens were administered on entry and at follow-up visits from 8 to 44 mo; information on number of hours of exposure to specific allergens was obtained. Among 769 apprentices, 698 attended >/= 1 follow-up visit. A total of 111 subjects developed specific sensitization over the study period. The incidence of work-related sensitization (per person-year) was 8.9% (95% CI 7.3 to 11.0%) in the animal-health program, 4.2% (95% CI 1.8 to 8.2%) in the pastry-making program, and 2.5% (95% CI = 0.7 to 4.3%) in the dental-hygiene program. In the animal health group, Cox regression analyses showed that atopy, nasal, and respiratory symptoms in the pollen season, and exposure assessed by the school attended or by duration of exposure to rodents were the most significant predictors of sensitization. In the dental-hygiene program, atopy and asthma were significant determinants. This study shows that: (1) an apprenticeship in animal-health technology carries a greater risk of developing specific sensitization than do apprenticeships in pastry-making and dental-hygiene; (2) atopy, respiratory symptoms in the pollen season, and number of hours in contact with rodents determine the risk of sensitization in apprentices in the animal health program. PMID:11029321

  19. Spectroscopic Evidence for Covalent Binding of Sulfadiazine to Natural Soils via 1,4-nucleophilic addition (Michael Type Addition) studied by Spin Labeling ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Among different classes of veterinary pharmaceuticals, Sulfadiazine (SDZ) is widely used in animal husbandry. Its residues were detected in different environmental compartments. However, soil is a hot spot for SDZ as it receives a large portion of excreted compounds through the application of manure during soil fertilization. Ample studies on the fate of SDZ in soils showed that a large portion forms nonextractable residues (NER) along with transformation products and a low mineralization (Mueller et al., 2013). A common observation was an initially fast formation of NER up to 10% of the applied amount promptly after the application of SDZ to soil, and this portion increased up to 50% within a few days (Mueller et al., 2013; Nowak et al., 2011). A common finding for SDZ, as for other sulfonamides, was biphasic kinetics of the formation of NER, which was attributed to the occurrence of two reaction processes: a rapid, often reversible process and a slower, irreversible process (Weber et al., 1996). A single-phase reaction process was also established under anaerobic treatment (Gulkowska et al., 2014). A major focus of this work is to elucidate a reaction mechanism of covalent binding of SDZ to soil that is currently required to estimate a risk of NER formed by SDZ in soils for human health. Taking into account a key role of the amine functional groups of SDZ on its reactivity in soil, nitroxide radicals with the sewed aromatic or aliphatic amines labeled soil samples and then, were investigated by means of ESR spectroscopy. 2,5,5-Trimethyl-2-(3-aminophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yloxy and 4-amino-2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl modeled decomposition products of SDZ with the aromatic and aliphatic amines, respectively. The application of the defined combination of both spin labels (SL) to different soils well simulated a change of a paramagnetic signal of soil organic radicals interacted with SDZ. After their application to soil, SL were found in soil sites characterized

  20. Spectroscopic Evidence for Covalent Binding of Sulfadiazine to Natural Soils via 1,4-nucleophilic addition (Michael Type Addition) studied by Spin Labeling ESR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrova, Olga

    2015-04-01

    Among different classes of veterinary pharmaceuticals, Sulfadiazine (SDZ) is widely used in animal husbandry. Its residues were detected in different environmental compartments. However, soil is a hot spot for SDZ as it receives a large portion of excreted compounds through the application of manure during soil fertilization. Ample studies on the fate of SDZ in soils showed that a large portion forms nonextractable residues (NER) along with transformation products and a low mineralization (Mueller et al., 2013). A common observation was an initially fast formation of NER up to 10% of the applied amount promptly after the application of SDZ to soil, and this portion increased up to 50% within a few days (Mueller et al., 2013; Nowak et al., 2011). A common finding for SDZ, as for other sulfonamides, was biphasic kinetics of the formation of NER, which was attributed to the occurrence of two reaction processes: a rapid, often reversible process and a slower, irreversible process (Weber et al., 1996). A single-phase reaction process was also established under anaerobic treatment (Gulkowska et al., 2014). A major focus of this work is to elucidate a reaction mechanism of covalent binding of SDZ to soil that is currently required to estimate a risk of NER formed by SDZ in soils for human health. Taking into account a key role of the amine functional groups of SDZ on its reactivity in soil, nitroxide radicals with the sewed aromatic or aliphatic amines labeled soil samples and then, were investigated by means of ESR spectroscopy. 2,5,5-Trimethyl-2-(3-aminophenyl)pyrrolidin-1-yloxy and 4-amino-2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidin-1-oxyl modeled decomposition products of SDZ with the aromatic and aliphatic amines, respectively. The application of the defined combination of both spin labels (SL) to different soils well simulated a change of a paramagnetic signal of soil organic radicals interacted with SDZ. After their application to soil, SL were found in soil sites characterized

  1. Mesoscale ensemble sensitivity analysis for predictability studies and observing network design in complex terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacker, Joshua

    2013-04-01

    Ensemble sensitivity analysis (ESA) is emerging as a viable alternative to adjoint sensitivity. Several open issues face ESA for forecasts dominated by mesoscale phenomena, including (1) sampling error arising from finite-sized ensembles causing over-estimated sensitivities, and (2) violation of linearity assumptions for strongly nonlinear flows. In an effort to use ESA for predictability studies and observing network design in complex terrain, we present results from experiments designed to address these open issues. Sampling error in ESA arises in two places. First, when hypothetical observations are introduced to test the sensitivity estimates for linearity. Here the same localization that was used in the filter itself can be simply applied. Second and more critical, localization should be considered within the sensitivity calculations. Sensitivity to hypothetical observations, estimated without re-running the ensemble, includes regression of a sample of a final-time (forecast) metric onto a sample of initial states. Derivation to include localization results in two localization coefficients (or factors) applied in separate regression steps. Because the forecast metric is usually a sum, and can also include a sum over a spatial region and multiple physical variables, a spatial localization function is difficult to specify. We present results from experiments to empirically estimate localization factors for ESA to test hypothetical observations for mesoscale data assimilation in complex terrain. Localization factors are first derived for an ensemble filter following the empirical localization methodology. Sensitivities for a fog event over Salt Lake City, and a Colorado downslope wind event, are tested for linearity by approximating assimilation of perfect observations at points of maximum sensitivity, both with and without localization. Observation sensitivity is then estimated, with and without localization, and tested for linearity. The validity of the

  2. Te Rita Papesch: Case Study of an Exemplary Learner of Maori as an Additional Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratima, Matiu Tai; Papesch, Te Rita

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the life experiences of one exemplar adult second language Maori learner--Te Rita Papesch. Te Rita was one of 17 participants who were interviewed as a part of the first author's PhD study which sought to answer the question: what factors lead to the development of proficiency in te reo Maori amongst adult…

  3. Study of NiO cathode modified by ZnO additive for MCFC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Bo; Li, Fei; Yu, Qing-chun; Chen, Gang; Zhao, Bin-yuan; Hu, Ke-ao

    The preparation and subsequent oxidation of nickel cathodes modified by impregnation with zinc oxide (ZnO) were evaluated by surface and bulk analysis. The electrochemical behaviors of ZnO impregnated NiO cathodes was also evaluated in a molten 62 mol% Li 2CO 3 + 38 mol% K 2CO 3 eutectic at 650 °C by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) as a function of ZnO content and immersion time. The ZnO impregnated nickel cathodes showed the similar porosity, pore size distribution and morphology to the reference nickel cathode. The stability tests of ZnO impregnated NiO cathodes showed that the ZnO additive could dramatically reduce the solubility of NiO in a eutectic carbonate mixture under the standard cathode gas condition. The impedance spectra for cathode materials show important variations during the 100 h of immersion. The incorporation of lithium in its structure and the low dissolution of nickel oxide and zinc oxide are responsible of these changes. After that, the structure reaches a stable state. The cathode material having 2 mol% of ZnO showed a very low dissolution and a good catalytic efficiency close to the NiO value. We thought that 2 mol% ZnO/NiO materials would be able to adapt as alternative cathode materials for MCFCs.

  4. Generalized linear and generalized additive models in studies of species distributions: Setting the scene

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guisan, A.; Edwards, T.C., Jr.; Hastie, T.

    2002-01-01

    An important statistical development of the last 30 years has been the advance in regression analysis provided by generalized linear models (GLMs) and generalized additive models (GAMs). Here we introduce a series of papers prepared within the framework of an international workshop entitled: Advances in GLMs/GAMs modeling: from species distribution to environmental management, held in Riederalp, Switzerland, 6-11 August 2001. We first discuss some general uses of statistical models in ecology, as well as provide a short review of several key examples of the use of GLMs and GAMs in ecological modeling efforts. We next present an overview of GLMs and GAMs, and discuss some of their related statistics used for predictor selection, model diagnostics, and evaluation. Included is a discussion of several new approaches applicable to GLMs and GAMs, such as ridge regression, an alternative to stepwise selection of predictors, and methods for the identification of interactions by a combined use of regression trees and several other approaches. We close with an overview of the papers and how we feel they advance our understanding of their application to ecological modeling. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chromosome studies in the aquatic monocots of Myanmar: A brief review with additional records

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Myanmar (Burma) constitutes a significant component of the Indo-Myanmar biodiversity hotspot, with elements of the Indian, the Indochina, and the Sino-Japanese floristic regions, yet thus far only a few reliable sources of the country's flora have been available. As a part of a contribution for the floristic inventory of Myanmar, since it is important in a floristic survey to obtain as much information as possible, in addition to previous two reports, here we present three more chromosome counts in the aquatic monocots of Myanmar: Limnocharis flava with 2n = 20, Sagittaria trifolia with 2n = 22 (Alismataceae), and Potamogeton distinctus × Potamogeton nodosus with 2n = 52 (Potamogetonaceae); the third one is new to science. A brief review of cytological researches in the floristic regions' 45 non-hybrid aquatic monocots plus well investigated two inter-specific hybrids that are recorded in Myanmar is given, indicating that the further works with a focus on species in Myanmar that has infra-specific chromosome variation in the floristic regions will address the precise evolutionary history of the aquatic flora of Myanmar. PMID:24891826

  6. Exploratory studies of extended storage of apheresis platelets in a platelet additive solution (PAS).

    PubMed

    Slichter, Sherrill J; Corson, Jill; Jones, Mary Kay; Christoffel, Todd; Pellham, Esther; Bailey, S Lawrence; Bolgiano, Doug

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the poststorage viability of apheresis platelets stored for up to 18 days in 80% platelet additive solution (PAS)/20% plasma, 117 healthy subjects donated platelets using the Haemonetics MCS+, COBE Spectra (Spectra), or Trima Accel (Trima) systems. Control platelets from the same subjects were compared with their stored test PAS platelets by radiolabeling their stored and control platelets with either (51)chromium or (111)indium. Trima platelets met Food and Drug Administration poststorage platelet viability criteria for only 7 days vs almost 13 days for Haemonetics platelets; ie, platelet recoveries after these storage times averaged 44 ± 3% vs 49 ± 3% and survivals were 5.4 ± 0.3 vs 4.6 ± 0.3 days, respectively. The differences in storage duration are likely related to both the collection system and the storage bag. The Spectra and Trima platelets were hyperconcentrated during collection, and PAS was added, whereas the Haemonetics platelets were elutriated with PAS, which may have resulted in less collection injury. When Spectra and Trima platelets were stored in Haemonetics' bags, poststorage viability was significantly improved. Platelet viability is better maintained in vitro than in vivo, allowing substantial increases in platelet storage times. However, implementation will require resolution of potential bacterial overgrowth during storage. PMID:24258816

  7. Fluorine-18-fluorodeoxygglucose-guided breast cancer surgery with a positron-sensitive probe: Validation in preclinical studies

    SciTech Connect

    Raylman, R.R.; Fisher, S.J.; Brown, R.S.; Ethier, S.P.; Wahl, R.L.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, the feasibility of utilizing 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-d-glucose (FDG) in conjunction with a positron-sensitive intraoperative probe to guide breast tumor excision was investigated. The probe was constructed with a plastic scintillator tip coupled to a photomultiplier tube with fiber optic cable. Anticipated resolution degradation was evaluated by measurement of line spread functions in the presence of background radiation. Realistic photon background distributions were simulated with a human torso phantom and a cardiac insert. The relationship between resolution and energy threshold was measured to find the optimal discriminator settings. In addition, probe sensitivity as a function of energy threshold was determined for various size-simulated tumors. Finally, the ability to localize breast cancers in vivo was tested in a rodent model. Mammary rat tumors implanted in Lewis rats were examined after injection with FDG; these results were correlated with those of histologic analyses. Measurements of line spread functions indicated that resolution could be maximized in a realistic background photon environment by increasing the energy threshold to levels at or above the Compton continuum edge (340 keV). At this setting, the probe`s sensitivity was determined to be 58 and 11 cps/{mu}Ci for 3.18- and 6.35-mm diameter simulated tumors, respectively. Probe readings correlated well with histologic results; the probe was generally able to discriminate between tumor and normal tissue. This study indicates that breast cancer surgery guided by a positron-sensitive probe warrants future evaluation in breast-conserving surgery of patients with breast cancer. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Sensitivity of Utility-Scale Solar Deployment Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market and Performance Assumptions

    SciTech Connect

    Eurek, K.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Mowers, M.

    2013-04-01

    The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The ReEDS model was used to simulate utility PV and CSP deployment for this present study, based on several market and performance assumptions - electricity demand, natural gas prices, coal retirements, cost and performance of non-solar renewable technologies, PV resource variability, distributed PV deployment, and solar market supply growth - in addition to the SunShot solar price projections. This study finds that utility-scale solar deployment is highly sensitive to solar prices. Other factors can have significant impacts, particularly electricity demand and natural gas prices.

  9. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  10. Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 10 loci influencing allergic sensitization

    PubMed Central

    Granell, Raquel; Strachan, David P; Alves, Alexessander Couto; Linneberg, Allan; Curtin, John A; Warrington, Nicole M; Standl, Marie; Kerkhof, Marjan; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Bukvic, Blazenka K; Kaakinen, Marika; Sleimann, Patrick; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Schramm, Katharina; Baltic, Svetlana; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Simpson, Angela; St Pourcain, Beate; Coin, Lachlan; Hui, Jennie; Walters, Eugene H; Tiesler, Carla M T; Duffy, David L; Jones, Graham; Ring, Susan M; McArdle, Wendy L; Price, Loren; Robertson, Colin F; Pekkanen, Juha; Tang, Clara S; Thiering, Elisabeth; Montgomery, Grant W; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Husemoen, Lise L; Herder, Christian; Kemp, John P; Elliot, Paul; James, Alan; Waldenberger, Melanie; Abramson, Michael J; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Knight, Julian C; Gupta, Ramneek; Thompson, Philip J; Holt, Patrick; Sly, Peter; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Blekic, Mario; Weidinger, Stephan; Hakonarsson, Hakon; Stefansson, Kari; Heinrich, Joachim; Postma, Dirkje S; Custovic, Adnan; Pennell, Craig E; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Koppelman, Gerard H; Timpson, Nicholas; Ferreira, Manuel A; Bisgaard, Hans; Henderson, A John

    2016-01-01

    Allergen-specific IgE (allergic sensitization) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of allergic disease. We performed the first large-scale genome wide association study (GWAS) of allergic sensitization in 5,789 affected individuals and 10,056 controls and followed up the top SNP from 26 loci in 6,114 affected individuals and 9,920 controls. We increased the number of susceptibility loci with genome-wide significant association to allergic sensitization from three to 10, including SNPs in or near TLR6, C11orf30, STAT6, SLC25A46, HLA-DQB1, IL1RL1, LPP, MYC, IL2 and HLA-B. All the top-SNPs were associated with allergic symptoms in an independent study. Risk variants at these 10 loci were estimated to account for at least 25% of allergic sensitization and allergic rhinitis. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations may provide novel insight into the etiology of allergic disease. PMID:23817571

  11. Cosmetic Contact Sensitivity in Patients with Melasma: Results of a Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Prabha, Neel; Mahajan, Vikram K.; Mehta, Karaninder S.; Chauhan, Pushpinder S.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Some of the patients with melasma perhaps have pigmented cosmetic dermatitis. However, cosmetic contact sensitivity in melasma remains poorly studied particularly in the Indian context. Objectives. To study cosmetic contact sensitivity in patients with melasma. Materials and Methods. 67 (F : M = 55 : 12) consecutive patients with melasma between 19 and 49 years of age were patch tested sequentially during January–December, 2012, with Indian Cosmetic and Fragrance Series, Indian Sunscreen Series, p-phenylenediamine, and patient's own cosmetic products. Results. 52 (78%) patients were in the age group of 20–40 years. The duration of melasma varied from 1 month to 20 years. Centrofacial, malar, and mandibular patterns were observed in 48 (72%), 18 (27%), and 1 (1%) patients, respectively. Indian Cosmetics and Fragrance Series elicited positive reactions in 29 (43.3%) patients. Cetrimide was the most common contact sensitizers eliciting positivity in 15 (52%) patients, followed by gallate mix in 9 (31%) patients and thiomersal in 7 (24%) patients. Only 2 of the 42 patients showed positive reaction from their own cosmetics while the other 5 patients had irritant reaction. Indian Sunscreen Series did not elicit any positive reaction. Conclusion. Cosmetics contact sensitivity appears as an important cause of melasma not associated with pregnancy, lactation, or hormone therapy. PMID:25132846

  12. Does a culturally sensitive smoking prevention program reduce smoking intentions among Aboriginal children? A pilot study.

    PubMed

    McKennitt, Daniel W; Currie, Cheryl L

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine if a culturally sensitive smoking prevention program would have short-term impacts on smoking intentions among Aboriginal children. Two schools with high Aboriginal enrollment were selected for the study. A grade 4 classroom in one school was randomly assigned to receive the culturally sensitive smoking prevention program. A grade 4 classroom in the second school received a standard smoking prevention program delivered in this jurisdiction. Children in each classroom were tested pre- and post-intervention to measure attitude changes about smoking. There was a significant reduction in intentions to smoke among Aboriginal children who received the culturally sensitive smoking prevention program. The small overall sample size precluded a direct comparison of the efficacy of the culturally sensitive and standard programs. The present findings suggest a smoking prevention program that has been culturally adapted for Aboriginal children may reduce future smoking intentions among Aboriginal grade 4 students. Further research is needed to determine the extent to which school smoking prevention programs adapted to respect the long-standing use of tobacco in Aboriginal cultural traditions may be more effective than standard programs in reaching Aboriginal youth. PMID:22875472

  13. The sensitizing capacity of naturally occurring quinones. Experimental studies in guinea pigs. II. Benzoquinones.

    PubMed

    Schulz, K H; Garbe, I; Hausen, B M; Simatupang, M H

    1979-05-01

    Experimental studies on the sensitizing capacity of naturally occurring benzoquinones, isolated from plants and woods have been carried out in guinea pigs of the Pirbright white strain. Seven compounds were available: primin, three dalbergiones, mansonia quinone (mansonone A), 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone and rapanone. With five of these substances (primin, mansonone A, three dalbergiones) guinea pigs could be sensitized. Primin, the allergen of Primula obconica Hance (primrose) proved to be the most effective one of all quinones tested in this and the preceding studies. As a similar but weaker sensitizer R-3, 4-dimethoxydalbergione from Machaerium scleroxylon Tul. (Pao ferro, Caviuna vermelha) could be identified. The results obtained with mansonone A, a sesquiterpenoid quinone from Mansonia altissima A. Chev. demonstrate that even naturally occurring orthoquinones are capable of inducing contact allergy. Allergic cross reactions could be obtained between all chemically related mansonones A-F. The results are in good accordance with the view that the sensitizing capacity of naturally occurring quinones depends on the fundamental quinoid structure and the length, position and configuration of the aliphatic side-chain. PMID:464645

  14. Voice measures of workload in the advanced flight deck: Additional studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Sid J.; Alpert, Murray

    1989-01-01

    These studies investigated acoustical analysis of the voice as a measure of workload in individual operators. In the first study, voice samples were recorded from a single operator during high, medium, and low workload conditions. Mean amplitude, frequency, syllable duration, and emphasis all tended to increase as workload increased. In the second study, NASA test pilots performed a laboratory task, and used a flight simulator under differing work conditions. For two of the pilots, high workload in the simulator brought about greater amplitude, peak duration, and stress. In both the laboratory and simulator tasks, high workload tended to be associated with more statistically significant drop-offs in the acoustical measures than were lower workload levels. There was a great deal of intra-subject variability in the acoustical measures. The results suggested that in individual operators, increased workload might be revealed by high initial amplitude and frequency, followed by rapid drop-offs over time.

  15. Additional Study of Water Droplet Median Volume Diameter (MVD) Effects on Ice Shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsao, Jen-Ching; Anderson, David N.

    2005-01-01

    This paper reports the result of an experimental study in the NASA Glenn Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) to evaluate how well the MVD-independent effect identified previously might apply to SLD conditions in rime icing situations. Models were NACA 0012 wing sections with chords of 53.3 and 91.4 cm. Tests were conducted with a nominal airspeed of 77 m/s (150 kt) and a number of MVD's ranging from 15 to 100 m with LWC of 0.5 to 1 g/cu m. In the present study, ice shapes recorded from past studies and recent results at SLD and Appendix-C conditions are reviewed to show that droplet diameter is not important to rime ice shape for MVD of 30 microns or larger, but for less than 30 m drop sizes a rime ice shape transition from convex to wedge to spearhead type ice shape is observed.

  16. Study on Type C Coal Fly ash as an Additive to Molding Sand for Steel Casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaniappan, Jayanthi

    2016-05-01

    Study of physio-chemical properties studies such as granulometric analysis, moisture, X ray fluorescence etc. were performed with Type C coal—combustion fly ash to investigate their potential as a distinct option for molding sand in foundry, thereby reducing the dependency on latter. Technological properties study such as compressive strength, tensile strength, permeability and compaction of various compositions of fly ash molding sand (10, 20 and 30 % fly ash substitute to chemically bonded sand) were performed and compared with silica molding sand. Steel casting production using this fly ash molding sand was done and the casting surface finish and typical casting parameters were assessed. It was noted that a good quality steel casting could be produced using type C fly ash molding sand, which effectively replaced 20 % of traditional molding sand and binders thereby providing greater financial profits to the foundry and an effective way of fly ash utilization (waste management).

  17. In situ vitrification and the effects of soil additives; A mixture experiment case study

    SciTech Connect

    Piepel, G.F.; Shade, J.W. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents a case study involving in situ vitrification (ISV), a process for immobilizing chemical or nuclear wastes in soil by melting-dissolving the contaminated soil into a glass block. One goal of the study was to investigate how viscosity and electrical conductivity were affected by mixing CaO and Na{sub 2}O with soil. A three-component constrained-region mixture experiment design was generated and the viscosity and electrical conductivity data collected. Several second-order mixture models were considered, and the Box-Cox transformation technique was applied to select property transformations. The fitted models were used to produce contour and component effects plots.

  18. Sensitivity enhancement of chemically amplified resists and performance study using EUV interference lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buitrago, Elizabeth; Nagahara, Seiji; Yildirim, Oktay; Nakagawa, Hisashi; Tagawa, Seiichi; Meeuwissen, Marieke; Nagai, Tomoki; Naruoka, Takehiko; Verspaget, Coen; Hoefnagels, Rik; Rispens, Gijsbert; Shiraishi, Gosuke; Terashita, Yuichi; Minekawa, Yukie; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Oshima, Akihiro; Vockenhuber, Michaela; Ekinci, Yasin

    2016-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL, λ = 13.5 nm) is the most promising candidate to manufacture electronic devices for future technology nodes in the semiconductor industry. Nonetheless, EUVL still faces many technological challenges as it moves toward high-volume manufacturing (HVM). A key bottleneck from the tool design and performance point of view has been the development of an efficient, high power EUV light source for high throughput production. Consequently, there has been extensive research on different methodologies to enhance EUV resist sensitivity. Resist performance is measured in terms of its ultimate printing resolution, line width roughness (LWR), sensitivity (S or best energy BE) and exposure latitude (EL). However, there are well-known fundamental trade-off relationships (LRS trade-off) among these parameters for chemically amplified resists (CARs). Here we present early proof-of-principle results for a multi-exposure lithography process that has the potential for high sensitivity enhancement without compromising other important performance characteristics by the use of a Photosensitized Chemically Amplified Resist (PSCAR). With this method, we seek to increase the sensitivity by combining a first EUV pattern exposure with a second UV flood exposure (λ = 365 nm) and the use of a PSCAR. In addition, we have evaluated over 50 different state-of-the-art EUV CARs. Among these, we have identified several promising candidates that simultaneously meet sensitivity, LWR and EL high performance requirements with the aim of resolving line space (L/S) features for the 7 and 5 nm logic node (16 nm and 13 nm half-pitch HP, respectively) for HVM. Several CARs were additionally found to be well resolved down to 12 nm and 11 nm HP with minimal pattern collapse and bridging, a remarkable feat for CARs. Finally, the performance of two negative tone state-of-the-art alternative resist platforms previously investigated was compared to the CAR performance at and

  19. A review of approaches to the study of turbulence modification by means of non-Newtonian additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlassopoulos, Dimitris; Schowalter, William R.

    1987-12-01

    The addition of small amounts of polymers to Newtonian liquids under conditions of turbulent flow results in substantial reduction of skin friction. This phenomenon has been observed experimentally. It can be attributed to the unusual behavior of dilute polymer solutions in turbulent flows. A condensed review of topics relevent to theoretical study of drag reduction by non-Newtonian additives is presented. In addition, the techniques and results of experimental investigations of this phenomenon are examined. It is proposed that dilute solutions of polymers or surfactants can be rheologically characterized by measuring the secondary flow characteristics that occur in the neighborhood of an oscillating cylinder. Plans for conducting these measurements are presented.

  20. A Study of the Effect of Additional Reading Assistance on Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillan-Sanderson, Nicole A.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a procedure one school district used to increase students' reading abilities through reviewing data and adjusting the instruction to give students intensive services, as needed. This school worked in a problem-solving team approach to develop a comprehensive team that followed the progression of student achievement.…

  1. Genome-Wide Association Study of Intelligence: Additive Effects of Novel Brain Expressed Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loo, Sandra K.; Shtir, Corina; Doyle, Alysa E.; Mick, Eric; McGough, James J.; McCracken, James; Biederman, Joseph; Smalley, Susan L.; Cantor, Rita M.; Faraone, Stephen V.; Nelson, Stanley F.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present study was to identify common genetic variants that are associated with human intelligence or general cognitive ability. Method: We performed a genome-wide association analysis with a dense set of 1 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and quantitative intelligence scores within an ancestrally…

  2. Nahuatl as a Classical, Foreign, and Additional Language: A Phenomenological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Felice, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    In this study, participants learning an endangered language variety shared their experiences, thoughts, and feelings about the often complex and diverse language-learning process. I used phenomenological interviews in order to learn more about these English or Spanish language speakers' journey with the Nahuatl language. From first encounter to…

  3. CNV-based genome wide association study reveals additional variants contributing to meat quality in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pork quality is important both to the meat processing industry and consumers’ purchasing attitudes. Copy number variation (CNV) is a burgeoning kind of variant that may influence meat quality. Herein, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed between CNVs and meat quality traits in swine....

  4. Vascular autorescaling of fMRI (VasA fMRI) improves sensitivity of population studies: A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Kazan, Samira M; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Callaghan, Martina F; Flandin, Guillaume; Huber, Laurentius; Leech, Robert; Kennerley, Aneurin; Windischberger, Christian; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal is widely used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of brain function in health and disease. The statistical power of fMRI group studies is significantly hampered by high inter-subject variance due to differences in baseline vascular physiology. Several methods have been proposed to account for physiological vascularization differences between subjects and hence improve the sensitivity in group studies. However, these methods require the acquisition of additional reference scans (such as a full resting-state fMRI session or ASL-based calibrated BOLD). We present a vascular autorescaling (VasA) method, which does not require any additional reference scans. VasA is based on the observation that slow oscillations (<0.1Hz) in arterial blood CO2 levels occur naturally due to changes in respiration patterns. These oscillations yield fMRI signal changes whose amplitudes reflect the blood oxygenation levels and underlying local vascularization and vascular responsivity. VasA estimates proxies of the amplitude of these CO2-driven oscillations directly from the residuals of task-related fMRI data without the need for reference scans. The estimates are used to scale the amplitude of task-related fMRI responses, to account for vascular differences. The VasA maps compared well to cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) maps and cerebral blood volume maps based on vascular space occupancy (VASO) measurements in four volunteers, speaking to the physiological vascular basis of VasA. VasA was validated in a wide variety of tasks in 138 volunteers. VasA increased t-scores by up to 30% in specific brain areas such as the visual cortex. The number of activated voxels was increased by up to 200% in brain areas such as the orbital frontal cortex while still controlling the nominal false-positive rate. VasA fMRI outperformed previously proposed rescaling approaches based on resting-state fMRI data and can be readily applied to any

  5. Vascular autorescaling of fMRI (VasA fMRI) improves sensitivity of population studies: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kazan, Samira M.; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Callaghan, Martina F.; Flandin, Guillaume; Huber, Laurentius; Leech, Robert; Kennerley, Aneurin; Windischberger, Christian; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    The blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signal is widely used for functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of brain function in health and disease. The statistical power of fMRI group studies is significantly hampered by high inter-subject variance due to differences in baseline vascular physiology. Several methods have been proposed to account for physiological vascularization differences between subjects and hence improve the sensitivity in group studies. However, these methods require the acquisition of additional reference scans (such as a full resting-state fMRI session or ASL-based calibrated BOLD). We present a vascular autorescaling (VasA) method, which does not require any additional reference scans. VasA is based on the observation that slow oscillations (< 0.1 Hz) in arterial blood CO2 levels occur naturally due to changes in respiration patterns. These oscillations yield fMRI signal changes whose amplitudes reflect the blood oxygenation levels and underlying local vascularization and vascular responsivity. VasA estimates proxies of the amplitude of these CO2-driven oscillations directly from the residuals of task-related fMRI data without the need for reference scans. The estimates are used to scale the amplitude of task-related fMRI responses, to account for vascular differences. The VasA maps compared well to cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) maps and cerebral blood volume maps based on vascular space occupancy (VASO) measurements in four volunteers, speaking to the physiological vascular basis of VasA. VasA was validated in a wide variety of tasks in 138 volunteers. VasA increased t-scores by up to 30% in specific brain areas such as the visual cortex. The number of activated voxels was increased by up to 200% in brain areas such as the orbital frontal cortex while still controlling the nominal false-positive rate. VasA fMRI outperformed previously proposed rescaling approaches based on resting-state fMRI data and can be readily applied to

  6. Sensitization to silk allergen among workers of silk filatures in India: a comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Gowda, Giriyanna; Vijayeendra, Anagha Manakari; Sarkar, Nivedita; Nagaraj, Chitra; Masthi, Nugehally Raju Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Background Sericulture plays an eminent role in development of rural economy in India. Silk filature is a unit where silk is unwound from the cocoons and the strands are collected into skeins. During the process workers are exposed to the high molecular weight proteins like Sericin and Fibroin which are potent allergens leading to sensitization over a period of time and subsequently occupational related health disorders. Objective To identify and compare the magnitude of silk allergen sensitization in workers of silk filatures. Methods A community based comparative descriptive study was conducted for a period of 1 year at Ramanagara in south India. One hundred twenty subjects working in the silk filatures formed the study group. For comparison, 2 types of controls were selected viz.120 subjects who were not working in the silk filatures but resided in the same geographical area (control A) and 360 subjects who were not working in silk filatures as well not residing in the same geographical area (control B). Skin prick test was used to identify the silk allergen sensitization. Results Mean age was 34.14 ± 2.84 years in the study group. Mean age was 40.59 ± 14.40 years and 38.54 ± 12.20 years in control A and control B, respectively. There were 35 males (29.16%) and 85 females (70.84%) in the study group. There were 58 (48.34%) males and 62 (51.66%) females and 152 (42.2%) males and 208 females (57.8%) in control A and control B, respectively. Sensitization to silk allergen was 35.83% in the study group and 20.83% in the control group A and 11.11% in control group B. There was difference in the allergen sensitivity between the study group and control groups and it was statistically significant (chi-square = 38.08; p < 0.001). Conclusion There is high burden of silk allergen sensitization among silk filature workers. PMID:27141481

  7. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  8. Thermal analysis studies of Ge additive of Se-Te glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, M.; Abdel-Rahim, M. A.

    2016-04-01

    Ge x Se50Te50- x ( x = 5, 15, 20, 35 at.%) bulk glasses were synthesized by the melt quenching method. The amorphous nature of the investigated glasses was determined by X-ray diffraction. Results of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) of the studied compositions under non-isothermal conditions were reported and discussed. The glass transition temperature ( T g), onset crystallization temperature ( T c), and crystallization peak temperature ( T p) were determined from DSC traces at different heating rates. It was found that the values of T g, T c, and T p rely on both composition and heating rate. A double crystallization stages were observed in the DSC results. Various kinetics parameters such as the glass transition energy ( E g), crystallization activation energy ( E c), and rate constant ( K p) were calculated. The glass-forming ability of the studied compositions was discussed as function of the determined kinetics parameters.

  9. Comparative study of glycine single crystals with additive of potassium nitrate in different concentration ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gujarati, Vivek P.; Deshpande, M. P.; Patel, Kamakshi R.; Chaki, S. H.

    2016-05-01

    Semi-organic crystals of Glycine Potassium Nitrate (GPN) with potential applications in Non linear optics (NLO) were grown using slow evaporation technique. Glycine and Potassium Nitrate were taken in three different concentration ratios of 3:1, 2:1 and 1:1 respectively. We checked the solubility of the material in distilled water at different temperatures and could observe the growth of crystals in 7 weeks time. Purity of the grown crystals was confirmed by Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDAX) and CHN analysis. GSN Powder X-ray diffraction pattern was recorded to confirm the crystalline nature. To confirm the applications of grown crystals in opto-electronics field, UV-Vis-NIR study was carried out. Dielectric properties of the samples were studied in between the frequency range 1Hz to 100 KHz.

  10. Brief reconnaissance study for the addition of hydropower for Riegel Dam, Trion, Georgia

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, T.G. Jr.

    1982-05-10

    The feasibility of retrofitting the Riegel Dam near Trion, Georgia for power generation was examined. This dam has a developable head of 17 ft., was built in 1900 for supplying hydroelectric power for a textile mill, and currently provides cooling water to the mill. The study of environmental, institutional, safety and economic factors showed that hydroelectric power development at this site would require new generating equipment and that such retrofitting appears to be economically feasible. (LCL)

  11. Brief reconnaissance study for the addition of hydropower for Carr Fork Dam, Sassafras, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, T.G. Jr.

    1982-05-24

    The feasibility of retrofitting the Carr Fork Dam near Hazard, KY for power generation was examined. This dam has a developable head of 80 ft and was built in 1975 to provide flood protection. The study of environmental, institutional, safety, and economic factors showed that the total investment cost would be $909,600 and that hydroelectric power development at this site is not feasible unless a higher price could be obtained for the power sold. (LCL)

  12. A clinical comparative study of Cadiax Compact II and intraoral records using wax and addition silicone.

    PubMed

    Torabi, Kianoosh; Pour, Sasan Rasaei; Ahangari, Ahmad Hassan; Ghodsi, Safoura

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of mandibular movements is necessary to form the occlusal anatomical contour, analyze the temporomandibular joint status, and evaluate the patient's occlusion. This clinical study was conducted to compare the mandibular recording device Cadiax Compact II with routine intraoral records for measuring condylar inclinations. The results showed that the differences between Cadiax and intraoral records were statistically significant for all measurements. Cadiax measurements had a stronger correlation with silicone records. The quantities of recorded Bennett angles were lower and the values of sagittal condylar inclination were higher with Cadiax than with routine intraoral records. PMID:25390868

  13. A study of the enhanced sensitizing capacity of a contact allergen in lipid vesicle formulations

    SciTech Connect

    Simonsson, Carl; Madsen, Jakob Torp; Graneli, Annette; Andersen, Klaus E.; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Jonsson, Charlotte A.; Ericson, Marica B.

    2011-05-01

    The growing focus on nanotechnology and the increased use of nano-sized structures, e.g. vesicles, in topical formulations has led to safety concerns. We have investigated the sensitizing capacity and penetration properties of a fluorescent model compound, rhodamine B isothiocyanate (RBITC), when administered in micro- and nano-scale vesicle formulations. The sensitizing capacity of RBITC was studied using the murine local lymph node assay (LLNA) and the skin penetration properties were compared using diffusion cells in combination with two-photon microscopy (TPM). The lymph node cell proliferation, an indicator of a compounds sensitizing capacity, increased when RBITC was applied in lipid vesicles as compared to an ethanol:water (Et:W) solution. Micro-scale vesicles showed a slightly higher cell proliferative response compared to nano-scale vesicles. TPM imaging revealed that the vesicle formulations improved the skin penetration of RBITC compared to the Et:W solution. A strong fluorescent region in the stratum corneum and upper epidermis implies elevated association of RBITC to these skin layers when formulated in lipid vesicles. In conclusion, the results indicate that there could be an elevated risk of sensitization when haptens are delivered in vehicles containing lipid vesicles. Although the size of the vesicles seems to be of minor importance, further studies are needed before a more generalized conclusion can be drawn. It is likely that the enhanced sensitizing capacity is a consequence of the improved penetration and increased formation of hapten-protein complexes in epidermis when RBITC is delivered in ethosomal formulations. - Graphical Abstract: Display Omitted

  14. Wheat sensitization and work-related symptoms in the baking industry are preventable. An epidemiologic study.

    PubMed

    Houba, R; Heederik, D; Doekes, G

    1998-11-01

    A cross-sectional study was conducted among 393 workers from 21 bakeries to study the relationship between wheat allergen exposure and wheat sensitization and work-related allergic symptoms. Exposure to wheat allergens was characterized by a recently developed and validated immunoassay. Specific IgE antibodies against wheat flour and common allergens were measured by immunoassays, and work-related allergic symptoms were registered by questionnaire. A strong and positive association was found between wheat flour allergen exposure and wheat flour sensitization. This relationship was steepest and strongest in atopics. Prevalence ratios for high and medium wheat allergen exposure were 5.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6-16.2), and 2.7 (0.5-14.5) for atopic workers, and 2.5 (0.8-7.5) and 1.4 (0. 3-6.4) for nonatopics, compared with workers with low wheat allergen exposure. In sensitized bakers those with an elevated allergen exposure had more often work-related symptoms, with prevalence ratios for high and medium wheat allergen exposure of 3.5 (CI 1.6-7. 5) and 2.6 (CI 0.9-7.8), respectively, compared with workers with low wheat allergen exposure. The existence of exposure-sensitization gradients suggests that work-related sensitization risk will be negligible when exposure levels will be reduced to average exposure concentration of 0.2 microgram/m3 wheat allergen or approximately 0.5 mg/m3 inhalable dust during a work shift. PMID:9817699

  15. [Chewing gum as an additional agent in maintaining oral hygiene versus smoking status--preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Nakonieczna-Rudnicka, Marta; Strycharz-Dudziak, Małgorzata; Bachanek, Teresa

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays chewing gum is widely used in different age groups, so complying with proper duration and frequency of chewing is an important factor influencing the state of masticatory system. The study involved 112 dental students of the Medical University of Lublin. Everyday use of chewing gum declared 47,32% of cases. Chewing time up to 10 minutes was stated in 23,08% of respondents, 11-20 minutes in 40,38% of interviewees. Among the examined students 17,3% smoked cigarettes. In smokers group 83,33% of questioned chewed the gum every day, while among non-smokers - 43,37%. Chewing time shorter than 10 minutes declared 22,22% of smokers and 23,26% of non-smokers, while chewing time between 11-20 minutes - 27,78% i 44,35% of smokers and non-smokers respectively. Obtained results indicate the need of carrying out further studies aimed at the nicotine influence on saliva parameters with respect to development of diseases of hard tooth tissues. PMID:23421028

  16. Study on the interaction of the toxic food additive carmoisine with serum albumins: a microcalorimetric investigation.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anirban; Kumar, Gopinatha Suresh

    2014-05-30

    The interaction of the synthetic azo dye and food colorant carmoisine with human and bovine serum albumins was studied by microcalorimetric techniques. A complete thermodynamic profile of the interaction was obtained from isothermal titration calorimetry studies. The equilibrium constant of the complexation process was of the order of 10(6)M(-1) and the binding stoichiometry was found to be 1:1 with both the serum albumins. The binding was driven by negative standard molar enthalpy and positive standard molar entropy contributions. The binding affinity was lower at higher salt concentrations in both cases but the same was dominated by mostly non-electrostatic forces at all salt concentrations. The polyelectrolytic forces contributed only 5-8% of the total standard molar Gibbs energy change. The standard molar enthalpy change enhanced whereas the standard molar entropic contribution decreased with rise in temperature but they compensated each other to keep the standard molar Gibbs energy change almost invariant. The negative standard molar heat capacity values suggested the involvement of a significant hydrophobic contribution in the complexation process. Besides, enthalpy-entropy compensation phenomenon was also observed in both the systems. The thermal stability of the serum proteins was found to be remarkably enhanced on binding to carmoisine. PMID:24742664

  17. Combined ab initio molecular dynamics and experimental studies of carbon atom addition to benzene.

    PubMed

    McKee, Michael L; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Schreiner, Peter R

    2014-04-17

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics was used to explore the reactions between triplet and singlet carbon atoms with benzene. The computations reveal that, in the singlet C atom reaction, products are very exothermic where nearly every collision yields a product that is determined by the initial encounter geometry. The singlet C atom reaction does not follow the minimum energy path because the bimolecular reaction is controlled by dynamics (i.e., initial orientation of encounter). On the other hand, in a 10 K solid Ar matrix, ground state C((3)P) atoms do tend to follow RRKM kinetics. Thus, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) results indicate that a significant fraction of C-H insertion occurs to form phenylcarbene whereas, in marked contrast to previous theoretical and experimental conclusions, the Ar matrix isolation studies indicate a large fraction of direct cycloheptatetraene formation, without the intermediacy of phenylcarbene. The AIMD calculations are more consistent with vaporized carbon atom experiments where labeling studies indicate the initial formation of phenylcarbene. This underlines that the availability of thermodynamic sinks can completely alter the observed reaction dynamics. PMID:24661002

  18. Critical analysis of studies concerning reports of respiratory sensitization to certain wood dusts.

    PubMed

    Williams, P Brock

    2005-01-01

    Studies have been published reporting that exposures to certain wood dusts are sensitizing, resulting in respiratory symptoms in susceptible individuals. Many of the publications in this field are case reports that collectively have a number of important shortcomings. Illuminating these should further our understanding of whether respiratory sensitization results from occupational exposure to particular wood dusts. The aim of this study was to critically review and understand the evidence to date regarding reported respiratory sensitization in connection with wood dusts from oak, beech, pine, ash, and western red cedar. Publications dealing with these commercially important woods in North America have been selected from the Pubmed/Medline database (1966 to the present) using the key word, wood dust. These articles, along with supporting references on procedures and techniques, are reviewed according to the strengths and weaknesses of evidence and conclusions presented. Evidence from skin testing, specific immunoglobulin E measurements, and basophil histamine release tests suggests that reported symptoms are not likely to be immunologically derived. Because of methodological problems, challenge tests with specific wood dusts do not support the conclusion that reactions to certain wood dusts are specific. Experiments with nonspecific bronchoconstrictive agents indicate that a number of study subjects possess hyperresponsive airways. Thus, select individuals can demonstrate various respiratory symptoms in the woodworking industry, but any specificity or direct cause is currently unproved. Current studies do not support that exposure to wood dusts from a number of common North American wood species causes immunologic sensitization in woodworkers. Rather, symptoms reported in some studies of exposed workers seem to follow the paradigm for nonspecific respiratory responses in individuals with hyperresponsive airways. PMID:16270718

  19. A sensitivity study of weather data inaccuracies on evaporation duct height algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, John

    1991-05-01

    The sensitivity of five evaporation duct height algorithms to errors in shipboard meteorological data is examined, and the algorithms are intercompared. The data set used was generated parametrically so a large variation of environmental conditions could be considered. The errors in the meteorological data consisted of two types: uncorrelated random errors associated with sensor inaccuracies and both random and systematic errors due to the influence of ship-induced distortions. Before considering any errors, however, algorithm-to-algorithm differences of 10%-70% in the computed duct height are demonstrated and related to the assumptions and simplifications used during algorithm development. The sensitivity study shows that although the evaporation duct height algorithms have different genealogies, they have similar sensitivities. The sensitivities to errors caused by sensor inaccuracies range from 10% to 50% relative uncertainty in the calculated duct height, except for extremely low duct heights where the uncertainties are greater. During the daytime the relative uncertainties due to errors caused by ship-induced distortions are approximately 10%-20% higher than those due to the sensor errors, and they are about 50%-75% smaller at night because of a lack of solar heating of the ship. These conclusions represent a best-case scenario for Navy operational applications because of the omission of some sources of error, the optimistic ship error characteristics used, and the assumption of horizontal homogeneity in the near-surface refractivity field.

  20. Time-Resolved Study on Xanthene Dye-Sensitized Carbon Nitride Photocatalytic Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiyu; Li, Shuang; Lu, Rong; Yu, Anchi

    2015-10-01

    Dye sensitization is a promising strategy to extend the visible light absorption of carbon nitride (C3N4) and increase the photocatalytic hydrogen evolution efficiency of C3N4 under visible light irradiation. However, the interaction dynamics between C3N4 and a sensitized dye has not been reported in the literature. Herein, we selected four commonly used xanthene dyes such as fluorescein, dibromofluorescein, eosin Y, and erythrosine B and prepared their corresponding dye-sensitized-C3N4 composites. For the first time, we derived the electron transfer rate from the LUMO of each photoexcited xanthene dye to the conduction band of C3N4 using picoesecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements. We also obtained the reduction potentials of all selected xanthene dyes and C3N4 with cyclic voltammetry measurements. The cyclic voltammetry measurements gave a consistent result with the picosecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements. Besides, the possibility of the selected xanthene dye as an acceptor for the hole of the photoexcited C3N4 was also discussed. We believe this study is significant for the researcher to understanding the fundamental aspects in the xanthene dye-sensitized-C3N4 photocatalytic systems. PMID:26389679

  1. Shelf Life and Quality Study of Minced Tilapia with Nori and Hijiki Seaweeds as Natural Additives

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Ingridy Simone; Shirahigue, Ligianne Din; Ferraz de Arruda Sucasas, Lia; Anbe, Lika; da Cruz, Pedro Gomes; Gallo, Cláudio Rosa; Carpes, Solange Teresinha; Marques, Marcos José; Oetterer, Marília

    2014-01-01

    The extraction of mechanically separated meat has emerged as an attractive process. However, it increases the incorporation of oxygen and, consequently, of flavors due to rancidity. Thus, preservatives must be added. The objective of this study was to evaluate the shelf life of minced tilapia to replace synthetic preservatives with Hijiki and Nori seaweeds extracts. The application of the extracts had no effect on the chemical composition of the minced tilapia. The seaweed extracts had inhibitory effect on total volatile base nitrogen. The minced tilapia complied with the microbiological standard set by Brazilin law. The panelists detected no differences in the rancid aroma and only minor differences were detected in the color of the products. It can be concluded that the minced tilapia with added seaweed extracts were within quality standards during frozen storage. PMID:25478593

  2. Shelf life and quality study of minced tilapia with Nori and Hijiki seaweeds as natural additives.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ingridy Simone; Shirahigue, Ligianne Din; Ferraz de Arruda Sucasas, Lia; Anbe, Lika; da Cruz, Pedro Gomes; Gallo, Cláudio Rosa; Carpes, Solange Teresinha; Marques, Marcos José; Oetterer, Marília

    2014-01-01

    The extraction of mechanically separated meat has emerged as an attractive process. However, it increases the incorporation of oxygen and, consequently, of flavors due to rancidity. Thus, preservatives must be added. The objective of this study was to evaluate the shelf life of minced tilapia to replace synthetic preservatives with Hijiki and Nori seaweeds extracts. The application of the extracts had no effect on the chemical composition of the minced tilapia. The seaweed extracts had inhibitory effect on total volatile base nitrogen. The minced tilapia complied with the microbiological standard set by Brazilin law. The panelists detected no differences in the rancid aroma and only minor differences were detected in the color of the products. It can be concluded that the minced tilapia with added seaweed extracts were within quality standards during frozen storage. PMID:25478593

  3. l-carnitine as a Potential Additive in Blood Storage Solutions: A Study on Erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Soumya, R; Carl, H; Vani, R

    2016-09-01

    Erythrocytes undergo various changes during storage (storage lesion) that in turn reduces their functioning and survival. Oxidative stress plays a major role in the storage lesion and antioxidants can be used to combat this stress. This study elucidates the effects of l-carnitine (LC) on erythrocytes of stored blood. Blood was obtained from male Wistar rats and stored (4 °C) for 20 days in CPDA-1 (citrate phosphate dextrose adenine) solution. Samples were divided into-(i) controls (ii) LC 10 (l-carnitine at a concentration of 10 mM) (iii) LC 30 (l-carnitine at a concentration of 30 mM) and (iv) LC 60 (l-carnitine at a concentration of 60 mM). Every fifth day, the biomarkers (haemoglobin, hemolysis, antioxidant enzymes, lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation products) were analysed in erythrocytes. Hemoglobin and protein sulfhydryls were insignificant during storage indicative of the maintenance of hemoglobin and sulfhydryls in all groups. Superoxide dismutase and malondialdehyde levels increased initially and decreased towards the end of storage. The levels of catalase and glutathione peroxidase were lower in experimentals than controls during storage. l-carnitine assisted the enzymes by scavenging the reactive oxygen species produced. Hemolysis increased in all groups with storage, elucidating that l-carnitine could not completely protect lipids and proteins from oxidative stress. Hence, this study opens up new avenues of using l-carnitine as a component of storage solutions with combinations of antioxidants in order to maintain efficacy of erythrocytes. PMID:27429526

  4. Biological effect of food additive titanium dioxide nanoparticles on intestine: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Song, Zheng-Mei; Chen, Ni; Liu, Jia-Hui; Tang, Huan; Deng, Xiaoyong; Xi, Wen-Song; Han, Kai; Cao, Aoneng; Liu, Yuanfang; Wang, Haifang

    2015-10-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) are widely found in food-related consumer products. Understanding the effect of TiO2 NPs on the intestinal barrier and absorption is essential and vital for the safety assessment of orally administrated TiO2 NPs. In this study, the cytotoxicity and translocation of two native TiO2 NPs, and these two TiO2 NPs pretreated with the digestion simulation fluid or bovine serum albumin were investigated in undifferentiated Caco-2 cells, differentiated Caco-2 cells and Caco-2 monolayer. TiO2 NPs with a concentration less than 200 µg ml(-1) did not induce any toxicity in differentiated cells and Caco-2 monolayer after 24 h exposure. However, TiO2 NPs pretreated with digestion simulation fluids at 200 µg ml(-1) inhibited the growth of undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Undifferentiated Caco-2 cells swallowed native TiO2 NPs easily, but not pretreated NPs, implying the protein coating on NPs impeded the cellular uptake. Compared with undifferentiated cells, differentiated ones possessed much lower uptake ability of these TiO2 NPs. Similarly, the traverse of TiO2 NPs through the Caco-2 monolayer was also negligible. Therefore, we infer the possibility of TiO2 NPs traversing through the intestine of animal or human after oral intake is quite low. This study provides valuable information for the risk assessment of TiO2 NPs in food. PMID:26106068

  5. Mechanistic study of secondary organic aerosol components formed from nucleophilic addition reactions of methacrylic acid epoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Miner, C. R.; Mael, L. E.; Elrod, M. J.

    2014-08-01

    Recently, methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) has been proposed as a precursor to an important class of isoprene-derived compounds found in secondary organic aerosol (SOA): 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) and a set of oligomers, nitric acid esters and sulfuric acid esters related to 2-MG. However, the specific chemical mechanisms by which MAE could form these compounds have not been previously studied. In order to determine the relevance of these processes to atmospheric aerosol, MAE and 2-MG have been synthesized and a series of bulk solution-phase experiments aimed at studying the reactivity of MAE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been performed. The present results indicate that the acid-catalyzed MAE reaction is more than 600 times slower than a similar reaction of an important isoprene-derived epoxide, but is still expected to be kinetically feasible in the atmosphere on more acidic SOA. The specific mechanism by which MAE leads to oligomers was identified, and the reactions of MAE with a number of atmospherically relevant nucleophiles were also investigated. Because the nucleophilic strengths of water, sulfate, alcohols (including 2-MG), and acids (including MAE and 2-MG) in their reactions with MAE were found to be of a similar magnitude, it is expected that a diverse variety of MAE + nucleophile product species may be formed on ambient SOA. Thus, the results indicate that epoxide chain reaction oligomerization will be limited by the presence of high concentrations of non-epoxide nucleophiles (such as water); this finding is consistent with previous environmental chamber investigations of the relative humidity-dependence of 2-MG-derived oligomerization processes and suggests that extensive oligomerization may not be likely on ambient SOA because of other competitive MAE reaction mechanisms.

  6. Mechanistic study of secondary organic aerosol components formed from nucleophilic addition reactions of methacrylic acid epoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdsall, A. W.; Miner, C. R.; Mael, L. E.; Elrod, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    Recently, methacrylic acid epoxide (MAE) has been proposed as a precursor to an important class of isoprene-derived compounds found in secondary organic aerosol (SOA): 2-methylglyceric acid (2-MG) and a set of oligomers, nitric acid esters, and sulfuric acid esters related to 2-MG. However, the specific chemical mechanisms by which MAE could form these compounds have not been previously studied with experimental methods. In order to determine the relevance of these processes to atmospheric aerosol, MAE and 2-MG have been synthesized and a series of bulk solution-phase experiments aimed at studying the reactivity of MAE using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy have been performed. The present results indicate that the acid-catalyzed MAE reaction is more than 600 times slower than a similar reaction of an important isoprene-derived epoxide, but is still expected to be kinetically feasible in the atmosphere on more acidic SOA. The specific mechanism by which MAE leads to oligomers was identified, and the reactions of MAE with a number of atmospherically relevant nucleophiles were also investigated. Because the nucleophilic strengths of water, sulfate, alcohols (including 2-MG), and acids (including MAE and 2-MG) in their reactions with MAE were found to be of similar magnitudes, it is expected that a diverse variety of MAE + nucleophile product species may be formed on ambient SOA. Thus, the results indicate that epoxide chain reaction oligomerization will be limited by the presence of high concentrations of non-epoxide nucleophiles (such as water); this finding is consistent with previous environmental chamber investigations of the relative humidity dependence of 2-MG-derived oligomerization processes and suggests that extensive oligomerization may not be likely on ambient SOA because of other competitive MAE reaction mechanisms.

  7. Maternal Sensitivity and Child Secure Base Use in Early Childhood: Studies in Different Cultural Contexts.

    PubMed

    Posada, German; Trumbell, Jill; Noblega, Magaly; Plata, Sandra; Peña, Paola; Carbonell, Olga A; Lu, Ting

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether maternal sensitivity and child security are related during early childhood and whether such an association is found in different cultural and social contexts. Mother-child dyads (N = 237) from four different countries (Colombia, Mexico, Peru, and the United States) were observed in naturalistic settings when children were between 36 and 72 months of age. Maternal and child behavior during interactions at home and in the playground were described using Q methodology. Findings reveal that across cultures, concurrent maternal sensitivity and more specific behavioral domains of maternal care (e.g., contributions to harmonious interactions and secure base support) are important for children's attachment security during early childhood. Implications for the study of attachment relationships beyond infancy and in diverse contexts are highlighted. PMID:26525825

  8. Alignment and Polarization Sensitivity Study on the Cassini: CIRS FIR Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crooke, Julie; Hagopian, John

    1998-01-01

    The Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) instrument flying on the Cassini spacecraft to Saturn is a cryogenic spectrometer with far-infrared (FIR) and mid-infrared (MIR) channels. The CIRS FIR channel is a polarizing interferometer that contains three polarizing grid components. These components are an input polarizer, a polarizing beamsplitter, and an output polarizer/analyzer. They consist of a 1.5 micron thick mylar substrate with 2 microns wide copper wires, with 2 microns spacing (4 microns pitch) photolithographically deposited on the substrate. This paper details the alignment sensitivity studies performed on the polarizing beamsplitter, and the polarization sensitivity studies performed on all three polarizing components in the FIR interferometer.

  9. Distributions of inorganic nitrogen and biological production in the equatorial Pacific: a basin-scale model sensitivity study of nitrification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiujun; Murtugudde, Raghu

    2015-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that there is stronger nitrification in the euphotic zone than previously thought. We employ a physical-biogeochemical model to study the implications of nitrification for basin-scale distributions of nitrate, ammonium, and biological production in the equatorial Pacific. The model can faithfully reproduce observed features in nitrate distribution, with or without photoinhibition of nitrification in the euphotic zone. In addition, new production, net community production and export production are not very sensitive to the parameterization of nitrification in this model. However, simulated ammonium distribution, nitrate uptake and ammonium uptake are sensitive to this parameterization. High nitrification results in low ammonium concentration, low ammonium uptake rate, and high nitrate uptake rate in the euphotic zone. This study suggests that nitrification may be responsible for up to 40% of nitrate uptake in the equatorial Pacific. This modeling study also demonstrates large differences (in terms of the magnitude and spatial distribution) between nitrate uptake, new production and export production, reflecting decoupling of upward nutrient supply, biological uptake and downward export.

  10. A digital process for additive manufacturing of occlusal splints: a clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Salmi, Mika; Paloheimo, Kaija-Stiina; Tuomi, Jukka; Ingman, Tuula; Mäkitie, Antti

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a digital process for manufacturing of occlusal splints. An alginate impression was taken from the upper and lower jaws of a patient with temporomandibular disorder owing to cross bite and wear of the teeth, and then digitized using a table laser scanner. The scanned model was repaired using the 3Data Expert software, and a splint was designed with the Viscam RP software. A splint was manufactured from a biocompatible liquid photopolymer by stereolithography. The system employed in the process was SLA 350. The splint was worn nightly for six months. The patient adapted to the splint well and found it comfortable to use. The splint relieved tension in the patient's bite muscles. No sign of tooth wear or significant splint wear was detected after six months of testing. Modern digital technology enables us to manufacture clinically functional occlusal splints, which might reduce costs, dental technician working time and chair-side time. Maximum-dimensional errors of approximately 1 mm were found at thin walls and sharp corners of the splint when compared with the digital model. PMID:23614943

  11. A digital process for additive manufacturing of occlusal splints: a clinical pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Salmi, Mika; Paloheimo, Kaija-Stiina; Tuomi, Jukka; Ingman, Tuula; Mäkitie, Antti

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a digital process for manufacturing of occlusal splints. An alginate impression was taken from the upper and lower jaws of a patient with temporomandibular disorder owing to cross bite and wear of the teeth, and then digitized using a table laser scanner. The scanned model was repaired using the 3Data Expert software, and a splint was designed with the Viscam RP software. A splint was manufactured from a biocompatible liquid photopolymer by stereolithography. The system employed in the process was SLA 350. The splint was worn nightly for six months. The patient adapted to the splint well and found it comfortable to use. The splint relieved tension in the patient's bite muscles. No sign of tooth wear or significant splint wear was detected after six months of testing. Modern digital technology enables us to manufacture clinically functional occlusal splints, which might reduce costs, dental technician working time and chair-side time. Maximum-dimensional errors of approximately 1 mm were found at thin walls and sharp corners of the splint when compared with the digital model. PMID:23614943

  12. Value addition of Palmyra palm and studies on the storage life.

    PubMed

    Chaurasiya, A K; Chakraborty, I; Saha, J

    2014-04-01

    Palmyra palm (Borassus flabellifer L.) belonging to the family Palmae is referred to as tree of life with several uses including food, beverage, fibre, medicinal and timber. Unfortunately, the nutritionally enriched pulp of ripened palm has limited commercial use. Extraction of pulp has been accomplished by using water and heat to ensure maximum pulp recovery. Different recipes were tried for the preparation of two uncommon value added products like palm spread and palm toffee. On the basis of biochemical composition, organoleptic scores, microbial estimation and storage study both under ambient and refrigerated conditions; the suitable recipe was selected with the maximum acceptability. Gradual increase in total soluble solid (TSS), total sugar and reducing sugar while decrease in ascorbic acid, pH, β-carotene and protein content of processed products have been observed irrespective of storage condition. The results obtained from sensory evaluation and microbial status revealed that palm spread and toffee remained acceptable up to 9 months and 8 months, respectively at ambient temperature. The income per rupee investment for these two products was found to be remunerative. PMID:24741173

  13. Additional weight load increases freezing of gait episodes in Parkinson's disease; an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Mensink, Senja H G; Nonnekes, Jorik; van Bon, Geert; Snijders, Anke H; Duysens, Jacques; Weerdesteyn, Vivian; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Oude Nijhuis, Lars B

    2014-05-01

    Freezing of gait is an episodic gait disorder,characterized by the inability to generate effective forward stepping movements. The pathophysiology underlying freezing of gait remains insufficiently understood, and this hampers the development of better treatment strategies.Preliminary evidence suggests that impaired force control during walking may contribute to freezing episodes, with difficulty to unload the swing leg and initiate the swing phase. Here, we used external loading to manipulate force control and to investigate its influence on freezing of gait.Twelve Parkinson's disease patients with freezing of gait performed three contrasting tasks: (1) loaded gait while wearing a belt fortified with lead weights; (2) weight supported gait using a parachute harness connected to a rigid metal cable running above the gait trajectory; and (3)normal gait. Gait tasks were used to provoke freezing episodes, including rapid 360° turns. Freezing episodes were quantified using blinded, videotaped clinical assessment. Furthermore, ground reaction forces and body kinematics were recorded. Loading significantly increased the mean number of freezing episodes per trial compared to the normal gait condition (P<0.05), but the effect of weight support was not consistent. Loading particularly increased the number of freezing episodes during rapid short steps. Step length was significantly smaller during loaded gait compared to normal gait (P<0.05), but changes in anticipatory postural adjustments were not different.Our results may point to impaired force control playing a key role in freezing of gait. Future studies should further investigate the mechanism, i.e., the contribution of deficient load feedback, and evaluate which forms of weight support might offer treatment opportunities. PMID:24658705

  14. N Reactor core heatup sensitivity study for the 32-inch unit cell model

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, F.; Zimmerman, B.; Heard, F.

    1988-02-01

    A number of N Reactor core heatup studies have been performed using the TRUMP-BD computer code. These studies were performed to address questions concerning the dependency of results on potential variations in the material properties and/or modeling assumptions. This report described and documents a series of 31 TRUMP-BD runs that were performed to determine the sensitivity of calculated inner-fuel temperatures to a variety of TRUMP input parameters and also to a change in the node density in a high-temperature-gradient region. The results of this study are based on the 32-in. model. 18 refs., 17 figs., 2 tab.

  15. First principles DFT study of dye-sensitized CdS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Kalpna; Singh, Kh. S.; Kishor, Shyam; Josefesson, Ida; Odelius, Michael; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.

    2014-04-24

    Dye-sensitized quantum dots (QDs) are considered promising candidates for dye-sensitized solar cells. In order to maximize their efficiency, detailed theoretical studies are important. Here, we report a first principles density functional theory (DFT) investigation of experimentally realized dye - sensitized QD / ligand systems, viz., Cd{sub 16}S{sub 16}, capped with acetate molecules and a coumarin dye. The hybrid B3LYP functional and a 6−311+G(d,p)/LANL2dz basis set are used to study the geometric, energetic and electronic properties of these clusters. There is significant structural rearrangement in all the clusters studied - on the surface for the bare QD, and in the positions of the acetate / dye ligands for the ligated QDs. The density of states (DOS) of the bare QD shows states in the band gap, which disappear on surface passivation with the acetate molecules. Interestingly, in the dye-sensitised QD, the HOMO is found to be localized mainly on the dye molecule, while the LUMO is on the QD, as required for photo-induced electron injection from the dye to the QD.

  16. Assessment of musculoskeletal pain sensitivity and temporal summation by cuff pressure algometry: a reliability study.

    PubMed

    Graven-Nielsen, Thomas; Vaegter, Henrik Bjarke; Finocchietti, Sara; Handberg, Gitte; Arendt-Nielsen, Lars

    2015-11-01

    Chronic musculoskeletal pain is linked with sensitization, and standardized methods for assessment are needed. This study investigated (1) the test-retest reliability of computer-controlled cuff-pressure algometry (pain thresholds and temporal pain summation) on the arm and leg and (2) conditioned pain modulation (CPM) assessed by cuff algometry. The influences of age and gender were evaluated. On 2 different days, cuff pain threshold (cPPT), cuff pain tolerance (cPTT), and temporal summation of pain (TSP) by visual analog scale scores to 10 repeated cuff stimulations at cPTT intensity, as well as pressure pain threshold with handheld pressure algometry, were assessed in 136 healthy subjects. In one session, cuff pain sensitivity was also assessed before and after cold pressor-induced CPM. Good-to-excellent intraclass correlations (0.60-0.90) were demonstrated for manual and cuff algometry, and no systematic bias between sessions was found for cPPT, cPTT, and TSP on the leg and for cPTT and TSP on the arm. Cuff pressure pain threshold and cPTT were higher in men compared with women (P < 0.05). Middle-aged subjects had higher pressure pain threshold, but lower cPPT and cPTT, compared with younger subjects (P < 0.05). Temporal summation of pain was increased in women compared with men (P < 0.05). Cuff algometry was sensitive to CPM demonstrated as increased cPPT and cPTT and reduced TSP (P < 0.05). Reliability and sensitivity of computer-controlled cuff algometry for pain assessment is comparable with manual pressure algometry and constitutes a user-independent method for assessment of pain. Difference in age-related pain sensitivity between manual and cuff algometry should be further investigated. PMID:26172551

  17. A case study for evaluating potential soil sensitivity in aridland systems.

    PubMed

    Peterman, Wendy L; Ferschweiler, Ken

    2016-04-01

    Globally, ecosystems are subjected to prolonged droughts and extreme heat events, leading to forest die-offs and dominance shifts in vegetation. Some scientists and managers view soil as the main resource to be considered in monitoring ecosystem responses to aridification. As the medium through which precipitation is received, stored, and redistributed for plant use, soil is an important factor in the sensitivity of ecosystems to a drying climate. This study presents a novel approach to evaluating where on a landscape soils may be most sensitive to drying, making them less resilient to disturbance, and where potential future vegetation changes could lead to such disturbance. The drying and devegetation of arid lands can increase wind erosion, contributing to aerosol and dust emissions. This has implications for air quality, human health, and water resources. This approach combines soil data with vegetation simulations, projecting future vegetation change, to create maps of potential areas of concern for soil sensitivity and dust production in a drying climate. Consistent with recent observations, the projections show shifts from grasslands and woodlands to shrublands in much of the southwestern region. An increase in forested area occurs, but shifts in the dominant types and spatial distribution of the forests also are seen. A net increase in desert ecosystems in the region and some changes in alpine and tundra ecosystems are seen. Approximately 124,000 km(2) of soils flagged as "sensitive" are projected to have vegetation change between 2041 and 2050, and 82,927 km(2) of soils may become sensitive because of future vegetation changes. These maps give managers a way to visualize and identify where soils and vegetation should be investigated and monitored for degradation in a drying climate, so restoration and mitigation strategies can be focused in these areas. PMID:26272449

  18. Study on an auto-correlation-function-based damage index: Sensitivity analysis and structural damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Muyu; Schmidt, Rüdiger

    2015-12-01

    The damage index based on the auto correlation function to detect the damage of the structure under white noise excitation is studied in detail in this paper. The maximum values of the auto correlation function of the vibration response signals (displacement, velocity and acceleration) from different measurement points of the structure are collected and formulated as a vector called Auto Correlation Function at Maximum Point Value Vector (AMV), which is expressed as a weighted combination of the Hadamard product of two mode shapes. AMV is normalized by its root mean square value so that the influence of the excitation can be eliminated. Sensitivity analysis for the different parts of the normalized AMV shows that the sensitivity of the normalized AMV to the local stiffness is dependent most on the sensitivity of the Hadamard product of the two lower order mode shapes to the local stiffness, which has a sudden change of the value around the local stiffness change position. The sensitivity of the normalized AMV has the similar shape and same trend that shows it is a very good damage indicator even for the very small damage. The relative change of the normalized AMV before and after damage occurs in the structure is adopted as the damage index to show the damage location. Several examples of the stiffness reduction detection of a 12-story shear frame structure are utilized to validate the results in sensitivity analysis, illustrate the effectiveness and anti-noise ability of the AMV-based damage detection method and compare the effect of the response type on the detectability of the normalized AMV.

  19. Evaluation of Pre-Transplant Panel Reactive Antibody Levels and Sensitization: A Single-Center Study.

    PubMed

    Can, Özgür; Gökçe, Ali Murat; Canbakan, Mustafa; Ata, Pınar; Şahin, Gülizar Manga; Titiz, Mesut İzzet; Apaydın, Süheyla

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Sensitization is one of the most important barriers against transplantation. Our aim was to evaluate the sensitization status of our patients awaiting cadaveric transplantation and to identify factors causing sensitization. MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 140 patients on the cadaveric waiting list during January 2014 were included in this retrospective cross-sectional study. The parametric t-test and the non-parametric chi-square test were used to detect differences between PRA-positive and -negative patients. Multivariate analysis was used to identify factors associated with PRA positivity. One-way analysis of variance was used to compare PRA-negative and -positive results. RESULTS Anti-HCV positivity (p=0.040), history of transfusion (p=0.041), and mean number of blood product transfused (p=0.047) were significantly related to class 1 PRA positivity. History of transfusion (p=0.038) and mean number of blood product transfused (p=0.044) were related to class 2 PRA positivity. The multivariate analysis indicated that transfusion and more than 5 units of blood product transfused were related to either class 1 or class 2 PRA positivity. No associations were found between PRA positivity and pregnancy, transplantation, age, sex, infection, abortion, cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatitis B, or time spent on dialysis and being on the transplantation waiting list. CONCLUSIONS Anti-HCV positivity and transfusion are risk factors for sensitization. Particular emphasis should be given to sensitization and its prevention to reduce waiting time for transplantation. PMID:27618946

  20. Neurobehavioral deficits in Persian Gulf veterans: additional evidence from a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Storzbach, D; Rohlman, D S; Anger, W K; Binder, L M; Campbell, K A

    2001-01-01

    Reports of low-concentration nerve gas exposures during the Gulf War (GW) have spurred concern about possible health consequences and symptoms reported by many returning veterans. The Portland Environmental Hazards Research Center is studying veterans from the northwest United States who report persistent, unexplained "Gulf War" symptoms (cases) and those who do not report those symptoms (controls). An epidemiological survey focused on exposures and symptoms was mailed to a random sample of GW veterans from Oregon and southwestern Washington. Volunteers recruited from survey respondents agreed to undergo a thorough medical examination and psychological and neurobehavioral assessment. Persistent symptoms with no medical explanation associated with Persian Gulf service (e.g., fatigue, muscle pain, memory deficits) beginning during or after the war qualified respondents as cases. The 239 cases with unexplained symptoms and the 112 controls without symptoms were administered a computerized assessment battery of 12 psychosocial and 6 neurobehavioral tests. Replicating and extending previous interim findings, a subgroup of veterans emerged from the initial analysis in the form of extreme outliers which produced a visually and quantitatively obvious bimodal distribution. This led, as it had previously, to analyses of the outliers as a separate group (labeled "slow ODTP"), which confirmed the initial findings of neurobehavioral differences between the outliers and the other cases and controls and provided more convincing evidence that the majority of cases who report neurobehavioral symptoms have no objective evidence of neurobehavioral deficits. However, the larger group of symptomatic veterans do have highly significant and compelling evidence of psychological distress based on scores from 11 separate psychological tests. Whereas the cases differed from the controls by poorer neurobehavioral test performance, extraction of the slow ODTP participants (almost all cases

  1. Climate engineering of vegetated land for hot extremes mitigation: an ESM sensitivity study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, Micah; Davin, Edouard; Seneviratne, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    Mitigation efforts to reduce anthropogenic climate forcing have thus far proven inadequate, as evident from accelerating greenhouse gas emissions. Many subtropical and mid-latitude regions are expected to experience longer and more frequent heat waves and droughts within the next century. This increased occurrence of weather extremes has important implications for human health, mortality and for socio-economic factors including forest fires, water availability and agricultural production. Various solar radiation management (SRM) schemes that attempt to homogeneously counter the anthropogenic forcing have been examined with different Earth System Models (ESM). Land climate engineering schemes have also been investigated which reduces the amount of solar radiation that is absorbed at the surface. However, few studies have investigated their effects on extremes but rather on mean climate response. Here we present the results of a series of climate engineering sensitivity experiments performed with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) version 1.0.2 at 2°-resolution. This configuration entails 5 fully coupled model components responsible for simulating the Earth's atmosphere, land, land-ice, ocean and sea-ice that interact through a central coupler. Historical and RCP8.5 scenarios were performed with transient land-cover changes and prognostic terrestrial Carbon/Nitrogen cycles. Four sets of experiments are performed in which surface albedo over snow-free vegetated grid points is increased by 0.5, 0.10, 0.15 and 0.20. The simulations show a strong preferential cooling of hot extremes throughout the Northern mid-latitudes during boreal summer. A strong linear scaling between the cooling of extremes and additional surface albedo applied to the land model is observed. The strongest preferential cooling is found in southeastern Europe and the central United States, where increases of soil moisture and evaporative fraction are the largest relative to the control

  2. Sensitivity study with respect to the domain size with ALADIN-Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boros-Törék, Orsolya; Krüzselyi, Ilona; Szépszó, Gabriella

    2015-04-01

    The ALADIN-Climate regional climate model was adapted by the Hungarian Meteorological Service (HMS) in 2005, and it has been used to estimate climate change impacts over the territory of the Carpathian Basin. During these experiments it was proved that the applied 10 km-resolution integration domain was too small, and near its boundary artificial noises arose because the edges cross mountainous areas. Therefore, two new areas were tested in a sensitivity study to find a more appropriate domain for the future runs. Although the size of new integration area is limited by the computational capacity of HMS, both test domains cover the Central-European region containing the whole Danube catchment, with their boundaries far from highly elevated orographic features. The bigger domain includes the smaller one and is extended towards South, West and East. As test period, 1971-1980 years were selected. Lateral boundary conditions were supplied by the 0.44-degree (~50 km) resolution ALADIN simulation (conducted in EURO-CORDEX) driven with global ARPEGE fields. Basically three meteorological variables were examined: sea level pressure, 2-m temperature and rainfall. The evaluation was concentrating on their seasonal and annual means, while in case of precipitation daily data was also used: due to high spatial and temporal variability of precipitation, its modelling is difficult task, therefore, additional indices were calculated. During the validation the model results were compared to two different observational gridded datasets: for the Carpathian Basin the homogenized CARPATCLIM is applied and for continent-scale investigations E-OBS is considered as reference. The obtained results suggest: (1) ALADIN works acceptably over both domains, and although it provides some similar results (e.g., temperature underestimation and precipitation overestimation over major part of the domain and year) as in the earlier experiments, the largest errors derived from the boundary conditions

  3. Numerical modeling of stress in stenotic arteries with microcalcifications: a parameter sensitivity study.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Jonathan F

    2011-01-01

    As a follow-up to the work presented in Wenk et al. (2010, "Numerical Modeling of Stress in Stenotic Arteries With Microcalcifications: A Micromechanical Approximation," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 132, p. 091011), a formal sensitivity study was conducted in which several model parameters were varied. The previous work only simulated a few combinations of the parameters. In the present study, the fibrous cap thickness, longitudinal position of the region of microcalcifications, and volume fraction of microcalcifications were varied over a broader range of values. The goal of the present work is to investigate the effects of localized regions of microcalcifications on the stress field of atherosclerotic plaque caps in a section of carotid artery. More specifically, the variations in the magnitude and location of the maximum circumferential stress were assessed for a range of parameters using a global sensitivity analysis method known as Sobol' indices. The stress was calculated by performing finite element simulations of three-dimensional fluid-structure interaction models, while the sensitivity indices were computed using a Monte Carlo scheme. The results indicate that cap thickness plays a significant role in the variation in the magnitude of the maximum circumferential stress, with the sensitivity to volume fraction increasing when the region of microcalcification is located at the shoulder. However, the volume fraction played a larger role in the variation in the location of the maximum circumferential stress. This matches the finding of the previous study (Wenk et al., 2010, "Numerical Modeling of Stress in Stenotic Arteries With Microcalcifications: A Micromechanical Approximation," ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 132, p. 091011), which indicates that the maximum circumferential stress always shifts to the region of microcalcification. PMID:21186905

  4. Sensitivity and uncertainty in crop water footprint accounting: a case study for the Yellow River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, L.; Mekonnen, M. M.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2014-06-01

    Water Footprint Assessment is a fast-growing field of research, but as yet little attention has been paid to the uncertainties involved. This study investigates the sensitivity of and uncertainty in crop water footprint (in m3 t-1) estimates related to uncertainties in important input variables. The study focuses on the green (from rainfall) and blue (from irrigation) water footprint of producing maize, soybean, rice, and wheat at the scale of the Yellow River basin in the period 1996-2005. A grid-based daily water balance model at a 5 by 5 arcmin resolution was applied to compute green and blue water footprints of the four crops in the Yellow River basin in the period considered. The one-at-a-time method was carried out to analyse the sensitivity of the crop water footprint to fractional changes of seven individual input variables and parameters: precipitation (PR), reference evapotranspiration (ET0), crop coefficient (Kc), crop calendar (planting date with constant growing degree days), soil water content at field capacity (Smax), yield response factor (Ky) and maximum yield (Ym). Uncertainties in crop water footprint estimates related to uncertainties in four key input variables: PR, ET0, Kc, and crop calendar were quantified through Monte Carlo simulations. The results show that the sensitivities and uncertainties differ across crop types. In general, the water footprint of crops is most sensitive to ET0 and Kc, followed by the crop calendar. Blue water footprints were more sensitive to input variability than green water footprints. The smaller the annual blue water footprint is, the higher its sensitivity to changes in PR, ET0, and Kc. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop due to combined uncertainties in climatic inputs (PR and ET0) were about ±20% (at 95% confidence interval). The effect of uncertainties in ET0was dominant compared to that of PR. The uncertainties in the total water footprint of a crop as a result of combined key input

  5. Contributions to Future Stratospheric Climate Change: An Idealized Chemistry-Climate Model Sensitivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, M. M.; Braesicke, P.; Pyle, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Within the framework of an idealized model sensitivity study, three of the main contributors to future stratospheric climate change are evaluated: increases in greenhouse gas concentrations, ozone recovery, and changing sea surface temperatures (SSTs). These three contributors are explored in combination and separately, to test the interactions between ozone and climate; the linearity of their contributions to stratospheric climate change is also assessed. In a simplified chemistry-climate model, stratospheric global mean temperature is most sensitive to CO2 doubling, followed by ozone depletion, then by increased SSTs. At polar latitudes, the Northern Hemisphere (NH) stratosphere is more sensitive to changes in CO2, SSTs and O3 than is the Southern Hemisphere (SH); the opposing responses to ozone depletion under low or high background CO2 concentrations, as seen with present-day SSTs, are much weaker and are not statistically significant under enhanced SSTs. Consistent with previous studies, the strength of the Brewer-Dobson circulation is found to increase in an idealized future climate; SSTs contribute most to this increase in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) region, while CO2 and ozone changes contribute most in the stratosphere and mesosphere.

  6. Association of oxidative status and insulin sensitivity in periparturient dairy cattle: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Abuelo, A; Hernández, J; Benedito, J L; Castillo, C

    2016-04-01

    Post-parturient insulin resistance (IR) is a common feature in all mammalian animals. However, in dairy cows, it can be exacerbated because of high milk yield, leading to excessive negative energy balance, which is related with increased disease incidence, reduced milk production and worsened reproductive performance. IR has been extensively investigated in humans suffering from diabetes mellitus. In these subjects, it is known that oxidative stress (OS) plays a causative role in the onset of IR. Although OS occurs in transitional dairy cattle, there are yet no studies that investigated the association between IR and OS in dairy cattle. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether there is a relationship between OS and IR in dairy cattle. Serum samples were taken repeatedly from 22 dairy cows from 2 months prior to the expected calving date to 2 months after calving and were analysed for markers of metabolic and redox balance. Surrogate indices of insulin sensitivity were also calculated. Generalised linear mixed models revealed an effect of the oxidative status on peripheral insulin concentration and on indices of insulin sensitivity. Hence, field trials should investigate the effectiveness of antioxidant therapy on insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues during the transition period of dairy cattle. PMID:26174108

  7. Thermal performance sensitivity studies in support of material modeling for extended storage of used nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Cuta, Judith M.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-08-15

    The work reported here is an investigation of the sensitivity of component temperatures of a storage system, including fuel cladding temperatures, in response to age-related changes that could degrade the design-basis thermal behavior of the system. Three specific areas of interest were identified for this study. • degradation of the canister backfill gas from pure helium to a mixture of air and helium, resulting from postulated leakage due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of canister welds • changes in surface emissivity of system components, resulting from corrosion or other aging mechanisms, which could cause potentially significant changes in temperatures and temperature distributions, due to the effect on thermal radiation exchange between components • changes in fuel and basket temperatures due to changes in fuel assembly position within the basket cells in the canister The purpose of these sensitivity studies is to provide a realistic example of how changes in the physical properties or configuration of the storage system components can affect temperatures and temperature distributions. The magnitudes of these sensitivities can provide guidance for identifying appropriate modeling assumptions for thermal evaluations extending long term storage out beyond 50, 100, 200, and 300 years.

  8. A hierarchical Bayesian approach to adaptive vision testing: A case study with the contrast sensitivity function

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Hairong; Kim, Woojae; Hou, Fang; Lesmes, Luis Andres; Pitt, Mark A.; Lu, Zhong-Lin; Myung, Jay I.

    2016-01-01

    Measurement efficiency is of concern when a large number of observations are required to obtain reliable estimates for parametric models of vision. The standard entropy-based Bayesian adaptive testing procedures addressed the issue by selecting the most informative stimulus in sequential experimental trials. Noninformative, diffuse priors were commonly used in those tests. Hierarchical adaptive design optimization (HADO; Kim, Pitt, Lu, Steyvers, & Myung, 2014) further improves the efficiency of the standard Bayesian adaptive testing procedures by constructing an informative prior using data from observers who have already participated in the experiment. The present study represents an empirical validation of HADO in estimating the human contrast sensitivity function. The results show that HADO significantly improves the accuracy and precision of parameter estimates, and therefore requires many fewer observations to obtain reliable inference about contrast sensitivity, compared to the method of quick contrast sensitivity function (Lesmes, Lu, Baek, & Albright, 2010), which uses the standard Bayesian procedure. The improvement with HADO was maintained even when the prior was constructed from heterogeneous populations or a relatively small number of observers. These results of this case study support the conclusion that HADO can be used in Bayesian adaptive testing by replacing noninformative, diffuse priors with statistically justified informative priors without introducing unwanted bias. PMID:27105061

  9. Preliminary Thermal-Mechanical Sizing of Metallic TPS: Process Development and Sensitivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poteet, Carl C.; Abu-Khajeel, Hasan; Hsu, Su-Yuen

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to perform sensitivity studies and develop a process to perform thermal and structural analysis and sizing of the latest Metallic Thermal Protection System (TPS) developed at NASA LaRC (Langley Research Center). Metallic TPS is a key technology for reducing the cost of reusable launch vehicles (RLV), offering the combination of increased durability and competitive weights when compared to other systems. Accurate sizing of metallic TPS requires combined thermal and structural analysis. Initial sensitivity studies were conducted using transient one-dimensional finite element thermal analysis to determine the influence of various TPS and analysis parameters on TPS weight. The thermal analysis model was then used in combination with static deflection and failure mode analysis of the sandwich panel outer surface of the TPS to obtain minimum weight TPS configurations at three vehicle stations on the windward centerline of a representative RLV. The coupled nature of the analysis requires an iterative analysis process, which will be described herein. Findings from the sensitivity analysis are reported, along with TPS designs at the three RLV vehicle stations considered.

  10. Case study sensitivity analysis of transmission spectra for water contaminant monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrakos, S. G.; Yapijakis, C.; Aiken, D.; Shabaev, A.; Ramsey, S.; Peak, J.

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring of contaminants associated with specific water resources using transmission spectra, with respect to types and relative concentrations, requires tracking statistical profiles of water contaminants in terms of spatial-temporal distributions of electromagnetic absorption spectra ranging from the ultraviolet to infrared. For this purpose, correlation between spectral signatures and types of contaminants within specific water resources must be made, as well as correlation of spectral signatures with results of processes for removal of contaminants, such as ozonation. Correlation between absorption spectra and changes in chemical and physical characteristics of contaminants, within a volume of sampled solution, requires sufficient sensitivity. The present study examines the sensitivity of transmission spectra with respect to general characteristics of water contaminants for spectral analysis of water samples.

  11. A study of the simulated evolution of the spectral sensitivity of visual agent receptors.

    PubMed

    Liese, A; Polani, D; Uthmann, T

    2001-01-01

    In this article we study a model for the evolution of the spectral sensitivity of visual receptors for agents in a continuous virtual environment. The model uses a genetic algorithm (GA) to evolve the agent sensors along with the control of the agents by requiring the agents to solve certain tasks in the simulation environment. The properties of the evolved sensors are analyzed for different scenarios. In particular, it is shown that the GA is able to find a balance between sensor costs and agent performance in such a way that the spectral sensor sensitivity reflects the emission spectrum of the target objects and that the capability of the sensors to evolve can help the agents significantly in adapting to their task. PMID:11580876

  12. Study of the sensitivity of gas sensing by use of index-guiding photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Shu-Guang; Liu, Si-Ying; Song, Zhao-Yuan; Han, Yin; Cheng, Tong-Lei; Zhou, Gui-Yao; Hou, Lan-Tian

    2007-08-01

    We demonstrate an absorption transmission spectrum of CH(4) in a 16.9 cm long index-guiding photonic crystal fiber (PCF) fabricated in our laboratory. One of the main factors to improve the sensitivity is to increase the fraction of power in PCF cladding air holes. We study the fraction of power in PCF cladding air holes as a function of the index-guiding PCF parameters. We found that a PCF with small spacing and a large air-filling ratio has a higher fraction of power in its cladding air holes. At the same time the mode area in this PCF is small and would generate strong nonlinear effects in the fiber. If we use a PCF in which the core is formed by missing seven air holes, it is immediately obvious that the PCF used as a sensor has higher sensitivity and a larger mode area. PMID:17676130

  13. A Pilot Study to Examine the Effect of Additional Structured Outdoor Playtime on Preschoolers' Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhassan, Sofiya; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi; Lyden, Kate; Goldsby, TaShauna; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The impact of additional structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; physical activity (PA) level is unclear. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the effects of increasing structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; PA levels. Eight full-day classrooms (n = 134 children) from two preschool programmes were randomised into a treatment…

  14. STUDY OF THE EFFECT OF CHLORINE ADDITION ON MERCURY OXIDATION BY SCR CATALYST UNDER SIMULATED SUBBITUMINOUS COAL FLUE GAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    An entrained flow reactor is used to study the effect of addition of chlorine-containing species on the oxidation of elemental mercury (Hgo)by a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst in simulated subbituminous coal combustion flue gas. The combustion flue gas was doped wit...

  15. The Coda of the Transient Response in a Sensitive Cochlea: A Computational Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yizeng; Grosh, Karl

    2016-01-01

    In a sensitive cochlea, the basilar membrane response to transient excitation of any kind–normal acoustic or artificial intracochlear excitation–consists of not only a primary impulse but also a coda of delayed secondary responses with varying amplitudes but similar spectral content around the characteristic frequency of the measurement location. The coda, sometimes referred to as echoes or ringing, has been described as a form of local, short term memory which may influence the ability of the auditory system to detect gaps in an acoustic stimulus such as speech. Depending on the individual cochlea, the temporal gap between the primary impulse and the following coda ranges from once to thrice the group delay of the primary impulse (the group delay of the primary impulse is on the order of a few hundred microseconds). The coda is physiologically vulnerable, disappearing when the cochlea is compromised even slightly. The multicomponent sensitive response is not yet completely understood. We use a physiologically-based, mathematical model to investigate (i) the generation of the primary impulse response and the dependence of the group delay on the various stimulation methods, (ii) the effect of spatial perturbations in the properties of mechanically sensitive ion channels on the generation and separation of delayed secondary responses. The model suggests that the presence of the secondary responses depends on the wavenumber content of a perturbation and the activity level of the cochlea. In addition, the model shows that the varying temporal gaps between adjacent coda seen in experiments depend on the individual profiles of perturbations. Implications for non-invasive cochlear diagnosis are also discussed. PMID:27380177

  16. Screening for symptomatic metal sensitivity: a prospective study of 92 patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Niki, Yasuo; Matsumoto, Hideo; Otani, Toshiro; Yatabe, Taku; Kondo, Makoto; Yoshimine, Fumihiro; Toyama, Yoshiaki

    2005-03-01

    Metal sensitivity (MS) reactions to implant metals represent a rare but well-documented complication following total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Although 20-25% of post-TJA patients develop MS, only a few highly susceptible patients (< 1%) exhibit symptoms. Whether surgeons should perform screening for MS is currently a matter of debate. The present study investigated the clinical importance of screening for patients predisposed to symptomatic MS, and the specific metals causing symptomatic MS following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Between 2000 and 2002, a total of 108 primary TKAs were performed on 92 patients. Preoperatively, all patients underwent modified lymphocyte stimulation test (mLST) to Ni, Co, Cr, and Fe. Of the 92 patients, 24 (26%) displayed positive preoperative responses to at least one metal. Five patients displayed implant metal-related eczema and were all mLST-positive preoperatively, suggesting that screening for symptomatic MS is clinically useful. Two of these underwent revision TKA and thereafter, eczema healed and mLST results changed from positive to negative. All mLST-positive patients were divided into three groups: Group I, patients with eczema; Group II, patients with clear history of MS; and Group III, patients neither eczema nor history of MS. When the type of sensitive metals were compared among the three groups, a significant association between presence of Cr-sensitivity and development of eczema (P < 0.05) was identified. No significant association was observed between other metals and development of eczema or history of MS. This indicates that Cr is a potential candidate metal for causing eczema in our TKA series, and Cr-sensitivity may offer a potential predictor for symptomatic MS. The present study indicates that the surgeons should undertake routine preoperative screening for MS, particularly to Cr. PMID:15369690

  17. A comprehensive evaluation of various sensitivity analysis methods: A case study with a hydrological model

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Yanjun; Duan, Qingyun; Gong, Wei; Tong, Charles; Sun, Yunwei; Chu, Wei; Ye, Aizhong; Miao, Chiyuan; Di, Zhenhua

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is a commonly used approach for identifying important parameters that dominate model behaviors. We use a newly developed software package, a Problem Solving environment for Uncertainty Analysis and Design Exploration (PSUADE), to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of ten widely used SA methods, including seven qualitative and three quantitative ones. All SA methods are tested using a variety of sampling techniques to screen out the most sensitive (i.e., important) parameters from the insensitive ones. The Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model, which has thirteen tunable parameters, is used for illustration. The South Branch Potomac River basin near Springfield, West Virginia in the U.S. is chosen as the study area. The key findings from this study are: (1) For qualitative SA methods, Correlation Analysis (CA), Regression Analysis (RA), and Gaussian Process (GP) screening methods are shown to be not effective in this example. Morris One-At-a-Time (MOAT) screening is the most efficient, needing only 280 samples to identify the most important parameters, but it is the least robust method. Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS), Delta Test (DT) and Sum-Of-Trees (SOT) screening methods need about 400–600 samples for the same purpose. Monte Carlo (MC), Orthogonal Array (OA) and Orthogonal Array based Latin Hypercube (OALH) are appropriate sampling techniques for them; (2) For quantitative SA methods, at least 2777 samples are needed for Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) to identity parameter main effect. McKay method needs about 360 samples to evaluate the main effect, more than 1000 samples to assess the two-way interaction effect. OALH and LPτ (LPTAU) sampling techniques are more appropriate for McKay method. For the Sobol' method, the minimum samples needed are 1050 to compute the first-order and total sensitivity indices correctly. These comparisons show that qualitative SA methods are more efficient

  18. Is Hiding Foot and Mouth Disease Sensitive Behavior for Farmers? A Survey Study in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Gunarathne, Anoma; Kubota, Satoko; Kumarawadu, Pradeep; Karunagoda, Kamal; Kon, Hiroichi

    2016-02-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) has a long history in Sri Lanka and was found to be endemic in various parts of the country and constitutes a constant threat to farmers. In Sri Lanka, currently there is no regular, nationwide vaccination programme devised to control FMD. Therefore, improving farmers' knowledge regarding distinguishing FMD from other diseases and ensuring prompt reporting of any suspicion of FMD as well as restricting movement of animals are critical activities for an effective FMD response effort. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between farmers' knowledge levels and their behaviors to establish a strategy to control FMD. In our study, item count technique was applied to estimate the number of farmers that under-report and sell FMD-infected animals, although to do so is prohibited by law. The following findings were observed: about 63% of farmers have very poor knowledge of routes of FMD transmission; 'under-reporting' was found to be a sensitive behavior and nearly 23% of the farmers were reluctant to report FMD-infected animals; and 'selling FMD-infected animals' is a sensitive behavior among high-level knowledge group while it is a non-sensitive behavior among the low-level knowledge group. If farmers would understand the importance of prompt reporting, they may report any suspected cases of FMD to veterinary officials. However, even if farmers report honestly, they do not want to cull FMD-infected animals. Thus, education programs should be conducted not only on FMD introduction and transmission, but also its impact. Furthermore, consumers may criticize the farmers for culling their infected animals. Hence, not only farmers, but also consumers need to be educated on the economic impact of FMD and the importance of controlling an outbreak. If farmers have a high knowledge of FMD transmission, they consider selling FMD-infected animals as a sensitive behavior. Therefore, severe punishment should be levied for

  19. A comprehensive evaluation of various sensitivity analysis methods: A case study with a hydrological model

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Gan, Yanjun; Duan, Qingyun; Gong, Wei; Tong, Charles; Sun, Yunwei; Chu, Wei; Ye, Aizhong; Miao, Chiyuan; Di, Zhenhua

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis (SA) is a commonly used approach for identifying important parameters that dominate model behaviors. We use a newly developed software package, a Problem Solving environment for Uncertainty Analysis and Design Exploration (PSUADE), to evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of ten widely used SA methods, including seven qualitative and three quantitative ones. All SA methods are tested using a variety of sampling techniques to screen out the most sensitive (i.e., important) parameters from the insensitive ones. The Sacramento Soil Moisture Accounting (SAC-SMA) model, which has thirteen tunable parameters, is used for illustration. The South Branch Potomac River basin nearmore » Springfield, West Virginia in the U.S. is chosen as the study area. The key findings from this study are: (1) For qualitative SA methods, Correlation Analysis (CA), Regression Analysis (RA), and Gaussian Process (GP) screening methods are shown to be not effective in this example. Morris One-At-a-Time (MOAT) screening is the most efficient, needing only 280 samples to identify the most important parameters, but it is the least robust method. Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS), Delta Test (DT) and Sum-Of-Trees (SOT) screening methods need about 400–600 samples for the same purpose. Monte Carlo (MC), Orthogonal Array (OA) and Orthogonal Array based Latin Hypercube (OALH) are appropriate sampling techniques for them; (2) For quantitative SA methods, at least 2777 samples are needed for Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) to identity parameter main effect. McKay method needs about 360 samples to evaluate the main effect, more than 1000 samples to assess the two-way interaction effect. OALH and LPτ (LPTAU) sampling techniques are more appropriate for McKay method. For the Sobol' method, the minimum samples needed are 1050 to compute the first-order and total sensitivity indices correctly. These comparisons show that qualitative SA methods are more

  20. Sensitivity studies of spin cut-off models on fission fragment observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thulliez, L.; Litaize, O.; Serot, O.

    2016-03-01

    A fission fragment de-excitation code, FIFRELIN, is being developed at CEA Cadarache. It allows probing the characteristics of the prompt emitted particles, neutrons and gammas, during the de-excitation process of fully accelerated fission fragments. The knowledge of the initial states of the fragments is important to accurately reproduce the fission fragment observables. In this paper a sensitivity study of various spin cut-off models, completely defining the initial fission fragment angular momentum distribution has been performed. This study shows that the choice of the model has a significant impact on gamma observables such as spectrum and multiplicity and almost none on the neutron observables.

  1. Efficient Flowline Simulations of Ice Shelf-Ocean Interactions: Sensitivity Studies with a Fully Coupled Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Ryan Thomas; Holland, David; Parizek, Byron R.; Alley, Richard B.; Nowicki, Sophie M. J.; Jenkins, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Thermodynamic flowline and plume models for the ice shelf-ocean system simplify the ice and ocean dynamics sufficiently to allow extensive exploration of parameters affecting ice-sheet stability while including key physical processes. Comparison between geophysically and laboratory-based treatments of ice-ocean interface thermodynamics shows reasonable agreement between calculated melt rates, except where steep basal slopes and relatively high ocean temperatures are present. Results are especially sensitive to the poorly known drag coefficient, highlighting the need for additional field experiments to constrain its value. These experiments also suggest that if the ice-ocean interface near the grounding line is steeper than some threshold, further steepening of the slope may drive higher entrainment that limits buoyancy, slowing the plume and reducing melting; if confirmed, this will provide a stabilizing feedback on ice sheets under some circumstances.

  2. Development of a model system to study leukotriene-induced modification of radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Walden, T.L.; Holahan, E.V.; Catravas, G.N.

    1986-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LT) are an important class of biological mediators, for which no information exists concerning their synthesis following a radiation insult, or on their ability to modify cellular response to a subsequent radiation exposure. LT are derived from arachidonic acid, as are prostaglandins, although by a separate enzyme system. Prostaglandins are able to modify radiosensitivity of mammalian cells in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the cytoprotective effect induced by prostaglandins may have significance in cancer therapy since certain breast cancers which secrete elevated levels of prostaglandins are more resistant to therapy than similar tumors without the prostaglandin elevation. The objective of this study was to define a model system in which the metabolic fate of the LT could be monitored, and the effort of LT on the ionizing radiation sensitivity of mammalian cells in vitro could also be characterized.

  3. Study of single and combined mass-sensitive observables of cosmic ray induced extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastegarzadeh, G.; Nemati, M.

    2016-03-01

    In this study, combinations of the global arrival time, (Δτ_{global}), pseudorapidity, and lateral density distribution (ρ_{μ}) of muons, which are three mass-sensitive observables of cosmic ray induced extensive air showers, have been used as new parameters to study the primary mass discrimination around the knee energies (100 TeV-10 PeV). This is a simulation-based study and the simulations have been performed for the KASCADE array at Karlsruhe and the Alborz-I array at Tehran to study the effect of the altitude on the quality of the primary mass discrimination. The merit factors of the single and combined three mass-sensitive observables have been calculated to compare the discrimination power of combined and single observables. We have used the CORSIKA 7.4 code to simulate the extensive air showers (EASs) sample sets. Considering all aspects of our study, it is found that the ratio of the global time to the lateral density distribution of the muons gives better results than other ratios; also in the case of single observables, the muon density gives better results compared with the other observables. Also it is shown that below 1 PeV primary energies, the ratio of the muon global time to the muon density (Δτ_{global}/ρ_{μ}) results in a better mass discrimination relative to the muon density only.

  4. Developmental effects of decision-making on sensitivity to reward: An fMRI study

    PubMed Central

    Jarcho, Johanna M; Benson, Brenda E; Plate, Rista C; Guyer, Amanda E; Detloff, Allison M; Pine, Daniel S.; Leibenluft, Ellen; Ernst, Monique

    2012-01-01

    Studies comparing neural correlates of reward processing across development yield inconsistent findings. This challenges theories characterizing adolescents as globally hypo- or hypersensitive to rewards. Developmental differences in reward sensitivity may fluctuate based on reward magnitude, and on whether rewards require decision-making. We examined whether these factors modulate developmental differences in neural response during reward anticipation and/or receipt in 26 adolescents (14.05±2.37yrs) and 26 adults (31.25±8.23yrs). Brain activity was assessed with fMRI during reward anticipation, when subjects made responses with-vs.-without decision-making, to obtain large–vs.–small rewards, and during reward receipt. When reward-receipt required decision-making, neural activity did not differ by age. However, when reward receipt did not require decision-making, neural activity varied by development, reward magnitude, and stage of the reward task. During anticipation, adolescents, but not adults, exhibited greater activity in the insula, extending into putamen, and cingulate gyrus for large-vs.-small incentives. During feedback, adults, but not adolescents, exhibited greater activity in the precuneus for large-vs.-small incentives. These data indicate that age-related differences in reward sensitivity cannot be characterized by global hypo- or hyper-responsivity. Instead, neural responding in striatum, prefrontal cortex and precuneus is influenced by both situational demands and developmental factors. This suggests nuanced maturational effects in adolescent reward sensitivity. PMID:22591860

  5. Luminophore Application Study of Polymer-Ceramic Pressure-Sensitive Paint

    PubMed Central

    Sakaue, Hirotaka; Hayashi, Tatsunori; Ishikawa, Hitoshi

    2013-01-01

    A polymer-ceramic pressure-sensitive paint (PC-PSP) is a fast responding and sprayable PSP which has been applied for capturing global unsteady flows. The luminophore application process is studied to enhance the characterization of the PC-PSP. A dipping deposition method is used to apply a luminophore on a polymer-ceramic coating. The method selects a solvent by its polarity index. The characterization includes the signal level, pressure sensitivity, temperature dependency, and response time. It is found that the luminophore application process affects the steady-state characterizations, such as the signal level, pressure sensitivity, and temperature dependency. A range of change for each characterization, which is based on the minimum quantity, is a factor of 4.7, 9, and 3.8, respectively. A response time on the order of ten microseconds is shown. The application process is not a dominant factor for changing the response time, which is within the uncertainty of the thickness variation. Comparisons of the effects on the luminophore application process and the polymer content are made to discuss the PC-PSP characterization results. PMID:23760088

  6. Application and sensitivity studies of the orographic cloud model MCCP (Mountain Cloud Chemistry Program) PLUVIUS

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, E.G.; Luecken, D.J.; Whiteman, C.D.

    1987-07-01

    A special MCCP version of the PLUVIUS MOD 5.0 reactive storm model (MCCP PLUVIUS) was applied to conditions representative of Mt. Mitchell, North Carolina. Tests were also conducted to determine the sensitivity of the model to various meteorological and chemical parameters. Results of the modeling investigation indicate that aqueous concentrations and deposition fluxes of pollutants are location dependent. The greatest concentrations occur at the edges of the cloud, where the liquid water content is low, and the greatest deposition flux occurs on the windward side of the mountain. For conditions considered representative of summertime conditions at Mt. Mitchell, predicted ion concentrations in deposited cloud water at a point corresponding to the MCCP field station are within the ranges actually observed. Sensitivity studies indicate that in-cloud oxidation of SO/sub 2/ makes a limited contribution to total sulfate deposition for typical concentrations of SO/sub 2/, O/sub 3/, and H/sub 2/O/sub 2/. However, sulfate deposition predicted by MCCP PLUVIUS is extremely sensitive to the value selected for aerosol sulfate existing in the modeled air mass prior to cloud formation. Hydrogen ion deposition predicted by the model is strongly influenced by input values for gas-phase nitric acid and ammonia. 11 refs., 19 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Endogenous Opioid-Masked Latent Pain Sensitization: Studies from Mouse to Human

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Jørgen B.; Werner, Marianne; Taylor, Bradley K.; Werner, Mads U.

    2015-01-01

    Following the resolution of a severe inflammatory injury in rodents, administration of mu-opioid receptor inverse agonists leads to reinstatement of pain hypersensitivity. The mechanisms underlying this form of latent pain sensitization (LS) likely contribute to the development of chronic pain, but LS has not yet been demonstrated in humans. Using a C57BL/6 mouse model of cutaneous mild heat injury (MHI) we demonstrated a dose-dependent reinstatement of pain sensitization, assessed as primary (P < 0.001) and secondary hyperalgesia (P < 0.001) by naloxone (0.3–10 mg/kg), 168 hrs after the induction of MHI. Forward-translating the dose data to a human MHI model (n = 12) we could show that LS does indeed occur after naloxone 2 mg/kg, 168 hrs after a MHI. Our previous unsuccessful efforts to demonstrate unmasking of LS in humans are thus likely explained by an insufficient naloxone dose (0.021 mg/kg). However, while LS was consistently demonstrated in 21/24 mice, LS was only seen in 4/12 subjects. This difference is likely due to selection bias since the C57BL/6 mouse strain exhibits markedly enhanced pain sensitivity in assays of acute thermal nociception. Future exploratory studies in humans should prioritize inclusion of “high-sensitizers” prone to develop LS and use post-surgical models to elucidate markers of vulnerability to chronic postsurgical pain. Trial Registration EudraCT 2012-005663-27 PMID:26305798

  8. Altered sensitivity to excitotoxic cell death and glutamate receptor expression between two commonly studied mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Finn, Rozzy; Kovács, Attila D.; Pearce, David A.

    2011-01-01

    Alterations in glutamatergic synapse function have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many different neurological disorders including ischemia, epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. While studying glutamate receptor function in juvenile Batten disease on the C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEv mouse backgrounds, we noticed differences unlikely to be due to mutation difference alone. We report here that primary cerebellar granule cell cultures from C57BL/6J mice are more sensitive to NMDA-mediated cell death. Moreover, sensitivity to AMPA-mediated excitotoxicity is more variable and is dependent upon the treatment conditions and age of the cultures. Glutamate receptor surface expression levels examined in vitro by in situ ELISA and in vivo by Western blot in surface cross-linked cerebellar samples indicated that these differences in sensitivity are likely due to strain-dependent differences in cell surface receptor expression levels. We propose that differences in glutamate receptor expression and in excitotoxic vulnerability should be taken into consideration in the context of characterizing disease models on the C57BL/6J and 129S6/SvEv mouse backgrounds. PMID:20544821

  9. Hydrocarbon dissociation on palladium studied with a hydrogen sensitive Pd-metal-oxide-semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannetun, H.; Lundström, I.; Petersson, L.-G.

    1988-01-01

    The polycrystalline Pd surface of a hydrogen sensitive palladium-silicon dioxide-silicon [Pd-MOS (metal-oxide-semiconductor)] structure has been exposed to small unsaturated hydrocarbons in the temperature range 300-500 K. Apart from the hydrogen response of the Pd-MOS structure also work function (ΔΦ) and electron energy-loss studies were performed. At 500 K the hydrocarbons dissociate completely upon adsorption and produce a surface with atomically adsorbed carbon. The Pd-MOS structure can be used to observe both the dehydrogenation of the hydrocarbon molecules and the process of carbon adsorbing on the palladium surface. The sticking coefficient at this temperature for all hydrocarbons is close to unity. Furthermore, the hydrogen sensitivity of the structure is not drastically reduced by the adsorbed carbon. If the hydrocarbon adsorption is performed at 300 K there is still, at least on the initially clean surface, a large dehydrogenation. The dissociation is, however, not at all complete and there are considerable amounts of hydrocarbon species adsorbed for each gas. The induced work function shifts due to the different hydrocarbons vary from -1.0 to -1.7 eV. The hydrogen sensitivity of the Pd-MOS structure is reduced for growing hydrocarbon coverages and disappears completely for work function shifts of -1.7 eV.

  10. Efficient eco-friendly inverted quantum dot sensitized solar cells† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images of QDs, XPS spectra, UV-vis and PL spectra of the sensitized electrodes, details about photophysical characterization and IPCE spectra interpretation. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ta06769c Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinhyung; Sajjad, Muhammad T.; Jouneau, Pierre-Henri; Ruseckas, Arvydas; Faure-Vincent, Jérôme; Reiss, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in quantum dot (QD) sensitized solar cells has demonstrated the possibility of low-cost and efficient photovoltaics. However, the standard device structure based on n-type materials often suffers from slow hole injection rate, which may lead to unbalanced charge transport. We have fabricated efficient p-type (inverted) QD sensitized cells, which combine the advantages of conventional QD cells with p-type dye sensitized configurations. Moreover, p-type QD sensitized cells can be used in highly promising tandem configurations with n-type ones. QDs without toxic Cd and Pb elements and with improved absorption and stability were successfully deposited onto mesoporous NiO electrode showing good coverage and penetration according to morphological analysis. Detailed photophysical charge transfer studies showed that high hole injection rates (108 s–1) observed in such systems are comparable with electron injection in conventional n-type QD assemblies. Inverted solar cells fabricated with various QDs demonstrate excellent power conversion efficiencies of up to 1.25%, which is 4 times higher than the best values for previous inverted QD sensitized cells. Attempts to passivate the surface of the QDs show that traditional methods of reduction of recombination in the QD sensitized cells are not applicable to the inverted architectures. PMID:27478616

  11. 20th century precipitation changes in the Sahel region: sensitivity studies with ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, D.; Baumgartner, D.; Wild, M.

    2012-04-01

    The 20th century has seen an enormous growth in population and industrialization. These changes are accompanied, among others, by a substantial increase in aerosol emission. To learn more about associated consequences for the climate system we have carried out a comparatively large set of transient sensitivity studies with the global atmosphere only climate model ECHAM5-HAM, using aerosol emission data from NIES (National Institute of Environmental Studies, Japan) and prescribed, observation based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the Hadley Center. The sensitivity studies cover the period from 1870 to 2005 and comprise ensembles of simulations (up to 13 members per ensemble), which allow to address the role of different aerosol species, greenhouse gases, and prescribed sea surface temperatures. We present a preliminary analysis of these global simulation data for the Sahel region (land within 20W / 35E / 10N / 20N). The annual cycle as well as the overall temporal evolution of precipitation in the Sahel according to CRU (Climate Research Unit, UK) is captured well by the model simulations: two comparatively wet phases in the 1930s and 1950s, a more or less continuous decline thereafter, and a renewed increase in precipitation since the 1980s. This decline / renewed incline since the 1950s is, however, about twice as strong in the CRU data than in the model data. The sensitivity studies reveal SSTs as a prominent factor for the time evolution of precipitation, while the atmosphere only effect of aerosols plays a minor role for the modeled precipitation. The observation based prescribed SSTs may, however, encapsulate and aerosol effect already.

  12. Sensitivity study of an image processing workflow on synchrotron μ-CT images of Berea sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leu, Leon; Berg, Steffen; Ott, Holger; Armstrong, Ryan T.; Enzmann, Frieder; Kersten, Michael

    2014-05-01

    For the present study, the sensitivity of the threshold value for watershed-based segmentation and global threshold segmentation was assessed on μ-CT images of fine grained Berea sandstone. The sensitivities were assessed in terms of porosity, permeability, single-phase flow simulations and capillary pressure curves that were calculated from the segmented data. The μ-CT images of fine grained Berea sandstone with a resolution of 3 μm/pixel was segmented using different threshold values that were systematically varied, which resulted in slightly different structures for the pore space. The results show, that watershed-based segmentation is more robust than global threshold segmentation and that the measured permeability showed a stronger sensitivity to threshold variation than porosity, indicating that it is a more sensitive parameter to image segmentation settings. Calculated permeability and capillary pressure curves matched well with experimental data revealing that the average pores and pore throats of the watershed-based segmented structure were segmented accurately. In contrast, capillary pressure curves indicated that pore sizes near the resolution limit of 3 μm, located in kaolinite rich areas of the rock, were not segmented correctly and thus caused the disagreement between the experimental measured porosity and that measured from the digital rock image. We conclude that capillary pressure curves and permeability values that result from the digital rock data is more indicative of the flow relevant fraction of the pore structure and are therefore better suited as validation criterion than porosity data. Numerical modeling of two-phase flow on segmented data from high resolution μ-CT images enhances our understanding of the dynamics of multiphase-flow of immiscible fluids at the pore-scale. To be confident about simulated data it is therefore important to identify meaningful properties, e.g. permeability, that can be used as benchmark parameters for

  13. Laboratory Measurements and Model Sensitivity Studies of Dust Deposition Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Fan, Jiwen; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

    2012-08-16

    We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties to two different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles of 100, 300 and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (-25, -30 and -35 C), and 400 nm ATD and kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (-30 and -35 C). These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RH{sub ice}) required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on CNT. For the probability density function (PDF) representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution were determined by fitting CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RH{sub ice}. Results show that onset single contact angles vary from {approx}18 to 24 degrees, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to the measurement conditions (i.e. temperature and dust size). Cloud modeling simulations were performed to understand the sensitivity of cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times) to the representation of contact angle and PDF distribution parameters. The model simulations show that cloud properties are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within {+-}2.0 degrees, while our derived PDF parameters have larger discrepancies.

  14. A magnetotelluric study of the sensitivity of an area to seismoelectric signals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balasis, G.; Bedrosian, P.A.; Eftaxias, K.

    2005-01-01

    During recent years, efforts at better understanding the physical properties of precursory ultra-low frequency pre-seismic electric signals (SES) have been intensified. Experiments show that SES cannot be observed at all points of the Earth's surface but only at certain so-called sensitive sites. Moreover, a sensitive site is capable of collecting SES from only a restricted number of seismic areas (selectivity effect). Tberefore the installation of a permanent station appropriate for SES collection should necessarily be preceded by a pilot study over a broad area and for a long duration. In short, a number of temporary stations are installed and, after the occurrence of several significant earthquakes (EQs) from a given seismic area, the most appropriate (if any) of these temporary stations, in the sense that they happen to collect SES, can be selected as permanent. Such a long experiment constitutes a serious disadvantage in identifying a site as SES sensitive. However, the SES sensitivity of a site should be related to the geoelectric structure of the area that hosts the site as well as the regional geoelectric structure between the station and the seismic focal area. Thus, knowledge of the local and regional geoelectric structure can dramatically reduce the time involved in identifying SES sites. hi this paper the magnetotelluric method is used to investigate the conductivity structure of an area where a permanent SES station is in operation. Although general conclusions cannot be drawn, the area surrounding an SES site near Ioannina, Greece is characterized by: (1) major faults in the vicinity; (2) highly resistive structure flanked by abrupt conductivity contrasts associated with large-scale geologic contacts, and (3) local inhomogeneities in conductivity structure. The above results are consistent with the fact that electric field amplitudes from remotely-generated signals should be appreciably stronger at such sites when compared to neighboring sites

  15. Abatacept improves whole-body insulin sensitivity in rheumatoid arthritis: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Ursini, Francesco; Russo, Emilio; Letizia Hribal, Marta; Mauro, Daniele; Savarino, Francesca; Bruno, Caterina; Tripolino, Cesare; Rubino, Mariangela; Naty, Saverio; Grembiale, Rosa Daniela

    2015-05-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is characterized by increased insulin resistance, a well-known risk factor for diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of abatacept on insulin sensitivity in RA patients with moderate to severe disease despite treatment with methotrexate. Fifteen RA patients were recruited for the present study. Patients were evaluated at time 0 and after 6 months of the treatment with i.v. abatacept at the dosage recommended for weight range. Evaluation included oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) at both time points. Insulin sensitivity was estimated with insulin sensitivity index (ISI) by Matsuda, a measure of whole-body insulin sensitivity. ISI significantly increased after the treatment with abatacept from 3.7 ± 2.6 to 5.0 ± 3.2 (P = 0.003) with a mean difference of 1.23. Analysis of glucose and insulin values during OGTT revealed a reduction of both glucose (303.9 ± 73.4 mg/dL min versus 269.2 ± 69.5 mg/dL min, P = 0.009) and insulin (208.4 ± 119.7 mg/dL min versus 158.0 ± 95.3 mg/dL min, P = 0.01) area under the curves (AUCs). Accordingly also glycated hemoglobin significantly improved (5.5 ± 0.4% versus 5.3 ± 0.3%, P = 0.04). No significant differences were found for measures of β-cell function insulinogenic index (1.11 ± 1.19 versus 1.32 ± 0.82, P = 0.77) and oral disposition index (2.0 ± 5.4 versus 6.0 ± 6.0, P = 0.25). Treatment with abatacept seems to be able to improve whole-body insulin sensitivity in RA patients without affecting β-cell function. PMID:26020396

  16. Parametric Sensitivity Study of Operating and Design Variables in Wellbore Heat Exchangers

    SciTech Connect

    Nalla, G.; Shook, G.M.; Mines, G.L.; Bloomfield, K.K.

    2004-05-01

    This report documents the results of an extensive sensitivity study conducted by the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. This study investigated the effects of various operating and design parameters on wellbore heat exchanger performance to determine conditions for optimal thermal energy extraction and evaluate the potential for using a wellbore heat exchanger model for power generation. Variables studied included operational parameters such as circulation rates, wellbore geometries and working fluid properties, and regional properties including basal heat flux and formation rock type. Energy extraction is strongly affected by fluid residence time, heat transfer contact area, and formation thermal properties. Water appears to be the most appropriate working fluid. Aside from minimal tubing insulation, tubing properties are second order effects. On the basis of the sensitivity study, a best case model was simulated and the results compared against existing low-temperature power generation plants. Even assuming ideal work conversion to electric power, a wellbore heat exchange model cannot generate 200 kW (682.4e+3 BTU/h) at the onset of pseudosteady state. Using realistic conversion efficiency, the method is unlikely to generate 50 kW (170.6e+3 BTU/h).

  17. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raguvarun, K.; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic; Kapoor, Ajay

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  18. A study of internal structure in components made by additive manufacturing process using 3 D X-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raguvarun, K. Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Palanisamy, Suresh; Nagarajah, Romesh; Kapoor, Ajay; Hoye, Nicholas; Curiri, Dominic

    2015-03-31

    Additive manufacturing methods are gaining increasing popularity for rapidly and efficiently manufacturing parts and components in the industrial context, as well as for domestic applications. However, except when used for prototyping or rapid visualization of components, industries are concerned with the load carrying capacity and strength achievable by additive manufactured parts. In this paper, the wire-arc additive manufacturing (AM) process based on gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) has been examined for the internal structure and constitution of components generated by the process. High-resolution 3D X-ray tomography is used to gain cut-views through wedge-shaped parts created using this GTAW additive manufacturing process with titanium alloy materials. In this work, two different control conditions for the GTAW process are considered. The studies reveal clusters of porosities, located in periodic spatial intervals along the sample cross-section. Such internal defects can have a detrimental effect on the strength of the resulting AM components, as shown in destructive testing studies. Closer examination of this phenomenon shows that defect clusters are preferentially located at GTAW traversal path intervals. These results highlight the strong need for enhanced control of process parameters in ensuring components with minimal defects and higher strength.

  19. Experimental study of unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena on shock-tube wall using fast-response temperature-sensitive paints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozawa, Hiroshi

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes an experimental study that used a fast-response temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) to investigate the unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena occurring on a shock-tube wall. To understand these phenomena in detail, a fast-response TSP with high temperature sensitivity developed for transient temperature measurement was applied to the wall. The shock-tube experiment was carried out under the over-tailored condition, with a pressure ratio of 110 for test gases of air in driver/driven tubes. The following aspects were clarified using the TSP: (a) the TSP could be used to visualize the unsteady aerothermodynamic phenomena and estimate the quantitative heat flux on the shock-tube wall; (b) an x-t diagram based on the TSP response showed shock-tube wall characteristics that included the incident/reflected shocks, laminar-to-turbulent boundary-layer transition, streaks in the turbulent boundary layer, reflected shock/turbulent boundary layer interaction, and waves reflected from a contact surface; (c) the TSP graphically showed that a transition front from the plate's leading edge and turbulent spots moved with 80% of the free-stream velocity behind the incident shock. In addition, the TSP could track the growth of the turbulent spots on the wall.

  20. Study of the sensitivity of neonates to digoxin: contribution of erythrocyte /sup 86/Rb uptake test

    SciTech Connect

    Zannad, F.; Marchal, F.; Royer, R.J.; Vert, P.; Robert, J.

    1981-01-01

    In general, there is little agreement how digoxin should be used in newborn, and the results of studies in this field seem contradictory. This study attempts a quantitative assessment of the number and the sensitivity of cellular receptors for digoxin in the organism, by the in vitro measurement of erythrocyte /sup 86/Rb neonates compared with adults and old people. Red blood cells are first incubated with differing concentrations of digoxin, and then incubated with /sup 86/Rb. The initial level of /sup 86/Rb uptake (Rbi) is that observed in the absence of digoxin. The 50% index of captation (IC50) is the digoxin concentration in nanograms per ml at which /sup 86/Rb uptake is half Rbi. Three grups of patients were studied: Group I: 12 neonates, less that 5 days old; Group II: 11 adults (26 to 57 years old); Group III: 9 elderly people (71 to 82 years old). Rbi was significantly lower in neonates (Mean +/- SD: 25.8% +/- 3.5, P less than 0.001) and in the elderly (29.9% +/- 3.1) than in adults (36.8% +/- 4.6). IC50 was significantly lower in the elderly (12.1 mg/ml +/- 2.4) than in the adult patients (20.5 ng/ml +/- 5.5, P less than 0.001). In the newborns, values of IC50 were widely scattered (16.2 ng/ml +/- 7.2). The authors suggest that since Rbi reflects Na+, K+-ATPase activity, this activity is diminished in newborn and old people, and indicates that they have fewer cellular recaptors for digoxin than adults. In the elderly, the low IC50 would imply increased sensitivity to digoxin. In neonates, the wide range of values for IC50 suggests considerable individual variation in sensitivity to digoxin. The results aer consistent with the recently recomnended lower dosages of digoxin i neonates.

  1. A confirmatory study of the Combined Index of Severity of Fibromyalgia (ICAF*): factorial structure, reliability and sensitivity to change

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fibromyalgia (FM) is a complex syndrome that affects many aspects of the patients life and it is very difficult to evaluate in clinical practice. A recent study has developed the Combined Index of Severity of Fibromyalgia (ICAF), an instrument that evaluates diverse aspects of FM and offers five indices: emotional, physical, active coping, passive coping and total. The objective of this study is to confirm the structure of the ICAF, check its test-retest reliability, assess its sensitivity to change, and compare the results obtained in a sample of patients with fibromyalgia with another sample of healthy controls. Methods A total of 232 patients took part in the study, 228 women and 4 men, with a mean age of 47.73 years of age (SD = 8.61) and a time of disease evolution since diagnosis of 4.28 years (SD = 4.03). The patients from the FM group completed the ICAF. Between one and two weeks later, they again attended the clinic and complete the 59 items on the ICAF (retest) and immediately afterwards they began treatment (according to daily clinical practice criteria). A sample of healthy subjects was also studied as a control group: 110 people were included (106 women and 4 men) with a mean age of 46.01 years of age (SD = 9.35). The study was conducted in Spain. Results The results obtained suggest that the four-factor model obtained in the previous study adequately fits the data obtained in this study. The test-retest reliability and internal consistency were all significant and show a high degree of correlation for all the factors as well as in overall score. With the exception of the passive coping factor, all the other scores, including the overall score, were sensitive to change after the therapeutic intervention. The ICAF scores of the patients with fibromyalgia compared with those of the control group were markedly different. Conclusions The findings suggest that the ICAF is a valid, reliable, sensitive to change instrument with the added advantage

  2. Microcalorimetry is a sensitive method for studying the effect of nucleotide mutation on promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhu, Juncheng; Liu, Yi; Shen, Ping; Qu, Songsheng

    2005-03-31

    Microcalorimetric method was successfully used to study the effect of nucleotide mutations on promoter activity and identify the important nucleotide necessary for the promoter function in Escherichia coli. The thermokinetic parameters, such as k, I and IC(50), were calculated from the metabolic power-time curves obtained by microcalorimetric measurement using the TAM air Isothermal Microcalorimeter (manufactured by Thermometric AB company of Sweden). Analysis of these data revealed that different nucleotide mutations in -10 box sequence of RM07 fragment had different effect on the promoter activity. Our research also suggest that the microcalorimetric method is a very sensitive and easily performed method for investigation of promoter mutation. PMID:15733578

  3. Study on The Response Improvement of A Linear Actuator Using Temperature-Sensitive Magnetic Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirata, Katsuhiro; Kanzaki, Yasunori; Ota, Tomohiro; Yamaguchi, Tadashi; Kawase, Yoshihiro

    We have been studying a linear actuator for the thermostatic switch using temperature-sensitive magnetic material (TSMM). In this paper, the effect of the geometry of TSMM on response time is investigated by computing the dynamic characteristics of the actuator employing the 3-D finite element method coupled with the equations of magnetic field, heat transfer and motion. As a result, it is found that the response of the actuator is greatly improved. The validity of the computation is clarified though the comparison with the measurement of a prototype.

  4. Turbulence Model Sensitivity and Scour Gap Effect of Unsteady Flow around Pipe: A CFD Study

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Abbod; Sharma, R. K.; Ganesan, P.

    2014-01-01

    A numerical investigation of incompressible and transient flow around circular pipe has been carried out at different five gap phases. Flow equations such as Navier-Stokes and continuity equations have been solved using finite volume method. Unsteady horizontal velocity and kinetic energy square root profiles are plotted using different turbulence models and their sensitivity is checked against published experimental results. Flow parameters such as horizontal velocity under pipe, pressure coefficient, wall shear stress, drag coefficient, and lift coefficient are studied and presented graphically to investigate the flow behavior around an immovable pipe and scoured bed. PMID:25136666

  5. Sensitivity Study of the Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) for Rectangular Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, Eric L.; Everhart, Joel L.; Iyer, Venkit

    2001-01-01

    An off-line version of the Wall Interference Correction System (WICS) has been implemented for the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility. The correction capability is currently restricted to corrections for solid wall interference in the model pitch plane for Mach numbers less than 0.45 due to a limitation in tunnel calibration data. A study to assess output sensitivity to measurement uncertainty was conducted to determine standard operational procedures and guidelines to ensure data quality during the testing process. Changes to the current facility setup and design recommendations for installing the WICS code into a new facility are reported.

  6. Experimental Study of Highly Sensitive Sensor Using a Surface Acoustic Wave Resonator for Wireless Strain Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao; Zhongqing; Hara, Motoaki; Mitsui, Misato; Sano, Koji; Nagasawa, Sumito; Kuwano, Hiroki

    2012-07-01

    We developed a highly sensitive strain sensor employing a surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonator for a wireless sensing system. The aim of this study is to monitor the distribution of the strain in the earth crust or giant infrastructures, such as bridges, skyscrapers and power plants, for disaster prevention. A SAW strain sensor was fabricated using LiNbO3 and a quartz substrate, and applied in a tensile test by attaching the steel specimen based on Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS Z2441-1). The results confirmed that the developed sensor could detect a strain of 10-6 order with linearity.

  7. Sensitivity studies for incorporating the direct effect of sulfate aerosols into climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mary Rawlings Lamberton

    2000-09-01

    Aerosols have been identified as a major element of the climate system known to scatter and absorb solar and infrared radiation, but the development of procedures for representing them is still rudimentary. This study addresses the need to improve the treatment of sulfate aerosols in climate models by investigating how sensitive radiative particles are to varying specific sulfate aerosol properties. The degree to which sulfate particles absorb or scatter radiation, termed the direct effect, varies with the size distribution of particles, the aerosol mass density, the aerosol refractive indices, the relative humidity and the concentration of the aerosol. This study develops 504 case studies of altering sulfate aerosol chemistry, size distributions, refractive indices and densities at various ambient relative humidity conditions. Ammonium sulfate and sulfuric acid aerosols are studied with seven distinct size distributions at a given mode radius with three corresponding standard deviations implemented from field measurements. These test cases are evaluated for increasing relative humidity. As the relative humidity increases, the complex index of refraction and the mode radius for each distribution correspondingly change. Mie theory is employed to obtain the radiative properties for each case study. The case studies are then incorporated into a box model, the National Center of Atmospheric Research's (NCAR) column radiation model (CRM), and NCAR's community climate model version 3 (CCM3) to determine how sensitive the radiative properties and potential climatic effects are to altering sulfate properties. This study found the spatial variability of the sulfate aerosol leads to regional areas of intense aerosol forcing (W/m2). These areas are particularly sensitive to altering sulfate properties. Changes in the sulfate lognormal distribution standard deviation can lead to substantial regional differences in the annual aerosol forcing greater than 2 W/m 2. Changes in the

  8. Mask roughness induced LER control and mitigation: aberrations sensitivity study and alternate illumination scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-04-01

    Here we conduct a mask-roughness-induced line-edge-roughness (LER) aberrations sensitivity study both as a random distribution amongst the first 16 Fringe Zernikes (for overall aberration levels of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75nm rms) as well as an individual aberrations sensitivity matrix over the first 37 Fringe Zernikes. Full 2D aerial image modeling for an imaging system with NA = 0.32 was done for both the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes on a rough mask with a replicated surface roughness (RSR) of 100 pm and a correlation length of 32 nm at the nominal extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) wavelength of 13.5nm. As the ideal RSR value for commercialization of EUVL is 50 pm and under, and furthermore as has been shown elsewhere, a correlation length of 32 nm of roughness on the mask sits on the peak LER value for an NA = 0.32 imaging optic, these mask roughness values and consequently the aberration sensitivity study presented here, represent a worst-case scenario. The illumination conditions were chosen based on the possible candidates for the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes, respectively. In the 22-nm case, a disk illumination setting of σ = 0.50 was used, and for the 16-nm case, crosspole illumination with σ = 0.10 at an optimum offset of dx = 0 and dy = .67 in sigma space. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we considered an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a "strip". While this illumination surprisingly provides minimal improvement to the LER as compared to several alternate illumination schemes, the overall imaging quality in terms of image-log-slope (ILS) and contrast is improved.

  9. Mask roughness induced LER control and mitigation: aberrations sensitivity study and alternate illumination scheme

    SciTech Connect

    McClinton, Brittany M.; Naulleau, Patrick P.

    2011-03-11

    Here we conduct a mask-roughness-induced line-edge-roughness (LER) aberrations sensitivity study both as a random distribution amongst the first 16 Fringe Zernikes (for overall aberration levels of 0.25, 0.50, and 0.75nm rms) as well as an individual aberrations sensitivity matrix over the first 37 Fringe Zernikes. Full 2D aerial image modeling for an imaging system with NA = 0.32 was done for both the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes on a rough mask with a replicated surface roughness (RSR) of 100 pm and a correlation length of 32 nm at the nominal extreme-ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) wavelength of 13.5nm. As the ideal RSR value for commercialization of EUVL is 50 pm and under, and furthermore as has been shown elsewhere, a correlation length of 32 nm of roughness on the mask sits on the peak LER value for an NA = 0.32 imaging optic, these mask roughness values and consequently the aberration sensitivity study presented here, represent a worst-case scenario. The illumination conditions were chosen based on the possible candidates for the 22-nm and 16-nm half-pitch nodes, respectively. In the 22-nm case, a disk illumination setting of {sigma} = 0.50 was used, and for the 16-nm case, crosspole illumination with {sigma} = 0.10 at an optimum offset of dx = 0 and dy = .67 in sigma space. In examining how to mitigate mask roughness induced LER, we considered an alternate illumination scheme whereby a traditional dipole's angular spectrum is extended in the direction parallel to the line-and-space mask absorber pattern to represent a 'strip'. While this illumination surprisingly provides minimal improvement to the LER as compared to several alternate illumination schemes, the overall imaging quality in terms of image-log-slope (ILS) and contrast is improved.

  10. Relationship between insulin sensitivity and the triglyceride-HDL-C ratio in overweight and obese postmenopausal women: a MONET study.

    PubMed

    Karelis, Antony D; Pasternyk, Stephanie M; Messier, Lyne; St-Pierre, David H; Lavoie, Jean-Marc; Garrel, Dominique; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to examine the relationship between the triglyceride-HDL-cholesterol ratio (TG:HDL-C) and insulin sensitivity in overweight and obese sedentary postmenopausal women. The study population consisted of 131 non-diabetic overweight and obese sedentary postmenopausal women (age; 57.7+/-5.0 y; body mass index (BMI), 32.2+/-4.3 kg/m2). Subjects were characterized by dividing the entire cohort into tertiles based on the TG:HDL-C (T1<0.86 vs. T2=0.86 to 1.35 vs. T3>1.35, respectively). We measured (i) insulin sensitivity (using the hyperinsulinenic-euglycemic clamp and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)), (ii) body composition (using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry), (iii) visceral fat (using computed tomography), (iv) plasma lipids, C-reactive protein, 2 h glucose concentration during an oral glucose tolerance test (2 h glucose), as well as fasting glucose and insulin, (v) peak oxygen consumption, and (vi) lower-body muscle strength (using weight training equipment). Significant correlations were observed between the TG:HDL-C and the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp (r=-0.45; p<0.0001), as well as with HOMA (r=0.42; p<0.0001). Moreover, the TG:HDL-C significantly correlated with lean body mass, visceral fat, 2 h glucose, C-reactive protein, and muscle strength. Stepwise regression analysis showed that the TG:HDL-C explained 16.4% of the variation in glucose disposal in our cohort, which accounted for the greatest source of unique variance. Other independent predictors of glucose disposal were 2 h glucose (10.1%), C-reactive protein (CRP; 7.6%), and peak oxygen consumption (5.8%), collectively (including the TG:HDL-C) explaining 39.9% of the unique variance. In addition, the TG:HDL-C was the second predictor for HOMA, accounting for 11.7% of the variation. High levels of insulin sensitivity were associated with low levels of the TG:HDL-C. In addition, the TG:HDL-C was a predictor for glucose disposal rates and HOMA values

  11. Using a generalized additive model with autoregressive terms to study the effects of daily temperature on mortality

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Generalized Additive Model (GAM) provides a flexible and effective technique for modelling nonlinear time-series in studies of the health effects of environmental factors. However, GAM assumes that errors are mutually independent, while time series can be correlated in adjacent time points. Here, a GAM with Autoregressive terms (GAMAR) is introduced to fill this gap. Methods Parameters in GAMAR are estimated by maximum partial likelihood using modified Newton’s method, and the difference between GAM and GAMAR is demonstrated using two simulation studies and a real data example. GAMM is also compared to GAMAR in simulation study 1. Results In the simulation studies, the bias of the mean estimates from GAM and GAMAR are similar but GAMAR has better coverage and smaller relative error. While the results from GAMM are similar to GAMAR, the estimation procedure of GAMM is much slower than GAMAR. In the case study, the Pearson residuals from the GAM are correlated, while those from GAMAR are quite close to white noise. In addition, the estimates of the temperature effects are different between GAM and GAMAR. Conclusions GAMAR incorporates both explanatory variables and AR terms so it can quantify the nonlinear impact of environmental factors on health outcome as well as the serial correlation between the observations. It can be a useful tool in environmental epidemiological studies. PMID:23110601

  12. Microstructural Development and Technical Challenges in Laser Additive Manufacturing: Case Study with a 316L Industrial Part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marya, Manuel; Singh, Virendra; Marya, Surendar; Hascoet, Jean Yves

    2015-08-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) brings disruptive changes to the ways parts, and products are designed, fabricated, tested, qualified, inspected, marketed, and sold. These changes introduce novel technical challenges and concerns arising from the maturity and diversity of today's AM processes, feedstock materials, and process parameter interactions. AM bears a resemblance with laser and electron beam welding in the so-called conduction mode, which involves a multitude of dynamic physical events between the projected feedstock and a moving heat source that eventually influence AM part properties. For this paper, an air vent was selected for its thin-walled, hollow, and variable cross section, and limited size. The studied air vents, randomly selected from a qualification batch, were fabricated out of 316L stainless steel using a 4 kW fiber laser powder-fed AM system, referred to as construction laser additive direct (CLAD). These were systematically characterized by microhardness indentation, visual examination, optical and scanning electron microscopy, and electron-back-scattering diffraction in order to determine AM part suitability for service and also broadly discuss metallurgical phenomena. The paper then briefly expands the discussion to include additional engineering alloys and further analyze relationships between AM process parameters and AM part properties, consistently utilizing past experience with the same powder-fed CLAD 3D printer, the well-established science and technology of welding and joining, and recent publications on additive manufacturing.

  13. Shyness-Sensitivity and Social, School, and Psychological Adjustment in Urban Chinese Children: A Four-Wave Longitudinal Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Chen, Xinyin; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study examined reciprocal contributions between shyness-sensitivity and social, school, and psychological adjustment in urban Chinese children. Longitudinal data were collected once a year from Grade 3 to Grade 6 (ages 9-12 years) for 1,171 children from multiple sources. Shyness-sensitivity positively contributed to social, school, and psychological difficulties over time, with the most consistent effects on peer preference and loneliness. Social and school adjustment negatively contributed to the development of shyness-sensitivity. The initial levels of shyness-sensitivity and social and school adjustment moderated the growth of each other, mainly as a resource-potentiating factor. The results indicate the significance of shyness-sensitivity for adjustment and the role of adjustment in the development of shyness-sensitivity in today's urban Chinese society. PMID:26331958

  14. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  15. Phosphazene additives

    SciTech Connect

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  16. Effect of One Percent Chlorhexidine Addition on the Antibacterial Activity and Mechanical Properties of Sealants: An in vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Asokan, Sharath; John, J Baby; Priya, PR Geetha; Devi, Jagadeesan Gnana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Aim: The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of addition of 1% chlorhexidine digluconate solution on the antibacterial activity and mechanical properties of glass ionomer and resin based sealant. Materials and methods: Conventional glass ionomer sealant (GIS) (Fuji VII, Japan) and resin sealant (Clinpro 3M ESPE, USA) were used in this study. Chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) (20%) liquid was added to both the sealants, and the concentration of chlorhexidine in sealants was adjusted to 1%. The sealants were divided into four groups as: group A (GIS), group B (GIS + 1% CHX), group C (resin sealant), group D (resin sealant + 1% CHX). Five cylindrical specimens were prepared in each group. Their antibacterial activity against Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus, and their mechanical properties (compressive strength and diametrical tensile strength) were assessed. Mann-Whitney and Wilcoxon signed rank test were used appropriately for statistical analysis (SPSS version 19). Result: Addition of one percent chlorhexidine significantly increased the antibacterial activity of both the sealants. There was a significant difference between groups A and B (p < 0.009), and groups C and D (p < 0.008). There was no significant difference in the mechanical properties of the sealants. Conclusion: Addition of one percent chlorhexidine to the glass ionomer and resin based sealants provided sufficient antibacterial activity, without significantly affecting the mechanical property of the sealants. How to cite this article: Shanmugaavel AK, Asokan S, John JB, Geetha Priya PR, Gnana Devi J. Effect of one percent Chlorhexidine Addition on the Antibacterial Activity and Mechanical Properties of Sealants: An in vitro Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2015;8(3):196-201. PMID:26628854

  17. A study on the effect of halloysite nanoparticle addition on the strength of glass fiber reinforced plastic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yun-Hae; Park, Soo-Jeong; Lee, Jin-Woo; Moon, Kyung-Man

    2015-03-01

    Halloysite nanotube, which has been used in the polymer, has been spotlighted as a useful functional materials in the improvement of mechanical properties. In the current study, we established the optimal nanoparticle dispersion and analyzed the mechanical characteristics and the behavior of composites reinforced by HNTs have been synthesized by dispersing HNTs to the unsaturated polyester resin (UPR) and their mechanical characteristics, especially the tensile strength, interlaminar shear strength have been analyzed. Additionally, the reinforcement effect and its variation according to the amount of HNTs was also studied.

  18. Phase Sensitive X-Ray Diffraction Imaging Study of Protein Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Z. W.

    2003-01-01

    The study of defects and growth of protein crystals is of importance in providing a fundamental understanding of this important category of systems and the rationale for crystallization of better ordered crystals for structural determination and drug design. Yet, as a result of the extremely weak scattering power of x-rays in protein and other biological macromolecular crystals, the extinction lengths for those crystals are extremely large and, roughly speaking, of the order of millimeters on average compared to the scale of micrometers for most small molecular crystals. This has significant implication for x-ray diffraction and imaging study of protein crystals, and presents an interesting challenge to currently available x-ray analytical techniques. We proposed that coherence-based phase sensitive x-ray diffraction imaging could provide a way to augment defect contrast in x-ray diffraction images of weakly diffracting biological macromolecular crystals. I shall examine the principles and ideas behind this approach and compare it to other available x-ray topography and diffraction methods. I shall then present some recent experimental results in two model protein systems-cubic apofemtin and tetragonal lysozyme crystals to demonstrate the capability of the coherence-based imaging method in mapping point defects, dislocations, and the degree of perfection of biological macromolecular crystals with extreme sensitivity. While further work is under way, it is intended to show that the observed new features have yielded important information on protein crystal perfection and nucleation and growth mechanism otherwise unobtainable.

  19. Model-based POD study of manual ultrasound inspection and sensitivity analysis using metamodel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribay, Guillemette; Artusi, Xavier; Jenson, Frédéric; Reece, Christopher; Lhuillier, Pierre-Emile

    2016-02-01

    The reliability of NDE can be quantified by using the Probability of Detection (POD) approach. Former studies have shown the potential of the model-assisted POD (MAPOD) approach to replace expensive experimental determination of POD curves. In this paper, we make use of CIVA software to determine POD curves for a manual ultrasonic inspection of a heavy component, for which a whole experimental POD campaign was not available. The influential parameters were determined by expert analysis. The semi-analytical models used in CIVA for wave propagation and beam-defect interaction have been validated in the range of variation of the influential parameters by comparison with finite element modelling (Athena). The POD curves are computed for « hit/miss » and « â versus a » analysis. The verification of Berens hypothesis is evaluated by statistical tools. A sensitivity study is performed to measure the relative influence of parameters on the defect response amplitude variance, using the Sobol sensitivity index. A meta-model is also built to reduce computing cost and enhance the precision of estimated index.

  20. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  1. Numerical study of premixed HCCI engine combustion and its sensitivity to computational mesh and model uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Song-Charng; Reitz, Rolf D.

    2003-06-01

    This study used a numerical model to investigate the combustion process in a premixed iso-octane homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine. The engine was a supercharged Cummins C engine operated under HCCI conditions. The CHEMKIN code was implemented into an updated KIVA-3V code so that the combustion could be modelled using detailed chemistry in the context of engine CFD simulations. The model was able to accurately simulate the ignition timing and combustion phasing for various engine conditions. The unburned hydrocarbon emissions were also well predicted while the carbon monoxide emissions were under predicted. Model results showed that the majority of unburned hydrocarbon is located in the piston-ring crevice region and the carbon monoxide resides in the vicinity of the cylinder walls. A sensitivity study of the computational grid resolution indicated that the combustion predictions were relatively insensitive to the grid density. However, the piston-ring crevice region needed to be simulated with high resolution to obtain accurate emissions predictions. The model results also indicated that HCCI combustion and emissions are very sensitive to the initial mixture temperature. The computations also show that the carbon monoxide emissions prediction can be significantly improved by modifying a key oxidation reaction rate constant.

  2. Shyness-Sensitivity and Social, School, and Psychological Adjustment in Urban Chinese Children: A Four-Wave Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Fan; Chen, Xinyin; Wang, Li

    2015-01-01

    This study examined reciprocal contributions between shyness-sensitivity and social, school, and psychological adjustment in urban Chinese children. Longitudinal data were collected once a year from Grade 3 to Grade 6 (ages 9-12 years) for 1,171 children from multiple sources. Shyness-sensitivity positively contributed to social, school, and…

  3. Is Hiding Foot and Mouth Disease Sensitive Behavior for Farmers? A Survey Study in Sri Lanka

    PubMed Central

    Gunarathne, Anoma; Kubota, Satoko; Kumarawadu, Pradeep; Karunagoda, Kamal; Kon, Hiroichi

    2016-01-01

    Foot and mouth disease (FMD) has a long history in Sri Lanka and was found to be endemic in various parts of the country and constitutes a constant threat to farmers. In Sri Lanka, currently there is no regular, nationwide vaccination programme devised to control FMD. Therefore, improving farmers’ knowledge regarding distinguishing FMD from other diseases and ensuring prompt reporting of any suspicion of FMD as well as restricting movement of animals are critical activities for an effective FMD response effort. Therefore, the main purpose of this study was to clarify the relationship between farmers’ knowledge levels and their behaviors to establish a strategy to control FMD. In our study, item count technique was applied to estimate the number of farmers that under-report and sell FMD-infected animals, although to do so is prohibited by law. The following findings were observed: about 63% of farmers have very poor knowledge of routes of FMD transmission; ‘under-reporting’ was found to be a sensitive behavior and nearly 23% of the farmers were reluctant to report FMD-infected animals; and ‘selling FMD-infected animals’ is a sensitive behavior among high-level knowledge group while it is a non-sensitive behavior among the low-level knowledge group. If farmers would understand the importance of prompt reporting, they may report any suspected cases of FMD to veterinary officials. However, even if farmers report honestly, they do not want to cull FMD-infected animals. Thus, education programs should be conducted not only on FMD introduction and transmission, but also its impact. Furthermore, consumers may criticize the farmers for culling their infected animals. Hence, not only farmers, but also consumers need to be educated on the economic impact of FMD and the importance of controlling an outbreak. If farmers have a high knowledge of FMD transmission, they consider selling FMD-infected animals as a sensitive behavior. Therefore, severe punishment should

  4. A Sensitivity Analysis Method to Study the Behavior of Complex Process-based Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnach, M.; Neilson, R.; Bolte, J.

    2001-12-01

    The use of process-based models as a tool for scientific inquiry is becoming increasingly relevant in ecosystem studies. Process-based models are artificial constructs that simulate the system by mechanistically mimicking the functioning of its component processes. Structurally, a process-based model can be characterized, in terms of its processes and the relationships established among them. Each process comprises a set of functional relationships among several model components (e.g., state variables, parameters and input data). While not encoded explicitly, the dynamics of the model emerge from this set of components and interactions organized in terms of processes. It is the task of the modeler to guarantee that the dynamics generated are appropriate and semantically equivalent to the phenomena being modeled. Despite the availability of techniques to characterize and understand model behavior, they do not suffice to completely and easily understand how a complex process-based model operates. For example, sensitivity analysis studies model behavior by determining the rate of change in model output as parameters or input data are varied. One of the problems with this approach is that it considers the model as a "black box", and it focuses on explaining model behavior by analyzing the relationship input-output. Since, these models have a high degree of non-linearity, understanding how the input affects an output can be an extremely difficult task. Operationally, the application of this technique may constitute a challenging task because complex process-based models are generally characterized by a large parameter space. In order to overcome some of these difficulties, we propose a method of sensitivity analysis to be applicable to complex process-based models. This method focuses sensitivity analysis at the process level, and it aims to determine how sensitive the model output is to variations in the processes. Once the processes that exert the major influence in

  5. Radar sensitivity and antenna scan pattern study for a satellite-based Radar Wind Sounder (RAWS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Modeling global atmospheric circulations and forecasting the weather would improve greatly if worldwide information on winds aloft were available. Recognition of this led to the inclusion of the LAser Wind Sounder (LAWS) system to measure Doppler shifts from aerosols in the planned for Earth Observation System (EOS). However, gaps will exist in LAWS coverage where heavy clouds are present. The RAdar Wind Sensor (RAWS) is an instrument that could fill these gaps by measuring Doppler shifts from clouds and rain. Previous studies conducted at the University of Kansas show RAWS as a feasible instrument. This thesis pertains to the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) sensitivity, transmit waveform, and limitations to the antenna scan pattern of the RAWS system. A dop-size distribution model is selected and applied to the radar range equation for the sensitivity analysis. Six frequencies are used in computing the SNR for several cloud types to determine the optimal transmit frequency. the results show the use of two frequencies, one higher (94 GHz) to obtain sensitivity for thinner cloud, and a lower frequency (24 GHz) to obtain sensitivity for thinner cloud, and a lower frequency (24 GHz) for better penetration in rain, provide ample SNR. The waveform design supports covariance estimation processing. This estimator eliminates the Doppler ambiguities compounded by the selection of such high transmit frequencies, while providing an estimate of the mean frequency. the unambiguous range and velocity computation shows them to be within acceptable limits. The design goal for the RAWS system is to limit the wind-speed error to less than 1 ms(exp -1). Due to linear dependence between vectors for a three-vector scan pattern, a reasonable wind-speed error is unattainable. Only the two-vector scan pattern falls within the wind-error limits for azimuth angles between 16 deg to 70 deg. However, this scan only allows two components of the wind to be determined. As a result, a technique is

  6. A fundamental study of the oxidation behavior of SI primary reference fuels with propionaldehyde and DTBP as an additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Rodney

    In an effort to combine the benefits of SI and CI engines, Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engines are being developed. HCCI combustion is achieved by controlling the temperature, pressure, and composition of the fuel and air mixture so that autoignition occurs in proper phasing with the piston motion. This control system is fundamentally more challenging than using a spark plug or fuel injector to determine ignition timing as in SI and CI engines, respectively. As a result, this is a technical barrier that must be overcome to make HCCI engines applicable to a wide range of vehicles and viable for high volume production. One way to tailor the autoignition timing is to use small amounts of ignition enhancing additives. In this study, the effect of the addition of DTBP and propionaldehyde on the autoignition behavior of SI primary reference fuels was investigated. The present work was conducted in a new research facility built around a single cylinder Cooperative Fuels Research (CFR) octane rating engine but modified to run in HCCI mode. It focused on the effect of select oxygenated hydrocarbons on hydrocarbon fuel oxidation, specifically, the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane. This work was conducted under HCCI operating conditions. Previously, the operating parameters for this engine were validated for stable combustion under a wide range of operating parameters such as engine speeds, equivalence ratios, compression ratios and inlet manifold temperature. The stable operating range under these conditions was recorded and used for the present study. The major focus of this study was to examine the effect of the addition of DTBP or propionaldehyde on the oxidation behavior of SI primary reference fuels. Under every test condition the addition of the additives DTBP and propionaldehyde caused a change in fuel oxidation. DTBP always promoted fuel oxidation while propionaldehyde promoted oxidation for lower octane number fuels and delayed

  7. Thymidine analog methods for studies of adult neurogenesis are not equally sensitive

    PubMed Central

    Leuner, Benedetta; Glasper, Erica R.; Gould, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis is often studied by labeling new cells with the thymidine analog bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and using immunohistochemical methods for their visualization. Using this approach, considerable variability has been reported in the number of new cells produced in the dentate gyrus of adult rodents. We examined whether immunohistochemical methods, including BrdU antibodies from different vendors (Vector, BD, Roche, Dako, Novocastra, Accurate) and DNA denaturation pretreatments, alter the quantitative and qualitative patterns of BrdU labeling. We also compared the sensitivity and specificity of BrdU with two other thymidine analogs, iododeoxyuridine (IdU) and chlorodeoxyuridine (CldU). We found that the number of BrdU-labeled cells in the dentate gyrus of adult rats was dependent on the BrdU antibody used but was unrelated to differences in antibody penetration. Even at a higher concentration, some antibodies stained fewer cells (Vector, Novocastra). A sensitive BrdU antibody (BD) was specific for dividing cells; all BrdU-labeled cells stained for Ki67, an endogenous marker of cell proliferation. We also observed that DNA denaturation pretreatments affected the number of BrdU-labeled cells and staining intensity for a marker of neuronal differentiation, NeuN. Finally, we found that IdU and CldU, when used at molarities comparable to those that label the maximal number of cells with BrdU, are less sensitive. These data suggest that antibody and thymidine analog selection, as well as the staining procedure employed, can affect the number of newly generated neurons detected in the adult brain thus providing a potential explanation for some of the variability in the adult neurogenesis literature. PMID:19731267

  8. Sensitive skin.

    PubMed

    Misery, L; Loser, K; Ständer, S

    2016-02-01

    Sensitive skin is a clinical condition defined by the self-reported facial presence of different sensory perceptions, including tightness, stinging, burning, tingling, pain and pruritus. Sensitive skin may occur in individuals with normal skin, with skin barrier disturbance, or as a part of the symptoms associated with facial dermatoses such as rosacea, atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Although experimental studies are still pending, the symptoms of sensitive skin suggest the involvement of cutaneous nerve fibres and neuronal, as well as epidermal, thermochannels. Many individuals with sensitive skin report worsening symptoms due to environmental factors. It is thought that this might be attributed to the thermochannel TRPV1, as it typically responds to exogenous, endogenous, physical and chemical stimuli. Barrier disruptions and immune mechanisms may also be involved. This review summarizes current knowledge on the epidemiology, potential mechanisms, clinics and therapy of sensitive skin. PMID:26805416

  9. A numerical study of the influence of ammonia addition on the auto-ignition limits of methane/air mixtures.

    PubMed

    Van den Schoor, F; Norman, F; Vandebroek, L; Verplaetsen, F; Berghmans, J

    2009-05-30

    In this study the auto-ignition limit of ammonia/methane/air mixtures is calculated based upon a perfectly stirred reactor model with convective heat transfer. The results of four different reaction mechanisms are compared with existing experimental data at an initial temperature of 723 K with ammonia concentrations of 0-20 mol.% and methane concentrations of 2.5-10 mol.%. It is found that the calculation of the auto-ignition limit pressure at constant temperature leads to larger relative deviations between calculated and experimental results than the calculation of the auto-ignition temperature at constant pressure. In addition to the calculations, a reaction path analysis is performed to explain the observed lowering of the auto-ignition limit of methane/air mixtures by ammonia addition. It is found that this decrease is caused by the formation of NO and NO(2), which enhance the oxidation of methane at low temperatures. PMID:18926632

  10. The influence of deposit control additives on nitrogen oxides emissions from spark ignition engines (case study: Tehran).

    PubMed

    Bidhendi, Gholamreza Nabi; Zand, Ali Daryabeigi; Tabrizi, Alireza Mikaeili; Pezeshk, Hamid; Baghvand, Akbar

    2007-04-15

    In the present research, the influence of a deposit control additive on NOx emissions from two types of gasoline engine vehicles i.e., Peykan (base on Hillman) and Pride (South Korea Kia motors) was studied. Exhaust NOx emissions were measured in to stages, before decarbonization process and after that. Statistical analysis was conducted on the measurement results. Results showed that NOx emissions from Peykans increased 0.28% and NOx emissions from Pride automobiles decreased 6.18% on average, due to the elimination of engine deposits. The observed variations were not statistically and practically significant. The results indicated that making use of detergent additives is not an effective way to reduce the exhaust NOx emissions from gasoline engine vehicles. PMID:19069943

  11. A mechanistic study of the addition of alcohol to a five-membered ring silene via a photochemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Su, Ming-Der

    2016-03-21

    The mechanism for the photochemical rearrangement of a cyclic divinyldisilane (1-Si) in its first excited state ((1)π → (1)π*) is determined using the CAS/6-311G(d) and MP2-CAS/6-311++G(3df,3pd) levels of theory. The photoproduct, a cyclic silene, reacts with various alcohols to yield a mixture of cis- and trans- adducts. The two reaction pathways are denoted as the cis- addition path (path A) and the trans-addition path (path B). These model studies demonstrate that conical intersections play a crucial role in the photo-rearrangements of cyclic divinyldisilanes. The theoretical evidence also demonstrates that the addition of alcohol to a cyclic divinyldisilane follows the reaction path: cyclic divinyldisilane → Franck-Condon region → conical intersection → photoproduct (cyclic silene) → local intermediate (with alcohol) → transition state → cis- or trans-adduct. The theoretical studies demonstrate that the steric effects as well as the concentrations of CH3OH must have a dominant role in determining the yields of the final adducts by stereochemistry. The same mechanism for the carbon derivative (1-C) is also considered in this work. However, the theoretical results indicate that 1-C does not undergo a methanol addition reaction via the photochemical reaction pathway, since its energy of conical intersection (S1/S0-CI-C) is more than that of its FC (FC-C). The reason for these phenomena could be that the atomic radius of carbon is much smaller than that of silicon (77 and 117 pm, respectively). As a result, the conformation for 1-C is more sterically congested than that for 1-Si, along the 1,3-silyl-migration pathway. PMID:26928893

  12. The Low Frequency All Sky Monitor for the Study of Radio Transients: Array Configuration and Sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Rossina B.; Jenet, F. A.; Hicks, B.; Kassim, N. E.; Ray, P. S.; Taylor, G. B.

    2012-01-01

    The forthcoming Low Frequency All Sky Monitor (LoFASM), will be an array of dipoles working between 10-88 MHz adapted from the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) design. This array will offer significant advantages over other projects for the study of radio transients, but its effectiveness will depend on the geometric details of the array. This poster presents the results of theoretical sensitivity calculations for a single 12 antenna array. An optimal configuration was found that can effectively block terrestrial signals incident from the horizon at certain "resonant" frequencies. This configuration will allow LoFASM to operate in regions with relatively high radio frequency interference. We also discuss possible transient sources that could be studied by this instrument.

  13. In vitro and in vivo study of sustained nitric oxide release coating using diazeniumdiolate-oped poly(vinyl chloride) matrix with poly(lactide-co-glycolide) additive.

    PubMed

    Handa, Hitesh; Brisbois, Elizabeth J; Major, Terry C; Refahiyat, Lahdan; Amoako, Kagya A; Annich, Gail M; Bartlett, Robert H; Meyerhoff, Mark E

    2013-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an endogenous vasodilator as well as natural inhibitor of platelet adhesion and activation that can be released from a NO donor species, such as diazeniumdiolated dibutylhexanediamine (DBHD/N2O2) within a polymer coating. In this study, various Food and Drug Administration approved poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) species were evaluated as additives to promote a prolonged NO release from DBHD/N2O2 within a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) matrix. When using an ester-capped PLGA additive with a slow hydrolysis time, the resulting coatings continuously release between 7-18×10(-10) mol cm(-2) min(-1) NO for 14 d at 37°C in PBS buffer. The corresponding pH changes within the polymer films were visualized using pH sensitive indicators and are shown to correlate with the extended NO release pattern. The optimal combined diazeniumdiolate/PLGA-doped NO release (NOrel) PVC coating was evaluated in vitro and its effect on the hemodynamics was also studied within a 4 h in vivo extracorporeal circulation (ECC) rabbit model of thrombogenicity. Four out of 7 control circuits clotted within 3 h, whereas all the NOrel coated circuits were patent after 4 h. Platelet counts on the NOrel ECC were preserved (79 ± 11% compared to 54 ± 6% controls). The NOrel coatings showed a significant decrease in the thrombus area as compared to the controls. Results suggest that by using ester-capped PLGAs as additives to a conventional plasticized PVC material containing a lipophilic diazeniumdiolates, the NO release can be prolonged for up to 2 weeks by controlling the pH within the organic phase of the coating. PMID:23914297

  14. Asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) micro-viscometer for rapid, sensitive and label-free studies of bacterial growth and drug sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Sinn, Irene; Albertson, Theodore; Kinnunen, Paivo; Breslauer, David N.; McNaughton, Brandon H.; Burns, Mark A.; Kopelman, Raoul

    2012-01-01

    The long turnaround time in antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) endangers patients and encourages the administration of wide spectrum antibiotics, thus resulting in alarming increases of multi-drug resistant pathogens. A method for faster detection of bacterial proliferation presents one avenue towards addressing this global concern. We report on a label-free asynchronous magnetic bead rotation (AMBR) based viscometry method that rapidly detects bacterial growth and determines drug sensitivity by measuring changes in the suspension’s viscosity. With this platform, we observed the growth of a uropathogenic Escherichia coli isolate, with an initial concentration of 50 cells per drop, within 20 minutes; in addition, we determined the gentamicin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the E. coli isolate within 100 minutes. We thus demonstrated a label-free, micro-viscometer platform that can measure bacterial growth and drug susceptibility more rapidly, with lower initial bacterial counts than existing commercial systems, and potentially with any microbial strains. PMID:22507307

  15. Recent changes in surface solar radiation and precipitation in India: sensitivity studies with ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folini, D.; Frischknecht, M.; Wild, M.

    2012-04-01

    Population growth and industrialization is progressing at an unprecedented rate on a global scale. One region undergoing a particularly fast transition is India. These changes are accompanied, among others, by a substantial increase in aerosol emission. To learn more about associated consequences for the climate system we have carried out a comparatively large set of transient sensitivity studies with the global atmosphere only climate model ECHAM5-HAM, using aerosol emission data from NIES (National Institute of Environmental Studies, Japan) and prescribed, observation based sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the Hadley Center. The sensitivity studies cover the period from 1870 to 2005 and comprise ensembles of simulations (up to 13 members per ensemble), which allow to address the role of different aerosol species, greenhouse gases, and prescribed sea surface temperatures. We present and analysis of these simulation data with particular focus on surface solar radiation (SSR) and precipitation in India, and discuss potential physical mechanisms involved. Modeled annual mean SSR is found to decrease over the Indian subcontinent (land between 67E / 90E / 10N / 25N) at a rate of about -3 to -4 W/m2 per decade. This dimming is roughly in line with observation based estimates. The decrease is comparable under all sky conditions. Regional and seasonal differences are substantial, with the Ganges plane showing the strongest dimming. Aerosols are transported far out over the Indian ocean, leading to a substantial decrease in SSR also there. Modeled precipitation captures well the annual monsoon cycle. The observed, recent decrease in precipitation is, however, overestimated by the model. More precisely, the model captures the observed precipitation reduction in northern India in July / August, but not the observed increase in precipitation in May / June. Our sensitivity studies suggest that the atmosphere only response to increasing aerosol emissions is a reduction of

  16. Additive contributions of childhood adversity and recent stressors to inflammation at midlife: Findings from the MIDUS study.

    PubMed

    Hostinar, Camelia E; Lachman, Margie E; Mroczek, Daniel K; Seeman, Teresa E; Miller, Gregory E

    2015-11-01

    We examined the joint contributions of self-reported adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and recent life events (RLEs) to inflammation at midlife, by testing 3 competing theoretical models: stress generation, stress accumulation, and early life stress sensitization. We aimed to identify potential mediators between adversity and inflammation. Participants were 1,180 middle-aged and older adults from the Midlife in the United States (MIDUS) Biomarker Project (M age = 57.3 years, SD = 11.5; 56% female). A composite measure of inflammation was derived from 5 biomarkers: serum levels of C-reactive protein, interleukin-6, fibrinogen, E-selectin, and ICAM-1. Participants provided self-report data regarding ACEs, RLEs, current lifestyle indices (cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, physical exercise, waist circumference), current depressive symptoms, and demographic/biomedical characteristics. We also used indices of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical outflow (12-hr urinary cortisol) and sympathetic nervous system output (12-hr urinary norepinephrine and epinephrine). Analyses indicated that ACEs and RLEs were independently associated with higher levels of inflammation, controlling for each other's effects. Their interaction was not significant. The results were consistent with the hypothesis that associations between ACEs and inflammation were mediated through higher urinary norepinephrine output, greater waist circumference, smoking, and lower levels of exercise, whereas higher waist circumference and more smoking partially mediated the association between RLEs and inflammation. In support of the stress accumulation model, ACEs and RLEs had unique and additive contributions to inflammation at midlife, with no evidence of synergistic effects. Results also suggested that norepinephrine output and lifestyle indices may help explain how prior stressors foster inflammation at midlife. PMID:26389605

  17. Hypothesis for induction and propagation of chemical sensitivity based on biopsy studies.

    PubMed

    Meggs, W J

    1997-03-01

    The reactive airways dysfunction syndrome (RADS), the reactive upper airways dysfunction syndrome (RUDS), the sick building syndrome (SBS), and the multiple chemical sensitivity syndrome (MCS) are overlapping disorders in which there is an intolerance to environmental chemicals. The onset of these illnesses is often associated with an initial acute chemical exposure. To understand the pathophysiology of these conditions, a study of the nasal pathology of individuals experiencing these syndromes was undertaken. Preliminary data indicate that the nasal pathology of these disorders is characterized by defects in tight junctions between cells, desquamation of the respiratory epithelium, glandular hyperplasia, lymphocytic infiltrates, and peripheral nerve fiber proliferation. These findings suggest a model for a relationship between the chronic inflammation seen in these conditions and an individual's sensitivity to chemicals. A positive feedback loop is set up: the inflammatory response to low levels of chemical irritants is enhanced due to the observed changes in the epithelium, and the epithelial changes are propagated by the inflammatory response to the chemicals. This model, combined with the concept of neurogenic switching, has the potential to explain many aspects of RADS, RUDS, SBS, and MCS in a unified way. PMID:9167982

  18. Nanoscale elemental sensitivity study of Nd₂Fe₁₄B using absorption correlation tomography.

    PubMed

    Kao, Thomas L; Shi, Crystal Y; Wang, Junyue; Mao, Wendy L; Liu, Yijin; Yang, Wenge

    2013-11-01

    Transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) is a rapidly developing technique with the capability of nanoscale three dimensional (3D) real-space imaging. Combined with the wide range in energy tunability from synchrotron sources, TXM enables the retrieval of 3D microstructural information with elemental/chemical sensitivity that would otherwise be inaccessible. The differential absorption contrast above and below absorption edges has been used to reconstruct the distributions of different elements, assuming the absorption edges of the interested elements are fairly well separated. Here we present an "Absorption Correlation Tomography" (ACT) method based on the correlation of the material absorption across multiple edges. ACT overcomes the significant limitation caused by overlapping absorption edges, significantly expands the capabilities of TXM, and makes it possible for fully quantitative nano-scale 3D structural investigation with chemical/elemental sensitivity. The capability and robustness of this new methodology is demonstrated in a case study of an important type of rare earth magnet (Nd₂Fe₁₄B). PMID:23922210

  19. Host cell reactivation studies with epidermal cells of mice sensitive and resistant to carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, J.E.; Strickland, A.G.

    1984-03-01

    Primary epidermal cells from AKR, BALB/c, CD-1, and SENCAR mice, listed in order of least to most sensitive to epidermal carcinogenesis by initiation and promotion protocols, were found to be equally competent to ''reactivate'' herpes simplex virus type 1 irradiated by germicidal ultraviolet radiation. Nontumorigenic BALB/c epidermal cell lines selected in vitro for resistance to terminal differentiation after in vivo or in vitro treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens showed virus survival curves similar to those of primary cells. Similarly, primary cultures which were allowed to grow to confluency following a single treatment with the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (100 ng/ml) retained normal host cell reactivation. Host cell reactivation studies with mouse dermal fibroblasts could not be done because of the failure of the herpes simplex virus to infect these cells and produce plaques. These results demonstrate that survival of ultraviolet light-damaged virus in primary epidermal cells in culture is unrelated to whether the cells are derived from mice sensitive or resistant to epidermal carcinogenesis. Furthermore, virus survival is not changed by tumor promoter treatment or by treatment with initiating doses of carcinogens which results in differentiation-resistant cells.

  20. Transport studies of quantum dots sensitized single Mn-ZnO nanowire field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Maloney, Francis Scott; Rimal, Gaurab; Poudyal, Uma; Tang, Jinke; Wang, Wenyong

    We present opto-electrical transport properties of Mn-CdSe quantum dots (QDs) sensitized single Mn-ZnO nanowire (NW) field effect transistors (FET). The ZnO NWs with 2 atomic % of Mn doping are grown by chemical vapor deposition. The NWs are ferromagnetic at low temperature. The as grown nanowires are transferred to clean SiO2/Si substrate and single nanowire field effect transistors (FET) are fabricated by standard e-beam lithography. Mobility and carrier concentration of Mn-ZnO NWs are estimated from FET device measurement which shows NWs are n-type semiconductors. Pulse laser deposition of Mn-CdSe QDs on the single NW FET significantly increases carrier concentration of the QD-NW system in dark where the QD monolayer conduction is negligibly small. The photoconductivity study of QD sensitized NW FET enlightens the conduction spectrum of QD-NW system and QD to NW carrier transfer mechanism. This work has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-FG02-10ER46728.

  1. Microarray study of temperature-dependent sensitivity and selectivity of metal/oxide sensing interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiffany, Jason; Cavicchi, Richard E.; Semancik, Stephen

    2001-02-01

    Conductometric gas microsensors offer the benefits of ppm-level sensitivity, real-time data, simple interfacing to electronics hardware, and low power consumption. The type of device we have been exploring consists of a sensor film deposited on a "microhotplate"- a 100 micron platform with built-in heating (to activate reactions on the sensing surface) and thermometry. We have been using combinatorial studies of 36-element arrays to characterize the relationship between sensor film composition, operating temperature, and response, as measured by the device's sensitivity and selectivity. Gases that have been tested on these arrays include methanol, ethanol, dichloromethane, propane, methane, acetone, benzene, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide, and are of interest in the management of environmental waste sites. These experiments compare tin oxide films modified by catalyst overlayers, and ultrathin metal seed layers. The seed layers are used as part of a chemical vapor deposition process that uses each array element's microheater to activate the deposition of SnO2, and control its microstructure. Low coverage (20 Ê) catalytic metals (Pd, Cu, Cr, In, Au) are deposited on the oxides by masked evaporation or sputtering. This presentation demonstrates the value of an array-based approach for developing film processing methods, measuring performance characteristics, and establishing reproducibility. It also illustrates how temperature-dependent response data for varied metal/oxide compositions can be used to tailor a microsensor array for a given application.

  2. Hurricane-generated currents on the outer continental shelf. 2. Model sensitivity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Cortis; Thompson, J. Dana

    1989-09-01

    A numerical model described and verified in part 1 of this two-part series (Cooper and Thompson, this issue) is applied to study the sensitivity of hurricane-generated currents on the outer shelf and slope. Numerical experiments are performed in a simple basin with a straight shelf. The sensitivity of the response to changes in storm parameters, direction of storm approach, and topography is quantified. Response is measured in terms of the mixed-layer velocity and depth at sites along the storm track. Results reveal the most important factors are (in decreasing order) wind speed, storm translation speed, direction of storm approach, asymmetry in the wind field, entrainment parameterization, and advection at slower storm translation speeds. Response is largely insensitive (less than 10%) to radius of maximum wind, shelf and slope configuration, bottom friction, atmospheric pressure gradients, and further reductions in the model grid size. For a storm approaching cross shelf, the response is primarily baroclinic (greater than 90%) and only weakly dependent (less than 10%) on the water depth at the site.

  3. Contact allergens in persons with leg ulcers: a Canadian study in contact sensitization.

    PubMed

    Smart, Victoria; Alavi, Afsaneh; Coutts, Pat; Fierheller, Marjorie; Coelho, Sunita; Linn Holness, D; Sibbald, R Gary

    2008-09-01

    Individuals with chronic leg ulcers often develop contact allergic reactions to topical preparations used to treat their wounds and the surrounding skin. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of positive patch test responses to common allergens in patients with leg ulcers or venous disease. A case series of 100 consecutive, consenting patients with chronic venous disease and other causes of leg ulcers that were available for patch testing were enrolled. The patients were tested with 38 common allergens, including those most relevant to leg ulcers. A total of 46% of the patients had at least 1 positive patch test response. Multiple reactions in the same patient were common. The most frequent groups of sensitizers were fragrances, lanolin, antibacterial agents, and rubber-related allergens. Though the prevalence of positive patch test reactions is high in this population, it is lower than commonly reported. This may be the result of clinical practice that considered the avoidance of common sensitizers in the management of patients with leg ulcers. PMID:18757387

  4. Sensitivity Studies for Space-Based Global Measurements of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Jian-Ping; Kawa, S. Randolph; Bhartia, P. K. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is well known as the primary forcing agent of global warming. Although the climate forcing due to CO2 is well known, the sources and sinks of CO2 are not well understood. Currently the lack of global atmospheric CO2 observations limits our ability to diagnose the global carbon budget (e.g., finding the so-called "missing sink") and thus limits our ability to understand past climate change and predict future climate response. Space-based techniques are being developed to make high-resolution and high-precision global column CO2 measurements. One of the proposed techniques utilizes the passive remote sensing of Earth's reflected solar radiation at the weaker vibration-rotation band of CO2 in the near infrared (approx. 1.57 micron). We use a line-by-line radiative transfer model to explore the potential of this method. Results of sensitivity studies for CO2 concentration variation and geophysical conditions (i.e., atmospheric temperature, surface reflectivity, solar zenith angle, aerosol, and cirrus cloud) will be presented. We will also present sensitivity results for an O2 A-band (approx. 0.76 micron) sensor that will be needed along with CO2 to make surface pressure and cloud height measurements.

  5. Derivation of soil thresholds for lead applying species sensitivity distribution: A case study for root vegetables.

    PubMed

    Ding, Changfeng; Ma, Yibing; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Taolin; Wang, Xingxiang

    2016-02-13

    The combination of food quality standard and soil-plant transfer models can be used to derive critical limits of heavy metals for agricultural soils. In this paper, a robust methodology is presented, taking the variations of plant species and cultivars and soil properties into account to derive soil thresholds for lead (Pb) applying species sensitivity distribution (SSD). Three species of root vegetables (four cultivars each for radish, carrot, and potato) were selected to investigate their sensitivity differences for accumulating Pb through greenhouse experiment. Empirical soil-plant transfer model was developed from carrot New Kuroda grown in twenty-one soils covering a wide variation in physicochemical properties and was used to normalize the bioaccumulation data of non-model cultivars. The relationship was then validated to be reliable and would not cause over-protection using data from field experimental sites and published independent studies. The added hazardous concentration for protecting 95% of the cultivars not exceeding the food quality standard (HC5add) were then calculated from the Burr Type III function fitted SSD curves. The derived soil Pb thresholds based on the added risk approach (total soil concentration subtracting the natural background part) were presented as continuous or scenario criteria depending on the combination of soil pH and CEC. PMID:26513560

  6. Sample size calculations for crossover thorough QT studies: satisfaction of regulatory threshold and assay sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Anand, Suraj P; Murray, Sharon C; Koch, Gary G

    2010-05-01

    The cost for conducting a "thorough QT/QTc study" is substantial and an unsuccessful outcome of the study can be detrimental to the safety profile of the drug, so sample size calculations play a very important role in ensuring adequate power for a thorough QT study. Current literature offers some help in designing such studies, but these methods have limitations and mostly apply only in the context of linear mixed models with compound symmetry covariance structure. It is not evident that such models can satisfactorily be employed to represent all kinds of QTc data, and the existing literature inadequately addresses whether there is a change in sample size and power for more general covariance structures for the linear mixed models. We assess the use of some of the existing methods to design a thorough QT study through data arising from a GlaxoSmithKline (GSK)-conducted thorough QT study, and explore newer models for sample size calculation. We also provide a new method to calculate the sample size required to detect assay sensitivity with adequate power. PMID:20358438

  7. Addition of docetaxel or bisphosphonates to standard of care in men with localised or metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analyses of aggregate data

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Claire L; Burdett, Sarah; Rydzewska, Larysa H M; Albiges, Laurence; Clarke, Noel W; Fisher, David; Fizazi, Karim; Gravis, Gwenaelle; James, Nicholas D; Mason, Malcolm D; Parmar, Mahesh K B; Sweeney, Christopher J; Sydes, Matthew R; Tombal, Bertrand; Tierney, Jayne F

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Results from large randomised controlled trials combining docetaxel or bisphosphonates with standard of care in hormone-sensitive prostate cancer have emerged. In order to investigate the effects of these therapies and to respond to emerging evidence, we aimed to systematically review all relevant trials using a framework for adaptive meta-analysis. Methods For this systematic review and meta-analysis, we searched MEDLINE, Embase, LILACS, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, trial registers, conference proceedings, review articles, and reference lists of trial publications for all relevant randomised controlled trials (published, unpublished, and ongoing) comparing either standard of care with or without docetaxel or standard of care with or without bisphosphonates for men with high-risk localised or metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer. For each trial, we extracted hazard ratios (HRs) of the effects of docetaxel or bisphosphonates on survival (time from randomisation until death from any cause) and failure-free survival (time from randomisation to biochemical or clinical failure or death from any cause) from published trial reports or presentations or obtained them directly from trial investigators. HRs were combined using the fixed-effect model (Mantel-Haenzsel). Findings We identified five eligible randomised controlled trials of docetaxel in men with metastatic (M1) disease. Results from three (CHAARTED, GETUG-15, STAMPEDE) of these trials (2992 [93%] of 3206 men randomised) showed that the addition of docetaxel to standard of care improved survival. The HR of 0·77 (95% CI 0·68–0·87; p<0·0001) translates to an absolute improvement in 4-year survival of 9% (95% CI 5–14). Docetaxel in addition to standard of care also improved failure-free survival, with the HR of 0·64 (0·58–0·70; p<0·0001) translating into a reduction in absolute 4-year failure rates of 16% (95% CI 12–19). We identified 11 trials of

  8. Numerical study on the influence of hydrogen addition on soot formation in a laminar ethylene-air diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Hongsheng; Liu, Fengshan; Smallwood, Gregory J.; Guelder, OEmer L.

    2006-04-15

    The influence of hydrogen addition to the fuel of an atmosphere pressure coflow laminar ethylene-air diffusion flame on soot formation was studied by numerical simulation. A detailed gas-phase reaction mechanism, which includes aromatic chemistry up to four rings, and complex thermal and transport properties were used. The fully coupled elliptic governing equations were solved. The interactions between soot and gas-phase chemistry were taken into account. Radiation heat transfer from CO{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, and soot was calculated using the discrete-ordinates method coupled to a statistical narrow-band-correlated K-based wide-band model. The predicted results were compared with the available experimental data and analyzed. It is indicated that the addition of hydrogen to the fuel in an ethylene-air diffusion flame suppresses soot formation through the effects of dilution and chemistry. This result is in agreement with available experiments. The simulations further suggest that the chemically inhibiting effect of hydrogen addition on soot formation is due to the decrease of hydrogen atom concentration in soot surface growth regions and higher concentration of molecular hydrogen in the lower flame region. (author)

  9. A case study of morphometry as a more sensitive paleoceanographic tool in Globigerinoides ruber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, F. S.; de Lima Toledo, F. A.; Badaraco Costa, K.

    2013-12-01

    There are a number of paleoceanographic tools that take advantage from the wide geographic and temporal occurrence of planktic foraminifers in marine sediments. These tools comprises since simple visual identification and counting to geochemical analysis. Globigerinoides ruber is specially employed due to its high abundance in addition to the advantages mentioned above. That has been attributed to its broad tolerance to most of ecological factors and due to this fact, for this reason, its abundance fluctuation does not provide a significant paleocenographic data like other species do. Globigerinoides ruber has been largely employed in geochemical analysis which demands a higher number of individuals. However, Globigerinoides ruber from brazilian continental margin core tops sediments presents no significant fluctuation either in its abundance and on two of the main paleoceanographic proxies, oxygen and carbon isotope signals, indicating there is no significant environmental difference along brazilian continental margin. Nevertheless, Globigerinoides ruber specimens morphometry does show a significant change between brazilian continental margin core tops. This indicates that morphometry may be a more sensitive tool, enabling a more detailed exploration of paleoceanographical data than other tools do in this species.

  10. Fatigue life prediction for wind turbines: A case study on loading spectra and parameter sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sutherland, H.J.; Veers, P.S.; Ashwill, T.D.

    1992-01-01

    Wind turbines are fatigue-critical machines used to produce electrical energy from the wind. These rotating machines are subjected to environmental loadings that are highly irregular in nature. Historical examples of fatigue problems in both research and commercial wind turbine development are presented. Some example data on wind turbine environments, loadings and material properties are also shown. Before a description of how the authors have chosen to attack the cumulative damage assessment, questions are presented for the reader's reflection. The solution technique used by the authors is then presented, followed by a case study applying the procedures to an actual wind turbine blade joint. The wind turbine is the 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) erected by Sandia National Laboratories near Bushland, Texas. The case study examines parameter sensitivities for realistic uncertainties in inputs defining the turbine environment, stress response and material properties. The fatigue lifetimes are calculated using a fatigue analysis program, called LIFE2, which was developed at Sandia. The LIFE2 code, described in some detail in an appendix, is a PC-based, menu-driven package that leads the user through the steps required to characterize the loading and material properties, then uses Miner's rule or a linear crack propagation rule to numerically calculate the time to failure. Only S-n based cumulative damage applications are illustrated here. The LIFE2 code is available to educational institutions for use as a case study in describing complicated loading histories and for use by students in examining, hands on, parameter sensitivity of fatigue life analysis.

  11. Fatigue life prediction for wind turbines: A case study on loading spectra and parameter sensitivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutherland, H. J.; Veers, P. S.; Ashwill, T. D.

    Wind turbines are fatigue-critical machines used to produce electrical energy from the wind. These rotating machines are subjected to environmental loadings that are highly irregular in nature. Historical examples of fatigue problems in both research and commercial wind turbine development are presented. Some example data on wind turbine environments, loadings and material properties are also shown. Before a description of how the authors have chosen to attack the cumulative damage assessment, questions are presented for the reader's reflection. The solution technique used by the authors is then presented, followed by a case study applying the procedures to an actual wind turbine blade joint. The wind turbine is the 34-meter diameter vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) erected by Sandia National Laboratories near Bushland, Texas. The case study examines parameter sensitivities for realistic uncertainties in inputs defining the turbine environment, stress response and material properties. The fatigue lifetimes are calculated using a fatigue analysis program, called LIFE2, which was developed at Sandia. The LIFE2 code, described in some detail in an appendix, is a PC-based, menu-driven package that leads the user through the steps required to characterize the loading and material properties, then uses Miner's rule or a linear crack propagation rule to numerically calculate the time to failure. Only S-n based cumulative damage applications are illustrated here. The LIFE2 code is available to educational institutions for use as a case study in describing complicated loading histories and for use by students in examining, hands on, parameter sensitivity of fatigue life analysis.

  12. Angiotensin II (de)sensitization: Fluid intake studies with implications for cardiovascular control.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Derek

    2016-08-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and hypertension is the most common risk factor for death. Although many anti-hypertensive pharmacotherapies are approved for use in the United States, rates of hypertension have increased over the past decade. This review article summarizes a presentation given at the 2015 meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior. The presentation described work performed in our laboratory that uses angiotensin II-induced drinking as a model system to study behavioral and cardiovascular effects of the renin-angiotensin system, a key component of blood pressure regulation, and a common target of anti-hypertensives. Angiotensin II (AngII) is a potent dipsogen, but the drinking response shows a rapid desensitization after repeated injections of AngII. This desensitization appears to be dependent upon the timing of the injections, requires activation of the AngII type 1 (AT1) receptor, requires activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase family members, and involves the anteroventral third ventricle (AV3V) region as a critical site of action. Moreover, the response does not appear to be the result of a more general suppression of behavior, a sensitized pressor response to AngII, or an aversive state generated by the treatment. More recent studies suggest that the treatment regimen used to produce desensitization in our laboratory also prevents the sensitization that occurs after daily bolus injections of AngII. Our hope is that these findings can be used to support future basic research on the topic that could lead to new developments in treatments for hypertension. PMID:26801390

  13. Effect of memantine on cough reflex sensitivity: translational studies in guinea pigs and humans.

    PubMed

    Dicpinigaitis, Peter V; Canning, Brendan J; Garner, Rachel; Paterson, Blake

    2015-03-01

    Cough is the most common complaint for which outpatients in the United States seek medical attention, and yet available therapeutic options for cough lack proven efficacy and are further limited by safety and abuse liabilities. Thus, safe and effective cough suppressants are needed. Recent preclinical studies described the antitussive effects of memantine, an N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channel blocker used in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease. The goals of the present study were to compare the antitussive effects of memantine, dextromethorphan, and codeine in guinea pigs; to relate the dose-dependent actions of memantine in these studies to peak plasma concentrations achieved following oral administration; and to provide the first ever evaluation of the antitussive effect of memantine in humans. In guinea pigs, memantine and codeine were comparable in efficacy and potency but both were superior to dextromethorphan in the citric acid cough challenge model. The pharmacokinetic analyses suggest that memantine was active in guinea pigs at micromolar plasma concentrations. Subsequently, 14 healthy volunteers as well as 14 otherwise healthy adults with acute viral upper respiratory tract infection (URI) underwent capsaicin cough challenges 6 hours after ingestion of 20 mg memantine and matched placebo in a randomized, double-blind, crossover fashion. In healthy volunteers, memantine significantly inhibited cough reflex sensitivity (P = 0.034). In subjects with URI, responsiveness to capsaicin was markedly increased, and in these patients, the inhibition of cough reflex sensitivity by memantine relative to placebo did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.088). These data support further research to investigate the potential of memantine as a clinically useful antitussive. PMID:25525191

  14. A study on the effect of the polymeric additive HPMC on morphology and polymorphism of ortho-aminobenzoic acid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simone, E.; Cenzato, M. V.; Nagy, Z. K.

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, the effect of Hydroxy Propyl Methyl Cellulose (HPMC) on the crystallization of ortho-aminobenzoic acid (OABA) was investigated by seeded and unseeded cooling crystallization experiments. The influence of HPMC on the induction time, crystal shape of Forms I and II of OABA and the polymorphic transformation time was studied. Furthermore, the capability of HPMC to inhibit growth of Form I was evaluated quantitatively and modeled using population balance equations (PBE) solved with the method of moments. The additive was found to strongly inhibit nucleation and growth of Form I as well as to increase the time for the polymorphic transformation from Form II to I. Solvent was also found to influence the shape of Form I crystals at equal concentrations of HPMC. In situ process analytical technology (PAT) tools, including Raman spectroscopy, focused beam reflectance measurement (FBRM) and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) UV-vis spectroscopy were used in combination with off-line techniques, such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman spectroscopy, Malvern Mastersizer and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to study the crystals produced. The results illustrate how shape, size and stability of the two polymorphs of OABA can be controlled and tailored using a polymeric additive.

  15. Three new double-headed nucleotides with additional nucleobases connected to C-5 of pyrimidines; synthesis, duplex and triplex studies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pawan; Sharma, Pawan K; Hansen, Jonas; Jedinak, Lukas; Reslow-Jacobsen, Charlotte; Hornum, Mick; Nielsen, Poul

    2016-02-15

    In the search for double-coding DNA-systems, three new pyrimidine nucleosides, each coded with an additional nucleobase anchored to the major groove face, are synthesized. Two of these building blocks carry a thymine at the 5-position of 2'-deoxyuridine through a methylene linker and a triazolomethylene linker, respectively. The third building block carries an adenine at the 6-position of pyrrolo-2'-deoxycytidine through a methylene linker. These double-headed nucleosides are introduced into oligonucleotides and their effects on the thermal stabilities of duplexes are studied. All studied double-headed nucleotide monomers reduce the thermal stability of the modified duplexes, which is partially compensated by using consecutive incorporations of the modified monomers or by flanking the new double-headed analogs with members of our former series containing propyne linkers. Also their potential in triplex-forming oligonucleotides is studied for two of the new double-headed nucleotides as well as the series of analogs with propyne linkers. The most stable triplexes are obtained with single incorporations of additional pyrimidine nucleobases connected via the propyne linker. PMID:26778611

  16. Experimental study of temperature-sensitive chitosan/β-glycerophosphate embolic material in embolizing the basicranial rete mirabile in swines

    PubMed Central

    NING, XIANBIN; ZHAO, CHANGFU; PANG, JINFENG; DING, ZHAOYI; WANG, YUBO; XU, KAN; CHEN, HAO; LI, BINGWEI; LUO, QI

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the feasibility of the non-adhesive temperature-sensitive liquid embolic material, chitosan/β-glycerophosphate (C/GP), in embolizing the basicranial rete mirabile (REM) in a swine model of cerebral arteriovenous malformation (cAVM). A total of 24 domestic swines were used as the experimental animals, among which 12 pigs underwent direct embolization of one side of the REM, while the other 12 pigs underwent embolization of the bilateral REM following anastomosis of the carotid artery and jugular vein. A super-selective microcatheter was introduced into the REM during the embolization procedure, and the C/GP hydrogel was injected until an image of the REM disappeared in the angiography examination. Further angiography examinations were performed after 2 and 6 weeks, and histological examination of the REM was performed after 6 weeks. Of the 24 domestic swines, 23 cases underwent successful thrombosis. Convulsions occurred in one case and that pig died during the embolization procedure. Following embolization, the angiography observations revealed that the embolized REM was no longer able to be developed, and adhesion of the microcatheter tip with the embolic agent did not occur. In addition, no apparent revascularization was observed in the angiography examinations performed at weeks 2 and 6. Therefore, the current preliminary study indicated that use of the non-adhesive temperature-sensitive embolic material was feasible for the embolization of cAVM; thus, C/GP may be used as an ideal embolic material for the treatment of cAVM. PMID:26170955

  17. DFT and TD-DFT study on geometries, electronic structures and electronic absorption of some metal free dye sensitizers for dye sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, T.; Aroulmoji, V.; Ravindran, R. Samson; Müller, M.; Ranjitha, S.; Rajarajan, G.; Anbarasan, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    The geometries, electronic structures, polarizabilities and hyperpolarizabilities of 2-hydroxynaphthalene-1,4-dione (henna1), 3-(5-((1E)-2-(1,4-dihydro-1,4-dioxonaphthalen-3-yloxy) vinyl) thiophen-2-yl)-2-isocyanoacrylic acid (henna2) and anthocyanin dye sensitizers were <