Science.gov

Sample records for addition site visitors

  1. Interpretation reduces ecological impacts of visitors to world heritage site.

    PubMed

    Littlefair, Carolyn; Buckley, Ralf

    2008-07-01

    Minimal-impact interpretation is widely used to reduce the ecological impacts of visitors to protected areas. We tested whether verbal appeals and/or role-model demonstrations of minimal-impact behavior by a trained guide reduced noise, litter, and trampling impacts on hiking trails in a subtropical rainforest. Interpretation did reduce impacts significantly. Different interpretive techniques were more effective for different impacts. The experimental groups were mature, well-educated professionals; interpretation may differ in effectiveness for different visitors. Interpretation by skilled guides can indeed reduce visitor impacts in protected areas, especially if role modeling is combined with verbal appeals.

  2. Non-Additive Effects of Genotypic Diversity Increase Floral Abundance and Abundance of Floral Visitors

    PubMed Central

    Genung, Mark A.; Lessard, Jean-Philippe; Brown, Claire B.; Bunn, Windy A.; Cregger, Melissa A.; Reynolds, Wm. Nicholas; Felker-Quinn, Emmi; Stevenson, Mary L.; Hartley, Amanda S.; Crutsinger, Gregory M.; Schweitzer, Jennifer A.; Bailey, Joseph K.

    2010-01-01

    Background In the emerging field of community and ecosystem genetics, genetic variation and diversity in dominant plant species have been shown to play fundamental roles in maintaining biodiversity and ecosystem function. However, the importance of intraspecific genetic variation and diversity to floral abundance and pollinator visitation has received little attention. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an experimental common garden that manipulated genotypic diversity (the number of distinct genotypes per plot) of Solidago altissima, we document that genotypic diversity of a dominant plant can indirectly influence flower visitor abundance. Across two years, we found that 1) plant genotype explained 45% and 92% of the variation in flower visitor abundance in 2007 and 2008, respectively; and 2) plant genotypic diversity had a positive and non-additive effect on floral abundance and the abundance of flower visitors, as plots established with multiple genotypes produced 25% more flowers and received 45% more flower visits than would be expected under an additive model. Conclusions/Significance These results provide evidence that declines in genotypic diversity may be an important but little considered factor for understanding plant-pollinator dynamics, with implications for the global decline in pollinators due to reduced plant diversity in both agricultural and natural ecosystems. PMID:20090850

  3. Reading, Learning and Enacting: Interpretation at Visitor Sites in the Wet Tropics Rainforest of Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNamara, Karen Elizabeth; Prideaux, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The northern Wet Tropics rainforest of Australia was declared a world heritage site in 1988 and now supports an extensive tourism industry that attracts an estimated 2.5 million local and international visits annually. As part of the visitor experience, many sites include both environmental and cultural interpretation experiences, which range from…

  4. Assessing recreation impacts to cliffs in Shenandoah National Park: Integrating visitor observation with trail and recreation site measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, K.T.; Lawson, S.R.; Marion, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    The rock outcrops and cliffs of Shenandoah National Park provide habitat for several rare and endangered plant and animal species, including the federally endangered Shenandoah Salamander (Plethodon shenandoah; Ludwig et al., 1993). The location of the well-known park tour road, Skyline Drive, along the ridgeline provides exceptional access to many outcrops and cliffs throughout the park for a large number of the park?s 1.2 million annual visitors. Consequently, visitor use of cliff areas has led to natural resource impacts, including marked decreases in size and vigor of known rare plant populations. Despite the clear ecological value and potential threats to the natural resources at cliff areas, managers possess little information on visitor use of cliff sites and presently have no formal planning document to guide management. Thus, a park wide study of cliff sites was initiated during the 2005 visitor use season. As part of this research effort, our study used an integrative approach to study recreational use and visitor-caused resource impacts at one of the more heavily visited cliff sites in the park: Little Stony Man Cliffs (LSMC). In particular, this study integrated data from resource impact measurements and visitor use observation to help assess the effects of recreational use on the natural resources of LSMC. Procedures derived from campsite and trail impact studies were used to measure and characterize the amount of visitor-caused resource impacts on LSMC (Marion & Leung, 2001; Marion, 1995). Visitor use observations were conducted on top of LSMC to document and characterize the type and amount of recreational use the cliffs receive and the behaviors of recreationists that may contribute to cliff-top resource impacts. Resource impact measurement data show trampling disturbance present at LSMC, characterized by vegetation loss, exposed soil, and root exposure. Documentation of informal trails, soil erosion, tree damage, and tree stumps provide further

  5. Marketing Basics for Interpretive Sites and Attractions: It's All about the Visitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veverka, John

    2001-01-01

    Professionals spend thousands in design, production, and distribution of marketing brochures for tourist information centers, yet have no proof that the brochures work. Explains how to market heritage attractions by better understanding the intended visitors. Includes questions for identifying markets, ways to generate new market groups, trends in…

  6. Probabilistic and statistical relationships between number of vehicles and number of visitors at a geologic site in a National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crovelli, R.A.

    1997-01-01

    The National Park Service needs to establish in all of the national parks how large the parking lots should be in order to enjoy and presence our natural resources, for example, in the Delicate Arch in the Arches National Park. Probabilistic and statistical relationships were developed between the number of vehicles (N) at one time in the Wolfe Ranch parking lot and the number of visitors (X) at Delicate Arch 1.5 miles away in the Arches National Park, southeastern Utah. The value of N is determined such that 30 or more visitors are at the arch only 10% of the time.

  7. Determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions on two small Greek islands: is ecotourism possible at coastal protected areas?

    PubMed

    Kafyri, Andriani; Hovardas, Tasos; Poirazidis, Konstantinos

    2012-07-01

    A relatively under-researched question is whether there is a possibility of influencing environmentally aware tourists regarding ecotourism at destinations that continue to develop under a pattern of mass 'seaside' tourism. Our objective was to assess the pro-environmental intentions of visitors at two small Greek islands, which are within a Natura 2000 site, specifically Paxoi and Antipaxoi. Intentions involved willingness to receive information about the protected area, willingness to accept pro-environmental limitations on recreational experience, and willingness-to-pay a conditional environmental conservation value added tax. In addition, we aimed to identify determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions among visitor and visit characteristics, visitor satisfaction, and self-reported environmental knowledge, as well as anticipated outcomes of tourism development and suggestions for protected area management. We randomly collected 324 usable questionnaires during the summer season; 242 (74.69 %) by Greek visitors and 82 (25.31 %) by foreign visitors. Visitor satisfaction was quite high; however, visitors reported low levels of environmental knowledge. Our findings showed that the unique characteristics of the destination were not salient among visitors and that there is a lack of effective outreach campaigns, interpretation, and on-site environmental education programs. However, our study revealed high levels of visitor pro-environmental intentions that might support the promotion of ecotourism on the two islands. We provide recommendations based on determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions, which might assist towards advancing visitor participation in environmental education projects, environmentally responsible behavior among visitors, and financial contribution to environmental conservation by visitors.

  8. Determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions on two small Greek islands: is ecotourism possible at coastal protected areas?

    PubMed

    Kafyri, Andriani; Hovardas, Tasos; Poirazidis, Konstantinos

    2012-07-01

    A relatively under-researched question is whether there is a possibility of influencing environmentally aware tourists regarding ecotourism at destinations that continue to develop under a pattern of mass 'seaside' tourism. Our objective was to assess the pro-environmental intentions of visitors at two small Greek islands, which are within a Natura 2000 site, specifically Paxoi and Antipaxoi. Intentions involved willingness to receive information about the protected area, willingness to accept pro-environmental limitations on recreational experience, and willingness-to-pay a conditional environmental conservation value added tax. In addition, we aimed to identify determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions among visitor and visit characteristics, visitor satisfaction, and self-reported environmental knowledge, as well as anticipated outcomes of tourism development and suggestions for protected area management. We randomly collected 324 usable questionnaires during the summer season; 242 (74.69 %) by Greek visitors and 82 (25.31 %) by foreign visitors. Visitor satisfaction was quite high; however, visitors reported low levels of environmental knowledge. Our findings showed that the unique characteristics of the destination were not salient among visitors and that there is a lack of effective outreach campaigns, interpretation, and on-site environmental education programs. However, our study revealed high levels of visitor pro-environmental intentions that might support the promotion of ecotourism on the two islands. We provide recommendations based on determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions, which might assist towards advancing visitor participation in environmental education projects, environmentally responsible behavior among visitors, and financial contribution to environmental conservation by visitors. PMID:22538319

  9. Determinants of Visitor Pro-Environmental Intentions on Two Small Greek Islands: Is Ecotourism Possible at Coastal Protected Areas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafyri, Andriani; Hovardas, Tasos; Poirazidis, Konstantinos

    2012-07-01

    A relatively under-researched question is whether there is a possibility of influencing environmentally aware tourists regarding ecotourism at destinations that continue to develop under a pattern of mass `seaside' tourism. Our objective was to assess the pro-environmental intentions of visitors at two small Greek islands, which are within a Natura 2000 site, specifically Paxoi and Antipaxoi. Intentions involved willingness to receive information about the protected area, willingness to accept pro-environmental limitations on recreational experience, and willingness-to-pay a conditional environmental conservation value added tax. In addition, we aimed to identify determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions among visitor and visit characteristics, visitor satisfaction, and self-reported environmental knowledge, as well as anticipated outcomes of tourism development and suggestions for protected area management. We randomly collected 324 usable questionnaires during the summer season; 242 (74.69 %) by Greek visitors and 82 (25.31 %) by foreign visitors. Visitor satisfaction was quite high; however, visitors reported low levels of environmental knowledge. Our findings showed that the unique characteristics of the destination were not salient among visitors and that there is a lack of effective outreach campaigns, interpretation, and on-site environmental education programs. However, our study revealed high levels of visitor pro-environmental intentions that might support the promotion of ecotourism on the two islands. We provide recommendations based on determinants of visitor pro-environmental intentions, which might assist towards advancing visitor participation in environmental education projects, environmentally responsible behavior among visitors, and financial contribution to environmental conservation by visitors.

  10. The influence of visitor use levels on visitor spatial behavior in off-trail areas of dispersed recreation use.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Ashley; Monz, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    A variety of social and ecological factors influence the level and extent of ecological change that occurs in a park or protected area. Understanding these factors and how they are interrelated can help managers prevent undesirable ecological impacts, especially in areas without formal trails and visitor sites. This study examines the relationship between levels of visitor use and spatial patterns of visitor behavior at a variety of backcountry recreation destinations. Current assumptions in both the literature and simulation modeling efforts assume that visitor behavior either does not change with use level or that visitors are more likely to disperse at high levels of visitor use. Using visitor counts and GPS tracks of visitor behavior in locations where visitors could disperse off-trail, we found that visitors' spatial behavior does vary with visitor use level in some recreation settings, however the patterns of visitor behavior observed in this study are sometimes contrary to current generalizations. When visitor behavior does vary with use level, visitors are dispersing more at low levels of visitor use not when use level is high. Overall, these findings suggest that in certain situations the amount of visitor use at a recreation destination may be a less important driver of ecological change than visitor behavior.

  11. The influence of visitor use levels on visitor spatial behavior in off-trail areas of dispersed recreation use.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Ashley; Monz, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    A variety of social and ecological factors influence the level and extent of ecological change that occurs in a park or protected area. Understanding these factors and how they are interrelated can help managers prevent undesirable ecological impacts, especially in areas without formal trails and visitor sites. This study examines the relationship between levels of visitor use and spatial patterns of visitor behavior at a variety of backcountry recreation destinations. Current assumptions in both the literature and simulation modeling efforts assume that visitor behavior either does not change with use level or that visitors are more likely to disperse at high levels of visitor use. Using visitor counts and GPS tracks of visitor behavior in locations where visitors could disperse off-trail, we found that visitors' spatial behavior does vary with visitor use level in some recreation settings, however the patterns of visitor behavior observed in this study are sometimes contrary to current generalizations. When visitor behavior does vary with use level, visitors are dispersing more at low levels of visitor use not when use level is high. Overall, these findings suggest that in certain situations the amount of visitor use at a recreation destination may be a less important driver of ecological change than visitor behavior. PMID:26803258

  12. Site Preference of Ternary Alloying Additions to AuTi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of the site substitution behavior of several alloying additions, namely. Na, Mg, Al, Si. Sc, V, Cr, Mn. Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr. Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir, and Pt in B2 TiAu is reported. The 30 elements can be grouped according to their absolute preference for a specific site, regardless of concentration, or preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice. Results of large scale simulations are also presented, distinguishing between additions that remain in solution from those that precipitate a second phase.

  13. 20. Photographic copy of an asconstructed site plan for additions ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photographic copy of an as-constructed site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. A(8-1), Military Construction, Materiel Command Flight Test Base, Muroc, California; Additional Construction, Location Plan, Sheet No. 2, October 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  14. Establishment of sentinel sampling sites to monitor changes in water and sediment quality and biota related to visitor use at Lake Powell, Arizona and Utah, 2004-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hart, Robert J.; Taylor, Howard E.; Anderson, G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty sentinel sampling sites were established and sampled during 2004–06 at Lake Powell, Arizona and Utah, by the U.S. Geological Survey and the National Park Service—Glen Canyon National Recreation Area. The sentinel sampling sites provide sampling locations on Lake Powell, the Nation’s second largest reservoir that can be visited and sampled repeatedly over time to monitor changes in water and sediment quality and also biota. The sites were established in response to an Environmental Impact Statement that addressed the use of personal watercraft on Lake Powell. The use of personal watercraft can potentially introduce hydrocarbons and other contaminants and are of concern to the health of visitors and aquatic habitats of these environments. Data from this initial sampling period (2004–06) include (1) discrete measurements of water temperature, specific conductance, pH, and water clarity; (2) major ions, nutrients, and organic carbon; (3) trace elements including rare earths; (4) organic compounds including oil and grease, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and volatile organic compounds; (5) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in lakebed sediments; and (6) continuous depth profile measurements of water temperature, specific conductance, pH, dissolved oxygen, and turbidity. Also, the National Park Service-Glen Canyon National Recreation Area collected bacteria samples during this initial sampling period.

  15. 19. Photographic copy of an asconstructed site plan for additions ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photographic copy of an as-constructed site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. Muroc A(511), Military Construction, Third District Region, San Bernardino, California; Muroc Bombing Range, Muroc Lake, Calif; Additional Temporary Construction, Materiel Center Flight Test Base, Location Grading & Paving Plan, Sheet No. 1 of 21, March 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  16. 18. Photographic copy of site plan for additions to North ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photographic copy of site plan for additions to North Base: Job No. Muroc A(511), Military Construction, Third District Region, San Bernardino, California; Muroc Bombing Range, Muroc Lake, Calif; Additional Temporary Construction, Materiel Center Flight Test Base, Location Plan, February 1943. Reproduced from the holdings of the National Archives, Pacific Southwest Region - Edwards Air Force Base, North Base, North Base Road, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. Additional evidence for complex 2-site polarons in CMR manganites.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridges, Frank; Kurczveil, Geza; Downward, Lisa; Neumeier, John J.

    2007-03-01

    Recently we have proposed a complex 2-site polaron model (which we call a dimeron) that exists for temperatures near and above the ferromagnetic transition temperature, Tc [1]. The dimeron has a hole delocalized over two Mn sites (i.e. a hole and an electron share the two Mn sites) and the two Mn sites have a reduced distortion compared to the remaining Jahn-Teller distorted electron sites. Magnetic clusters just above Tc are likely clusters of these dimeron quasiparticles. The average valance of the two Mn sites in the dimeron is 3.5 and the spin is 7/2. We show that the Mn K-absorption edge is much better described as a sum of a 3.5 valence edge (fraction 2x) plus a 3 valance edge (fraction 1-2x), compared to earlier simulations using x CaMnO3 plus 1-x LaMnO3. We also show that fitting the Mn-O peak to a sum of two experimental Mn-O standards leads to a similar result as in the earlier study - a fraction 2x of lower distorted Mn sites (dimerons) and a fraction 1-2x of more distorted sites with 1 eg electron. Both support the proposed complex - 2-site polaron model.Supported under NSF grant DMR0301971.[1] L. Downward et. al., Phys Rev Lett 95, 106401 (2005).

  18. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Astronaut Katherine Hire and LEGO-Master Model Builders assisted children from Mississippi, Louisiana and Mississippi in the building of a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled ' Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  19. Visitors Center activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    More than 2,000 children and adults from Mississippi, Louisiana and Alabama recently build a 12-foot tall Space Shuttle made entirely from tiny LEGO bricks at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center in South Mississippi. The shuttle was part of an exhibit titled 'Travel in Space' World Show which depicts the history of flight and space travel from the Wright brothers to future generations of space vehicles. For more information concerning hours of operation or Visitors Center educational programs, call 1-800-237-1821 in Mississippi and Louisiana or (601) 688-2370.

  20. Visitor Evaluation: An Appraisal of Goals and Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Phillip L.; Moscardo, Gianna

    1985-01-01

    This article reviews a subsection of leisure research--studies on visitor characteristics, reactions, and behaviors in recreational settings. Four areas of visitor evaluation research are examined: (1) museums; (2) natural environments; (3) tourist sites, and (4) tourist facilities. The role of the psychologist in the development and improvement…

  1. Evaluating Visitors' Reactions to Interpretation in Australian National Parks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckman, Elizabeth A.

    1999-01-01

    Evaluations of visitors' reactions to interpretation in Australian national parks found that guided activities provided more immediate responses to visitors' questions on Aboriginal culture than on-site signs; a well-designed interpretive mural mitigated people's disappointment at visiting wetlands when no birds were present; and ranger-guided…

  2. 40. Peaks of Otter Visitor Center. The stone faced visitor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    40. Peaks of Otter Visitor Center. The stone faced visitor was completed in 1957 with a comfort station added in the mid-1960's. View is to the northwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  3. Diversity of the Insect Visitors on Calluna vulgaris (Ericaceae) in Southern France Heathlands.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Charlotte; Moquet, Laura; Migon, Marc; Jacquemart, Anne-Laure

    2015-01-01

    As part of an ongoing research project on the pollination networks in European heathlands, the objective of this study was to assess the insect visitor guild on Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull (Ericaceae). We focused the study on a region renowned for its largely well-preserved heathlands, the Cévennes National Park, Southern France. In 2013, flower visitors were observed over 3 d per site, in four heathland sites at mont Lozère. Honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) were the main visitors (62-88% of total visitors). Besides honeybees, a high diversity of visitors was detected with 57 different species identified (42 Diptera and 15 Hymenoptera). Hoverflies (Syrphidae, Diptera) visitors were abundant and diverse, especially individuals belonging to the genera Eristalis and Episyrphus. The reported diversity of visitors was probably due to the preservation of large heathland areas at mont Lozère and to the generalist pollination system of C. vulgaris.

  4. Visitor Behavior at Melbourne Zoo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchman, David

    The potential educational impact of the Melbourne Zoo (Australia) for recreational visitors was examined in this study using time as the major dependent variable. Specific goals included: (1) assessment of the potential cognitive and affective educational impact of zoos on recreational visitors; (2) determination of the temporal and spatial…

  5. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  6. Environmental projects, volume 11. Environmental assessment: Addition to operations building, Mars site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    An Environmental Assessment was performed of the proposed addition to building G-86 at the Mars Site, which will provide space for new electronic equipment to consolidate the Deep Space Network (DSN) support facilities from other Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex (GDSCC) sites at the Mars Site, and will include a fifth telemetry and command group with its associated link monitor, control processor, and operator consoles. The addition of these facilities will increase the capability of the DSN to support future sophisticated NASA spacecraft missions such as the International Solar and Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) Program. The planned construction of this building addition requires an Environmental Assessment (EA) document that records the existing environmental conditions at the Mars Site, that analyzes the environmental effects that possibly could be expected from the construction and use of the new building addition, and that recommends measures to be taken to mitigate any possible deleterious environmental effects.

  7. Ten factors that affect the severity of environmental impacts of visitors in protected areas.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Catherine Marina

    2010-02-01

    Protected areas represent the major method for conserving biodiversity. However, visitor use can threaten their conservation value. Based on a review of recent research, I have categorized factors that affect the severity of environmental impacts of visitor use. These factors need to be considered or evaluated when assessing visitor use of sites in protected areas. They are: (i) the conservation value of the site, (ii) its resistance to use, (iii) its recovery from use, (iv) its susceptibility to erosion, (v) the severity of direct impacts associated with specific activities, (vi) the severity of indirect impacts, (vii) the amount of use, (viii) the social and (ix) ecological dimensions to the timing of use, and (x) the total area affected. Although the factors may not be of equal importance or necessarily assessed on an equal scale, they allow people to make more informed assessments of potential impacts, assist in identifying where monitoring may be required, and indicate where additional site- or activity-specific research may be appropriate.

  8. 22 CFR 62.28 - International visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false International visitors. 62.28 Section 62.28 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Specific Program Provisions § 62.28 International visitors. (a) Purpose. The international visitor category is...

  9. 22 CFR 62.28 - International visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false International visitors. 62.28 Section 62.28 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Specific Program Provisions § 62.28 International visitors. (a) Purpose. The international visitor category is...

  10. 22 CFR 62.28 - International visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false International visitors. 62.28 Section 62.28 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Specific Program Provisions § 62.28 International visitors. (a) Purpose. The international visitor category is...

  11. Conservation caring: measuring the influence of zoo visitors' connection to wildlife on pro-conservation behaviors.

    PubMed

    Skibins, Jeffrey C; Powell, Robert B

    2013-01-01

    Zoos in the 21st century are striving to make effective contributions to conservation. Although zoos are extremely popular and host over 600 million visitors worldwide, one challenge zoos face is how to effectively engage visitors and raise awareness and action for conservation. To this end, zoos commonly rely on charismatic megafauna, which have been shown to elicit a connection with zoo visitors. However, little is known about how to measure a connection to a species or how this connection may influence conservation behaviors. This study had two sequential objectives. The first was to develop a scale to measure visitors' connection to a species (Conservation Caring). The second was to investigate the relationship of Conservation Caring to pro-conservation behaviors, following a zoo experience. Pre- (n = 411) and post-visit (n = 452) responses were collected from three sites in order to assess the reliability and validity of a scale to measure Conservation Caring. Structural equation modeling was used to explore the relationship between Conservation Caring and pro-conservation behaviors. Conservation Caring was deemed a valid and reliable scale and was a strong predictor of species oriented behaviors (β = 0.62), for example, "adopting" an animal, but a weak predictor for biodiversity oriented behaviors (β = 0.07), for example, supporting sustainability policies. Results support the role zoos can play in fostering a connection to wildlife and stimulating pro-conservation behaviors. Additionally, visitors connected to a wide array of animals. On the basis of these results, zoos may recruit a wider assemblage of species as potential flagships.

  12. Analyzing traffic source impact on returning visitors ratio in information provider website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetio, A.; Sari, P. K.; Sharif, O. O.; Sofyan, E.

    2016-04-01

    Web site performance, especially returning visitor is an important metric for an information provider web site. Since high returning visitor is a good indication of a web site’s visitor loyalty, it is important to find a way to improve this metric. This research investigated if there is any difference on returning visitor metric among three web traffic sources namely direct, referral and search. Monthly returning visitor and total visitor from each source is retrieved from Google Analytics tools and then calculated to measure returning visitor ratio. The period of data observation is from July 2012 to June 2015 resulting in a total of 108 samples. These data then analysed using One-Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) to address our research question. The results showed that different traffic source has significantly different returning visitor ratio especially between referral traffic source and the other two traffic sources. On the other hand, this research did not find any significant difference between returning visitor ratio from direct and search traffic sources. The owner of the web site can focus to multiply referral links from other relevant sites.

  13. The effects of local ecological knowledge, minimum-impact knowledge, and prior experience on visitor perceptions of the ecological impacts of backcountry recreation.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Ashley; Monz, Christopher; Newman, Peter; Lawson, Steve; Taff, Derrick

    2012-10-01

    An on-site visitor survey instrument was developed to examine visitor perceptions of resource impacts resulting from backcountry hiking activities. The survey was conducted in the Bear Lake Corridor of Rocky Mountain National Park, CO and examined visitor characteristics that may influence visitor perceptions of specific resource conditions. Findings indicate that visitors are more perceptive of recreation-related resource impacts that are the result of undesirable behavior and, while visitors do perceive resource impacts, visitors tend to be more affected by crowding. Factors such as local ecological knowledge and knowledge of minimal-impact practices positively influence visitor perceptions of resource impacts. These findings support the use of visitor education on ecological knowledge and minimum-impact as a means of increasing visitor awareness of recreation impact issues.

  14. Can visitor regulations enhance recreational experiences?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Jeffrey E.; McCool, Stephen F.

    1988-01-01

    Regulations at recreation sites have been described as anathema to recreation itself. Many recent authors have suggested that managers use more “light-handed” techniques, such as information and education, before attempting regulatory and intrusive actions. This study of visitors to Glacier National Park in Montana, USA, during the fall bald eagle migration season demonstrates that, under certain conditions, recreationists will view regulations as a way to enhance the opportunity rather than detract from it. The results reinforce previous suggestions in the literature that managers carefully examine the objectives and consequences of regulations prior to their use.

  15. Impacts of visitor number on Kangaroos housed in free-range exhibits.

    PubMed

    Sherwen, Sally L; Hemsworth, Paul H; Butler, Kym L; Fanson, Kerry V; Magrath, Michael J L

    2015-01-01

    Free range exhibits are becoming increasingly popular in zoos as a means to enhance interaction between visitors and animals. However very little research exists on the impacts of visitors on animal behaviour and stress in free range exhibits. We investigated the effects of visitor number on the behaviour and stress physiology of Kangaroo Island (KI) Kangaroos, Macropus fuliginosus fuliginosus, and Red Kangaroos, Macropus rufus, housed in two free range exhibits in Australian zoos. Behavioural observations were conducted on individual kangaroos at each site using instantaneous scan sampling to record activity (e.g., vigilance, foraging, resting) and distance from the visitor pathway. Individually identifiable faecal samples were collected at the end of each study day and analysed for faecal glucocorticoid metabolite (FGM) concentration. When visitor number increased, both KI Kangaroos and Red Kangaroos increased the time spent engaged in visitor-directed vigilance and KI Kangaroos also increased the time spent engaged in locomotion and decreased the time spent resting. There was no effect of visitor number on the distance kangaroos positioned themselves from the visitor pathway or FGM concentration in either species. While there are limitations in interpreting these results in terms of fear of visitors, there was no evidence of adverse effects animal welfare in these study groups based on avoidance behaviour or stress physiology under the range of visitor numbers that we studied.

  16. An hourly variation in zoo visitor interest: measurement and significance for animal welfare research.

    PubMed

    Davey, Gareth

    2006-01-01

    A methodological difficulty facing welfare research on nonhuman animals in the zoo is the large number of uncontrolled variables due to variation within and between study sites. Zoo visitors act as uncontrolled variables, with number, density, size, and behavior constantly changing. This is worrisome because previous research linked visitor variables to animal behavioral changes indicative of stress. There are implications for research design: Studies not accounting for visitors' effect on animal welfare risk confounding (visitor) variables distorting their findings. Zoos need methods to measure and minimize effects of visitor behavior and to ensure that there are no hidden variables in research models. This article identifies a previously unreported variable--hourly variation (decrease) in visitor interest--that may impinge on animal welfare and validates a methodology for measuring it. That visitor interest wanes across the course of the day has important implications for animal welfare management; visitor effects on animal welfare are likely to occur, or intensify, during the morning or in earlier visits when visitor interest is greatest. This article discusses this issue and possible solutions to reduce visitor effects on animal well-being.

  17. Impacts of visitor number on Kangaroos housed in free-range exhibits.

    PubMed

    Sherwen, Sally L; Hemsworth, Paul H; Butler, Kym L; Fanson, Kerry V; Magrath, Michael J L

    2015-01-01

    Free range exhibits are becoming increasingly popular in zoos as a means to enhance interaction between visitors and animals. However very little research exists on the impacts of visitors on animal behaviour and stress in free range exhibits. We investigated the effects of visitor number on the behaviour and stress physiology of Kangaroo Island (KI) Kangaroos, Macropus fuliginosus fuliginosus, and Red Kangaroos, Macropus rufus, housed in two free range exhibits in Australian zoos. Behavioural observations were conducted on individual kangaroos at each site using instantaneous scan sampling to record activity (e.g., vigilance, foraging, resting) and distance from the visitor pathway. Individually identifiable faecal samples were collected at the end of each study day and analysed for faecal glucocorticoid metabolite (FGM) concentration. When visitor number increased, both KI Kangaroos and Red Kangaroos increased the time spent engaged in visitor-directed vigilance and KI Kangaroos also increased the time spent engaged in locomotion and decreased the time spent resting. There was no effect of visitor number on the distance kangaroos positioned themselves from the visitor pathway or FGM concentration in either species. While there are limitations in interpreting these results in terms of fear of visitors, there was no evidence of adverse effects animal welfare in these study groups based on avoidance behaviour or stress physiology under the range of visitor numbers that we studied. PMID:26036594

  18. On the site preferences of ternary additions to triple defect B2 intermetallic compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Pike, L.M.; Chen, S.L.; Chang, Y.A.

    1995-12-31

    Knowledge of the site preference of ternary solute additions is essential to developing an understanding of how these solutes affect the properties of B2 intermetallic compounds. A quasichemical model will be presented which is able to predict the site preferences of dilute solute additions to triple defect B2 compounds. The only parameters required are enthalpies of formation at the stoichiometric composition. General equations are developed which can be used to determine site occupations and defect concentrations for dilute as well as non-dilute solute additions. These equations use atom pair bond enthalpies as the parameters. It is found that the site preferences of dilute additions are not always in agreement with predictions based on the solubility lobes in ternary Gibbs isotherms, Predictions for dilute additions to NiAl and FeAl are compared to experimental results found in the literature. Satisfactory correlation is found between the model and the experimental results. In addition, the predictions from the model on vacancy concentrations in Fe doped NiAl are compared to recent experimental results by the authors.

  19. The Visitor Centre "Marcello Ceccarelli"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovani, F.

    2005-12-01

    The "Big Ears" of the Medicina Radio Observatory are a great attraction for visitors. The Observatory is located near the town of Medicina, at about 35 km from Bologna, Italy, and it is operated by the Istituto di Radioastronomia, a part of the National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF). Weekly guided tours have been organized for high school students and the general public since 1983. A typical tour starts with an introduction to radio astronomy, followed by a visit to the observing facilities, the 32-m dish and the 30,000 m2 "Northern Cross". There are about 5,000 visitors per year.

  20. Visitor Perceptions and the Shifting Social Carrying Capacity of South Sinai's Coral Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leujak, Wera; Ormond, Rupert F. G.

    2007-04-01

    To investigate how the perceptions and behaviour of visitors to coral reefs are influenced by their prior experience and knowledge of marine life, a questionnaire-based study was undertaken at sites in the Ras Mohammed National Park and at Sharm El Sheikh, South Sinai, Egypt. It was evident that over the 10-20 years during which these reefs have deteriorated (mainly due to reef-flat trampling), there have been interrelated shifts in the nature of visitors making use of them. First, there has been a shift from experienced divers and snorkellers to inexperienced snorkellers and non-snorkellers with a poorer knowledge of reef biology. Second, there has been a shift in the predominant nationalities of visitors, from German and British, through Italian, to Russian. More recent user groups both stated and showed that they had less experience of snorkelling; they also showed less knowledge of marine life and less interest in learning about it. Visitor perceptions of both the state of the marine life on the reefs and the acceptability of current visitor numbers also varied between groups. More recent visitor groups and visitors with less knowledge were more satisfied with reef health. In general, however, visitor perceptions of reef health did not correlate well with actual reef conditions, probably because more experienced visitors preferred less impacted sites with which they were nevertheless less satisfied than inexperienced visitors at heavily impacted sites. More recent visitor groups were also less bothered by crowding on the shore or in the water. Consequently, the apparent “social carrying capacity” of sites seems to be increasing to a level well above the likely “ecological carrying capacity”.

  1. Enhancing the utility of visitor impact assessment in parks and protected areas: a combined social-ecological approach.

    PubMed

    D'Antonio, Ashley; Monz, Christopher; Newman, Peter; Lawson, Steve; Taff, Derrick

    2013-07-30

    Understanding the ecological consequences of visitor use in parks and how visitors interact with resource conditions is essential for avoiding the impairment of park and protected area resources and visitor experiences. This study combined ecological measures of off-trail resource impacts with social science techniques to understand visitor judgments of ecological impacts and visitors' degree of exposure to impacts. Specifically, this paper reports on a novel integration of techniques that was tested in the Bear Lake Road Corridor of Rocky Mountain National Park, CO, USA in which resource change, as a result of visitor use off designated trails and sites, was assessed and combined with social science and visitor use data. Visual survey techniques were used to understand visitor judgments of ecologically important resource impacts and GPS-tracking of visitor use and behavior allowed for the determination of the degree of visitor's exposure to impaired resources. Results suggest that resource impacts are prevalent and intense throughout the area, but tended to be spatially limited in proximity to attraction sites. Visitors are interacting with resource conditions reported to be unacceptable for significant portions of their hikes. Overall, the work represents an advancement of predictive capabilities when managing park and protected area resources.

  2. Visitors' effects on the welfare of animals in the zoo: a review.

    PubMed

    Davey, Gareth

    2007-01-01

    Since the 1970s, research about zoo visitors' effects on the welfare of nonhuman animals in captivity has intensified. Numerous studies have shown that characteristics such as visitor presence, density, activity, size, and position are associated with animal behavioral and--to a lesser extent physiological--changes. Studies usually interpret these changes as negative (undesirable) or positive (enriching), but it remains unclear whether they significantly impinge on animal welfare. To make confident conclusions about visitors' effects necessitates more studies using (a) a wider range of animal groupings, (b) measures of stress, (c) visitor-animal variables, and (d) other methodological improvements In the meantime, in addition to further research, individual zoos need to emphasize (a) monitoring the stress indicators of their captive animals, (b) observing visitor behavior, and (c) ensuring that staffs are aware of the "visitor effect" concept.

  3. 22 CFR 62.29 - Government visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Government visitors. 62.29 Section 62.29... Program Provisions § 62.29 Government visitors. (a) Purpose. The government visitor category is for the exclusive use of the U.S. federal, state, or local government agencies. Programs under this section are...

  4. 22 CFR 62.29 - Government visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Government visitors. 62.29 Section 62.29... Program Provisions § 62.29 Government visitors. (a) Purpose. The government visitor category is for the exclusive use of the U.S. federal, state, or local government agencies. Programs under this section are...

  5. 22 CFR 62.29 - Government visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Government visitors. 62.29 Section 62.29... Program Provisions § 62.29 Government visitors. (a) Purpose. The government visitor category is for the exclusive use of the U.S. federal, state, or local government agencies. Programs under this section are...

  6. 22 CFR 62.29 - Government visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Government visitors. 62.29 Section 62.29... Program Provisions § 62.29 Government visitors. (a) Purpose. The government visitor category is for the exclusive use of the U.S. federal, state, or local government agencies. Programs under this section are...

  7. Conserved DNA sequences adjacent to chromosome fragmentation and telomere addition sites in Euplotes crassus.

    PubMed

    Klobutcher, L A; Gygax, S E; Podoloff, J D; Vermeesch, J R; Price, C M; Tebeau, C M; Jahn, C L

    1998-09-15

    During the formation of a new macronucleus in the ciliate Euplotes crassus, micronuclear chromosomes are reproducibly broken at approximately 10 000 sites. This chromosome fragmentation process is tightly coupled with de novo telomere synthesis by the telomerase ribonucleoprotein complex, generating short linear macronuclear DNA molecules. In this study, the sequences of 58 macronuclear DNA termini and eight regions of the micronuclear genome containing chromosome fragmentation/telomere addition sites were determined. Through a statistically based analysis of these data, along with previously published sequences, we have defined a 10 bp conserved sequence element (E-Cbs, 5'-HATTGAAaHH-3', H = A, C or T) near chromosome fragmentation sites. The E-Cbs typically resides within the DNA destined to form a macronuclear DNA molecule, but can also reside within flanking micronuclear DNA that is eliminated during macronuclear development. The location of the E-Cbs in macronuclear-destined versus flanking micronuclear DNA leads us to propose a model of chromosome fragmentation that involves a 6 bp staggered cut in the chromosome. The identification of adjacent macronuclear-destined sequences that overlap by 6 bp provides support for the model. Finally, our data provide evidence that telomerase is able to differentiate between newly generated ends that contain partial telomeric repeats and those that do not in vivo.

  8. 22 CFR 62.28 - International visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... programs are designed to enable the international visitors to better understand American culture and society and contribute to enhanced American knowledge of foreign cultures. The category is for...

  9. Child neglect identification: The health visitor's role.

    PubMed

    Akehurst, Rachel

    2015-11-01

    Child neglect is a significant public health issue, with impact often persisting into adulthood. However, neglect is not easily identifiable and may go undetected for many years. This library-based literature review critically analyses the research to uncover effective practices to aid neglect identification. The literature identifies that professionals may observe particular risk factors in a child's life that make neglect more probable. Additionally, children who suffer neglect, and parents who neglect their children, may display signs that practitioners can be alert to. However, a number of barriers exist that make identification difficult. The literature highlights that health visitors have a significant role to play in identifying neglect. Final conclusions relate to the need for professional supervision, use of assessment tools and frameworks, multi-agency training, and timely interventions to safeguard children.

  10. Experiential benefits, place meanings, and environmental setting preferences between proximate and distant visitors to a national scenic trail.

    PubMed

    Kil, Namyun; Holland, Stephen M; Stein, Taylor V

    2015-05-01

    Effective management of conserved natural areas often requires a good understanding of recreation visitors who possess various values for those areas. This study examined differences in experiential benefits sought, place meanings, and environmental setting preferences between proximate and distant visitors to a publicly managed national scenic trail, which transects a variety of conserved public lands. Data were collected using on-site post-hike interviews with visitors at low, moderate, and high use trailheads. Proximate visitors sought mental and physical health more strongly than distant visitors, while distant visitors sought environmental exploration more strongly than proximate visitors. No significant difference in family bonding and achievement benefits existed between the two groups. Meanings related to place dependence, family identity, community identity, and place identity were more strongly ascribed by proximate visitors, and both groups rated ecological integrity meanings highly. Distant visitors showed stronger tendencies toward preferring a lesser level of trail development, lower level of encounters with other groups, and higher level of natural landscapes, which indicated an inclination toward natural settings. These findings indicate a managerially relevant role of the degree of proximity to environmental resources on individuals' recreation behaviors, meanings ascribed to the resources and setting conditions. Understanding differences and similarities between groups dichotomized by proximity to natural resources should advance more effective management of recreation and benefit opportunities for diverse visitor groups.

  11. Experiential Benefits, Place Meanings, and Environmental Setting Preferences Between Proximate and Distant Visitors to a National Scenic Trail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kil, Namyun; Holland, Stephen M.; Stein, Taylor V.

    2015-05-01

    Effective management of conserved natural areas often requires a good understanding of recreation visitors who possess various values for those areas. This study examined differences in experiential benefits sought, place meanings, and environmental setting preferences between proximate and distant visitors to a publicly managed national scenic trail, which transects a variety of conserved public lands. Data were collected using on-site post-hike interviews with visitors at low, moderate, and high use trailheads. Proximate visitors sought mental and physical health more strongly than distant visitors, while distant visitors sought environmental exploration more strongly than proximate visitors. No significant difference in family bonding and achievement benefits existed between the two groups. Meanings related to place dependence, family identity, community identity, and place identity were more strongly ascribed by proximate visitors, and both groups rated ecological integrity meanings highly. Distant visitors showed stronger tendencies toward preferring a lesser level of trail development, lower level of encounters with other groups, and higher level of natural landscapes, which indicated an inclination toward natural settings. These findings indicate a managerially relevant role of the degree of proximity to environmental resources on individuals' recreation behaviors, meanings ascribed to the resources and setting conditions. Understanding differences and similarities between groups dichotomized by proximity to natural resources should advance more effective management of recreation and benefit opportunities for diverse visitor groups.

  12. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The newly added Robot Scouts exhibit at the KSC Visitor Complex is situated next to the Rocket Garden. Part of the $13 million expansion to the Visitor Complex, the exhibit helps describe for visitors the accomplishments of unsung space heroes - space probes - and their role in space exploration. It also includes a display of how data from robotic probes might be used to build a human habitat for Mars. Visitors can witness a simulated Martian sunset. Other additions include a new foyer, films, and an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  13. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites... NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. (a) An...

  14. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Solid waste disposal sites... NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. (a) An...

  15. Living Liquid: Design and Evaluation of an Exploratory Visualization Tool for Museum Visitors.

    PubMed

    Ma, J; Liao, I; Ma, Kwan-Liu; Frazier, J

    2012-12-01

    Interactive visualizations can allow science museum visitors to explore new worlds by seeing and interacting with scientific data. However, designing interactive visualizations for informal learning environments, such as museums, presents several challenges. First, visualizations must engage visitors on a personal level. Second, visitors often lack the background to interpret visualizations of scientific data. Third, visitors have very limited time at individual exhibits in museums. This paper examines these design considerations through the iterative development and evaluation of an interactive exhibit as a visualization tool that gives museumgoers access to scientific data generated and used by researchers. The exhibit prototype, Living Liquid, encourages visitors to ask and answer their own questions while exploring the time-varying global distribution of simulated marine microbes using a touchscreen interface. Iterative development proceeded through three rounds of formative evaluations using think-aloud protocols and interviews, each round informing a key visualization design decision: (1) what to visualize to initiate inquiry, (2) how to link data at the microscopic scale to global patterns, and (3) how to include additional data that allows visitors to pursue their own questions. Data from visitor evaluations suggests that, when designing visualizations for public audiences, one should (1) avoid distracting visitors from data that they should explore, (2) incorporate background information into the visualization, (3) favor understandability over scientific accuracy, and (4) layer data accessibility to structure inquiry. Lessons learned from this case study add to our growing understanding of how to use visualizations to actively engage learners with scientific data.

  16. The influence of an interactive educational approach on visitors' learning in a Swiss zoo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindemann-Matthies, Petra; Kamer, Tobias

    2006-03-01

    A new but costly approach to providing visitors of zoos with information on conservation is the presentation of small exhibits by zoo professionals or volunteers. At these touch tables visitors can find out about the biology, ecology, and conservation of animals kept in the zoo. We studied the effect of a touch table on visitors' learning in a Swiss zoo (Tierpark Goldau) using an experimental approach. For half of each day, visitors could choose to gain information from labels next to the enclosures and posters. In addition, for the other half of the day visitors could also choose to make use of a touch table on the bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus). More than 600 visitors participated in the study. Results revealed that the modern approach was successful. Visitors using the touch table knew more about the biology, ecology, and conservation of bearded vultures, both immediately after their visit to the zoo and two months later. It is suggested that more use be made of touch tables in zoos, museums, visitor centers, and other settings for nature education.

  17. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. (a) An...

  18. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. (a) An...

  19. 36 CFR 6.6 - Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... within new additions to the National Park System. 6.6 Section 6.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SOLID WASTE DISPOSAL SITES IN UNITS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 6.6 Solid waste disposal sites within new additions to the National Park System. (a) An...

  20. Privacy and health in the information age: a content analysis of health web site privacy policy statements.

    PubMed

    Rains, Stephen A; Bosch, Leslie A

    2009-07-01

    This article reports a content analysis of the privacy policy statements (PPSs) from 97 general reference health Web sites that was conducted to examine the ways in which visitors' privacy is constructed by health organizations. PPSs are formal documents created by the Web site owner to describe how information regarding site visitors and their behavior is collected and used. The results show that over 80% of the PPSs in the sample indicated automatically collecting or requesting that visitors voluntarily provide information about themselves, and only 3% met all five of the Federal Trade Commission's Fair Information Practices guidelines. Additionally, the results suggest that the manner in which PPSs are framed and the use of justifications for collecting information are tropes used by health organizations to foster a secondary exchange of visitors' personal information for access to Web site content. PMID:19657826

  1. 22 CFR 62.29 - Government visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... designed to enable government visitors to better understand American culture and society, and to contribute to enhanced American knowledge of foreign cultures. The objective is to develop and strengthen... government visitor programs are for such persons as editors, business and professional persons,...

  2. Home Visitor Job Satisfaction and Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchbinder, Sharon B.; Duggan, Anne K.; Young, Elizabeth; Fuddy, Loretta; Sia, Cal

    This paper summarizes findings of a 3-year study of the job satisfaction and turnover of home visitors, both professional and paraprofessional, in programs which link families-at-risk for impaired functioning to medical home care and other resources. Specifically, the study examined: (1) home visitor personal characteristics that influence…

  3. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bryan Mound Salt Dome, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Ahmad, S.

    1994-11-01

    This report revises the original report that was published in 1980. Some of the topics covered in the earlier report were provisional and it is now practicable to reexamine them using new or revised geotechnical data and that obtained from SPR cavern operations, which involves 16 new caverns. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences as compared with the 1980 report and more definition in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major southeast-northwest trending anomalous zone. The original interpretation was of westward tilt of the dome, this revision shows a tilt to the southeast, consistent with other gravity and seismic data. This interpretation refines the evaluation of additional cavern space, by adding more salt buffer and allowing several more caverns. Additional storage space is constrained on this nearly full dome because of low-lying peripheral wetlands, but 60 MMBBL or more of additional volume could be gained in six or more new caverns. Subsidence values at Bryan Mound are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging about 11 mm/yr (0.4 in/yr), but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values are about the same as survey measurement accuracy. Periodic flooding is a continuing threat because of the coastal proximity and because peripheral portions of the site are at elevations less than 15 ft. This threat may increase slightly as future subsidence lowers the surface, but the amount is apt to be small. Caprock integrity may be affected by structural features, especially the faulting associated with anomalous zones. Injection wells have not been used extensively at Bryan Mound, but could be a practicable solution to future brine disposal needs. Environmental issues center on the areas of low elevation that are below 15 feet above mean sea level: the coastal proximity and lowland environment combined with the potential for flooding create conditions that require continuing surveillance.

  4. Laparoendoscopic Single-Site Pyeloplasty Using Additional 2 mm Instruments: A Comparison with Conventional Laparoscopic Pyeloplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Sung Ho; Lee, Dong-Gi; Lee, Jun Ho; Baek, Min Ki; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Despite a recent surge in the performance of laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS), concerns remain about performing LESS pyeloplasty (LESS-P) because of the technical difficulty in suturing. We report our techniques and initial experiences with LESS-P using additional needlescopic instruments and compare the results with conventional laparoscopic pyeloplasty (CL-P). Materials and Methods Nine patients undergoing LESS-P were matched 2:1 with regard to age and side of surgery to a previous cohort of 18 patients who underwent CL-P. In both groups, the operating procedures were performed equally except for the number of access points. In the LESS-P group, we made a single 2 cm incision at the umbilicus and used a homemade port. We also used additional 2 mm needlescopic instruments at the subcostal area to facilitate suturing and the ureteral stenting. Results The preoperative characteristics were comparable in both groups. Postoperatively, no significant differences were noted between the LESS-P and CL-P cases in regard to length of stay, estimated blood loss, analgesics required, and complications. But, LESS-P was associated with a shorter operative time (252.2 vs. 309.7 minutes, p=0.044) and less pain on postoperative day one (numeric rating scale 3.7 vs. 5.6, p=0.024). The success rate was 94% with CL-P (median, 23 months) and 100% with LESS-P (median, 14 months). Conclusions Our initial experiences suggest that LESS-P is a feasible and safe procedure. The use of additional 2 mm instruments can help to overcome the difficulties associated with LESS surgery. PMID:22025957

  5. Novel adaptation to hawkmoth pollinators in Clarkia reduces efficiency, not attraction of diurnal visitors

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Timothy J.; Raguso, Robert A.; Kay, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims Plant populations experiencing divergent pollination environments may be under selection to modify floral traits in ways that increase both attractiveness to and efficiency of novel pollinators. These changes may come at the cost of reducing overall effectiveness of other pollinators. The goal of this study was to examine differences in attractiveness and efficiency between Clarkia concinna and C. breweri, sister species of annual plants with parapatric distributions. Methods An assessment was made as to whether observed differences in visitors between natural populations are driven by differences in floral traits or differences in the local pollination environment. Differences in floral attractiveness were quantified by setting out arrays of both species in the geographical range of each species and exposing both species to nocturnal hawkmoths (Hyles lineata) in flight cages. Differences in visitor efficiency were estimated by measuring stigma–visitor contact frequency and pollen loads for diurnal visitors, and pollen deposition on stigmas for hawkmoths. Key Results The composition of visitors to arrayed plants was similar between plant species at any particular site, but highly divergent among sites, and reflected differences in visitors to natural populations. Diurnal insects visited both species, but were more common at C. concinna populations. Hummingbirds and hawkmoths were only observed visiting within the range of C. breweri. Despite attracting similar species when artificially presented together, C. concinna and C. breweri showed large differences in pollinator efficiency. All visitors except hawkmoths pollinated C. concinna more efficiently. Conclusions Differences in the available pollinator community may play a larger role than differences in floral traits in determining visitors to natural populations of C. concinna and C. breweri. However, floral traits mediate differences in pollinator efficiency. Increased effectiveness of the

  6. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-04-20

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  7. Methanopyrus kandleri topoisomerase V contains three distinct AP lyase active sites in addition to the topoisomerase active site

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Rakhi; Osterman, Amy; Mondragón, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase V (Topo-V) is the only topoisomerase with both topoisomerase and DNA repair activities. The topoisomerase activity is conferred by a small alpha-helical domain, whereas the AP lyase activity is found in a region formed by 12 tandem helix-hairpin-helix ((HhH)2) domains. Although it was known that Topo-V has multiple repair sites, only one had been mapped. Here, we show that Topo-V has three AP lyase sites. The atomic structure and Small Angle X-ray Scattering studies of a 97 kDa fragment spanning the topoisomerase and 10 (HhH)2 domains reveal that the (HhH)2 domains extend away from the topoisomerase domain. A combination of biochemical and structural observations allow the mapping of the second repair site to the junction of the 9th and 10th (HhH)2 domains. The second site is structurally similar to the first one and to the sites found in other AP lyases. The 3rd AP lyase site is located in the 12th (HhH)2 domain. The results show that Topo-V is an unusual protein: it is the only known protein with more than one (HhH)2 domain, the only known topoisomerase with dual activities and is also unique by having three AP lyase repair sites in the same polypeptide. PMID:26908655

  8. Identifying and assessing ecotourism visitor impacts at selected protected areas in Costa Rica and Belize

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrell, T.A.; Marion, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    Protected area visitation is an important component of ecotourism, and as such, must be sustainable. However, protected area visitation may degrade natural resources, particularly in areas of concentrated visitor activities like trails and recreation sites. This is an important concern in ecotourism destinations such as Belize and Costa Rica, because they actively promote ecotourism and emphasize the pristine qualities of their natural resources. Research on visitor impacts to protected areas has many potential applications in protected area management, though it has not been widely applied in Central and South America. This study targeted this deficiency through manager interviews and evaluations of alternative impact assessment procedures at eight protected areas in Belize and Costa Rica. Impact assessment procedures included qualitative condition class systems, ratings systems, and measurement-based systems applied to trails and recreation sites. The resulting data characterize manager perceptions of impact problems, document trail and recreation site impacts, and provide examples of inexpensive, efficient and effective rapid impact assessment procedures. Interview subjects reported a variety of impacts affecting trails, recreation sites, wildlife, water, attraction features and other resources. Standardized assessment procedures were developed and applied to record trail and recreation site impacts. Impacts affecting the study areas included trail proliferation, erosion and widening, muddiness on trails, vegetation cover loss, soil and root exposure, and tree damage on recreation sites. The findings also illustrate the types of assessment data yielded by several alternative methods and demonstrate their utility to protected area managers. The need for additional rapid assessment procedures for wildlife, water, attraction feature and other resource impacts was also identified.

  9. An exploration of visitor motivations: The search for silence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Lelaina D.

    2011-12-01

    This research aims to study the relationship between visitor motivations for experiencing solitude, sounds of nature, and quiet and a visitor's soundscape experience. This relationship will improve managers' ability to provide satisfying and diverse experiences for their visitors and "protect" something that is increasingly rare outside of national parks and other protected natural areas; natural sounds and quiet. Chapter 1 focuses on the effect motivation for a quiet setting can have on acceptability of natural or human-caused sound in Muir Woods National Monument. This study used a dose-response methodology where visitors listened to five audio recordings varying in the percentage of time that human-caused sound was louder than natural sound (percent time above). Visitors were then asked to rate the acceptability of each recording. Three sound-related motivations for visiting Muir Woods were examined: "enjoying peace and quiet", "hearing sounds of nature" and "experiencing solitude." Cluster analysis was used to identify discrete groups with similar motivational profiles (i.e., low, moderate and high motivation for quiet). Results indicated that as percent time above natural sound increased, visitor ratings of human-caused sound decreased. Tolerance for human-caused sound also decreased as motivation for quiet increased. Consensus regarding the acceptability of sound was greatest when the percent time above natural sound was lowest (i.e., quietest sounds). Chapter 2 describes a study of the ability of motivations to predict which of three locations a visitor would most likely choose for recreation. Particular focus was given to sound-related motivations. Data for this study were collected at three sites with varying visitation levels within two national parks; Sequoia National Park-backcountry (low visitation), Sequoia National Park-frontcountry (moderate visitation), and Muir Woods National Monument-frontcountry (high visitation). Survey respondents were asked

  10. Innovative Interactive Visitor Experiences Focused on Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettvin, E. E.

    2011-12-01

    Pacific Science Center has adopted a multi-pronged approach to introduce visitors to the concepts of climate change and linkages to human behavior in an informal science education setting. We leverage key fixed exhibit assets derived from collaborations with NOAA: Science on a Sphere and an exhibit kiosk showcasing local CO2 measurements that are adjacent on our exhibit floor. NOAA PMEL Scientists deployed a sensor at the top of the Space Needle that measures variability in atmospheric CO2 over Seattle; the kiosk showcases these near-real-time, daily, weekly and monthly measurements as well as similar observations from a NOAA buoy near Aberdeen, Washington. Displays of these data enable visitors to see first-hand varying CO2 levels in urban and remote marine environments as well as seasonal cycling. It also reveals quantifiable increases in CO2 levels over a relatively short time (~5 years). Trained interpreters help visitors understand linkages between personal behavior and corresponding CO2 footprints. Interpreters discuss connections between local and regional CO2 measurements displayed on the kiosk, and global Sphere datasets including NOAA Carbon Tracker, changing arctic sea ice coverage and sea level rise projections. Portable Discovery Carts, consisting of props and interactive, hands-on activities provide a platform for facilitated interpretation on a series of topics. We have developed two climate focused carts: 'Sinks and Sources' that examines materials and activities that produce and absorb carbon, and 'Ocean Acidification' that shows how absorption of atmospheric CO2 is changing ocean composition and its habitability for marine life. These carts can be deployed anywhere on the exhibit floor but are primarily used adjacent to the Sphere and the kiosk, making it possible to have a range of conversations about global and local CO2 levels, linkages to individual and collective behaviour and associated implications. Additional collaborations with members of

  11. Spatially characterizing visitor use and its association with informal trails in Yosemite Valley meadows.

    PubMed

    Walden-Schreiner, Chelsey; Leung, Yu-Fai

    2013-07-01

    Ecological impacts associated with nature-based recreation and tourism can compromise park and protected area goals if left unrestricted. Protected area agencies are increasingly incorporating indicator-based management frameworks into their management plans to address visitor impacts. Development of indicators requires empirical evaluation of indicator measures and examining their ecological and social relevance. This study addresses the development of the informal trail indicator in Yosemite National Park by spatially characterizing visitor use in open landscapes and integrating use patterns with informal trail condition data to examine their spatial association. Informal trail and visitor use data were collected concurrently during July and August of 2011 in three, high-use meadows of Yosemite Valley. Visitor use was clustered at statistically significant levels in all three study meadows. Spatial data integration found no statistically significant differences between use patterns and trail condition class. However, statistically significant differences were found between the distance visitors were observed from informal trails and visitor activity type with active activities occurring closer to trail corridors. Gender was also found to be significant with male visitors observed further from trail corridors. Results highlight the utility of integrated spatial analysis in supporting indicator-based monitoring and informing management of open landscapes. Additional variables for future analysis and methodological improvements are discussed.

  12. Spatially Characterizing Visitor Use and Its Association with Informal Trails in Yosemite Valley Meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walden-Schreiner, Chelsey; Leung, Yu-Fai

    2013-07-01

    Ecological impacts associated with nature-based recreation and tourism can compromise park and protected area goals if left unrestricted. Protected area agencies are increasingly incorporating indicator-based management frameworks into their management plans to address visitor impacts. Development of indicators requires empirical evaluation of indicator measures and examining their ecological and social relevance. This study addresses the development of the informal trail indicator in Yosemite National Park by spatially characterizing visitor use in open landscapes and integrating use patterns with informal trail condition data to examine their spatial association. Informal trail and visitor use data were collected concurrently during July and August of 2011 in three, high-use meadows of Yosemite Valley. Visitor use was clustered at statistically significant levels in all three study meadows. Spatial data integration found no statistically significant differences between use patterns and trail condition class. However, statistically significant differences were found between the distance visitors were observed from informal trails and visitor activity type with active activities occurring closer to trail corridors. Gender was also found to be significant with male visitors observed further from trail corridors. Results highlight the utility of integrated spatial analysis in supporting indicator-based monitoring and informing management of open landscapes. Additional variables for future analysis and methodological improvements are discussed.

  13. Visitor evaluations of management actions at a highly impacted Appalachian Trail camping area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniels, M.L.; Marion, J.L.

    2006-01-01

    Protected area management involves balancing environmental and social objectives. This is particularly difficult at high-use/high-impact recreation sites, because resource protection objectives may require substantial site management or visitor regulation. This study examined visitors? reactions to both of these types of actions at Annapolis Rocks, Maryland, a popular Appalachian Trail camping area. We surveyed visitors before and after implementation of camping policies that included shifting camping to designated newly constructed campsites and prohibiting campfires. Survey results reveal that visitors were more satisfied with all social and environmental indicators after the changes were enacted. An Importance-Performance analysis also determined that management actions improved conditions for factors of greatest concern to campers prior to the changes. Posttreatment visitors were least satisfied with factors related to reduced freedom and to some characteristics of the constructed campsites. Although there was evidence of visitor displacement, the camping changes met management goals by protecting the camping area?s natural resources and improving social conditions.

  14. Demographic characteristics and physical activity behavior of park-visitors versus non-visitors.

    PubMed

    Reed, Julian A; Price, Anna E

    2012-12-01

    To examine physical activity (PA) behaviors among park visitors versus non-visitors by select demographic variables of a large city park. A sample of 251 respondents participated in a random digit dial survey. PA was measured using the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) PA module. The majority of respondents reported meeting PA recommendations (70.5 %) and being park visitors (60.2 %). A greater proportion of adults were park visitors (65.6 %) compared to the proportion of older adults who were park visitors (49.2 %). All persons who identified as being a race other than white and reported meeting the national PA recommendations through vigorous PA were park visitors. Environmental interventions that increase the availability of city parks may impact PA behavior among racial minority groups. There is also an opportunity to promote park usage among older adults.

  15. NASA Dryden's Educator and Visitor Centers Reopen

    NASA Video Gallery

    The City of Palmdale, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center and the AERO Institute recently hosted the reopening of NASA Dryden's Educator Resource and Visitor Centers. Now housed at the AERO Instit...

  16. 22 CFR 62.28 - International visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...: (1) Selected by the Department of State; (2) Engaged in consultation, observation, research, training... exchange visitor program; and (2) A summary of the significant components of the program. (e) Issuance...

  17. 76 FR 33993 - Exchange Visitor Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-10

    ... political turmoil in their home country. DATES: This action is effective June 10, 2011, and will remain in... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Recent political turmoil in Libya has affected Exchange Visitor Program college...

  18. Pulp fiction - The volunteer concept (or how not to site additional LLRW disposal capacity)

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, D.A.

    1995-12-31

    Experiences of compacts and of individual states throughout the nation indicate that low-level radioactive waste disposal siting processes, based from the beginning upon the volunteer concept are fraught with problems. Most apparent among these problems is that the volunteer concept does not lead to scientifically and technically based siting endeavors. Ten years have passed since the Amendments Act of 1985, and no compact or state has been - successful in providing for new LLRW disposal capacity. That failure can be traced in part to the reliance upon the volunteer concept in siting attempts. If success is to be achieved, the future direction for LLRW management must focus on three areas: first, a comprehensive evaluation of all LLRW management options, including reduction of waste generated and on-site storage; secondly, a comprehensive evaluation of the current as well as projected waste stream, to determine the amount of disposal capacity actually needed; and, finally, sound scientifically and technically based siting processes.

  19. Camping impact management at Isle Royale National Park: an evaluation of visitor activity containment policies from the perspective of social conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Farrell, T.A.; Marion, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of backcountry and wilderness campsites at Isle Royale National Park reveals that the park?s policies for managing visitor impacts have been remarkably effective in limiting the areal extent of camping-related disturbance. However, the dense spatial arrangement of designated campsites within backcountry campgrounds has also contributed to problems with visitor crowding and conflict. Only 9% of the sites had no other sites visible, while 22% had three or more other sites visible. Mean intersite distance was only 76 feet, and 34% of the sites are within 50 feet of another site. Visitor education programs and selected relocation of sites could reduce these social problems.

  20. Zoo Visitor Knowledge and Attitudes toward Gorillas and Chimpanzees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lukas, K. E.; Ross, S. R.

    2005-01-01

    The authors conducted an evaluation of visitor knowledge and conservation attitudes toward African apes at Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo. Using S. R. Kellert's and J. Dunlap's (1989) analysis of zoo visitor knowledge and attitudes as a model, they modified and administered a survey to 1,000 visitors to the ape facility. On average, visitors correctly…

  1. JEA's Code of Ethics for Advisers; and Sites for Additional Ethics Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, John

    1997-01-01

    Lists general principles that media advisers should follow, the 12 points agreed upon as the Journalism Education Association's (JEA) Code of Ethics for Advisers, and a list of Web sites that deal with journalism ethics. (PA)

  2. On-Site Additive Manufacturing by Selective Laser Melting of Composite Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateri, M.; Khosravi, M.

    2012-06-01

    This paper proposes a method for cost reduction of future space missions by manufacturing parts on foreign planets. The suitability of Selective Laser Melting process for on-site production of metallic, ceramic and glass products on mars is examined.

  3. Breeding site selection by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch) in relation to large wood additions and factors that influence reproductive success

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Steven M.; Dunham, Jason B.; McEnroe, Jeffery R.; Lightcap, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    The fitness of female Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) with respect to breeding behavior can be partitioned into at least four fitness components: survival to reproduction, competition for breeding sites, success of egg incubation, and suitability of the local environment near breeding sites for early rearing of juveniles. We evaluated the relative influences of habitat features linked to these fitness components with respect to selection of breeding sites by coho salmon (Oncorhynchus kisutch). We also evaluated associations between breeding site selection and additions of large wood, as the latter were introduced into the study system as a means of restoring habitat conditions to benefit coho salmon. We used a model selection approach to organize specific habitat features into groupings reflecting fitness components and influences of large wood. Results of this work suggest that female coho salmon likely select breeding sites based on a wide range of habitat features linked to all four hypothesized fitness components. More specifically, model parameter estimates indicated that breeding site selection was most strongly influenced by proximity to pool-tail crests and deeper water (mean and maximum depths). Linkages between large wood and breeding site selection were less clear. Overall, our findings suggest that breeding site selection by coho salmon is influenced by a suite of fitness components in addition to the egg incubation environment, which has been the emphasis of much work in the past.

  4. Public Outreach at Appalachian State University's Dark Sky Observatory Cline Visitor Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caton, Daniel B.; Hawkins, L.; Smith, A. B.

    2012-01-01

    With the recent completion of the Cline Visitor Center we have begun a program of public nights at our Dark Sky Observatory's 32-inch telescope. Events are ticketed online using an inexpensive commercial ticketing service and are limited to two groups of 60 visitors per night that arrive for 1.5-hour sessions. We are installing two large (70-inch) flat panel displays in the Center and planning additional exhibits to entertain visitors while they await their turn at the telescope's eyepiece. The facility is fully ADA compliant, with eyepiece access via a DFM Engineering Articulated Relay Eyepiece, and a wheelchair lift if needed. We present some of our experiences in this poster and encourage readers to offer suggestions. The Visitor Center was established with the support of Mr. J. Donald Cline, for which we are very grateful. The telescope was partially funded by the National Science Foundation.

  5. Effect of a-site cation deficiency and YSZ additions on sintering and properties of doped lanthanum manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, J.W.; Armstrong, T.R.; Weber, W.J.

    1995-06-01

    The sintering behavior of Ca- and Sr-doped lanthanum manganite (the preferred SOFC cathode material) is highly dependent on the relative proportion of A and B site cations in the material. In general, A-site cation deficiency increases sintered density. The effect of additions of YSZ to lanthanum manganite (to expand the reactive region at the cathode/electrolyte interface and improve thermal expansion and sintering shrinkage matches) on sintering and other properties will also be reported.

  6. Exploring visitor acceptability for hardening trails to sustain visitation and minimize impacts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cahill, K.L.; Marion, J.L.; Lawson, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    Protected natural area managers are challenged to provide high quality recreation opportunities and ensure the protection of resources from impacts associated with visitation. Development of visitor use facilities and application of site hardening practices are commonly applied tools for achieving these competing management objectives. This study applies stated choice analysis to examine visitor opinions on acceptability when they are asked to make tradeoffs among competing social, resource and management attributes in backcountry and frontcountry settings of Acadia National Park. This study demonstrates that asking visitors about recreation setting attributes uni-dimensionally, a common approach, can yield less informative responses. Analyses that considered direct tradeoffs revealed more divergent opinions on acceptability for setting attributes than a unidimensional approach. Findings revealed that visitors to an accessible and popular attraction feature supported trail development options to protect resource conditions with unrestricted visitor access. In contrast, visitors to a remote undeveloped island expressed stronger support for no or limited trail development and access restrictions to protect resource conditions.

  7. Determining visitors' dispositions toward the designation of a Greek National Park.

    PubMed

    Machairas, Ioannis; Hovardas, Tasos

    2005-07-01

    This article presents the findings of the first major visitor survey conducted at the Central Rhodope Mountain Complex, situated in northern Greece. The study area is one of a number of sites planned to become National Parks under a recent initiative of the Greek government. We used a logistic regression method to define significant predictors of visitors' awareness and attitude toward park designation, as well as their willingness to pay a conditional entrance fee. Study findings demonstrated that the probability of being aware of the park designation initiative is higher for visitors who obtained information from travel agencies or media to make their destination choice, compared to visitors who resorted to word-of-mouth recommendations. Knowledge and attitudes toward animals living in the study area revealed a limited influence on visitors' dispositions toward park designation. The results of this study call for action to implement education programs for National Park users. These programs should aim at rendering the environmental characteristics of the Central Rhodope Mountain Complex to be significant predictors of visitors' dispositions toward the study area. This would favor its uniqueness as a destination, as well as contribute to its long-term economic sustainability.

  8. The relationship between aircraft noise exposure and day-use visitor survey responses in backcountry areas of national parks.

    PubMed

    Rapoza, Amanda; Sudderth, Erika; Lewis, Kristin

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the relationship between aircraft noise exposure and the quality of national park visitor experience, more than 4600 visitor surveys were collected at seven backcountry sites in four U.S. national parks simultaneously with calibrated sound level measurements. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate parameters describing the relationship among visitor responses, aircraft noise dose metrics, and mediator variables. For the regression models, survey responses were converted to three dichotomous variables, representing visitors who did or did not experience slightly or more, moderately or more, or very or more annoyance or interference with natural quiet from aircraft noise. Models with the most predictive power included noise dose metrics of sound exposure level, percent time aircraft were audible, and percentage energy due to helicopters and fixed-wing propeller aircraft. These models also included mediator variables: visitor ratings of the "importance of calmness, peace and tranquility," visitor group composition (adults or both adults and children), first visit to the site, previously taken an air tour, and participation in bird-watching or interpretive talks. The results complement and extend previous research conducted in frontcountry areas and will inform evaluations of air tour noise effects on visitors to national parks and remote wilderness sites. PMID:26520292

  9. The relationship between aircraft noise exposure and day-use visitor survey responses in backcountry areas of national parks.

    PubMed

    Rapoza, Amanda; Sudderth, Erika; Lewis, Kristin

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the relationship between aircraft noise exposure and the quality of national park visitor experience, more than 4600 visitor surveys were collected at seven backcountry sites in four U.S. national parks simultaneously with calibrated sound level measurements. Multilevel logistic regression was used to estimate parameters describing the relationship among visitor responses, aircraft noise dose metrics, and mediator variables. For the regression models, survey responses were converted to three dichotomous variables, representing visitors who did or did not experience slightly or more, moderately or more, or very or more annoyance or interference with natural quiet from aircraft noise. Models with the most predictive power included noise dose metrics of sound exposure level, percent time aircraft were audible, and percentage energy due to helicopters and fixed-wing propeller aircraft. These models also included mediator variables: visitor ratings of the "importance of calmness, peace and tranquility," visitor group composition (adults or both adults and children), first visit to the site, previously taken an air tour, and participation in bird-watching or interpretive talks. The results complement and extend previous research conducted in frontcountry areas and will inform evaluations of air tour noise effects on visitors to national parks and remote wilderness sites.

  10. Visitors' perception of thermal comfort during extreme heat events at the Royal Botanic Garden Melbourne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Cho Kwong Charlie; Loughnan, Margaret; Tapper, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Outdoor thermal comfort studies have mainly examined the perception of local residents, and there has been little work on how those conditions are perceived differently by tourists, especially tourists of diverse origins. This issue is important because it will improve the application of thermal indices in predicting the thermal perception of tourists. This study aims to compare the differences in thermal perception and preferences between local and overseas visitors to the Royal Botanic Garden (RBG) in Melbourne during summer. An 8-day survey was conducted in February 2014 at four sites in the garden (n = 2198), including 2 days with maximum temperature exceeding 40 °C. The survey results were compared with data from four weather stations adjacent to the survey locations. One survey location, `Fern Gully', has a misting system and visitors perceived the Fern Gully to be cooler than other survey locations. As the apparent temperature exceeded 32.4 °C, visitors perceived the environment as being `warm' or `hot'. At `hot' conditions, 36.8 % of European visitors voted for no change to the thermal conditions, which is considerably higher than the response from Australian visitors (12.2 %) and Chinese visitors (7.5 %). Study results suggest that overseas tourists have different comfort perception and preferences compared to local Australians in hot weather based at least in part on expectations. Understanding the differences in visitors' thermal perception is important to improve the garden design. It can also lead to better tour planning and marketing to potential visitors from different countries.

  11. Uncovering Visitor Identity: A Citywide Utilization of the Falk Visitor-Identity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trainer, Laureen; Steele-Inama, Marley; Christopher, Amber

    2012-01-01

    In his book, "Identity and the Museum Visitor Experience," John Falk makes the case that by understanding the underlying motivations that drive a visitor, a museum can create an experience that reflects a person's identity and therefore satisfy their motivation for visiting. According to Falk, this level of personal connection increases…

  12. Site preference of ternary alloying additions to NiTi: Fe, Pt, Pd, Au, Al, Cu, Zr and Hf

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Noebe, Ronald D.; Mosca, Hugo O.

    2004-01-01

    Atomistic modeling of the site substitution behavior of Pd in NiTi (J. Alloys and Comp. (2004), in press) has been extended to examine the behavior of several other alloying additions, namely, Fe, Pt, Au, Al, Cu, Zr and Hf in this important shape memory alloy. It was found that all elements, to a varying degree, displayed absolute preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice. How- ever, the energetics of the different substitutional schemes, coupled with large scale simulations indicate that the general trend in all cases is for the ternary addition to want to form stronger ordered structures with Ti.

  13. Visitors or visits? An examination of zoo visitor numbers using the case study of Australia.

    PubMed

    Smith, Liam

    2013-01-01

    Usually cited in reference to the potential reach of zoo education, one of the popular figures for global zoo visitation is that 600 million people visit zoos annually. However, this number needs clarification on two fronts. First, there are many zoo visitors who are not included in the calculation because they visited a zoo that was not included in the count. Second, it does not take into consideration the people visit either the same or different zoos more than once annually. Using data collected from several sources, including zoo visitors themselves, this article focuses on one country--Australia--that contributes 15.6 million to the visitation total, and contends that the correct number of unique annual zoo visitors to Australian zoos is likely to be between 8 and 10 million. However, rather than suggesting an overemphasis on the potential of zoos for educating visitors, having regular repeat visitors represents a distinct advantage for zoos, allowing for progressive education opportunities.

  14. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This Shuttle/Gantry mockup and Post Show Dome anchor the northeast corner of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The Astronaut Memorial is located just above. Sprawling across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast, the complex is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. The building at the upper left is the Theater Complex. Other exhibits and buildings on the site are the Center for Space Education, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, Ticket Pavilion and Center for Space Education.

  15. Explaining the effects of floral density on flower visitor species composition

    PubMed Central

    Essenberg, Carla J.

    2013-01-01

    Floral density often influences the species composition of flower visitors. This variation in visitor species composition could have significant effects on pollination success and plant fitness but is poorly understood, especially in the many pollination guilds dominated by non-territorial species. This paper presents a foraging model that explores how flower visitors with diverse traits should distribute themselves across resource patches differing in floral density. The model predicts that species with low flower search speeds and low flower handling costs compared to competitors will usually dominate dense flower patches. In addition, amongst flower visitors that have lower energy expenditure rates while handling flowers than while traveling, species maximizing energetic efficiency are typically associated with dense flower patches whereas those maximizing net rate of energy intake are associated with sparse patches. The model is able to predict some key aspects of a previously-observed effect of floral density on species composition of flower visitors to the yellowflower tarweed (Holocarpha virgata). By providing insights into how flower visitors’ traits shape the effects of floral density on the species composition of flower visitors, this study makes an important step towards understanding how pollinator diversity influences relationships between plant density and plant fitness. PMID:23448884

  16. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) additional geologic site characterization studies, Bayou Choctaw salt dome, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Neal, J.T.; Magorian, T.R.; Byrne, K.O.; Denzler, S.

    1993-09-01

    This report revises and updates the geologic site characterization report that was published in 1980. Revised structure maps and sections show interpretative differences in the dome shape and caprock structural contours, especially a major east-west trending shear zone, not mapped in the 1980 report. Excessive gas influx in Caverns 18 and 20 may be associated with this shear zone. Subsidence values at Bayou Choctaw are among the lowest in the SPR system, averaging only about 10 mm/yr but measurement and interpretation issues persist, as observed values often approximate measurement accuracy. Periodic, temporary flooding is a continuing concern because of the low site elevation (less than 10 ft), and this may intensify as future subsidence lowers the surface even further. Cavern 4 was re-sonared in 1992 and the profiles suggest that significant change has not occurred since 1980, thereby reducing the uncertainty of possible overburden collapse -- as occurred at Cavern 7 in 1954. Other potential integrity issues persist, such as the proximity of Cavern 20 to the dome edge, and the narrow web separating Caverns 15 and 17. Injection wells have been used for the disposal of brine but have been only marginally effective thus far; recompletions into more permeable lower Pleistocene gravels may be a practical way of increasing injection capacity and brinefield efficiency. Cavern storage space is limited on this already crowded dome, but 15 MMBBL could be gained by enlarging Cavern 19 and by constructing a new cavern beneath and slightly north of abandoned Cavern 13. Environmental issues center on the low site elevation: the backswamp environment combined with the potential for periodic flooding create conditions that will require continuing surveillance.

  17. Accident prevention: the health visitor's role.

    PubMed

    Levene, S

    1992-10-01

    The health of the nation white paper sets targets in five key areas for reductions in both mortality and morbidity: coronary heart disease and stroke, cancers, mental illness, HIV/Aids and sexual health and accidents. In a series of articles in Health visitor, experts will be considering the opportunities the white paper offers for community nurses in each of the key areas. Here Dr Sara Levene, medical consultant to the Child Accident Prevention Trust, considers accidents, a major problem which health visitors can do much to control. She reviews how accidents are presented in the white paper, what health visitors can do and what resources are available to help them. She offers particular advice on special accident prevention initiatives and discusses some of the opportunities created by the white paper.

  18. Characteristics of the Las Vegas/Clark County visitor economy

    SciTech Connect

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a review of the Clark County visitor economy and the Clark County visitor. The review, undertaken in support of NWPO`s two objectives mentioned above, addressed a number of topics including performance of the Clark County visitor economy as a generator of employment, earnings and tax base; importance of the Clark County visitor economy to the Nevada economy as a whole; elements of the Clark County visitor economy outside the Las Vegas strip and downtown areas; current trends in the Clark County visitor industry; and indirect economic effects of Clark County casino/hotel purchases.

  19. Addition of feruloyl esterase and xylanase produced on-site improves sugarcane bagasse hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Braga, Cleiton Márcio Pinto; Delabona, Priscila da Silva; Lima, Deise Juliana da Silva; Paixão, Douglas Antônio Alvaredo; Pradella, José Geraldo da Cruz; Farinas, Cristiane Sanchez

    2014-10-01

    Accessory enzymes that assist biomass degradation could be used to improve the recovery of fermentable sugar for use in biorefineries. In this study, different fungal strains isolated from the Amazon rainforest were evaluated in terms of their ability to produce feruloyl esterase (FAE) and xylanase enzymes, and an assessment was made of the contributions of the enzymes in the hydrolysis of pretreated sugarcane bagasse. In the selection step, screening using plate assays was followed by shake flask submerged cultivations. After carbon source selection and cultivation in a stirred-tank bioreactor, Aspergillusoryzae P21C3 proved to be a promising strain for production of the enzymes. Supplementation of a commercial enzyme preparation with 30% (v/v) crude enzymatic complex from A. oryzae P21C3 increased the conversion of cellulose derived from pretreated sugarcane bagasse by 36%. Supplementation with FAE and xylanase enzymes produced on-site can therefore be used to improve the hydrolysis of sugarcane bagasse.

  20. Ethanol Addition for Enhancing Denitrification at the Uranium Mill Tailing Site in Monument Valley, AZ

    SciTech Connect

    Borden, A. K.; Brusseau, M. L.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; McMillan, Andrew; Akyol, N. H.; Berkompas, J.; Miao, Z.; Jordan, F.; Tick, Geoff; Waugh, W. J.; Glenn, E. P.

    2012-01-01

    Uranium mining and processing near Monument Valley, Arizona resulted in the formation of a large nitrate plume in a shallow alluvial aquifer. The results of prior field characterization studies indicate that the nitrate plume is undergoing a slow rate of attenuation via denitrification, and the results of bench-scale studies suggest that denitrification rates can potentially be increased by an order of magnitude with the addition of ethanol as a carbon substrate. The objective of the study was to investigate the potential of ethanol amendment for enhancing the natural denitrification occurring in the alluvial aquifer. Pilot tests were conducted using the single well, push-pull method and a natural-gradient test. The results showed that the concentration of nitrate decreased, while the concentration of nitrous oxide (a product of denitrification) increased. In addition, changes in aqueous concentrations of sulfate, iron, and manganese indicate the ethanol amendment effected a change in prevailing redox conditions. The results of compound-specific stable isotope analysis for nitrogen indicated that the nitrate concentration reductions were biologically mediated. Continued monitoring after completion of the pilot tests has shown that nitrate concentrations in the injection zone have remained at levels three orders of magnitude lower than the initial values, indicating that the impacts of the pilot tests have been sustained for several months.

  1. 75 FR 22562 - Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Visitors (BoV) will be held at DAU Headquarters at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. The purpose of this meeting is to report back to the BoV on continuing items of interest. DATES: The meeting will be held on May...

  2. Scottish Visitor Attractions: Managerial Competence Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Sandra; McCracken, Martin; Hughes, Moira

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a study into managerial competence in the Scottish visitor attraction sector. It provides an insight into the range, diversity and perceived importance of current and future competences highlighting differences based on gender, age, size, level of training and location. Although the main findings reveal a…

  3. Visitor Reports about Chinese Schools: Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin

    An annotated bibliography of 77 books, journal articles, congressional reports, and conference papers all based on visits to Chinese schools by U.S. and British visitors including professional educators, teachers, government officials, historians, and lay citizens is presented. A wide range of entries includes specialized, scholarly journals and…

  4. 22 CFR 41.62 - Exchange visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... language to undertake the program for which selected, or, except for an alien coming to participate in a graduate medical education or training program, the sponsoring organization is aware of the language... nonimmigrant visa, at the time of admission as an exchange visitor, or at the time of acquisition of...

  5. 22 CFR 41.62 - Exchange visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... language to undertake the program for which selected, or, except for an alien coming to participate in a graduate medical education or training program, the sponsoring organization is aware of the language... nonimmigrant visa, at the time of admission as an exchange visitor, or at the time of acquisition of...

  6. Visitor center museum display, detail of diorama booth with raised ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Visitor center museum display, detail of diorama booth with raised step; door to electrical door panel at left - Wright Brothers National Memorial Visitor Center, Highway 158, Kill Devil Hills, Dare County, NC

  7. Visitor center flight room, detail of twin structural piers at ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Visitor center flight room, detail of twin structural piers at northeast corner supporting flight room dome - Wright Brothers National Memorial Visitor Center, Highway 158, Kill Devil Hills, Dare County, NC

  8. 75 FR 44276 - National Fire Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... FR 39561) announcing a National Fire Academy Board of Visitors public teleconference meeting on... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency National Fire Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice of cancellation of meeting. SUMMARY: The National...

  9. AERIAL OF VISITORS INFORMATION CENTER [VIC] & ROCKET GARDEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    AERIAL OF VISITORS INFORMATION CENTER [VIC] & ROCKET GARDEN KSC-373C-0556.20 116-KSC-373C-556.20, P-01622-B, ARCHIVE-04455 Aerial view of Easter crowds at Visitors Information Center, Kennedy Space Center, Florida.

  10. 2. WATER PUMPS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE VISITORS CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. WATER PUMPS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE VISITORS CENTER, LOOKING WEST. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Visitor's Center, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  11. 3. WATER PUMPS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE VISITORS CENTER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. WATER PUMPS IN THE BASEMENT OF THE VISITORS CENTER, LOOKING EAST. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Visitor's Center, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  12. Lessons Learned from National Park Service Electronic Visitors: Implications for K-12 Classrooms and Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parmley, John D.; Hutchinson, Art; Parmley, Scott C.

    During the early 1990s, Art Hutchinson, in his role as Park Ranger and Coordinator of Education/School Services at Mesa Verde (Colorado), was exploring possible applications of the early digital information and multimedia technologies. The goal was to provide new experiences for Park visitors on-site as well as for students across the Four Corners…

  13. 75 FR 18524 - National Fire Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency National Fire Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Federal... Meeting. ] SUMMARY: The National Fire Academy Board of Visitors will meet on April 28-29, 2010. DATES: The... background documents or comments received by the National Fire Academy Board of Visitors, go to...

  14. 76 FR 17425 - National Fire Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency National Fire Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Federal... Meeting. SUMMARY: The National Fire Academy Board of Visitors will meet on April 6-7, 2011. The meeting... the National Fire Academy Board of Visitors, go to http://www.regulations.gov . A public...

  15. 76 FR 20696 - National Fire Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... Federal Register at 76 FR 17425 that the National Fire Academy Board of Visitors would meet on April 6 and... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency National Fire Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Federal... National Fire Academy Board of Visitors meeting was held on Wednesday, April 6, 2011, from 8:30 a.m. to 5...

  16. 75 FR 2153 - National Fire Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency National Fire Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Federal... Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The National Fire Academy Board of Visitors will meet by... documents or comments received by the National Fire Academy Board of Visitors, go to...

  17. 75 FR 39561 - National Fire Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency National Fire Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Federal... Meeting. SUMMARY: The National Fire Academy Board of Visitors will meet by teleconference on August 2... or comments received by the National Fire Academy Board of Visitors, go to...

  18. 78 FR 17183 - Information Collection: Grey Towers Visitor Comment Card

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Forest Service Information Collection: Grey Towers Visitor Comment Card AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA... collection 0596- 0222, ``Grey Towers Visitor Comment Card'' with 0596-0226, ``Forest Service Generic.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title: Grey Towers Visitor Comment Card. OMB Number: 0596-0222. Expiration Date...

  19. 28 CFR 540.45 - Qualification as special visitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Qualification as special visitor. 540.45... CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.45 Qualification as special visitor. Persons in the categories listed in this section may qualify as special visitors rather than as...

  20. Additional disturbances as a beneficial tool for restoration of post-mining sites: a multi-taxa approach.

    PubMed

    Řehounková, Klára; Čížek, Lukáš; Řehounek, Jiří; Šebelíková, Lenka; Tropek, Robert; Lencová, Kamila; Bogusch, Petr; Marhoul, Pavel; Máca, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Open interior sands represent a highly threatened habitat in Europe. In recent times, their associated organisms have often found secondary refuges outside their natural habitats, mainly in sand pits. We investigated the effects of different restoration approaches, i.e. spontaneous succession without additional disturbances, spontaneous succession with additional disturbances caused by recreational activities, and forestry reclamation, on the diversity and conservation values of spiders, beetles, flies, bees and wasps, orthopterans and vascular plants in a large sand pit in the Czech Republic, Central Europe. Out of 406 species recorded in total, 112 were classified as open sand specialists and 71 as threatened. The sites restored through spontaneous succession with additional disturbances hosted the largest proportion of open sand specialists and threatened species. The forestry reclamations, in contrast, hosted few such species. The sites with spontaneous succession without disturbances represent a transition between these two approaches. While restoration through spontaneous succession favours biodiversity in contrast to forestry reclamation, additional disturbances are necessary to maintain early successional habitats essential for threatened species and open sand specialists. Therefore, recreational activities seem to be an economically efficient restoration tool that will also benefit biodiversity in sand pits.

  1. Additional disturbances as a beneficial tool for restoration of post-mining sites: a multi-taxa approach.

    PubMed

    Řehounková, Klára; Čížek, Lukáš; Řehounek, Jiří; Šebelíková, Lenka; Tropek, Robert; Lencová, Kamila; Bogusch, Petr; Marhoul, Pavel; Máca, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Open interior sands represent a highly threatened habitat in Europe. In recent times, their associated organisms have often found secondary refuges outside their natural habitats, mainly in sand pits. We investigated the effects of different restoration approaches, i.e. spontaneous succession without additional disturbances, spontaneous succession with additional disturbances caused by recreational activities, and forestry reclamation, on the diversity and conservation values of spiders, beetles, flies, bees and wasps, orthopterans and vascular plants in a large sand pit in the Czech Republic, Central Europe. Out of 406 species recorded in total, 112 were classified as open sand specialists and 71 as threatened. The sites restored through spontaneous succession with additional disturbances hosted the largest proportion of open sand specialists and threatened species. The forestry reclamations, in contrast, hosted few such species. The sites with spontaneous succession without disturbances represent a transition between these two approaches. While restoration through spontaneous succession favours biodiversity in contrast to forestry reclamation, additional disturbances are necessary to maintain early successional habitats essential for threatened species and open sand specialists. Therefore, recreational activities seem to be an economically efficient restoration tool that will also benefit biodiversity in sand pits. PMID:27053054

  2. Cultural factors of visitors' understanding of United States National Park Service natural resource messages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Sunita Claire

    Current trends in the demographic structure of the US population indicate increasing cultural diversity. Culturally-diverse populations have varying beliefs, views and understandings of natural resource use and management. This study concentrates on understanding how messages pertaining to natural resources concepts and associated management decisions are communicated to and received by culturally-diverse audiences. This is particularly relevant to land managing agencies, such as the US National Park Service (NPS), that rely on a high degree of public contact and support. Failure to consider cultural-diversity has the potential to interfere with this agency's success at communicating its mission and management decisions. The study took place in three US National Parks; Grand Canyon National Park (North Rim), Guadalupe Mountains National Park, and Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park. Visitors were asked to complete an on-site anonymous questionnaire. Data were collected at various locations including trailheads, scenic overlooks, at visitor centers, and after interpretive programs. Total number of participants was 549, Grand Canyon National Park n = 156, Guadalupe Mountains National Park n = 153, and Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park n = 240. Results indicate that visitors were knowledgeable about the resources they were visiting. Visitors to NPS sites have achieved a high level of formal education. Certain aspects of culture, religion/spirituality seem to have a greater role in how visitors identify themselves, as opposed to ethnicity/cultural heritage. However when visitors are in a park they seem display similar cultural characteristics, which may come to the forefront while in the park setting as opposed to home setting. Methodological challenges of studying culture in a national park setting are also discussed.

  3. The prevalence of psychiatric disorders among visitors to faith healers in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Alosaimi, Fahad D.; Alshehri, Youssef; Alfraih, Ibrahim; Alghamdi, Ayedh; Aldahash, Saleh; Alkhuzayem, Haifa; Albeeeshi, Haneen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We investigated the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among visitors to Faith Healers (FHs) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. We also studied the sociodemographic profiles for these visitors, in addition to their past psychiatric history, reason(s) for seeking FH help, and past and current treatment experience with FHs. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study among the visitors (n=321) to a number of faith healing settings in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia using a specially designed questionnaire and validated Arabic version of The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Results: Most of the participants were young adults (35.1±10.8 years) and males with intermediate and secondary levels of education who had not sought medical help prior to their visits. A high proportion of the FH visitors have diagnosable mental illnesses. Depressive and anxiety disorders were the most prevalent among the study participants; few visitors were affected by psychotic or bipolar disorders. Conclusions: The present study provides insight for understanding the type of patients with psychiatric disorders who visit Faith Healers.(FHs). The study highlights the tendency of psychiatric patients in Saudi Arabia to visit FHs, which could reflect the importance of further studies to clarify the impact of FHs on the management of those patients. PMID:25225530

  4. The Arecibo Observatory Visitor and Educational Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altschuler, Daniel R.

    1994-12-01

    As the world's largest single-dish radio telescope, Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico attracts thousands of visitors each year of all ages and from many countries. Pride in the Observatory has caused local Puerto Rican organizations to contribute the funds necessary for the construction of the new Arecibo Observatory Visitor and Educational Facility (AOVEF). Funds to develop the exhibits were obtained through a grant from the National Science Foundation. The Observatory is the main facility of the National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center, which is operated by Cornell University under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation. The AOVEF consists of approximately 9,000 square feet of building and outdoor program space. It will house about 3500 square feet of exhibits, a 100 person multi-purpose theater, a science merchandise store and appropriate meeting rooms and workspace. We expect to be able to begin construction in early 1995. Based on current experience, we anticipate that half of the expected 100,000 visitors per year will be school children brought by buses from their schools and half will be families and individuals, coming for a visit on their own. Details about our project and a discussion of the contents of the exhibitions which are being prepared will be presented.

  5. Asymmetric Iridium-Catalyzed C-C Coupling of Chiral Diols via Site-Selective Redox-Triggered Carbonyl Addition.

    PubMed

    Shin, Inji; Krische, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Cyclometalated π-allyliridium C,O-benzoate complexes modified by axially chiral chelating phosphine ligands display a pronounced kinetic preference for primary alcohol dehydrogenation, enabling highly site-selective redox-triggered carbonyl additions of chiral primary-secondary 1,3-diols with exceptional levels of catalyst-directed diastereoselectivity. Unlike conventional methods for carbonyl allylation, the present redox-triggered alcohol C-H functionalizations bypass the use of protecting groups, premetalated reagents, and discrete alcohol-to-aldehyde redox reactions.

  6. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex includes a new International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. Other additions are the new information center, a walk-through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  7. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex includes a new International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. Other additions are a new information center, a walk-through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  8. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Part of the $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex, the new information center welcomes visitors to the Gateway to the Universe. The five large video walls provide an orientation video, with an introduction to the range of activities and exhibits, and honor the center's namesake, President John F. Kennedy. Other additions include a walk-through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater, plus an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  9. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Part of the $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex, the new information center welcomes visitors to the Gateway to the Universe. The five large video walls provide an orientation video, shown here with photos of John Glenn in his historic Shuttle mission in October 1998, with an introduction to the range of activities and exhibits, plus honor the center's namesake, President John F. Kennedy. Other new additions include a walk-through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater, plus an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  10. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Part of the Robot Scouts exhibit in the $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex, this display offers a view of how data from robotic probes might be used to build a human habitat for Mars. Visitors witness a simulated Martian sunset. Other new additions include and information center, a walk-through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater, plus an International Space Station- themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  11. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A host robot, Starquester 2000, helps describe for visitors the accomplishments of unsung space heroes - space probes - and their role in space exploration. The walk-through Robot Scouts exhibit is part of the $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex. Other additions include a walk-through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater, plus an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. Inaugurated three decades ago, the Visitor Complex is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  12. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Part of the $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex, the new information center welcomes visitors to the Gateway to the Universe. The five large video walls provide an orientation video, with an introduction to the range of activities and exhibits, and honor the center's namesake, President John F. Kennedy. Other new additions include a walk-through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater, and an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  13. NMR and X-ray analysis of structural additivity in metal binding site-swapped hybrids of rubredoxin

    PubMed Central

    LeMaster, David M; Anderson, Janet S; Wang, Limin; Guo, Yi; Li, Hongmin; Hernández, Griselda

    2007-01-01

    Background Chimeric hybrids derived from the rubredoxins of Pyrococcus furiosus (Pf) and Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp) provide a robust system for the characterization of protein conformational stability and dynamics in a differential mode. Interchange of the seven nonconserved residues of the metal binding site between the Pf and Cp rubredoxins yields a complementary pair of hybrids, for which the sum of the thermodynamic stabilities is equal to the sum for the parental proteins. Furthermore, the increase in amide hydrogen exchange rates for the hyperthermophile-derived metal binding site hybrid is faithfully mirrored by a corresponding decrease for the complementary hybrid that is derived from the less thermostable rubredoxin, indicating a degree of additivity in the conformational fluctuations that underlie these exchange reactions. Results Initial NMR studies indicated that the structures of the two complementary hybrids closely resemble "cut-and-paste" models derived from the parental Pf and Cp rubredoxins. This protein system offers a robust opportunity to characterize differences in solution structure, permitting the quantitative NMR chemical shift and NOE peak intensity data to be analyzed without recourse to the conventional conversion of experimental NOE peak intensities into distance restraints. The intensities for 1573 of the 1652 well-resolved NOE crosspeaks from the hybrid rubredoxins were statistically indistinguishable from the intensities of the corresponding parental crosspeaks, to within the baseplane noise level of these high sensitivity data sets. The differences in intensity for the remaining 79 NOE crosspeaks were directly ascribable to localized dynamical processes. Subsequent X-ray analysis of the metal binding site-swapped hybrids, to resolution limits of 0.79 Å and 1.04 Å, demonstrated that the backbone and sidechain heavy atoms in the NMR-derived structures lie within the range of structural variability exhibited among the individual

  14. Diversity of the Insect Visitors on Calluna vulgaris (Ericaceae) in Southern France Heathlands

    PubMed Central

    Descamps, Charlotte; Moquet, Laura; Migon, Marc; Jacquemart, Anne-Laure

    2015-01-01

    As part of an ongoing research project on the pollination networks in European heathlands, the objective of this study was to assess the insect visitor guild on Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull (Ericaceae). We focused the study on a region renowned for its largely well-preserved heathlands, the Cévennes National Park, Southern France. In 2013, flower visitors were observed over 3 d per site, in four heathland sites at mont Lozère. Honeybees (Apis mellifera L.) were the main visitors (62–88% of total visitors). Besides honeybees, a high diversity of visitors was detected with 57 different species identified (42 Diptera and 15 Hymenoptera). Hoverflies (Syrphidae, Diptera) visitors were abundant and diverse, especially individuals belonging to the genera Eristalis and Episyrphus. The reported diversity of visitors was probably due to the preservation of large heathland areas at mont Lozère and to the generalist pollination system of C. vulgaris. RESUME. Cette étude fait partie d’un projet de recherche en cours sur les réseaux de pollinisation dans les landes européennes. Son objectif est d’évaluer la guilde des insectes visiteurs de Calluna vulgaris (L.) Hull (Ericaceae). Cette étude se déroule dans une région réputée pour ses landes globalement bien préservées: le Parc natinal des Cévennes, situé dans le sud de la France. En 2013, les insectes visiteurs ont été observés durant trois jours par site, dans quatre sites au mont Lozère. Les abeilles domestiques (A. mellifera L.) sont les visiteurs principaux (62–88% du nombre total de visiteurs). Outre les abeilles domestiques, une diversité importante de visiteurs est constatée: 57 espèces ont été identifiées (42 appartenant à l'ordre des Diptères et 15 à l'ordre des Hyménoptères). Les syrphes (Syrphidae, Diptera) sont abondants et diversifiés, en particulier les genres Eristalis et Episyrphus. La diversité de visiteurs observée peut certainement s’expliquer par la préservation de

  15. 76 FR 39076 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... overview of the Language, Science & Technology directorate. In addition, the meeting will involve... Advisory Committee Act of 1972 (5 U.S.C., Appendix, as amended), the Government in the Sunshine Act of 1976... following Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors,...

  16. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left, can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup, the Post Show Dome, the Astronaut Memorial, and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right of the site is a display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Parking lots span the width of the complex on the south side.

  17. Investigating Visitors' and Facilitators' Experiences at International Observe the Moon Night Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenger, Matthew; Buxner, Sanlyn; Jones, Andrea; Hsu, Brooke; Shaner, Andy; Bleacher, Lora; Day, Brian

    2014-11-01

    International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) is an annual event where people around the world are encouraged to look up at the Moon and share in the excitement of lunar science and exploration. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) leads the coordination of InOMN, with support from partner NASA mission and institution teams, including the Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) and the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE). In 2013, InOMN was held on October 12th and a total of 521 unique events were registered on the InOMN website from around the world. These 521 events were held in 56 different countries, 46% of which were events in the United States. The InOMN evaluation was designed to characterize the overall participation of sites and visitors, characterize the types of visitors who attended, understand visitors’ intentions for attending an InOMN event, and understand how can facilitators be better supported for future events. Data was collected from event facilitators before and after the event and from visitors at the event. The follow-up facilitator survey was designed to understand to what extent the InOMN hosts were aware of the LRO mission and more generally understand how to support InOMN events in the future. Thirty-eight visitor surveys were collected and 186 facilitators completed follow-up surveys to give us an insight into both visitors’ and facilitators’ experiences.Most of the visitors (67%) who responded to the surveys were new to InOMN and reported that they had not attended a previous InOMN event. As with the 2012 events, the findings from 2013 continue to support the findings that InOMN events are social experiences and that most visitors attend with other people. The majority of visitors attended in family groups (72%), and another 20% attended with groups of other individuals (friends or other groups) with only 7% attending by themselves. A majority of survey respondents were aware of the LRO

  18. AudioGuides at a National Research Laboratory Supporting Visitors With Special Needs: Initial Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, R.; Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Carbone, L.; Lewis, H.; Abshire, W.; Mann, L.

    2003-12-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Mesa Laboratory offers the public an opportunity to visit an internationally recognized research laboratory housed in an architectural landmark located in a dramatic geological setting. The Mesa Lab's exhibits are viewed by over 80,000 people each year. Exhibits provide information about NCAR's scientific mission, current research efforts, technology, and the societal benefits of weather and climate research. Nearly 13,000 of NCAR's visitors are served with staff-led guided tours, including 3,000 students in school groups. Frequently, these tours are tailored to address the interests, ages, nationality, and special needs of the visitors. In June 2003, an audioguide was unveiled in English and Spanish versions for both adults and children. Based on preliminary summer usage figures, the audioguides may reach an additional 7,000 visitors in the coming year, many of whom may have special needs. With this in mind, the University Corporation of Atmospheric Research (UCAR) Office of Education and Outreach (EO) contracted local experts as advisors on the needs of people with low-vision, hearing loss, and Spanish language accessibility as the audioguide was developed. The script was written with the help of scientists and an internationally recognized audioguide production firm. Since the installation of the audioguide in July, visitors of all ages appear to be enthusiastic about this service and better focused on their learning experiences while viewing the exhibits. Interviews are helping EO to learn more about how the audioguide is helpful or may be revised to more effectively serve visitors in general as well as visitors with special needs. The audioguide was made possible by grants from the National Science Foundation Geoscience Education Program and the Friends of UCAR Fund.

  19. From the Arctic to fetal life: physiological importance and structural basis of an 'additional' chloride-binding site in haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, M Cristina; Castagnola, Massimo; Bertonati, Claudia; Galtieri, Antonio; Giardina, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    Haemoglobins from mammals of sub-Arctic and Arctic species, as well as fetal human Hb, are all characterized by a significantly lower Delta H of oxygenation compared with the majority of mammalian haemoglobins from temperate species (exceptions are represented by some cold-resistant species, such as cow, horse and pig). This has been interpreted as an adaptive mechanism of great importance from a physiological point of view. To date, the molecular basis of this thermodynamic characteristic is still not known. In the present study, we show that binding of extra chloride (with respect to adult human Hb) ions to Hb would significantly contribute to lowering the overall heat of oxygenation, thus providing a molecular basis for the low effect of temperature on the oxygenation-deoxygenation cycle. To this aim, the oxygen binding properties of bovine Hb, bear (Ursus arctos) Hb and horse Hb, which are representative of this series of haemoglobins, have been studied with special regard to the effect of heterotropic ligands, such as organic phosphates (namely 2,3-diphosphoglycerate) and chloride. Functional results are consistent with a mechanism for ligand binding that involves an additional binding site for chloride ion. Analysis of computational chemistry results, obtained by the GRID program, further confirm the hypothesis that the reason for the lower Delta H of oxygenation is mainly due to an increase in the number of the oxygen-linked chloride-binding sites. PMID:14979874

  20. Addition of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheets Improves Bone Formation at an Ectopic Site

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhifa; Li, Zhijin; Dai, Taiqiang; Zong, Chunlin; Liu, Yanpu; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) added to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) sheets on bone formation at an ectopic site. We isolated MSCs and ADSCs from the same rabbits. We then prepared MSC sheets for implantation with or without ADSCs subcutaneously in the backs of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. We assessed bone formation at eight weeks after implantation by micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. In osteogenic medium, MSCs grew to form multilayer sheets containing many calcium nodules. MSC sheets without ADSCs formed bone-like tissue; although neo-bone and cartilage-like tissues were sparse and unevenly distributed by eight weeks after implantation. In comparison, MSC sheets with ADSCs promoted better bone regeneration as evidenced by the greater density of bone, increased mineral deposition, obvious formation of blood vessels, large number of interconnected ossified trabeculae and woven bone structures, and greater bone volume/total volume within the composite constructs. Our results indicate that although sheets of only MSCs have the potential to form tissue engineered bone at an ectopic site, the addition of ADSCs can significantly increase the osteogenic potential of MSC sheets. Thus, the combination of MSC sheets with ADSCs may be regarded as a promising therapeutic strategy to stimulate bone regeneration. PMID:26848656

  1. Addition of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells to Mesenchymal Stem Cell Sheets Improves Bone Formation at an Ectopic Site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhifa; Li, Zhijin; Dai, Taiqiang; Zong, Chunlin; Liu, Yanpu; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effect of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) added to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) sheets on bone formation at an ectopic site. We isolated MSCs and ADSCs from the same rabbits. We then prepared MSC sheets for implantation with or without ADSCs subcutaneously in the backs of severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice. We assessed bone formation at eight weeks after implantation by micro-computed tomography and histological analysis. In osteogenic medium, MSCs grew to form multilayer sheets containing many calcium nodules. MSC sheets without ADSCs formed bone-like tissue; although neo-bone and cartilage-like tissues were sparse and unevenly distributed by eight weeks after implantation. In comparison, MSC sheets with ADSCs promoted better bone regeneration as evidenced by the greater density of bone, increased mineral deposition, obvious formation of blood vessels, large number of interconnected ossified trabeculae and woven bone structures, and greater bone volume/total volume within the composite constructs. Our results indicate that although sheets of only MSCs have the potential to form tissue engineered bone at an ectopic site, the addition of ADSCs can significantly increase the osteogenic potential of MSC sheets. Thus, the combination of MSC sheets with ADSCs may be regarded as a promising therapeutic strategy to stimulate bone regeneration.

  2. 77 FR 65166 - Information Collection; Request for Comment; Visitor Permit and Visitor Registration Card

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-25

    ... should be addressed to Wilderness Program Manager; USDA Forest Service, Wilderness and Wild and Scenic... Wild and Scenic River Staff, 1601 N. Kent Street, Arlington, VA during normal business hours. Visitors... INFORMATION CONTACT: Steven Boutcher, Wilderness and Wild and Scenic River Staff at 802 656-1718 or...

  3. National wildlife refuge visitor survey results: 2010/2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Dietsch, Alia M.; Don Carolos, Andrew W.; Miller, Holly M.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Solomon, Adam N.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The survey was conducted to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. The survey results will inform Service performance planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCPs), Visitor Services, and Transportation Planning processes. The survey was conducted on 53 refuges across the National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System) to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. A total of 14,832 visitors agreed to participate in the survey between July 2010 and November 2011. In all, 10,233 visitors completed the survey for a 71% response rate. This report provides a summary of visitor and trip characteristics; visitor opinions about refuges and their offerings; and visitor opinions about alternative transportation and climate change, two Refuge System topics of interest. The Refuge System, established in 1903 and managed by the Service, is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 556 National Wildlife Refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts more than 45 million visitors annually, including 25 million people per year to observe and photograph wildlife, over 9 million to hunt and fish, and more than 10 million to participate in educational and interpretation programs. Understanding visitors and characterizing their experiences on national wildlife refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. These combined results are based on surveying at 53 participating

  4. Lion, ungulate, and visitor reactions to playbacks of lion roars at Zoo Atlanta.

    PubMed

    Kelling, Angela S; Allard, Stephanie M; Kelling, Nicholas J; Sandhaus, Estelle A; Maple, Terry L

    2012-01-01

    Felids in captivity are often inactive and elusive in zoos, leading to a frustrating visitor experience. Eight roars were recorded from an adult male lion and played back over speakers as auditory enrichment to benefit the lions while simultaneously enhancing the zoo visitor experience. In addition, ungulates in an adjacent exhibit were observed to ensure that the novel location and increased frequency of roars did not lead to a stress or fear response. The male lion in this study roared more in the playback phase than in the baseline phases while not increasing any behaviors that would indicate compromised welfare. In addition, zoo visitors remained at the lion exhibit longer during playback. The nearby ungulates never exhibited any reactions stronger than orienting to playbacks, identical to their reactions to live roars. Therefore, naturalistic playbacks of lion roars are a potential form of auditory enrichment that leads to more instances of live lion roars and enhances the visitor experience without increasing the stress levels of nearby ungulates or the lion themselves, who might interpret the roar as that of an intruder.

  5. Managing visitor impacts in parks: A multi-method study of the effectiveness of alternative management practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, L.O.; Marion, J.L.; Manning, R.E.; Lawson, S.R.; Jacobi, C.

    2008-01-01

    How can recreation use be managed to control associated environmental impacts? What management practices are most effective and why? This study explored these and related questions through a series of experimental ?treatments? and associated ?controls? at the summit of Cadillac Mountain in Acadia National Park, a heavily used and environmentally fragile area. The treatments included five management practices designed to keep visitors on maintained trails, and these practices ranged from ?indirect? (information/education) to ?direct? (a fence bordering the trail). Research methods included unobtrusive observation of visitors to determine the percentage of visitors who walked off-trail and a follow-up visitor survey to explore why management practices did or didn?t work. All of the management practices reduced the percentage of visitors who walked off-trail. More aggressive applications of indirect practices were more effective than less aggressive applications, and the direct management practice of fencing was the most effective of all. None of the indirect management practices reduced walking off-trail to a degree that is likely to control damage to soil and vegetation at the study site. Study findings suggest that an integrated suite of direct and indirect management practices be implemented on Cadillac Mountain (and other, similar sites) that includes a) a regulation requiring visitors to stay on the maintained trail, b) enforcement of this regulation as needed, c) unobtrusive fencing along the margins of the trail, d) redesign of the trail to extend it, widen it in key places, and provide short spur trails to key ?photo points?, and e) an aggressive information/education program to inform visitors of the regulation to stay on the trail and the reasons for it. These recommendations are a manifestation of what may be an emerging principle of park and outdoor recreation management: intensive use requires intensive management.

  6. Do Zoo Visitors Come to Learn? An Internationally Comparative, Mixed-Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roe, Katie; McConney, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Zoo visitors go to see animals, but are they there to learn? This mixed-methods study examines visitor learning from both zoos' and visitors' perspectives using qualitative and quantitative data. Five hundred and forty zoo visitor interviews from nine case studies provide insight into visitor intentions, which indicate that the majority of…

  7. Site-directed mutagenesis of tobacco anionic peroxidase: Effect of additional aromatic amino acids on stability and activity.

    PubMed

    Poloznikov, A A; Zakharova, G S; Chubar, T A; Hushpulian, D M; Tishkov, V I; Gazaryan, I G

    2015-08-01

    Tobacco anionic peroxidase (TOP) is known to effectively catalyze luminol oxidation without enhancers, in contrast to horseradish peroxidase (HRP). To pursue structure-activity relationship studies for TOP, two amino acids have been chosen for mutation, namely Thr151, close to the heme plane, and Phe140 at the entrance to the active site pocket. Three mutant forms TOP F140Y, T151W and F140Y/T151W have been expressed in Escherichia coli, and reactivated to yield active enzymes. Single-point mutations introducing additional aromatic amino acid residues at the surface of TOP exhibit a significant effect on the enzyme catalytic activity and stability as judged by the results of steady-state and transient kinetics studies. TOP T151W is up to 4-fold more active towards a number of aromatic substrates including luminol, whereas TOP F140Y is 2-fold more stable against thermal inactivation and 8-fold more stable in the reaction course. These steady-state observations have been rationalized with the help of transient kinetic studies on the enzyme reaction with hydrogen peroxide in a single turnover regime. The stopped-flow data reveal (a) an increased stability of F140Y Compound I towards hydrogen peroxide, and thus, a higher operational stability as compared to the wild-type enzyme, and (b) a lesser leakage of oxidative equivalents from TOP T151W Compound I resulting in the increased catalytic activity. The results obtained show that TOP unique properties can be further improved for practical applications by site-directed mutagenesis.

  8. Characterization of an Additional Splice Acceptor Site Introduced into CYP4B1 in Hominoidae during Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Parkinson, Oliver T.; Roellecke, Katharina; Freund, Marcel; Gombert, Michael; Lottmann, Nadine; Steward, Charles A.; Kramm, Christof M.; Yarov-Yarovoy, Vladimir; Rettie, Allan E.; Hanenberg, Helmut

    2015-01-01

    CYP4B1 belongs to the cytochrome P450 family 4, one of the oldest P450 families whose members have been highly conserved throughout evolution. The CYP4 monooxygenases typically oxidize fatty acids to both inactive and active lipid mediators, although the endogenous ligand(s) is largely unknown. During evolution, at the transition of great apes to humanoids, the CYP4B1 protein acquired a serine instead of a proline at the canonical position 427 in the meander region. Although this alteration impairs P450 function related to the processing of naturally occurring lung toxins, a study in transgenic mice suggested that an additional serine insertion at position 207 in human CYP4B1 can rescue the enzyme stability and activity. Here, we report that the genomic insertion of a CAG triplet at the intron 5–exon 6 boundary in human CYP4B1 introduced an additional splice acceptor site in frame. During evolution, this change occurred presumably at the stage of Hominoidae and leads to two major isoforms of the CYP4B1 enzymes of humans and great apes, either with or without a serine 207 insertion (insSer207). We further demonstrated that the CYP4B1 enzyme with insSer207 is the dominant isoform (76%) in humans. Importantly, this amino acid insertion did not affect the 4-ipomeanol metabolizing activities or stabilities of the native rabbit or human CYP4B1 enzymes, when introduced as transgenes in human primary cells and cell lines. In our 3D modeling, this functional neutrality of insSer207 is compatible with its predicted location on the exterior surface of CYP4B1 in a flexible side chain. Therefore, the Ser207 insertion does not rescue the P450 functional activity of human CYP4B1 that has been lost during evolution. PMID:26355749

  9. 35. James River Visitor Center. Opened as an open air ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. James River Visitor Center. Opened as an open air visitor center in 1962, it was enclosed and a heating system installed in 1984 to allow use through the cooler months and help reduce vandalism. Looking northeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  10. Functional homogenization of flower visitor communities with urbanization.

    PubMed

    Deguines, Nicolas; Julliard, Romain; de Flores, Mathieu; Fontaine, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Land-use intensification and resulting habitat loss are put forward as the main causes of flower visitor decline. However, the impact of urbanization, the prime driver of land-use intensification in Europe, is poorly studied. In particular, our understanding of whether and how it affects the composition and functioning of flower visitor assemblages is scant, yet required to cope with increasing urbanization worldwide. Here, we use a nation-wide dataset of plant-flower visitor (Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera) interactions sampled by citizen scientists following a standardized protocol to assess macroecological changes in richness and composition of flower visitor communities with urbanization. We measured the community composition by quantifying the relative occurrence of generalist and specialist flower visitors based on their specialisation on flowering plant families. We show that urbanization is associated with reduced flower visitor richness and a shift in community composition toward generalist insects, indicating a modification of the functional composition of communities. These results suggest that urbanization affects not only the richness of flower visitor assemblages but may also cause their large-scale functional homogenization. Future research should focus on designing measures to reconcile urban development with flower visitor conservation. PMID:27066219

  11. Functional homogenization of flower visitor communities with urbanization.

    PubMed

    Deguines, Nicolas; Julliard, Romain; de Flores, Mathieu; Fontaine, Colin

    2016-04-01

    Land-use intensification and resulting habitat loss are put forward as the main causes of flower visitor decline. However, the impact of urbanization, the prime driver of land-use intensification in Europe, is poorly studied. In particular, our understanding of whether and how it affects the composition and functioning of flower visitor assemblages is scant, yet required to cope with increasing urbanization worldwide. Here, we use a nation-wide dataset of plant-flower visitor (Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera) interactions sampled by citizen scientists following a standardized protocol to assess macroecological changes in richness and composition of flower visitor communities with urbanization. We measured the community composition by quantifying the relative occurrence of generalist and specialist flower visitors based on their specialisation on flowering plant families. We show that urbanization is associated with reduced flower visitor richness and a shift in community composition toward generalist insects, indicating a modification of the functional composition of communities. These results suggest that urbanization affects not only the richness of flower visitor assemblages but may also cause their large-scale functional homogenization. Future research should focus on designing measures to reconcile urban development with flower visitor conservation.

  12. AERIAL OF VISITORS INFORMATION CENTER [VIC] & ROCKET GARDEN EXHIBIT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    AERIAL OF VISITORS INFORMATION CENTER [VIC] & ROCKET GARDEN EXHIBIT KSC-375C-0604.12 116-KSC-375C-604.12, P-20220, ARCHIVE-04465 Aerial view of Kennedy Space Center Visitors Information Center looking east-northeastward. New food services building under construction is visible at upper left.

  13. 28 CFR 540.45 - Qualification as special visitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Qualification as special visitor. 540.45 Section 540.45 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT... recurring nature. Except as specified, the conditions of visiting for special visitors are the same as...

  14. 28 CFR 540.45 - Qualification as special visitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Qualification as special visitor. 540.45 Section 540.45 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT... recurring nature. Except as specified, the conditions of visiting for special visitors are the same as...

  15. 28 CFR 540.45 - Qualification as special visitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Qualification as special visitor. 540.45 Section 540.45 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT... recurring nature. Except as specified, the conditions of visiting for special visitors are the same as...

  16. 28 CFR 540.45 - Qualification as special visitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Qualification as special visitor. 540.45 Section 540.45 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT... recurring nature. Except as specified, the conditions of visiting for special visitors are the same as...

  17. 78 FR 28137 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ..., 2013 (RIN 1400-AD28; 78 FR 6263), with a request for comments, to amend 22 CFR 62.17 (``Fees and... Part 62 RIN 1400-AD28 Exchange Visitor Program--Fees and Charges AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION... Application Fee for Sponsor Designation or Redesignation and the Administrative Fee for Exchange Visitor...

  18. 49 CFR 37.127 - Complementary paratransit service for visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Complementary paratransit service for visitors. 37... FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Paratransit as a Complement to Fixed Route Service § 37.127 Complementary paratransit service for visitors. (a) Each public entity required to provide...

  19. 75 FR 8049 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of Visitors.... degree at Air University. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552b, as amended, and 41 CFR 102-3.155 all sessions of...

  20. 78 FR 36752 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of Visitors... policies and programs of Air University and for the AFIT Subcommittee to discuss their recent...

  1. 77 FR 31338 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of Visitors... policies and programs of Air University and for the ] AFIT Subcommittee to discuss their...

  2. 75 FR 34440 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of Visitors... the at Air University. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552b, as amended, and 41 CFR 102-3.155 all sessions of...

  3. 77 FR 9633 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of meeting of the Air...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) Subcommittee of the Air University Board of Visitors will meet on Monday, March 12, 2012, from...

  4. 75 FR 8049 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of Visitors..., from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. The meeting will be held in the Air University Commander's Conference Room...

  5. 76 FR 57979 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of Visitors... positioning of Air University's educational mission. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. Sec. 552b, as amended, and 41...

  6. 77 FR 16213 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting Cancellation of the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) Subcommittee of the Air University Board of Visitors..., the Department of Defense announced that the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) Subcommittee...

  7. 76 FR 62787 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... Department of the Air Force Air University Board of Visitors Meeting ACTION: Notice of Meeting of the Air...), and 41 CFR 102-3.150, the Department of Defense announces that the Air University Board of Visitors..., 2011, from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The meeting will be held in the Air University Commander's Conference...

  8. Influences on visitor behavior at a modern immersive zoo exhibit.

    PubMed

    Ross, Stephen R; Gillespie, Katie L

    2009-09-01

    Zoos serve as centers for both research and education. The challenge is to convey messages about their conservation projects while meeting visitor expectations, which often include recreation and entertainment. One way this can be achieved is through the design of immersive exhibits that draw visitors in and engage them with interactive educational elements. Regenstein African Journey (RAJ) opened at Lincoln Park Zoo in 2003 and was designed to take visitors on a simulated safari through Africa. Because visitor experience was a major design goal, we conducted a timing and tracking study to evaluate use of the building and educational components. For a 9-week period in 2003, we tracked 338 visitors to RAJ and recorded continuous data as they moved through the building. Data were collected on handheld computers that provided precise timing data. The median visit was 11.08 min, 41% of which was spent looking at animals and 9% of which was spent engaged with interpretive elements. We found significant differences in the way visitors used signage: those in groups without children spent more of their visit engaged with signage than those with children and visitors who spent more of their visit interacting socially spent less time engaged with signage. By understanding how visitors use the educational opportunities presented to them, we can better meet their expectations and more effectively achieve the goal of conservation education.

  9. Teenagers and Their Babies: A Perinatal Home Visitor's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cardone, Ida; Gilkerson, Linda; Wechsler, Nick

    2008-01-01

    "Teenagers and Their Babies" is a self-study and preparation guide for paraprofessional home-based visitors to engage expectant and new parents in an exploration of their baby's development and their expectations for parenthood. The guide includes service interventions--strategies, techniques, and activities--for home visitors and doulas to use…

  10. 10 CFR 95.34 - Control of visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Control of visitors. 95.34 Section 95.34 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Physical Security § 95.34 Control of visitors. (a) Uncleared...

  11. The effects of visitor density and intensity on the behavior of two captive jaguars (Panthera onca).

    PubMed

    Sellinger, Rebecca L; Ha, James C

    2005-01-01

    Several researchers have reported significant effects of visitor density and intensity on captive animal behavior. This study determined whether this was the case for 2 captive jaguars housed at the Woodland Park Zoo, Seattle, WA. Subjects were monitored for changes in behavior as a function of visitor density and intensity. The jaguars were observed for 8 hr per week for 29 weeks--March 31 until October 11, 1998--for a total of 230 hr. Continuous frequency sampling was used, and visitor density and intensity were recorded every minute. Parametric statistics were used to test for correlations between behavior and density, intensity, or a combination of the two. Both density and intensity were significant for time spent non-visible for both cats, and intensity showed a significant effect on the female's pacing behavior. In addition, the male cat exhibited a trend for increased aggression based on both visitor density and intensity and a trend of intensity affecting his social behavior. In conclusion, both density and intensity had a significant effect on behavior, with intensity showing a larger effect.

  12. The influence of environmental enrichment on Chinese visitor behavior.

    PubMed

    Davey, Gareth; Henzi, Peter; Higgins, Louise

    2005-01-01

    Welfare improvements for nonhuman animals should aim to satisfy the needs of visitors as well as those of the animals. Little research has been conducted, however, and existing work is confined to zoos in developed countries. This article reports the behavioral responses of Chinese visitors to environmental enrichment improvements in a zoo enclosure. Visit, viewing, and stopping behaviors significantly increased at the transformed exhibit, indicating that it provoked greater visitor interest. Furthermore, increased intragroup behaviors suggested that the exhibit probably motivated visitors to interact socially. The positive impact of the exhibit changes supports the enrichment efforts taking place in zoos around the world. The changes also provide encouragement for zoos in developing countries such as China because greater visitor interest provides a strong argument and an incentive for improving welfare standards.

  13. The effect of nitrogen additions on oak foliage and herbivore communities at sites with high and low atmospheric pollution.

    PubMed

    Eatough Jones, Michele; Paine, Timothy D; Fenn, Mark E

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate plant and herbivore responses to nitrogen we conducted a fertilization study at a low and high pollution site in the mixed conifer forests surrounding Los Angeles, California. Contrary to expectations, discriminant function analysis of oak herbivore communities showed significant response to N fertilization when atmospheric deposition was high, but not when atmospheric deposition was low. We hypothesize that longer-term fertilization treatments are needed at the low pollution site before foliar N nutrition increases sufficiently to affect herbivore communities. At the high pollution site, fertilization was also associated with increased catkin production and higher densities of a byturid beetle that feeds on the catkins of oak. Leaf nitrogen and nitrate were significantly higher at the high pollution site compared to the low pollution site. Foliar nitrate concentrations were positively correlated with abundance of sucking insects, leafrollers and plutellids in all three years of the study.

  14. Relative pollination effectiveness of floral visitors of Pitcairnia angustifolia (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Fumero-Cabán, José J; Meléndez-Ackerman, Elvia J

    2007-03-01

    The effectiveness of flower visitors as pollinators will determine their potential role as selective agents on flower traits. Pitcairnia angustifolia has floral characters that would fit pollination by long-billed hummingbirds, and they should be the most effective pollinators for this plant. To test this prediction, we characterized the behavior of visitors toward flowers and their pollination effectiveness. Coereba flaveola (bananaquits) was the most frequent flower visitor and acted as a primary nectar robber; however, they pollinated incidentally and deposited pollen on stigmas. The endemic short-billed hummingbird Chlorostilbon maugaeus behaved as a secondary robber and did not pollinate flowers. As expected, the long-billed hummingbird, Anthracothorax viridis, was the most efficient visitor in terms of pollen deposition; however, it was the least frequent flower visitor. Introduced Apis mellifera (honeybees) were second in efficiency at depositing pollen and performed one third of the flower visits. Estimates of the expected rate of pollen deposition by each pollinator did not identify a single most effective pollinator. For P. angustifolia at least three flower visitors including an exotic bee and a nectar robber may be equally important to reproductive success. While these results limit our ability to make predictions on the role of hummingbird-pollination on current flower evolution, they do suggest the potential for pollination redundancy among flower visitors for P. angustifolia populations.

  15. Nurse-patient/visitor communication in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Pytel, Constance; Fielden, Nina M; Meyer, Kate H; Albert, Nancy

    2009-09-01

    Patients and visitors need to be encouraged to express their needs and be provided with enough relevant information so that treatment and recovery from illness are optimized. In the emergency department, it is important for nurses to create an environment of trust, respect, and acceptance. Using a survey design, a convenience sample of nurses and patients/visitors described patient/visitor communication needs and determined if needs were met during the ED encounter. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Mantel Haenszel chi(2) tests were used to determine associations between patient-rated importance of nurse communication needs and nursing communication performance. Sixty-four nurses and 123 patients/visitors completed a communication needs survey. More than 80% of patients answered "excellent" or "very good" to 6 of the top 10 important communication needs. Patient and nurse importance differed significantly on only 2 communication needs: calm voice and social status (nurses rated these needs of higher importance than patients; P = .01, P = .006). Patient-ranked importance was positively associated with patient opinion of how well needs were met in 6 of 19 patient/visitor communication needs; that is, not making assumptions about social status (P = .0006), offering reassurance to calm fears (P = .004), and teaching about primary medical concerns/conditions (P = .01). Nurse and patient/visitor perceptions of important communication are similar. Educating nurses about patient/visitor communication needs is the first step in enhancing how well nurses meet those needs.

  16. Insect Visitors and Potential Pollinators of Orchis militaris (Orchidaceae) in Southern Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Henneresse, Thomas; Tyteca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    As part of a research project on the food deception strategy in Orchis militaris (L.), the objective of this study was to identify insect visitors and potential pollinators of this orchid species in Belgium. In 2013, insects were collected over 2 d per site in five localities distributed in Southern Belgium (Wallonia). A total of 104 insects belonging to 49 species were caught. Dipterans were the most abundant visitors (50% of total specimens), followed by Hymenopterans (32%). Rhingia campestris Meigen, Bombylius venosus Mikan, Apis mellifera (L.), and Bombus lapidarius (L.) were the most abundant species. Only five specimens bore one to more than 10 pollinia: four honeybees (A. mellifera) and one bumblebee worker (B. lapidarius). These two species should be considered as potential pollinators in the study area, but probably not confirmed ones.

  17. Insect Visitors and Potential Pollinators of Orchis militaris (Orchidaceae) in Southern Belgium

    PubMed Central

    Henneresse, Thomas; Tyteca, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    As part of a research project on the food deception strategy in Orchis militaris (L.), the objective of this study was to identify insect visitors and potential pollinators of this orchid species in Belgium. In 2013, insects were collected over 2 d per site in five localities distributed in Southern Belgium (Wallonia). A total of 104 insects belonging to 49 species were caught. Dipterans were the most abundant visitors (50% of total specimens), followed by Hymenopterans (32%). Rhingia campestris Meigen, Bombylius venosus Mikan, Apis mellifera (L.), and Bombus lapidarius (L.) were the most abundant species. Only five specimens bore one to more than 10 pollinia: four honeybees (A. mellifera) and one bumblebee worker (B. lapidarius). These two species should be considered as potential pollinators in the study area, but probably not confirmed ones. PMID:27694346

  18. 43. Photographer unknown September 1967 VISITOR INFORMATION KIOSK, LOCATED NEAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Photographer unknown September 1967 VISITOR INFORMATION KIOSK, LOCATED NEAR THE POWDER MILL ROAD INTERCHANGE. (NPS/NCR (cn) 9995-C) - Baltimore-Washington Parkway, Greenbelt, Prince George's County, MD

  19. Atlantis Time-Lapse Move to KSC Visitor Complex

    NASA Video Gallery

    Time-lapse cameras captured space shuttle Atlantis making a 10-mile trek from the Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida to the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex whe...

  20. 33. View of footbridge near visitor's center, looking from the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. View of footbridge near visitor's center, looking from the northeast (duplicate of HALS no. LA-1-4 (CT)) - Briarwood: The Caroline Dormon Nature Preserve, 216 Caroline Dormon Road, Saline, Bienville Parish, LA

  1. 3. ROAD TO SUMMIT SHOWING VISITOR OVERLOOK AND SCIENCE CITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. ROAD TO SUMMIT SHOWING VISITOR OVERLOOK AND SCIENCE CITY, FROM ATOP WHITE HILL. NOTE THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS OF WHAT APPEARS TO BE A CIRCULAR SHELTER AT LOWER RIGHT. - Haleakala National Park Roads, Pukalani, Maui County, HI

  2. 29. ROAD TO SUMMIT SHOWING VISITOR OVERLOOK AND SCIENCE CITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. ROAD TO SUMMIT SHOWING VISITOR OVERLOOK AND SCIENCE CITY, FROM ATOP WHITE HILL. NOTE THE ARCHAEOLOGICAL REMAINS OF WHAT APPEARS TO BE A CIRCULAR SHELTER AT LOWER RIGHT. - Haleakala National Park Roads, Pukalani, Maui County, HI

  3. 72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR AND CANAL (LOCATION T) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  4. 49. Second floor, southeast stair (former office and visitor stair), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    49. Second floor, southeast stair (former office and visitor stair), transition of marble to wrought iron) - Sheffield Farms Milk Plant, 1075 Webster Avenue (southwest corner of 166th Street), Bronx, Bronx County, NY

  5. 11. GAS STATION AND OLD ROAD ALIGNMENT, FACING S. VISITOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. GAS STATION AND OLD ROAD ALIGNMENT, FACING S. VISITOR CENTER BEHIND TREES. SAME CAMERA POSITION AS AZ-45-10. - South Entrance Road, Between South park boundary & Village Loop Road, Grand Canyon, Coconino County, AZ

  6. 8. EMPTY LOCK CHAMBER FROM DOWNSTREAM (WEST) END, WITH VISITORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. EMPTY LOCK CHAMBER FROM DOWNSTREAM (WEST) END, WITH VISITORS CENTER (LEFT) AND LOCKMASTER'S HOUSE ON NORTH BANK. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Starved Rock Locks & Dam, Illinois Waterway River mile 231, Peru, La Salle County, IL

  7. 2. VIEW OF VISITOR CENTER AND PARKING AREA AT MAIN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF VISITOR CENTER AND PARKING AREA AT MAIN ENTRANCE, FACING EAST - Arches National Park Main Entrance Road, Beginning at U.S. Highway 191, approximately 6 miles north of Moab, Moab, Grand County, UT

  8. Phase Structure and Site Preference Behavior of Ternary Alloying Additions to PdTi and PtTi Shape-Memory Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo; Mosca, Hugo O.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    2006-01-01

    The phasc structure and concentration dependence of the lattice parameter and energy of formation of ternary Pd-'I-X and Pt-Ti-X alloys for a large number of ternary alloying additions X (X = Na, Mg, Al, Si, Sc. V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Ag, Cd, Hf, Ta, W, Re, Os, Ir) are investigated with an atomistic modeling approach. In addition, a detailed description of the site preference behavior of such additions showing that the elements can be grouped according to their absolute preference for a specific site, regardless of concentration, or preference for available sites in the deficient sublattice is provided.

  9. Spatial strategies for managing visitor impacts in National Parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leung, Y.-F.; Marion, J.L.

    1999-01-01

    Resource and social impacts caused by recreationists and tourists have become a management concern in national parks and equivalent protected areas. The need to contain visitor impacts within acceptable limits has prompted park and protected area managers to implement a wide variety of strategies and actions, many of which are spatial in nature. This paper classifies and illustrates the basic spatial strategies for managing visitor impacts in parks and protected areas. A typology of four spatial strategies was proposed based on the recreation and park management literature. Spatial segregation is a common strategy for shielding sensitive resources from visitor impacts or for separating potentially conflicting types of use. Two forms of spatial segregation are zoning and closure. A spatial containment strategy is intended to minimize the aggregate extent of visitor impacts by confining use to limited designated or established Iocations. In contrast, a spatial dispersal strategy seeks to spread visitor use, reducing the frequency of use to levels that avoid or minimize permanent resource impacts or visitor crowding and conflict. Finally, a spatial configuration strategy minimizes impacting visitor behavior though the judicious spatial arrangement of facilities. These four spatial strategics can be implemented separately or in combination at varying spatial scales within a single park. A survey of national park managers provides an empirical example of the diversity of implemented spatial strategies in managing visitor impacts. Spatial segregation is frequently applied in the form of camping restrictions or closures to protect sensitive natural or cultural resources and to separate incompatible visitor activities. Spatial containment is the most widely applied strategy for minimizing the areal extent of resource impacts. Spatial dispersal is commonly applied to reduce visitor crowding or conflicts in popular destination areas but is less frequently applied or

  10. AERIAL OF VISITORS INFORMATION CENTER [VIC] & RELOCATED ROCKET GARDEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This is an aerial view of KSC's Visitors Information Center, origination point of guided bus tours of KSC and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. More than one million visitors a year take advantage of the public bus tours. In left midground are the new Hall of History and food services building. The bus tours will remain in operation during the U. S. Bicentennial Exposition on Science and Technology to be held here from May 30 through September 7.

  11. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Reserve, may be made only after written approval by NOAA. NOAA may require public notice, including notice... statement may be required. NOAA will place a notice in the Federal Register of any proposed changes in... made. NOAA will publish notice of the proposed new site including an invitation for comments from...

  12. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Reserve, may be made only after written approval by NOAA. NOAA may require public notice, including notice... statement may be required. NOAA will place a notice in the Federal Register of any proposed changes in... made. NOAA will publish notice of the proposed new site including an invitation for comments from...

  13. 76 FR 80377 - Notice of Submission of Proposed Information Collection to OMB Additional On-Site Data Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-23

    ... below has been submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for review, as required by the...-performing and efficient HCV programs. The proposed data collection will take place through site visits to up...: HUD Desk Officer, Office of Management and Budget, New Executive Office Building, Washington, DC...

  14. A review and synthesis of recreation ecology research supporting carrying capacity and visitor use management decisionmaking

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Resource and experiential impacts associated with visitation to wilderness and other similar backcountry settings have long been addressed by land managers under the context of “carrying capacity” decisionmaking. Determining a maximum level of allowable use, below which high-quality resource and experiential conditions would be sustained, was an early focus in the 1960s and 1970s. However, decades of recreation ecology research have shown that the severity and areal extent of visitor impact problems are influenced by an interrelated array of use-related, environmental, and managerial factors. This complexity, with similar findings from social science research, prompted scientists and managers to develop more comprehensive carrying capacity frameworks, including a new Visitor Use Management framework. These frameworks rely on a diverse array of management strategies and actions, often termed a “management toolbox,” for resolving visitor impact problems. This article reviews the most recent and relevant recreation ecology studies that have been applied in wildland settings to avoid or minimize resource impacts. The key findings and their management implications are highlighted to support the professional management of common trail, recreation site, and wildlife impact problems. These studies illustrate the need to select from a more diverse array of impact management strategies and actions based on an evaluation of problems to identify the most influential factors that can be manipulated.

  15. Open complex scrunching before nucleotide addition accounts for the unusual transcription start site of E. coli ribosomal RNA promoters.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, Jared T; Chandrangsu, Pete; Ross, Wilma; Gourse, Richard L

    2016-03-29

    Most Escherichia coli promoters initiate transcription with a purine 7 or 8 nt downstream from the -10 hexamer, but some promoters, including the ribosomal RNA promoter rrnB P1, start 9 nt from the -10 element. We identified promoter and RNA polymerase determinants of this noncanonical rrnB P1 start site using biochemical and genetic approaches including mutational analysis of the promoter, Fe(2+) cleavage assays to monitor template strand positions near the active-site, and Bpa cross-linking to map the path of open complex DNA at amino acid and nucleotide resolution. We find that mutations in several promoter regions affect transcription start site (TSS) selection. In particular, we show that the absence of strong interactions between the discriminator region and σ region 1.2 and between the extended -10 element and σ region 3.0, identified previously as a determinant of proper regulation of rRNA promoters, is also required for the unusual TSS. We find that the DNA in the single-stranded transcription bubble of the rrnB P1 promoter complex expands and is "scrunched" into the active site channel of RNA polymerase, similar to the situation in initial transcribing complexes. However, in the rrnB P1 open complex, scrunching occurs before RNA synthesis begins. We find that the scrunched open complex exhibits reduced abortive product synthesis, suggesting that scrunching and unusual TSS selection contribute to the extraordinary transcriptional activity of rRNA promoters by increasing promoter escape, helping to offset the reduction in promoter activity that would result from the weak interactions with σ.

  16. Open complex scrunching before nucleotide addition accounts for the unusual transcription start site of E. coli ribosomal RNA promoters.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, Jared T; Chandrangsu, Pete; Ross, Wilma; Gourse, Richard L

    2016-03-29

    Most Escherichia coli promoters initiate transcription with a purine 7 or 8 nt downstream from the -10 hexamer, but some promoters, including the ribosomal RNA promoter rrnB P1, start 9 nt from the -10 element. We identified promoter and RNA polymerase determinants of this noncanonical rrnB P1 start site using biochemical and genetic approaches including mutational analysis of the promoter, Fe(2+) cleavage assays to monitor template strand positions near the active-site, and Bpa cross-linking to map the path of open complex DNA at amino acid and nucleotide resolution. We find that mutations in several promoter regions affect transcription start site (TSS) selection. In particular, we show that the absence of strong interactions between the discriminator region and σ region 1.2 and between the extended -10 element and σ region 3.0, identified previously as a determinant of proper regulation of rRNA promoters, is also required for the unusual TSS. We find that the DNA in the single-stranded transcription bubble of the rrnB P1 promoter complex expands and is "scrunched" into the active site channel of RNA polymerase, similar to the situation in initial transcribing complexes. However, in the rrnB P1 open complex, scrunching occurs before RNA synthesis begins. We find that the scrunched open complex exhibits reduced abortive product synthesis, suggesting that scrunching and unusual TSS selection contribute to the extraordinary transcriptional activity of rRNA promoters by increasing promoter escape, helping to offset the reduction in promoter activity that would result from the weak interactions with σ. PMID:26976590

  17. Scale-dependent shifts in the species composition of flower visitors with changing floral density.

    PubMed

    Essenberg, Carla J

    2013-01-01

    Responses of flower-visiting animals to floral density can alter interactions between plants, influencing a variety of biological processes, including plant population dynamics and the evolution of flowering phenology. Many studies have found effects of floral or plant density on pollinator visitation rates at patch scales, but little is known about responses of flower visitors to floral densities at larger scales. Here, I present data from an observational field study in which I measured the effects of floral density on visitation to the annual composite Holocarpha virgata at both patch (4 m(2)) and site (12.6 ha) spatial scales. The species composition of flower visitors changed with floral density, and did so in different ways at the two scales. At the site scale, average floral density within patches of H. virgata or within patches of all summer-flowering species combined had a significant positive effect on per-flowerhead visitation by the long-horned bee Melissodes lupina and no significant effects on visitation by any other taxa. At the patch scale, per-flowerhead visitation by honeybees significantly increased whereas visitation by M. lupina often decreased with increasing floral density. For both species, responses to patch-scale floral density were strongest when site-scale floral density was high. The scale-dependence of flower visitor responses to floral density and the interactions between site- and patch-scale effects of floral density observed in this study underscore the importance of improving our understanding of pollinators' responses to floral density at population scales.

  18. Evidence for a Transient Additional Ligand Binding Site in the TAS2R46 Bitter Taste Receptor.

    PubMed

    Sandal, Massimo; Behrens, Maik; Brockhoff, Anne; Musiani, Francesco; Giorgetti, Alejandro; Carloni, Paolo; Meyerhof, Wolfgang

    2015-09-01

    Most human G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are activated by small molecules binding to their 7-transmembrane (7-TM) helix bundle. They belong to basally diverging branches: the 25 bitter taste 2 receptors and most members of the very large rhodopsin-like/class A GPCRs subfamily. Some members of the class A branch have been suggested to feature not only an orthosteric agonist-binding site but also a more extracellular or "vestibular" site, involved in the binding process. Here we use a hybrid molecular mechanics/coarse-grained (MM/CG) molecular dynamics approach on a widely studied bitter taste receptor (TAS2R46) receptor in complex with its agonist strychnine. Three ∼1 μs molecular simulation trajectories find two sites hosting the agonist, which together elucidate experimental data measured previously and in this work. This mechanism shares similarities with the one suggested for the evolutionarily distant class A GPCRs. It might be instrumental for the remarkably broad but specific spectrum of agonists of these chemosensory receptors.

  19. Longer visits on familiar plants?: testing a regular visitor's tendency to probe more flowers than occasional visitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Takashi T.

    2013-07-01

    An individual pollinator may tend to consecutively probe more flowers on a plant to which it returns at shorter intervals than other plants. In a large net cage, I let individually marked bumble bees forage on flowering heads of red clovers arranged in 37 bottles (plants), each of which was monitored by an observer to record every visit and probe for 2.5 h on each of 3 days. The data of collective visits by marked individuals revealed that the bees had their own foraging areas, in which they visited a set of plants frequently and others less often, i.e., the same individual bee repeatedly returned to certain plants as a regular visitor while sampling others as an occasional visitor. I further found that as a regular visitor, an individual bee tended to probe more flowering heads on familiar plants while probing fewer on unfamiliar plants as an occasional visitor. The mean number of consecutive probes by a bee was also positively correlated with its activity (the total number of plant visits made during the observation period). The fact that each bee behaves differently on different plants indicates that the same individual pollinator can exert different influence on the reproductive success of each plant: apparently, a pollinator likely reduces the potential for geitonogamous self-pollination when foraging as an occasional visitor. Attracting occasional visitors therefore may be beneficial for plants to avoid geitonogamy. This study thus emphasizes the importance of paying attention to pollinator individuality in pollination ecology.

  20. How Do Zoos "Talk" to Their General Visitors? Do Visitors "Listen"? A Mixed Method Investigation of the Communication between Modern Zoos and Their General Visitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roe, Katie; McConney, Andrew; Mansfield, Caroline F.

    2014-01-01

    Modern zoos utilise a variety of education tools for communicating with visitors. Previous research has discussed the benefits of providing multiple education communications, yet little research provides an indication of what communications are being employed within zoos today. This research is a two-phased, mixed-methods investigation into the…

  1. What blocks health visitors from taking on a leadership role?

    PubMed

    Hyett, Erika

    2003-07-01

    Current government documents in the United Kingdom call for all nurses to take on a greater leadership role. This paper critically considers some of the management factors that block one group of specialist nurses (health visitors) from fulfilling their leadership role. Health visitors have a key role to play in meeting the public health targets of local primary care trusts, known as local health improvement plans. But to take on a greater public health role, health visitors need to move away from working independently within separate general practitioner surgeries and to work in teams which share the vision and goals of the primary care trusts. The paper explores different styles of management that promote transformational leadership and relate to practice. It is suggested that use of the Servant-Leader model of management should encourage the empowerment of staff, and through empowerment health visitors should be able to instigate change and become more innovative in their practice. Persistent recruitment and retention problems have resulted in little time being available to focus on the effectiveness of services. The future management of health visitors will be to primarily run the service while supporting staff in accessing and influencing those in power.

  2. Evaluating Education and Science in the KSC Visitor Complex Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Lance K.

    2000-01-01

    The continuing development of exhibits at the Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex is an excellent opportunity for NASA personnel to promote science and provide insight into NASA programs and projects for the approximately 3 million visitors that come to KSC annually. Stated goals for the Visitor Complex, in fact, emphasize science awareness and recommend broadening the appeal of the displays and exhibits for all age groups. To this end, this summer project seeks to evaluate the science content of planned exhibits/displays in relation to these developing opportunities and identify specific areas for enhancement of existing or planned exhibits and displays. To help expand the educational and science content within the developing exhibits at the Visitor Complex, this project was structured to implement the goals of the Visitor Center Director. To accomplish this, the exhibits and displays planned for completion within the year underwent review and evaluation for science content and educational direction. Planning emphasis for the individual displays was directed at combining the elements of effective education with fundamental scientific integrity, within an appealing format.

  3. Empowering health visitors: a multi-faceted approach.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Stephen; Bryar, Rosamund

    2015-10-01

    Health visitors working in Tower Hamlets, a deprived inner London borough, face a large and growing under-5 population, and caseloads with disproportionate numbers of vulnerable families and child protection concerns. This paper reports and evaluation of a project to empower health visitors. Baseline data about their activity (primarily derived from observation and interviews) showed that health visitors would benefit from improved resources (e.g. leaflets, books, training packs); enhanced knowledge of local borough and third sector services; and support for their own wellbeing and morale. After the programme that was implemented to provide these, seven health visitors were interviewed for evaluation purposes. They reported feeling empowered by the project: the training had been invaluable in providing affirmation, reassurance, and the opportunity to reflect; the new sleep information packs were very helpful for families, as was the new leaflet explaining their role; and restorative supervision had been useful in helping individuals think through how to deal with particular challenges in life or work. The project was thus successful in helping the health visitors interviewed to feel more supported and thus empowered in their work with families. PMID:26596132

  4. Wilderness Quality and Visitors' Wilderness Attitudes: ManagementImplications

    PubMed

    SHIN; JAAKSON

    1997-03-01

    / This study examines whether or not wilderness visitors'attitudes toward wilderness are related to the quality of the wilderness thathas been visited. From three Ontario, Canada, provincial parks (Algonquin,Killarney, and Quetico), a sample of 540 wilderness campers was randomlyselected from a total of 138,317 campers. People sampled ranged in age from15 to 75 years with a mean of slightly over 37. They were highly educated. Amajority of them resided in urban or suburban areas. Significant correlationsbetween visitors' levels of wilderness attitudes and wilderness qualitywere found. However, wilderness quality evaluated by wilderness visitors(subjective quality) did not agree with that evaluated by the wildernessmanagers (objective quality).KEY WORDS: Wilderness; Attitudes; Subjective quality; Objectivequality

  5. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    DOE PAGES

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two activemore » bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.« less

  6. Identification of bacteria synthesizing ribosomal RNA in response to uranium addition during biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research site

    SciTech Connect

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Boyanov, Maxim I.

    2015-09-18

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this research, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.

  7. Identification of Bacteria Synthesizing Ribosomal RNA in Response to Uranium Addition During Biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Site.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, Lora R; Wilkins, Michael J; Williams, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Kerkhof, Lee J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this study, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites.

  8. Identification of Bacteria Synthesizing Ribosomal RNA in Response to Uranium Addition During Biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Site

    PubMed Central

    McGuinness, Lora R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Long, Philip E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this study, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites. PMID:26382047

  9. Identification of Bacteria Synthesizing Ribosomal RNA in Response to Uranium Addition During Biostimulation at the Rifle, CO Integrated Field Research Site.

    PubMed

    McGuinness, Lora R; Wilkins, Michael J; Williams, Kenneth H; Long, Philip E; Kerkhof, Lee J

    2015-01-01

    Understanding which organisms are capable of reducing uranium at historically contaminated sites provides crucial information needed to evaluate treatment options and outcomes. One approach is determination of the bacteria which directly respond to uranium addition. In this study, uranium amendments were made to groundwater samples from a site of ongoing biostimulation with acetate. The active microbes in the planktonic phase were deduced by monitoring ribosomes production via RT-PCR. The results indicated several microorganisms were synthesizing ribosomes in proportion with uranium amendment up to 2 μM. Concentrations of U (VI) >2 μM were generally found to inhibit ribosome synthesis. Two active bacteria responding to uranium addition in the field were close relatives of Desulfobacter postgateii and Geobacter bemidjiensis. Since RNA content often increases with growth rate, our findings suggest it is possible to rapidly elucidate active bacteria responding to the addition of uranium in field samples and provides a more targeted approach to stimulate specific populations to enhance radionuclide reduction in contaminated sites. PMID:26382047

  10. Development and Testing of the Glenn Research Center Visitor's Center Grid-Tied Photovoltaic Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eichenberg, Dennis J.

    2009-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has developed, installed, and tested a 12 kW DC grid-tied photovoltaic (PV) power system at the GRC Visitor s Center. This system utilizes a unique ballast type roof mount for installing the photovoltaic panels on the roof of the Visitor s Center with no alterations or penetrations to the roof. The PV system has generated in excess of 15000 kWh since operation commenced in August 2008. The PV system is providing power to the GRC grid for use by all. Operation of the GRC Visitor s Center PV system has been completely trouble free. A grid-tied PV power system is connected directly to the utility distribution grid. Facility power can be obtained from the utility system as normal. The PV system is synchronized with the utility system to provide power for the facility, and excess power is provided to the utility. The project transfers space technology to terrestrial use via nontraditional partners. GRC personnel glean valuable experience with PV power systems that are directly applicable to various space power systems, and provides valuable space program test data. PV power systems help to reduce harmful emissions and reduce the Nation s dependence on fossil fuels. Power generated by the PV system reduces the GRC utility demand, and the surplus power aids the community. Present global energy concerns reinforce the need for the development of alternative energy systems. Modern PV panels are readily available, reliable, efficient, and economical with a life expectancy of at least 25 years. Modern electronics has been the enabling technology behind grid-tied power systems, making them safe, reliable, efficient, and economical with a life expectancy of at least 25 years. Based upon the success of the GRC Visitor s Center PV system, additional PV power system expansion at GRC is under consideration. The GRC Visitor s Center grid-tied PV power system was successfully designed and developed which served to validate the basic principles

  11. Visitor center at the Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve, Lancaster, California

    SciTech Connect

    Colyer, R.D.; Freeman, S.P.

    1981-01-01

    The Antelope Valley California Poppy Reserve contains the largest remaining stand of the California Poppy (Eschschozia Californica), the state flower of California. To welcome the thousands of people viewing the desert wildflowers each spring, the State of California decided to build a visitor/interpretive center. This building deals primarily with the question of fit; a building's fit aesthetically with its site and the fit of a building's design response to the climate of the site. In this case, both aspects of this question led the client and architects to seek an earth sheltered solution using materials at least metaphorically indigenous to the region. On both a technical and formal level, this building seeks to fit the unique climate and historical heritage of its site.

  12. National wildlife refuge visitor survey 2012--Individual refuge results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dietsch, Alia M.; Sexton, Natalie R.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Conk, Shannon J.

    2013-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System), established in 1903 and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 560 national wildlife refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts nearly 45 million visitors annually, including 34.8 million people who observe and photograph wildlife, 9.6 million who hunt and fish, and nearly 675,000 teachers and students who use refuges as outdoor classrooms. Understanding visitor perceptions of refuges and characterizing their experiences on refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. The Service collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The purpose of the survey was to better understand visitor experiences and trip characteristics, to gauge visitors’ levels of satisfaction with existing recreational opportunities, and to garner feedback to inform the design of programs and facilities. The survey results will inform performance, planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plans (CCPs), visitor services, and transportation planning processes. This Data Series consists of 25 separate data files. Each file describes the results of the survey for an individual refuge and contains the following information: • Introduction: An overview of the Refuge System and the goals of the national surveying effort. • Methods: The procedures for the national surveying effort, including selecting refuges, developing the survey instrument, contacting visitors, and guidance for interpreting the results.• Refuge Description: A brief description of the refuge location, acreage, purpose, recreational

  13. Problems of outdoor recreation: the effect of visitors' demographics on the perceptions of Termessos National Park, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Sayan, Selcuk; Karagüzel, Osman

    2010-06-01

    Visitor demographics, perceptions and their relationships are investigated to determine the problems and issues for outdoor recreation, which has been a neglected part of the Turkish national park system, using the case of Termessos National Park, located in the south of Turkey. The park is attractive for both its historical and natural resources. Five demographic characteristics (gender, age, nationality, education level and income level) were used to test perceptions of the park resources, preference for number of groups and perception of crowding. The data was collected via a questionnaire survey administered on-site. Chi-square tests demonstrated that perceptions are significantly influenced by the nationality of respondents. Archaeological ruins were perceived as the most popular park resource, and were more appreciated by the older age groups, French visitors and those with higher education. Although the park was not perceived to be crowded, at least 25% of all age groups and 30% of all nationalities preferred not to encounter any other groups, whereas a significant majority of Turkish visitors (over 95%) did not mind having one or two groups present during their visit. Visitors with higher education and income levels preferred to encounter fewer groups. At least 60% of the visitors were comfortable with the actual condition of the park. The trails, signage and brochures were considered major problems. As an integrated part of the ruins, redesign of trails was perceived as necessary. Signage was perceived to be the second most important problem, which is also related to trails and orientation, whereas brochures were suggested as supplementary materials.

  14. Problems of Outdoor Recreation: The Effect of Visitors' Demographics on the Perceptions of Termessos National Park, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayan, Selcuk; Karagüzel, Osman

    2010-06-01

    Visitor demographics, perceptions and their relationships are investigated to determine the problems and issues for outdoor recreation, which has been a neglected part of the Turkish national park system, using the case of Termessos National Park, located in the south of Turkey. The park is attractive for both its historical and natural resources. Five demographic characteristics (gender, age, nationality, education level and income level) were used to test perceptions of the park resources, preference for number of groups and perception of crowding. The data was collected via a questionnaire survey administered on-site. Chi-square tests demonstrated that perceptions are significantly influenced by the nationality of respondents. Archaeological ruins were perceived as the most popular park resource, and were more appreciated by the older age groups, French visitors and those with higher education. Although the park was not perceived to be crowded, at least 25% of all age groups and 30% of all nationalities preferred not to encounter any other groups, whereas a significant majority of Turkish visitors (over 95%) did not mind having one or two groups present during their visit. Visitors with higher education and income levels preferred to encounter fewer groups. At least 60% of the visitors were comfortable with the actual condition of the park. The trails, signage and brochures were considered major problems. As an integrated part of the ruins, redesign of trails was perceived as necessary. Signage was perceived to be the second most important problem, which is also related to trails and orientation, whereas brochures were suggested as supplementary materials.

  15. 75 FR 65975 - Exchange Visitor Program-Secondary School Students

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-27

    ... adoption of 22 CFR Part 62--Exchange Visitor Program, establishing a student exchange program (14 FR 4592... the general public on current best practices in the industry (see 74 FR 45385, September 2, 2009). The... language addressing each matter were consolidated into a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) (see 75...

  16. 78 FR 6263 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... published a final rule on November 1, 2007 (72 FR 61800), which became effective December 3, 2007. The 2007... requesting individual program services. The Department published a final rule on February 25, 2011 (76 FR... the Administrative Fee for Exchange Visitor (J-1 Visa Holder) Benefits assessed for providing...

  17. 77 FR 73975 - Information Collection: National Visitor Use Monitoring

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... (including outdoor physical activities), customer satisfaction, and visitor values. The knowledge gained from... concerning this notice should be addressed to Dr. Donald B.K. English, Recreation, Heritage, and Volunteer... facilitate entry to the building. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Donald B.K. English, Recreation,...

  18. 75 FR 60674 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... and Budget (OMB) Circular No. A-25, user fees for Exchange Visitor Program Services were adopted for... for certain services for which application is required were adopted. OMB Circular No. A-25 directs the... final rule was amended by a rule dated October 7, 1999 (4 FR 54538), and also by a second rule...

  19. 4. LOOKING WEST FROM THE VISITORS' GALLERY ABOVE THE SOUTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. LOOKING WEST FROM THE VISITORS' GALLERY ABOVE THE SOUTH END OF LEVEL 4; SAWTOOTH MONITORS PROVIDED AMPLE NATURAL LIGHT FOR KILLING OPERATIONS; STEEL SUBSTRUCTURE NEAR BOTTOM OF PHOTO SUPPORTED CHAIN CONVEYOR SYSTEM - Rath Packing Company, Beef Killing Building, Sycamore Street between Elm & Eighteenth Streets, Waterloo, Black Hawk County, IA

  20. FACILITIES - VISITORS INFORMATION CENTER [VIC] ASTRONAUTS MEMORIAL CONSTRUCTION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Construction steadily progresses on the Astronauts Memorial to be dedicated in May 1991 at Spaceport USA, The NASA Visitors Center at KSC. Both the memorial space mirror and a future education center will be dedicated to all U. S. astronauts who have died in the pursuit of space exploration.

  1. Communicating Climate Change to Visitors of Informal Science Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koepfler, Jes A.; Heimlich, Joe E.; Yocco, Victor S.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports findings on visitors' preferences for content presentation of a future global warming and climate change exhibit. The study was conducted with two groups: one from the Marian Koshland Science Museum of the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, and the other at the Center of Science and Industry in Columbus, Ohio. The…

  2. 76 FR 10498 - Exchange Visitor Program-Fees and Charges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... rule, Public Notice 7077 at 75 FR 60674-60679, October 1, 2010, with a request for comments, amending... Part 62 RIN 1400-AC67 Exchange Visitor Program--Fees and Charges AGENCY: Department of State. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of State is amending its regulations regarding fees and charges...

  3. 3. Humpback Rocks Visitor Center. View of the selfguided interpretive ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Humpback Rocks Visitor Center. View of the self-guided interpretive mountain farm trail and a post-and-rail fence in the foreground with humpback rocks in the background. The view is looking south. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  4. Interpretation for Disabled Visitors in the National Park System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Intended to help interpretive staff identify programmatic needs of disabled U.S. national park visitors, the booklet suggests reasonable modifications to assure participation. An introductory section reviews legal and policy guidelines, the emergence of the disability movement in America, and components of integrated programing. Guidelines and…

  5. Health visitors' awareness and perception of clinical genetic services.

    PubMed Central

    Guilbert, P; Cheater, F

    1990-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 84 health visitors to assess their awareness and perception of genetic services and how they perceived their role in the referral of patients. The study showed that while health visitors had a reasonable knowledge of the more obvious aspects of genetic services, there were a number of areas in which they were unsure. The respondents did not identify themselves as prime initiators in the process of referring patients to a genetic service, although they appeared able to identify families on their caseloads for whom this service may be relevant. Health visitors viewed their own knowledge of genetics as poor, a factor which may account for the low referral rate initiated by this group of professionals. The respondents attached importance to genetic issues and 76 (95%) wished to be better informed about the subject. It is suggested that the inclusion of genetics as part of an in-service training programme might fulfil this need and lead to greater advocacy of genetic services among the families in their care. These findings are of interest in view of the proposals within the recent Royal College of Physicians report (Prenatal screening and genetic counselling) suggesting that community genetic services should make use of primary health care workers such as health visitors. PMID:2213844

  6. 97. Cumberland knob recreation area. The visitor contact center originally ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. Cumberland knob recreation area. The visitor contact center originally opened in 1941 as a combined sandwich shop, picnic area, and comfort station, the central building of the first recreation area to open looking north. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  7. Factors Influencing Zoo Visitors' Conservation Attitudes and Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanagan, Jeffrey S.

    2000-01-01

    Predicts that Zoo Atlanta visitors who had interactive experience with the zoo's elephant demonstration and bio-fact program would be more likely to actively support elephant conservation than those who simply viewed the animals in their exhibit and read graphics. Uses survey instruments including 25 closed-ended questions, petitions, and…

  8. Understanding the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Croom, Patty; Bellows, Kathy

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how achieving compliance with the federal government's new Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS) will require higher education institutions to establish, on a very tight schedule, systems to track international students and share data about them with the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). (EV)

  9. How and What Recreational Visitors Learn at Zoos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchman, David

    The impact of the educational programs of zoos on the recreational visitor is addressed in this report. Unobtrusive or nonreactive research methods were employed as primary evaluative techniques by graduate social science students conducting six research projects at the Los Angeles Zoo. These studies were designed and implemented to examine: (1)…

  10. Coordination and Human Resource Planning in the Hawaii Visitor Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Commission on Manpower and Full Employment, Honolulu.

    This report was undertaken in response to a request by the Sixth Legislature, which expressed its concern with the lack of coordination and overall human resource planning in the visitor industry and that the findings of the January 6-7, 1970 Travel Industry Congress had not been fully implemented. The State Commission on Manpower and Full…

  11. Dengue Risk among Visitors to Hawaii during an Outbreak

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carrie E.; Tom, Tammy; Sasaki, Jed; Ayers, Tracy

    2005-01-01

    Despite the high rates of dengue in many tropical destinations frequented by tourists, limited information is available on the risk for infection among short-term visitors. We retrospectively surveyed 4,000 persons who arrived in Hawaii during the peak of the 2001–2002 dengue outbreak and collected follow-up serologic test results for those reporting denguelike illness. Of 3,064 visitors who responded, 94 (3%) experienced a denguelike illness either during their trip or within 14 days of departure; 34 of these persons were seen by a physician, and 2 were hospitalized. Twenty-seven visitors with denguelike illness provided a serum specimen; all specimens were negative for anti-dengue immunoglobulin G antibodies. The point estimate of dengue incidence was zero infections per 358 person-days of exposure with an upper 95% confidence limit of 3.0 cases per person-year. Thus, the risk for dengue infection for visitors to Hawaii during the outbreak was low. PMID:15890133

  12. Visitor center flight room,detail of modern soffit and original ribbedconcrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Visitor center flight room,detail of modern soffit and original ribbed-concrete including original integrated duct work, view to northwest - Wright Brothers National Memorial Visitor Center, Highway 158, Kill Devil Hills, Dare County, NC

  13. 50. VIEW OF CENTRAL CONTROL STATION AND VISITOR CENTER/RIVER SIDES ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. VIEW OF CENTRAL CONTROL STATION AND VISITOR CENTER/RIVER SIDES (Visitor Center Building constructed after field negatives were taken and numbered.) - Mississippi River 9-Foot Channel Project, Lock & Dam No. 11, Upper Mississippi River, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  14. 75 FR 33573 - Information Collection; Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute Wilderness Visitor Study

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    ... Forest Service Information Collection; Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute Wilderness Visitor... organizations on the new information collection: Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute Wilderness Visitor...: Comments concerning this notice should be addressed to Alan Watson, Aldo Leopold Wilderness...

  15. 75 FR 28786 - Federal Advisory Committee; National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors; Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors; Closed Meeting AGENCY: Defense Intelligence Agency, National Defense Intelligence College, DoD. ACTION... of the Defense Intelligence Agency, National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors will...

  16. 78 FR 90 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Intelligence University, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of... a closed meeting of the National Intelligence University Board of Visitors has been scheduled...

  17. 78 FR 32241 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors; Notice of Closed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors; Notice of Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Intelligence University, Defense Intelligence Agency... given that a closed meeting of the National Intelligence University Board of Visitors has been...

  18. Hoxb-2 transcriptional activation in rhombomeres 3 and 5 requires an evolutionarily conserved cis-acting element in addition to the Krox-20 binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Vesque, C; Maconochie, M; Nonchev, S; Ariza-McNaughton, L; Kuroiwa, A; Charnay, P; Krumlauf, R

    1996-01-01

    Segmentation is a key feature of the development of the vertebrate hindbrain where it involves the generation of repetitive morphological units termed rhombomeres (r). Hox genes are likely to play an essential role in the specification of segmental identity and we have been investigating their regulation. We show here that the mouse and chicken Hoxb-2 genes are dependent for their expression in r3 and r5 on homologous enhancer elements and on binding to this enhancer of the r3/r5-specific transcriptional activator Krox-20. Among the three Krox-20 binding sites of the mouse Hoxb-2 enhancer, only the high-affinity site is absolutely necessary for activity. In contrast, we have identified an additional cis-acting element, Box1, essential for r3/r5 enhancer activity. It is conserved both in sequence and in position respective to the high-affinity Krox-20 binding site within the mouse and chicken enhancers. Furthermore, a short 44 bp sequence spanning the Box1 and Krox-20 sites can act as an r3/r5 enhancer when oligomerized. Box1 may therefore constitute a recognition sequence for another factor cooperating with Krox-20. Taken together, these data demonstrate the conservation of Hox gene regulation and of Krox-20 function during vertebrate evolution. Images PMID:8895582

  19. 22 CFR 41.57 - International cultural exchange visitors and visitors under the Irish Peace Process Cultural and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false International cultural exchange visitors and... AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Business and Media Visas § 41.57 International cultural exchange...) International cultural exchange visitors—(1) Requirements for classification under INA section...

  20. 22 CFR 41.31 - Temporary visitors for business or pleasure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Temporary visitors for business or pleasure. 41.31 Section 41.31 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE VISAS VISAS: DOCUMENTATION OF NONIMMIGRANTS UNDER THE IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT, AS AMENDED Temporary Visitors § 41.31 Temporary visitors...

  1. 78 FR 59045 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will meet on October... or comments received by the National Fire Academy Board of Visitors, go to...

  2. 78 FR 25289 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy Teleconference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy Teleconference... Advisory Committee Teleconference. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board...: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy will meet on Wednesday, May 15, 2013, from 1:30...

  3. 78 FR 72094 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will meet on... or comments received by the National Fire Academy Board of Visitors, go to...

  4. 76 FR 6149 - National Fire Academy Board of Visitors; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-03

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency National Fire Academy Board of Visitors; Notice of Meeting... Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The National Fire Academy Board of Visitors will meet on February 22... background documents or comments received by the National Fire Academy Board of Visitors, go to...

  5. 76 FR 5143 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. This is the 2011 Organizational Meeting of the USMA Board of... States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Wednesday, February 16, 2011. ] 3. Time: 12...

  6. 76 FR 2190 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-12

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor (J-1) Status... of 1995. Title of Information Collection: Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor (J-1... the proper administration of the Exchange Visitor Program (J-Visa). Evaluate the accuracy of...

  7. 76 FR 24956 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-03

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor (J-1) Status... Exchange Visitor (J-1) Status OMB Control Number: 1405-0119 Type of Request: Extension of a Currently... the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs in administering the Exchange Visitor Program...

  8. Making Space for Experimentation, Collaboration, and Play: Re-Imagining the Drop-in Visitor Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mostov, Merilee

    2014-01-01

    In late 2006, the Columbus Museum of Art education department adopted a new framework that established creativity as the lens for learning and visitor experiences. But what does creativity look like in a gallery experience? What are visitor attitudes toward creativity? This article explores how the drop-in visitor experience was reimagined at the…

  9. 7 CFR 502.10 - Photographs by visitors or for news, advertising, or commercial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Photographs by visitors or for news, advertising, or... RESEARCH CENTER PROPERTY, BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND § 502.10 Photographs by visitors or for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. Photographs may be taken by visitors or for news purposes without...

  10. The Influence of an Interactive Educational Approach on Visitors' Learning in a Swiss Zoo

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindemann-Matthies, Petra; Kamer, Tobias

    2005-01-01

    A new but costly approach to providing visitors of zoos with information on conservation is the presentation of small exhibits by zoo professionals or volunteers. At these "touch tables" visitors can find out about the biology, ecology, and conservation of animals kept in the zoo. We studied the effect of a touch table on visitors' learning in a…

  11. 77 FR 50757 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Visitor Program Participant Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-22

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Visitor Program Participant Survey--Summer Work... Collection: Exchange Visitor Program Participant Survey--Summer Work Travel Program. OMB Control Number: None.... Form Number: SV 2012-0004. Respondents: Exchange Visitor Program participants in the Summer Work...

  12. 7 CFR 502.10 - Photographs by visitors or for news, advertising, or commercial purposes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Photographs by visitors or for news, advertising, or... RESEARCH CENTER PROPERTY, BELTSVILLE, MARYLAND § 502.10 Photographs by visitors or for news, advertising, or commercial purposes. Photographs may be taken by visitors or for news purposes without...

  13. Effects of nutrient and lime additions in mine site rehabilitation strategies on the accumulation of antimony and arsenic by native Australian plants.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Susan C; Leech, Calvin D; Butler, Leo; Lisle, Leanne; Ashley, Paul M; Lockwood, Peter V

    2013-10-15

    The effects of nutrient and lime additions on antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) accumulation by native Australian and naturalised plants growing in two contaminated mine site soils (2,735 mg kg(-1) and 4,517 mg kg(-1) Sb; 826 mg kg(-1) and 1606 As mgkg(-1)) was investigated using a glasshouse pot experiment. The results indicated an increase in soil solution concentrations with nutrient addition in both soils and also with nutrient+lime addition for Sb in one soil. Metalloid concentrations in plant roots were significantly greater than concentrations in above ground plant parts. The metalloid transfer to above ground plant parts from the roots and from the soil was, however, low (ratio of leaf concentration/soil concentration≪1) for all species studied. Eucalyptus michaeliana was the most successful at colonisation with lowest metalloid transfer to above ground plant parts. Addition of nutrients and nutrients+lime to soils, in general, increased plant metalloid accumulation. Relative As accumulation was greater than that of Sb. All the plant species studied were suitable for consideration in the mine soil phytostabilisation strategies but lime additions should be limited and longer term trials also recommended. PMID:23433572

  14. Variation in visitor perceptions of a polar bear enclosure based on the presence of natural vs. un-natural enrichment items.

    PubMed

    Kutska, Debra

    2009-07-01

    A debate exists among modern zoo staff as to whether or not the addition of un-naturalistic enrichment takes away from, or even defeats, the educational messages designers are trying to incorporate in naturalistic exhibits. A visitor study was conducted at the Central Park Zoo's polar bear exhibit in order to determine whether or not the type of enrichment in an enclosure actually alters guest perceptions. Visitors were exposed to one of two enrichment treatments in the bear enclosure: Naturalistic or Un-naturalistic. The results of this study suggest that enrichment type did not alter the perceptions of visitors. However, it did identify some of the different ways adults and youths perceive animals and zoos. Additionally, the study highlighted the varying perceptions individuals have of the concept of polar bears vs. their perceptions of the captive individuals at the Central Park Zoo. Implications for enrichment usage and exhibit design are discussed.

  15. Presentation to JAEA Visitors, July 24, 2012

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, Victor

    2012-07-19

    There are 7 Reasons for characterizing spent fuel nuclide concentrations: (1) Provide IAEA with the capability to independently verify the mass of plutonium at any site that has spent fuel; (2) Shipper/receiver difference; (3) Determination of the input accountability mass of an electrochemical (pyro-chemical) processing facility; (4) Continuity of knowledge at spent fuel storage site; (5) Optimal reloads through knowledge of true actinide content; (6) Burnup credit for fuel transport and storage; and (7) Provide confidence to the public that the shipment of spent fuel around the world is being undertaken in a rigorous manner, assuring that material is not diverted during shipment. Types of fuel of interest are: Fast Reactor Fuel, Normal burnup low enriched uranium (LEU), Mixed oxide (MOX), Low burnup LEU, and Research reactor. MCNPX calculates the slowing down and the energy spread for a given time. The principles are: (1) Neutrons slow down in LSDS; (2) Slow neutrons capture preferentially on a fission resonance; (3) Fission emits high-energy neutrons; (4) High-energy neutrons detected in threshold detector (that is not sensitive to slow neutrons) (e.g., {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th); and (5) The detection time is characteristic of the slow neutron energy. Following each PSR pulse, the entire signal is digitized in 2 nanosecond intervals, and subsequently analyzed Analysis involves applying a digital filter to extract fission pulses in a background of initial oscillations and noise throughout. Some of the noise is not random. Depending on the threshold setting and filter parameters, both the normalization and the trend change. Original PNNL LSDS design required a 1-meter radius cylindrical LSDS. Much higher efficiency would allow us to use a (1.2m) LSDS (this is the LANL LSDS size), or a less intense source, or a combination of both. We still estimate 10{sup 16} total neutrons from the source to obtain 2-3% precision in {sup 239}Pu and {sup 235}U assay.

  16. VISITOR CENTER BRANCH CHIEF JIM BALL SPEAKS AT THE APOLLO/SATURN V CENTER RIBBON-CUTTING CEREMONY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    James E. Ball, chief of the Visitor Center Branch of KSC/NASA Public Affairs, speaks to the guests invited to the ribbon-cutting ceremony which officially opens the new Apollo/Saturn V Center, part of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center. The 100,000-square-foot facility includes two theaters, various exhibits and an Apollo-era Saturn V rocket, which formerly was on display outside the Vehicle Assembly Building and is one of only three moon rockets remaining in existence. The new center is located off the Kennedy Parkway at the Banana Creek launch viewing site.

  17. The effect of minimum impact education on visitor spatial behavior in parks and protected areas: An experimental investigation using GPS-based tracking.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Abigail M; Monz, Christopher; D'Antonio, Ashley; Manning, Robert E; Reigner, Nathan; Goonan, Kelly A; Jacobi, Charles

    2015-10-01

    The unmanaged impacts of recreation and tourism can often result in unacceptable changes in resource conditions and quality of the visitor experience. Minimum impact visitor education programs aim to reduce the impacts of recreation by altering visitor behaviors. Specifically, education seeks to reduce impacts resulting from lack of knowledge both about the consequences of one's actions and impact-minimizing best practices. In this study, three different on-site minimum impact education strategies ("treatments") and a control condition were applied on the trails and summit area of Sargent Mountain in Acadia National Park, Maine. Treatment conditions were designed to encourage visitors to stay on marked trails and minimize off-trail travel. Treatments included a message delivered via personal contact, and both an ecological-based message and an amenity-based message posted on signs located alongside the trail. A control condition of current trail markings and directional signs was also assessed. The efficacy of the messaging was evaluated through the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking of visitor spatial behavior on/off trails. Spatial analysis of GPS tracks revealed statistically significant differences among treatments, with the personal contact treatment yielding significantly less dispersion of visitors on the mountain summit. Results also indicate that the signs deployed in the study were ineffective at limiting off-trail use beyond what can be accomplished with trail markers and directional signs. These findings suggest that personal contact by a uniformed ranger or volunteer may be the most effective means of message delivery for on-site minimum impact education. PMID:26225933

  18. The effect of minimum impact education on visitor spatial behavior in parks and protected areas: An experimental investigation using GPS-based tracking.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Abigail M; Monz, Christopher; D'Antonio, Ashley; Manning, Robert E; Reigner, Nathan; Goonan, Kelly A; Jacobi, Charles

    2015-10-01

    The unmanaged impacts of recreation and tourism can often result in unacceptable changes in resource conditions and quality of the visitor experience. Minimum impact visitor education programs aim to reduce the impacts of recreation by altering visitor behaviors. Specifically, education seeks to reduce impacts resulting from lack of knowledge both about the consequences of one's actions and impact-minimizing best practices. In this study, three different on-site minimum impact education strategies ("treatments") and a control condition were applied on the trails and summit area of Sargent Mountain in Acadia National Park, Maine. Treatment conditions were designed to encourage visitors to stay on marked trails and minimize off-trail travel. Treatments included a message delivered via personal contact, and both an ecological-based message and an amenity-based message posted on signs located alongside the trail. A control condition of current trail markings and directional signs was also assessed. The efficacy of the messaging was evaluated through the use of Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking of visitor spatial behavior on/off trails. Spatial analysis of GPS tracks revealed statistically significant differences among treatments, with the personal contact treatment yielding significantly less dispersion of visitors on the mountain summit. Results also indicate that the signs deployed in the study were ineffective at limiting off-trail use beyond what can be accomplished with trail markers and directional signs. These findings suggest that personal contact by a uniformed ranger or volunteer may be the most effective means of message delivery for on-site minimum impact education.

  19. Progress report on Safe VISITOR: approaching a practical instrument for terahertz security screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Erik; Born, Detlef; Zieger, Gabriel; May, Torsten; Krause, Torsten; Krüger, Andre; Schulz, Marco; Anders, Solveig; Zakosarenko, Viatcheslav; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Starkloff, Michael; Rößler, Mario; Thorwirth, Guenter; Krause, Ulf

    2010-04-01

    As reported before,1, 2 Safe VISITOR (Safe VISible, Infrared and Terahertz Object recognition) is a German project to build a passive security camera which visualizes sub-mm wavelengths using cooled bolometer arrays. This camera could be used for a variety of application scenarios, such as airport screenings or to protect military camps. In all cases, a practical instrument requires ease of use, in particular a flexible installation and a straightforward usage by the security personnel. Here we present a new generation of Safe VISITOR designed to meet these requirements. The main condition for an effective operation is a high frame rate of the imager. Safe VISITOR is able to record videos up to 10 Hz, using a small array of superconducting bolometers in combination with an opto-mechanical scanner. The required cooling of the detector array is provided by a commercial pulse tube cooler with a second, self-contained cooling stage. The cooling cycle is completely automated; after 10 hours of initial cooling from room temperature the system can operate quasi-continuously. For imaging, a 50 cm diameter optics is used which is able to provide an object resolution of approximately 1.5 cm at 8 m distance. For a flexible installation, the object distance can be tuned manually between 7 and 10 m. Additionally, video streams from two commercial cameras are fused with the sub-mm stream: a CCD for visible light and a microbolometer for far infrared (14 μm). This combines the ability of identification of the person under test with the unprecedented temperature resolution at infrared and the almost perfect transmission at sub-mm. To assist a security official, all image data are displayed in various graphic renditions by a unified system software.

  20. Developing a monitoring protocol for visitor-created informal trails in Yosemite National Park, USA.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yu-Fai; Newburger, Todd; Jones, Marci; Kuhn, Bill; Woiderski, Brittany

    2011-01-01

    Informal trails created or perpetuated by visitors is a management challenge in many protected natural areas such as Yosemite National Park. This is a significant issue as informal trail networks penetrate and proliferate into protected landscapes and habitats, threatening ecological integrity, aesthetics, and visitor experiences. In order to develop effective strategies for addressing this problem under an adaptive management framework, indicators must be developed and monitoring protocol must be established to gather timely and relevant data about the condition, extent, and distribution of these undesired trail segments. This article illustrates a process of developing and evaluating informal trail indicators for meadows in Yosemite Valley. Indicator measures developed in past research were reviewed to identify their appropriateness for the current application. Information gaps in existing indicator measures were addressed by creating two new indices to quantify the degree of informal trailing based on its land fragmentation effects. The selected indicator measures were applied to monitoring data collected between 2006 and 2008. The selected measures and indices were evaluated for their ability to characterize informal trail impacts at site and landscape scales. Results demonstrate the utility of indicator measures in capturing different characteristics of the informal trail problem, though several metrics are strongly related to each other. The two fragmentation indices were able to depict fragmentation without being too sensitive to changes in one constituent parameter. This study points to the need for a multiparameter approach to informal trail monitoring and integration with other monitoring data. Implications for monitoring programs and research are discussed.

  1. Communication about science in a traditional museum: visitors' and staff's perceptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rennie, Léonie J.; Williams, Gina F.

    2006-12-01

    This study investigated visitors' and staff's perceptions about the communication of science in a traditional natural history museum. The research examined the science-related outcomes for adult visitors and explored visitors' and staff's ideas of science and how it is portrayed at the museum. Data were collected by questionnaire and interview from 84 staff and 102 visitors. Both groups held positive views about science, its importance and the need for everyone to understand it. Comparison of visitors' pretest and posttest scores on the questionnaire revealed some significant changes, several suggesting a change to views about science that were less "scientific." Most visitors thought that their ideas about science had not changed as a result of their visit, but they were positive about the museum as a place for learning science. Staff held more "scientific" views about the nature of science than did visitors; they recognized the potential of the museum to educate people about science, but felt it needed to be presented as more relevant and accessible, particularly in terms of science as a cultural practice. Neither staff nor visitors perceived that the museum stimulated visitors to think critically about science. While acknowledging that interpreting complex scientific knowledge into exhibits readily understood by lay visitors and displaying controversy are difficult, these challenges must be addressed if visitors are to be encouraged to think about science and the social, cultural and political contexts which shape it.

  2. Reducing visitor noise levels at Muir Woods National Monument using experimental management.

    PubMed

    Stack, David W; Peter, Newman; Manning, Robert E; Fristrup, Kurt M

    2011-03-01

    Noise impacts resources and visitor experience in many protected natural areas, and visitors can be the dominant source of noise. This experimental study tested the efficacy and acceptability of signs asking visitors to be quiet at Muir Woods National Monument, California. Signs declaring a "quiet zone" (at the park's Cathedral Grove) or a "quiet day" (throughout the park) were posted on a randomized schedule that included control days (no signs). Visitor surveys were conducted to measure the cognitive and behavioral responses of visitors to the signs and test the acceptability of these management practices to visitors. Visitors were highly supportive of these management practices and reported that they consciously limited the amount of noise they produced. Sound level measurements showed substantial decreases on days when signs were posted.

  3. Highly Asynchronous VisitOr Queue Graph Toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Pearce, R.

    2012-10-01

    HAVOQGT is a C++ framework that can be used to create highly parallel graph traversal algorithms. The framework stores the graph and algorithmic data structures on external memory that is typically mapped to high performance locally attached NAND FLASH arrays. The framework supports a vertex-centered visitor programming model. The frameworkd has been used to implement breadth first search, connected components, and single source shortest path.

  4. Visitors Center Educational Programs (Living and Working in Space)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Educational programs at the John C. Stennis Space Center Visitors Center reach more than 30,000 students in grades K-8 each year. Pictured above, a Stennis tour guide conducts a Living and Working in Space program for children at a local mall. This program, and others designed for specific age levels, is offered throughout the school year and summer for visiting students and youth groups.

  5. The effect of visitor number and spice provisioning in pacing expression by jaguars evaluated through a case study.

    PubMed

    Vidal, L S; Guilherme, F R; Silva, V F; Faccio, M C S R; Martins, M M; Briani, D C

    2016-06-01

    Captive animals exhibit stereotypic pacing in response to multiple causes, including the inability to escape from human contact. Environmental enrichment techniques can minimize pacing expression. By using an individual-based approach, we addressed whether the amount of time two males and a female jaguar (Panthera onca) devote to pacing varied with the number of visitors and tested the effectiveness of cinnamon and black pepper in reducing pacing. The amount of time that all jaguars engaged in pacing increased significantly with the number of visitors. Despite the difference between the males regarding age and housing conditions, both devoted significantly less time to pacing following the addition of both spices, which indicates their suitability as enrichment techniques. Mean time devoted to pacing among the treatments did not differ for the female. Our findings pointed out to the validity of individual-based approaches, as they can reveal how suitable olfactory stimuli are to minimizing stereotypies irrespective of particular traits.

  6. The effect of visitor number and spice provisioning in pacing expression by jaguars evaluated through a case study.

    PubMed

    Vidal, L S; Guilherme, F R; Silva, V F; Faccio, M C S R; Martins, M M; Briani, D C

    2016-06-01

    Captive animals exhibit stereotypic pacing in response to multiple causes, including the inability to escape from human contact. Environmental enrichment techniques can minimize pacing expression. By using an individual-based approach, we addressed whether the amount of time two males and a female jaguar (Panthera onca) devote to pacing varied with the number of visitors and tested the effectiveness of cinnamon and black pepper in reducing pacing. The amount of time that all jaguars engaged in pacing increased significantly with the number of visitors. Despite the difference between the males regarding age and housing conditions, both devoted significantly less time to pacing following the addition of both spices, which indicates their suitability as enrichment techniques. Mean time devoted to pacing among the treatments did not differ for the female. Our findings pointed out to the validity of individual-based approaches, as they can reveal how suitable olfactory stimuli are to minimizing stereotypies irrespective of particular traits. PMID:26959957

  7. Visitor reaction to pacing behavior: influence on the perception of animal care and interest in supporting zoological institutions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lance J

    2012-01-01

    Many publications within the field of zoo animal welfare have stated the importance of decreasing stereotypic behavior (e.g., pacing) to help ensure a positive visitor experience. The idea behind these statements is that visitors want to see animals engaged in natural behavior. Additionally, it is thought that watching an animal exhibit species-appropriate behavior could help increase a visitor's connection to wildlife and ultimately their interest in conservation. However, until recently, no information was available to validate such statements. The purpose of this research was to examine people's reaction to viewing an animal engaged in pacing behavior. Participants were randomly selected to fill out a survey after watching a short video of either a tiger pacing or resting (control). Results indicate that having viewed a tiger pacing significantly decreases people's perception of the level of care animals receive at that facility. In addition, people's interest in supporting zoos decreased as a result of viewing this behavior. Results are discussed from an animal welfare, business, and conservation perspective. PMID:21773984

  8. Visitor reaction to pacing behavior: influence on the perception of animal care and interest in supporting zoological institutions.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lance J

    2012-01-01

    Many publications within the field of zoo animal welfare have stated the importance of decreasing stereotypic behavior (e.g., pacing) to help ensure a positive visitor experience. The idea behind these statements is that visitors want to see animals engaged in natural behavior. Additionally, it is thought that watching an animal exhibit species-appropriate behavior could help increase a visitor's connection to wildlife and ultimately their interest in conservation. However, until recently, no information was available to validate such statements. The purpose of this research was to examine people's reaction to viewing an animal engaged in pacing behavior. Participants were randomly selected to fill out a survey after watching a short video of either a tiger pacing or resting (control). Results indicate that having viewed a tiger pacing significantly decreases people's perception of the level of care animals receive at that facility. In addition, people's interest in supporting zoos decreased as a result of viewing this behavior. Results are discussed from an animal welfare, business, and conservation perspective.

  9. Additive Promotion of Viral Internal Ribosome Entry Site-Mediated Translation by Far Upstream Element-Binding Protein 1 and an Enterovirus 71-Induced Cleavage Product

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chuan-Tien; Kung, Yu-An; Li, Mei-Ling; Lee, Kuo-Ming; Liu, Shih-Tung; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    The 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of the enterovirus 71 (EV71) RNA genome contains an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) that is indispensable for viral protein translation. Due to the limited coding capacity of their RNA genomes, EV71 and other picornaviruses typically recruit host factors, known as IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs), to mediate IRES-dependent translation. Here, we show that EV71 viral proteinase 2A is capable of cleaving far upstream element-binding protein 1 (FBP1), a positive ITAF that directly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region to promote viral IRES-driven translation. The cleavage occurs at the Gly-371 residue of FBP1 during the EV71 infection process, and this generates a functional cleavage product, FBP11-371. Interestingly, the cleavage product acts to promote viral IRES activity. Footprinting analysis and gel mobility shift assay results showed that FBP11-371 similarly binds to the EV71 5' UTR linker region, but at a different site from full-length FBP1; moreover, FBP1 and FBP11-371 were found to act additively to promote IRES-mediated translation and virus yield. Our findings expand the current understanding of virus-host interactions with regard to viral recruitment and modulation of ITAFs, and provide new insights into translational control during viral infection. PMID:27780225

  10. SLaP mapper: a webserver for identifying and quantifying spliced-leader addition and polyadenylation site usage in kinetoplastid genomes.

    PubMed

    Fiebig, Michael; Gluenz, Eva; Carrington, Mark; Kelly, Steven

    2014-09-01

    The Kinetoplastida are a diverse and globally distributed class of free-living and parasitic single-celled eukaryotes that collectively cause a significant burden on human health and welfare. In kinetoplastids individual genes do not have promoters, but rather all genes are arranged downstream of a small number of RNA polymerase II transcription initiation sites and are thus transcribed in polycistronic gene clusters. Production of individual mRNAs from this continuous transcript occurs co-transcriptionally by trans-splicing of a ∼39 nucleotide capped RNA and subsequent polyadenylation of the upstream mRNA. SLaP mapper (Spliced-Leader and Polyadenylation mapper) is a fully automated web-service for identification, quantitation and gene-assignment of both spliced-leader and polyadenylation addition sites in Kinetoplastid genomes. SLaP mapper only requires raw read data from paired-end Illumina RNAseq and performs all read processing, mapping, quality control, quantification, and analysis in a fully automated pipeline. To provide usage examples and estimates of the quantity of sequence data required we use RNAseq obtained from two different library preparations from both Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania mexicana to show the number of expected reads that are obtained from each preparation type. SLaP mapper is an easy to use, platform independent webserver that is freely available for use at http://www.stevekellylab.com/software/slap. Example files are provided on the website.

  11. Perceived Effects of Setting Attributes on Visitor Experiences in Wilderness: Variation with Situational Context and Visitor Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, David N.; Hall, Troy E.

    2009-07-01

    Understanding how setting attributes influence the nature of the visitor experience is crucial to effective recreation management. Highly influential attributes are useful indicators to monitor within a planning framework, such as Limits of Acceptable Change. This study sought to identify the setting attributes perceived to have the most profound effect on the ability to have “a real wilderness experience” and to assess the degree to which attribute importance varied with situational context and visitor characteristics. To this end, exiting hikers were surveyed at moderate and very high use trailheads in Alpine Lakes Wilderness, WA (USA), and Three Sisters Wilderness, OR (USA). They were asked about the degree to which encountering varying levels of different setting attributes would add to or detract from their experience. Attributes with the largest range of effect on experience, based on evaluations of different levels, were considered most important. The most influential attributes were litter and several types of campsite interaction—people walking through camp and number of other groups camping close by. The perceived importance of setting attributes did not vary much between wilderness locations with substantially different use levels, suggesting that conclusions are robust and generalizable across wilderness areas. There also was little difference in the perceptions of day and overnight visitors. In contrast, we found substantial variation in the perceived importance of setting attributes with variation in wilderness experience, knowledge, attachment, and motivation. Our results validate the emphasis of many wilderness management plans on indicators of social interaction, such as number of encounters.

  12. High Energy Theory Workshops and Visitors at the Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics FY15

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Aaron T.

    2015-09-18

    The String theory workshop was held from March 4-7, 2015 on the University of Michigan campus. Local organizers were Gordon Kane and Aaron Pierce. Piyush Kumar (Yale), Jim Halverson (KITP), Bobby Acharya (ICTP) and Sven Krippendorf (Oxford) served as external organizers.The meeting focused on the status of work to project 10 or 11 dimensional string/M theories onto our 4 spacetime dimensions (compactification). The workshop had 31 participants, half from outside the U.S. Participants were encouraged to focus on predictions for recent and forthcoming data, particularly for Higgs physics and LHC and dark matter, rather than on the traditional approach of embedding the Standard Model particles and forces. The Higgs boson sympoosium was locally organized by James Wells (chair), Aaron Pierce and Jianming Qian. Additional input in the early stages by Stefan Pokorski (Warsaw) who was unable to attend in the end. The workshop consistent of 22 talks from experts around the world, both theoretical and experimental. Experimentalists summarized the current state of knowledge of the Higgs boson and its varients. The theory talks ranged from technical calculations of Standard Model processes to speculative novel ideas. The YHET visitor program invited weekly young visitors to the University of Michigan campus to present their work. This year 24 participants came under the program, with 17 of them receiving at least partial support for their visits.

  13. Evaluating Education and Science at the KSC Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Lance K.

    2002-01-01

    As part of a two-year NASA-ASEE project, a preliminary evaluation and subsequent recommendations were developed to improve the education and science content of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex exhibits. Recommendations for improvements in those exhibits were based on qualitative descriptions of the exhibits, on comparisons to similar exhibit collections, and on available evaluation processes. Because of the subjective nature of measuring content in a broad group of exhibits and displays, emphasis is placed on employing a survey format for a follow-on, more quantitative evaluation. The use of an external organization for this evaluation development is also recommended to reduce bias and increase validity.

  14. Evaluating Education and Science at the KSC Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Lance K.

    2001-01-01

    As part of a two-year NASA-ASEE project, a preliminary evaluation and subsequent recommendations were developed to improve the education and science content of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex exhibits. Recommendations for improvements in those exhibits were based on qualitative descriptions of the exhibits, on comparisons to similar exhibit collections, and on available evaluation processes. Because of the subjective nature of measuring content in a broad group of exhibits and displays, emphasis is placed on employing a survey format for a follow-on, more quantitative evaluation. The use of an external organization for this evaluation development is also recommended to reduce bias and increase validity.

  15. The Griffith Observatory exhibit programme: Turning visitors into observers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins Petersen, C.; Pine, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    For most Southern Californians and the many visitors who come to Los Angeles, the venerable Griffith Observatory is the shining white building in the Hollywood Hills, once referred to by director E. C. Krupp as "the hood ornament of Los Angeles". It is also familiar to moviegoers in numerous films, most notably the famous James Dean flick, Rebel Without a Cause. Griffith Jenkins Griffith gave funding for construction of the Observatory to the city, as he wanted to create a "people's observatory". Since opening in 1935, the institution has been sharing the skies for free with anyone who wants to see them.

  16. Perinatal mental health: midwives and health visitors working together.

    PubMed

    Halnan, Bridget

    2014-03-01

    The Healthy Child Programme (HCP) focuses on the care offered to pregnant women and children in the first five years of life. It is delivered by a range of professionals, with the health visitor as lead. Effective delivery of the HCP depends on services for children and families being fully integrated, and partnership working between different agencies on a local level seems to be the key to success. This article focuses on how effective implementation of the HCP facilitates the recognition and care of women with anxiety, mild to moderate depression and other perinatal mental disorders during both the antenatal period and after the birth.

  17. Visitor impact assessment and monitoring systems: Evolution and current development

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leung, Y.-F.; Marion, J.L.; Cole, D.N.; Bondrup-Nielsen, Soren

    2002-01-01

    Managers of protected areas are increasingly concerned with recreation impacts to the resource and how they should be managed. Impact management programs must be based on information about the severity and extent of impacts and how they are changing over time. This information need has generated considerable interest in the development of visitor impact assessment and monitoring (VIAM) systems. Over the past three decades VIAM systems have been implemented in various protected areas. This paper provides a historical review of VIAM systems and discusses the current areas of refinement in their methodology. Potential areas of future research are also outlined.

  18. Influence of Visitors' Flows on Indoor Air Quality of Museum Premises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dovgaliuk, Volodymyr; Lysak, Pavlo

    2012-06-01

    The article considers the influence of visitors' flows on indoor air quality of museum premises and work of ventilation and air conditioning systems. The article provides the analysis of the heat input from visitors, the results of mathematical simulation of visitors flow influence on indoor air quality. Several advice options are provided on application of variable air volume systems for provision of constant indoor air quality.

  19. A review of the relationships between visitors and ungulates in national parks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gerald, Wright R.

    1998-01-01

    The growth in ungulate populations and the enhanced viewing opportunities they provide in many national parks, a mixed blessing to park managers, has been viewed positively by most park visitors. Visitors, long the major constituency of parks, have played a major role in the way ungulates are managed. I trace the history of the relationships between visitors and ungulates in parks and provide examples of how visitors have influenced ungulate management policies. Today, although public influence on ungulate management seems to be greater than ever, the public has a poor understanding of park management actions. Park interpretive programs can be used to address this problem.

  20. Categorizing "frequent visitors" in the psychiatric emergency room: a semistructured interview study.

    PubMed

    Buus, Niels

    2011-04-01

    Nurses can become demoralized and hostile toward frequent visitors in psychiatric emergency rooms because of the number of visits. The aim of this study was to develop more knowledge about the ways in which nurses categorize frequent visitors. Eleven nurses were interviewed, and their categorizing practices were examined from a social constructionist perspective. The results showed that the nurses did not categorize frequent visitors as particularly unlikeable or difficult to treat. Like other visitors, they could be categorized as difficult if they obstructed a smooth flow of successful referrals through the emergency room and/or there was poor rapport with the nurses.

  1. What's a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds.

    PubMed

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable about weeds; with >75% correctly defining weeds as 'plants that grow where they are not wanted'. About 10% of the visitors, however, provided their own sophisticated definitions. This capacity to define weeds did not vary with people's age, sex or level of education. We constructed a scale measuring visitors' overall concern about weeds in parks using the responses to ten Likert scale statements. Over 85% of visitors were concerned about weeds with older visitors, hikers, and those who could correctly define weeds more concerned than their counterparts. The majority think visitors unintentionally introduce seeds into parks, with many (63%) having found seeds on their own clothing. However, over a third disposed of these seeds in ways that could facilitate weed spread. Therefore, although most visitors were knowledgeable and concerned about weeds, and support their control, there is a clear need for more effective communication regarding the risk of visitors unintentionally dispersing weed seeds in parks.

  2. Improving health visitor emollient prescribing using a CQUIN-based approach.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Christina; Khatau, Tejas

    2015-12-01

    Prescribing is an essential element of health visiting practice. This initiative used the payment framework of Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) to develop health visiting practice across a large health visiting workforce in the East Midlands. A focus on emollient prescribing practice was agreed and a guidance booklet regarding preferred emollient products was produced, based on the local formulary Each health visitor benefitted from receiving additional training and was given a guidance booklet to inform their practice. Targets were set for each quarter to demonstrate an improved prescribing adherence to the preferred product list.The targets were achieved for each quarter. Prescribing rates and confidence improved across the service. Therefore, it was demonstrated that specific guidance and ongoing support can improve prescribing practice within the health visiting service.

  3. Assessing possible visitor-use impacts on water quality in Yosemite National Park, California.

    PubMed

    Clow, David W; Peavler, Rachael S; Roche, Jim; Panorska, Anna K; Thomas, James M; Smith, Steve

    2011-12-01

    There is concern that visitor-use associated activities, such as bathing, dish washing, wastewater production, and stock animal use near lakes and streams, could cause degradation of water quality in Yosemite National Park. A study was conducted during 2004-2007 to assess patterns in nutrient and Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations in the Merced and Tuolumne Rivers and characterize natural background concentrations of nutrients in the park. Results indicated that nutrient and E. coli concentrations were low, even compared to other undeveloped sites in the United States. A multiple linear regression approach was used to model natural background concentrations of nutrients, with basin characteristics as explanatory variables. Modeled nitrogen concentrations increased with elevation, and modeled phosphorus concentrations increased with basin size. Observed concentrations (±uncertainty) were compared to modeled concentrations (±uncertainty) to identify sites that might be impacted by point sources of nutrients, as indicated by large model residuals. Statistically significant differences in observed and modeled concentrations were observed at only a few locations, indicating that most sites were representative of natural background conditions. The empirical modeling approach used in this study can be used to estimate natural background conditions at any point along a study reach in areas minimally impacted by development, and may be useful for setting water-quality standards in many national parks.

  4. Assessing possible visitor-use impacts on water quality in Yosemite National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clow, David W.; Peavler, Rachael S.; Roche, Jim; Panorska, Anna K.; Thomas, James M.; Smith, Steve

    2011-01-01

    There is concern that visitor-use associated activities, such as bathing, dish washing, wastewater production, and stock animal use near lakes and streams, could cause degradation of water quality in Yosemite National Park. A study was conducted during 2004–2007 to assess patterns in nutrient and Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations in the Merced and Tuolumne Rivers and characterize natural background concentrations of nutrients in the park. Results indicated that nutrient and E. coli concentrations were low, even compared to other undeveloped sites in the United States. A multiple linear regression approach was used to model natural background concentrations of nutrients, with basin characteristics as explanatory variables. Modeled nitrogen concentrations increased with elevation, and modeled phosphorus concentrations increased with basin size. Observed concentrations (±uncertainty) were compared to modeled concentrations (±uncertainty) to identify sites that might be impacted by point sources of nutrients, as indicated by large model residuals. Statistically significant differences in observed and modeled concentrations were observed at only a few locations, indicating that most sites were representative of natural background conditions. The empirical modeling approach used in this study can be used to estimate natural background conditions at any point along a study reach in areas minimally impacted by development, and may be useful for setting water-quality standards in many national parks.

  5. Assessing possible visitor-use impacts on water quality in Yosemite National Park, California.

    PubMed

    Clow, David W; Peavler, Rachael S; Roche, Jim; Panorska, Anna K; Thomas, James M; Smith, Steve

    2011-12-01

    There is concern that visitor-use associated activities, such as bathing, dish washing, wastewater production, and stock animal use near lakes and streams, could cause degradation of water quality in Yosemite National Park. A study was conducted during 2004-2007 to assess patterns in nutrient and Escherichia coli (E. coli) concentrations in the Merced and Tuolumne Rivers and characterize natural background concentrations of nutrients in the park. Results indicated that nutrient and E. coli concentrations were low, even compared to other undeveloped sites in the United States. A multiple linear regression approach was used to model natural background concentrations of nutrients, with basin characteristics as explanatory variables. Modeled nitrogen concentrations increased with elevation, and modeled phosphorus concentrations increased with basin size. Observed concentrations (±uncertainty) were compared to modeled concentrations (±uncertainty) to identify sites that might be impacted by point sources of nutrients, as indicated by large model residuals. Statistically significant differences in observed and modeled concentrations were observed at only a few locations, indicating that most sites were representative of natural background conditions. The empirical modeling approach used in this study can be used to estimate natural background conditions at any point along a study reach in areas minimally impacted by development, and may be useful for setting water-quality standards in many national parks. PMID:21336482

  6. Multi-site study of additive genetic effects on fractional anisotropy of cerebral white matter: comparing meta and mega analytical approaches for data pooling

    PubMed Central

    Kochunov, Peter; Jahanshad, Neda; Sprooten, Emma; Nichols, Thomas E.; Mandl, René C.; Almasy, Laura; Booth, Tom; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Curran, Joanne E.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dimitrova, Rali; Duggirala, Ravi; Fox, Peter T.; Hong, L. Elliot; Landman, Bennett A.; Lemaitre, Hervé; Lopez, Lorna; Martin, Nicholas G.; McMahon, Katie L.; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Olvera, Rene L.; Peterson, Charles P.; Starr, John M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Toga, Arthur W.; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Wright, Margaret J.; Wright, Susan N.; Bastin, Mark E.; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Kahn, René S.; den Braber, Anouk; de Geus, Eco JC; Deary, Ian J.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Williamson, Douglas E.; Blangero, John; van ’t Ent, Dennis; Thompson, Paul M.; Glahn, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Combining datasets across independent studies can boost statistical power by increasing the numbers of observations and can achieve more accurate estimates of effect sizes. This is especially important for genetic studies where a large number of observations are required to obtain sufficient power to detect and replicate genetic effects. There is a need to develop and evaluate methods for joint-analytical analyses of rich datasets collected in imaging genetics studies. The ENIGMA-DTI consortium is developing and evaluating approaches for obtaining pooled estimates of heritability through meta-and mega-genetic analytical approaches, to estimate the general additive genetic contributions to the intersubject variance in fractional anisotropy (FA) measured from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). We used the ENIGMA-DTI data harmonization protocol for uniform processing of DTI data from multiple sites. We evaluated this protocol in five family-based cohorts providing data from a total of 2248 children and adults (ages: 9–85) collected with various imaging protocols. We used the imaging genetics analysis tool, SOLAR-Eclipse, to combine twin and family data from Dutch, Australian and Mexican-American cohorts into one large “mega-family”. We showed that heritability estimates may vary from one cohort to another. We used two meta-analytical (the sample-size and standard-error weighted) approaches and a mega-genetic analysis to calculate heritability estimates across-population. We performed leave-one-out analysis of the joint estimates of heritability, removing a different cohort each time to understand the estimate variability. Overall, meta- and mega-genetic analyses of heritability produced robust estimates of heritability. PMID:24657781

  7. Three-year summary report of biological monitoring at the Southwest Ocean dredged-material disposal site and additional locations off Grays Harbor, Washington, 1990--1992

    SciTech Connect

    Antrim, L.D.; Shreffler, D.K.; Pearson, W.H.; Cullinan, V.I.

    1992-12-01

    The Grays Harbor Navigation Improvement Project was initiated to improve navigation by widening and deepening the federal channel at Grays Harbor. Dredged-material disposal sites were selected after an extensive review process that included inter-agency agreements, biological surveys, other laboratory and field studies, and preparation of environmental impact statements The Southwest Site, was designated to receive materials dredged during annual maintenance dredging as well as the initial construction phase of the project. The Southwest Site was located, and the disposal operations designed, primarily to avoid impacts to Dungeness crab. The Final Environmental Impact Statement Supplement for the project incorporated a Site Monitoring Plan in which a tiered approach to disposal site monitoring was recommended. Under Tier I of the Site Monitoring Plan, Dungeness crab densities are monitored to confirm that large aggregations of newly settled Dungeness crab have not moved onto the Southwest Site. Tier 2 entails an increased sampling effort to determine whether a change in disposal operations is needed. Four epibenthic surveys using beam trawls were conducted in 1990, 1991, and 1992 at the Southwest Site and North Reference area, where high crab concentrations were found in the spring of 1985. Survey results during these three years prompted no Tier 2 activities. Epibenthic surveys were also conducted at two nearshore sites where construction of sediment berms has been proposed. This work is summarized in an appendix to this report.

  8. Interactions between visitors and Formosan macaques (Macaca cyclopis) at Shou-Shan Nature Park, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Minna J; Kao, Chien-Ching; Agoramoorthy, Govindasamy

    2009-03-01

    Ecotourism involving feeding wildlife has raised public attention and is a controversial issue, especially concerning nonhuman primates. Between July 2002 and April 2005, the behavior of monkeys and tourists was collected through scan samplings, focal samplings and behavior samplings at the Shou-Shan Nature Park located in Taiwan's second largest city--Kaohsiung. In addition, the number of tourists and monkeys was counted in different hours and places within the park. Four hundred visitors were interviewed using a questionnaire to gather data on sex, age, purpose and frequency of visit to the park. The number of tourists was significantly higher during weekends than in weekdays in all locations. Humans dominated in the initiation of interspecies interactions--the overall ratio of human-initiated and monkey-initiated interactions was 2.44:1. Human-monkey conflicts accounted for only 16.4% of the total interactions (n=2,166), and adult human males and adult male macaques participated in higher rates than other age/sex groups in these conflicts. Visitors showed more affiliative behavior (15.9%) than agonistic behavior (8%) toward the macaques. In response to visitors' threat or attack, the Formosan macaques mostly showed submissive behavior with bared teeth, squealed or ran away to avoid confrontation (69.1%)--only few responded with counteraggression (18.7%). This study for the first time provided evidence that food provisioning increased both the frequency and duration of aggression among Formosan macaques (P<0.001). During food provisioning, the average frequency and the duration of agonistic events of macaques were more than 4 times higher compared with those without food provisioning. The average frequency of food provision by tourists was 0.73 times/hr--more than twice the incident that monkeys grabbed the food from tourists (0.34 times/hr). If people refrain from feeding monkeys and destroying the city park's natural vegetation, monkeys can be used to educate

  9. Behavioral Analysis of Visitors to a Medical Institution’s Website Using Markov Chain Monte Carlo Methods

    PubMed Central

    Tani, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    keyword “clinic name and regional name,” the probability for a repeated visit to the website and the mammography screening page was negative. In the case of the keyword “clinic name + medical examination,” the visit probability to the website was positive, and the visit probability to the information page was negative. When visitors referred to the keywords “mammography screening,” the visit probability to the mammography screening page was positive (95% highest posterior density interval = 3.38-26.66). Conclusions Further analysis for not only the clinic website but also various other medical institution websites is necessary to build a general inspection model for medical institution websites; we want to consider this in future research. Additionally, we hope to use the results obtained in this study as a prior distribution for future work to conduct higher-precision analysis. PMID:27457537

  10. Estimation of the limitations for surficial water addition above a potential high level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect

    Fewell, M.E.; Sobolik, S.R.; Gauthier, J.H.

    1992-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project is studying Yucca Mountain in southwestern Nevada as a potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Site characterization includes surface-based and underground testing. Analyses have been performed to design site characterization activities with minimal impact on the ability of the site to isolate waste, and on tests performed as part of the characterization process. One activity of site characterization is the construction of an Exploratory Studies Facility, consisting of underground shafts, drifts, and ramps, and the accompanying surface pad facility and roads. The information in this report addresses the following topics: (1) a discussion of the potential effects of surface construction water on repository-performance, and on surface and underground experiments; (2) one-dimensional numerical calculations predicting the maximum allowable amount of water that may infiltrate the surface of the mountain without affecting repository performance; and (3) two-dimensional numerical calculations of the movement of that amount of surface water and how the water may affect repository performance and experiments. The results contained herein should be used with other site data and scientific/engineering judgement in determining controls on water usage at Yucca Mountain. This document contains information that has been used in preparing Appendix I of the Exploratory Studies Facility Design Requirements document for the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project.

  11. Neither Too Young nor Too Old: A Comparison of Visitor Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hood, Marilyn G.; Roberts, Lisa C.

    1994-01-01

    Identification and Characteristics of 2 key visitor groups, seniors aged 55 and older and younger guests aged 18-34, emerged from a visitor study at Chicago's Botanic Garden. Discusses their differing leisure preferences, expectations of the garden, psychographics, demographics, and the impact their distinct leisure interests and values have on…

  12. 22 CFR Appendix C to Part 62 - Update of Information on Exchange-Visitor Program Sponsor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Update of Information on Exchange-Visitor Program Sponsor C Appendix C to Part 62 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Pt. 62, App. C Appendix C to Part 62—Update of Information on...

  13. 22 CFR Appendix C to Part 62 - Update of Information on Exchange-Visitor Program Sponsor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Update of Information on Exchange-Visitor Program Sponsor C Appendix C to Part 62 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Pt. 62, App. C Appendix C to Part 62—Update of Information on...

  14. 22 CFR Appendix C to Part 62 - Update of Information on Exchange-Visitor Program Sponsor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Update of Information on Exchange-Visitor Program Sponsor C Appendix C to Part 62 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Pt. 62, App. C Appendix C to Part 62—Update of Information on...

  15. 22 CFR Appendix C to Part 62 - Update of Information on Exchange-Visitor Program Sponsor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Update of Information on Exchange-Visitor Program Sponsor C Appendix C to Part 62 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Pt. 62, App. C Appendix C to Part 62—Update of Information on...

  16. 22 CFR Appendix C to Part 62 - Update of Information on Exchange-Visitor Program Sponsor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Update of Information on Exchange-Visitor Program Sponsor C Appendix C to Part 62 Foreign Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND EXCHANGES EXCHANGE VISITOR PROGRAM Pt. 62, App. C Appendix C to Part 62—Update of Information on...

  17. 2014 National Park visitor spending effects: economic contributions to local communities, states, and the nation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cullinane Thomas, Catherine; Huber, Christopher; Koontz, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    New this year, results from the Visitor Spending Effects report series are available online via an interactive tool. Users can explore current year visitor spending, jobs, labor income, value added, and output effects by sector for national, state, and local economies. This interactive tool is available via the NPS Social Science Program webpage at http://www.nature.nps.gov/socialscience/economics.cfm.

  18. 77 FR 69648 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board... of the Board The purpose of the Board is to review annually the programs of the National Fire...

  19. 77 FR 5818 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... committee teleconference meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will... of the Board The purpose of the Board is to review annually the programs of the National Fire...

  20. 76 FR 36933 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-23

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board... Board The purpose of the Board is to review annually the programs of the National Fire Academy...

  1. 77 FR 57102 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-17

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will meet on October... programs of the National Fire Academy (Academy) and advise the Administrator of the Federal...

  2. 76 FR 58028 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-19

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will meet on October... Board The purpose of the Board is to review annually the programs of the National Fire Academy...

  3. 77 FR 61775 - Cancellation; Federal Advisory Committee Meeting: Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-11

    ... was published in the September 17, 2012, issue of the Federal Register at 77 FR 57102. Purpose of the... Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY: Federal Emergency Management Agency, DHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting cancellation. SUMMARY: The meeting of the Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy...

  4. 77 FR 41196 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-12

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Committee Teleconference Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will... programs of the National Fire Academy (Academy) and advise the Administrator of the Federal...

  5. 77 FR 21576 - Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy AGENCY... Committee Teleconference Meeting. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors for the National Fire Academy (Board) will... The purpose of the Board is to review annually the programs of the National Fire Academy (Academy)...

  6. An Integrative Suicide Prevention Program for Visitor Charcoal Burning Suicide and Suicide Pact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Paul W. C.; Liu, Patricia M. Y.; Chan, Wincy S. C.; Law, Y. W.; Law, Steven C. K.; Fu, King-Wa; Li, Hana S. H.; Tso, M. K.; Beautrais, Annette L.; Yip, Paul S. F.

    2009-01-01

    An integrative suicide prevention program was implemented to tackle an outbreak of visitor charcoal burning suicides in Cheung Chau, an island in Hong Kong, in 2002. This study evaluated the effectiveness of the program. The numbers of visitor suicides reduced from 37 deaths in the 51 months prior to program implementation to 6 deaths in the 42…

  7. A Study of Use of the New York State Library by Visitors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipetz, Ben-Ami

    Based on data gathered during a full 5-day, 40-hour week of visiting time, this study determined various characteristics of visitors to the New York State Library (NYSL) main facility; e.g., traffic rates, user intent, and user status. Visitors exiting the library were counted, short interviews were conducted with 25 percent of the total visitors…

  8. Coaching via Electronic Performance Feedback to Support Home Visitors' Use of Caregiver Coaching Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krick Oborn, Kellie M.; Johnson, LeAnne D.

    2015-01-01

    Recommended practices for Part C early childhood special education home visitors encourage use of caregiver coaching strategies to enhance learning opportunities within the natural routines of infants and toddlers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a multicomponent professional development intervention on home visitors' use…

  9. 76 FR 70980 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Partially Closed Meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. on December 5, 2011,...

  10. 76 FR 27031 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Partially Closed Meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. on June 6, 2011,...

  11. 77 FR 31591 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-29

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of partially closed meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on June 11,...

  12. 76 FR 10341 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-24

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of partially closed meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. on March 7, 2011,...

  13. 75 FR 51247 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-19

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Partially Closed Meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. on September 13, 2010,...

  14. 77 FR 65870 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of partially closed meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on December 3,...

  15. 75 FR 18167 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of partially closed meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. on June 28, 2010,...

  16. 78 FR 5424 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Partially Closed Meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on March 4,...

  17. 78 FR 53430 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-29

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of partially closed meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on September 30,...

  18. 76 FR 54223 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of partially closed meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. on September 19, 2011,...

  19. 75 FR 68773 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of partially closed meeting. SUMMARY: The U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. on December 6, 2010,...

  20. 77 FR 73974 - Information Collection: Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest Visitor Surveys for Recreation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-12

    ... Forest Service Information Collection: Arapaho-Roosevelt National Forest Visitor Surveys for Recreation... Forest Visitor Surveys for Recreation Transportation System Alternatives Study. OMB Number: 0596-NEW. Expiration Date of Approval: Not applicable. Type of Request: New. Abstract: With over 5.4 million...

  1. 32 CFR 553.22 - Visitors' rules for the Arlington National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Cemetery. 553.22 Section 553.22 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.22 Visitors' rules for the... of all visitors to the Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia. Applicable Army...

  2. 32 CFR 553.22 - Visitors' rules for the Arlington National Cemetery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Cemetery. 553.22 Section 553.22 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY MILITARY RESERVATIONS AND NATIONAL CEMETERIES ARMY NATIONAL CEMETERIES § 553.22 Visitors' rules for the... of all visitors to the Arlington National Cemetery, Arlington, Virginia. Applicable Army...

  3. What’s a Weed? Knowledge, Attitude and Behaviour of Park Visitors about Weeds

    PubMed Central

    Ansong, Michael; Pickering, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Weeds are a major threat to biodiversity globally degrading natural areas of high conservation value. But what are our attitudes about weeds and their management including weeds in national parks? Do we know what a weed is? Do we consider weeds a problem? Do we support their management? Are we unintentionally spreading weeds in parks? To answer these questions, we surveyed visitors entering a large popular national park near the city of Brisbane, Australia. Park visitors were knowledgeable about weeds; with >75% correctly defining weeds as ‘plants that grow where they are not wanted’. About 10% of the visitors, however, provided their own sophisticated definitions. This capacity to define weeds did not vary with people’s age, sex or level of education. We constructed a scale measuring visitors’ overall concern about weeds in parks using the responses to ten Likert scale statements. Over 85% of visitors were concerned about weeds with older visitors, hikers, and those who could correctly define weeds more concerned than their counterparts. The majority think visitors unintentionally introduce seeds into parks, with many (63%) having found seeds on their own clothing. However, over a third disposed of these seeds in ways that could facilitate weed spread. Therefore, although most visitors were knowledgeable and concerned about weeds, and support their control, there is a clear need for more effective communication regarding the risk of visitors unintentionally dispersing weed seeds in parks. PMID:26252004

  4. Recreation in a Zoo Environment: Applying Animal Behavior Research Techniques to Understand How Visitors Allocate Time.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Lisa

    1995-01-01

    A focal-animal sampling technique was applied to measure and quantify visitor behavior at an enclosed hummingbird aviary. The amount of time visitors stayed within the aviary and how they allocated time was measured. Results can be used by exhibit designers to create and modify museum exhibits. (LZ)

  5. Visualizing Biological Data in Museums: Visitor Learning with an Interactive Tree of Life Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horn, Michael S.; Phillips, Brenda C.; Evans, Evelyn Margaret; Block, Florian; Diamond, Judy; Shen, Chia

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigate museum visitor learning and engagement at an interactive visualization of an evolutionary tree of life consisting of over 70,000 species. The study was conducted at two natural history museums where visitors collaboratively explored the tree of life using direct touch gestures on a multi-touch tabletop display. In the…

  6. Exploring Use of New Media in Environmental Education Contexts: Introducing Visitors' Technology Use in Zoos Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yocco, Victor; Danter, Elizabeth H.; Heimlich, Joseph E.; Dunckel, Betty A.; Myers, Chris

    2011-01-01

    Modern zoological gardens have invested substantial resources in technology to deliver environmental education concepts to visitors. Investment in these media reflects a currently unsubstantiated belief that visitors will both use and learn from these media alongside more traditional and less costly displays. This paper proposes a model that…

  7. 77 FR 23466 - Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... of the Secretary Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Defense Acquisition University, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory... advisory committee meeting of the Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors will take place....

  8. 75 FR 8310 - Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Board of Visitors (BoV) Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... of the Secretary Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Board of Visitors (BoV) Meeting AGENCY: Defense Acquisition University, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: The next meeting of the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) Board of Visitors (BoV) will be held at DAU Headquarters at Fort Belvoir, Virginia....

  9. 76 FR 62394 - Meeting of the Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors; Cancellation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... of the Secretary Meeting of the Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors; Cancellation AGENCY: Defense Acquisition University (DAU), Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Notice; cancellation. SUMMARY: On September 22, 2011 (76 FR 58786), the Defense Acquisition University Board of Visitors announced...

  10. 78 FR 36540 - Establishment of the Board of Visitors, Marine Corps University

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... of the Secretary Establishment of the Board of Visitors, Marine Corps University AGENCY: Department... the charter for the Board of Visitors, Marine Corps University (``the Board''). The Board has been... provide independent advice and recommendations on matters relating to the Marine Corps University, as...

  11. 75 FR 22559 - Federal Advisory Committee; Air University Board of Visitors; Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... of the Secretary Federal Advisory Committee; Air University Board of Visitors; Charter Renewal AGENCY... the charter for the Air University Board of Visitors (hereafter referred to as the Board). FOR FURTHER... activities of Air University. The Board shall: a. Review and evaluate the progress of the...

  12. Validation of the Visitor and Resident Framework in an E-Book Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelsmann, Hazel C.; Greifeneder, Elke; Lauridsen, Nikoline D.; Nielsen, Anja G.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: By applying the visitor and resident framework on e-book usage, the article explores whether the concepts of a resident and a visitor can help to explain e-book use, and can help to gain a better insight into users' motivations for e-book use. Method: A questionnaire and semi-structured interviews were conducted with users of…

  13. 78 FR 13141 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Visitor Program Participant Survey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Exchange Visitor Program Participant Survey--Summer Work... Participant Survey--Summer Work Travel Program. OMB Control Number: None. Type of Request: New Collection...: Exchange Visitor Program participants in the Summer Work Travel category. Estimated Number of...

  14. 28 CFR 540.43 - Frequency of visits and number of visitors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT CONTACT WITH PERSONS IN THE COMMUNITY Visiting Regulations § 540.43 Frequency of visits..., to prevent overcrowding in the visiting room or unusual difficulty in supervising a visit. Exceptions... visitor must travel, frequency of the inmate's visits, or health problems of the inmate or visitor....

  15. Dosage versus Distribution: The Support of Docents on Zoo Visitors' Acquisition of Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birney, Barbara A.; Shaha, Steve

    This study hypothesized that: the mode of instruction used at a zoo exhibit and the familiarity (low, medium, high) of an animal to visitors interacts with the amount of knowledge they demonstrate about the animal; a relationship exists between visitors' demonstrated knowledge of an animal of a given level of familiarity and attitude toward…

  16. The generalist Inga subnuda subsp. luschnathiana (Fabaceae): negative effect of floral visitors on reproductive success?

    PubMed

    Avila, R; Pinheiro, M; Sazima, M

    2015-05-01

    Inga species are characterised by generalist or mixed pollination system. However, this feature does not enhance reproductive rates in species with very low fruit set under natural conditions. Some ecological and genetic factors are associated with this feature, and to test the effect of massive visits on pollination success in Inga subnuda subsp. luschnathiana, we studied the efficacy of polyads deposited on stigmas of flowers isolated from visitors and polyads exposed to visitors. The proportion of polyads fixed in stigmas decreased after exposure to visitors (24 h) in comparison to stigmas isolated from visitors (hummingbirds, bees, wasps, hawkmoths and bats), and fruit set was very low. Furthermore, nectar production, sugar composition and other floral biology traits were evaluated. Increased nectar production, sugar availability and sucrose dominance during the night indicates adaptation to nocturnal visitors and supports their role as main pollinators; although the brush-flower morphology, time of anthesis, nectar dynamics and chemical composition also allow daytime visitors. Thus the species is an important resource for a diverse group of floral visitors. We conclude that excess visits (diurnal and nocturnal) are responsible for the decrease in fixed polyads in stigmas of I. subnuda subsp. luschnathiana flowers, thus contributing, with others factors, to its low fruit set. Therefore, the generalist pollination system does not result in reproductive advantages because the low fruit set in natural conditions could be the result of a negative effect of visitors/pollinators.

  17. 77 FR 59221 - Information Collection Activities: Timpanogos Cave National Monument Visitor and Community Survey

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ... that will be used to collect visitors and local community members' perceptions and evaluations of four... the park. The collection will be used to understand visitors and local resident's perceptions and... and community members' perceptions of how each of the above management issue affects their...

  18. Investigating the Impact of Prior Knowledge and Interest on Aquarium Visitor Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, John H.; Adelman, Leslie M.

    2003-01-01

    Explores to what extent and for which visitors do free-choice learning settings accomplish their educational mission. Uses data collected at the National Aquarium in Baltimore to determine whether grouping makes it possible to discern the nature of changes in aquarium visitors' conservation knowledge and attitudes. Discusses the effects of learner…

  19. 76 FR 52013 - Notice of Continuation of Visitor Services-Yosemite National Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... National Park Service Notice of Continuation of Visitor Services--Yosemite National Park AGENCY: National..., the National Park Service intends to request a continuation of visitor services in Yosemite National... Services Program, National Park Service, 1201 Eye Street, NW., 11th Floor, Washington, DC 20005;...

  20. 77 FR 11567 - Notice of Extension of Visitor Services-Mount Rainier National Park

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... National Park Service Notice of Extension of Visitor Services--Mount Rainier National Park AGENCY: National..., the National Park Service intends to request an extension of visitor services in Mount Rainier National Park for a period not to exceed one year from the expiration date of the current contract....

  1. 76 FR 45543 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Register on Tuesday, July 5, 2011 (76 FR 39076) has been cancelled. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY: Department of the Army, DOD. ACTION: Notice; cancellation. SUMMARY: The Board of Visitors, Defense...

  2. 75 FR 47797 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-09

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 43496) has been rescheduled. The Board of Visitors meeting will now be held on September 13 & 14, 2010 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center in Monterey... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center...

  3. Hobby-Related Information-Seeking Behaviour of Highly Dedicated Online Museum Visitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skov, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: This paper explores the characteristics of online museum visitors in an everyday life, information-seeking context. Method: A triangulation of research methods was applied. A Web questionnaire survey gave initial, quantitative information about online museum visitors to a military museum. Follow-up interviews (n = 24) obtained rich,…

  4. Perception of Sacredness at Heritage Religious Sites

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levi, Daniel; Kocher, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Tourism at historic religious sites requires balancing the needs of historic preservation, the tourist experience, and community use of the site. The sacredness of these places is defined by the behaviors that occur there, the experience of users and visitors, and the meanings associated with the place by various groups. This research examines the…

  5. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, shown in this aerial view looking east, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast. It is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top left of the photo. In the foreground is the display of rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Just above that, left to right, can be seen the Theater Complex, Space Flight Exhibit Building and Spaceport Central. Other buildings clustered at the center are the Cafeteria, Souvenir Sales Building, and Ticket Pavilion. To the left of the Theater Complex are the Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and the Shuttle/Gantry mockup. Not seen in the photo is the Center for Space Education.

  6. Titan: a distant but enticing destination for human visitors.

    PubMed

    Nott, Julian

    2009-10-01

    Until recently, very little was known about Saturn's largest satellite, Titan. But that has changed dramatically since the Cassini spacecraft started orbiting in the Saturn system in 2004. Larger than Mercury and with a dense atmosphere, Titan has many of the characteristics of a planet. Indeed, many scientists now see it as the most interesting place in the Solar System for robotic exploration, with many unique features and even the possibility of exotic forms of life. This paper points out that Titan is also a potential destination for humans. With its predominantly nitrogen atmosphere, moderate gravity, and available water and oxygen, it also appears that, once it becomes possible to travel there, it will prove to be much more hospitable for human visitors than any other destination in the Solar System.

  7. Titan: a distant but enticing destination for human visitors.

    PubMed

    Nott, Julian

    2009-10-01

    Until recently, very little was known about Saturn's largest satellite, Titan. But that has changed dramatically since the Cassini spacecraft started orbiting in the Saturn system in 2004. Larger than Mercury and with a dense atmosphere, Titan has many of the characteristics of a planet. Indeed, many scientists now see it as the most interesting place in the Solar System for robotic exploration, with many unique features and even the possibility of exotic forms of life. This paper points out that Titan is also a potential destination for humans. With its predominantly nitrogen atmosphere, moderate gravity, and available water and oxygen, it also appears that, once it becomes possible to travel there, it will prove to be much more hospitable for human visitors than any other destination in the Solar System. PMID:19817245

  8. Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit previews at Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Children on a tour at the KSC Visitor Complex get an early look at the Discovery Channel's Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit, which opens to the public on Saturday, June 17. They are on a re- creation of the deck of Ocean Project, the ship that located and recovered the space capsule from the floor of the Atlantic Ocean. Liberty Bell 7 launched U.S. Air Force Captain Virgil '''Gus''' Grissom July 21, 1961, on a mission that lasted 15 minutes and 37 seconds before sinking. It lay undetected for nearly four decades before a Discovery Channel expedition located it and recovered it. The space capsule, now restored and preserved, is part of an interactive exhibit touring science centers and museums in 12 cities throughout the United States until 2003. The exhibit also includes hands-on elements such as a capsule simulator, a centrifuge, and ROV pilot.

  9. STS-113 visitors watch the Space Shuttle Endeavour launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - Among the visitors watching the launch of Space Shuttle Endeavour on mission STS-113 are NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe (top, center) and Glen Mahone, associate administrator for public affairs, NASA (left of O'Keefe). Liftoff occurred ontime at 7:49:47 p.m. EST. The launch is the 19th for Endeavour, and the 112th flight in the Shuttle program. Mission STS-113 is the 16th assembly flight to the International Space Station, carrying another structure for the Station, the P1 integrated truss. Also onboard are the Expedition 6 crew, who will replace Expedition 5. Endeavour is scheduled to land at KSC after an 11-day journey.

  10. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking northwest, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the top of the photo (left to right). Just below the roadway, from left, can be seen the Center for Space Education, the Theater Complex, Astronaut Memorial, the Post Show Dome, and Shuttle/Gantry mockup. In front of the theater complex are a cluster of buildings that include the Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the left of the complex are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program. Beyond the roadway can be seen the Banana River.

  11. Zoo visitors' understanding of terms denoting research activity.

    PubMed

    Carson, Lloyd

    2014-07-01

    Zoos have increasingly sought to justify their existence by reference to a scientific role particularly in the domains of animal welfare and conservation. Given recent initiatives by the UK government to foster public engagement with science, it is timely to investigate public attitudes towards primary research activity by zoos. This study reports the views of 83 visitors to Edinburgh Zoo. Within certain items in a structured interview noun terms denoting research activity were manipulated ("research" versus "studies") as was their qualification (adjective "scientific" present or absent before the noun term). "Research" was associated with a restricted and negative perception of investigatory activity. This effect was intensified when the noun term was preceded by "scientific". It is concluded that there is a continuing need to challenge public perceptions, particularly of the phrase "scientific research"; that in the meantime zoos should perhaps exercise caution when using it in relation to their activities. PMID:25414921

  12. Aerial view of the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    The Kennedy Space Center Visitor Center, shown in this aerial view looking south, sprawls across 70 acres on Florida's Space Coast , and is located off State Road 405, NASA Parkway, six miles inside the Space Center entrance. SR 405 can be seen at the bottom of the photo. Just above the roadway, from left can be seen the Shuttle/Gantry mockup; the Post Show Dome; the Astronaut Memorial; and to the far right, the Center for Space Education. Behind the Memorial are a cluster of buildings that include the Theater Complex, Cafeteria, Space Flight Exhibit Building, Souvenir Sales Building, Spaceport Central, and Ticket Pavilion. At the upper right are various rockets that have played a significant role in the growth of the space program.

  13. Use of Queensland Hospital services by interstate and overseas visitors.

    PubMed

    Walker, S; Wilks, J; Ring, I; Nicol, J; Oldenburg, B; Mutzelburg, C

    1995-01-01

    In response to concerns about the number of interstate and overseas visitors using Queensland hospital services, the present study examined a sample of 1,295 hospital records to determine the proportion of patients who were incorrectly identified as Queensland residents. Across six hospitals the overall detection rate was 4.6%. Rates varied between hospitals, with the highest detection recorded for Goondiwindi near the Queensland/New South Wales border; and the lowest for Prince Charles in Brisbane. There were also important variations across hospitals based on specific holiday periods. In particular, Goondiwindi and the Gold Coast had substantially higher detection rates for the Christmas holiday period (December-January) than for the mid-year period (June-August). These findings are discussed in terms of their implications for hospital services, especially lost revenue and increased patient load. Health information managers are identified as a key group for addressing some of the current problems in this area.

  14. Frequent visitors to psychiatric emergency services: staff attitudes and temporal patterns.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Cynthia; Zeman, Lori Lackman; Yeager, Lindsay; Mischel, Edward; Amirsadri, Alireza

    2002-11-01

    Providing quality psychiatric emergency services is becoming more difficult as utilization rates soar, especially by individuals who are frequent visitors. To address this issue, a staff survey and analysis of admission patterns were conducted. Staff were more likely to believe that frequent visitors sought care because they had difficulty accessing alternative services, had basic needs unmet, were substance abusers, wanted inpatient admission, and were noncompliant with treatment plans. The 1999 temporal admission pattern documented that frequent visitors' admissions were higher during the first week of the month and inclement weather. Surprisingly, the infrequent visitors' admissions also were higher during the first week of the month. Together, these findings suggest that, in this urban location, frequent visitors are disadvantaged individuals lacking support and alternative treatment settings who use psychiatric emergency services to meet basic needs.

  15. Visitor survey results for the Souris River Loop National Wildlife Refuges: Completion report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Koontz, Lynne; Stewart, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    In support of the CCP planning effort for the Souris River Loop Refuges, the Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch/Fort Collins Science Center (PASA) of the U.S. Geological Survey conducted visitor surveys at three refuges in North Dakota: Des Lacs, J. Clark Salyer, and Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuges. This research was conducted in order to assess visitor experience, perceptions, and preferences and visitor spending related to recreation on these public lands. This baseline information and input is needed by the refuges to inform their CCP process. Specifically, this survey research assesses the characteristics of visitors and their trips, the activities in which visitors engage while on the refuge, details regarding their trip experience, as well as their preferences and attitudes about various management features, including existing and future conditions. 

  16. The Whereabouts of Flower Visitors: Contrasting Land-Use Preferences Revealed by a Country-Wide Survey Based on Citizen Science

    PubMed Central

    Deguines, Nicolas; Julliard, Romain; de Flores, Mathieu; Fontaine, Colin

    2012-01-01

    Background In the past decade, accumulating evidence of pollinator decline has raised concerns regarding the functioning of terrestrial ecosystems and the sustainability of crop production. Although land-use changes have been advanced as the major causes, the affinities of most wild pollinators with the main land-use types remain unknown. Filling this gap in our knowledge is a prerequisite to improving conservation and management programmes. Methodology/Principal Findings We estimated the affinity of flower visitors with urban, agricultural and natural land-uses using data from a country-wide scale monitoring scheme based on citizen science (Spipoll). We tested whether the affinities differed among insect orders and according to insect frequency (frequent or infrequent). Our results indicate that the affinities with the three land-use types differed among insect orders. Apart from Hymenopterans, which appeared tolerant to the different land-uses, all flower visitors presented a negative affinity with urban areas and a positive affinity with agricultural and natural areas. Additionally, infrequent taxa displayed a lower affinity with urban areas and a higher affinity with natural areas than did frequent taxa. Within frequent taxa, Hymenoptera and Coleoptera included specialists of the three land-use types whereas Diptera and Lepidoptera contained specialists of all but urban areas. Conclusions/Significance Our approach allowed the first standardised evaluation of the affinity of flower visitors with the main land-use types across a broad taxonomical range and a wide geographic scope. Our results suggest that the most detrimental land-use change for flower visitor communities is urbanisation. Moreover, our findings highlight the fact that agricultural areas have the potential to host highly diverse pollinator communities. We suggest that policy makers should, therefore, focus on the implementation of pollinator-friendly practices in agricultural lands. This may be a

  17. 8 CFR 214.12 - Preliminary enrollment of schools in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). 214.12 Section 214.12 Aliens and Nationality... of schools in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). (a) Private elementary and... schools are eligible for preliminary enrollment in Student and Exchange Visitor Information System...

  18. An Empirical Investigation of the Relationships between Service Quality, Satisfaction and Behavioral Intentions among Visitors to a Wildlife Refuge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tian-Cole, Shu; Crompton, John L.; Willson, Victor L.

    2002-01-01

    Collected data from wildlife refuge visitors to examine relationships between service quality, satisfaction, and behavioral intentions. Specific psychological benefits visitors obtained from the visit did not significantly contribute to perceptions of service quality. Results verified the existence of service quality and visitor satisfaction at…

  19. Higher pollinator effectiveness by specialist than generalist flower-visitors of unspecialized Knautia arvensis (Dipsacaceae).

    PubMed

    Larsson, Magnus

    2005-12-01

    A critical issue in pollination ecology is the evolution of generalist pollination systems, and under which conditions floral specializations evolve from these. The gynodioecious herb Knautia arvensis (Dipsacaceae) exhibits a generalized pollination system, but is visited by both generalist and specialist flower-visitors. The present study tested pollinator effectiveness and pollinator importance of the pollen specialist solitary bee Andrena hattorfiana (Andrenidae) vs. the generalist flower-visitors to K. arvensis on the island of Oland, SE Sweden. Females of the specialist bee removed more pollen per inflorescence-visit than the major groups of generalist visitors such as bumblebees and flies. They also deposited more pollen per inflorescence-visit than any of the generalist visitor groups. The females have a preference for pollen-presenting vs. stigma-presenting inflorescences, a pattern shared with most of the generalist flower-visitors. Females of the specialist exert such a strong preference that they, despite their great pollinator effectiveness, make modest contribution to pollen transfer in K. arvensis. The females of A. hattorfiana accounted for 14.2% of the overall visits and 5.8% of the total pollination, the rest being performed by generalist visitors and males of A. hattorfiana. This study shows that pollinator effectiveness of a specialist can be superior while generalist flower-visitors select floral characters towards generalization through their greater contribution to overall pollen flow.

  20. Challenges in health visitor prescribing in a London primary care trust.

    PubMed

    Thurtle, Val

    2007-11-01

    In this primary care trust there was limited health visitor prescribing. A case study approach sought to identify reasons for this, to lead to recommendations and changes to develop health visitor prescribing. The situation was examined using qualitative methods to consider the opportunities and challenges in health visitor prescribing. Semi-structured interviews with eighteen health visitors and managers explored their views of health visitor prescribing and its position within the PCT. The findings demonstrated only three health visitors prescribed; yet the majority were positive about prescribing, both for clients and health visitor development. Practitioners recognised their difficult working context and felt that organisational systems were not supportive of prescribing. A culture of prescribing was not felt to be in evidence, but was seen as a realistic possibility. Recommendations for change focused on the organisation and practitioners, with improved communication and structures supportive of prescribing. There was a need for practitioners to be active in learning so that they could share knowledge, experience and commitment to prescribing in locally based groups. PMID:18064850

  1. Generalization versus Specialization in Pollination Systems: Visitors, Thieves, and Pollinators of Hypoestes aristata (Acanthaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Padyšáková, Eliška; Bartoš, Michael; Tropek, Robert; Janeček, Štěpán

    2013-01-01

    Many recent studies have suggested that the majority of animal-pollinated plants have a higher diversity of pollinators than that expected according to their pollination syndrome. This broad generalization, often based on pollination web data, has been challenged by the fact that some floral visitors recorded in pollination webs are ineffective pollinators. To contribute to this debate, and to obtain a contrast between visitors and pollinators, we studied insect and bird visitors to virgin flowers of Hypoestes aristata in the Bamenda Highlands, Cameroon. We observed the flowers and their visitors for 2-h periods and measured the seed production as a metric of reproductive success. We determined the effects of individual visitors using 2 statistical models, single-visit data that were gathered for more frequent visitor species, and frequency data. This approach enabled us to determine the positive as well as neutral or negative impact of visitors on H. aristata’s reproductive success. We found that (i) this plant is not generalized but rather specialized; although we recorded 15 morphotaxa of visitors, only 3 large bee species seemed to be important pollinators; (ii) the carpenter bee Xylocopa cf. inconstans was both the most frequent and the most effective pollinator; (iii) the honey bee Apis mellifera acted as a nectar thief with apparent negative effects on the plant reproduction; and (iv) the close relationship between H. aristata and carpenter bees was in agreement with the large-bee pollination syndrome of this plant. Our results highlight the need for studies detecting the roles of individual visitors. We showed that such an approach is necessary to evaluate the pollination syndrome hypothesis and create relevant evolutionary and ecological hypotheses. PMID:23593135

  2. Providing Hands on Experiences to Museum Visitors to Explore and Learn about Earthquakes and their Impacts in the Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, S. E.; Schiffman, C. R.; Butler, R. F.; Farley, M.; Frankel, S.; Hunter, N.; Lillie, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Over the past ten years, UNAVCO has developed a suite of learning materials for formal undergraduate and grades 6-12 classroom environments, integrating GPS data from the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) to explore Earth science processes. To make complex Earth processes accessible to general audiences, UNAVCO has designed a multi-component visiting museum exhibit that explores the tectonic setting of the United States Pacific Northwest, hazards of living on a plate boundary, and the technologies being used to study the plate motion and in the future, help communities become more resilient to the impacts of earthquakes. This exhibit was installed in Fall 2013 at the Oregon State University (OSU) Hatfield Marine Science Center (HMSC) in Newport, Oregon. Through multiple hands-on elements, visitors to the HMSC exhibit explore and experience the build up and release of strain in the region, along with some of the technologies used to measure these changes. In one component, visitors compress a model of the Pacific Northwest to feel the build up of strain in the landscape and observe the movement of land over time. Supporting panels connect this movement to the measurements currently being observed by the network of PBO and other GPS stations in the Pacific Northwest. In another component, visitors learn about the recurrence interval for earthquakes at the Juan De Fuca - North America plate boundary by turning a handle to slowly move and compress plates until a simulated earthquake occurs. A related component explores how an earthquake early warning system (EEWS) of the future might combine seismic data collected by both seismometers and real time GPS to allow people and communities time to prepare for oncoming ground shaking and tsunami after an earthquake. Several technologies are also highlighted throughout the exhibit, including information panels that compare the accuracy of high precision GPS with smartphone technologies. Additionally, models of a full

  3. The influence of visitor interaction on the behavior of captive crowned lemurs (Eulemur coronatus) and implications for welfare.

    PubMed

    Jones, H; McGregor, P K; Farmer, H L A; Baker, K R

    2016-05-01

    Research suggests that zoo visitors can have positive, negative, and neutral impacts on captive primate welfare; however, research investigating the implications of visitor-animal feeding experiences is extremely limited. In the UK, a large proportion of BIAZA zoos that house lemur species offer visitor interaction experiences (16 out of 33). This study investigated the impact on the behavior of a family group of crowned lemurs (Eulemur coronatus) housed at Newquay Zoo, UK of visitors, accompanied by a keeper, entering the enclosure to feed the lemurs. Behavior was observed under four conditions: (i) during visitor feed; (ii) 30 min post-visitor feed; (iii) during a keeper feed; and (iv) 30 min post-keeper feed. Keeper feeds were conducted by keepers only, on the day after visitor feeds. The lemur group spent significantly less time performing aggressive behavior and was also significantly more interactive with keepers during visitor feeds compared with keeper-only feeds. There was no significant difference in behaviors performed immediately after interacting with visitors. Over the study period, there was a tendency for interactions with visitors to increase, and for interactions with keepers during visitor feeds to decrease. After a 28-day interval without visitor interaction, the lemurs' interaction with visitors had returned to the level recorded at the start of the study. In conclusion, visitor interaction did not compromise the welfare of the study subjects in either the short- or long-term, while an increase in visitor interactions over time has interesting implications for the enrichment properties of, or habituation to, unfamiliar humans. Zoo Biol. 35:222-227, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. The influence of visitor interaction on the behavior of captive crowned lemurs (Eulemur coronatus) and implications for welfare.

    PubMed

    Jones, H; McGregor, P K; Farmer, H L A; Baker, K R

    2016-05-01

    Research suggests that zoo visitors can have positive, negative, and neutral impacts on captive primate welfare; however, research investigating the implications of visitor-animal feeding experiences is extremely limited. In the UK, a large proportion of BIAZA zoos that house lemur species offer visitor interaction experiences (16 out of 33). This study investigated the impact on the behavior of a family group of crowned lemurs (Eulemur coronatus) housed at Newquay Zoo, UK of visitors, accompanied by a keeper, entering the enclosure to feed the lemurs. Behavior was observed under four conditions: (i) during visitor feed; (ii) 30 min post-visitor feed; (iii) during a keeper feed; and (iv) 30 min post-keeper feed. Keeper feeds were conducted by keepers only, on the day after visitor feeds. The lemur group spent significantly less time performing aggressive behavior and was also significantly more interactive with keepers during visitor feeds compared with keeper-only feeds. There was no significant difference in behaviors performed immediately after interacting with visitors. Over the study period, there was a tendency for interactions with visitors to increase, and for interactions with keepers during visitor feeds to decrease. After a 28-day interval without visitor interaction, the lemurs' interaction with visitors had returned to the level recorded at the start of the study. In conclusion, visitor interaction did not compromise the welfare of the study subjects in either the short- or long-term, while an increase in visitor interactions over time has interesting implications for the enrichment properties of, or habituation to, unfamiliar humans. Zoo Biol. 35:222-227, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27142724

  5. Visitor effects on the behavior of captive Western lowland gorillas: the importance of individual differences in examining welfare.

    PubMed

    Stoinski, Tara S; Jaicks, Hannah F; Drayton, Lindsey A

    2012-01-01

    Given the conflicting and somewhat limited findings available on the effect of zoo visitors on primate behavior, the primary purpose of this study was to provide additional data on gorillas' response to variations in crowd size and to look at what other factors-both intrinsic (e.g. personality, sex, and rearing history) and extrinsic (e.g. group)-might influence such responses. Subjects included four groups (three mixed-sex and one bachelor) of captive western lowland gorillas living at Zoo Atlanta. Overall activity budgets and rates of social behaviors in high and low crowd conditions were compared. Behaviors suggestive of general welfare did not vary as a function of crowd size alone, although we did observe one significant interaction and several trends. Specifically, two groups spent more time engaged in undesirable behaviors in the high crowd condition, whereas the other two groups showed the opposite response pattern. Additionally, males, but not females, showed a trend toward greater rates of contact aggression in the high crowd condition, although wounding rates did not vary with crowd size. We also found trends towards variation in response to crowd size as a function of individual personality ratings. These results suggest that although the visitor effect may constitute an impediment to optimal animal welfare, this may only apply to some individuals or groups. We emphasize the importance of continuing to explore individual differences and the limitations of a one-size-fits-all approach when describing influences on animal welfare. PMID:22038867

  6. cis-Acting sequences in addition to donor and acceptor sites are required for template switching during synthesis of plus-strand DNA for duck hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Havert, M B; Loeb, D D

    1997-01-01

    A characteristic of all hepadnaviruses is the relaxed-circular conformation of the DNA genome within an infectious virion. Synthesis of the relaxed-circular genome by reverse transcription requires three template switches. These template switches, as for the template switches or strand transfers of other reverse-transcribing genetic elements, require repeated sequences (the donor and acceptor sites) between which a complementary strand of nucleic acid is transferred. The mechanism for each of the template switches in hepadnaviruses is poorly understood. To determine whether sequences other than the donor and acceptor sites are involved in the template switches of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a series of molecular clones which express viral genomes bearing deletion mutations were analyzed. We found that three regions of the DHBV genome, which are distinct from the donor and acceptor sites, are required for the synthesis of relaxed-circular DNA. One region, located near the 3' end of the minus-strand template, is required for the template switch that circularizes the genome. The other two regions, located in the middle of the genome and near DR2, appear to be required for plus-strand primer translocation. We speculate that these cis-acting sequences may play a role in the organization of the minus-strand DNA template within the capsid particle so that it supports efficient template switching during plus-strand DNA synthesis. PMID:9188603

  7. Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit previews at Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Media gather at the KSC Visitor Complex for the kickoff of the Discovery Channel's Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit, which will open to the public on Saturday, June 17. At the podium is Mike Quattrone, executive vice president and general manager, Discovery Channel. Standing to the left of the podium is Rick Abramson, president and chief operating officer of Delaware North Parks Services of Spaceport, Inc., and far left, Jim Jennings, deputy director of Kennedy Space Center. Liberty Bell 7 launched U.S. Air Force Captain Virgil '''Gus''' Grissom July 21, 1961 on a mission that lasted 15 minutes and 37 seconds before sinking to the floor of the Atlantic Ocean, three miles deep. It lay undetected for nearly four decades before a Discovery Channel expedition located it and recovered it. The space capsule is now restored and preserved, and part of an interactive exhibit touring science centers and museums in 12 cities throughout the United States until 2003. The exhibit includes hands-on elements such as a capsule simulator, a centrifuge, and ROV pilot.

  8. Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit previews at Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The Discovery Channel's Liberty Bell 7 Space Capsule Exhibit, which opens to the public at the KSC Visitor Complex on Saturday, June 17, had a preview for the press today. Liberty Bell 7 launched U.S. Air Force Captain Virgil 'Gus' Grissom July 21, 1961, on a mission that lasted 15 minutes and 37 seconds before sinking. The capsule lay undetected for nearly four decades before a Discovery Channel expedition located it and recovered it. Standing in front of the restored Liberty Bell 7 capsule are (left to right) KSC's Deputy Director Jim Jennings; Gunther Wendt, who worked on the Liberty Bell 7 before its launch; Jim Lewis, who piloted the Hunt Club 1 helicopter that rescued Gus Grissom; and Larry Grissom, brother of Gus Grissom. The space capsule, now restored and preserved, is part of an interactive exhibit touring science centers and museums in 12 cities throughout the United States until 2003. The exhibit also includes hands-on elements such as a capsule simulator, a centrifuge, and ROV pilot.

  9. Developing a fidelity assessment instrument for nurse home visitors.

    PubMed

    Black, Kirsten J; Wenger, Mary Beth; O' Fallon, Molly

    2015-06-01

    Fidelity monitoring is a core component for successful translation of evidence-based interventions, yet little guidance is available on developing tools to assess intervention fidelity that are valid and feasible for use in community settings. We partnered with nurses in the field to develop a fidelity monitoring instrument that would capture the essential elements of the nursing intervention that is the core of Nurse-Family Partnership, a prenatal and early childhood home visitation program. Using a grounded approach, we employed concept mapping to identify the salient behavioral characteristics associated with the program, and then, adapting Dreyfus' model of skill development, created a tool to assess nurse home visitors (NHVs) according to their stage of growth. In a pilot, the Nursing Practice Assessment (NPA) form was used to assess 188 NHVs. The average time to complete the tool was 1 hour, and skill development stage was concordant with years of NHV experience. According to surveys of supervisors and NHVs, the tool captured the essential elements of the program model. Articulating the essential elements of each skill development stage can provide a foundation for professional development for NHVs. In response to feedback, online training modules were developed prior to large-scale implementation in the field. The grounded methods used to develop the NPA enhanced its internal consistency and implementation feasibility and could be utilized by other public health nursing programs.

  10. Developing a fidelity assessment instrument for nurse home visitors.

    PubMed

    Black, Kirsten J; Wenger, Mary Beth; O' Fallon, Molly

    2015-06-01

    Fidelity monitoring is a core component for successful translation of evidence-based interventions, yet little guidance is available on developing tools to assess intervention fidelity that are valid and feasible for use in community settings. We partnered with nurses in the field to develop a fidelity monitoring instrument that would capture the essential elements of the nursing intervention that is the core of Nurse-Family Partnership, a prenatal and early childhood home visitation program. Using a grounded approach, we employed concept mapping to identify the salient behavioral characteristics associated with the program, and then, adapting Dreyfus' model of skill development, created a tool to assess nurse home visitors (NHVs) according to their stage of growth. In a pilot, the Nursing Practice Assessment (NPA) form was used to assess 188 NHVs. The average time to complete the tool was 1 hour, and skill development stage was concordant with years of NHV experience. According to surveys of supervisors and NHVs, the tool captured the essential elements of the program model. Articulating the essential elements of each skill development stage can provide a foundation for professional development for NHVs. In response to feedback, online training modules were developed prior to large-scale implementation in the field. The grounded methods used to develop the NPA enhanced its internal consistency and implementation feasibility and could be utilized by other public health nursing programs. PMID:25778796

  11. An Interactive Exhibition about Animal Skeletons: Did the Visitors Learn Any Zoology?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnicliffe, Sue Dale; Laterveer-de Beer, Manon

    2002-01-01

    Explores museum visitors' understanding of skeleton exhibits and whether such exhibits increase their understanding of the zoology displayed. The exhibition under study focused on the diversity of vertebrae skeletons which were arranged according to the mode of locomotion. (DDR)

  12. U.N. Tightens Safe Sex Guidelines for Visitors to Zika Zones

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_160807.html U.N. Tightens Safe Sex Guidelines for Visitors to Zika Zones Male and ... travelers, with or without symptoms, should practice safe sex or abstinence for 6 months after return To ...

  13. Ames Director William 'Bill' Ballhaus (center left) joins visitor Sir Jeffrey Pope from Royla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Ames Director William 'Bill' Ballhaus (center left) joins visitor Sir Jeffrey Pope from Royla Aircraft Industry, England (center right) at the NAS Facility Cray 2 computer with Ron Deiss, NAS Deputy Manager (L) and Vic Peterson, Ames Deputy Director (R).

  14. Minimising visitor impacts to protected areas: The efficacy of low impact education programmes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marion, J.L.; Reid, S.E.

    2007-01-01

    Protected area managers, tourism providers, and other organisations commonly employ education programmes to address visitation-related impairment of natural and cultural resources, social conditions, and neighbouring communities. These programmes have different names (Leave No Trace, Codes of Conduct, Environmental Guidelines for Tourists) but share common objectives: to sustain opportunities for high quality visitor experiences while avoiding or minimising associated negative impacts to protected area resources, visitor experiences, and park neighbours. Theoretical and empirical research studies in the United States are reviewed to evaluate the efficacy of educational efforts that seek to encourage adoption of low impact behaviours. Findings reveal that most of the visitor education efforts evaluated did effectively alter visitor knowledge, behaviour and/or resource and social conditions in the intended direction. These findings, including discussions of message content, delivery, audience characteristics and theoretical grounding, provide insights for improving the efficacy of future educational efforts.

  15. Thai visitors' expectations and experiences of explainer interaction within a science museum context.

    PubMed

    Kamolpattana, Supara; Chen, Ganigar; Sonchaeng, Pichai; Wilkinson, Clare; Willey, Neil; Bultitude, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In Western literature, there is evidence that museum explainers offer significant potential for enhancing visitors' learning through influencing their knowledge, content, action, behaviour and attitudes. However, little research has focused on the role of explainers in other cultural contexts. This study explored interactions between visitors and museum explainers within the setting of Thailand. Two questionnaires were distributed to 600 visitors and 41 museum explainers. The results demonstrated both potential similarities and differences with Western contexts. Explainers appeared to prefer didactic approaches, focussing on factual knowledge rather than encouraging deep learning. Two-way communication, however, appeared to be enhanced by the use of a 'pseudo-sibling relationship' by explainers. Traditional Thai social reserve was reduced through such approaches, with visitors taking on active learning roles. These findings have implications for training museum explainers in non-Western cultures, as well as museum communication practice more generally.

  16. Space Day 2002; Directors Breakfast @ NASA Ames Visitors Center for student Winners of Santa Clara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Space Day 2002; Directors Breakfast @ NASA Ames Visitors Center for student Winners of Santa Clara Valley Science & Engineering Fair and San Francisco Bay Aera Science Fair (Students are addressed by Bob Rosen, Ames Associate Director for Aerospace Programs)

  17. Highlighting high performance: Zion National Park Visitor Center, a sustainable building for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Torcellini, P.

    2000-08-11

    Zion National Park Visitor Center incorporated a variety of energy-efficient features into its design to address Zion's specific needs. The design blended with the canyon's unique qualities and will save energy and operation costs at the center.

  18. 76 FR 28960 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-19

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Defense Intelligence College, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of... a closed meeting of the Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board...

  19. 77 FR 32952 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: Department of Defense, Defense Intelligence Agency, National Intelligence... a closed meeting of the Defense Intelligence Agency National Intelligence University Board...

  20. 75 FR 76423 - Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... of the Secretary Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board of Visitors Closed Meeting AGENCY: National Defense Intelligence College, Defense Intelligence Agency, Department of... a closed meeting of the Defense Intelligence Agency National Defense Intelligence College Board...

  1. 76 FR 14950 - Cancellation of Open Meeting of the National Defense University Board of Visitors (BOV)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Defense University Board of Visitors on January 10, 2011 (76 FR 1408). The meeting previously scheduled to.... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Dolores Hodge @ (202) 685-0082, Fax (202) 685-7707 or...

  2. National wildlife refuge visitor survey 2010/2011: Individual refuge results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Dietsch, Alia M.; Don Carlos, Andrew W.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Solomon, Adam N.; Miller, Holly M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System), established in 1903 and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 556 national wildlife refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts more than 45 million visitors annually, including 25 million people per year to observe and photograph wildlife, over 9 million to hunt and fish, and more than 10 million to participate in educational and interpretation programs. Understanding visitors and characterizing their experiences on national wildlife refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. The Service collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The survey was conducted to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. The survey results will inform Service performance planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCPs), Visitor Services, and Transportation Planning processes. This data series consists of 53 separate data files. Each file describes the results of the survey for an individual refuge and contains the following information: * Introduction: An overview of the Refuge System and the goals of the national surveying effort. * Methods: The procedures for the national surveying effort, including selecting refuges, developing the survey instrument, contacting visitors, and guidance for interpreting the results. * Refuge Description: A brief description of the refuge location, acreage, purpose, recreational activities, and visitation statistics, including a map (where available) and refuge website link

  3. Hosting an `Ask the Astronomer' Site on the Internet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenwald, S. F.

    1996-12-01

    Since 1995, the World Wide Web has explosively evolved into a significant medium for dispensing astronomical information to the general public. In addition to the numerous image archives that have proliferated, an increasing number of sites invite visitors to pose questions about astronomy and receive answers provided by professional astronomers. In this paper, I describe the operation of an Ask the Astronomer site that was opened on the WWW during August, 1995 as part of an astronomy education resource area called the "Astronomy Cafe" (URL=http://www2.ari.net/home/odenwald/cafe.html). The Astronomy Cafe includes a number of documents describing: a career in astronomy; how research papers are written; essays about cosmology, hyperspace and infrared astronomy; and the results from a 100-question, just for fun, personality test which distinguishes astronomers from non-astronomers. The Ask the Astronomer site is operated by a single astronomer through private donations and is now approaching its 500th day of operation. It contains over 2000+ questions and answers with a growth rate of 5 - 10 questions per day. It has attracted 70,000 visitors who are responsible for nearly 1 million 'hits' during the site's lifetime. The monthly statistics provide a unique survey of the kinds of individuals and organizations who visit Ask the Astronomer-type web sites, moreover, the accumulated questions provide a diagnostic X-ray into the public mind in the area of astronomy. I will present an analysis of the user demographics, and the types of questions that appear to be the most frequently asked. A paper copy of the complete index of these questions will be available for inspection.

  4. Using synoptic weather types to predict visitor attendance at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perkins, David R.

    2016-02-01

    Defining an ideal "tourism climate" has been an often-visited research topic where explanations have evolved from global- to location-specific indices tailored to tourists' recreational behavior. Unfortunately, as indices become increasingly specific, they are less translatable across geographies because they may only apply to specific activities, locales, climates, or populations. A key need in the future development of weather and climate indices for tourism has been a translatable, meteorologically based index capturing the generalized ambient atmospheric conditions yet considering local climatology. To address this need, this paper tests the applicability of the spatial synoptic classification (SSC) as a tool to predict visitor attendance response in the tourism, recreation, and leisure (TRL) sector across different climate regimes. Daily attendance data is paired with the prevailing synoptic weather condition at Atlanta and Indianapolis zoological parks from September 2001 to June 2011, to review potential impacts ambient atmospheric conditions may have on visitor attendances. Results indicate that "dry moderate" conditions are most associated with high levels of attendance and "moist polar" synoptic conditions are most associated with low levels of attendance at both zoological parks. Comparing visitor response at these zoo locations, visitors in Indianapolis showed lower levels of tolerance to synoptic conditions which were not "ideal." Visitors in Indianapolis also displayed more aversion to "polar" synoptic regimes while visitors in Atlanta displayed more tolerance to "moist tropical" synoptic regimes. Using a comprehensive atmospheric measure such as the SSC may be a key to broadening application when assessing tourism climates across diverse geographies.

  5. Visitor assessment of the mandatory alternative transportation system at Zion National Park.

    PubMed

    Mace, Britton L; Marquit, Joshua D; Bates, Scott C

    2013-11-01

    Transportation infrastructure in national parks has historically been designed for the automobile. With more vehicles in the parks, visitors found themselves in circumstances more reminiscent of a city than a park. Traffic jams, overcrowding, illegal parking, horn honking, and idling vehicles became common, creating stress and contributing to air and noise pollution, the very things visitors were hoping to get away from. Park managers began searching for alternatives, including shuttle systems. Many national parks have implemented optional shuttle systems, but relatively few have completely closed roads to vehicles, transporting visitors on mandatory shuttles. Zion National Park instituted a mandatory shuttle system in May 2000 to relieve crowding and congestion in the main canyon and to protect natural resources. Taking a longitudinal approach, attributes of the shuttle (e.g., crowding, accessibility, freedom, efficiency, preference, and success) were assessed with experiential park factors (e.g., scenic beauty, naturalness, solitude, tranquility, air quality, and soundscape) in 2000, 2003, and 2010 by surveying shuttle-riding park visitors. While visitors initially reported a few reservations about the shuttle system, by 2003, the majority rated the system successful. Ratings of all shuttle-related variables, except crowding, improved over the decade. Improvements were greatest for freedom, accessibility, and efficiency. Multiple regression found overall shuttle success to be mediated by preference, freedom, accessibility, efficiency, and comfort. Experiential variables assessing park conditions followed a similar pattern, with improved ratings as the decade progressed. Results provide important insights into the visitor experience with mandatory alternative shuttle systems in national parks. PMID:24036600

  6. Visitor Assessment of the Mandatory Alternative Transportation System at Zion National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mace, Britton L.; Marquit, Joshua D.; Bates, Scott C.

    2013-11-01

    Transportation infrastructure in national parks has historically been designed for the automobile. With more vehicles in the parks, visitors found themselves in circumstances more reminiscent of a city than a park. Traffic jams, overcrowding, illegal parking, horn honking, and idling vehicles became common, creating stress and contributing to air and noise pollution, the very things visitors were hoping to get away from. Park managers began searching for alternatives, including shuttle systems. Many national parks have implemented optional shuttle systems, but relatively few have completely closed roads to vehicles, transporting visitors on mandatory shuttles. Zion National Park instituted a mandatory shuttle system in May 2000 to relieve crowding and congestion in the main canyon and to protect natural resources. Taking a longitudinal approach, attributes of the shuttle (e.g., crowding, accessibility, freedom, efficiency, preference, and success) were assessed with experiential park factors (e.g., scenic beauty, naturalness, solitude, tranquility, air quality, and soundscape) in 2000, 2003, and 2010 by surveying shuttle-riding park visitors. While visitors initially reported a few reservations about the shuttle system, by 2003, the majority rated the system successful. Ratings of all shuttle-related variables, except crowding, improved over the decade. Improvements were greatest for freedom, accessibility, and efficiency. Multiple regression found overall shuttle success to be mediated by preference, freedom, accessibility, efficiency, and comfort. Experiential variables assessing park conditions followed a similar pattern, with improved ratings as the decade progressed. Results provide important insights into the visitor experience with mandatory alternative shuttle systems in national parks.

  7. Technology at the zoo: the influence of a touchscreen computer on orangutans and zoo visitors.

    PubMed

    Perdue, Bonnie M; Clay, Andrea W; Gaalema, Diann E; Maple, Terry L; Stoinski, Tara S

    2012-01-01

    A computer-controlled touchscreen apparatus (hereafter referred to as "touchscreen") in the orangutan exhibit at Zoo Atlanta provides enrichment to the animals and allows cognitive research to take place on exhibit. This study investigated the impact of the touchscreen on orangutan behavior and visibility, as well as its impact on zoo visitors. Despite previous research suggesting that providing a single computer system may negatively affect orangutan behavior, there was not a significant increase in aggression, stereotypic, or distress-related behaviors following the activation of the on-exhibit touchscreen. We also investigated the possibility that zoo visitors may be negatively affected by technology because it deviates from naturalism. However, we did not find a change in stay time or overall experience rating when the computer was turned on. This research was the first to assess visitor attitudes toward technology at the zoo, and we found that visitors report highly positive attitudes about technology for both animals and visitors. If subjects visited the exhibit when the computer was turned on, they more strongly agreed that orangutans benefit from interacting with computerized enrichment. This study is the first investigation of an on-exhibit touchscreen in group-housed apes; our findings of no negative effects on the animals or zoo visitors and positive attitudes toward technology suggest a significant value of this practice.

  8. Visitor interest in zoo animals and the implications for collection planning and zoo education programmes.

    PubMed

    Moss, Andrew; Esson, Maggie

    2010-01-01

    As zoos have sought to further their conservation missions, they have become powerful providers of environmental education. Outside of "formal" education initiatives, such as those designed for school and other organized groups, or structured public talks programmes, much of the learning potential that the zoo has to offer is around the viewing of animals and the response of visitors to them. In this, zoo learning is a very personal construct, develops from the previous knowledge, and experiences and motivations of each individual. In this article, we make the assertion that learning potential, although difficult to quantify, is very much related to the attractiveness of animal species and the interest that visitors show in them. Using standard behaviorist measures of attraction and interest (the proportion of visitors that stop and for how long), we analyzed the relative interest in 40 zoo species held in a modern UK zoo and the variables that are significant in predicting that popularity. Further to this, the suggestion is made that the zoo collection planning process could use such information to make more informed decisions about which species should be housed for their educational value. Taxonomic grouping was found to be the most significant predictor of visitor interest--that is, visitors were far more interested in mammals than any other group--although body size (length), increasing animal activity and whether the species was the primary or "flagship" species in an exhibit or not, were all found to have a significant bearing on visitor interest.

  9. Re-Paying Attention to Visitor Behavior: A Re-Analysis using Meta-Analytic Techniques.

    PubMed

    Castro, Yone; Botella, Juan; Asensio, Mikel

    2016-01-01

    The present study describes a meta-analytic review of museum visitors' behavior. Although there is a large number of visitor studies available, their cumulative importance has not been determined due to the lack of rigorous methods to determine common causes of visitors' behaviors. We analyzed Serrell's (1998) database of 110 studies, defining a number of variables that measure visitors' behaviors in exhibition spaces which exceeded the most typical and obvious ones. We defined four indexes of effect size and obtained their combined estimates: average time per feature [ATF● = 0.43 (0.49; 0.37)], percentage of diligent visitors [dv● = 30% (0.39; 0.23)], inverse of velocity [Iv● = 4.07 min/100m2 (4.55; 3.59)], and stops per feature [SF● = 0.35 (0.38; 0.33)], and we analyzed the role of relevant moderating variables. Key findings indicate, for example, that the visiting time for each display element relates to the size of the exhibition and its newness, and visitor walking speed is higher in large exhibit areas. The indexes obtained in this study can be understood as references to be used for comparison with new evaluations. They may help to predict people's behavior and appreciation of new exhibitions, identifying important problems in museum designs, and providing new research tools for this field. PMID:27319781

  10. Investigating the impact of prior knowledge and interest on aquarium visitor learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falk, John H.; Adelman, Leslie M.

    2003-02-01

    Most free-choice science learning institutions, in particular science centers, zoos, aquariums, and natural history museums, define themselves as educational institutions. However, to what extent, and for which visitors, do these free-choice learning settings accomplish their educational mission? Answering this question has proven challenging, in large part because of the inherent variability of visitors to such settings. We hypothesize that the challenges of measuring free-choice science learning might be diminished if it were possible to pool populations during analysis in ways that reduced this variability. Specifically, we propose grouping learners according to their entering understanding and attitudes, using qualitative categories such as minimal, moderate, and extensive. In this article, we use data collected at the National Aquarium in Baltimore to determine whether grouping makes it possible to discern more readily the nature of changes in aquarium visitors' conservation knowledge and attitudes. Although analysis revealed that there were significant changes in both conservation knowledge and attitudes, entry to exit, for all 100 visitors studied, a more detailed analysis revealed that gains were not evenly distributed across all visitors. The results support the hypothesis that the grouping of learners into minimal, moderate, and extensive conservation knowledge and attitude categories enabled a more fine-grained and accurate understanding of changes in aquarium visitor's conservation learning.

  11. Visitor assessment of the mandatory alternative transportation system at Zion National Park.

    PubMed

    Mace, Britton L; Marquit, Joshua D; Bates, Scott C

    2013-11-01

    Transportation infrastructure in national parks has historically been designed for the automobile. With more vehicles in the parks, visitors found themselves in circumstances more reminiscent of a city than a park. Traffic jams, overcrowding, illegal parking, horn honking, and idling vehicles became common, creating stress and contributing to air and noise pollution, the very things visitors were hoping to get away from. Park managers began searching for alternatives, including shuttle systems. Many national parks have implemented optional shuttle systems, but relatively few have completely closed roads to vehicles, transporting visitors on mandatory shuttles. Zion National Park instituted a mandatory shuttle system in May 2000 to relieve crowding and congestion in the main canyon and to protect natural resources. Taking a longitudinal approach, attributes of the shuttle (e.g., crowding, accessibility, freedom, efficiency, preference, and success) were assessed with experiential park factors (e.g., scenic beauty, naturalness, solitude, tranquility, air quality, and soundscape) in 2000, 2003, and 2010 by surveying shuttle-riding park visitors. While visitors initially reported a few reservations about the shuttle system, by 2003, the majority rated the system successful. Ratings of all shuttle-related variables, except crowding, improved over the decade. Improvements were greatest for freedom, accessibility, and efficiency. Multiple regression found overall shuttle success to be mediated by preference, freedom, accessibility, efficiency, and comfort. Experiential variables assessing park conditions followed a similar pattern, with improved ratings as the decade progressed. Results provide important insights into the visitor experience with mandatory alternative shuttle systems in national parks.

  12. An interpretive study of Yosemite National Park visitors' perspectives toward alternative transportation in Yosemite Valley.

    PubMed

    White, Dave D

    2007-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) is increasingly focusing on alternative transportation systems in national parks to address environmental and social problems arising from a historical reliance on personal automobiles as the primary means of visitor access. Despite the potential advantages, alternative transportation may require a reorientation in the way that Americans have experienced national parks since the advent of auto-tourism in the early twentieth century. Little research exists, however, on visitor perspectives towards alternative transportation or the rationale underlying their perspectives. It remains unclear how transportation systems affect visitors' experiences of the park landscape or the factors influencing their travel behavior in the parks. This report presents an interpretive study of visitor perspectives toward transportation management in the Yosemite Valley area of Yosemite National Park, California. Qualitative analysis of 160 semi-structured interviews identified individual psychological factors as well as situational influences that affect visitors' behavior and perspectives. Individual psychological factors include perceived freedom, environmental values and beliefs, prior experience with Yosemite National Park and other national parks, prior experience with alternative transportation in national parks, and sensitivity to subjective perceptions of crowding. Situational factors included convenience, access, and flexibility of travel modes, as well as type of visit, type of group, and park use level. Interpretive communication designed to encourage voluntary visitor use of alternative transportation should focus on these psychological and situational factors. Although challenges remain, the results of this study suggest approaches for shaping the way Americans visit and experience their national parks to encourage environmental sustainability.

  13. Flower visitors and pollination in the Oriental (Indomalayan) Region.

    PubMed

    Corlett, Richard T

    2004-08-01

    Current knowledge of flower visitors and pollination in the Oriental Region is summarised. Much less is known about pollination than seed dispersal and the coverage of habitats and taxa in the region is very uneven. The available evidence suggests that pollination in lowland forests is dominated by highly social bees (mainly Trigona and Apis species), with beetles probably the next most important group, followed by other bees and flies. In comparison with the better-studied Neotropics, large solitary bees, moths, Lepidoptera and vertebrates are relatively less important. These differences are greatest in the canopy of the lowland dipterocarp forests of Southeast Asia, where they probably reflect the unique temporal pattern of floral resource availability resulting from 'general flowering' at supra-annual intervals. Apis bees (but not Trigona species) are also important in most montane, subtropical and non-forest habitats. Apart from the figs (Ficus spp.), there are few well-documented examples of plant species visited by a single potential pollinator and most plant-pollinator relationships in the region appear to be relatively generalised. The small sizes of most pollinators and the absence of direct human exploitation probably make pollination mutualisms less vulnerable to failure as a result of human impacts than dispersal mutualisms, but more subtle impacts, as a result of altered gene flows, are likely to be widespread. On current evidence, pollination systems in the Oriental Region do not require any specific conservation action, but this review reinforces arguments for making the preservation (or restoration) of habitat connectivity the major focus of Oriental conservation.

  14. EXPO '02, Piazza Pinocchio: monitoring visitor live loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerulli, Marco; Posenato, Daniele; Inaudi, Daniele; Glisic, Branko; Vurpillot, Samuel

    2003-08-01

    Once every generation, Switzerland treats itself to a National Exhibition commissioned by the Swiss Confederation. Expo 02 was spread out in five "Arteplage" over a whole region: the land of the three lakes, on the shores of the lakes of Biel, Murten and Neuchatel, which are located in the northwest of Switzerland. Each "Arteplage" relates to a theme, which is reflected in its architectures and exhibitions. The "Arteplage" of Neuchatel was related to "Nature and Artificiality" A big steel-wood whale eating a village represents the fairy tale named "Pinocchio" from the Italian writer Collodi. The "Piazza Pinocchio" was built together with other exposition buildings on one large artificial peninsula. The belly of the whale holds the exposition dedicated to robotic and artificial intelligence, while the rest of the village was developed on two floors with steel piles/beams and wood walls and floors. A fiber optic sensor system was commissioned to monitor the visitor's loads over the whole "Piazza Pinocchio." The main requirements were: real-time computer-screen figure-form results of the live loads during 18 hours a day, automatic thermal-induced strain compensation, real-time warnings and pre-warnings for each single pile, automatic phone call advises when reaching warning thresholds and remote monitoring for complete management of the monitoring sytem. The SOFO system based on low coherence fiber optic deformation sensors was selected to carry out the requirements. The aim of this paper is to present an overview of the project, the installation solution, the results, and data analysis of the installed monitoring system.

  15. An evaluation of the First Parent Health Visitor Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Emond, A; Pollock, J; Deave, T; Bonnell, S; Peters, T; Harvey, I

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To assess outcomes in families who received the First Parent Health Visitor Scheme (FPHVS), in comparison with families who received conventional ("generic") health visiting. Methods: Retrospective data on 2113 families were collected during 1986–92 as part of National Health Service (NHS) service provision. Prospective data were collected during 1993–98 on 459 mothers and their children, with outcomes assessed at one year (93% follow up) and two years (80% follow up). Results: There were no differences between the groups of mothers in self esteem, locus of control, or depression rates. The women who received the FPHVS were more likely to have changed partners, but they also had a wider support network than comparison women, and consulted their general practitioner (GP) less often. Breast feeding rates were higher in the FPHVS mothers, who also gave their infants more fruit juice drinks than the comparison group. No differences were apparent in developmental outcome using the Bayley Scales at 1 and 2 years of age. Both height and weight Z scores at 2 years of age were lower in the FPHVS children than the comparison children. Receipt of the FPHVS was associated with increased use of electric socket covers and lower accident rates in the second year of life. No differences were seen in immunisation rates, uptake of child health surveillance, or use of hospital services. A higher proportion of families who received the FPHVS were registered on the local child protection register compared with comparison families. Conclusion: Clustering effects dominated the analysis, but overall this evaluation could not show a clear advantage for the FPHVS over conventional health visiting. PMID:11861228

  16. Increases in quitline calls and smoking cessation website visitors during a national tobacco education campaign--March 19-June 10, 2012.

    PubMed

    2012-08-31

    Mass media campaigns and telephone quitlines are effective in increasing cessation rates among cigarette smokers. During March 19-June 10, 2012, CDC aired Tips from Former Smokers (TIPS), the first federally funded, nationwide, paid-media tobacco education campaign in the United States. The TIPS campaign featured former smokers talking about their experiences living with diseases caused by smoking. The campaign was primarily intended to encourage adult smokers aged 18-54 years to quit by making them aware of the health damage caused by smoking and letting them know that they could call the telephone quitline portal 1-800-QUIT-NOW or visit the National Cancer Institute (NCI) smoking cessation website (http://www.smokefree.gov) if they needed free help to quit. The campaign included advertising on national and local cable television, local radio, online media, and billboards, and in movie theaters, transit venues, and print media. To determine the effects of the TIPS campaign on weekly quitline call volume and weekly unique visitors to the cessation website, CDC analyzed call and visitor data immediately before, during, and immediately after the campaign period and compared them with data from the corresponding weeks in 2011. This report summarizes the results of that analysis, which found that the number of weekly calls to the quitline from the 50 states, the District of Columbia, Guam, and Puerto Rico increased 132% (207,519 additional calls) during the TIPS campaign, and the number of unique visitors to the cessation website increased 428% (510,571 additional unique visitors). These results indicate that many smokers are interested in quitting and learning more about cessation assistance, and will respond to motivational messages that include an offer of help. PMID:22932300

  17. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  18. Vero cytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 gastroenteritis in farm visitors, North Wales.

    PubMed

    Payne, Christopher J I; Petrovic, Marko; Roberts, Richard J; Paul, Ashish; Linnane, Eithne; Walker, Mark; Kirby, David; Burgess, Anthony; Smith, Robert M M; Cheasty, Thomas; Willshaw, Geraldine; Salmon, Roland L

    2003-05-01

    An outbreak of Vero cytotoxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 (VTEC O157) gastroenteritis in visitors to an open farm in North Wales resulted in 17 primary and 7 secondary cases of illness. E. coli O157 Vero cytotoxin type 2, phage type 2 was isolated from 23 human cases and environmental animal fecal samples. A case-control study of 16 primary case-patients and 36 controls (all children) showed a significant association with attendance on the 2nd day of a festival, eating ice cream or cotton candy (candy floss), and contact with cows or goats. On multivariable analysis, only the association between illness and ice cream (odds ratio [OR]=11.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04 to 137.76) and cotton candy (OR=51.90, 95% CI 2.77 to 970.67) remained significant. In addition to supervised handwashing, we recommend that foods on open farms only be eaten in dedicated clean areas and that sticky foods be discouraged. PMID:12737734

  19. Vero Cytotoxin–Producing Escherichia coli O157 Gastroenteritis in Farm Visitors, North Wales

    PubMed Central

    Petrovic, Marko; Roberts, Richard J.; Paul, Ashish; Linnane, Eithne; Walker, Mark; Kirby, David; Burgess, Anthony; Smith, Robert M.M.; Cheasty, Thomas; Willshaw, Geraldine; Salmon, Roland L.

    2003-01-01

    An outbreak of Vero cytotoxin–producing Escherichia coli O157 (VTEC O157) gastroenteritis in visitors to an open farm in North Wales resulted in 17 primary and 7 secondary cases of illness. E. coli O157 Vero cytotoxin type 2, phage type 2 was isolated from 23 human cases and environmental animal fecal samples. A case-control study of 16 primary case-patients and 36 controls (all children) showed a significant association with attendance on the 2nd day of a festival, eating ice cream or cotton candy (candy floss), and contact with cows or goats. On multivariable analysis, only the association between illness and ice cream (odds ratio [OR]=11.99, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.04 to 137.76) and cotton candy (OR=51.90, 95% CI 2.77 to 970.67) remained significant. In addition to supervised handwashing, we recommend that foods on open farms only be eaten in dedicated clean areas and that sticky foods be discouraged. PMID:12737734

  20. Autonomous self-pollination and insect visitors in partially and fully mycoheterotrophic species of Cymbidium (Orchidaceae).

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the reproductive ecology of mycoheterotrophic plants, but the existing literature hypothesizes that they adopt a self-pollinating strategy. Although growing evidence indicates that some rewarding mycoheterotrophic plants depend (at least partially) on an insect-mediated pollination system, it remains unclear whether some mycoheterotrophic plants can attract pollinators without nectar or other rewards. Moreover, in a broader evolutionary/ecological context, the question of whether the evolution of mycoheterotrophy induces a shift in pollination pattern is still unknown. Here I present a comparative investigation into the breeding system of two fully mycoheterotrophic orchids, Cymbidium macrorhizon and C. aberrans, and their closest extant relative, the mixotrophic C. lancifolium. Pollination experiments were conducted to determine the breeding system of these plants. In addition, flower visitors that might contribute to pollination were recorded. Flowers at different maturity stages were examined to investigate mechanisms enabling or limiting self-fertilization. While nectarless flowers of C. lancifolium and C. macrorhizon can successfully attract potential pollinator honeybees, all three Cymbidium possess an effective self-pollination system in which the rostellum that physically separates the stigma and pollinia is absent. Because mixotrophic and mycoheterotrophic Cymbidium occupy low-light niches, pollinator foraging would be negatively influenced by low-light intensity. In partial and fully mycoheterotrophic Cymbidium, autogamy would likely be favoured as a reproductive assurance to compensate for pollinator limitation due to their lack of nectar and pollinators' hostile habitat preferences.

  1. Identifying the Cognitive Needs of Visitors and Content Selection Parameters for Designing the Interactive Kiosk Software for Museums

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katre, Dinesh; Sarnaik, Mandar

    This research presents the findings of contextual interviews, visitor survey and behavioural study that were carried out in Indian museums. It originates from the hypothesis that the museum exhibits are unable to express their relevance, historical significance and related knowledge to satisfy the curiosity of visitors. Our objective is to identify the cognitive needs of museum visitors and the content selection parameters for designing the interactive kiosk software, which is expected to be set up in every thematic gallery of the museum. The kiosk software is intended to offer higher level of engaging and learnable experience to the museum visitors. The research involved participation of 100+ visitors in Indian museums. The access restrictions and constraints of museums cause cognitive deprivation of visitors and compromise the quality of experience. Therefore, the interactivity, animations and multimedia capabilities of kiosk software must be focused on overcoming these limitations.

  2. Facilitating the Development and Evaluation of a Citizen Science Web Site: A Case Study of Repeat Photography and Climate Change in Southwest Alaska's National Parks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Karina C.; Newman, Gregory; Thompson, Jessica L.

    2013-01-01

    Interviews with national park visitors across the country revealed that climate change education through place-based, hands-on learning using repeat photographs and technology is appealing to park visitors. This manuscript provides a summary of the development of a repeat photography citizen science Web site for national parks in Southwest Alaska.…

  3. The +37 kb Cebpa Enhancer Is Critical for Cebpa Myeloid Gene Expression and Contains Functional Sites that Bind SCL, GATA2, C/EBPα, PU.1, and Additional Ets Factors.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Stacy; Guo, Hong; Friedman, Alan D

    2015-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains an evolutionarily conserved 453 bp enhancer located at +37 kb that, together with its promoter, directs expression to myeloid progenitors and to long-term hematopoietic stem cells in transgenic mice. In human acute myeloid leukemia cases, the enhancer lacks point mutations but binds the RUNX1-ETO oncoprotein. The enhancer contains the H3K4me1 and H3K27Ac histone modifications, denoting an active enhancer, at progressively increasing levels as long-term hematopoietic stem cells transition to granulocyte-monocyte progenitors. We previously identified four enhancer sites that bind RUNX1 and demonstrated that their integrity is required for maximal enhancer activity in 32Dcl3 myeloid cells. The +37 kb Cebpa enhancer also contains C/EBP, Ets factor, Myb, GATA, and E-box consensus sites conserved in the human +42 kb CEBPA enhancer. Mutation of the two C/EBP, seven Ets, one Myb, two GATA, or two E-box sites reduces activity of an enhancer-promoter reporter in 32Dcl3 cells. In 293T gel shift assays, exogenous C/EBPα binds both C/EBP sites, c-Myb binds the Myb site, PU.1 binds the second Ets site, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, and Ets1 bind the sixth Ets site, GATA2 binds both GATA sites, and SCL binds the second E-box. Endogenous hematopoietic RUNX1, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, C/EBPα, GATA2, and SCL were previously shown to bind the enhancer, and we find that endogenous PU.1 binds the second Ets site in 32Dcl3 cells. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we developed 32Dcl3 lines in which the wild-type enhancer alleles are replaced with a variant mutant in the seven Ets sites. These lines have 20-fold reduced Cebpa mRNA when cultured in IL-3 or G-CSF, demonstrating a critical requirement for enhancer integrity for optimal Cebpa expression. In addition, these results indicate that the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer is the focus of multiple regulatory transcriptional pathways that impact its expression during normal hematopoiesis and potentially during myeloid transformation.

  4. The +37 kb Cebpa Enhancer Is Critical for Cebpa Myeloid Gene Expression and Contains Functional Sites that Bind SCL, GATA2, C/EBPα, PU.1, and Additional Ets Factors

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Stacy; Guo, Hong; Friedman, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    The murine Cebpa gene contains an evolutionarily conserved 453 bp enhancer located at +37 kb that, together with its promoter, directs expression to myeloid progenitors and to long-term hematopoietic stem cells in transgenic mice. In human acute myeloid leukemia cases, the enhancer lacks point mutations but binds the RUNX1-ETO oncoprotein. The enhancer contains the H3K4me1 and H3K27Ac histone modifications, denoting an active enhancer, at progressively increasing levels as long-term hematopoietic stem cells transition to granulocyte-monocyte progenitors. We previously identified four enhancer sites that bind RUNX1 and demonstrated that their integrity is required for maximal enhancer activity in 32Dcl3 myeloid cells. The +37 kb Cebpa enhancer also contains C/EBP, Ets factor, Myb, GATA, and E-box consensus sites conserved in the human +42 kb CEBPA enhancer. Mutation of the two C/EBP, seven Ets, one Myb, two GATA, or two E-box sites reduces activity of an enhancer-promoter reporter in 32Dcl3 cells. In 293T gel shift assays, exogenous C/EBPα binds both C/EBP sites, c-Myb binds the Myb site, PU.1 binds the second Ets site, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, and Ets1 bind the sixth Ets site, GATA2 binds both GATA sites, and SCL binds the second E-box. Endogenous hematopoietic RUNX1, PU.1, Fli-1, ERG, C/EBPα, GATA2, and SCL were previously shown to bind the enhancer, and we find that endogenous PU.1 binds the second Ets site in 32Dcl3 cells. Using CRISPR/Cas9, we developed 32Dcl3 lines in which the wild-type enhancer alleles are replaced with a variant mutant in the seven Ets sites. These lines have 20-fold reduced Cebpa mRNA when cultured in IL-3 or G-CSF, demonstrating a critical requirement for enhancer integrity for optimal Cebpa expression. In addition, these results indicate that the +37 kb Cebpa enhancer is the focus of multiple regulatory transcriptional pathways that impact its expression during normal hematopoiesis and potentially during myeloid transformation. PMID:25938608

  5. SVM to detect the presence of visitors in a smart home environment.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Johanna; Larimer, Nicole; Kaye, Jeffrey A; Pavel, Misha; Hayes, Tamara L

    2012-01-01

    With the rising age of the population, there is increased need to help elderly maintain their independence. Smart homes, employing passive sensor networks and pervasive computing techniques, enable the unobtrusive assessment of activities and behaviors of the elderly which can be useful for health state assessment and intervention. Due to the multiple health benefits associated with socializing, accurately tracking whether an individual has visitors to their home is one of the more important aspects of elders' behaviors that could be assessed with smart home technology. With this goal, we have developed a preliminary SVM model to identify periods where untagged visitors are present in the home. Using the dwell time, number of sensor firings, and number of transitions between major living spaces (living room, dining room, kitchen and bathroom) as features in the model, and self report from two subjects as ground truth, we were able to accurately detect the presence of visitors in the home with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.90 and 0.89 for subject 1, and of 0.67 and 0.78 for subject 2, respectively. These preliminary data demonstrate the feasibility of detecting visitors with in-home sensor data, but highlight the need for more advanced modeling techniques so the model performs well for all subjects and all types of visitors.

  6. Evidence of public engagement with science: visitor learning at a zoo-housed primate research centre.

    PubMed

    Waller, Bridget M; Peirce, Kate; Mitchell, Heidi; Micheletta, Jerome

    2012-01-01

    Primate behavioural and cognitive research is increasingly conducted on direct public view in zoo settings. The potential of such facilities for public engagement with science is often heralded, but evidence of tangible, positive effects on public understanding is rare. Here, the effect of a new zoo-based primate research centre on visitor behaviour, learning and attitudes was assessed using a quasi-experimental design. Zoo visitors approached the primate research centre more often when a scientist was present and working with the primates, and reported greater awareness of primates (including conservation) compared to when the scientist was not present. Visitors also reported greater perceived learning when the scientist was present. Installation of information signage had no main effect on visitor attitudes or learning. Visitors who interacted with the signage, however, demonstrated increased knowledge and understanding when asked about the specific information present on the signs (which was related to the ongoing facial expression research at the research centre). The findings show that primate behaviour research centres on public view can have a demonstrable and beneficial effect on public understanding of science.

  7. Visitor and community survey results for Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge and Lighthouse: Completion report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie; Gillette, Shana C.; Koontz, Lynne; Stewart, Susan C.; Loomis, John; Wundrock, Katherine D.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Central Federal Lands Highway Division of the Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation are currently pursuing the planning and potential design of an alternative transportation system (ATS) for Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge or Kilauea Point NWR). The USFWS and CFLHD seek an alternative transportation solution that provides the highest quality visitor experience and is sensitive to biological and cultural resources and the needs of the local community. In planning the alternative transportation system, managers need to consider how an ATS would change factors such as visitor access, visitor experience, visitor willingness to pay, and visitor net economic benefits. The Policy Analysis and Science Assistance branch (PASA) at the U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center is dedicated to studying relations between humans and the environment. The objective of PASA is to conduct studies to understand how humans are affected by environmental management decisions and how human activities impact use and conservation of natural resources.

  8. Feeding live prey to zoo animals: response of zoo visitors in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Cottle, Lauren; Tamir, Dan; Hyseni, Mimoza; Bühler, Dominique; Lindemann-Matthies, Petra

    2010-01-01

    In summer 2007, with the help of a written questionnaire, the attitudes of more than 400 visitors to the zoological garden of Zurich, Switzerland, toward the idea of feeding live insects to lizards, live fish to otters, and live rabbits to tigers were investigated. The majority of Swiss zoo visitors agreed with the idea of feeding live prey (invertebrates and vertebrates) to zoo animals, both off- and on-exhibit, except in the case of feeding live rabbits to tigers on-exhibit. Women and frequent visitors of the zoo disagreed more often with the on-exhibit feeding of live rabbits to tigers. Study participants with a higher level of education were more likely to agree with the idea of feeding live invertebrates and vertebrates to zoo animals off-exhibit. In comparison to an earlier study undertaken in Scotland, zoo visitors in Switzerland were more often in favor of the live feeding of vertebrates. Feeding live prey can counter the loss of hunting skills of carnivores and improve the animals' well-being. However, feeding enrichments have to strike a balance between optimal living conditions of animals and the quality of visitor experience. Our results show that such a balance can be found, especially when live feeding of mammals is carried out off-exhibit. A good interpretation of food enrichment might help zoos to win more support for the issue, and for re-introduction programs and conservation.

  9. 75 FR 24964 - Proposed Information Collection; OMB Control Number 1018-NEW; Refuge Daily Visitor Use Report and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-06

    ..., wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and interpretation, and other... observation, wildlife photography, auto touring, birding, hiking, boating/canoeing, visitor center,...

  10. 43 CFR 8365.2 - Developed recreation sites and areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Developed recreation sites and areas. 8365... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS VISITOR SERVICES Rules of Conduct § 8365.2 Developed recreation sites and areas. The rules governing conduct and use of a...

  11. 43 CFR 8365.2 - Developed recreation sites and areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Developed recreation sites and areas. 8365... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS VISITOR SERVICES Rules of Conduct § 8365.2 Developed recreation sites and areas. The rules governing conduct and use of a...

  12. 43 CFR 8365.2 - Developed recreation sites and areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Developed recreation sites and areas. 8365... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS VISITOR SERVICES Rules of Conduct § 8365.2 Developed recreation sites and areas. The rules governing conduct and use of a...

  13. 43 CFR 8365.2 - Developed recreation sites and areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Developed recreation sites and areas. 8365... LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RECREATION PROGRAMS VISITOR SERVICES Rules of Conduct § 8365.2 Developed recreation sites and areas. The rules governing conduct and use of a...

  14. Bridging the Divide Between Climate and Global Change Science and Education of Public and K-12 Visitors at the National Center for Atmospheric Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, S. Q.; Johnson, R. M.; Carbone, L.; Munoz, R.; Eastburn, T.; Ammann, C.; Lu, G.; Richmond, A.; Committee, S.

    2004-12-01

    knowledge, and address their misconceptions. Visitors view the exhibit every day of the year on their own, using an audiotour, or with a tour guide. NCAR/UCAR's educational content about climate change is increasingly available to national audiences through the new NCAR EO web site (www.ncar.ucar.edu/eo), Windows to the Universe (www.windows.ucar.edu), UCAR-EO's summer teachers workshops, and sessions at the National Science Teacher Association meetings and other professional education venues.

  15. Visitor impacts on trails in the Sagarmatha (Mt. Everest) National Park, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Sanjay K; Nepal, Stella Amor

    2004-08-01

    This study summarizes findings of a visitor impact study conducted in the Sagarmatha (Mt. Everest) National Park, Nepal. The effect of visitor use, and the influence of environmental characteristics on trail conditions are investigated. Seven trails divided into 208 trail segments, and with a total length of 90 kilometers were included in the assessment. A four-class rating system has been used for the assessment of trail conditions. Arc/Info and Arc/View geographic information system (GIS) are used to analyze spatial patterns of impacts. The study indicates a strong correlation between visitor use and trail degradation. However, locational and environmental factors are equally important variables. The study concludes that more systematic, and experimental studies are needed that can make a clear distinction between human-induced trail damage and the effects of natural factors.

  16. Visitor impacts on trails in the Sagarmatha (Mt. Everest) National Park, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Sanjay K; Nepal, Stella Amor

    2004-08-01

    This study summarizes findings of a visitor impact study conducted in the Sagarmatha (Mt. Everest) National Park, Nepal. The effect of visitor use, and the influence of environmental characteristics on trail conditions are investigated. Seven trails divided into 208 trail segments, and with a total length of 90 kilometers were included in the assessment. A four-class rating system has been used for the assessment of trail conditions. Arc/Info and Arc/View geographic information system (GIS) are used to analyze spatial patterns of impacts. The study indicates a strong correlation between visitor use and trail degradation. However, locational and environmental factors are equally important variables. The study concludes that more systematic, and experimental studies are needed that can make a clear distinction between human-induced trail damage and the effects of natural factors. PMID:15387069

  17. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Part of the $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex, the new information center welcomes visitors to the Gateway to the Universe. The five large video walls provide an orientation video, with an introduction to the range of activities and exhibits, and honor the center's namesake, President John F. Kennedy. Other new attractions are an information center, a walk- through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  18. A conceptual curriculum framework designed to ensure quality student health visitor training in practice.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, Jayne; Stirling, Linda

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the challenges faced by a trust in England following the introduction of the Health Visitor Implementation Plan. Two practice education facilitators designed a conceptual curriculum framework to ensure quality student health visitor education in practice. This curriculum complimented the excellent academic course already delivered by the University. A justification is provided for the design of the curriculum framework, including a rationale for the introduction of specific training sessions. Student and practice teacher feedback demonstrate the success of the introduction of this programme to ensure the development of student health visitors fit for practice. The conclusion places emphasis on the importance of continuous evaluation of the training programme to meet the needs of the students and the service.

  19. Exploring barriers for health visitors' adaption of the Danish children's database.

    PubMed

    Pape-Haugaard, Louise; Haugaard, Karin; Carøe, Per; Høstgaard, Anna Marie

    2013-01-01

    Denmark has unique health informatics databases such as "The Children's Database" (CDB), which since 2009 has held data on all Danish children from birth until 17 years of age. In the current set-up a number of potential sources of error exist - both technical and human - which means that the data is flawed. The objective of this paper is both to clarify errors in the database and to enlighten the underlying mechanisms causing these errors. This is done through an ethnographic study using participant observations, interviews and workshops. Errors are documented through statistical analysis. The data show redundant records. This redundancy can be explained by multiple transmissions conducted by end users or systems, or a lack of validation methods in the National CDB. In our results three types of cases are presented: from health visitors at school, from health visitors visiting families and from health visitors at central health offices. PMID:23920857

  20. Implementation of the court visitor program in a clinical nursing curriculum.

    PubMed

    Stowell, Jane M; Pihlak, Mary Rose; Matzke, Amanda; O'Keefe, Mary

    2013-12-01

    The State of Texas has more than 19,000 individuals who lack the physical or mental ability to provide for their need for shelter, financial management, or physical care. These individuals have been designated as wards of the court and placed under guardianship. Texas probate courts appoint individuals known as court visitors to make annual visits to wards of the court to assess their well-being under guardianship. Although the 10 statutory probate courts have court visitor programs, many county courts do not. This article describes the details of a service-learning experience using an online distance educational program to train undergraduate nursing students in a mental health course to become court visitors. This information may be useful to others looking for nontraditional clinical experiences and service-learning opportunities for undergraduate nursing students.

  1. Global climate change attitudes and perceptions among south American zoo visitors.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Jerry F; Clayton, Susan; Kelly, Lisa-Anne DeGregoria; Grajal, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    There is a substantial gap between the scientific evidence for anthropogenic climate change and the human response to this evidence. Perceptions of and responses to climate change can differ among regions of the world, as well as within countries. Therefore, information about the public's attitudes and perceptions related to climate change is essential to the development of relevant educational resources. In the present study, zoo visitors in four South American countries responded to a questionnaire regarding their attitudes and perceptions toward global climate change. Results indicated that most respondents are already highly concerned about global climate change and are interested in greater engagement in pro-environmental behaviors. Visitors also perceive various obstacles to engagement in climate change mitigation behaviors. We discuss the results of our study in terms of addressing visitors' climate change attitudes and perceptions within the social and emotional context of zoo settings.

  2. A conceptual curriculum framework designed to ensure quality student health visitor training in practice.

    PubMed

    Hollinshead, Jayne; Stirling, Linda

    2014-07-01

    This paper describes the challenges faced by a trust in England following the introduction of the Health Visitor Implementation Plan. Two practice education facilitators designed a conceptual curriculum framework to ensure quality student health visitor education in practice. This curriculum complimented the excellent academic course already delivered by the University. A justification is provided for the design of the curriculum framework, including a rationale for the introduction of specific training sessions. Student and practice teacher feedback demonstrate the success of the introduction of this programme to ensure the development of student health visitors fit for practice. The conclusion places emphasis on the importance of continuous evaluation of the training programme to meet the needs of the students and the service. PMID:25167726

  3. The museum in adult education: A psychological study of visitor reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dufresne-Tasse, Colette; Lefebvre, Andre

    1994-11-01

    The authors of this article argue that classroom education does not fit the museum setting and that researchers need to re-think the basic principles for the use of museums in adult education. In order to do this, it is necessary to understand the psychology of the museum visitor. However, while much has been published on visitor behaviour and the factors influencing it, very little is known about what visitors think or feel in the exhibition room. A research team at the University of Montreal is currently studying the psychological reactions of adults when observing museum exhibits. This paper describes the methodology used by this team, some of the results obtained and the perspectives opened up by the study.

  4. Teamwork in primary care: the views and experiences of nurses, midwives and health visitors.

    PubMed

    Wiles, R; Robison, J

    1994-08-01

    This paper reports on findings from a study of teamwork in primary care in one family health services authority in England. It is based on interviews using a semi-structured questionnaire with practice nurses, district nurses, health visitors and midwives in 20 practices. Six topics emerged as important in relation to the views of nurses, midwives and health visitors and their experiences of teamwork: team identity; leadership; access to general practitioners; philosophies of care; understanding of team members' roles and responsibilities; and, disagreement regarding roles and responsibilities. Differences in the various views and experiences of teamwork were identified. Midwives and health visitors emerged as the least integrated members of the primary health care team. Recent changes to the organization of primary health care services, as well as professional changes, are seen as accounting for the different experiences of the nursing groups. The potential for teamwork in the future is discussed.

  5. U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon Visitors Guide 2015

    SciTech Connect

    2015-09-03

    The U.S. Department of Energy 2015 Visitors Guide is a free, hard-copy publication distributed free to those attending the Solar Decathlon event. The publications' objectives are to serve as the primary information resource for those in attendance, and to deliver a compelling message about the Solar Decathlon's success as a proven workforce development program and its role in educating students and the public about clean energy products and design solutions. The U.S. Department of Energy 2015 Visitors Guide SD15 Visitors Guide goals are to guide attendees through the Solar Decathlon village; List and explain the 10 contests; educate attendees about the participating teams and their competition houses; provide access to more information on the Solar Decathlon website through the use of QR codes; and acknowledge the support of all event sponsors.

  6. Storage of Poisonous Substances and Firearms in Homes with Young Children Visitors and Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Coyne-Beasley, Tamera; Runyan, Carol W.; Baccaglini, Lorena; Perkis, David; Johnson, Renee M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Most unintentional childhood poisonings and firearm injuries occur in residential environments. Therefore, a preventive strategy includes limiting children’s access to poisons and firearms through safe storage. This study examines storage of poisons and firearms among households with older adults, and households where young children reside compared to those where they visit only. Methods Sample is from a 2002 national random-digit-dial survey of 1003 households. Analyses were weighted to reflect the national population. Results There were 637 households with children residents or visitors aged <6 years. Seventy-five percent of the households (n =480) had children aged <6 as visitors only, and 15% had older adult residents (aged ≥70 years). Poisons and firearms were stored less securely in homes with young children as visitors as compared to those homes with resident young children. In 55% of homes where young children lived, and 74% of homes where young children were only visitors, household chemicals were reportedly stored unlocked. Although firearm ownership was comparable between the two categories of households (33% vs 34%), homes in which children were only visitors were more likely to store firearms unlocked (56%), than homes in which children resided (33%). Homes with older adult residents had more firearms present. Conclusions Children are at risk from improperly stored poisonous substances and firearms in their own homes and homes they visit. Strategies are needed to improve the storage practices of both poisons and firearms to minimize in-home hazards to young children, particularly raising awareness of these hazards to young visitors. PMID:15626565

  7. Modeling the Active Sites in Metalloenzymes 5. The Heterolytic Bond Cleavage of H2 in the [NiFe] Hydrogenase of DesulfoWibrio gigas by a Nucleophilic Addition Mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Shuqiang; Hall, Michael B.

    2001-11-19

    The H2 activation catalyzed by an Fe(II)-Ni(III) model of the [NiFe] hydrogenase of DesulfoVibrio gigas has been investigated by density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) calculations on the neutral and anionic active site complexes, [(CO)(CN)2Fe(Mu-SH)2Ni(SH)(SH2)]0 and [(CO)(CN)2Fe(Mu-SH)2Ni(SH)2]-. The results suggest that the reaction proceeds by a nucleophilic addition mechanism that cleaves the H-H bond heterolytically. The terminal cysteine residue Cys530 in the [NiFe] hydrogenase active site of the D. gigas enzyme plays a crucial role in the catalytic process by accepting the proton. The active site is constructed to provide access by this cysteine residue, and this role explains the change in activity observed when this cysteine is replaced by a selenocysteine. Furthermore, the optimized geometry of the transition state in the model bears a striking resemblance to the geometry of the active site as determined by X-ray crystallography.

  8. 2012 National Park visitor spending effects: economic contributions to local communities, states, and the nation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cullinane Thomas, Catherine; Huber, Christopher C.; Koontz, Lynne

    2014-01-01

    This 2012 analysis marks a major revision to the NPS visitor spending effects analyses, with the development of a new visitor spending effects model (VSE model) that replaces the former Money Generation Model (MGM2). Many of the hallmarks and processes of the MGM2 model are preserved in the new VSE model, but the new model makes significant strides in improving the accuracy and transparency of the analysis. Because of this change from the MGM2 model to the VSE model, estimates from this year’s analysis are not directly comparable to previous analyses.

  9. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  10. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  11. Park Visitors' Understandings, Values and Beliefs Related to Their Experience at Midway Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, USA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Michael; Tomkiewicz, Warren

    2002-01-01

    Investigates the development of park visitors' knowledge, values, and beliefs during their visit to the Midway Geyser Basin. Draws on prior work in the areas of museum and informal education, and public understanding of science and cognitive psychology. Interprets the results in terms of park visitors' knowledge systems, how the experience…

  12. Long-term prediction of emergency department revenue and visitor volume using autoregressive integrated moving average model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chieh-Fan; Ho, Wen-Hsien; Chou, Huei-Yin; Yang, Shu-Mei; Chen, I-Te; Shi, Hon-Yi

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed meteorological, clinical and economic factors in terms of their effects on monthly ED revenue and visitor volume. Monthly data from January 1, 2005 to September 30, 2009 were analyzed. Spearman correlation and cross-correlation analyses were performed to identify the correlation between each independent variable, ED revenue, and visitor volume. Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model was used to quantify the relationship between each independent variable, ED revenue, and visitor volume. The accuracies were evaluated by comparing model forecasts to actual values with mean absolute percentage of error. Sensitivity of prediction errors to model training time was also evaluated. The ARIMA models indicated that mean maximum temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, non-trauma, and trauma visits may correlate positively with ED revenue, but mean minimum temperature may correlate negatively with ED revenue. Moreover, mean minimum temperature and stock market index fluctuation may correlate positively with trauma visitor volume. Mean maximum temperature, relative humidity and stock market index fluctuation may correlate positively with non-trauma visitor volume. Mean maximum temperature and relative humidity may correlate positively with pediatric visitor volume, but mean minimum temperature may correlate negatively with pediatric visitor volume. The model also performed well in forecasting revenue and visitor volume.

  13. 78 FR 58343 - Information Collection Activities: Visitor Perceptions of Climate Change in U.S. National Parks

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... National Park Service Information Collection Activities: Visitor Perceptions of Climate Change in U.S... reference Information Collection 1024-NEW, Visitor Perceptions of Climate Change in U.S. National Parks in the subject line. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Angie Richman, Communication Specialist,...

  14. 8 CFR 214.12 - Preliminary enrollment of schools in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of schools in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). (a) Private elementary and private secondary schools, public high schools, post-secondary schools, language schools, and vocational schools are eligible for preliminary enrollment in Student and Exchange Visitor Information System...

  15. 8 CFR 214.12 - Preliminary enrollment of schools in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... of schools in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). (a) Private elementary and private secondary schools, public high schools, post-secondary schools, language schools, and vocational schools are eligible for preliminary enrollment in Student and Exchange Visitor Information System...

  16. 8 CFR 214.12 - Preliminary enrollment of schools in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of schools in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). (a) Private elementary and private secondary schools, public high schools, post-secondary schools, language schools, and vocational schools are eligible for preliminary enrollment in Student and Exchange Visitor Information System...

  17. 8 CFR 214.12 - Preliminary enrollment of schools in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... of schools in the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS). (a) Private elementary and private secondary schools, public high schools, post-secondary schools, language schools, and vocational schools are eligible for preliminary enrollment in Student and Exchange Visitor Information System...

  18. Paraprofessional Home Visitors' Perspectives on Addressing Poor Mental Health, Substance Abuse, and Domestic Violence: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tandon, S. Darius; Mercer, Constance D.; Saylor, Elizabeth L.; Duggan, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    This research was conducted to understand paraprofessional home visitors' perceptions of their training in addressing poor mental health, substance abuse, and domestic violence, and their actions in working with families in addressing these issues. Five focus groups were conducted with a total of 28 paraprofessional home visitors. Three main…

  19. 78 FR 3453 - Public Comment and Public Meeting on Draft Revisions to the Visitors Element of the Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... COMMISSION Public Comment and Public Meeting on Draft Revisions to the Visitors Element of the Comprehensive Plan for the National Capital: Federal Elements AGENCY: National Capital Planning Commission. ACTION... to release for public comment draft revisions to the Federal Visitors and Commemorative Works...

  20. Home-Oriented Preschool Education: Evaluation of the Prototype Home Visitor Training Package. Technical Report No. 45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shively, Joe E.; And Others

    An evaluation of the HOPE (Home-Oriented Preschool Education) Training Package for home visitors (paraprofessional educators) was performed. The home visitor is one part of the three-way--home, group, television--integrated instruction program being developed by the Appalachian Educational Laboratory for the education of preschoolers. The…

  1. 77 FR 20687 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-3097, Exchange Visitor Program Annual...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-05

    ... Visitor Information System (SEVIS) and then printed and signed by a sponsor official, and sent to the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Form DS-3097, Exchange Visitor Program Annual Report,...

  2. Relational Aesthetics in Art Museum Education: Engendering Visitors' Narratives through Participatory Acts for Interpretive Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Sunghee

    2013-01-01

    This article explores how to ensure visitor engagement with art objects at exhibition spaces in art museums through relational aesthetics, which focuses on the intersubjective relationship that art objects arouse in visitors. In the 1990s, Bourriaud coined the term "relational aesthetics" in reference to interactive installation art, but…

  3. 36 CFR 51.77 - Will a concession contract provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide visitor services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide visitor services? 51.77 Section 51.77 Parks, Forests... Contract Provisions § 51.77 Will a concession contract provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide... certain types of visitor services in a park area. The Director may limit the number of...

  4. 75 FR 65458 - Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; Board of Visitors of the U.S. Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... Department of Defense gives notice that it is renewing the charter for the Board of Visitors of the U.S. Air Force Academy (hereafter referred to as the ``Board''). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jim Freeman... of the Secretary Renewal of Department of Defense Federal Advisory Committee; Board of Visitors...

  5. 36 CFR 51.77 - Will a concession contract provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide visitor services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide visitor services? 51.77 Section 51.77 Parks, Forests... Contract Provisions § 51.77 Will a concession contract provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide... certain types of visitor services in a park area. The Director may limit the number of...

  6. 36 CFR 51.77 - Will a concession contract provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide visitor services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide visitor services? 51.77 Section 51.77 Parks, Forests... Contract Provisions § 51.77 Will a concession contract provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide... certain types of visitor services in a park area. The Director may limit the number of...

  7. 36 CFR 51.77 - Will a concession contract provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide visitor services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide visitor services? 51.77 Section 51.77 Parks, Forests... Contract Provisions § 51.77 Will a concession contract provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide... certain types of visitor services in a park area. The Director may limit the number of...

  8. 36 CFR 51.77 - Will a concession contract provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide visitor services?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide visitor services? 51.77 Section 51.77 Parks, Forests... Contract Provisions § 51.77 Will a concession contract provide a concessioner an exclusive right to provide... certain types of visitor services in a park area. The Director may limit the number of...

  9. Long-term prediction of emergency department revenue and visitor volume using autoregressive integrated moving average model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chieh-Fan; Ho, Wen-Hsien; Chou, Huei-Yin; Yang, Shu-Mei; Chen, I-Te; Shi, Hon-Yi

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzed meteorological, clinical and economic factors in terms of their effects on monthly ED revenue and visitor volume. Monthly data from January 1, 2005 to September 30, 2009 were analyzed. Spearman correlation and cross-correlation analyses were performed to identify the correlation between each independent variable, ED revenue, and visitor volume. Autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model was used to quantify the relationship between each independent variable, ED revenue, and visitor volume. The accuracies were evaluated by comparing model forecasts to actual values with mean absolute percentage of error. Sensitivity of prediction errors to model training time was also evaluated. The ARIMA models indicated that mean maximum temperature, relative humidity, rainfall, non-trauma, and trauma visits may correlate positively with ED revenue, but mean minimum temperature may correlate negatively with ED revenue. Moreover, mean minimum temperature and stock market index fluctuation may correlate positively with trauma visitor volume. Mean maximum temperature, relative humidity and stock market index fluctuation may correlate positively with non-trauma visitor volume. Mean maximum temperature and relative humidity may correlate positively with pediatric visitor volume, but mean minimum temperature may correlate negatively with pediatric visitor volume. The model also performed well in forecasting revenue and visitor volume. PMID:22203886

  10. Tropical forest fragmentation affects floral visitors but not the structure of individual-based palm-pollinator networks.

    PubMed

    Dáttilo, Wesley; Aguirre, Armando; Quesada, Mauricio; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing knowledge about the effects of habitat loss on pollinators in natural landscapes, information is very limited regarding the underlying mechanisms of forest fragmentation affecting plant-pollinator interactions in such landscapes. Here, we used a network approach to describe the effects of forest fragmentation on the patterns of interactions involving the understory dominant palm Astrocaryum mexicanum (Arecaceae) and its floral visitors (including both effective and non-effective pollinators) at the individual level in a Mexican tropical rainforest landscape. Specifically, we asked: (i) Does fragment size affect the structure of individual-based plant-pollinator networks? (ii) Does the core of highly interacting visitor species change along the fragmentation size gradient? (iii) Does forest fragment size influence the abundance of effective pollinators of A. mexicanum? We found that fragment size did not affect the topological structure of the individual-based palm-pollinator network. Furthermore, while the composition of peripheral non-effective pollinators changed depending on fragment size, effective core generalist species of pollinators remained stable. We also observed that both abundance and variance of effective pollinators of male and female flowers of A. mexicanum increased with forest fragment size. These findings indicate that the presence of effective pollinators in the core of all forest fragments could keep the network structure stable along the gradient of forest fragmentation. In addition, pollination of A. mexicanum could be more effective in larger fragments, since the greater abundance of pollinators in these fragments may increase the amount of pollen and diversity of pollen donors between flowers of individual plants. Given the prevalence of fragmentation in tropical ecosystems, our results indicate that the current patterns of land use will have consequences on the underlying mechanisms of pollination in remnant forests

  11. Tropical forest fragmentation affects floral visitors but not the structure of individual-based palm-pollinator networks.

    PubMed

    Dáttilo, Wesley; Aguirre, Armando; Quesada, Mauricio; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing knowledge about the effects of habitat loss on pollinators in natural landscapes, information is very limited regarding the underlying mechanisms of forest fragmentation affecting plant-pollinator interactions in such landscapes. Here, we used a network approach to describe the effects of forest fragmentation on the patterns of interactions involving the understory dominant palm Astrocaryum mexicanum (Arecaceae) and its floral visitors (including both effective and non-effective pollinators) at the individual level in a Mexican tropical rainforest landscape. Specifically, we asked: (i) Does fragment size affect the structure of individual-based plant-pollinator networks? (ii) Does the core of highly interacting visitor species change along the fragmentation size gradient? (iii) Does forest fragment size influence the abundance of effective pollinators of A. mexicanum? We found that fragment size did not affect the topological structure of the individual-based palm-pollinator network. Furthermore, while the composition of peripheral non-effective pollinators changed depending on fragment size, effective core generalist species of pollinators remained stable. We also observed that both abundance and variance of effective pollinators of male and female flowers of A. mexicanum increased with forest fragment size. These findings indicate that the presence of effective pollinators in the core of all forest fragments could keep the network structure stable along the gradient of forest fragmentation. In addition, pollination of A. mexicanum could be more effective in larger fragments, since the greater abundance of pollinators in these fragments may increase the amount of pollen and diversity of pollen donors between flowers of individual plants. Given the prevalence of fragmentation in tropical ecosystems, our results indicate that the current patterns of land use will have consequences on the underlying mechanisms of pollination in remnant forests.

  12. Tropical Forest Fragmentation Affects Floral Visitors but Not the Structure of Individual-Based Palm-Pollinator Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dáttilo, Wesley; Aguirre, Armando; Quesada, Mauricio; Dirzo, Rodolfo

    2015-01-01

    Despite increasing knowledge about the effects of habitat loss on pollinators in natural landscapes, information is very limited regarding the underlying mechanisms of forest fragmentation affecting plant-pollinator interactions in such landscapes. Here, we used a network approach to describe the effects of forest fragmentation on the patterns of interactions involving the understory dominant palm Astrocaryum mexicanum (Arecaceae) and its floral visitors (including both effective and non-effective pollinators) at the individual level in a Mexican tropical rainforest landscape. Specifically, we asked: (i) Does fragment size affect the structure of individual-based plant-pollinator networks? (ii) Does the core of highly interacting visitor species change along the fragmentation size gradient? (iii) Does forest fragment size influence the abundance of effective pollinators of A. mexicanum? We found that fragment size did not affect the topological structure of the individual-based palm-pollinator network. Furthermore, while the composition of peripheral non-effective pollinators changed depending on fragment size, effective core generalist species of pollinators remained stable. We also observed that both abundance and variance of effective pollinators of male and female flowers of A. mexicanum increased with forest fragment size. These findings indicate that the presence of effective pollinators in the core of all forest fragments could keep the network structure stable along the gradient of forest fragmentation. In addition, pollination of A. mexicanum could be more effective in larger fragments, since the greater abundance of pollinators in these fragments may increase the amount of pollen and diversity of pollen donors between flowers of individual plants. Given the prevalence of fragmentation in tropical ecosystems, our results indicate that the current patterns of land use will have consequences on the underlying mechanisms of pollination in remnant forests

  13. 75 FR 63165 - Air University Board of Visitors Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-14

    ...' meeting will take place on Monday, November 15th, 2010, from 12:15 p.m. to 5 p.m. and Tuesday, November... University educational programs. Additionally, four working groups will meet to discuss issues relating...

  14. Bristlecone Pine: Science and Esthetics: A 7100-year tree-ring chronology aids scientists; old trees draw visitors to California mountains.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, C W

    1968-02-23

    A 7100-year tree-ring chronology has been developed for bristlecone pine, Pinus aristata Engelm., in the White Mountains of east-central California by the addition of data from long-dead specimens to the 4600-year record from living trees. These dendrochronological studies have major applications to climatic interpretations, radiocarbon analysis, and the dating of past events. The great age of these trees and the esthetic appeal of both the trees and their environment are drawing increasing numbers of visitors to the bristlecone pine areas. Concern is expressed for the preservation of this ancient wood.

  15. Education and role conflict in the health visitor profession, 1918-39.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Jane; Rafferty, Anne Marie

    2010-06-01

    Health visiting was the public health profession in the UK, which arose during the Victorian period to support and supervise the mothers of the nation. The health visitor was expected to teach the new mothers hygiene, infant feeding and diet, help them in the home when necessary and then report back to the Medical Officer for Health. Her role therefore was multifaceted and required education and training from a number of differing bodies. She needed nursing skills to help with the practicalities of observation and home care, sanitary knowledge to ensure that the buildings were safe and training in law and epidemiology. In order to fulfil these professional requirements, by the middle of the twentieth century the health visitor was expected to be a nurse by background, be educated for health visiting in a university and understand community medicine. These differing and sometimes opposing requirements meant that the health visitor was often caught in-between conflicting ideologies. It is this idea of 'in-betweenness' from the work of the anthropologist Marilyn Strathern and its relation to the work and education of the health visitor that this article will focus.

  16. The 1966 Audience of the New York State Museum: An Evaluation of the Museum's Visitors Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Div. of Evaluation.

    The purpose of this study was to provide the New York State Museum (NYSM) with a profile of its audience during 1966. A total of 1,544 persons were interviewed. Visitors came from seven counties, with Albany accounting for 58%. A comparison was made with Royal Ontario Museum on the basis of group size, sex, age, educational level, occupation, and…

  17. 77 FR 14006 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-08

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the... advisory committee meeting will take place: 1. Name of Committee: United States Military Academy Board of... attend the meeting will need to show photo identification in order to gain access to the meeting...

  18. 75 FR 43496 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-26

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY... Language Institute Foreign Language Center. Date: August 10 and 11, 2010. Time of Meeting: Approximately 8... Language Institute Foreign Language Center and Presidio of Monterey (DLIFLC & POM), Building...

  19. 78 FR 65977 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... of Visitors. 2. Date: Wednesday, October 16, 2013. 3. Time: 2:00 p.m.-5:30 p.m. 4. Location: Haig... Point of Contact: Ms. Deadra Ghostlaw, (845) 938-4200, Deadra.Ghostlaw@us.army.mil . 7. Due to the...

  20. Mammoth Cave: It's Explorers, Miners, Archeologists, and Visitors. Teaching with Historic Places.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Robert H.

    The mysterious darkness of Mammoth Cave in southwestern Kentucky, about 90 miles south of Louisville and 90 miles north of Nashville, has lured travelers to enter and warned them to stay away. From the dawn of time visitors have been awestruck by the cave's size and rugged beauty. This lesson is based on the National Register of Historic Places…

  1. Museum Learning via Social and Mobile Technologies: (How) Can Online Interactions Enhance the Visitor Experience?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charitonos, Koula; Blake, Canan; Scanlon, Eileen; Jones, Ann

    2012-01-01

    Key to introducing information and communication technologies in museums is to support meaning-making activity in encounters with artefacts. The study presented in this paper is exploratory in nature and investigates the use of social and mobile technologies in school field trips as a means of enhancing the visitor experience. It is anchored in…

  2. Solar energy system installed at Mount Rushmore National Visitor Center in Keystone, South Dakota

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design and installation of the solar energy system installed at the Mount Rushmore Visitor Center is described. The system was designed to furnish about 45 percent of the heating for the total facility and about 53 percent partial cooling for the 2000 square foot observatory.

  3. An Interpretive Study of Yosemite National Park Visitors' Perspectives Toward Alternative Transportation in Yosemite Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Dave D.

    2007-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) is increasingly focusing on alternative transportation systems in national parks to address environmental and social problems arising from a historical reliance on personal automobiles as the primary means of visitor access. Despite the potential advantages, alternative transportation may require a reorientation in the way that Americans have experienced national parks since the advent of auto-tourism in the early twentieth century. Little research exists, however, on visitor perspectives towards alternative transportation or the rationale underlying their perspectives. It remains unclear how transportation systems affect visitors’ experiences of the park landscape or the factors influencing their travel behavior in the parks. This report presents an interpretive study of visitor perspectives toward transportation management in the Yosemite Valley area of Yosemite National Park, California. Qualitative analysis of 160 semi-structured interviews identified individual psychological factors as well as situational influences that affect visitors’ behavior and perspectives. Individual psychological factors include perceived freedom, environmental values and beliefs, prior experience with Yosemite National Park and other national parks, prior experience with alternative transportation in national parks, and sensitivity to subjective perceptions of crowding. Situational factors included convenience, access, and flexibility of travel modes, as well as type of visit, type of group, and park use level. Interpretive communication designed to encourage voluntary visitor use of alternative transportation should focus on these psychological and situational factors. Although challenges remain, the results of this study suggest approaches for shaping the way Americans visit and experience their national parks to encourage environmental sustainability.

  4. Environment Assessment for the Construction of a Visitor/Education Center at NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Carolyn D.

    2006-01-01

    This document is an environmental assessment that examines the environmental impacts of a proposed plan to clear land and to construct a building for the operation of a Visitor/Education Center at a location next to the Mississippi Welcome Center on Interstate 10 along highway 607 in Hancock County Mississippi.

  5. 75 FR 71421 - Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation Board of Visitors; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation Board of Visitors; Meeting... Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC). Notice of this meeting is required under the...

  6. 77 FR 20369 - Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation Board of Visitors; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation Board of Visitors; Meeting... Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC). Notice of this meeting is required under the...

  7. 75 FR 32418 - Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation Board of Visitors; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Army Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation Board of Visitors; Meeting... Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC). Notice of this meeting is required under the...

  8. 75 FR 10809 - Agency Information Collection Activities: United States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... Expansion to the 50 Most Highly Trafficked Land Border Ports of Entry.'' 73 FR 77473. That rule became... States Visitor and Immigrant Status Indicator Technology (US-VISIT); Biometric Data Collection at the... disseminates biometric information (digital fingerprint images and facial photos) from individuals during...

  9. UK health visitors' role in identifying and intervening with infants at risk of developing obesity.

    PubMed

    Redsell, Sarah A; Swift, Judy A; Nathan, Dilip; Siriwardena, A Niroshan; Atkinson, Philippa; Glazebrook, Cris

    2013-07-01

    Childhood obesity is associated with a number of modifiable risk factors that can be identified during infancy or earlier. In the UK, health visitors advise parents about infant feeding, but little is known about their role in obesity prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the beliefs and current practices of UK health visitors in relation to recognising and intervening with infants at risk of developing obesity. Thirty members of the health visiting team were interviewed. The interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis was applied using an interpretative, inductive approach. Health visitors were aware of some of the modifiable risk factors for childhood obesity such as infant feeding practices. They felt they had a role in advising parents about diet but did not formally identify and/or intervene with larger infants. Infant overweight was considered a sensitive issue that was difficult to raise with parents. They believed some parents preferred larger infants and were unaware that their feeding practices might be contributing to obesity risk. A need for training and guidance was identified together with strategies to overcome system barriers. Health visitors do not currently target parents of infants at risk of obesity largely because they do not perceive they have appropriate guidance and skills to enable them to do so. There is an urgent need for tools and training to enable all health care professionals to recognise and manage infants at risk of developing obesity without creating a sense of blame.

  10. 75 FR 7571 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-22

    ... Committee: United States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Tuesday, March 9, 2010. 3. Time: 12:30...-3.165, and the availability of space, this meeting is open to the public. Seating is on a first-come... next meeting in order to provide time for member consideration. By rule, no member of the...

  11. 76 FR 41490 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... Visitors. 2. Date: Friday, July 29, 2011. 3. Time: 12 p.m.-3 p.m. Members of the public wishing to attend... availability of space, this meeting is open to the public. Seating is on a first-come basis. 8. Committee's... must be received no later than five working days prior to the next meeting in order to provide time...

  12. 75 FR 20827 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-21

    ... Visitors. 2. Date: Tuesday, May 11, 2010. 3. Time: 10:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Members of the public wishing to... availability of space, this meeting is open to the public. Seating is on a first-come basis. 8. Committee's... must be received no later than five working days prior to the next meeting in order to provide time...

  13. 77 FR 31339 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Visitors. 2. Date: Thursday, June 14, 2012. 3. Time: 12:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m. Members of the public wishing to... space, this meeting is open to the public. Seating is on a first-come basis. 8. Committee's Designated... to the next meeting in order to provide time for member consideration. FOR FURTHER...

  14. 78 FR 32241 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA); Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... Committee: United States Military Academy Board of Visitors. 2. Date: Wednesday, June 19, 2013. 3. Time: 2 p... CFR 102-3.140 through 102-3.165 and the availability of space, this meeting is open to the public... than five working days prior to the next meeting in order to provide time for member consideration....

  15. The Black Holes Traveling Exhibition: Visitors Go In, But Does Learning Come Out?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussault, Mary E.; Gould, R.; Sunbury, S.; Londhe, R.

    2011-01-01

    How do you make a fascinating but challenging scientific topic accessible to the broadest audience of museum-goers? What kinds of learning outcomes might escape from a visit to an exhibition on black holes? In 2009, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics developed a 2500 square foot interactive museum exhibition with funding from the National Science Foundation and NASA. The project pursued two innovations to achieve its educational goals: 1) the participation of youth teams as co-developers of several exhibit and program components; and 2) the use of networked exhibit technology to personalize the visitor experience, to support learning over time including beyond the gallery, and to provide a rich quantitative source of embedded evaluation data. Visitor use a bar-coded "Black Holes Explorer's Card” to gather digital data as they navigate the exhibition, and an automated web-content authorizing system creates a personalized online journal of their experience that they can access once they get home. Summative evaluation results reported by Goodman Research Group include successful implementation of the two project innovations, and multiple positive visitor outcomes in knowledge, engagement and attitudes towards science. Furthermore, the evidence shows that use of the bar-coded Explorer's Card significantly enhances these positive outcomes and that the youth-designed elements contributed to visitor engagement.

  16. Colorado Canyons National Conservation Area 2003 visitor use survey: Completion report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponds, Phadrea; Gillette, Shana C.; Koontz, Lynne

    2004-01-01

    Trail activities are often those that people participate in on a regular basis as a way to exercise. This can make trail related activities more attractive from a management standpoint because people who participate in an activity may be more likely to be repeat visitors.

  17. Use of Questions in Exhibit Labels to Generate Explanatory Conversation among Science Museum Visitors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohenstein, Jill; Tran, Lynn Uyen

    2007-01-01

    Research suggests that conversations at museums contribute to, as well as serve as evidence for, learning. Many museums use labels to provide visitors with information as well as stimulate conversation about exhibit topics. However, most studies on exhibit labels do not centre on conversations. This investigation uses a Vygotskian framework to…

  18. 48 CFR 1352.237-73 - Foreign national visitor and guest access to departmental resources.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... resources. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1337.110-70 (e), insert the following clause: Foreign National Visitor... Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text... provide the Government with notice of foreign nationals requiring access to any Department of...

  19. 78 FR 29124 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice of partially closed meeting. SUMMARY: The United States Naval Academy Board of... Naval Academy. The executive session of this meeting from 11:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on June 3, 2013,...

  20. Characteristics and the Economic Impact of Visitors to Heritage and Cultural Tourism Attractions in North Dakota

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodur, Nancy Marie

    2010-01-01

    In the last two decades, travel and tourism has grown into an increasingly important industry. More recently, travelers have sought out activities and attractions that focus on authenticity, heritage and uniqueness, and rural communities have begun to realize that their communities and attractions match well with what visitors are demanding.…

  1. 78 FR 60266 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Michael McClendon, a former tactical non- commissioned officer in the US Corps of Cadets; the...

  2. 78 FR 13030 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act... Designated Federal Officer or Point of Contact: Ms. Deadra Ghostlaw, (845) 938-4200,...

  3. 76 FR 776 - Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ] ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal..., CA, 93944, Detlev.kesten@us.army.mil , (831) 242-6670. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Pursuant to 41...

  4. 78 FR 65300 - Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation Board of Visitors; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Department of the Army Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation Board of Visitors; Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Notice of open meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the... period. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Richard Procell at (913) 684-2963 or...

  5. 76 FR 60816 - Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... Department of the Army Board of Visitors, United States Military Academy (USMA) AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Meeting notice. SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act...: Ms. Joy A. Pasquazi, (845) 938-5078, Joy.Pasquazi@us.army.mil . ] SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  6. 77 FR 6788 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, Do... executive session of this meeting to the public. Accordingly, the Secretary of the Navy has determined in..., Judge Advocate General's Corps, U.S. Navy, Federal Register Liaison Officer. BILLING CODE 3810-FF-P...

  7. 78 FR 70296 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors AGENCY: Department of the Navy, Do... of the Navy has determined in writing that the meeting shall be partially closed to the public..., 2013. N.A. Hagerty-Ford, Commander, Office of the Judge Advocate General, U.S. Navy, Federal...

  8. 77 FR 33202 - Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the U.S. Naval Academy Board of Visitors; Correction AGENCY: Department of Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice; correction. SUMMARY: The Department of the Navy published a document in the Federal Register (77 FR 103) on May 29, 2012, concerning the partially closed meeting of the U.S....

  9. Continuing Education Needs of Community Nurses, Midwives and Health Visitors for Supervising and Assessing Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomson, Ann M.; Davies, Susan; Shepherd, Bernadette; Whittaker, Karen

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 314 community nurses, midwives, and health visitors in Britain revealed the practitioners' need for continuing education to help them provide research-based instruction for learners preparing for community-health service. Most practitioners had to study on their own time at their own expense. (SK)

  10. Focus Your Young Visitors: Kids Innovation--Fundamental Changes in Digital Edutainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauer, Sebastian; Gobel, Stefan

    With regard to the acceptance of human-computer interfaces, immersion represents one of the most important methods for attracting young visitors into museum exhibitions. Exciting and diversely presented content as well as intuitive, natural and human-like interfaces are indispensable to bind users to an interactive system with real and digital…

  11. 36 CFR 13.1906 - Headquarters/Visitor Center Developed Area (HVCDA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Headquarters/Visitor Center Developed Area (HVCDA). 13.1906 Section 13.1906 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Wrangell-St....

  12. 36 CFR 13.1906 - Headquarters/Visitor Center Developed Area (HVCDA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Headquarters/Visitor Center Developed Area (HVCDA). 13.1906 Section 13.1906 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Wrangell-St....

  13. 36 CFR 13.1906 - Headquarters/Visitor Center Developed Area (HVCDA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Headquarters/Visitor Center Developed Area (HVCDA). 13.1906 Section 13.1906 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Wrangell-St....

  14. 36 CFR 13.1906 - Headquarters/Visitor Center Developed Area (HVCDA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Headquarters/Visitor Center Developed Area (HVCDA). 13.1906 Section 13.1906 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Wrangell-St....

  15. 36 CFR 13.1906 - Headquarters/Visitor Center Developed Area (HVCDA).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Headquarters/Visitor Center Developed Area (HVCDA). 13.1906 Section 13.1906 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM UNITS IN ALASKA Special Regulations-Wrangell-St....

  16. How Full Is Your Luggage? Background Knowledge of Zoo Visitors Regarding Sharks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    das Neves, João Pedro Correia; Monteiro, Rute Cristina Rocha

    2013-01-01

    For the general population, sharks have a reputation that does not really fit with their biological and ecological nature. Informal surveys often classify sharks as dangerous, aggressive and/or man-eaters. This apparent common knowledge seems difficult to detach from the conscience of many worldwide zoo visitors, even with the help of…

  17. LOFT. Interior of visitors' room in control building (TAN630), typically ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOFT. Interior of visitors' room in control building (TAN-630), typically occupied during tests. Indicator display allowed observers to watch progress of experiment. Date: May 2004. INEEL negative no. HD-39-14-1 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. 77 FR 12578 - Meeting of the Board of Visitors of Marine Corps University

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-01

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the Board of Visitors of Marine Corps University AGENCY: Department of the... University will meet to review, develop and provide recommendations on all aspects of the academic and administrative policies of the University; examine all aspects of professional military education operations;...

  19. 78 FR 3409 - Meeting of the Board of Visitors of Marine Corps University

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the Board of Visitors of Marine Corps University AGENCY: Department of the... University will meet to review, develop and provide recommendations on all aspects of the academic and administrative policies of the University; examine all aspects of professional military education operations;...

  20. 77 FR 55813 - Meeting of the Board of Visitors of Marine Corps University

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-11

    ... Department of the Navy Meeting of the Board of Visitors of Marine Corps University AGENCY: Department of the... University will meet to review, develop and provide recommendations on all aspects of the academic and administrative policies of the University; examine all aspects of professional military education operations;...