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Sample records for addition specific molecular

  1. An Additive Definition of Molecular Complexity.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Thomas

    2016-03-28

    A framework for molecular complexity is established that is based on information theory and consistent with chemical knowledge. The resulting complexity index Cm is derived from abstracting the information content of a molecule by the degrees of freedom in the microenvironments on a per-atom basis, allowing the molecular complexity to be calculated in a simple and additive way. This index allows the complexity of any molecule to be universally assessed and is sensitive to stereochemistry, heteroatoms, and symmetry. The performance of this complexity index is evaluated and compared against the current state of the art. Its additive character gives consistent values also for very large molecules and supports direct comparisons of chemical reactions. Finally, this approach may provide a useful tool for medicinal chemistry in drug design and lead selection, as demonstrated by correlating molecular complexities of antibiotics with compound-specific parameters. PMID:26857537

  2. Manipulating crystallization with molecular additives.

    PubMed

    Shtukenberg, Alexander G; Lee, Stephanie S; Kahr, Bart; Ward, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Given the importance of organic crystals in a wide range of industrial applications, the chemistry, biology, materials science, and chemical engineering communities have focused considerable attention on developing methods to control crystal structure, size, shape, and orientation. Tailored additives have been used to control crystallization to great effect, presumably by selectively binding to particular crystallographic surfaces and sites. However, substantial knowledge gaps still exist in the fundamental mechanisms that govern the formation and growth of organic crystals in both the absence and presence of additives. In this review, we highlight research discoveries that reveal the role of additives, either introduced by design or present adventitiously, on various stages of formation and growth of organic crystals, including nucleation, dislocation spiral growth mechanisms, growth inhibition, and nonclassical crystal morphologies. The insights from these investigations and others of their kind are likely to guide the development of innovative methods to manipulate crystallization for a wide range of materials and applications. PMID:24579880

  3. Molecular Mechanisms of Synaptic Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Margeta, Milica A.; Shen, Kang

    2011-01-01

    Synapses are specialized junctions that mediate information flow between neurons and their targets. A striking feature of the nervous system is the specificity of its synaptic connections: an individual neuron will form synapses only with a small subset of available presynaptic and postsynaptic partners. Synaptic specificity has been classically thought to arise from homophilic or heterophilic interactions between adhesive molecules acting across the synaptic cleft. Over the past decade, many new mechanisms giving rise to synaptic specificity have been identified. Synapses can be specified by secreted molecules that promote or inhibit synaptogenesis, and their source can be a neighboring guidepost cell, not just presynaptic and postsynaptic neurons. Furthermore, lineage, fate, and timing of development can also play critical roles in shaping neural circuits. Future work utilizing large-scale screens will aim to elucidate the full scope of cellular mechanisms and molecular players that can give rise to synaptic specificity. PMID:19969086

  4. Theory of atomic additivity in molecular hyperpolizabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, James K.

    1987-01-01

    Hyperpolarizability is a function of frequency. This is called dispersion. Because of the Kramers-Kronig relations, researchers expect that a material that is dispersing light is also absorbing it. Where there is both dispersion and absorption, the molecular polarizabilities are complex functions of the frequency. This led researchers to consider atomic additivity in both the real and imaginary parts of the ordinary and hyperpolarizabilities. This effort is desirable not only from a theoretical point of view, but also because of the existence of a large body of complex refractive index data, which may be used to test the additivity principle with the complex valued ordinary dipole polarizability.

  5. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  6. Molecular specific optoacoustic imaging with plasmonic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Larson, Timothy; Aaron, Jesse; Sokolov, Konstantin; Emelianov, Stanislav

    2007-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles functionalized with antibodies can specifically bind to molecular biomarkers such as epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR). The molecule specific nature of the antibody-functionalized gold nanoparticles forms the basis for the developed optoacoustic imaging technique to detect cancer at an asymptotic stage. Optoacoustic imaging was performed with 532 nm and 680 nm pulsed laser irradiation on three-dimensional tissue phantoms prepared using a human keratinocyte cell line. The results of our study demonstrate that the combination of anti-EGFR gold ioconjugates and optoacoustic imaging can allow highly sensitive and selective detection of human epithelial cancer cells.

  7. 45 CFR 156.285 - Additional standards specific to SHOP.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Additional standards specific to SHOP. 156.285 Section 156.285 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO HEALTH CARE ACCESS HEALTH INSURANCE ISSUER STANDARDS UNDER THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT, INCLUDING...

  8. Molecular and cellular limits to somatosensory specificity

    PubMed Central

    Belmonte, Carlos; Viana, Félix

    2008-01-01

    Animals detect environmental changes through sensory neural mechanisms that enable them to differentiate the quality, intensity and temporal characteristics of stimuli. The 'doctrine of specific nervous energies' postulates that the different sensory modalities experienced by humans result of the activation of specific nervous pathways. Identification of functional classes of sensory receptors provided scientific support to the concept that somatosensory modalities (touch, pain, temperature, kinesthesis) are subserved by separate populations of sensory receptor neurons specialized in detecting innocuous and injurious stimuli of different quality (mechanical forces, temperature, chemical compounds). The identification of receptor proteins activated by different physicochemical stimuli, in particular ion channels of the Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) superfamily, has put forward the concept that specificity of peripheral sensory receptor neurons is determined by their expression of a particular "molecular sensor" that confers to each functional type its selectivity to respond with a discharge of nerve impulses to stimuli of a given quality. Nonetheless, recent experimental data suggest that the various molecular sensors proposed as specific transducer molecules for stimuli of different quality are not as neatly associated with the distinct functional types of sensory receptors as originally proposed. First, many ion channel molecules initially associated to the transduction of only one particular form of energy are also activated by stimuli of different quality, implying a limited degree of specificity in their transducing capacities. Second, molecular sensors associated with a stimulus quality and hence to a sensory receptor type and ultimately to a sensory modality may be concomitantly expressed in sensory receptor neurons functionally defined as specific for another stimulus quality. Finally, activation of voltage gated channels involved primarily in nerve

  9. Specificity of site directed psoralen addition to RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Teare, J; Wollenzien, P

    1989-01-01

    We describe the attachment of a psoralen derivative (site specific psoralen, SSP) to the 5' end of a DNA oligonucleotide and the hybridization and the photoreaction of this reagent with a complementary target site on an RNA molecule. SSP was coupled to a variety of DNA oligonucleotides to investigate the structural requirements for addition to the RNA. Efficient SSP photoadducts were made on specific uridines by designing an intercalation site at an unpaired nucleotide in the RNA strand within the heteroduplex region. The optimal location for this site was five nucleotides from the oligonucleotide 5' end and just 5' to the target uridine residue. Because the attachment of the SSP to the oligonucleotide is through a disulfide bond, the DNA oligonucleotide can be removed with reduction to leave SSP attached to the RNA strand. The SSP adduct made in this way will be useful for subsequent biochemical and biophysical experiments. Images PMID:2471154

  10. Molecular Aluminum Additive for Burn Enhancement of Hydrocarbon Fuels.

    PubMed

    Guerieri, Philip M; DeCarlo, Samantha; Eichhorn, Bryan; Connell, Terrence; Yetter, Richard A; Tang, Xin; Hicks, Zachary; Bowen, Kit H; Zachariah, Michael R

    2015-11-12

    Additives to hydrocarbon fuels are commonly explored to change the combustion dynamics, chemical distribution, and/or product integrity. Here we employ a novel aluminum-based molecular additive, Al(I) tetrameric cluster [AlBrNEt3]4 (Et = C2H5), to a hydrocarbon fuel and evaluate the resultant single-droplet combustion properties. This Al4 cluster offers a soluble alternative to nanoscale particulate additives that have recently been explored and may mitigate the observed problems of particle aggregation. Results show the [AlBrNEt3]4 additive to increase the burn rate constant of a toluene-diethyl ether fuel mixture by ∼20% in a room temperature oxygen environment with only 39 mM of active aluminum additive (0.16 wt % limited by additive solubility). In comparison, a roughly similar addition of nano-aluminum particulate shows no discernible difference in burn properties of the hydrocarbon fuel. High speed video shows the [AlBrNEt3]4 to induce microexplosive gas release events during the last ∼30% of the droplet combustion time. We attribute this to HBr gas release based on results of temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments of the [AlBrNEt3]4 dosed with O2 and D2O. A possible mechanism of burn rate enhancement is presented that is consistent with microexplosion observations and TPR results. PMID:26488461

  11. Molecular Recognition and Specific Interactions for Biosensing Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong Chung; Kang, Dae Joon

    2008-01-01

    Molecular recognition and specific interactions are reliable and versatile routes for site-specific and well-oriented immobilization of functional biomolecules on surfaces. The control of surface properties via the molecular recognition and specific interactions at the nanoscale is a key element for the nanofabrication of biosensors with high sensitivity and specificity. This review intends to provide a comprehensive understanding of the molecular recognition- and specific interaction-mediated biosensor fabrication routes that leads to biosensors with well-ordered and controlled structures on both nanopatterned surfaces and nanomaterials. Herein self-assembly of the biomolecules via the molecular recognition and specific interactions on nanoscaled surfaces as well as nanofabrication techniques of the biomolecules for biosensor architecture are discussed. We also describe the detection of molecular recognition- and specific interaction-mediated molecular binding as well as advantages of nanoscale detection.

  12. The Molecular Basis for Kinesin Functional Specificity During Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Welburn, Julie P I

    2013-01-01

    Microtubule-based motor proteins play key roles during mitosis to assemble the bipolar spindle, define the cell division axis, and align and segregate the chromosomes. The majority of mitotic motors are members of the kinesin superfamily. Despite sharing a conserved catalytic core, each kinesin has distinct functions and localization, and is uniquely regulated in time and space. These distinct behaviors and functional specificity are generated by variations in the enzymatic domain as well as the non-conserved regions outside of the kinesin motor domain and the stalk. These flanking regions can directly modulate the properties of the kinesin motor through dimerization or self-interactions, and can associate with extrinsic factors, such as microtubule or DNA binding proteins, to provide additional functional properties. This review discusses the recently identified molecular mechanisms that explain how the control and functional specification of mitotic kinesins is achieved. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24039047

  13. FPGA-specific decimal sign-magnitude addition and subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Martín; Todorovich, Elías

    2016-07-01

    The interest in sign-magnitude (SM) representation in decimal numbers lies in the IEEE 754-2008 standard, where the significand in floating-point numbers is coded as SM. However, software implementations do not meet performance constraints in some applications and more development is required in programmable logic, a key technology for hardware acceleration. Thus, in this work, two strategies for SM decimal adder/subtractors are studied and six new Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-specific circuits are derived from these strategies. The first strategy is based on ten's complement (C10) adder/subtractors and the second one is based on parallel computation of an unsigned adder and an unsigned subtractor. Four of these alternative circuits are useful for at least one area-time-trade-off and specific operand size. For example, the fastest SM adder/subtractor for operand sizes of 7 and 16 decimal digits is based on the second proposed strategy with delays of 3.43 and 4.33 ns, respectively, but the fastest circuit for 34-digit operands is one of the three specific implementations based on C10 adder/subtractors with a delay of 4.65 ns.

  14. Additive manufacturing of patient-specific tubular continuum manipulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amanov, Ernar; Nguyen, Thien-Dang; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica

    2015-03-01

    Tubular continuum robots, which are composed of multiple concentric, precurved, elastic tubes, provide more dexterity than traditional surgical instruments at the same diameter. The tubes can be precurved such that the resulting manipulator fulfills surgical task requirements. Up to now the only material used for the component tubes of those manipulators is NiTi, a super-elastic shape-memory alloy of nickel and titan. NiTi is a cost-intensive material and fabrication processes are complex, requiring (proprietary) technology, e.g. for shape setting. In this paper, we evaluate component tubes made of 3 different thermoplastic materials (PLA, PCL and nylon) using fused filament fabrication technology (3D printing). This enables quick and cost-effective production of custom, patient-specific continuum manipulators, produced on site on demand. Stress-strain and deformation characteristics are evaluated experimentally for 16 fabricated tubes of each thermoplastic with diameters and shapes equivalent to those of NiTi tubes. Tubes made of PCL and nylon exhibit properties comparable to those made of NiTi. We further demonstrate a tubular continuum manipulator composed of 3 nylon tubes in a transnasal, transsphenoidal skull base surgery scenario in vitro.

  15. Molecular basis of host specificity in human pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaolei; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Jing-Ren

    2014-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria display various levels of host specificity or tropism. While many bacteria can infect a wide range of hosts, certain bacteria have strict host selectivity for humans as obligate human pathogens. Understanding the genetic and molecular basis of host specificity in pathogenic bacteria is important for understanding pathogenic mechanisms, developing better animal models and designing new strategies and therapeutics for the control of microbial diseases. The molecular mechanisms of bacterial host specificity are much less understood than those of viral pathogens, in part due to the complexity of the molecular composition and cellular structure of bacterial cells. However, important progress has been made in identifying and characterizing molecular determinants of bacterial host specificity in the last two decades. It is now clear that the host specificity of bacterial pathogens is determined by multiple molecular interactions between the pathogens and their hosts. Furthermore, certain basic principles regarding the host specificity of bacterial pathogens have emerged from the existing literature. This review focuses on selected human pathogenic bacteria and our current understanding of their host specificity. PMID:26038515

  16. The morpholino molecular beacon for specific RNA visualization in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jianbin; Wu, Jikui; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-02-21

    A non-invasive fluorescent probe, morpholino molecular beacon (MO-MB), was designed for RNA visualization in vivo. Featuring negligible toxicity, stability, and high target specificity in living embryos, MO-MB is superior to conventional probes and has the potential for specific RNA visualization in basic biological and clinical research. PMID:26810703

  17. Addition of molecular methods to mutation studies with Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.R. )

    1989-01-01

    For 80 years, Drosophila melanogaster has been used as a major tool in analyzing Mendelian genetics. By using chromosome inversions that suppress crossing over, geneticists have developed a large number of stocks for mutation analysis. These stocks permit numerous tests for specific locus mutations, lethals at multiple loci on any chromosome, chromosome exchanges, insertions, and deletions. The entire genome can be manipulated for a degree of genetic control not found in other germ-line systems. Recombinant DNA techniques now permit analysis of mutations to the nucleotide level. By combining classical genetic analysis with recombinant DNA techniques, it is possible to analyze mutations that range from chromosome aberrations and multilocus deficiencies to single nucleotide transitions.

  18. System among the corticosteroids: specificity and molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Brookes, Jennifer C.; Galigniana, Mario D.; Harker, Anthony H.; Stoneham, A. Marshall; Vinson, Gavin P.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding how structural features determine specific biological activities has often proved elusive. With over 161 000 steroid structures described, an algorithm able to predict activity from structural attributes would provide manifest benefits. Molecular simulations of a range of 35 corticosteroids show striking correlations between conformational mobility and biological specificity. Thus steroid ring A is important for glucocorticoid action, and is rigid in the most specific (and potent) examples, such as dexamethasone. By contrast, ring C conformation is important for the mineralocorticoids, and is rigid in aldosterone. Other steroids that are less specific, or have mixed functions, or none at all, are more flexible. One unexpected example is 11-deoxycorticosterone, which the methods predict (and our activity studies confirm) is not only a specific mineralocorticoid, but also has significant glucocorticoid activity. These methods may guide the design of new corticosteroid agonists and antagonists. They will also have application in other examples of ligand–receptor interactions. PMID:21613285

  19. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  20. Luminescent Nanomaterials for Molecular-Specific Cellular Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zvyagin, Andrei Vasilyevich; Song, Zhen; Nadort, Annemarie; Sreenivasan, Varun Kumaraswamy Annayya; Deyev, Sergey Mikhailovich

    Imaging of molecular trafficking in cells and biological tissue aided by molecular-specific fluorescent labeling is very attractive, since it affords capturing the key processes in comprehensive biological context. Several shortcomings of the existing organic dye labeling technology, however, call for development of alternative molecular reporters, with improved photostability, reduced cytotoxicity, and an increased number of controllable surface moieties. Such alternative molecular reporters are represented by inorganic luminescent nanoparticles (NP) whose optical, physical, and chemical properties are discussed on the examples of luminescent nanodiamonds (LND) and upconversion nanoparticles (UCNP). The emission origins of these nanomaterials differ markedly. LND emission results from individual nitrogen-vacancy color-centers in a biocompatible nanodiamond host whose properties can be controlled via size and surface groups. Photophysics of UCNP is governed by the collective, nonlinear excitation transfer processes, resulting in conversion of longer-wavelength excitation to the shorter-wavelength emission. The emission/excitation spectral properties of UCNP falling within the biological tissue transparency window open new opportunities of almost complete suppression of the cell/tissue autofluorescence background. The developed surface of these nanoparticles represents a flexible platform populated with biocompatible surface moieties onto which cargo and targeting biomolecules can be firmly docked through a process called bioconjugation. These bioconjugated modules, e.g., nanodiamond-antibody, (quantum dot)-somatostatin, or (upconversion nanoparticle)-(mini-antibody) can gain admission into the cells by initiating the cell-specific, cell-recognized communication protocol. In this chapter, we aim to demonstrate the whole bottom-up bio-nano-optics approach for optical biological imaging capturing luminescent nanoparticle design, surface activation, and bioconjugation

  1. Cellular and molecular specificity of pituitary gland physiology.

    PubMed

    Perez-Castro, Carolina; Renner, Ulrich; Haedo, Mariana R; Stalla, Gunter K; Arzt, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The anterior pituitary gland has the ability to respond to complex signals derived from central and peripheral systems. Perception of these signals and their integration are mediated by cell interactions and cross-talk of multiple signaling transduction pathways and transcriptional regulatory networks that cooperate for hormone secretion, cell plasticity, and ultimately specific pituitary responses that are essential for an appropriate physiological response. We discuss the physiopathological and molecular mechanisms related to this integrative regulatory system of the anterior pituitary gland and how it contributes to modulate the gland functions and impacts on body homeostasis. PMID:22298650

  2. Molecularly Imprinted Polymers: Thermodynamic and Kinetic Considerations on the Specific Sorption and Molecular Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Li, Songjun; Huang, Xing; Zheng, Mingxia; Li, Wuke; Tong, Kejun

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a work aiming at thermodynamically and kinetically interpreting the specific sorption and recognition by a molecularly imprinted polymer. Using Boc-L-Phe-OH as a template, the imprinted material was prepared. The result indicates that the prepared polymer can well discriminate the imprint species from its analogue (Boc-D-Phe-OH), so as to adsorb more for the former but less for the latter. Kinetic analysis indicates that this specific sorption, in nature, can be a result of a preferential promotion. The imprint within the polymer causes a larger adsorption rate for the template than for the analogue. Thermodynamic study also implies that the molecular induction from the specific imprint to the template is larger than to the analogue, which thus makes the polymer capable of preferentially alluring the template to bind.

  3. 49 CFR 173.301a - Additional general requirements for shipment of specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.301a Additional general requirements for shipment of specification cylinders. (a) General. The... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Additional general requirements for shipment...

  4. Structure, molecular evolution, and hydrolytic specificities of largemouth bass pepsins.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yoko; Suzuki-Matsubara, Mieko; Kageyama, Takashi; Moriyama, Akihiko

    2016-02-01

    The nucleotide sequences of largemouth bass pepsinogens (PG1, 2 and 3) were determined after molecular cloning of the respective cDNAs. Encoded PG1, 2 and 3 were classified as fish pepsinogens A1, A2 and C, respectively. Molecular evolutionary analyses show that vertebrate pepsinogens are classified into seven monophyletic groups, i.e. pepsinogens A, F, Y (prochymosins), C, B, and fish pepsinogens A and C. Regarding the primary structures, extensive deletion was obvious in S'1 loop residues in fish pepsin A as well as tetrapod pepsin Y. This deletion resulted in a decrease in hydrophobic residues in the S'1 site. Hydrolytic specificities of bass pepsins A1 and A2 were investigated with a pepsin substrate and its variants. Bass pepsins preferred both hydrophobic/aromatic residues and charged residues at the P'1 sites of substrates, showing the dual character of S'1 sites. Thermodynamic analyses of bass pepsin A2 showed that its activation Gibbs energy change (∆G(‡)) was lower than that of porcine pepsin A. Several sites of bass pepsin A2 moiety were found to be under positive selection, and most of them are located on the surface of the molecule, where they are involved in conformational flexibility. The broad S'1 specificity and flexible structure of bass pepsin A2 are thought to cause its high proteolytic activity. PMID:26627128

  5. Stathmin family proteins display specific molecular and tubulin binding properties.

    PubMed

    Charbaut, E; Curmi, P A; Ozon, S; Lachkar, S; Redeker, V; Sobel, A

    2001-05-11

    Stathmin family phosphoproteins (stathmin, SCG10, SCLIP, and RB3/RB3'/RB3") are involved in signal transduction and regulation of microtubule dynamics. With the exception of stathmin, they are expressed exclusively in the nervous system, where they display different spatio-temporal and functional regulations and hence play at least partially distinct and possibly complementary roles in relation to the control of development, plasticity, and neuronal activities. At the molecular level, each possesses a specific "stathmin-like domain" and, with the exception of stathmin, various combinations of N-terminal extensions involved in their association with intracellular membrane compartments. We show here that each stathmin-like domain also displays specific biochemical and tubulin interaction properties. They are all able to sequester two alpha/beta tubulin heterodimers as revealed by their inhibitory action on tubulin polymerization and by gel filtration. However, they differ in the stabilities of the complexes formed as well as in their interaction kinetics with tubulin followed by surface plasmon resonance as follows: strong stability and slow kinetics for RB3; medium for SCG10, SCLIP, and stathmin; and weak stability and rapid kinetics for RB3'. These results suggest that the fine-tuning of their stathmin-like domains contributes to the specific functional roles of stathmin family proteins in the regulation of microtubule dynamics within the various cell types and subcellular compartments of the developing or mature nervous system. PMID:11278715

  6. Molecular targeting of intracellular compartments specifically in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Hetal; Gibo, Denise M; Debinski, Waldemar

    2010-05-01

    We have implemented a strategy in which a genetically engineered, single-chain protein specifically recognizes cancer cells and is trafficked to a targeted subcellular compartment, such as the nucleus. The recombinant protein termed IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS has a triple functional property: (1) it binds a cancer-associated receptor, interleukin 13 receptor alpha 2 (IL-13Rα2), using modified IL-13 ligand, IL-13.E13K; (2) it exports its C-terminal portion out of the endosomal compartment using Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) translocation domain (D2); and (3) it travels to and accumulates in the nucleus guided by the nuclear localization signal (NLS). Here, we have demonstrated that this protein is transported into the brain tumor cells' nucleus, using 3 different methods of protein conjugation to dyes for the purpose of direct visualization of the protein's intracellular trafficking. IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS, and not the controls such as IL-13.E13K-D2, IL-13.E13K-NLS, or IL-13.E13K, accumulated in nuclei very efficiently, which increased with the time the cells were exposed to the protein. Also, IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS did not exhibit nuclear transport in cells with low expression levels of IL-13Rα2. Thus, it is possible to recognize cancer cells through their specific receptors and deliver a conjugated protein that travels specifically to the nucleus. Hence, our molecular targeting strategy succeeded in generating a single-chain proteinaceous agent capable of delivering drugs/labels needed to be localized to the cells' nuclei or potentially any other subcellular compartment, for their optimal efficacy or ability to exert their specific action. PMID:20740056

  7. Molecular Targeting of Intracellular Compartments Specifically in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Gibo, Denise M.; Debinski, Waldemar

    2010-01-01

    We have implemented a strategy in which a genetically engineered, single-chain protein specifically recognizes cancer cells and is trafficked to a targeted subcellular compartment, such as the nucleus. The recombinant protein termed IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS has a triple functional property: (1) it binds a cancer-associated receptor, interleukin 13 receptor alpha 2 (IL-13Rα2), using modified IL-13 ligand, IL-13.E13K; (2) it exports its C-terminal portion out of the endosomal compartment using Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) translocation domain (D2); and (3) it travels to and accumulates in the nucleus guided by the nuclear localization signal (NLS). Here, we have demonstrated that this protein is transported into the brain tumor cells’ nucleus, using 3 different methods of protein conjugation to dyes for the purpose of direct visualization of the protein’s intracellular trafficking. IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS, and not the controls such as IL-13.E13K-D2, IL-13.E13K-NLS, or IL-13.E13K, accumulated in nuclei very efficiently, which increased with the time the cells were exposed to the protein. Also, IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS did not exhibit nuclear transport in cells with low expression levels of IL-13Rα2. Thus, it is possible to recognize cancer cells through their specific receptors and deliver a conjugated protein that travels specifically to the nucleus. Hence, our molecular targeting strategy succeeded in generating a single-chain proteinaceous agent capable of delivering drugs/labels needed to be localized to the cells’ nuclei or potentially any other subcellular compartment, for their optimal efficacy or ability to exert their specific action. PMID:20740056

  8. 49 CFR 173.301a - Additional general requirements for shipment of specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional general requirements for shipment of specification cylinders. 173.301a Section 173.301a Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS...

  9. Rescue of abasic hammerhead ribozymes by exogenous addition of specific bases.

    PubMed

    Peracchi, A; Beigelman, L; Usman, N; Herschlag, D

    1996-10-15

    We have synthesized 13 hammerhead ribozyme variants, each containing an abasic residue at a specific position of the catalytic core. The activity of each of the variants is significantly reduced. In four cases, however, activity can be rescued by exogenous addition of the missing base. For one variant, the rescue is 300-fold; for another, the rescue is to the wild-type level. This latter abasic variant (G10.1X) has been characterized in detail. Activation is specific for guanine, the base initially removed. In addition, the specificity for guanine versus adenine is substantially altered by replacing C with U in the opposite strand of the ribozyme. These results show that a binding site for a small, noncharged ligand can be created in a preexisting ribozyme structure. This has implications for structure-function analysis of RNA, and leads to speculations about evolution in an "RNA world" and about the potential therapeutic use of ribozymes. PMID:8876168

  10. Dissecting the molecular origins of specific protein-nucleic acid recognition: hydrostatic pressure and molecular dynamics.

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Thomas W; Kosztin, Dorina; McLean, Mark A; Schulten, Klaus; Sligar, Stephen G

    2002-01-01

    The fundamental processes by which proteins recognize and bind to nucleic acids are critical to understanding cellular function. To explore the factors involved in protein-DNA recognition, we used hydrostatic pressure to perturb the binding of the BamHI endonuclease to cognate DNA, both in experiment and in molecular dynamic simulations. A new technique of high-pressure gel mobility shift analysis was used to test the effects of elevated hydrostatic pressure on the binding of BamHI to its cognate recognition sequence. Upon application of a pressure of 500 bar, the equilibrium dissociation constant of BamHI binding to the cognate site was found to increase nearly 10-fold. A challenge has been to link this type of pure thermodynamic measurement to functional events occurring at the molecular level. Thus, we used molecular dynamic simulations at both ambient and elevated pressures to reveal details of the direct and water-mediated interactions between BamHI and cognate DNA, which allow explanation of the effects of pressure on site-specific protein-DNA binding and complex stability. PMID:11751298

  11. Disease-specific molecular events in cortical multiple sclerosis lesions

    PubMed Central

    Wimmer, Isabella; Höftberger, Romana; Gerlach, Susanna; Haider, Lukas; Zrzavy, Tobias; Hametner, Simon; Mahad, Don; Binder, Christoph J.; Krumbholz, Markus; Bauer, Jan; Bradl, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Cortical lesions constitute an important part of multiple sclerosis pathology. Although inflammation appears to play a role in their formation, the mechanisms leading to demyelination and neurodegeneration are poorly understood. We aimed to identify some of these mechanisms by combining gene expression studies with neuropathological analysis. In our study, we showed that the combination of inflammation, plaque-like primary demyelination and neurodegeneration in the cortex is specific for multiple sclerosis and is not seen in other chronic inflammatory diseases mediated by CD8-positive T cells (Rasmussen’s encephalitis), B cells (B cell lymphoma) or complex chronic inflammation (tuberculous meningitis, luetic meningitis or chronic purulent meningitis). In addition, we performed genome-wide microarray analysis comparing micro-dissected active cortical multiple sclerosis lesions with those of tuberculous meningitis (inflammatory control), Alzheimer’s disease (neurodegenerative control) and with cortices of age-matched controls. More than 80% of the identified multiple sclerosis-specific genes were related to T cell-mediated inflammation, microglia activation, oxidative injury, DNA damage and repair, remyelination and regenerative processes. Finally, we confirmed by immunohistochemistry that oxidative damage in cortical multiple sclerosis lesions is associated with oligodendrocyte and neuronal injury, the latter also affecting axons and dendrites. Our study provides new insights into the complex mechanisms of neurodegeneration and regeneration in the cortex of patients with multiple sclerosis. PMID:23687122

  12. Allele-Specific Behavior of Molecular Networks: Understanding Small-Molecule Drug Response in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunquan; Hao, Dapeng; Zhang, Shaojun; Zhou, Meng; Su, Fei; Chen, Xi; Zhi, Hui; Li, Xia

    2013-01-01

    The study of systems genetics is changing the way the genetic and molecular basis of phenotypic variation, such as disease susceptibility and drug response, is being analyzed. Moreover, systems genetics aids in the translation of insights from systems biology into genetics. The use of systems genetics enables greater attention to be focused on the potential impact of genetic perturbations on the molecular states of networks that in turn affects complex traits. In this study, we developed models to detect allele-specific perturbations on interactions, in which a genetic locus with alternative alleles exerted a differing influence on an interaction. We utilized the models to investigate the dynamic behavior of an integrated molecular network undergoing genetic perturbations in yeast. Our results revealed the complexity of regulatory relationships between genetic loci and networks, in which different genetic loci perturb specific network modules. In addition, significant within-module functional coherence was found. We then used the network perturbation model to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of individual differences in response to 100 diverse small molecule drugs. As a result, we identified sub-networks in the integrated network that responded to variations in DNA associated with response to diverse compounds and were significantly enriched for known drug targets. Literature mining results provided strong independent evidence for the effectiveness of these genetic perturbing networks in the elucidation of small-molecule responses in yeast. PMID:23308257

  13. Properties and Microstructural Characteristic of Kaolin Geopolymer Ceramics with Addition of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Romisuhani; Bakri Abdullah, Mohd Mustafa Al; Hussin, Kamarudin; Sandu, Andrei Victor; Binhussain, Mohammed; Ain Jaya, Nur

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the mechanical properties and microstructure of kaolin geopolymer ceramics with addition of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene were studied. Inorganic polymers based on alumina and silica polysialate units were synthesized at room temperature from kaolin and sodium silicate in a highly alkaline medium, followed by curing and drying at 80 °C. Alkaline activator was formed by mixing the 12 M NaOH solution with sodium silicate at a ratio of 0.24. Addition of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene to the kaolin geopolymer are fabricated with Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene content of 2, 4, 6 and 8 (wt. %) by using powder metallurgy method. The samples were heated at 1200 °C and the strength and morphological were tested. It was found that the flexural strength for the kaolin geopolymer ceramics with addition of UHMWPE were improved and generally increased with the increasing of UHMWPE loading. The result revealed that the optimum flexural strength was obtained at UHMWPE loading of 4 wt. % (92.1 MPa) and the flexural strength started to decrease. Microstructural analysis showed the samples appeared to have more number of pores and connected of pores increased with the increasing of UHMWPE content.

  14. In Vitro Selection of Cancer Cell-Specific Molecular Recognition Elements from Amino Acid Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2015-01-01

    Differential cell systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) is an in vitro selection method for obtaining molecular recognition elements (MREs) that specifically bind to individual cell types with high affinity. MREs are selected from initial large libraries of different nucleic or amino acids. This review outlines the construction of peptide and antibody fragment libraries as well as their different host types. Common methods of selection are also reviewed. Additionally, examples of cancer cell MREs are discussed, as well as their potential applications. PMID:26436100

  15. A molecular code dictates sequence-specific DNA recognition by homeodomains.

    PubMed Central

    Damante, G; Pellizzari, L; Esposito, G; Fogolari, F; Viglino, P; Fabbro, D; Tell, G; Formisano, S; Di Lauro, R

    1996-01-01

    Most homeodomains bind to DNA sequences containing the motif 5'-TAAT-3'. The homeodomain of thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1HD) binds to sequences containing a 5'-CAAG-3' core motif, delineating a new mechanism for differential DNA recognition by homeodomains. We investigated the molecular basis of the DNA binding specificity of TTF-1HD by both structural and functional approaches. As already suggested by the three-dimensional structure of TTF-1HD, the DNA binding specificities of the TTF-1, Antennapedia and Engrailed homeodomains, either wild-type or mutants, indicated that the amino acid residue in position 54 is involved in the recognition of the nucleotide at the 3' end of the core motif 5'-NAAN-3'. The nucleotide at the 5' position of this core sequence is recognized by the amino acids located in position 6, 7 and 8 of the TTF-1 and Antennapedia homeodomains. These data, together with previous suggestions on the role of amino acids in position 50, indicate that the DNA binding specificity of homeodomains can be determined by a combinatorial molecular code. We also show that some specific combinations of the key amino acid residues involved in DNA recognition do not follow a simple, additive rule. Images PMID:8890172

  16. Fine Specificity and Molecular Competition in SLAM Family Receptor Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Timothy J.; Garner, Lee I.; Metcalfe, Clive; King, Elliott; Margraf, Stefanie; Brown, Marion H.

    2014-01-01

    SLAM family receptors regulate activation and inhibition in immunity through recruitment of activating and inhibitory SH2 domain containing proteins to immunoreceptor tyrosine based switch motifs (ITSMs). Binding of the adaptors, SAP and EAT-2 to ITSMs in the cytoplasmic regions of SLAM family receptors is important for activation. We analysed the fine specificity of SLAM family receptor phosphorylated ITSMs and the conserved tyrosine motif in EAT-2 for SH2 domain containing signalling proteins. Consistent with the literature describing dependence of CRACC (SLAMF7) on EAT-2, CRACC bound EAT-2 (KD = 0.003 μM) with approximately 2 orders of magnitude greater affinity than SAP (KD = 0.44 μM). RNA interference in cytotoxicity assays in NK92 cells showed dependence of CRACC on SAP in addition to EAT-2, indicating selectivity of SAP and EAT-2 may depend on the relative concentrations of the two adaptors. The concentration of SAP was four fold higher than EAT-2 in NK92 cells. Compared with SAP, the significance of EAT-2 recruitment and its downstream effectors are not well characterised. We identified PLCγ1 and PLCγ2 as principal binding partners for the EAT-2 tail. Both PLCγ1 and PLCγ2 are functionally important for cytotoxicity in NK92 cells through CD244 (SLAMF4), NTB-A (SLAMF6) and CRACC. Comparison of the specificity of SH2 domains from activating and inhibitory signalling mediators revealed a hierarchy of affinities for CD244 (SLAMF4) ITSMs. While binding of phosphatase SH2 domains to individual ITSMs of CD244 was weak compared with SAP or EAT-2, binding of tandem SH2 domains of SHP-2 to longer peptides containing tandem phosphorylated ITSMs in human CD244 increased the affinity ten fold. The concentration of the tyrosine phosphatase, SHP-2 was in the order of a magnitude higher than the adaptors, SAP and EAT-2. These data demonstrate a mechanism for direct recruitment of phosphatases in inhibitory signalling by ITSMs, while explaining competitive

  17. Molecular Determinants of Substrate Specificity in Plant 5-Methylthioadenosine Nucleosidases

    SciTech Connect

    Siu,K.; Lee, J.; Sufrin, J.; Moffatt, B.; McMillan, M.; Cornell, K.; Isom, C.; Howell, L.

    2008-01-01

    5?-Methylthioadenosine (MTA)/S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) nucleosidase (MTAN) is essential for cellular metabolism and development in many bacterial species. While the enzyme is found in plants, plant MTANs appear to select for MTA preferentially, with little or no affinity for SAH. To understand what determines substrate specificity in this enzyme, MTAN homologues from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtMTAN1 and AtMTAN2, which are referred to as AtMTN1 and AtMTN2 in the plant literature) have been characterized kinetically. While both homologues hydrolyze MTA with comparable kinetic parameters, only AtMTAN2 shows activity towards SAH. AtMTAN2 also has higher catalytic activity towards other substrate analogues with longer 5?-substituents. The structures of apo AtMTAN1 and its complexes with the substrate- and transition-state-analogues, 5?-methylthiotubercidin and formycin A, respectively, have been determined at 2.0-1.8 Angstroms resolution. A homology model of AtMTAN2 was generated using the AtMTAN1 structures. Comparison of the AtMTAN1 and AtMTAN2 structures reveals that only three residues in the active site differ between the two enzymes. Our analysis suggests that two of these residues, Leu181/Met168 and Phe148/Leu135 in AtMTAN1/AtMTAN2, likely account for the divergence in specificity of the enzymes. Comparison of the AtMTAN1 and available Escherichia coli MTAN (EcMTAN) structures suggests that a combination of differences in the 5?-alkylthio binding region and reduced conformational flexibility in the AtMTAN1 active site likely contribute to its reduced efficiency in binding substrate analogues with longer 5?-substituents. In addition, in contrast to EcMTAN, the active site of AtMTAN1 remains solvated in its ligand-bound forms. As the apparent pKa of an amino acid depends on its local environment, the putative catalytic acid Asp225 in AtMTAN1 may not be protonated at physiological pH and this suggests the transition state of AtMTAN1, like human MTA phosphorylase and

  18. Molecular-orbital coefficients for dinuclear polymethyne dyes in the effective additive parameter method

    SciTech Connect

    Dyadyusha, G.G.; Ushomirskii, M.M.

    1986-09-01

    A method previously proposed for determining the energy structure of a polymethyne dye with any terminal groups is used in considering formulas for the molecularorbital coefficients and the differences in the distribution on the atoms in the polymethyne chain for localized and delocalized energy levels, as well as the accuracy in calculating the molecular-orbital coefficients by means of a finite number of effective additive parameters. It is found that the localized states are important to the electron-density distribution on the chain atoms characteristic of the polymethyne dyes.

  19. High-Flow, High-Molecular-Weight, Addition-Curing Polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chuang, Kathy C.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1993-01-01

    In developed series of high-flow PMR-type polyimide resins, 2, 2'-bis(trifluoromethyl)-4, 4'-diaminobiphenyl (BTDB) substituted for 1, 4-pheylenediamine in PMR-II formulation. Polyimides designated either as PMR-12F when nadic ester (NE) end caps used, or as V-CAP-12F when p-aminostyrene end caps used. High-molecular-weight, addition-curing polyimides based on BTBD and HFDE highly processable high-temperature matrix resins used to make composite materials with excellent retention of properties during long-term exposure to air at 650 degrees F or higher temperature. Furthermore, 12F addition-curing polyimides useful for electronic applications; fluorinated rigid-rod polyimides known to exhibit low thermal expansion coefficients as well as low absorption of moisture.

  20. Ionic imbalance, in addition to molecular crowding, abates cytoskeletal dynamics and vesicle motility during hypertonic stress

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Paula; Roth, Isabelle; Meda, Paolo; Féraille, Eric; Brown, Dennis; Hasler, Udo

    2015-01-01

    Cell volume homeostasis is vital for the maintenance of optimal protein density and cellular function. Numerous mammalian cell types are routinely exposed to acute hypertonic challenge and shrink. Molecular crowding modifies biochemical reaction rates and decreases macromolecule diffusion. Cell volume is restored rapidly by ion influx but at the expense of elevated intracellular sodium and chloride levels that persist long after challenge. Although recent studies have highlighted the role of molecular crowding on the effects of hypertonicity, the effects of ionic imbalance on cellular trafficking dynamics in living cells are largely unexplored. By tracking distinct fluorescently labeled endosome/vesicle populations by live-cell imaging, we show that vesicle motility is reduced dramatically in a variety of cell types at the onset of hypertonic challenge. Live-cell imaging of actin and tubulin revealed similar arrested microfilament motility upon challenge. Vesicle motility recovered long after cell volume, a process that required functional regulatory volume increase and was accelerated by a return of extracellular osmolality to isosmotic levels. This delay suggests that, although volume-induced molecular crowding contributes to trafficking defects, it alone cannot explain the observed effects. Using fluorescent indicators and FRET-based probes, we found that intracellular ATP abundance and mitochondrial potential were reduced by hypertonicity and recovered after longer periods of time. Similar to the effects of osmotic challenge, isovolumetric elevation of intracellular chloride concentration by ionophores transiently decreased ATP production by mitochondria and abated microfilament and vesicle motility. These data illustrate how perturbed ionic balance, in addition to molecular crowding, affects membrane trafficking. PMID:26045497

  1. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  2. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  3. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  4. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  5. 21 CFR 660.54 - Potency tests, specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. 660.54 Section 660.54 Food and Drugs..., specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties. The...) Specificity tests, tests for heterospecific antibodies, and additional tests for nonspecific properties....

  6. Growth control of nonionic reverse micelles by surfactant and solvent molecular architecture and water addition.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Lok Kumar; Shrestha, Rekha Goswami; Aramaki, Kenji

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes a facile route to the shape, size, and structure control of reversed micelles by surfactant and solvent molecular architecture and water addition. Nonionic reverse micellar size is found to increase with increase in hydrophilic headgroup size of surfactant, whose scheme is understood in terms of decrease in the critical packing parameter (cpp). On the other hand, an opposite trend is observed with increase in lipophilicity of the surfactant. This is caused by the repulsive excluded volume interactions, which increases with the volume of lipophilic moiety of surfactant; as a result, the micelle interface tends to become more curved and micelles shrink. Solvent molecular structure has played a crucial role; increasing hydrocarbon chain length of alkanes favored one dimensional micellar growth. We note that long chain oil has a poor penetration tendency to lipophilic tail of surfactant and decreases the cpp. Solvent polarity is also crucial; globular micelles are formed in short chain oil cyclohexane. We note that decreasing chain length of oil mimic the decrease in the headgroup size of surfactant; rod-to-sphere type transition in the micellar structure. Addition of trace water favors micellar growth; maximum dimension and micellar cross section increases with increase in water concentration. The sizes of the water incorporated reverse micelles (or w/o microemulsion) are much bigger than the empty micelles. Micellar structure was confirmed by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and supported by rheology. PMID:21770115

  7. Evolutionary Genomics Suggests That CheV Is an Additional Adaptor for Accommodating Specific Chemoreceptors within the Chemotaxis Signaling Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Davi R.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are models for many experiments in molecular biology including chemotaxis, and most of the results obtained with one organism have been generalized to another. While most components of the chemotaxis pathway are strongly conserved between the two species, Salmonella genomes contain some chemoreceptors and an additional protein, CheV, that are not found in E. coli. The role of CheV was examined in distantly related species Bacillus subtilis and Helicobacter pylori, but its role in bacterial chemotaxis is still not well understood. We tested a hypothesis that in enterobacteria CheV functions as an additional adaptor linking the CheA kinase to certain types of chemoreceptors that cannot be effectively accommodated by the universal adaptor CheW. Phylogenetic profiling, genomic context and comparative protein sequence analyses suggested that CheV interacts with specific domains of CheA and chemoreceptors from an orthologous group exemplified by the Salmonella McpC protein. Structural consideration of the conservation patterns suggests that CheV and CheW share the same binding spot on the chemoreceptor structure, but have some affinity bias towards chemoreceptors from different orthologous groups. Finally, published experimental results and data newly obtained via comparative genomics support the idea that CheV functions as a “phosphate sink” possibly to off-set the over-stimulation of the kinase by certain types of chemoreceptors. Overall, our results strongly suggest that CheV is an additional adaptor for accommodating specific chemoreceptors within the chemotaxis signaling complex. PMID:26844549

  8. Evolutionary Genomics Suggests That CheV Is an Additional Adaptor for Accommodating Specific Chemoreceptors within the Chemotaxis Signaling Complex.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Davi R; Zhulin, Igor B

    2016-02-01

    Escherichia coli and Salmonella enterica are models for many experiments in molecular biology including chemotaxis, and most of the results obtained with one organism have been generalized to another. While most components of the chemotaxis pathway are strongly conserved between the two species, Salmonella genomes contain some chemoreceptors and an additional protein, CheV, that are not found in E. coli. The role of CheV was examined in distantly related species Bacillus subtilis and Helicobacter pylori, but its role in bacterial chemotaxis is still not well understood. We tested a hypothesis that in enterobacteria CheV functions as an additional adaptor linking the CheA kinase to certain types of chemoreceptors that cannot be effectively accommodated by the universal adaptor CheW. Phylogenetic profiling, genomic context and comparative protein sequence analyses suggested that CheV interacts with specific domains of CheA and chemoreceptors from an orthologous group exemplified by the Salmonella McpC protein. Structural consideration of the conservation patterns suggests that CheV and CheW share the same binding spot on the chemoreceptor structure, but have some affinity bias towards chemoreceptors from different orthologous groups. Finally, published experimental results and data newly obtained via comparative genomics support the idea that CheV functions as a "phosphate sink" possibly to off-set the over-stimulation of the kinase by certain types of chemoreceptors. Overall, our results strongly suggest that CheV is an additional adaptor for accommodating specific chemoreceptors within the chemotaxis signaling complex. PMID:26844549

  9. Genetic Rearrangements of Six Wheat–Agropyron cristatum 6P Addition Lines Revealed by Molecular Markers

    PubMed Central

    Su, Junji; Zhang, Jinpeng; Song, Liqiang; Gao, Ainong; Yang, Xinming; Li, Xiuquan; Liu, Weihua; Li, Lihui

    2014-01-01

    Agropyron cristatum (L.) Gaertn. (2n = 4x = 28, PPPP) not only is cultivated as pasture fodder but also could provide many desirable genes for wheat improvement. It is critical to obtain common wheat–A. cristatum alien disomic addition lines to locate the desired genes on the P genome chromosomes. Comparative analysis of the homoeologous relationships between the P genome chromosome and wheat genome chromosomes is a key step in transferring different desirable genes into common wheat and producing the desired alien translocation line while compensating for the loss of wheat chromatin. In this study, six common wheat–A. cristatum disomic addition lines were produced and analyzed by phenotypic examination, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), SSR markers from the ABD genomes and STS markers from the P genome. Comparative maps, six in total, were generated and demonstrated that all six addition lines belonged to homoeologous group 6. However, chromosome 6P had undergone obvious rearrangements in different addition lines compared with the wheat chromosome, indicating that to obtain a genetic compensating alien translocation line, one should recombine alien chromosomal regions with homoeologous wheat chromosomes. Indeed, these addition lines were classified into four types based on the comparative mapping: 6PI, 6PII, 6PIII, and 6PIV. The different types of chromosome 6P possessed different desirable genes. For example, the 6PI type, containing three addition lines, carried genes conferring high numbers of kernels per spike and resistance to powdery mildew, important traits for wheat improvement. These results may prove valuable for promoting the development of conventional chromosome engineering techniques toward molecular chromosome engineering. PMID:24595330

  10. Molecular Imprinting of Silica Nanoparticle Surfaces via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Polymerization for Optical Biosensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluz, Zehra; Nayab, Sana; Kursun, Talya Tugana; Caykara, Tuncer; Yameen, Basit; Duran, Hatice

    Azo initiator modified surface of silica nanoparticles were coated via reversible addition-fragmentation polymerization (RAFT) of methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate using 2-phenylprop 2-yl dithobenzoate as chain transfer agent. Using L-phenylalanine anilide as template during polymerization led molecularly imprinted nanoparticles. RAFT polymerization offers an efficient control of grafting process, while molecularly imprinted polymers shows enhanced capacity as sensor. L-phenylalanine anilide imprinted silica particles were characterized by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM). Performances of the particles were followed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) after coating the final product on gold deposited glass substrate against four different analogous of analyte molecules: D-henylalanine anilide, L-tyrosine, L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine. Characterizations indicated that silica particles coated with polymer layer do contain binding sites for L-phenylalanine anilide, and are highly selective for the molecule of interest. This project was supported by TUBITAK (Project No:112M804).

  11. Molecular Features of Subtype-Specific Progression from Ductal Carcinoma In Situ to Invasive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lesurf, Robert; Aure, Miriam Ragle; Mørk, Hanne Håberg; Vitelli, Valeria; Lundgren, Steinar; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela; Wärnberg, Fredrik; Hallett, Michael; Sørlie, Therese

    2016-07-26

    Breast cancer consists of at least five main molecular "intrinsic" subtypes that are reflected in both pre-invasive and invasive disease. Although previous studies have suggested that many of the molecular features of invasive breast cancer are established early, it is unclear what mechanisms drive progression and whether the mechanisms of progression are dependent or independent of subtype. We have generated mRNA, miRNA, and DNA copy-number profiles from a total of 59 in situ lesions and 85 invasive tumors in order to comprehensively identify those genes, signaling pathways, processes, and cell types that are involved in breast cancer progression. Our work provides evidence that there are molecular features associated with disease progression that are unique to the intrinsic subtypes. We additionally establish subtype-specific signatures that are able to identify a small proportion of pre-invasive tumors with expression profiles that resemble invasive carcinoma, indicating a higher likelihood of future disease progression. PMID:27396337

  12. Cytogenetic and molecular identification of three Triticum aestivum-Leymus racemosus translocation addition lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Le; Yuan, Jianhua; Bie, Tongde; Zhou, Bo; Chen, Peidu

    2009-06-01

    Chromosome 2C from Aegilops cylindrica has the ability to induce chromosome breakage in common wheat (Tritivum aestivum). In the BC(1)F(3) generation of the T. aestivum cv. Chinese Spring and a hybrid between T. aestivum-Leymus racemosus Lr.7 addition line and T. aestivum-Ae. cylindrica 2C addition line, three disomic translocation addition lines (2n = 44) were selected by mitotic chromosome C-banding and genomic in situ hybridization. We further characterized these T. aestivum-L. racemosus translocation addition lines, NAU636, NAU637 and NAU638, by chromosome C-banding, in situ hybridization using the A- and D-genome-specific bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clones 676D4 and 9M13; plasmids pAs1 and pSc119.2, and 45S rDNA; as well as genomic DNA of L. racemosus as probes, in combination with double ditelosomic test cross and SSR marker analysis. The translocation chromosomes were designated as T3AS-Lr7S, T6BS-Lr7S, and T5DS-Lr7L. The translocation line T3AS-Lr7S was highly resistant to Fusarium head blight and will be useful germplasm for resistance breeding. PMID:19539248

  13. Clinical survey of hantavirus in southern Brazil and the development of specific molecular diagnosis tools.

    PubMed

    Raboni, Sonia M; Rubio, Gisélia; DE Borba, Luana; Zeferino, Aurélio; Skraba, Irene; Goldenberg, Samuel; Dos Santos, Claudia N Duarte

    2005-06-01

    Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is an emerging disease caused by an increasing number of distinct hantavirus serotypes found worldwide. It is also a very severe immune disease. It progresses quickly and is associated with a high mortality rate. At the prodrome phase, hantavirosis symptoms can resemble those of other infectious diseases such as leptospirosis and influenza. Thus, prognosis could be improved by developing a rapid and sensitive diagnostic test for hantavirus infection, and by improving knowledge about clinical aspects of this disease. This study describes clinical features and laboratory parameters throughout the course of HPS in 98 patients. We report the seasonality and regional distribution of this disease in Paraná State, Brazil during the last seven years. In addition, we evaluated a specific molecular diagnostic test based on a nested reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction for the detection of hantaviruses circulating in Brazil. PMID:15964966

  14. The molecular motion of bovine serum albumin under physiological conditions is ion specific.

    PubMed

    Medda, Luca; Monduzzi, Maura; Salis, Andrea

    2015-04-18

    Specific ion effects on the Brownian molecular motion of BSA protein under physiological conditions are investigated. New useful insights into Hofmeister phenomena related to electrolyte-protein interactions are presented. PMID:25782536

  15. Molecular specificities of monoclonal antibodies directed against virulent Treponema pallidum.

    PubMed Central

    Marchitto, K S; Selland-Grossling, C K; Norgard, M V

    1986-01-01

    Radioimmunoprecipitation (RIP) and Western blot analyses with specific anti-Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum monoclonal antibodies were used to identify antigens with apparent masses of 102, 84, 54, 53, 52, 47, 32, 29, and 24 kilodaltons (kDa). Cross-reactivity of these antibodies with T. pallidum subsp. pertenue antigens and lack of cross-reactivity with T. phagedenis biotype Reiter, T. vincentii, T. refringens, T. scoliodontum, and T. denticola were also demonstrated by RIP and Western blot analyses. Reactivities in the T. pallidum immobilization test, along with the RIP of lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination products, suggested that the identified antigens were surface associated. The abundance and surface association of the 47- and 84-kDa antigens were supported by reactivity in the microhemagglutination test for T. pallidum and by strong reactivity of monoclonal antibodies upon indirect immunofluorescence assays with rabbit-cultivated T. pallidum subsp. pallidum, respectively, but not with T. phagedenis biotype Reiter. Anti-47-kDa and anti-84-kDa monoclonal antibodies were also reactive in indirect immunofluorescence assays using treponemes found in dark-field-positive smears of human genital ulcers. Images PMID:3510168

  16. Quantitative determination of protein molecular weight with an acoustic sensor; significance of specific versus non-specific binding.

    PubMed

    Mitsakakis, Konstantinos; Tsortos, Achilleas; Gizeli, Electra

    2014-08-21

    Surface acoustic wave sensors with integrated microfluidics for multi-sample sensing have been implemented in this work towards the quantitative correlation of the acoustic signal with the molecular weight of surface bound proteins investigating different interaction/binding conditions. The results are presented for: (i) four different biotinylated molecules (30 ≤ Mw ≤ 150 kDa) specifically binding to neutravidin; (ii) the same four non-biotinylated molecules, as well as neutravidin, adsorbing onto gold; and (iii) four cardiac marker proteins (86 ≤ Mw ≤ 540 kDa) specifically binding to their homologous antibodies. Surface plasmon resonance was employed as an independent optical mass sensor. A linear relationship was found to exist between the phase change of the acoustic signal and the molecular weight of the proteins in both cases of specific binding. In contrast, non-specific binding of proteins directly onto gold exhibited no such linear relationship. In all three cases phase change was correlated with the bound mass per area. The underlying mechanism behind the different behavior between specific and non-specific binding is discussed by taking into account the geometrical restrictions imposed by the size of the specific biorecognition molecule and the corresponding bound protein. Our results emphasize the quantitative nature of the phase of the acoustic signal in determining the Mw (in the case of specific binding) with a resolution of 15% and the mass of the bound proteins (in all cases), as well as the significance of the biorecognition molecules in deriving the molecular weight from acoustic or optical detectors. PMID:24943453

  17. Molecular anatomy of ascending aorta in atherosclerosis by MS Imaging: Specific lipid and protein patterns reflect pathology.

    PubMed

    Martin-Lorenzo, Marta; Balluff, Benjamin; Maroto, Aroa S; Carreira, Ricardo J; van Zeijl, Rene J M; Gonzalez-Calero, Laura; de la Cuesta, Fernando; Barderas, Maria G; Lopez-Almodovar, Luis F; Padial, Luis R; McDonnell, Liam A; Vivanco, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria

    2015-08-01

    The molecular anatomy of healthy and atherosclerotic tissue is pursued here to identify ongoing molecular changes in atherosclerosis development. Subclinical atherosclerosis cannot be predicted and novel therapeutic targets are needed. Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) is a novel unexplored ex vivo imaging approach in CVD able to provide in-tissue molecular maps. A rabbit model of early atherosclerosis was developed and high-spatial-resolution MALDI-MSI was applied to comparatively analyze histologically-based arterial regions of interest from control and early atherosclerotic aortas. Specific protocols were applied to identify lipids and proteins significantly altered in response to atherosclerosis. Observed protein alterations were confirmed by immunohistochemistry in rabbit tissue, and additionally in human aortas. Molecular features specifically defining different arterial regions were identified. Localized in the intima, increased expression of SFA and lysolipids and intimal spatial organization showing accumulation of PI, PG and SM point to endothelial dysfunction and triggered inflammatory response. TG, PA, SM and PE-Cer were identified specifically located in calcified regions. Thymosin β4 (TMSB4X) protein was upregulated in intima versus media layer and also in response to atherosclerosis. This overexpression and localization was confirmed in human aortas. In conclusion, molecular histology by MS Imaging identifies spatial organization of arterial tissue in response to atherosclerosis. PMID:26079611

  18. Formation of target-specific binding sites in enzymes: solid-phase molecular imprinting of HRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czulak, J.; Guerreiro, A.; Metran, K.; Canfarotta, F.; Goddard, A.; Cowan, R. H.; Trochimczuk, A. W.; Piletsky, S.

    2016-05-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike complex protein engineering approaches commonly employed to generate affinity proteins, the method proposed can be used to produce protein-based ligands in a short time period using native protein molecules. These affinity materials are potentially useful tools especially for assays since they combine the catalytic properties of enzymes (for signaling) and molecular recognition properties of antibodies. We demonstrate this concept in an ELISA-format assay where HRP imprinted with vancomycin and ampicillin replaced traditional enzyme-antibody conjugates for selective detection of templates at micromolar concentrations. This approach can potentially provide a fast alternative to raising antibodies for targets that do not require high assay sensitivities; it can also find uses as a biochemical research tool, as a possible replacement for immunoperoxidase-conjugates.Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike

  19. Specific interactions between DNA and regulatory protein controlled by ligand-binding: Ab initio molecular simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Matsushita, Y. Murakawa, T. Shimamura, K. Oishi, M. Ohyama, T. Kurita, N.

    2015-02-27

    The catabolite activator protein (CAP) is one of the regulatory proteins controlling the transcription mechanism of gene. Biochemical experiments elucidated that the complex of CAP with cyclic AMP (cAMP) is indispensable for controlling the mechanism, while previous molecular simulations for the monomer of CAP+cAMP complex revealed the specific interactions between CAP and cAMP. However, the effect of cAMP-binding to CAP on the specific interactions between CAP and DNA is not elucidated at atomic and electronic levels. We here considered the ternary complex of CAP, cAMP and DNA in solvating water molecules and investigated the specific interactions between them at atomic and electronic levels using ab initio molecular simulations based on classical molecular dynamics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results highlight the important amino acid residues of CAP for the interactions between CAP and cAMP and between CAP and DNA.

  20. Molecular Evolution of the Substrate Specificity of Chloroplastic Aldolases/Rubisco Lysine Methyltransferases in Plants.

    PubMed

    Ma, Sheng; Martin-Laffon, Jacqueline; Mininno, Morgane; Gigarel, Océane; Brugière, Sabine; Bastien, Olivier; Tardif, Marianne; Ravanel, Stéphane; Alban, Claude

    2016-04-01

    Rubisco and fructose-1,6-bisphosphate aldolases (FBAs) are involved in CO2 fixation in chloroplasts. Both enzymes are trimethylated at a specific lysine residue by the chloroplastic protein methyltransferase LSMT. Genes coding LSMT are present in all plant genomes but the methylation status of the substrates varies in a species-specific manner. For example, chloroplastic FBAs are naturally trimethylated in both Pisum sativum and Arabidopsis thaliana, whereas the Rubisco large subunit is trimethylated only in the former species. The in vivo methylation status of aldolases and Rubisco matches the catalytic properties of AtLSMT and PsLSMT, which are able to trimethylate FBAs or FBAs and Rubisco, respectively. Here, we created chimera and site-directed mutants of monofunctional AtLSMT and bifunctional PsLSMT to identify the molecular determinants responsible for substrate specificity. Our results indicate that the His-Ala/Pro-Trp triad located in the central part of LSMT enzymes is the key motif to confer the capacity to trimethylate Rubisco. Two of the critical residues are located on a surface loop outside the methyltransferase catalytic site. We observed a strict correlation between the presence of the triad motif and the in vivo methylation status of Rubisco. The distribution of the motif into a phylogenetic tree further suggests that the ancestral function of LSMT was FBA trimethylation. In a recent event during higher plant evolution, this function evolved in ancestors of Fabaceae, Cucurbitaceae, and Rosaceae to include Rubisco as an additional substrate to the archetypal enzyme. Our study provides insight into mechanisms by which SET-domain protein methyltransferases evolve new substrate specificity. PMID:26785049

  1. The PP1 binding code: a molecular-lego strategy that governs specificity.

    PubMed

    Heroes, Ewald; Lesage, Bart; Görnemann, Janina; Beullens, Monique; Van Meervelt, Luc; Bollen, Mathieu

    2013-01-01

    Ser/Thr protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is a single-domain hub protein with nearly 200 validated interactors in vertebrates. PP1-interacting proteins (PIPs) are ubiquitously expressed but show an exceptional diversity in brain, testis and white blood cells. The binding of PIPs is mainly mediated by short motifs that dock to surface grooves of PP1. Although PIPs often contain variants of the same PP1 binding motifs, they differ in the number and combination of docking sites. This molecular-lego strategy for binding to PP1 creates holoenzymes with unique properties. The PP1 binding code can be described as specific, universal, degenerate, nonexclusive and dynamic. PIPs control associated PP1 by interference with substrate recruitment or access to the active site. In addition, some PIPs have a subcellular targeting domain that promotes dephosphorylation by increasing the local concentration of PP1. The diversity of the PP1 interactome and the properties of the PP1 binding code account for the exquisite specificity of PP1 in vivo. PMID:22360570

  2. 75 FR 18413 - 2009-2010 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport Fishing Regulations-Additions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-12

    .... According to the July 9, 2007, final rule published in the Federal Register (72 FR 37346), we went from 487... Fish and Wildlife Service 50 CFR Part 32 RIN 1018-AW49 2009-2010 Refuge-Specific Hunting and Sport...: The Fish and Wildlife Service adds two refuges to the list of areas open for hunting and/or...

  3. Ab initio molecular simulations on specific interactions between amyloid beta and monosaccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Kazuya; Okamoto, Akisumi; Yano, Atsushi; Higai, Shin'ichi; Kondo, Takashi; Kamba, Seiji; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2012-09-01

    Aggregation of amyloid β (Aβ) peptides, which is a key pathogenetic event in Alzheimer's disease, can be caused by cell-surface saccharides. We here investigated stable structures of the solvated complexes of Aβ with some types of monosaccharides using molecular simulations based on protein-ligand docking and classical molecular mechanics methods. Moreover, the specific interactions between Aβ and the monosaccharides were elucidated at an electronic level by ab initio fragment molecular orbital calculations. Based on the results, we proposed which type of monosaccharide prefers to have large binding affinity to Aβ and inhibit the Aβ aggregation.

  4. Conformational diversity of bacterial FabH: implications for molecular recognition specificity.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Anuradha; Johnson, Michael E

    2015-02-01

    The molecular basis of variable substrate and inhibitor specificity of the highly conserved bacterial fatty acid synthase enzyme, FabH, across different bacterial species remains poorly understood. In the current work, we explored the conformational diversity of FabH enzymes to understand the determinants of diverse interaction specificity across Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations reveal that FabH from E. coli and E. faecalis exhibit distinct native state conformational ensembles and dynamic behaviors. Despite strikingly similar substrate binding pockets, hot spot assessment using computational solvent mapping identified quite different favorable binding interactions between the two homologs. Our data suggest that FabH utilizes protein dynamics and seemingly minor sequence and structural differences to modulate its molecular recognition and substrate specificity across bacterial species. These insights will potentially facilitate the rational design and development of antibacterial inhibitors against FabH enzymes. PMID:25437098

  5. Effect of Operating Parameters and Chemical Additives on Crystal Habit and Specific Cake Resistance of Zinc Hydroxide Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    1999-08-01

    The effect of process parameters and chemical additives on the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates was investigated. The ability of a slurry to be filtered is dependent upon the particle habit of the solid and the particle habit is influenced by certain process variables. The process variables studied include neutralization temperature, agitation type, and alkalinity source used for neutralization. Several commercially available chemical additives advertised to aid in solid/liquid separation were also examined in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation. A statistical analysis revealed that the neutralization temperature and the source of alkalinity were statistically significant in influencing the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates in this study. The type of agitation did not significantly effect the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates. The use of chemical additives in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation had a favorable effect on the filterability. The morphology of the hydroxide precipitates was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Telomere Capping Proteins are Structurally Related to RPA with an additional Telomere-Specific Domain

    SciTech Connect

    Gelinas, A.; Paschini, M; Reyes, F; Heroux, A; Batey, R; Lundblad, V; Wuttke, D

    2009-01-01

    Telomeres must be capped to preserve chromosomal stability. The conserved Stn1 and Ten1 proteins are required for proper capping of the telomere, although the mechanistic details of how they contribute to telomere maintenance are unclear. Here, we report the crystal structures of the C-terminal domain of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Stn1 and the Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ten1 proteins. These structures reveal striking similarities to corresponding subunits in the replication protein A complex, further supporting an evolutionary link between telomere maintenance proteins and DNA repair complexes. Our structural and in vivo data of Stn1 identify a new domain that has evolved to support a telomere-specific role in chromosome maintenance. These findings endorse a model of an evolutionarily conserved mechanism of DNA maintenance that has developed as a result of increased chromosomal structural complexity.

  7. Anticancer efficacy of the metabolic blocker 3-bromopyruvate: specific molecular targeting.

    PubMed

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram; Kunjithapatham, Rani; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    The anticancer efficacy of the pyruvate analog 3-bromopyruvate has been demonstrated in multiple tumor models. The chief principle underlying the antitumor effects of 3-bromopyruvate is its ability to effectively target the energy metabolism of cancer cells. Biochemically, the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has been identified as the primary target of 3-bromopyruvate. Its inhibition results in the depletion of intracellular ATP, causing cell death. Several reports have also demonstrated that in addition to GAPDH inhibition, the induction of cellular stress also contributes to 3-bromopyruvate treatment-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, recent evidence shows that 3-bromopyruvate is taken up selectively by tumor cells via the monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) that are frequently overexpressed in cancer cells (for the export of lactate produced during aerobic glycolysis). The preferential uptake of 3-bromopyruvate via MCTs facilitates selective targeting of tumor cells while leaving healthy and non-malignant tissue untouched. Taken together, the specificity of molecular (GAPDH) targeting and selective uptake by tumor cells, underscore the potential of 3-bromopyruvate as a potent and promising anticancer agent. In this review, we highlight the mechanistic characteristics of 3-bromopyruvate and discuss its potential for translation into the clinic. PMID:23267123

  8. Design rules for rational control of polymer glass formation behavior and mechanical properties with small molecular additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangalara, Jayachandra Hari; Simmons, David

    Small molecule additives have long been employed to tune polymers' glass formation, mechanical and transport properties. For example, plasticizers are commonly employed to suppress polymer Tg and soften the glassy state, while antiplasticizers, which stiffen the glassy state of a polymer while suppressing its Tg, are employed to enhance protein and tissue preservation in sugar glasses. Recent literature indicates that additives can have a wide range of possible effects, but all of these have not been clearly understood and well appreciated. Here we employ molecular dynamics simulations to establish design rules for the selection of small molecule additives with size, molecular stiffness, and interaction energy chosen to achieve targeted effects on polymer properties. We furthermore find that a given additive's effect on a polymer's Tg can be predicted from its Debye-Waller factor via a function previously found to describe nanoconfinement effects on the glass transition. These results emphasize the potential for a new generation of targeted molecular additives to contribute to more targeted rational design of polymers. We acknowledge the Keck Foundation and the Ohio Supercomputing Center for financial and computational support of this effort, respectively.

  9. Molecular epigenesis: distributed specificity as a break in the central dogma.

    PubMed

    Stotz, Karola

    2006-01-01

    The paper argues against the central dogma and its interpretation by C. Kenneth Waters and Alex Rosenberg. I argue that certain phenomena in the regulation of gene expression provide a break with the central dogma, according to which sequence specificity for a gene product must be template derived. My thesis of 'molecular epigenesis' with its three classes of phenomena, sequence 'activation', 'selection', and 'creation', is exemplified by processes such as transcriptional activation, alternative cis- and trans-splicing, and RNA editing. It argues that other molecular resources share the causal role of genes; the sequence specificity for the linear sequence of any gene product is distributed between the coding sequence, cis-acting sequences, trans-acting factors, environmental signals, and the contingent history of the cell (thesis of distributed causal specificity). I conclude that the central dogma has unnecessarily restricted genetic research to the sequencing of protein-coding genes, unilinear pathway analyses, and the focus on exclusive specificity. PMID:18351051

  10. Investigation of effect of particle size and rumen fluid addition on specific methane yields of high lignocellulose grass silage.

    PubMed

    Wall, D M; Straccialini, B; Allen, E; Nolan, P; Herrmann, C; O'Kiely, P; Murphy, J D

    2015-09-01

    This work examines the digestion of advanced growth stage grass silage. Two variables were investigated: particle size (greater than 3 cm and less than 1cm) and rumen fluid addition. Batch studies indicated particle size and rumen fluid addition had little effect on specific methane yields (SMYs). In continuous digestion of 3 cm silage the SMY was 342 and 343 L CH4 kg(-1)VS, respectively, with and without rumen fluid addition. However, digester operation was significantly affected through silage floating on the liquor surface and its entanglement in the mixing system. Digestion of 1cm silage with no rumen fluid addition struggled; volatile fatty acid concentrations rose and SMYs dropped. The best case was 1cm silage with rumen fluid addition, offering higher SMYs of 371 L CH4 kg(-1)VS and stable operation throughout. Thus, physical and biological treatments benefited continuous digestion of high fibre grass silage. PMID:26038332

  11. The 50th Anniversary of the Cahn-Ingold-Prelog Specification of Molecular Chirality.

    PubMed

    Helmchen, Günter

    2016-06-01

    "… Just over 50 years ago, Robert S. Cahn, Sir Christopher Ingold, and Vladimir Prelog published the Review 'Specification of Molecular Chirality' in Angewandte Chemie. The article would change the everyday language of the chemist by bringing the term chirality to their attention. Today, the CIP system is the specification tool in organic chemistry …" Read more in the Editorial by Günter Helmchen. PMID:27151758

  12. Tuning protein-protein interactions using cosolvents: specific effects of ionic and non-ionic additives on protein phase behavior.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Jan; Platten, Florian; Wagner, Dana; Egelhaaf, Stefan U

    2016-04-21

    Cosolvents are routinely used to modulate the (thermal) stability of proteins and, hence, their interactions with proteins have been studied intensely. However, less is known about their specific effects on protein-protein interactions, which we characterize in terms of the protein phase behavior. We analyze the phase behavior of lysozyme solutions in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl), guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl), glycerol, and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). We experimentally determined the crystallization boundary (XB) and, in combination with data on the cloud-point temperatures (CPTs), the crystallization gap. In agreement with other studies, our data indicate that the additives might affect the protein phase behavior through electrostatic screening and additive-specific contributions. At high salt concentrations, where electrostatic interactions are screened, both the CPT and the XB are found to be linear functions of the additive concentration. Their slopes quantify the additive-specific changes of the phase behavior and thus of the protein-protein interactions. While the specific effect of NaCl is to induce attractions between proteins, DMSO, glycerol and GuHCl (with increasing strength) weaken attractions and/or induce repulsions. Except for DMSO, changes of the CPT are stronger than those of the XB. Furthermore, the crystallization gap widens in the case of GuHCl and glycerol and narrows in the case of NaCl. We relate these changes to colloidal interaction models, namely square-well and patchy interactions. PMID:27020538

  13. A molecular-gap device for specific determination of mercury ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zheng; Liu, Zhong-Gang; Yao, Xian-Zhi; Zhang, Kai-Sheng; Chen, Xing; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2013-11-01

    Specific determination/monitoring of trace mercury ions (Hg2+) in environmental water is of significant importance for drinking safety. Complementarily to conventional inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and atomic emission/absorption spectroscopy, several methods, i.e., electrochemical, fluorescent, colorimetric, and surface enhanced Raman scattering approaches, have been developed recently. Despite great success, many inevitably encounter the interferences from other metal ions besides the complicated procedures and sophisticated equipments. Here we present a molecular-gap device for specific determination of trace Hg2+ in both standardized solutions and environmental samples based on conductivity-modulated glutathione dimer. Through a self-assembling technique, a thin film of glutathione monolayer capped Au nanoparticles is introduced into 2.5 μm-gap-electrodes, forming numerous double molecular layer gaps. Notably, the fabricated molecular-gap device shows a specific response toward Hg2+ with a low detection limit actually measured down to 1 nM. Theoretical calculations demonstrate that the specific sensing mechanism greatly depends on the electron transport ability of glutathione dimer bridged by heavy metal ions, which is determined by its frontier molecular orbital, not the binding energy.

  14. Combined ab initio molecular dynamics and experimental studies of carbon atom addition to benzene.

    PubMed

    McKee, Michael L; Reisenauer, Hans Peter; Schreiner, Peter R

    2014-04-17

    Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics was used to explore the reactions between triplet and singlet carbon atoms with benzene. The computations reveal that, in the singlet C atom reaction, products are very exothermic where nearly every collision yields a product that is determined by the initial encounter geometry. The singlet C atom reaction does not follow the minimum energy path because the bimolecular reaction is controlled by dynamics (i.e., initial orientation of encounter). On the other hand, in a 10 K solid Ar matrix, ground state C((3)P) atoms do tend to follow RRKM kinetics. Thus, ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) results indicate that a significant fraction of C-H insertion occurs to form phenylcarbene whereas, in marked contrast to previous theoretical and experimental conclusions, the Ar matrix isolation studies indicate a large fraction of direct cycloheptatetraene formation, without the intermediacy of phenylcarbene. The AIMD calculations are more consistent with vaporized carbon atom experiments where labeling studies indicate the initial formation of phenylcarbene. This underlines that the availability of thermodynamic sinks can completely alter the observed reaction dynamics. PMID:24661002

  15. Enhancing Specific Energy and Power in Asymmetric Supercapacitors - A Synergetic Strategy based on the Use of Redox Additive Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2016-01-01

    The strategy of using redox additive electrolyte in combination with multiwall carbon nanotubes/metal oxide composites leads to a substantial improvements in the specific energy and power of asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). When the pure electrolyte is optimally modified with a redox additive viz., KI, ~105% increase in the specific energy is obtained with good cyclic stability over 3,000 charge-discharge cycles and ~14.7% capacitance fade. This increase is a direct consequence of the iodine/iodide redox pairs that strongly modifies the faradaic and non-faradaic type reactions occurring on the surface of the electrodes. Contrary to what is shown in few earlier reports, it is established that indiscriminate increase in the concentration of redox additives will leads to performance loss. Suitable explanations are given based on theoretical laws. The specific energy or power values being reported in the fabricated ASCs are comparable or higher than those reported in ASCs based on toxic acetonitrile or expensive ionic liquids. The paper shows that the use of redox additive is economically favorable strategy for obtaining cost effective and environmentally friendly ASCs. PMID:27184260

  16. Enhancing Specific Energy and Power in Asymmetric Supercapacitors - A Synergetic Strategy based on the Use of Redox Additive Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2016-05-01

    The strategy of using redox additive electrolyte in combination with multiwall carbon nanotubes/metal oxide composites leads to a substantial improvements in the specific energy and power of asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). When the pure electrolyte is optimally modified with a redox additive viz., KI, ~105% increase in the specific energy is obtained with good cyclic stability over 3,000 charge-discharge cycles and ~14.7% capacitance fade. This increase is a direct consequence of the iodine/iodide redox pairs that strongly modifies the faradaic and non-faradaic type reactions occurring on the surface of the electrodes. Contrary to what is shown in few earlier reports, it is established that indiscriminate increase in the concentration of redox additives will leads to performance loss. Suitable explanations are given based on theoretical laws. The specific energy or power values being reported in the fabricated ASCs are comparable or higher than those reported in ASCs based on toxic acetonitrile or expensive ionic liquids. The paper shows that the use of redox additive is economically favorable strategy for obtaining cost effective and environmentally friendly ASCs.

  17. Enhancing Specific Energy and Power in Asymmetric Supercapacitors - A Synergetic Strategy based on the Use of Redox Additive Electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2016-01-01

    The strategy of using redox additive electrolyte in combination with multiwall carbon nanotubes/metal oxide composites leads to a substantial improvements in the specific energy and power of asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). When the pure electrolyte is optimally modified with a redox additive viz., KI, ~105% increase in the specific energy is obtained with good cyclic stability over 3,000 charge-discharge cycles and ~14.7% capacitance fade. This increase is a direct consequence of the iodine/iodide redox pairs that strongly modifies the faradaic and non-faradaic type reactions occurring on the surface of the electrodes. Contrary to what is shown in few earlier reports, it is established that indiscriminate increase in the concentration of redox additives will leads to performance loss. Suitable explanations are given based on theoretical laws. The specific energy or power values being reported in the fabricated ASCs are comparable or higher than those reported in ASCs based on toxic acetonitrile or expensive ionic liquids. The paper shows that the use of redox additive is economically favorable strategy for obtaining cost effective and environmentally friendly ASCs. PMID:27184260

  18. Nitrogen and phosphorus additions impact arbuscular mycorrhizal abundance and molecular diversity in a tropical montane forest.

    PubMed

    Camenzind, Tessa; Hempel, Stefan; Homeier, Jürgen; Horn, Sebastian; Velescu, Andre; Wilcke, Wolfgang; Rillig, Matthias C

    2014-12-01

    Increased nitrogen (N) depositions expected in the future endanger the diversity and stability of ecosystems primarily limited by N, but also often co-limited by other nutrients like phosphorus (P). In this context a nutrient manipulation experiment (NUMEX) was set up in a tropical montane rainforest in southern Ecuador, an area identified as biodiversity hotspot. We examined impacts of elevated N and P availability on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), a group of obligate biotrophic plant symbionts with an important role in soil nutrient cycles. We tested the hypothesis that increased nutrient availability will reduce AMF abundance, reduce species richness and shift the AMF community toward lineages previously shown to be favored by fertilized conditions. NUMEX was designed as a full factorial randomized block design. Soil cores were taken after 2 years of nutrient additions in plots located at 2000 m above sea level. Roots were extracted and intraradical AMF abundance determined microscopically; the AMF community was analyzed by 454-pyrosequencing targeting the large subunit rDNA. We identified 74 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with a large proportion of Diversisporales. N additions provoked a significant decrease in intraradical abundance, whereas AMF richness was reduced significantly by N and P additions, with the strongest effect in the combined treatment (39% fewer OTUs), mainly influencing rare species. We identified a differential effect on phylogenetic groups, with Diversisporales richness mainly reduced by N additions in contrast to Glomerales highly significantly affected solely by P. Regarding AMF community structure, we observed a compositional shift when analyzing presence/absence data following P additions. In conclusion, N and P additions in this ecosystem affect AMF abundance, but especially AMF species richness; these changes might influence plant community composition and productivity and by that various ecosystem processes. PMID:24764217

  19. DEVELOPMENT AND UTILITY OF A ‘ONE-STEP’ SPECIES-SPECIFIC MOLECULAR DIAGNOSTIC MARKER FOR GONATOCERUS MORRILLI DESIGNED TOWARD THE INTERNAL TRANSCRIBED SPACER REGION 2 (ITS2) TO MONITOR ESTABLISHMENT IN CALIFORNIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In addition to the ‘one-step’ species-specific molecular diagnostic ISSR-PCR DNA fingerprinting method, we developed an additional ‘one-step’ molecular diagnostic marker ‘gmtx’ toward Gonatocerus morrilli (Howard) designed toward the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2) to aid in mo...

  20. Diabetes-induced changes in specific lipid molecular species in rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Han, X; Abendschein, D R; Kelley, J G; Gross, R W

    2000-01-01

    Intrinsic cardiac dysfunction during the diabetic state has been causally linked to changes in myocardial lipid metabolism. However, the precise alterations in the molecular species of myocardial polar and non-polar lipids during the diabetic state and their responses to insulin have not been investigated. Herein we demonstrate four specific alterations in rat myocardial lipid molecular species after induction of the diabetic state by streptozotocin treatment: (i) a massive remodelling of triacylglycerol molecular species including a >5-fold increase in tripalmitin mass and a 60% decrease in polyunsaturated triacylglycerol molecular species mass (i.e. triacylglycerols containing at least one acyl residue with more than two double bonds); (ii) a 46% increase in myocardial phosphatidylinositol mass; (iii) a 44% increase in myocardial plasmenylethanolamine mass and (iv) a 22% decrease in 1-stearoyl-2-arachidonoyl phosphatidylethanolamine content. Each of the changes in phospholipid classes, subclasses and individual molecular species were prevented by insulin treatment after induction of the diabetic state. In sharp contrast, the alterations in triacylglycerol molecular species were not preventable by peripheral insulin treatment after induction of the diabetic state. These results segregate diabetes-induced alterations in myocardial lipid metabolism into changes that can be remedied or not by routine peripheral insulin treatment and suggest that peripheral insulin therapy alone may not be sufficient to correct all of the metabolic alterations present in diabetic myocardium. PMID:11062060

  1. Specific binding of molecularly targeted agents to pancreas tumors and impact on observed optical contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Hextrum, Shannon K.; Pardesi, Omar; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-02-01

    In optical imaging it is thought that optimum tumor contrast can be achieved with the use of small-labeled molecular tracers that have high affinity to their targets and fast clearance rates from the blood stream and healthy tissues. An example of this is fluorescently tagged EGF to monitor the molecular activity of tumors, such as pancreatic cancer. Extensive fluorescence contrast analysis for fluorescence molecular tomography has been performed on the AsPC-1 pancreas tumor, grown orthotopically in mice; yet, the binding dynamics of the EGF-fluorescent agent in vivo is not completely known. The bulk pancreatic tumor displays 3:1 contrast relative to the normal pancreas at long times after injection; however, even higher levels of fluorescence in the liver, kidney and intestine suggest that molecular specificity for the tumor may be low. Mice were administered a fluorescently labeled EGF agent and were sacrificed at various time points post-injection. To analyze the amount of specific binding at each time point frozen tissue samples were fluorescently imaged, washed with saline to remove the interstitially distributed contrast agent, and then imaged again. This technique demonstrated that approximately ~10% of the molecular target was firmly bound to the cell, while 90% was mobile or unbound. This low binding ratio suggests that the contrast observed is from inherent properties of the tumor (i.e. enhanced permeability and retention effect) and not from specific bound contrast as previously anticipated. The use of EGF contrast agents in MRI-guided fluorescence tomography and the impact of low binding specificity are discussed.

  2. Molecular aspects of aromatic C additions to soils: Implications of biochar quality for ecosystem functionality

    EPA Science Inventory

    Solid residues of incomplete combustion (biochar or char) are continuously being added to soils due to natural vegetation fires in many ecosystems. However, new strategies for carbon sequestration in soils are likely to include the active addition of biochar to soils. Since bioc...

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations provide insights into the substrate specificity of FAOX family members.

    PubMed

    Rigoldi, Federica; Spero, Ludovica; Dalle Vedove, Andrea; Redaelli, Alberto; Parisini, Emilio; Gautieri, Alfonso

    2016-07-19

    Enzymatic assays based on Fructosyl Amino Acid Oxidases (FAOX) represent a potential, rapid and economical strategy to measure glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), which is in turn a reliable method to monitor the insurgence and the development of diabetes mellitus. However, the engineering of naturally occurring FAOX to specifically recognize fructosyl-valine (the glycated N-terminal residue of HbA1c) has been hindered by the paucity of information on the tridimensional structures and catalytic residues of the different FAOX that exist in nature, and in general on the molecular mechanisms that regulate specificity in this class of enzymes. In this study, we use molecular dynamics simulations and advanced modeling techniques to investigate five different relevant wild-type FAOX (Amadoriase I, Amadoriase II, PnFPOX, FPOX-E and N1-1-FAOD) in order to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that drive their specificity towards polar and nonpolar substrates. Specifically, we compare these five different FAOX in terms of overall folding, ligand entry tunnels, ligand binding residues and ligand binding energies. Our work will contribute to future enzyme structure modifications aimed at the rational design of novel biosensors for the monitoring of blood glucose levels. PMID:27327839

  4. Improved detection of allergen-specific T-cell responses in allergic contact dermatitis through the addition of 'cytokine cocktails'.

    PubMed

    Moed, Helen; von Blomberg, Mary; Bruynzeel, Derk P; Scheper, Rik; Gibbs, Susan; Rustemeyer, Thomas

    2005-08-01

    The gold standard for the diagnosis of allergic hypersensitivity is skin patch testing with the suspected allergens. This diagnostic tool, however, has distinct disadvantages, and therefore the development of alternative or complementary in vitro tests is of great importance. In this study, we evaluate the applicability of an in vitro test method, as developed earlier for nickel allergy, to detect allergen-specific T cells in the blood of patients allergic to frequent sensitizers (chromate, cobalt, paraphenylenediamine, fragrances and chloromethyl-isothiazolinone). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of allergic patients and healthy controls were cultured in the absence or presence of allergen. Additionally, type 1 (IL-7 and IL-12) or type 2 (IL-7 and IL-4) stimulating cytokines were added; after 6-day proliferation, IFN-gamma and IL-5 secretions were determined. Without the addition of cytokines, consistent allergen-induced proliferation was observed in PBMCs of nickel-allergic patients only. By contrast, the addition of type 1 or type 2 stimulating cytokines resulted in a significantly enhanced allergen-specific proliferation for all allergens tested (sensitivity increased from 26 to 43% or 38%, respectively, P < 0.05). In these cultures, allergen-induced IFN-gamma and IL-5 secretion was also significantly increased, compared to healthy controls (P < 0.05, for IFN-gamma sensitivity 79%, specificity 93%; for IL-5 sensitivity 74%, specificity 81%). In conclusion, these results demonstrate an increased proliferative capacity and cytokine production by allergen-specific T cells from allergic patients, but not of healthy individuals upon stimulation with allergens in combination with type 1 or 2 skewing cytokines. The present data warrant further exploration of the application of this test to a broader set of allergens. PMID:16026586

  5. Methyl-specific isotopic labeling: a molecular tool box for solution NMR studies of large proteins.

    PubMed

    Kerfah, Rime; Plevin, Michael J; Sounier, Remy; Gans, Pierre; Boisbouvier, Jerome

    2015-06-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is a uniquely powerful tool for studying the structure, dynamics and interactions of biomolecules at atomic resolution. In the past 15 years, the development of new isotopic labeling strategies has opened the possibility of exploiting NMR spectroscopy in the study of supra-molecular complexes with molecular weights of up to 1MDa. At the core of these isotopic labeling developments is the specific introduction of [(1)H,(13)C]-labeled methyl probes into perdeuterated proteins. Here, we describe the evolution of these approaches and discuss their impact on structural and biological studies. The relevant protocols are succinctly reviewed for single and combinatorial isotopic-labeling of methyl-containing residues, and examples of applications on challenging biological systems, including high molecular weight and membrane proteins, are presented. PMID:25881211

  6. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, Helen Hundt, P. Morten; Reijzen, Maarten E. van; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D.

    2014-01-21

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  7. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chadwick, Helen; Hundt, P. Morten; van Reijzen, Maarten E.; Yoder, Bruce L.; Beck, Rainer D.

    2014-01-01

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes.

  8. Quantum state specific reactant preparation in a molecular beam by rapid adiabatic passage.

    PubMed

    Chadwick, Helen; Hundt, P Morten; van Reijzen, Maarten E; Yoder, Bruce L; Beck, Rainer D

    2014-01-21

    Highly efficient preparation of molecules in a specific rovibrationally excited state for gas/surface reactivity measurements is achieved in a molecular beam using tunable infrared (IR) radiation from a single mode continuous wave optical parametric oscillator (cw-OPO). We demonstrate that with appropriate focusing of the IR radiation, molecules in the molecular beam crossing the fixed frequency IR field experience a Doppler tuning that can be adjusted to achieve complete population inversion of a two-level system by rapid adiabatic passage (RAP). A room temperature pyroelectric detector is used to monitor the excited fraction in the molecular beam and the population inversion is detected and quantified using IR bleaching by a second IR-OPO. The second OPO is also used for complete population transfer to an overtone or combination vibration via double resonance excitation using two spatially separated RAP processes. PMID:25669393

  9. Molecular genetic mechanisms of allelic specific regulation of murine Comt expression.

    PubMed

    Segall, Samantha K; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Meloto, Carolina B; Wen, Xia; Cunningham, Danielle; Tarantino, Lisa M; Wiltshire, Tim; Gauthier, Josée; Tohyama, Sarasa; Martin, Loren J; Mogil, Jeffrey S; Diatchenko, Luda

    2015-10-01

    A functional allele of the mouse catechol-O-methyltransferase (Comt) gene is defined by the insertion of a B2 short interspersed repeat element in its 3'-untranslated region (UTR). This allele has been associated with a number of phenotypes, such as pain and anxiety. In comparison with mice carrying the ancestral allele (Comt+), Comt B2i mice show higher Comt mRNA and enzymatic activity levels. Here, we investigated the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying this allelic specific regulation of Comt expression. Insertion of the B2 element introduces an early polyadenylation signal generating a shorter Comt transcript, in addition to the longer ancestral mRNA. Comparative analysis and in silico prediction of Comt mRNA potential targets within the transcript 3' to the B2 element was performed and allowed choosing microRNA (miRNA) candidates for experimental screening: mmu-miR-3470a, mmu-miR-3470b, and mmu-miR-667. Cell transfection with each miRNA downregulated the expression of the ancestral transcript and COMT enzymatic activity. Our in vivo experiments showed that mmu-miR-667-3p is strongly correlated with decreasing amounts of Comt mRNA in the brain, and lentiviral injections of mmu-miR-3470a, mmu-miR-3470b, and mmu-miR-667 increase hypersensitivity in the mouse formalin model, consistent with reduced COMT activity. In summary, our data demonstrate that the Comt+ transcript contains regulatory miRNA signals in its 3'-untranslated region leading to mRNA degradation; these signals, however, are absent in the shorter transcript, resulting in higher mRNA expression and activity levels. PMID:26067582

  10. Theoretical investigation on the glycan-binding specificity of Agrocybe cylindracea galectin using molecular modeling and molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Parasuraman, Ponnusamy; Murugan, Veeramani; Selvin, Jeyasigamani F A; Gromiha, M Michael; Fukui, Kazuhiko; Veluraja, Kasinadar

    2015-09-01

    Galectins are β-galactoside binding proteins which have the ability to serve as potent antitumor, cancer biomarker, and induce tumor cell apoptosis. Agrocybe cylindracea galectin (ACG) is a fungal galectin which specifically recognizes α(2,3)-linked sialyllactose at the cell surface that plays extensive roles in the biological recognition processes. To investigate the change in glycan-binding specificity upon mutations, single point and double point site-directed in silico mutations are performed at the binding pocket of ACG. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies are carried out for the wild-type (ACG) and single point (ACG1) and double point (ACG2) mutated ACGs to investigate the dynamics of substituted mutants and their interactions with the receptor sialyllactose. Plausible binding modes are proposed for galectin-sialylglycan complexes based on the analysis of hydrogen bonding interactions, total pair-wise interaction energy between the interacting binding site residues and sialyllactose and binding free energy of the complexes using molecular mechanics-Poisson-Boltzmann surface area. Our result shows that high contribution to the binding in different modes is due to the direct and water-mediated hydrogen bonds. The binding specificity of double point mutant Y59R/N140Q of ACG2 is found to be high, and it has 26 direct and water-mediated hydrogen bonds with a relatively low-binding free energy of -47.52 ± 5.2 kcal/mol. We also observe that the substituted mutant Arg59 is crucial for glycan-binding and for the preference of α(2,3)-linked sialyllactose at the binding pocket of ACG2 galectin. When compared with the wild-type and single point mutant, the double point mutant exhibits enhanced affinity towards α(2,3)-linked sialyllactose, which can be effectively used as a model for biological cell marker in cancer therapeutics. PMID:25760468

  11. Site-specific labeling of proteins via sortase: protocols for the molecular biologist.

    PubMed

    Popp, Maximilian Wei-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Creation of site-specifically labeled protein bioconjugates is an important tool for the molecular biologist and cell biologist. Chemical labeling methods, while versatile with respect to the types of moieties that can be attached, suffer from lack of specificity, often targeting multiple positions within a protein. Here we describe protocols for the chemoenzymatic labeling of proteins at the C-terminus using the bacterial transpeptidase, sortase A. We detail a protocol for the purification of an improved pentamutant variant of the Staphylococcus aureus enzyme (SrtA 5(o)) that exhibits vastly improved kinetics relative to the wild-type enzyme. Importantly, a protocol for the construction of peptide probes compatible with sortase labeling using techniques that can be adapted to any cellular/molecular biology lab with no existing infrastructure for synthetic chemistry is described. Finally, we provide an example of how to optimize the labeling reaction using the improved SrtA 5(o) variant. PMID:25560076

  12. Communication: High pressure specific heat spectroscopy reveals simple relaxation behavior of glass forming molecular liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roed, Lisa Anita; Niss, Kristine; Jakobsen, Bo

    2015-12-01

    The frequency dependent specific heat has been measured under pressure for the molecular glass forming liquid 5-polyphenyl-4-ether in the viscous regime close to the glass transition. The temperature and pressure dependences of the characteristic time scale associated with the specific heat is compared to the equivalent time scale from dielectric spectroscopy performed under identical conditions. It is shown that the ratio between the two time scales is independent of both temperature and pressure. This observation is non-trivial and demonstrates the existence of specially simple molecular liquids in which different physical relaxation processes are both as function of temperature and pressure/density governed by the same underlying "inner clock." Furthermore, the results are discussed in terms of the recent conjecture that van der Waals liquids, like the measured liquid, comply to the isomorph theory.

  13. In Vitro Selection of a Single-Stranded DNA Molecular Recognition Element Specific for Bromacil

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Ryan M.; Kulick, Amanda R.; Yedlapalli, Srilakshmi; Battistella, Louisa; Hajiran, Cyrus J.; Sooter, Letha J.

    2014-01-01

    Bromacil is a widely used herbicide that is known to contaminate environmental systems. Due to the hazards it presents and inefficient detection methods, it is necessary to create a rapid and efficient sensing device. Towards this end, we have utilized a stringent in vitro selection method to identify single-stranded DNA molecular recognition elements (MRE) specific for bromacil. We have identified one MRE with high affinity (Kd = 9.6 nM) and specificity for bromacil compared to negative targets of selection and other pesticides. The selected ssDNA MRE will be useful as the sensing element in a field-deployable bromacil detection device. PMID:25400940

  14. Boronate Affinity-Molecularly Imprinted Biocompatible Probe: An Alternative for Specific Glucose Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guosheng; Qiu, Junlang; Fang, Xu'an; Xu, Jianqiao; Cai, Siying; Chen, Qing; Liu, Yan; Zhu, Fang; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2016-08-19

    A biocompatible probe for specific glucose recognition is based on photoinitiated boronate affinity-molecular imprinted polymers (BA-MIPs). The unique pre-self-assembly between glucose and boronic acids creates glucose-specific memory cavities in the BA-MIPs coating. As a result, the binding constant toward glucose was enhanced by three orders of magnitude. The BA-MIPs probe was applied to glucose determination in serum and urine and implanted into plant tissues for low-destructive and long-term in vivo continuous glucose monitoring. PMID:27411946

  15. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Liu Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an {alpha}-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G{sup 1111} and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G{sup 1111} in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G{sup 1111}, a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G{sup 1111} had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level.

  16. Squid spermiogenesis: molecular characterization of testis-specific pro-protamines.

    PubMed

    Wouters-Tyrou, D; Martin-Ponthieu, A; Ledoux-Andula, N; Kouach, M; Jaquinod, M; Subirana, J A; Sautière, P

    1995-07-15

    Cuttlefish spermiogenesis is characterized by a two-step nuclear protein transition: histones-->spermatid-specific protein (protein T)-->sperm protamine (protein Sp). A similar situation can be observed in another Cephalopod species, the squid Loligo pealeii. The protein T from Loligo consists of two structural variants, T1 and T2 (molecular masses: 10788 and 10791 Da respectively), phosphorylated to different degrees (2-6 phosphate groups). The primary structures of these two variants and of the protamine variant Sp2 were established from sequence analysis and mass spectrometric data of the proteins and their fragments. T1 and T2 are closely related proteins of 79 residues. The complete structural identity of the C-terminal domain (residues 22-79) of protein T2 with the sperm protamine Sp2 (molecular mass 8562 Da, 58 residues) strongly suggests that the testis-specific protein T2 is indeed the precursor of the protamine. The transition between the precursor protein T and protein Sp results from a hydrolytic cleavage similar to that found in many proteins that are synthesized as precursors. The processing mechanism involves the specific cleavage of a Gly-Arg bond in the sequence Met/Leu18-Lys-Gly-Gly-Arg-Arg23. Furthermore, the study provides molecular evidence on the taxonomic relationship between Loligo and Sepia. PMID:7626016

  17. Squid spermiogenesis: molecular characterization of testis-specific pro-protamines.

    PubMed Central

    Wouters-Tyrou, D; Martin-Ponthieu, A; Ledoux-Andula, N; Kouach, M; Jaquinod, M; Subirana, J A; Sautière, P

    1995-01-01

    Cuttlefish spermiogenesis is characterized by a two-step nuclear protein transition: histones-->spermatid-specific protein (protein T)-->sperm protamine (protein Sp). A similar situation can be observed in another Cephalopod species, the squid Loligo pealeii. The protein T from Loligo consists of two structural variants, T1 and T2 (molecular masses: 10788 and 10791 Da respectively), phosphorylated to different degrees (2-6 phosphate groups). The primary structures of these two variants and of the protamine variant Sp2 were established from sequence analysis and mass spectrometric data of the proteins and their fragments. T1 and T2 are closely related proteins of 79 residues. The complete structural identity of the C-terminal domain (residues 22-79) of protein T2 with the sperm protamine Sp2 (molecular mass 8562 Da, 58 residues) strongly suggests that the testis-specific protein T2 is indeed the precursor of the protamine. The transition between the precursor protein T and protein Sp results from a hydrolytic cleavage similar to that found in many proteins that are synthesized as precursors. The processing mechanism involves the specific cleavage of a Gly-Arg bond in the sequence Met/Leu18-Lys-Gly-Gly-Arg-Arg23. Furthermore, the study provides molecular evidence on the taxonomic relationship between Loligo and Sepia. Images Figure 1 Figure 6 PMID:7626016

  18. Molecular determinants on the insect sodium channel for the specific action of type II pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo, Ningguang; Liu, Zhiqi; Lee, Jung-Eun; Khambay, Bhupinder; Dong, Ke

    2009-01-15

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as type I or type II based on their distinct symptomology and effects on sodium channel gating. Structurally, type II pyrethroids possess an alpha-cyano group at the phenylbenzyl alcohol position, which is lacking in type I pyrethroids. Both type I and type II pyrethroids inhibit deactivation consequently prolonging the opening of sodium channels. However, type II pyrethroids inhibit the deactivation of sodium channels to a greater extent than type I pyrethroids inducing much slower decaying of tail currents upon repolarization. The molecular basis of a type II-specific action, however, is not known. Here we report the identification of a residue G(1111) and two positively charged lysines immediately downstream of G(1111) in the intracellular linker connecting domains II and III of the cockroach sodium channel that are specifically involved in the action of type II pyrethroids, but not in the action of type I pyrethroids. Deletion of G(1111), a consequence of alternative splicing, reduced the sodium channel sensitivity to type II pyrethroids, but had no effect on channel sensitivity to type I pyrethroids. Interestingly, charge neutralization or charge reversal of two positively charged lysines (Ks) downstream of G(1111) had a similar effect. These results provide the molecular insight into the type II-specific interaction of pyrethroids with the sodium channel at the molecular level. PMID:19022275

  19. Position specificity in Chitonomyces (Ascomycota, Laboulbeniomycetes) on Laccophilus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae): a molecular approach resolves a century-old debate.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, Lauren; Weir, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The occurrence of Laboulbeniomycete species consistently on a precise portion of beetle integument was investigated in 13 species of Chitonomyces ectoparasitic on the aquatic diving beetle Laccophilus maculosus (Coleoptera, Dytiscidae). The phenomenon was called "position specificity" by Roland Thaxter in 1896, yet the mechanism has remained unknown. By using molecular analysis of the nucSSU rRNA gene and the 5.8S and partial ITS1 rRNA regions, 13 species of Chitonomyces reported to exhibit position specificity on Laccophilus maculosus were placed neatly into pairs of morphotypes, resulting in synonomies and recognition of six phylogenetic species (one species is a triplet). Each phylogenetic species was located at corresponding positions on male and female beetles that make contact during mating. In addition, ecological data and video footage of the mating behaviors of Laccophilus confirmed that sexual transmission is the mechanism behind this enigmatic phenomenon. PMID:22684291

  20. Molecular cloning and expression of an additional epidermal growth factor receptor-related gene.

    PubMed Central

    Plowman, G D; Whitney, G S; Neubauer, M G; Green, J M; McDonald, V L; Todaro, G J; Shoyab, M

    1990-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha), and amphiregulin are structurally and functionally related growth regulatory proteins. These secreted polypeptides all bind to the 170-kDa cell-surface EGF receptor, activating its intrinsic kinase activity. However, amphiregulin exhibits different activities than EGF and TGF-alpha in a number of biological assays. Amphiregulin only partially competes with EGF for binding EGF receptor, and amphiregulin does not induce anchorage-independent growth of normal rat kidney cells (NRK) in the presence of TGF-beta. Amphiregulin also appears to abrogate the stimulatory effect of TGF-alpha on the growth of several aggressive epithelial carcinomas that overexpress EGF receptor. These findings suggest that amphiregulin may interact with a separate receptor in certain cell types. Here we report the cloning of another member of the human EGF receptor (HER) family of receptor tyrosine kinases, which we have named "HER3/ERRB3." The cDNA was isolated from a human carcinoma cell line, and its 6-kilobase transcript was identified in various human tissues. We have generated peptide-specific antisera that recognizes the 160-kDa HER3 protein when transiently expressed in COS cells. These reagents will allow us to determine whether HER3 binds amphiregulin or other growth regulatory proteins and what role HER3 protein plays in the regulation of cell growth. Images PMID:2164210

  1. Synthesis, Characterization, Molecular Modeling, and DNA Interaction Studies of Copper Complex Containing Food Additive Carmoisine Dye.

    PubMed

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Akbari, Alireza; Jamshidbeigi, Mina; Khodarahmi, Reza

    2016-06-01

    A copper complex of carmoisine dye; [Cu(carmoisine)2(H2O)2]; was synthesized and characterized by using physico-chemical and spectroscopic methods. The binding of this complex with calf thymus (ct) DNA was investigated by circular dichroism, absorption studies, emission spectroscopy, and viscosity measurements. UV-vis results confirmed that the Cu complex interacted with DNA to form a ground-state complex and the observed binding constant (2× 10(4) M(-1)) is more in keeping with the groove bindings with DNA. Furthermore, the viscosity measurement result showed that the addition of complex causes no significant change on DNA viscosity and it indicated that the intercalation mode is ruled out. The thermodynamic parameters are calculated by van't Hoff equation, which demonstrated that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions played major roles in the reaction. The results of circular dichroism (CD) suggested that the complex can change the conformation of DNA from B-like form toward A-like conformation. The cytotoxicity studies of the carmoisine dye and its copper complex indicated that both of them had anticancer effects on HT-29 (colon cancer) cell line and they may be new candidates for treatment of the colon cancer. PMID:27152751

  2. Alignment independent 3D-QSAR, quantum calculations and molecular docking of Mer specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors as anticancer drugs

    PubMed Central

    Shiri, Fereshteh; Pirhadi, Somayeh; Ghasemi, Jahan B.

    2015-01-01

    Mer receptor tyrosine kinase is a promising novel cancer therapeutic target in many human cancers, because abnormal activation of Mer has been implicated in survival signaling and chemoresistance. 3D-QSAR analyses based on alignment independent descriptors were performed on a series of 81 Mer specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The fractional factorial design (FFD) and the enhanced replacement method (ERM) were applied and tested as variable selection algorithms for the selection of optimal subsets of molecular descriptors from a much greater pool of such regression variables. The data set was split into 65 molecules as the training set and 16 compounds as the test set. All descriptors were generated by using the GRid INdependent descriptors (GRIND) approach. After variable selection, GRIND were correlated with activity values (pIC50) by PLS regression. Of the two applied variable selection methods, ERM had a noticeable improvement on the statistical parameters of PLS model, and yielded a q2 value of 0.77, an rpred2 of 0.94, and a low RMSEP value of 0.25. The GRIND information contents influencing the affinity on Mer specific tyrosine kinase were also confirmed by docking studies. In a quantum calculation study, the energy difference between HOMO and LUMO (gap) implied the high interaction of the most active molecule in the active site of the protein. In addition, the molecular electrostatic potential energy at DFT level confirmed results obtained from the molecular docking. The identified key features obtained from the molecular modeling, enabled us to design novel kinase inhibitors. PMID:27013913

  3. Molecular Cage Impregnated Palladium Nanoparticles: Efficient, Additive-Free Heterogeneous Catalysts for Cyanation of Aryl Halides.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Bijnaneswar; Acharyya, Koushik; Howlader, Prodip; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2016-02-10

    Two shape-persistent covalent cages (CC1(r) and CC2(r)) have been devised from triphenyl amine-based trialdehydes and cyclohexane diamine building blocks utilizing the dynamic imine chemistry followed by imine bond reduction. The cage compounds have been characterized by several spectroscopic techniques which suggest that CC1(r) and CC2(r) are [2+3] and [8+12] self-assembled architectures, respectively. These state-of-the-art molecules have a porous interior and stable aromatic backbone with multiple palladium binding sites to engineer the controlled synthesis and stabilization of ultrafine palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs). As-synthesized cage-embedded PdNPs have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry reveals that Pd@CC1(r) and Pd@CC2(r) have 40 and 25 wt% palladium loading, respectively. On the basis of TEM analysis, it has been estimated that as small as ∼1.8 nm PdNPs could be stabilized inside the CC1(r), while larger CC2(r) could stabilize ∼3.7 nm NPs. In contrast, reduction of palladium salts in the absence of the cages form structure less agglomerates. The well-dispersed cage-embedded NPs exhibit efficient catalytic performance in the cyanation of aryl halides under heterogeneous, additive-free condition. Moreover, these materials have excellent stability and recyclability without any agglomeration of PdNPs after several cycles. PMID:26771385

  4. Patterns of cryptic host specificity in duck lice based on molecular data.

    PubMed

    Escalante, G C; Sweet, A D; McCracken, K G; Gustafsson, D R; Wilson, R E; Johnson, K P

    2016-06-01

    Documenting patterns of host specificity in parasites relies on the adequate definition of parasite species. In many cases, parasites have simplified morphology, making species delimitation based on traditional morphological characters difficult. Molecular data can help in assessing whether widespread parasites harbour cryptic species and, alternatively, in guiding further taxonomic revision in cases in which there is morphological variation. The duck louse genus Anaticola (Phthiraptera: Philopteridae), based on current taxonomy, contains both host-specific and widespread species. Mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequences of samples from this genus were used to document patterns of host specificity. The comparison of these patterns with morphological variations in Anaticola revealed a general correspondence between the groups identified by DNA sequences and morphology, respectively. These results suggest that a more thorough taxonomic review of this genus is needed. In general, the groups identified on the basis of molecular data were associated with particular groups of waterfowl (e.g. dabbling ducks, sea ducks, geese) or specific biogeographic regions (e.g. North America, South America, Australia, Eurasia). PMID:26753998

  5. Roles of specific lipid species in the cell and their molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tomohiro; Jennings, William; Epand, Richard M

    2016-04-01

    Thousands of different molecular species of lipids are present within a single cell, being involved in modulating the basic processes of life. The vast number of different lipid species can be organized into a number of different lipid classes, which may be defined as a group of lipids with a common chemical structure, such as the headgroup, apart from the nature of the hydrocarbon chains. Each lipid class has unique biological roles. In some cases, a relatively small change in the headgroup chemical structure can result in a drastic change in function. Such phenomena are well documented, and largely understood in terms of specific interactions with proteins. In contrast, there are observations that the entire structural specificity of a lipid molecule, including the hydrocarbon chains, is required for biological activity through specific interactions with membrane proteins. Understanding of these phenomena represents a fundamental change in our thinking of the functions of lipids in biology. There are an increasing number of diverse examples of roles for specific lipids in cellular processes including: Signal transduction; trafficking; morphological changes; cell division. We are gaining knowledge and understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. They are of growing importance in both basic and applied sciences. PMID:26875545

  6. Production of specific-molecular-weight hyaluronan by metabolically engineered Bacillus subtilis 168.

    PubMed

    Jin, Peng; Kang, Zhen; Yuan, Panhong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2016-05-01

    Low-molecular-weight hyaluronan (LMW-HA) has attracted much attention because of its many potential applications. Here, we efficiently produced specific LMW-HAs from sucrose in Bacillus subtilis. By coexpressing the identified committed genes (tuaD, gtaB, glmU, glmM, and glmS) and downregulating the glycolytic pathway, HA production was significantly increased from 1.01gL(-1) to 3.16gL(-1), with a molecular weight range of 1.40×10(6)-1.83×10(6)Da. When leech hyaluronidase was actively expressed after N-terminal engineering (1.62×10(6)UmL(-1)), the production of HA was substantially increased from 5.96gL(-1) to 19.38gL(-1). The level of hyaluronidase was rationally regulated with a ribosome-binding site engineering strategy, allowing the production of LMW-HAs with a molecular weight range of 2.20×10(3)-1.42×10(6)Da. Our results confirm that this strategy for the controllable expression of hyaluronidase, together with the optimization of the HA synthetic pathway, effectively produces specific LMW-HAs, and could also be used to produce other LMW polysaccharides. PMID:26851304

  7. Molecular and cytogenetic identification of new wheat-Dasypyrum breviaristatum additions conferring resistance to stem rust and powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng; Li, Guangrong; Yan, Hongfei; Zhou, Jianping; Hu, Lijun; Lei, Mengping; Ran, Ling; Yang, Zujun

    2011-12-01

    Two cytologically stable wheat-Dasypyrum breviarisatatum addition lines, Y93-1-6-6 and Y93-1-A6-4, were identified by integrated molecular and cytogenetic techniques. C-banding and genomic in situ hybridization (GISH) showed that Y93-1-6-6 and Y93-1-A6-4 were different wheat-D. breviaristatum additions. A total of 51 markers (primer/enzyme combinations), including 6 PCR-based Landmark Unique Gene (PLUG) markers and 45 Sequence-Tagged-Site (STS) markers, were selected from 3,774 primer/enzyme combinations to further characterize these two additions. Marker haploytpes suggested that both D. breviaristatum chromosomes in Y93-1-6-6 and Y93-1-A6-4 were rearranged. Stem rust resistance screening indicated that both additions were highly resistant to race RKQQC, whereas only Y93-1-6-6 was resistant to race TTKSK (Ug99). Powdery mildew resistance screening showed that only Y93-1-6-6 was resistant. Pedigree analysis suggested that the stem rust and powdery mildew resistance of Y93-1-6-6 was derived from D. breviaristatum, indicating that the D. breviaristatum chromosomes in Y93-1-6-6 possess a new powdery mildew resistance gene(s), and new stem rust resistance gene(s). These two additions could be used as stem rust or powdery mildew resistance sources in wheat breeding programs. PMID:23136473

  8. Molecular basis for species-specific sensitivity to "hot" chili peppers.

    PubMed

    Jordt, Sven-Eric; Julius, David

    2002-02-01

    Chili peppers produce the pungent vanilloid compound capsaicin, which offers protection from predatory mammals. Birds are indifferent to the pain-producing effects of capsaicin and therefore serve as vectors for seed dispersal. Here, we determine the molecular basis for this species-specific behavioral response by identifying a domain of the rat vanilloid receptor that confers sensitivity to capsaicin to the normally insensitive chicken ortholog. Like its mammalian counterpart, the chicken receptor is activated by heat or protons, consistent with the fact that both mammals and birds detect noxious heat and experience thermal hypersensitivity. Our findings provide a molecular basis for the ecological phenomenon of directed deterence and suggest that the capacity to detect capsaicin-like inflammatory substances is a recent acquisition of mammalian vanilloid receptors. PMID:11853675

  9. A Telomerase-Specific Doxorubicin-Releasing Molecular Beacon for Cancer Theranostics.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yi; Wang, Zhaohui; Zhang, Min; Han, Zhihao; Chen, Dan; Zhu, Qiuyun; Gao, Weidong; Qian, Zhiyu; Gu, Yueqing

    2016-03-01

    A molecular beacon-based drug delivery system was designed for both detection of telomerase activity in living cells and telomerase-triggered drug release for precise cancer treatment. This system is composed of a gold nanoparticle core densely packed with FITC-labeled hairpin DNA sequences hybridized with telomerase primers. Molecules of the anticancer drug doxorubicin were intercalated into the stem region of the DNA sequence. The presence of telomerase will elongate the primers, leading to inner chain substitution followed by the release of the FITC fluorescence and the trapped doxorubicin. This molecular beacon could specifically distinguish tumor cells and normal cells based on telomerase activity, precisely release doxorubicin in response to telomerase activity in the tumor cells, and prevent toxicity to normal organs. PMID:26848056

  10. Molecular cytogenetic identification of a wheat-rye 1R addition line with multiple spikelets and resistance to powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wujuan; Wang, Changyou; Chen, Chunhuan; Wang, Yajuan; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Xinlun; Ji, Wanquan

    2016-04-01

    Alien addition lines are important for transferring useful genes from alien species into common wheat. Rye is an important and valuable gene resource for improving wheat disease resistance, yield, and environment adaptation. A new wheat-rye addition line, N9436B, was developed from the progeny of the cross of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBDD) cultivar Shaanmai 611 and rye (Secale cereal L., 2n = 2x = 14, RR) accession Austrian rye. We characterized this new line by cytology, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), molecular markers, and disease resistance screening. N9436B was stable in morphology and cytology, with a chromosome composition of 2n = 42 + 2t = 22II. GISH investigations showed that this line contained two rye chromosomes. GISH, FISH, and molecular maker identification suggested that the introduced R chromosome and the missing wheat chromosome arms were 1R chromosome and 2DL chromosome arm, respectively. N9436B exhibited 30-37 spikelets per spike and a high level of resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt) isolate E09 at the seedling stage. N9436B was cytologically stable, had the trait of multiple spikelets, and was resistant to powdery mildew; this line should thus be useful in wheat improvement. PMID:27021228

  11. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory Operations System: Version 4.0 - system requirements specification

    SciTech Connect

    Kashporenko, D.

    1996-07-01

    This document is intended to provide an operations standard for the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory OPerations System (EMSL OPS). It is directed toward three primary audiences: (1) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) facility and operations personnel; (2) laboratory line managers and staff; and (3) researchers, equipment operators, and laboratory users. It is also a statement of system requirements for software developers of EMSL OPS. The need for a finely tuned, superior research environment as provided by the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory has never been greater. The abrupt end of the Cold War and the realignment of national priorities caused major US and competing overseas laboratories to reposition themselves in a highly competitive research marketplace. For a new laboratory such as the EMSL, this means coming into existence in a rapidly changing external environment. For any major laboratory, these changes create funding uncertainties and increasing global competition along with concomitant demands for higher standards of research product quality and innovation. While more laboratories are chasing fewer funding dollars, research ideas and proposals, especially for molecular-level research in the materials and biological sciences, are burgeoning. In such an economically constrained atmosphere, reduced costs, improved productivity, and strategic research project portfolio building become essential to establish and maintain any distinct competitive advantage. For EMSL, this environment and these demands require clear operational objectives, specific goals, and a well-crafted strategy. Specific goals will evolve and change with the evolution of the nature and definition of DOE`s environmental research needs. Hence, EMSL OPS is designed to facilitate migration of these changes with ease into every pertinent job function, creating a facile {open_quotes}learning organization.{close_quotes}

  12. Transcriptomic Profile Reveals Gender-Specific Molecular Mechanisms Driving Multiple Sclerosis Progression

    PubMed Central

    Irizar, Haritz; Muñoz-Culla, Maider; Sepúlveda, Lucia; Sáenz-Cuesta, Matías; Prada, Álvaro; Castillo-Triviño, Tamara; Zamora-López, Gorka; de Munain, Adolfo López; Olascoaga, Javier; Otaegui, David

    2014-01-01

    Background Although the most common clinical presentation of multiple sclerosis (MS) is the so called Relapsing-Remitting MS (RRMS), the molecular mechanisms responsible for its progression are currently unknown. To tackle this problem, a whole-genome gene expression analysis has been performed on RRMS patients. Results The comparative analysis of the Affymetrix Human Gene 1.0 ST microarray data from peripheral blood leucocytes obtained from 25 patients in remission and relapse and 25 healthy subjects has revealed 174 genes altered in both remission and relapse, a high proportion of them showing what we have called “mirror pattern”: they are upregulated in remission and downregulated in relapse or vice versa. The coexpression analysis of these genes has shown that they are organized in three female-specific and one male-specific modules. Conclusions The interpretation of the modules of the coexpression network suggests that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation of B cells happens in MS relapses; however, qPCR expression data of the viral genes supports that hypothesis only in female patients, reinforcing the notion that different molecular processes drive disease progression in females and males. Besides, we propose that the “primed” state showed by neutrophils in women is an endogenous control mechanism triggered to keep EBV reactivation under control through vitamin B12 physiology. Finally, our results also point towards an important sex-specific role of non-coding RNA in MS. PMID:24587374

  13. Oxidation-specific epitopes as targets for biotheranostic applications in humans: Biomarkers, molecular imaging and therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Yury I.; Tsimikas, Sotirios

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review Emerging data demonstrates the potential of translational applications of antibodies directed against oxidation-specific epitopes (OSE). “Biotheranostics” in cardiovascular disease (CVD) describes targeting of OSE for biomarker, therapeutic and molecular imaging diagnostic applications. Recent findings Lipid oxidation collectively yields a large variety of oxidation-specific epitopes (OSE), such as oxidized phospholipids (OxPL) and malondialdehyde (MDA) epitopes. OSE are immunogenic, pro-inflammatory, pro-atherogenic and plaque destabilizing and represent danger associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). DAMPs are recognized by the innate immune system via pattern recognition receptors, including scavenger receptors IgM natural antibodies and complement factor H (CFH), that bind, neutralize and/or facilitate their clearance. Biomarker assays measuring OxPL present on apolipoprotein B-100 lipoproteins, and particularly on lipoprotein (a), predict the development of CVD events. In contrast, OxPL on plasminogen facilitate fibrinolysis and may reduce atherothrombosis. Oxidation-specific antibodies (OSA) attached to magnetic nanoparticles image lipid-rich, oxidation-rich plaques. Infusion or overexpression of OSA reduces the progression of atherosclerosis, suggesting that they may be used in similar applications in humans. Summary Using the accelerating knowledge base and improved understanding of the interplay of oxidation, inflammation and innate and adaptive immunity in atherogenesis, emerging clinical applications of OSA may identify, monitor and treat CVD in humans. PMID:23995232

  14. A recombinant horseshoe crab plasma lectin recognizes specific pathogen-associated molecular patterns of bacteria through rhamnose.

    PubMed

    Ng, Sim-Kun; Huang, Yu-Tsyr; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Low, Ee-Ling; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chen, Shiu-Ling; Mao, Liang-Chi; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2014-01-01

    Horseshoe crab is an ancient marine arthropod that, in the absence of a vertebrate-like immune system, relies solely on innate immune responses by defense molecules found in hemolymph plasma and granular hemocytes for host defense. A plasma lectin isolated from the hemolymph of Taiwanese Tachypleus tridentatus recognizes bacteria and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), yet its structure and mechanism of action remain unclear, largely because of limited availability of horseshoe crabs and the lack of a heterogeneous expression system. In this study, we have successfully expressed and purified a soluble and functional recombinant horseshoe crab plasma lectin (rHPL) in an Escherichia coli system. Interestingly, rHPL bound not only to bacteria and LPSs like the native HPL but also to selective medically important pathogens isolated from clinical specimens, such as Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae and Gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes. The binding was demonstrated to occur through a specific molecular interaction with rhamnose in pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) on the bacterial surface. Additionally, rHPL inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa PAO1 in a concentration-dependent manner. The results suggest that a specific protein-glycan interaction between rHPL and rhamnosyl residue may further facilitate development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for microbial pathogens. PMID:25541995

  15. A Recombinant Horseshoe Crab Plasma Lectin Recognizes Specific Pathogen-Associated Molecular Patterns of Bacteria through Rhamnose

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sim-Kun; Huang, Yu-Tsyr; Lee, Yuan-Chuan; Low, Ee-Ling; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chen, Shiu-Ling; Mao, Liang-Chi; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2014-01-01

    Horseshoe crab is an ancient marine arthropod that, in the absence of a vertebrate-like immune system, relies solely on innate immune responses by defense molecules found in hemolymph plasma and granular hemocytes for host defense. A plasma lectin isolated from the hemolymph of Taiwanese Tachypleus tridentatus recognizes bacteria and lipopolysaccharides (LPSs), yet its structure and mechanism of action remain unclear, largely because of limited availability of horseshoe crabs and the lack of a heterogeneous expression system. In this study, we have successfully expressed and purified a soluble and functional recombinant horseshoe crab plasma lectin (rHPL) in an Escherichia coli system. Interestingly, rHPL bound not only to bacteria and LPSs like the native HPL but also to selective medically important pathogens isolated from clinical specimens, such as Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumoniae and Gram-positive Streptococcus pneumoniae serotypes. The binding was demonstrated to occur through a specific molecular interaction with rhamnose in pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) on the bacterial surface. Additionally, rHPL inhibited the growth of P. aeruginosa PAO1 in a concentration-dependent manner. The results suggest that a specific protein-glycan interaction between rHPL and rhamnosyl residue may further facilitate development of novel diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for microbial pathogens. PMID:25541995

  16. Molecular basis of RNA polymerase promoter specificity switch revealed through studies of Thermus bacteriophage transcription regulator

    PubMed Central

    Severinov, Konstantin; Minakhin, Leonid; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Lopatina, Anna; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2014-01-01

    Transcription initiation is the central point of gene expression regulation. Understanding of molecular mechanism of transcription regulation requires, ultimately, the structural understanding of consequences of transcription factors binding to DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP), the enzyme of transcription. We recently determined a structure of a complex between transcription factor gp39 encoded by a Thermus bacteriophage and Thermus RNAP holoenzyme. In this addendum to the original publication, we highlight structural insights that explain the ability of gp39 to act as an RNAP specificity switch which inhibits transcription initiation from a major class of bacterial promoters, while allowing transcription from a minor promoter class to continue. PMID:25105059

  17. Specific interactions between amyloid-β peptide and curcumin derivatives: Ab initio molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimura, Hiromi; Kadoya, Ryushi; Suzuki, Tomoya; Murakawa, Takeru; Shulga, Sergiy; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2015-07-01

    Alzheimer's disease is caused by accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides in a brain. To suppress the production of Aβ peptides, it is effective to inhibit the cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by secretases. However, because the secretases also play important roles to produce vital proteins for human body, inhibitors for the secretases may have side effects. To propose new agents for protecting the cleavage site of APP from the attacking of the γ-secretase, we have investigated here the specific interactions between a short APP peptide and curcumin derivatives, using protein-ligand docking as well as ab initio molecular simulations.

  18. An accurate metalloprotein-specific scoring function and molecular docking program devised by a dynamic sampling and iteration optimization strategy.

    PubMed

    Bai, Fang; Liao, Sha; Gu, Junfeng; Jiang, Hualiang; Wang, Xicheng; Li, Honglin

    2015-04-27

    Metalloproteins, particularly zinc metalloproteins, are promising therapeutic targets, and recent efforts have focused on the identification of potent and selective inhibitors of these proteins. However, the ability of current drug discovery and design technologies, such as molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations, to probe metal-ligand interactions remains limited because of their complicated coordination geometries and rough treatment in current force fields. Herein we introduce a robust, multiobjective optimization algorithm-driven metalloprotein-specific docking program named MpSDock, which runs on a scheme similar to consensus scoring consisting of a force-field-based scoring function and a knowledge-based scoring function. For this purpose, in this study, an effective knowledge-based zinc metalloprotein-specific scoring function based on the inverse Boltzmann law was designed and optimized using a dynamic sampling and iteration optimization strategy. This optimization strategy can dynamically sample and regenerate decoy poses used in each iteration step of refining the scoring function, thus dramatically improving both the effectiveness of the exploration of the binding conformational space and the sensitivity of the ranking of the native binding poses. To validate the zinc metalloprotein-specific scoring function and its special built-in docking program, denoted MpSDockZn, an extensive comparison was performed against six universal, popular docking programs: Glide XP mode, Glide SP mode, Gold, AutoDock, AutoDock4Zn, and EADock DSS. The zinc metalloprotein-specific knowledge-based scoring function exhibited prominent performance in accurately describing the geometries and interactions of the coordination bonds between the zinc ions and chelating agents of the ligands. In addition, MpSDockZn had a competitive ability to sample and identify native binding poses with a higher success rate than the other six docking programs. PMID:25746437

  19. Mitochondrial electron transport chain identified as a novel molecular target of SPIO nanoparticles mediated cancer-specific cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    He, Chengyong; Jiang, Shengwei; Jin, Haijing; Chen, Shuzhen; Lin, Gan; Yao, Huan; Wang, Xiaoyong; Mi, Peng; Ji, Zhiliang; Lin, Yuchun; Lin, Zhongning; Liu, Gang

    2016-03-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) are highly cytotoxic and target cancer cells with high specificity; however, the mechanism by which SPIONs induce cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity remains unclear. Herein, the molecular mechanism of SPION-induced cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity to cancer cells is clarified through DNA microarray and bioinformatics analyses. SPIONs can interference with the mitochondrial electron transport chain (METC) in cancer cells, which further affects the production of ATP, mitochondrial membrane potential, and microdistribution of calcium, and induces cell apoptosis. Additionally, SPIONs induce the formation of reactive oxygen species in mitochondria; these reactive oxygen species trigger cancer-specific cytotoxicity due to the lower antioxidative capacity of cancer cells. Moreover, the DNA microarray and gene ontology analyses revealed that SPIONs elevate the expression of metallothioneins in both normal and cancer cells but decrease the expression of METC genes in cancer cells. Overall, these results suggest that SPIONs induce cancer cell death by targeting the METC, which is helpful for designing anti-cancer nanotheranostics and evaluating the safety of future nanomedicines. PMID:26773667

  20. Molecularly imprinted polymers on a silica surface for the adsorption of tobacco-specific nitrosamines in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Li, Min-ting; Zhu, Yong-yan; Li, Li; Wang, Wen-na; Yin, Yong-guan; Zhu, Quan-hong

    2015-07-01

    Tobacco-specific nitrosamines are one of the most important groups of carcinogens in tobacco products. Using adsorbents as filter additives is an effective way to reduce tobacco-specific nitrosamines in cigarette smoke. Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) using nicotinamide as template were grafted on the silica gel surface to obtain MIP@SiO2 and employed as filter additives to absorb tobacco-specific nitrosamines in mainstream cigarette smoke. Four milligrams of MIP@SiO2 per cigarette was added to the interface between filter and tobacco rod to prepare a binary filter system. The mainstream smoke was collected on an industry-standard Cambridge filter pad and extracted with ammonium acetate aqueous solution before analysis. Compared to the cigarette smoke of the control group, the levels of tobacco-specific nitrosamines with silica gel and with MIP@SiO2 were both reduced, and the adsorption rates of N-nitrosonornicotine, N-nitrosoanabasine, N-nitrosoanatabine, and 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridine)-1-butanone with silica gel and with MIP@SiO2 were 20.76, 15.32, 18.79, and 18.01%, and 41.33, 34.04, 37.86, and 35.53%, respectively. Furthermore the content of total particle materials in cigarette smoke with silica gel was decreased evidently but showed no observable change with MIP@SiO2 . It indicated MIP@SiO2 could selectively reduce tobacco-specific nitrosamines in the mainstream cigarette smoke with no change to the cigarette flavor. PMID:25914259

  1. Lentiviral hepatitis B pseudotype entry requires sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide and additional hepatocyte-specific factors.

    PubMed

    Meredith, L W; Hu, K; Cheng, X; Howard, C R; Baumert, T F; Balfe, P; van de Graaf, K F; Protzer, U; McKeating, J A

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the world's major unconquered infections, resulting in progressive liver disease, and current treatments rarely cure infection. A limitation to discovering new therapies is our limited knowledge of HBV entry and dissemination pathways that hinders the development of in vitro culture systems. To address this gap in our understanding we optimized the genesis of infectious lentiviral pseudoparticles (HBVpps). The recent discovery that the bile salt transporter sodium taurocholate co-transporting polypeptide (NTCP) acts as a receptor for HBV enabled us to assess the receptor dependency of HBVpp infection. HBVpps preferentially infect hepatoma cells expressing NTCP, whereas other non-liver cells engineered to express NTCP do not support infection, suggesting that additional hepatocyte-specific factors are required for HBVpp internalization. These results highlight the value of the HBVpp system to dissect the pathways of HBV entry and dissemination. PMID:26474824

  2. Correlating Molecular Character of NIR Imaging Agents with Tissue-Specific Uptake

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Eric A.; Hyun, Hoon; Tawney, Joseph G.; Choi, Hak Soo; Henary, Maged

    2015-01-01

    Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent contrast agents are emerging in optical imaging as sensitive, cost-effective, and nonharmful alternatives to current agents that emit harmful ionizing radiation. Developing spectrally distinct NIR fluorophores to visualize sensitive vital tissues to selectively avoid them during surgical resection of diseased tissue is of great significance. Herein, we report the synthetic variation of pentamethine cyanine fluorophores with modifications of physicochemical properties toward prompting tissue-specific uptake into sensitive tissues (i.e., endocrine glands). Tissue-specific targeting and biodistribution studies revealed localization of contrast agents in the adrenal and pituitary glands, pancreas, and lymph nodes with dependence on molecular characteristics. Incorporation of hydrophobic heterocyclic rings, alkyl groups, and halogens allowed a fine-tuning capability to the hydrophobic character and dipole moment for observing perturbation in biological activity in response to minor structural alterations. These NIR contrast agents have potential for clinical translation for intraoperative imaging in the delineation of delicate glands. PMID:25923454

  3. Molecular mechanisms and therapeutics of the deficit in specific force in ageing skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Delbono, Osvaldo

    2002-01-01

    The age-related impairment in muscle force is only partially explained by the loss of muscle mass. The loss both in specific and absolute forces contributes to the muscle weakness measured in the elderly and in animal models of ageing. Successful interventions aimed at preventing age-associated functional deficits will require a better insight into the mechanisms underlying the decline in muscle-specific force. The present review article is focused on recent evidence supporting excitation-contraction uncoupling as a key factor underlying fast and slow muscle fiber impairment with ageing. The molecular, functional and structural factors supporting this theory and counteracting measures such as insulin-like growth factor 1 transgenic overexpression are discussed. PMID:12237563

  4. A simple molecular beacon with duplex-specific nuclease amplification for detection of microRNA.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingcun; Zhang, Jiangyan; Zhao, Jingjing; Zhao, Likun; Cheng, Yongqiang; Li, Zhengping

    2016-02-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate gene activity, promoting or inhibiting cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Abnormal expression of miRNAs is associated with many diseases. Therefore, it is essential to establish a simple, rapid and sensitive miRNA detection method. In this paper, based on a simple molecular beacon (MB) and duplex-specific nuclease (DSN), we developed a target recycling amplification method for miRNA detection. By controlling the number of stem bases to 5, the MB probe used in this method can be prevented from hydrolysis by DSN without special modification. This assay is direct and simple to quantitatively detect miRNA with high sensitivity and specificity. The MB probe design provides a new strategy for nuclease-based amplification reaction. PMID:26688865

  5. Molecular basis of sequence-specific recognition of pre-ribosomal RNA by nucleolin

    PubMed Central

    Allain, Frédéric H.-T.; Bouvet, Philippe; Dieckmann, Thorsten; Feigon, Juli

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the 28 kDa complex of the first two RNA binding domains (RBDs) of nucleolin (RBD12) with an RNA stem–loop that includes the nucleolin recognition element UCCCGA in the loop was determined by NMR spectroscopy. The structure of nucleolin RBD12 with the nucleolin recognition element (NRE) reveals that the two RBDs bind on opposite sides of the RNA loop, forming a molecular clamp that brings the 5′ and 3′ ends of the recognition sequence close together and stabilizing the stem–loop. The specific interactions observed in the structure explain the sequence specificity for the NRE sequence. Binding studies of mutant proteins and analysis of conserved residues support the proposed interactions. The mode of interaction of the protein with the RNA and the location of the putative NRE sites suggest that nucleolin may function as an RNA chaperone to prevent improper folding of the nascent pre-rRNA. PMID:11118222

  6. Molecular Signatures of Tissue-Specific Microvascular Endothelial Cell Heterogeneity in Organ Maintenance and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Daniel J.; Ginsberg, Michael; Israely, Edo; Palikuqi, Brisa; Poulos, Michael G.; James, Daylon; Ding, Bi-Sen; Schachterle, William; Liu, Ying; Rosenwaks, Zev; Butler, Jason M.; Xiang, Jenny; Rafii, Arash; Shido, Koji; Rabbany, Sina Y.; Elemento, Olivier; Rafii, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) within different tissues are endowed with distinct but as yet unrecognized structural, phenotypic, and functional attributes. We devised EC purification, cultivation, profiling, and transplantation models that establish tissue-specific molecular libraries of ECs devoid of lymphatic ECs or parenchymal cells. These libraries identify attributes that confer ECs with their organotypic features. We show that clusters of transcription factors, angiocrine growth factors, adhesion molecules, and chemokines are expressed in unique combinations by ECs of each organ. Furthermore, ECs respond distinctly in tissue regeneration models, hepatectomy, and myeloablation. To test the data set, we developed a transplantation model that employs generic ECs differentiated from embryonic stem cells. Transplanted generic ECs engraft into regenerating tissues and acquire features of organotypic ECs. Collectively, we demonstrate the utility of informational databases of ECs toward uncovering the extravascular and intrinsic signals that define EC heterogeneity. These factors could be exploited therapeutically to engineer tissue-specific ECs for regeneration. PMID:23871589

  7. Configuration control on the shape memory stiffness of molecularly imprinted polymer for specific uptake of creatinine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ang, Qian Yee; Zolkeflay, Muhammad Helmi; Low, Siew Chun

    2016-04-01

    In this study, sol-gel processing was proposed to prepare a creatinine (Cre)-imprinted molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP). The intermolecular interaction constituted by the cross-linkers, i.e., 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane-sulfonic acid (AMPS) and aluminium ion (Al3+), was studied and compared in order to form a confined matrix that promises the effectiveness of molecular imprinting. In view of the shape recognition, the hydrogen bonded Cre-AMPS did not demonstrate good recognition of Cre, with Cre binding found only at 5.70 ± 0.15 mg g-1 of MIP. Whilst, MIP cross-linked using Al3+ was able to attain an excellent Cre adsorption capacity of 19.48 ± 0.64 mg g-1 of MIP via the stronger ionic interaction of Cre-Al3+. Based on the Scatchard analysis, a higher Cre concentration in testing solution required greater driving force to resolve the binding resistance of Cre molecules, so as to have a precise Cre binding with shape factor. The molecular recognition ability of Cre-MIP in present work was shape-specific for Cre as compared to its structural analogue, 2-pyrrolidinone (2-pyr), by an ideal selectivity coefficient of 6.57 ± 0.10. In overall, this study has come up with a practical approach on the preparation of MIP for the detection of renal dysfunction by point-of-care Cre testing.

  8. High resolution, molecular-specific, reflectance imaging in optically dense tissue phantoms with structured-illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.; Rahman, Mohammed; Mack, Vivian; Sokolov, Konstantin; Rogers, Jeremy D.; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Descour, Michael R.

    2004-08-01

    Structured-illumination microscopy delivers confocal-imaging capabilities and may be used for optical sectioning in bio-imaging applications. However, previous structured-illumination implementations are not capable of imaging molecular changes within highly scattering, biological samples in reflectance mode. Here, we present two advances which enable successful structured illumination reflectance microscopy to image molecular changes in epithelial tissue phantoms. First, we present the sine approximation algorithm to improve the ability to reconstruct the in-focus plane when the out-of-focus light is much greater in magnitude. We characterize the dependencies of this algorithm on phase step error, random noise and backscattered out-of-focus contributions. Second, we utilize a molecular-specific reflectance contrast agent based on gold nanoparticles to label disease-related biomarkers and increase the signal and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in structured illumination microscopy of biological tissue. Imaging results for multi-layer epithelial cell phantoms with optical properties characteristic of normal and cancerous tissue labeled with nanoparticles targeted against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) are presented. Structured illumination images reconstructed with the sine approximation algorithm compare favorably to those obtained with a standard confocal microscope; this new technique can be implemented in simple and small imaging platforms for future clinical studies.

  9. Molecular Determinants of the Substrate Specificity of the Complement-initiating Protease, C1r*

    PubMed Central

    Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.; Yongqing, Tang; Tran, Thuy P.; Thompson, Phillip E.; Viljoen, Jacqueline E.; Coetzer, Theresa H.; Duncan, Renee C.; Kass, Itamar; Buckle, Ashley M.; Pike, Robert N.

    2013-01-01

    The serine protease, C1r, initiates activation of the classical pathway of complement, which is a crucial innate defense mechanism against pathogens and altered-self cells. C1r both autoactivates and subsequently cleaves and activates C1s. Because complement is implicated in many inflammatory diseases, an understanding of the interaction between C1r and its target substrates is required for the design of effective inhibitors of complement activation. Examination of the active site specificity of C1r using phage library technology revealed clear specificity for Gln at P2 and Ile at P1′, which are found in these positions in physiological substrates of C1r. Removal of one or both of the Gln at P2 and Ile at P1′ in the C1s substrate reduced the rate of C1r activation. Substituting a Gln residue into the P2 of the activation site of MASP-3, a protein with similar domain structure to C1s that is not normally cleaved by C1r, enabled efficient activation of this enzyme. Molecular dynamics simulations and structural modeling of the interaction of the C1s activation peptide with the active site of C1r revealed the molecular mechanisms that particularly underpin the specificity of the enzyme for the P2 Gln residue. The complement control protein domains of C1r also made important contributions to efficient activation of C1s by this enzyme, indicating that exosite interactions were also important. These data show that C1r specificity is well suited to its cleavage targets and that efficient cleavage of C1s is achieved through both active site and exosite contributions. PMID:23589288

  10. Tissue-specific factors additively increase the probability of the all-or-none formation of a hypersensitive site.

    PubMed Central

    Boyes, J; Felsenfeld, G

    1996-01-01

    DNase I-hypersensitive sites lack a canonical nucleosome and have binding sites for various transcription factors. To understand how the hypersensitivity is generated and maintained, we studied the chicken erythroid-specific beta(A)/epsilon globin gene enhancer, a region where both tissue-specific and ubiquitous transcription factors can bind. Constructions containing mutations of this enhancer were stably introduced into a chicken erythroid cell line. We found that the hypersensitivity was determined primarily by the erythroid factors and that their binding additively increased the accessibility. The fraction of accessible sites in clonal cell lines was quantitated using restriction endonucleases; these data implied that the formation of each hypersensitive site was an all-or-none phenomenon. Use of DNase I and micrococcal nuclease probes further indicated that the size of the hypersensitive site was influenced by the binding of transcription factors which then determined the length of the nucleosome-free gap. Our data are consistent with a model in which hypersensitive sites are generated stochastically: mutations that reduce the number of bound factors reduce the probability that these factors will prevail over a nucleosome; thus, the fraction of sites in the population that are accessible is also diminished. Images PMID:8665857

  11. Optimization of the thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of pig manure, agriculture waste and inorganic additive through specific methanogenic activity.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, J; Cisneros-Ortiz, M E; Guardia-Puebla, Y; Morgan-Sagastume, J M; Noyola, A

    2014-01-01

    The anaerobic co-digestion of three wastes (manure, rice straw and clay residue, an inorganic additive) at different concentration levels and their interactive effects on methanogenic activity were investigated in this work at thermophilic conditions in order to enhance hydrolytic activity and methane production. A central composite design and the response surface methodology were applied for the optimization of specific methanogenic activity (SMA) by assessing their interaction effects with a reduced number of experiments. The results showed a significant interaction among the wastes on the SMA and confirmed that co-digestion enhances methane production. Rice straw apparently did not supply a significant amount of substrate to make a difference in SMA or methane yield. On the other hand, clay residue had a positive effect as an inorganic additive for stimulating the anaerobic process, based on its mineral content and its adsorbent properties for ammonia. Finally, the optimal conditions for achieving a thermophilic SMA value close to 1.4 g CH4-COD/g VSS · d(-1) were 20.3 gVSS/L of manure, 9.8 gVSS/L of rice straw and 3.3 gTSS/L of clay. PMID:24959998

  12. Rational molecular dynamics scheme for predicting optimum concentration loading of nano-additive in phase change materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, Monisha; Vaish, Rahul; Madhar, Niyaz Ahamad; Shaikh, Hamid; Al-Zahrani, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    The present study deals with the diffusion and phase transition behaviour of paraffin reinforced with carbon nano-additives namely graphene oxide (GO) and surface functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT). Bulk disordered systems of paraffin hydrocarbons impregnated with carbon nano-additives have been generated in realistic equilibrium conformations for potential application as latent heat storage systems. Ab initio molecular dynamics(MD) in conjugation with COMPASS forcefield has been implemented using periodic boundary conditions. The proposed scheme allows determination of optimum nano-additive loading for improving thermo-physical properties through analysis of mass, thermal and transport properties; and assists in determination of composite behaviour and related performance from microscopic point of view. It was observed that nanocomposites containing 7.8 % surface functionalised SWCNT and 55% GO loading corresponds to best latent heat storage system. The propounded methodology could serve as a by-pass route for economically taxing and iterative experimental procedures required to attain the optimum composition for best performance. The results also hint at the large unexplored potential of ab-initio classical MD techniques for predicting performance of new nanocomposites for potential phase change material applications.

  13. Exploration of Deinococcus-Thermus molecular diversity by novel group-specific PCR primers

    PubMed Central

    Theodorakopoulos, Nicolas; Bachar, Dipankar; Christen, Richard; Alain, Karine; Chapon, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    The deeply branching Deinococcus-Thermus lineage is recognized as one of the most extremophilic phylum of bacteria. In previous studies, the presence of Deinococcus-related bacteria in the hot arid Tunisian desert of Tataouine was demonstrated through combined molecular and culture-based approaches. Similarly, Thermus-related bacteria have been detected in Tunisian geothermal springs. The present work was conducted to explore the molecular diversity within the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum in these extreme environments. A set of specific primers was designed in silico on the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequences, validated for the specific detection of reference strains, and used for the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of metagenomic DNA retrieved from the Tataouine desert sand and Tunisian hot spring water samples. These analyses have revealed the presence of previously undescribed Deinococcus-Thermus bacterial sequences within these extreme environments. The primers designed in this study thus represent a powerful tool for the rapid detection of Deinococcus-Thermus in environmental samples and could also be applicable to clarify the biogeography of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum. PMID:23996915

  14. Molecular mechanisms of substrate recognition and specificity of botulinum neurotoxin serotype F.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng; Wan, Hoi Ying

    2011-01-15

    BoNTs (botulinum neurotoxins) are both deadly neurotoxins and natural toxins that are widely used in protein therapies to treat numerous neurological disorders of dystonia and spinal spasticity. Understanding the mechanism of action and substrate specificity of BoNTs is a prerequisite to develop antitoxin and novel BoNT-derived protein therapy. To date, there is a lack of detailed information with regard to how BoNTs recognize and hydrolyse the substrate VAMP-2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 2), even though it is known to be cleaved by four of the seven BoNT serotypes, B, D, F, G and TeNT (tetanus neurotoxin). In the present study we dissected the molecular mechanisms of VAMP-2 recognition by BoNT serotype F for the first time. The initial substrate recognition was mediated through sequential binding of VAMP-2 to the B1, B2 and B3 pockets in LC/F (light chain of BoNT serotype F), which directed VAMP-2 to the active site of LC/F and stabilized the active site substrate recognition, where the P2, P1' and P2' sites of VAMP-2 were specifically recognized by the S2, S1' and S2' pockets of LC/F to promote substrate hydrolysis. The understanding of the molecular mechanisms of LC/F substrate recognition provides insights into the development of antitoxins and engineering novel BoNTs to optimize current therapy and extend therapeutic interventions. PMID:21029044

  15. Biokinetics and dosimetry of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging and therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Torres-García, Eugenio; Gonz&Ález-v&Ázquez, Armando; de Murphy, Consuelo Arteaga

    Molecular imaging techniques directly or indirectly monitor and record the spatiotemporal distribution of molecular or cellular processes for biochemical, biologic, diagnostic or therapeutic applications. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC has shown high stability both in vitro and in vivo and rapid detection of somatostatin receptor-positive tumors. Therapies using radiolabeled anti-CD20 have demonstrated their efficacy in patients with B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). The aim of this study was to establish biokinetic models for 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC and 188Re-anti-CD20 and to evaluate their dosimetry as target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. The OLINDA/EXM code was used to calculate patient-specific internal radiation dose estimates. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC images showed an average tumor/blood ratio of 4.3±0.7 in receptor-positive tumors with an average effective dose of 4.4 mSv. Dosimetric studies indicated that after administration of 5.8 to 7.5 GBq of 188Re-anti-CD20 the absorbed dose to total body would be 0.75 Gy which corresponds to the recommended dose for NHL therapies.

  16. A microfluidic chamber to study the dynamics of muscle-contraction-specific molecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Roman, Horia Nicolae; Juncker, David; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-03-01

    In vitro motility and laser trap assays are commonly used for molecular mechanics measurements. However, chemicals cannot be added during these measurements, because they create flows that alter the molecular mechanics. Thus, we designed a microfluidic device that allows the addition of chemicals without creating bulk flows. Biocompatibility of the components of this device was tested. A microchannel chamber was created by photolithography with the patterns transferred to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The PDMS chamber was bound to a polycarbonate membrane, which itself was bound to a molecular mechanics chamber. The microchannels ensured rapid distribution of the chemicals over the membrane, whereas the membrane ensured efficient delivery to the mechanics chamber while preventing bulk flow. The biocompatibility of the materials was tested by comparing the velocity (ν(max)) of propulsion by myosin of fluorescently labeled actin filaments to that of the conventional assay; no difference in ν(max) was observed. To estimate total chemical delivery time, labeled bovine serum albumin was injected in the channel chamber and TIRF was used to determine the time to reach the assay surface (2.7 ± 0.1 s). Furthermore, the standard distance of a trapped microsphere calculated during buffer diffusion using the microfluidic device (14.9 ± 3.2 nm) was not different from that calculated using the conventional assay (15.6 ± 5.3 nm, p = 0.922). Finally, ν(max) obtained by injecting adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the microchannel chamber (2.37 ± 0.48 μm/s) was not different from that obtained when ATP was delivered directly to the mechanics chamber (2.52 ± 0.42 μm/s, p = 0.822). This microfluidic prototype validates the design for molecular mechanics measurements. PMID:25629255

  17. Linearity and additivity in cluster-induced sputtering: A molecular-dynamics study of van der Waals bonded systems

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Christian; Urbassek, Herbert M.; Johnson, Robert E.

    2004-10-15

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation, we study sputtering of a condensed-gas solid induced by the impact of atomic clusters with sizes 1{<=}n{<=}10{sup 4}. Above a nonlinear onset regime, we find a linear increase of the sputter yield Y with the total energy E of the bombarding cluster. The fitting coefficients in the linear regime depend only on the cluster size n such that for fixed bombardment energy, sputtering decreases with increasing cluster size n. We find that to a good approximation the sputter yield in this regime obeys an additivity rule in cluster size n such that doubling the cluster size at the same cluster velocity amounts to doubling the sputter yield. The sputter-limiting energy {epsilon}{sub s} is introduced which separates erosion ({epsilon}>{epsilon}{sub s}) from growth ({epsilon}<{epsilon}{sub s}) under cluster impact.

  18. Site-Specifically Labeled Immunoconjugates for Molecular Imaging--Part 1: Cysteine Residues and Glycans.

    PubMed

    Adumeau, Pierre; Sharma, Sai Kiran; Brent, Colleen; Zeglis, Brian M

    2016-02-01

    that this review fosters interest and enthusiasm for site-specific immunoconjugates within the nuclear medicine and molecular imaging communities. PMID:26754790

  19. ApoE4-specific Misfolded Intermediate Identified by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Williams II, Benfeard; Convertino, Marino; Das, Jhuma; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.

    2015-01-01

    The increased risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is associated with the APOE gene, which encodes for three variants of Apolipoprotein E, namely E2, E3, E4, differing only by two amino acids at positions 112 and 158. ApoE4 is known to be the strongest risk factor for AD onset, while ApoE3 and ApoE2 are considered to be the AD-neutral and AD-protective isoforms, respectively. It has been hypothesized that the ApoE isoforms may contribute to the development of AD by modifying the homeostasis of ApoE physiological partners and AD-related proteins in an isoform-specific fashion. Here we find that, despite the high sequence similarity among the three ApoE variants, only ApoE4 exhibits a misfolded intermediate state characterized by isoform-specific domain-domain interactions in molecular dynamics simulations. The existence of an ApoE4-specific intermediate state can contribute to the onset of AD by altering multiple cellular pathways involved in ApoE-dependent lipid transport efficiency or in AD-related protein aggregation and clearance. We present what we believe to be the first structural model of an ApoE4 misfolded intermediate state, which may serve to elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the role of ApoE4 in AD pathogenesis. The knowledge of the structure for the ApoE4 folding intermediate provides a new platform for the rational design of alternative therapeutic strategies to fight AD. PMID:26506597

  20. Molecular Characterization of Arabidopsis GAL4/UAS Enhancer Trap Lines Identifies Novel Cell-Type-Specific Promoters1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Radoeva, Tatyana; Saiga, Shunsuke

    2016-01-01

    Cell-type-specific gene expression is essential to distinguish between the numerous cell types of multicellular organism. Therefore, cell-type-specific gene expression is tightly regulated and for most genes RNA transcription is the central point of control. Thus, transcriptional reporters are broadly used markers for cell identity. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a recognized standard for cell identities is a collection of GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines. Yet, while greatly used, very few of them have been molecularly characterized. Here, we have selected a set of 21 frequently used GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines for detailed characterization of expression pattern and genomic insertion position. We studied their embryonic and postembryonic expression domains and grouped them into three groups (early embryo development, late embryo development, and embryonic root apical meristem lines) based on their dominant expression. We show that some of the analyzed lines are expressed in a domain often broader than the one that is reported. Additionally, we present an overview of the location of the T-DNA inserts of all lines, with one exception. Finally, we demonstrate how the obtained information can be used for generating novel cell-type-specific marker lines and for genotyping enhancer trap lines. The knowledge could therefore support the extensive use of these valuable lines. PMID:27208300

  1. Molecular Characterization of Arabidopsis GAL4/UAS Enhancer Trap Lines Identifies Novel Cell-Type-Specific Promoters.

    PubMed

    Radoeva, Tatyana; Ten Hove, Colette A; Saiga, Shunsuke; Weijers, Dolf

    2016-06-01

    Cell-type-specific gene expression is essential to distinguish between the numerous cell types of multicellular organism. Therefore, cell-type-specific gene expression is tightly regulated and for most genes RNA transcription is the central point of control. Thus, transcriptional reporters are broadly used markers for cell identity. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), a recognized standard for cell identities is a collection of GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines. Yet, while greatly used, very few of them have been molecularly characterized. Here, we have selected a set of 21 frequently used GAL4/UAS enhancer trap lines for detailed characterization of expression pattern and genomic insertion position. We studied their embryonic and postembryonic expression domains and grouped them into three groups (early embryo development, late embryo development, and embryonic root apical meristem lines) based on their dominant expression. We show that some of the analyzed lines are expressed in a domain often broader than the one that is reported. Additionally, we present an overview of the location of the T-DNA inserts of all lines, with one exception. Finally, we demonstrate how the obtained information can be used for generating novel cell-type-specific marker lines and for genotyping enhancer trap lines. The knowledge could therefore support the extensive use of these valuable lines. PMID:27208300

  2. Molecular design of specific metal-binding peptide sequences from protein fragments: theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Kozísek, Milan; Svatos, Ales; Budesínský, Milos; Muck, Alexander; Bauer, Mikael C; Kotrba, Pavel; Ruml, Tomás; Havlas, Zdenek; Linse, Sara; Rulísek, Lubomír

    2008-01-01

    A novel strategy is presented for designing peptides with specific metal-ion chelation sites, based on linking computationally predicted ion-specific combinations of amino acid side chains coordinated at the vertices of the desired coordination polyhedron into a single polypeptide chain. With this aim, a series of computer programs have been written that 1) creates a structural combinatorial library containing Zi-(X)n-Zj sequences (n=0-14; Z: amino acid that binds the metal through the side chain; X: any amino acid) from the existing protein structures in the non-redundant Protein Data Bank; 2) merges these fragments into a single Z1-(X)n1 -Z2-(X)n2 -Z3-(X)n3 -...-Zj polypeptide chain; and 3) automatically performs two simple molecular mechanics calculations that make it possible to estimate the internal strain in the newly designed peptide. The application of this procedure for the most M2+-specific combinations of amino acid side chains (M: metal; see L. Rulísek, Z. Havlas J. Phys. Chem. B 2003, 107, 2376-2385) yielded several peptide sequences (with lengths of 6-20 amino acids) with the potential for specific binding with six metal ions (Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+ and Hg2+). The gas-phase association constants of the studied metal ions with these de novo designed peptides were experimentally determined by MALDI mass spectrometry by using 3,4,5-trihydroxyacetophenone as a matrix, whereas the thermodynamic parameters of the metal-ion coordination in the condensed phase were measured by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), chelatometry and NMR spectroscopy methods. The data indicate that some of the computationally predicted peptides are potential M2+-specific metal-ion chelators. PMID:18633954

  3. Molecular basis for specific recognition of bacterial ligands by NAIP/NLRC4 inflammasomes.

    PubMed

    Tenthorey, Jeannette L; Kofoed, Eric M; Daugherty, Matthew D; Malik, Harmit S; Vance, Russell E

    2014-04-10

    NLR (nucleotide-binding domain [NBD]- and leucine-rich repeat [LRR]-containing) proteins mediate innate immune sensing of pathogens in mammals and plants. How NLRs detect their cognate stimuli remains poorly understood. Here, we analyzed ligand recognition by NLR apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) inflammasomes. Mice express multiple highly related NAIP paralogs that recognize distinct bacterial proteins. We analyzed a panel of 43 chimeric NAIPs, allowing us to map the NAIP domain responsible for specific ligand detection. Surprisingly, ligand specificity was mediated not by the LRR domain, but by an internal region encompassing several NBD-associated α-helical domains. Interestingly, we find that the ligand specificity domain has evolved under positive selection in both rodents and primates. We further show that ligand binding is required for the subsequent co-oligomerization of NAIPs with the downstream signaling adaptor NLR family, CARD-containing 4 (NLRC4). These data provide a molecular basis for how NLRs detect ligands and assemble into inflammasomes. PMID:24657167

  4. The peanut allergy epidemic: allergen molecular characterisation and prospects for specific therapy.

    PubMed

    de Leon, Maria P; Rolland, Jennifer M; O'Hehir, Robyn E

    2007-01-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) allergy is a major cause of food-induced anaphylaxis, with increasing prevalence worldwide. To date, there is no cure for peanut allergy, and, unlike many other food allergies, it usually persists through to adulthood. Prevention of exposure to peanuts is managed through strict avoidance, which can be compromised by the frequent use of peanuts and peanut products in food preparations. Conventional subcutaneous-injection allergen immunotherapy using crude peanut extract is not a recommended treatment because of the risk of severe side effects, largely as a result of specific IgE antibodies. Consequently, there is an urgent need to develop a suitable peanut allergen preparation that can induce specific clinical and immunological tolerance to peanuts in allergic individuals without adverse side effects. This requires detailed molecular and immunological characterisation of the allergenic components of peanut. This article reviews current knowledge on clinically relevant peanut allergens, in particular Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3, together with options for T-cell-reactive but non-IgE-binding allergen variants for specific immunotherapeutic strategies. These include T-cell-epitope peptide and hypoallergenic mutant vaccines. Alternative routes of administration such as sublingual are also considered, and appropriate adjuvants for delivering effective treatments at these sites examined. PMID:17210088

  5. [Specific molecular markers of the rust resistance gene M4 in flax].

    PubMed

    Bo, Tian-Yue; Ye, Hua-Zhi; Wang, Shi-Quan; Yang, Jian-Chun; Li, Xiao-Bing; Zhai, Wen-Xue

    2002-10-01

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum L.) is an important fiber and oil-producing crop. Flax rust, caused by Melampsora lini Ehrenb. Lev., occurs worldwide and can cause severe losses in seed yield and fiber quality. In order to identify molecular markers linked to the flax rust resistant gene M4, RAPD analysis of NM4, a near-isogenic line containing the M4 gene, and the recurrent parent Bison was carried out with 540 decamer primers. The primer OPA18 could stably amplify a specific fragment, OPA18(432), in the NM4 line. The OPA18(432) marker was testified to be closely linked to the M4 gene with a genetic distance of 2.1 cM through the analysis of the F2 mapping population derived from a cross of Bison x NM4. Based on the sequence of OPA18(432), the specific PCR primers were designed, and a SCAR marker for the M4 gene was produced. Amplification of different resistant materials proved that the maker is specific for the M4 gene. This marker has been used successfully in marker-assisted selection in the flax breeding program. PMID:12561479

  6. Molecularly imprinted polymer for specific extraction of hypericin from Hypericum perforatum L. herbal extract.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaozhou; Qin, Cuili; Li, Daomin; Hou, Yuze; Li, Songbiao; Sun, Junjie

    2014-09-01

    The molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were prepared by an oxidation-reduction polymerization system using a non-covalent molecularly imprinting strategy with hypericin as the template, acrylamide as the functional monomer and pentaerythritol triacrylate as the cross-linker in the porogen of acetone. The UV spectrum revealed that a cooperative hydrogen-bonding complex between hypericin and acrylamide might be formed at the ratio of 1:6 in the prepolymerized system. Two classes of the binding sites were produced in the resulting hypericin-imprinted polymer with the dissociation constants of 16.61μgL(-1) and 69.35μgL(-1), and the affinity binding sites of 456.53μgg(-1) and 603.06μgg(-1), respectively. The synthesized MIPs were characterized by scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis. High-performance liquid chromatography was used to investigate the adsorption and recognition properties of the MIPs. Selective binding of the template molecule was demonstrated in comparison to the analog pseudohypericin. After the Hypericum perforatum L. plant being air dried and finely ground, an extract was prepared by shaking the powder in a methanol-water solution (80:20, v/v), vacuum filtration though a Büchner funnel, liquid-liquid extraction with ethyl ether and ethyl acetate, and evaporating on a rotary evaporator until dry. With the sorbents of the optimized MIPs, a molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction (MISPE) procedure was developed for enrichment and separation of hypericin from the Hypericum extract in the presence of interfering substances. The selective extraction of hypericin from herbal medicine was achieved with the recovery of 82.30%. The results showed that MISPE can be a useful tool for specific isolation and effective clean-up of target compounds from natural products. PMID:24946147

  7. Molecular basis for the substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of thymine-7-hydroxylase in fungi.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Tianlong; Ding, Jianping

    2015-11-16

    TET proteins play a vital role in active DNA demethylation in mammals and thus have important functions in many essential cellular processes. The chemistry for the conversion of 5mC to 5hmC, 5fC and 5caC catalysed by TET proteins is similar to that of T to 5hmU, 5fU and 5caU catalysed by thymine-7-hydroxylase (T7H) in the nucleotide anabolism in fungi. Here, we report the crystal structures and biochemical properties of Neurospora crassa T7H. T7H can bind the substrates only in the presence of cosubstrate, and binding of different substrates does not induce notable conformational changes. T7H exhibits comparable binding affinity for T and 5hmU, but 3-fold lower affinity for 5fU. Residues Phe292, Tyr217 and Arg190 play critical roles in substrate binding and catalysis, and the interactions of the C5 modification group of substrates with the cosubstrate and enzyme contribute to the slightly varied binding affinity and activity towards different substrates. After the catalysis, the products are released and new cosubstrate and substrate are reloaded to conduct the next oxidation reaction. Our data reveal the molecular basis for substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of T7H and provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of substrate recognition and catalysis of TET proteins. PMID:26429971

  8. Formation of target-specific binding sites in enzymes: solid-phase molecular imprinting of HRP.

    PubMed

    Czulak, J; Guerreiro, A; Metran, K; Canfarotta, F; Goddard, A; Cowan, R H; Trochimczuk, A W; Piletsky, S

    2016-06-01

    Here we introduce a new concept for synthesising molecularly imprinted nanoparticles by using proteins as macro-functional monomers. For a proof-of-concept, a model enzyme (HRP) was cross-linked using glutaraldehyde in the presence of glass beads (solid-phase) bearing immobilized templates such as vancomycin and ampicillin. The cross-linking process links together proteins and protein chains, which in the presence of templates leads to the formation of permanent target-specific recognition sites without adverse effects on the enzymatic activity. Unlike complex protein engineering approaches commonly employed to generate affinity proteins, the method proposed can be used to produce protein-based ligands in a short time period using native protein molecules. These affinity materials are potentially useful tools especially for assays since they combine the catalytic properties of enzymes (for signaling) and molecular recognition properties of antibodies. We demonstrate this concept in an ELISA-format assay where HRP imprinted with vancomycin and ampicillin replaced traditional enzyme-antibody conjugates for selective detection of templates at micromolar concentrations. This approach can potentially provide a fast alternative to raising antibodies for targets that do not require high assay sensitivities; it can also find uses as a biochemical research tool, as a possible replacement for immunoperoxidase-conjugates. PMID:27174700

  9. Molecular Bottlebrushes as Tensile Machines for Probing Specific Bonds under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanchao; Nese, Alper; Lebedeva, Natalia; Davis, Tyler; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof; Sheiko, Sergei

    2012-02-01

    Significant tension on the order of 1 nN is self-generated along the backbone of bottlebrush macromolecules due to steric repulsion between densely grafted side chains. The intrinsic tension is amplified upon adsorption of bottlebrush molecules onto a substrate and increases with grafting density, side chain length, and strength of adhesion of the substrate. This allows us to employ these molecular bottlebrushes as miniature tensile machines to probe the mechanochemistry of specific bonds. For this purpose, bottlebrush macromolecules with a disulfide linker in the middle of the backbone were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). Two processes, (i) homolytic cleavage of disulfide and (ii) scission of disulfide due to reduction by dithiothreitol were monitored through molecular imaging by atomic force microscope (AFM). In both cases, the corresponding rate constants increase exponentially with mechanical tension along the disulfide bond. Moreover, the reduction rate at zero force is found to be significantly lower than that in bulk solution, which suggests an acidic composition of the water surface with pH=3.7. This opens a new application of brush-like macromolecules as surface pH sensors.

  10. Molecular basis for the substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of thymine-7-hydroxylase in fungi

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjing; Zhang, Tianlong; Ding, Jianping

    2015-01-01

    TET proteins play a vital role in active DNA demethylation in mammals and thus have important functions in many essential cellular processes. The chemistry for the conversion of 5mC to 5hmC, 5fC and 5caC catalysed by TET proteins is similar to that of T to 5hmU, 5fU and 5caU catalysed by thymine-7-hydroxylase (T7H) in the nucleotide anabolism in fungi. Here, we report the crystal structures and biochemical properties of Neurospora crassa T7H. T7H can bind the substrates only in the presence of cosubstrate, and binding of different substrates does not induce notable conformational changes. T7H exhibits comparable binding affinity for T and 5hmU, but 3-fold lower affinity for 5fU. Residues Phe292, Tyr217 and Arg190 play critical roles in substrate binding and catalysis, and the interactions of the C5 modification group of substrates with the cosubstrate and enzyme contribute to the slightly varied binding affinity and activity towards different substrates. After the catalysis, the products are released and new cosubstrate and substrate are reloaded to conduct the next oxidation reaction. Our data reveal the molecular basis for substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of T7H and provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of substrate recognition and catalysis of TET proteins. PMID:26429971

  11. Structural specifics of light-induced metastable states in copper(II)-nitroxide molecular magnets.

    PubMed

    Barskaya, I Yu; Veber, S L; Fokin, S V; Tretyakov, E V; Bagryanskaya, E G; Ovcharenko, V I; Fedin, M V

    2015-12-28

    Although light-induced magnetostructural switching in copper(II)-nitroxide molecular magnets Cu(hfac)2L(R) has been known for several years, structural characterization of metastable photoinduced states has not yet been accomplished due to significant technical demands. In this work we apply, for the first time, variable-temperature FTIR spectroscopy with photoexcitation to investigate the structural specifics of light-induced states in the Cu(hfac)2L(R) family represented by (i) Cu(hfac)2L(Me) comprising two-spin copper(II)-nitroxide clusters, and (ii) Cu(hfac)2L(Pr) comprising three-spin nitroxide-copper(II)-nitroxide clusters. The light-induced state of Cu(hfac)2L(Me) manifests the same set of vibrational bands as the corresponding thermally-induced state, implying their similar structures. For the second compound Cu(hfac)2L(Pr), the coordination environment of copper(II) is similar in light- and thermally-induced states, but distinct differences are found for packing of the peripheral n-propyl substituent of nitroxide. Thus, generally the structures of the corresponding thermally- and light-induced states in molecular magnets Cu(hfac)2L(R) might differ, and FTIR spectroscopy provides a useful approach for revealing and elucidating such differences. PMID:26571045

  12. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted protein contrast agents for molecular imaging of prostate cancer by MRI.

    PubMed

    Pu, Fan; Salarian, Mani; Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Feng, Jie; Tan, Shanshan; Patel, Anvi; Li, Xin; Mamouni, Kenza; Hekmatyar, Khan; Zou, Juan; Wu, Daqing; Yang, Jenny J

    2016-07-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high resolution has yet to be achieved due to the lack of contrast agents with significantly improved relaxivity for sensitivity, targeting capabilities and metal selectivity. We have previously reported our creation of a novel class of protein Gd(3+) contrast agents, ProCA32, which displayed significantly improved relaxivity while exhibiting strong Gd(3+) binding selectivity over physiological metal ions. In this study, we report our effort in further developing biomarker-targeted protein MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging of PSMA. Among three PSMA targeted contrast agents engineered with addition of different molecular recognition sequences, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits a binding affinity of 1.1 ± 0.1 μM for PSMA while the metal binding affinity is maintained at 0.9 ± 0.1 × 10(-22) M. In addition, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits r1 of 27.6 mM(-1) s(-1) and r2 of 37.9 mM(-1) s(-1) per Gd (55.2 and 75.8 mM(-1) s(-1) per molecule r1 and r2, respectively) at 1.4 T. At 7 T, ProCA32.PSMA also has r2 of 94.0 mM(-1) s(-1) per Gd (188.0 mM(-1) s(-1) per molecule) and r1 of 18.6 mM(-1) s(-1) per Gd (37.2 mM(-1) s(-1) per molecule). This contrast capability enables the first MRI enhancement dependent on PSMA expression levels in tumor bearing mice using both T1 and T2-weighted MRI at 7 T. Further development of these PSMA-targeted contrast agents are expected to be used for the precision imaging of prostate cancer at an early stage and to monitor disease progression and staging, as well as determine the effect of therapeutic treatment by non-invasive evaluation of the PSMA level using MRI. PMID:26961235

  13. Adult-specific electrical silencing of pacemaker neurons uncouples the molecular oscillator from circadian outputs

    PubMed Central

    Depetris-Chauvin, Ana; Berni, Jimena; Aranovich, Ezequiel J.; Muraro, Nara I.; Beckwith, Esteban J.; Ceriani, María Fernanda

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Circadian rhythms regulate physiology and behavior through transcriptional feedback loops of clock genes running within specific pacemaker cells. In Drosophila, molecular oscillations in the small ventral Lateral Neurons (sLNvs) command rhythmic behavior under free-running conditions releasing the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR (PDF) in a circadian fashion. Electrical activity in the sLNvs is also required for behavioral rhythmicity. Yet, how temporal information is transduced into behavior remains unclear. Results Here we developed a new tool for temporal control of gene expression to obtain adult-restricted electrical silencing of the PDF circuit, which led to reversible behavioral arrhythmicity. Remarkably, PER oscillations during the silenced phase remained unaltered, indicating that arrhythmicity is a direct consequence of the silenced activity. Accordingly, circadian axonal remodeling and PDF accumulation were severely affected during the silenced phase. Conclusions Although electrical activity of the sLNvs is not a clock component it coordinates circuit outputs leading to rhythmic behavior. PMID:22018542

  14. Molecular Imaging in Tracking Tumor-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTLs)

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhiyi; Li, Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Despite the remarkable progress of adoptive T cell therapy in cancer treatment, there remains an urgent need for the noninvasive tracking of the transfused T cells in patients to determine their biodistribution, viability, and functionality. With emerging molecular imaging technologies and cell-labeling methods, noninvasive in vivo cell tracking is experiencing impressive progress toward revealing the mechanisms and functions of these cells in real time in preclinical and clinical studies. Such cell tracking methods have an important role in developing effective T cell therapeutic strategies and steering decision-making process in clinical trials. On the other hand, they could provide crucial information to accelerate the regulatory approval process on the T cell therapy. In this review, we revisit the advances in tracking the tumor-specific CTLs, highlighting the latest development in human studies and the key challenges. PMID:25157278

  15. Methanol Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Oxide Catalysts: Molecular and Dissociative Routes and Hydrogen Addition Energies as Descriptors of Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-11-13

    The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of alkanols on oxide catalysts is generally described as involving H-abstraction from alkoxy species formed via O–H dissociation. Kinetic and isotopic data cannot discern between such routes and those involving kinetically-relevant H-abstraction from undissociated alkanols. Here, we combine such experiments with theoretical estimates of activation energies and entropies to show that the latter molecular routes prevail over dissociative routes for methanol reactions on polyoxometalate (POM) clusters at all practical reaction temperatures. The stability of the late transition states that mediate H-abstraction depend predominantly on the stability of the O–H bond formed, making H-addition energies (HAE) accurate and single-valued descriptors of reactivity. Density functional theory-derived activation energies depend linearly on HAE values at each O-atom location on clusters with a range of composition (H3PMo12, H4SiMo12, H3PW12, H4PV1Mo11, and H4PV1W11); both barriers and HAE values reflect the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy of metal centers that accept the electron and the protonation energy of O-atoms that accept the proton involved in the H-atom transfer. Bridging O-atoms form O–H bonds that are stronger than those of terminal atoms and therefore exhibit more negative HAE values and higher ODH reactivity on all POM clusters. For each cluster composition, ODH turnover rates reflect the reactivity-averaged HAE of all accessible O-atoms, which can be evaluated for each cluster composition to provide a rigorous and accurate predictor of ODH reactivity for catalysts with known structure. These relations together with oxidation reactivity measurements can then be used to estimate HAE values and to infer plausible structures for catalysts with uncertain active site structures.

  16. Resilient emotionality and molecular compensation in mice lacking the oligodendrocyte-specific gene Cnp1.

    PubMed

    Edgar, N M; Touma, C; Palme, R; Sibille, E

    2011-01-01

    Altered oligodendrocyte structure and function is implicated in major psychiatric illnesses, including low cell number and reduced oligodendrocyte-specific gene expression in major depressive disorder (MDD). These features are also observed in the unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) rodent model of the illness, suggesting that they are consequential to environmental precipitants; however, whether oligodendrocyte changes contribute causally to low emotionality is unknown. Focusing on 2'-3'-cyclic nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase (Cnp1), a crucial component of axoglial communication dysregulated in the amygdala of MDD subjects and UCMS-exposed mice, we show that altered oligodendrocyte integrity can have an unexpected functional role in affect regulation. Mice lacking Cnp1 (knockout, KO) displayed decreased anxiety- and depressive-like symptoms (i.e., low emotionality) compared with wild-type animals, a phenotypic difference that increased with age (3-9 months). This phenotype was accompanied by increased motor activity, but was evident before neurodegenerative-associated motor coordination deficits (≤ 9-12 months). Notably, Cnp1(KO) mice were less vulnerable to developing a depressive-like syndrome after either UCMS or chronic corticosterone exposure. Cnp1(KO) mice also displayed reduced fear expression during extinction, despite normal amygdala c-Fos induction after acute stress, together implicating dysfunction of an amygdala-related neural network, and consistent with proposed mechanisms for stress resiliency. However, the Cnp1(KO) behavioral phenotype was also accompanied by massive upregulation of oligodendrocyte- and immune-related genes in the basolateral amygdala, suggesting an attempt at functional compensation. Together, we demonstrate that the lack of oligodendrocyte-specific Cnp1 leads to resilient emotionality. However, combined with substantial molecular changes and late-onset neurodegeneration, these results suggest the low Cnp1 seen in MDD may

  17. Resilient emotionality and molecular compensation in mice lacking the oligodendrocyte-specific gene Cnp1

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, N M; Touma, C; Palme, R; Sibille, E

    2011-01-01

    Altered oligodendrocyte structure and function is implicated in major psychiatric illnesses, including low cell number and reduced oligodendrocyte-specific gene expression in major depressive disorder (MDD). These features are also observed in the unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) rodent model of the illness, suggesting that they are consequential to environmental precipitants; however, whether oligodendrocyte changes contribute causally to low emotionality is unknown. Focusing on 2′-3′-cyclic nucleotide 3′-phosphodiesterase (Cnp1), a crucial component of axoglial communication dysregulated in the amygdala of MDD subjects and UCMS-exposed mice, we show that altered oligodendrocyte integrity can have an unexpected functional role in affect regulation. Mice lacking Cnp1 (knockout, KO) displayed decreased anxiety- and depressive-like symptoms (i.e., low emotionality) compared with wild-type animals, a phenotypic difference that increased with age (3–9 months). This phenotype was accompanied by increased motor activity, but was evident before neurodegenerative-associated motor coordination deficits (⩽9–12 months). Notably, Cnp1KO mice were less vulnerable to developing a depressive-like syndrome after either UCMS or chronic corticosterone exposure. Cnp1KO mice also displayed reduced fear expression during extinction, despite normal amygdala c-Fos induction after acute stress, together implicating dysfunction of an amygdala-related neural network, and consistent with proposed mechanisms for stress resiliency. However, the Cnp1KO behavioral phenotype was also accompanied by massive upregulation of oligodendrocyte- and immune-related genes in the basolateral amygdala, suggesting an attempt at functional compensation. Together, we demonstrate that the lack of oligodendrocyte-specific Cnp1 leads to resilient emotionality. However, combined with substantial molecular changes and late-onset neurodegeneration, these results suggest the low Cnp1 seen in MDD

  18. Microscopic Analysis of Corn Fiber Using Corn Starch- and Cellulose-Specific Molecular Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, S. E.; Donohoe, B. S.; Beery, K. E.; Xu, Q.; Ding, S.-Y.; Vinzant, T. B.; Abbas, C. A.; Himmel, M. E.

    2007-09-01

    Ethanol is the primary liquid transportation fuel produced from renewable feedstocks in the United States today. The majority of corn grain, the primary feedstock for ethanol production, has been historically processed in wet mills yielding products such as gluten feed, gluten meal, starch, and germ. Starch extracted from the grain is used to produce ethanol in saccharification and fermentation steps; however the extraction of starch is not 100% efficient. To better understand starch extraction during the wet milling process, we have developed fluorescent probes that can be used to visually localize starch and cellulose in samples using confocal microscopy. These probes are based on the binding specificities of two types of carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which are small substrate-specific protein domains derived from carbohydrate degrading enzymes. CBMs were fused, using molecular cloning techniques, to a green fluorescent protein (GFP) or to the red fluorescent protein DsRed (RFP). Using these engineered probes, we found that the binding of the starch-specific probe correlates with starch content in corn fiber samples. We also demonstrate that there is starch internally localized in the endosperm that may contribute to the high starch content in corn fiber. We also surprisingly found that the cellulose-specific probe did not bind to most corn fiber samples, but only to corn fiber that had been hydrolyzed using a thermochemical process that removes the residual starch and much of the hemicellulose. Our findings should be of interest to those working to increase the efficiency of the corn grain to ethanol process.

  19. Microdialysis Sampling from Wound Fluids Enables Quantitative Assessment of Cytokines, Proteins, and Metabolites Reveals Bone Defect-Specific Molecular Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wissenbach, Dirk K.; Pfeiffer, Susanne E. M.; Baumann, Sven; Hofbauer, Lorenz C.; von Bergen, Martin; Kalkhof, Stefan; Rammelt, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Bone healing involves a variety of different cell types and biological processes. Although certain key molecules have been identified, the molecular interactions of the healing progress are not completely understood. Moreover, a clinical routine for predicting the quality of bone healing after a fracture in an early phase is missing. This is mainly due to a lack of techniques to comprehensively screen for cytokines, growth factors and metabolites at their local site of action. Since all soluble molecules of interest are present in the fracture hematoma, its in-depth assessment could reveal potential markers for the monitoring of bone healing. Here, we describe an approach for sampling and quantification of cytokines and metabolites by using microdialysis, combined with solid phase extractions of proteins from wound fluids. By using a control group with an isolated soft tissue wound, we could reveal several bone defect-specific molecular features. In bone defect dialysates the neutrophil chemoattractants CXCL1, CXCL2 and CXCL3 were quantified with either a higher or earlier response compared to dialysate from soft tissue wound. Moreover, by analyzing downstream adaptions of the cells on protein level and focusing on early immune response, several proteins involved in the immune cell migration and activity could be identified to be specific for the bone defect group, e.g. immune modulators, proteases and their corresponding inhibitors. Additionally, the metabolite screening revealed different profiles between the bone defect group and the control group. In summary, we identified potential biomarkers to indicate imbalanced healing progress on all levels of analysis. PMID:27441377

  20. Determination of specific molecular markers of biomass burning in lake sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchgeorg, Torben; Schüpbach, Simon; Kehrwald, Natalie; McWethy, David; Barbante, Carlo

    2014-05-01

    Fire influences regional to global atmospheric chemistry and climate. Molecular markers of biomass burning archived in lake sediments are becoming increasingly important in paleoenvironmental reconstruction and may help determine interactions between climate and fire activity. One group of these molecular markers is the monosaccharide anhydrides levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan. Several aerosol studies and recent ice core research use these compounds as a marker for biomass burning, but studies from lake sediment cores are rare. Previous sediment methods used gas chromatography - mass spectrometry and required derivatization of samples. Here, we present a high performance anion exchange chromatography-mass spectrometry method to allow separation and detection of the three monosaccharide anhydrides in lake sediments with implications for reconstructing past biomass burning events. We validated the method by quantifying levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan in selected sediment core samples from Lake Kirkpatrick, New Zealand. The freeze-dried, milled and homogenized sediment samples were first extracted with methanol by pressurized solvent extraction, pre-concentrated and finally separated and analyzed by high performance anion exchange chromatography-mass spectrometry. We compared these isomers with macroscopic charcoal concentrations, as charcoal is a well-known proxy for biomass burning. In addition, we applied the method to a sediment core from Lake Petén Itzá, Guatemala to prove the suitability of these markers for reconstructing biomass burning history over the entire Holocene. In the Lake Kirkpatrick samples, levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan concentrations significantly correlate with macroscopic charcoal concentrations. The three isomers are present in samples without any macroscopic charcoal, and may reflect the presence of microscopic charcoal. Levoglucosan/mannosan and levoglucosan/(mannosan+galactosan) ratios differ between samples with high

  1. Cell-specific transmembrane injection of molecular cargo with gold nanoparticle-generated transient plasmonic nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Wagner, Daniel S; Brenner, Malcolm K; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2012-07-01

    Optimal cell therapies require efficient, selective and rapid delivery of molecular cargo into target cells without compromising their viability. Achieving these goals ex vivo in bulk heterogeneous multi-cell systems such as human grafts is impeded by low selectivity and speed of cargo delivery and by significant damage to target and non-target cells. We have developed a cell level approach for selective and guided transmembrane injection of extracellular cargo into specific target cells using transient plasmonic nanobubbles (PNB) as cell-specific nano-injectors. As a technical platform for this method we developed a laser flow cell processing system. The PNB injection method and flow system were tested in heterogeneous cell suspensions of target and non-target cells for delivery of Dextran-FITC dye into squamous cell carcinoma HN31 cells and transfection of human T-cells with a green fluorescent protein-encoding plasmid. In both models the method demonstrated single cell type selectivity, high efficacy of delivery (96% both for HN31 cells T-cells), speed of delivery (nanoseconds) and viability of treated target cells (96% for HN31 cells and 75% for T-cells). The PNB injection method may therefore be beneficial for real time processing of human grafts without removal of physiologically important cells. PMID:22521612

  2. Structural and mutational analyses of dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis reveal the molecular basis for strict substrate specificity

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Yasumitsu; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Iizuka, Ippei; Tateoka, Chika; Roppongi, Saori; Fujimoto, Mayu; Inaka, Koji; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Yamada, Mitsugu; Ohta, Kazunori; Gouda, Hiroaki; Nonaka, Takamasa; Ogasawara, Wataru; Tanaka, Nobutada

    2015-01-01

    The dipeptidyl peptidase 11 from Porphyromonas gingivalis (PgDPP11) belongs to the S46 family of serine peptidases and preferentially cleaves substrates with Asp/Glu at the P1 position. The molecular mechanism underlying the substrate specificity of PgDPP11, however, is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of PgDPP11. The enzyme contains a catalytic domain with a typical double β-barrel fold and a recently identified regulatory α-helical domain. Crystal structure analyses, docking studies, and biochemical studies revealed that the side chain of Arg673 in the S1 subsite is essential for recognition of the Asp/Glu side chain at the P1 position of the bound substrate. Because S46 peptidases are not found in mammals and the Arg673 is conserved among DPP11s, we anticipate that DPP11s could be utilised as targets for antibiotics. In addition, the present structure analyses could be useful templates for the design of specific inhibitors of DPP11s from pathogenic organisms. PMID:26057589

  3. Abundant accumulation of the calcium-binding molecular chaperone calreticulin in specific floral tissues of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, D E; Glaunsinger, B; Bohnert, H J

    1997-01-01

    Calreticulin (CRT) is a calcium-binding protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) with an established role as a molecular chaper-one. An additional function in signal transduction, specifically in calcium distribution, is suggested but not proven. We have analyzed the expression pattern of Arabidopsis thaliana CRTs for a comparison with these proposed roles. Three CRT genes were expressed, with identities of the encoded proteins ranging from 54 to 86%. Protein motifs with established functions found in CRTs of other species were conserved. CRT was found in all of the cells in low amounts, whereas three distinct floral tissues showed abundant expression: secreting nectaries, ovules early in development, and a set of subepidermal cells near the abaxial surface of the anther. Localization in the developing endosperm, which is characterized by high protein synthesis rates, can be reconciled with a specific chaperone function. Equally, nectar production and secretion, a developmental stage marked by abundant ER, may require abundant CRT to accommodate the traffic of secretory proteins through the ER. Localization of CRT in the anthers, which are degenerating at the time of maximum expression of CRT, cannot easily be reconciled with a chaperone function but may indicate a role for CRT in anther maturation or dehiscence. PMID:9159940

  4. Predictive Bioinformatic Assignment of Methyl-Bearing Stereocenters, Total Synthesis, and an Additional Molecular Target of Ajudazol B.

    PubMed

    Essig, Sebastian; Schmalzbauer, Björn; Bretzke, Sebastian; Scherer, Olga; Koeberle, Andreas; Werz, Oliver; Müller, Rolf; Menche, Dirk

    2016-02-19

    Full details on the evaluation and application of an easily feasible and generally useful method for configurational assignments of isolated methyl-bearing stereocenters are reported. The analytical tool relies on a bioinformatic gene cluster analysis and utilizes a predictive enoylreductase alignment, and its feasibility was demonstrated by the full stereochemical determination of the ajudazols, highly potent inhibitors of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Furthermore, a full account of our strategies and tactics that culminated in the total synthesis of ajudazol B, the most potent and least abundant of these structurally unique class of myxobacterial natural products, is presented. Key features include an application of an asymmetric ortholithiation strategy for synthesis of the characteristic anti-configured hydroxyisochromanone core bearing three contiguous stereocenters, a modular oxazole formation, a flexible cross-metathesis approach for terminal allyl amide synthesis, and a late-stage Z,Z-selective Suzuki coupling. This total synthesis unambiguously proves the correct stereochemistry, which was further corroborated by comparison with reisolated natural material. Finally, 5-lipoxygenase was discovered as an additional molecular target of ajudazol B. Activities against this clinically validated key enzyme of the biosynthesis of proinflammatory leukotrienes were in the range of the approved drug zileuton, which further underlines the biological importance of this unique natural product. PMID:26796481

  5. Molecular targets of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG): specificity and interaction with membrane lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Patra, S K; Rizzi, F; Silva, A; Rugina, D O; Bettuzzi, S

    2008-12-01

    Proteomic studies on anticancer activity of Green Tea Catechins (specifically EGCG) are suggesting a large set of protein targets that may directly interact with EGCG and alter the physiology of diseased cells, including cancer. Of notice, benign cells are usually left untouched. Lipid rafts have been recently recognized as signal processing hubs and suggested to be involved in drug uptake by means of endocytosis. These findings are suggesting new insights on the molecular mechanisms of anticancer drugs action. In the membrane, EGCG is hijacked by the laminin receptor (LamR), a lipid raft protein. Similar to aplidin and edelfosin, EGCG alters membrane domains composition also preventing EGF binding to EGFR, imerization of EGFR and relocation of phosphorylated EGFR to lipid rafts. In vitro studies have recently shown that EGCG also binds both DNA and RNA in GpC-rich regions. This event may importantly affect genes function. Moreover, EGCG was shown to inhibit telomerase, topoisomerase II and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), thus ultimately affecting chromatin maintenance and remodeling. But another important alternative pathway besides interaction with specific proteins may play an important role in EGCG action: direct targeting of bioactive membrane platforms, lipid rafts. Structural alteration of the platforms deeply impact (and often inactivates) important pathways involving MAP kinases. The key issue is that, important and specific differences in lipid rafts composition have been found in transformed versus benign cells and apoptotic versus non-apoptotic cells. We suggest here that the anticancer activity of Green Tea Catechins against different kind of cancers may find an explanation in direct targeting of lipid rafts by EGCG. PMID:19261982

  6. Prostate-specific membrane antigen targeted protein contrast agents for molecular imaging of prostate cancer by MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Fan; Salarian, Mani; Xue, Shenghui; Qiao, Jingjuan; Feng, Jie; Tan, Shanshan; Patel, Anvi; Li, Xin; Mamouni, Kenza; Hekmatyar, Khan; Zou, Juan; Wu, Daqing; Yang, Jenny J.

    2016-06-01

    Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high resolution has yet to be achieved due to the lack of contrast agents with significantly improved relaxivity for sensitivity, targeting capabilities and metal selectivity. We have previously reported our creation of a novel class of protein Gd3+ contrast agents, ProCA32, which displayed significantly improved relaxivity while exhibiting strong Gd3+ binding selectivity over physiological metal ions. In this study, we report our effort in further developing biomarker-targeted protein MRI contrast agents for molecular imaging of PSMA. Among three PSMA targeted contrast agents engineered with addition of different molecular recognition sequences, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits a binding affinity of 1.1 +/- 0.1 μM for PSMA while the metal binding affinity is maintained at 0.9 +/- 0.1 × 10-22 M. In addition, ProCA32.PSMA exhibits r1 of 27.6 mM-1 s-1 and r2 of 37.9 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (55.2 and 75.8 mM-1 s-1 per molecule r1 and r2, respectively) at 1.4 T. At 7 T, ProCA32.PSMA also has r2 of 94.0 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (188.0 mM-1 s-1 per molecule) and r1 of 18.6 mM-1 s-1 per Gd (37.2 mM-1 s-1 per molecule). This contrast capability enables the first MRI enhancement dependent on PSMA expression levels in tumor bearing mice using both T1 and T2-weighted MRI at 7 T. Further development of these PSMA-targeted contrast agents are expected to be used for the precision imaging of prostate cancer at an early stage and to monitor disease progression and staging, as well as determine the effect of therapeutic treatment by non-invasive evaluation of the PSMA level using MRI.Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is one of the most specific cell surface markers for prostate cancer diagnosis and targeted treatment. However, achieving molecular imaging using non-invasive MRI with high

  7. Confocal Microscopy and Molecular-Specific Optical Contrast Agents for the Detection of Oral Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, Alicia L.; Gillenwater, Ann M.; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Richards-Kortum, R. R.

    2009-01-01

    Using current clinical diagnostic techniques, it is difficult to visualize tumor morphology and architecture at the cellular level, which is necessary for diagnostic localization of pathologic lesions. Optical imaging techniques have the potential to address this clinical need by providing real-time, sub-cellular resolution images. This paper describes the use of dual mode confocal microscopy and optical molecular-specific contrast agents to image tissue architecture, cellular morphology, and sub-cellular molecular features of normal and neoplastic oral tissues. Fresh tissue slices were prepared from 33 biopsies of clinically normal and abnormal oral mucosa obtained from 14 patients. Reflectance confocal images were acquired after the application of 6% acetic acid, and fluorescence confocal images were acquired after the application of a fluorescence contrast agent targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). The dual imaging modes provided images similar to light microscopy of hematoxylin and eosin and immunohistochemistry staining, but from thick fresh tissue slices. Reflectance images provided information on the architecture of the tissue and the cellular morphology. The nuclear-to-cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio from the reflectance images was at least 7.5 times greater for the carcinoma than the corresponding normal samples, except for one case of highly keratinized carcinoma. Separation of carcinoma from normal and mild dysplasia was achieved using this ratio (p<0.01). Fluorescence images of EGFR expression yielded a mean fluorescence labeling intensity (FLI) that was at least 2.7 times higher for severe dysplasia and carcinoma samples than for the corresponding normal sample, and could be used to distinguish carcinoma from normal and mild dysplasia (p<0.01). Analyzed together, the N/C ratio and the mean FLI may improve the ability to distinguish carcinoma from normal squamous epithelium. PMID:17877424

  8. Tissue-specific changes in molecular clocks during the transition from pregnancy to lactation in mice.

    PubMed

    Casey, Theresa M; Crodian, Jennifer; Erickson, Emily; Kuropatwinski, Karen K; Gleiberman, Anatoli S; Antoch, Marina P

    2014-06-01

    Circadian clocks regulate homeostasis and mediate responses to stressors. Lactation is one of the most energetically demanding periods of an adult female's life. Peripartum changes occur in almost every organ so the dam can support neonatal growth through milk production while homeostasis is maintained. How circadian clocks are involved in adaptation to lactation is currently unknown. The abundance and temporal pattern of core clock genes' expression were measured in suprachiasmatic nucleus, liver, and mammary from late pregnant and early lactation mice. Tissue-specific changes in molecular clocks occurred between physiological states. Amplitude and robustness of rhythms increased in suprachiasmatic nucleus and liver. Mammary rhythms of core molecular clock genes were suppressed. Attenuated rhythms appeared to be a physiological adaptation of mammary to lactation, because manipulation of timing of suckling resulting in significant differences in plasma prolactin and corticosterone had no effect on amplitude. Analysis of core clock proteins revealed that the stoichiometric relationship between positive (CLOCK) and negative (PER2) components remained 1:1 in liver but was increased to 4:1 in mammary during physiological transition. Induction of differentiation of mammary epithelial cell line HC11 with dexamethasone, insulin, and prolactin resulted in similar stoichiometric changes among positive and negative clock regulators, and prolactin induced phase shifts in HC11 Arntl expression rhythm. Data support that distinct mechanisms drive periparturient changes in mammary clock. Stoichiometric change in clock regulators occurs with gland differentiation. Suppression of mammary clock gene expression rhythms represents a physiological adaptation to suckling cues. Adaptations in mammary clock are likely needed in part to support suckling demands of neonates. PMID:24759789

  9. Molecular basis for sequence-specific DNA alkylation by CC-1065

    SciTech Connect

    Hurley, L.H.; Lee, C.S.; McGovren, J.P.; Warpehoski, M.A.; Mitchell, M.A.; Kelly, R.C.; Aristoff, P.A.

    1988-05-17

    CC-1065 is a potent antitumor antibiotic that binds covalently to N3 of adenine in the minor groove of DNA. The CC-1065 molecule is made up of three repeating pyrroloindole subunits, one of which (the left-hand one or A subunit) contains a reactive cyclopropyl function. The drug reacts with adenines in DNA in a highly sequence-specific manner, overlapping four base pairs to the 5'-side of the covalently modified base. Concomitant with CC-1065 covalent binding to DNA is an asymmetric effect on local DNA structure which extends more than one helix to turn the 5'-side of the covalent binding site. The DNA alkylation, sequence specificity, and biological potency of CC-1065 and a select group of trimeric synthetic analogues were evaluated. The results suggest that (a) noncovalent interactions between this series of compounds and DNA do not lead to the formation of complexes stable enough to be detected by footprinting methods, (b) sequence specificity and alkylation intensity can be modulated by the substituents on the nonreactive middle and right-hand segments, and (c) biological potency correlates well with ability to alkylate DNA. In addition, the extent and the sequence specificity of covalent adduct formation between linear DNA fragments and three analogues comprised of the CC-1065 alkylating subunit linked to zero (analogue A), one (analogue AB), or two (analogue ABC) nonreactive indole subunits were compared. These results provide strong experimental evidence for the importance of sequence-dependent site reactivity, rather than noncovalent minor groove interactions, in determining the alkylation specificity of some DNA-reactive molecules.

  10. 49 CFR 173.304a - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... specification cylinders, as follows: (1) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3AL, 3B, 3BN, 3E, 4B, 4BA, 4B240ET, 4BW, 4E, 39, except...) Liquefied petroleum gas must be shipped in specification cylinders as follows: (i) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3B,...

  11. 49 CFR 173.304a - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... specification cylinders, as follows: (1) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3AL, 3B, 3BN, 3E, 4B, 4BA, 4B240ET, 4BW, 4E, 39, except...) Liquefied petroleum gas must be shipped in specification cylinders as follows: (i) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3B,...

  12. 49 CFR 173.304a - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... specification cylinders, as follows: (1) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3AL, 3B, 3BN, 3E, 4B, 4BA, 4B240ET, 4BW, 4E, 39, except...) Liquefied petroleum gas must be shipped in specification cylinders as follows: (i) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3B,...

  13. 49 CFR 173.304a - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... specification cylinders, as follows: (1) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3AL, 3B, 3BN, 3E, 4B, 4BA, 4B240ET, 4BW, 4E, 39, except...) Liquefied petroleum gas must be shipped in specification cylinders as follows: (i) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3B,...

  14. 49 CFR 173.304a - Additional requirements for shipment of liquefied compressed gases in specification cylinders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... specification cylinders, as follows: (1) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3AL, 3B, 3BN, 3E, 4B, 4BA, 4B240ET, 4BW, 4E, 39, except...) Liquefied petroleum gas must be shipped in specification cylinders as follows: (i) DOT 3, 3A, 3AA, 3B,...

  15. Specific estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1) substrates and molecular imaging probe candidates

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Graham B.; Keum, Gyochang; Liu, Jie; Small, Gary W.; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Kepe, Vladimir; Barrio, Jorge R.

    2010-01-01

    This work focuses on the development of specific substrates for estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1) to produce molecular imaging probes for this enzyme. SULT1E1 is a key enzyme in estrogen homeostasis, playing a central role in the prevention and development of human disease. In vitro sulfation assays showed alkyl and aryl substitutions to a fused heterocyclic system modeled after β-naphthol (βN), based on compounds that interact with the estrogen receptor, rendered several molecules with enhanced specificity for SULT1E1 over SULT1A1*1, SULT1A1*2, SULT1A3, and SULT2A1. Several 6-hydroxy-2-arylbenzothiazoles tested demonstrated excellent affinity—Vmax/Km ratios—and specificity for SULT1E1. Km values ranged from 0.12–2.36 μM. A strong correlation was observed between polarity of the 4′-sustituent on the 2-aryl moiety (Hammett σp) and the log(Vmax/Km) (r = 0.964). Substrate sensitivity is influenced by the acidity of the 6-phenolic group demonstrated by correlating its 1H NMR chemical shift (δOH) with the log(Vmax/Km) (r = 0.963). Acidity is mediated by the electron withdrawing capacity of the 4′-substituent outlined by the correlation of the C-2 13C NMR chemical shift (δC2) with the log(Vmax/Km) (r = 0.987). 2-[4-(Methylamino)phenyl]-6-hydroxybenzothiazole (2b) was radiolabeled with carbon-11 (11C-(2b)) and used in vivo for microPET scanning and tissue metabolite identification. High PET signal was paralleled with the presence of radiolabeled 11C-(2b)-6-O-sulfate and the SULT1E1 protein detected by western blot. Because this and other members of this family presenting specificity for SULT1E1 can be labeled with carbon-11 or fluorine-18, in vivo assays of SULT1E1 functional activity are now feasible in humans. PMID:20304798

  16. Molecular cloning and characterization of the ABA-specific glucosyltransferase gene from bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Chung, Gyuhwa; Kim, Sang Hyon; Yang, Seung Hwan

    2015-04-15

    Levels of the plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) are maintained in homeostasis by a balance of its biosynthesis, catabolism and conjugation. The detailed molecular and signaling events leading to strict homeostasis are not completely understood in crop plants. In this study, we obtained cDNA of an ABA-inducible, ABA-specific UDP-glucosyltransferase (ABAGT) from the bean plant (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) involved in conjugation of a glucose residue to ABA to form inactive ABA-glucose ester (ABA-GE) to examine its role during development and abiotic stress in bean. The bacterially expressed PvABAGTase enzyme showed ABA-specific glucosylation activity in vitro. A higher level of the PvABAGT transcript was observed in mature leaves, mature flowers, roots, seed coats and embryos as well as upon rehydration following a period of dehydration. Overexpression of 35S::PvABAGT in Arabidopsis showed reduced sensitivity to ABA compared with WT. The transgenic plants showed a high level of ABA-GE without significant decrease in the level of ABA compared with the wild type (WT) during dehydration stress. Upon rehydration, the levels of ABA and phaseic acid (PA) decreased in the WT and the PvABAGT-overexpressing lines with high levels of ABA-GE only in the transgenic plants. Our findings suggest that the PvABAGT gene could play a role in ABA homeostasis during development and stress responses in bean and its overexpression in Arabidopsis did not alter ABA homeostasis during dehydration stress. PMID:25747288

  17. Molecular basis of the substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of citramalate synthase from Leptospira interrogans.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Zilong; Zha, Manwu; Xu, Hai; Zhao, Guoping; Ding, Jianping

    2008-10-01

    Leptospira interrogans is the causative agent for leptospirosis, a zoonotic disease of global importance. In contrast with most other micro-organisms, L. interrogans employs a pyruvate pathway to synthesize isoleucine and LiCMS (L. interrogans citramalate synthase) catalyses the first reaction of the pathway which converts pyruvate and acetyl-CoA into citramalate, thus making it an attractive target for the development of antibacterial agents. We report here the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of LiCMS and its complexes with substrates, and kinetic and mutagenesis studies of LiCMS, which together reveal the molecular basis of the high substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of LiCMS. The catalytic domain consists of a TIM barrel flanked by an extended C-terminal region. It forms a homodimer in the crystal structure, and the active site is located at the centre of the TIM barrel near the C-terminal ends of the beta-strands and is composed of conserved residues of the beta-strands of one subunit and the C-terminal region of the other. The substrate specificity of LiCMS towards pyruvate against other alpha-oxo acids is dictated primarily by residues Leu(81), Leu(104) and Tyr(144), which form a hydrophobic pocket to accommodate the C(2)-methyl group of pyruvate. The catalysis follows the typical aldol condensation reaction, in which Glu(146) functions as a catalytic base to activate the methyl group of acetyl-CoA to form an enolated acetyl-CoA intermediate and Arg(16) as a general acid to stabilize the intermediate. PMID:18498255

  18. Molecular cloning and characterization of genistein 4'-O-glucoside specific glycosyltransferase from Bacopa monniera.

    PubMed

    Ruby; Santosh Kumar, R J; Vishwakarma, Rishi K; Singh, Somesh; Khan, Bashir M

    2014-07-01

    Health related benefits of isoflavones such as genistein are well known. Glycosylation of genistein yields different glycosides like genistein 7-O-glycoside (genistin) and genistein 4'-O-glycoside (sophoricoside). This is the first report on isolation, cloning and functional characterization of a glycosyltransferase specific for genistein 4'-O-glucoside from Bacopa monniera, an important Indian medicinal herb. The glycosyltransferase from B. monniera (UGT74W1) showed 49% identity at amino acid level with the glycosyltransferases from Lycium barbarum. The UGT74W1 sequence contained all the conserved motifs present in plant glycosyltransferases. UGT74W1 was cloned in pET-30b (+) expression vector and transformed into E. coli. The molecular mass of over expressed protein was found to be around 52 kDa. Functional characterization of the enzyme was performed using different substrates. Product analysis was done using LC-MS and HPLC, which confirmed its specificity for genistein 4'-O-glucoside. Immuno-localization studies of the UGT74W1 showed its localization in the vascular bundle. Spatio-temporal expression studies under normal and stressed conditions were also performed. The control B. monniera plant showed maximum expression of UGT74W1 in leaves followed by roots and stem. Salicylic acid treatment causes almost tenfold increase in UGT74W1 expression in roots, while leaves and stem showed decrease in expression. Since salicylic acid is generated at the time of injury or wound caused by pathogens, this increase in UGT74W1 expression under salicylic acid stress might point towards its role in defense mechanism. PMID:24664316

  19. Specific age-related molecular alterations in the cerebellum of Down syndrome mouse models.

    PubMed

    Créau, Nicole; Cabet, Eva; Daubigney, Fabrice; Souchet, Benoit; Bennaï, Soumia; Delabar, Jean

    2016-09-01

    Down syndrome, or trisomy 21, has been modeled with various trisomic and transgenic mice to help understand the consequences of an altered gene dosage in brain development and function. Though Down syndrome has been associated with premature aging, little is known about the molecular and cellular alterations that target brain function. To help identify alterations at specific ages, we analyzed the cerebellum of Ts1Cje mice, trisomic for 77 HSA21 orthologs, at three ages-young (4 months), middle-age (12 months), and old (17 months)-compared to age-matched controls. Quantification of neuronal and glial markers (n=11) revealed increases in GFAP, with an age effect, and S100B, with age and genotype effects. The genotype effect on S100B with age was unexpected as Ts1Cje has only two copies of the S100b gene. Interestingly, the different increase in GFAP observed between Ts1Cje (trisomic segment includes Pcp4 gene) and controls was magnified in TgPCP4 mice (1 extra copy of the human PCP4 gene) at the same age. S100B increase was not found in the TgPCP4 confirming a difference of regulation with aging for GFAP and S100B and excluding the calcium signaling regulator, Pcp4, as a potential candidate for increase of S100B in the Ts1Cje. To understand these differences, comparison of GFAP and S100B immunostainings at young and middle-age were performed. Immunohistochemical detection of differences in GFAP and S100B localization with aging implicate S100B+ oligodendrocytes as a new phenotypic target in this specific aging process. PMID:27297494

  20. A thymidine-terminated molecular beacon for selective Hg 2+ or sequence-specific DNA assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Peng; Long, Yunfei; Zhao, Jin; Wang, Jianxiu; Zhou, Feimeng

    2012-02-01

    A new molecular beacon (MB) in which fluorescein (FAM) attached to its 3' end acts as a fluorophore and a bridged thymidine-Hg-thymidine (T-Hg-T) complex acts as a quencher is designed. The fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the fluorophore and the quencher results in annihilation of the FAM fluorescence. Experimental conditions that govern the fluorescence quenching, such as number of thymidine bases, pH value, and salt concentration, have been optimized. The MB was found to be highly selective for Hg 2+ among a number of metal ions investigated. In the presence of single-stranded (ss-) target oligonucleotides (ODNs) with bases complementary to those in the loop of MB, the FAM fluorescence can be largely restored due to DNA duplex formation. The present method for DNA assay is also sequence-specific and can determine target ODN concentration at a nanomolar level. The substitution of the quencher group in a conventional MB molecule with simple thymidine bases affords an inexpensive ODN that retains the unique property of the MB molecule.

  1. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal specific interactions of post-translational palmitoyl modifications with rhodopsin in membranes

    PubMed Central

    Olausson, Bjoern E.S.; Grossfield, Alan; Pitman, Michael C.; Brown, Michael F.; Feller, Scott E.; Vogel, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the behavior of the highly flexible post-translational lipid modifications of rhodopsin from multiple-microsecond all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. Rhodopsin was studied in a realistic membrane environment that includes cholesterol, as well as saturated and polyunsaturated lipids with phosphocholine and phosphoethanolamine headgroups. The simulation reveals striking differences between the palmitoylations at Cys322 and Cys323 as well as between the palmitoyl chains and the neighboring lipids. Notably the palmitoyl group at Cys322 shows considerably greater contact with helix H1 of rhodopsin, yielding frequent chain upturns with longer reorientational correlation times, and relatively low order parameters. While the palmitoylation at Cys323 makes fewer protein contacts and has increased order compared to Cys322, it nevertheless exhibits greater flexibility with smaller order parameters than the stearoyl chains of the surrounding lipids. The dynamical structure of the palmitoylations—as well as their extensive fluctuations—suggests a complex function for the post-translational modifications in rhodopsin and potentially other G protein-coupled receptors, going beyond their role as membrane anchoring elements. Rather, we propose that the palmitoylation at Cys323 has a potential role as a lipid anchor, whereas the palmitoyl-protein interaction observed for Cys322 suggests a more specific interaction that affects the stability of the dark state of rhodopsin. PMID:22280374

  2. Unraveling the molecular mechanism governing the tissue specific expression of IFNλR1.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Hashaam; Hamming, Ole Jensen; Jan, Syed Umer; Akhtar, Samar; Terczyn' ska-Dyla, Ewa; Siupka, Piotr; Shafique, Adeena; Hartmann, Rune; Sadia, Hajra

    2016-05-01

    The functional receptor for type III interferons (IFNs) is a heterodimer of IFNLR1 and IL10R2. IFNLR1 is expressed in a highly tissue specific manner, with epithelial and liver tissue as the prime expressing tissues in humans. However, knowledge about the molecular pathways responsible for regulating the expression of IFNLR1 is yet unknown. In this study, various bioinformatics tools were used to predict the scores of signal peptides of IFNλR1 and IFNαR1, which was considered as an important difference in the expression of both receptors or participation in regulating the IFNLR1 gene. In silico study revealed that the signal peptide of IFNαR1 had more potential than the signal peptide of IFNλR1 but changing the signal peptide of wild type IFNλR1 with the signal peptide of IFNαR1 in wet lab had barely shown any differences. Selective expression of IFNλR1 was considered to be a plus point towards the targeted anti-viral activity of IFNλs but artificial control on its expression will surely make IFNλs a better drug with enhanced activity. The results of this study may help us in contributing some understanding towards the mechanisms involved in the selective expression of IFNLR1 and exceptionalities involved. PMID:27166550

  3. Original triazine inductor of new specific molecular targets, with antitumor activity against nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Dimitri; Jacquot, Catherine; Tsita, Polyxeni; Chinou, Ioanna; Tomasoni, Cristophe; Juge, Marcel; Antoniadou-Vyza, Ekaterini; Martignat, Lionel; Pineau, Alain; Roussakis, Christos

    2008-12-01

    Despite our growing insight into carcinogenesis, treatment of tumors, especially nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), remains limited and it is urgent to develop strategies that target tumor cells and their genetic features. Drug discovery efforts have historically focused on the search for compounds that modulate the protein products of genes. Current drug therapy targets only a few hundred endogenous targets, mainly proteins, such as receptors and enzymes. But now, the interest in specifically targeting RNA is increasing, both for target validation and/or therapeutic purposes. In this regard, our work was concerned with the induction of new molecular targets correlated to a cytostatic effect on NSCLC cell line, after treatment with a new triazin named A190. The in vitro study of cell cycle and apoptosis induction demonstrated the antiproliferative potential of this new compounds, and the use of quantitative RT-PCR analysis permit to display an original mechanism of action involving 2 genes: HEF1 and B2. The antitumor effect was also confirmed by the good results in vivo on nude mice xenografts. PMID:18798255

  4. Molecular view of ligands specificity for CAG repeats in anti-Huntington therapy.

    PubMed

    Bochicchio, Anna; Rossetti, Giulia; Tabarrini, Oriana; Krauβ, Sybille; Carloni, Paolo

    2015-10-13

    Huntington's disease is a fatal and devastating neurodegenerative genetic disorder for which there is currently no cure. It is characterized by Huntingtin protein's mRNA transcripts with 36 or more CAG repeats. Inhibiting the formation of pathological complexes between these expanded transcripts and target proteins may be a valuable strategy against the disease. Yet, the rational design of molecules specifically targeting the expanded CAG repeats is limited by the lack of structural information. Here, we use well-tempered metadynamics-based free energy calculations to investigate pose and affinity of two ligands targeting CAG repeats for which affinities have been previously measured. The first consists of two 4-guanidinophenyl rings linked by an ester group. It is the most potent ligand identified so far, with Kd = 60(30) nM. The second consists of a 4-phenyl dihydroimidazole and 4-1H-indole dihydroimidazole connected by a C-C bond (Kd = 700(80) nM). Our calculations reproduce the experimental affinities and uncover the recognition pattern between ligands' and their RNA target. They also provide a molecular basis for the markedly different affinity of the two ligands for CAG repeats as observed experimentally. These findings may pave the way for a structure-based hit-to-lead optimization to further improve ligand selectivity toward CAG repeat-containing mRNAs. PMID:26574279

  5. Phylogeny and molecular signatures (conserved proteins and indels) that are specific for the Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi species

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Radhey S; Lorenzini, Emily

    2007-01-01

    Background The Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi species constitute two main groups of the Bacteria that are closely related in phylogenetic trees. The Bacteroidetes species are widely distributed and include many important periodontal pathogens. In contrast, all Chlorobi are anoxygenic obligate photoautotrophs. Very few (or no) biochemical or molecular characteristics are known that are distinctive characteristics of these bacteria, or are commonly shared by them. Results Systematic blast searches were performed on each open reading frame in the genomes of Porphyromonas gingivalis W83, Bacteroides fragilis YCH46, B. thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482, Gramella forsetii KT0803, Chlorobium luteolum (formerly Pelodictyon luteolum) DSM 273 and Chlorobaculum tepidum (formerly Chlorobium tepidum) TLS to search for proteins that are uniquely present in either all or certain subgroups of Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi. These studies have identified > 600 proteins for which homologues are not found in other organisms. This includes 27 and 51 proteins that are specific for most of the sequenced Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi genomes, respectively; 52 and 38 proteins that are limited to species from the Bacteroidales and Flavobacteriales orders, respectively, and 5 proteins that are common to species from these two orders; 185 proteins that are specific for the Bacteroides genus. Additionally, 6 proteins that are uniquely shared by species from the Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi phyla (one of them also present in the Fibrobacteres) have also been identified. This work also describes two large conserved inserts in DNA polymerase III (DnaE) and alanyl-tRNA synthetase that are distinctive characteristics of the Chlorobi species and a 3 aa deletion in ClpB chaperone that is mainly found in various Bacteroidales, Flavobacteriales and Flexebacteraceae, but generally not found in the homologs from other organisms. Phylogenetic analyses of the Bacteroidetes and Chlorobi species is also reported based on

  6. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers synthesized by surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization for the enrichment and determination of synthetic estrogens in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Zhang, Jingjing; Wang, Minjun; Kong, Jie

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers have attracted significant interest because of their multifunctionality of selective recognition of target molecules and rapid magnetic response. In this contribution, magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized via surface-initiated reversible addition addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization using diethylstilbestrol as the template for the enrichment of synthetic estrogens. The uniform imprinted surface layer and the magnetic property of the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers favored a fast binding kinetics and rapid analysis of target molecules. The static and selective binding experiments demonstrated a desirable adsorption capacity and good selectivity of the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers in comparison to magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers. Accordingly, a corresponding analytical method was developed in which magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were employed as magnetic solid-phase extraction materials for the concentration and determination of four synthetic estrogens (diethylstilbestrol, hexestrol, dienestrol, and bisphenol A) in fish pond water. The recoveries of these synthetic estrogens in spiked fish pond water samples ranged from 61.2 to 99.1% with a relative standard deviation of lower than 6.3%. This study provides a versatile approach to prepare well-defined magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers sorbents for the analysis of synthetic estrogens in water solution. PMID:25989155

  7. Phylogenomic Analyses and Comparative Studies on Genomes of the Bifidobacteriales: Identification of Molecular Signatures Specific for the Order Bifidobacteriales and Its Different Subclades

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Grace; Gao, Beile; Adeolu, Mobolaji; Khadka, Bijendra; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2016-01-01

    The order Bifidobacteriales comprises a diverse variety of species found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and other animals, some of which are opportunistic pathogens, whereas a number of others exhibit health-promoting effects. However, currently very few biochemical or molecular characteristics are known which are specific for the order Bifidobacteriales, or specific clades within this order, which distinguish them from other bacteria. This study reports the results of detailed comparative genomic and phylogenetic studies on 62 genome-sequenced species/strains from the order Bifidobacteriales. In a robust phylogenetic tree for the Bifidobacteriales constructed based on 614 core proteins, a number of well-resolved clades were observed including a clade separating the Scarodvia-related genera (Scardovia clade) from the genera Bifidobacterium and Gardnerella, as well as a number of previously reported clusters of Bifidobacterium spp. In parallel, our comparative analyses of protein sequences from the Bifidobacteriales genomes have identified numerous molecular markers that are specific for this group of bacteria. Of these markers, 32 conserved signature indels (CSIs) in widely distributed proteins and 10 signature proteins are distinctive characteristics of all sequenced Bifidobacteriales species and provide novel and highly specific means for distinguishing these bacteria. In addition, multiple other molecular signatures are specific for the following clades of Bifidobacteriales: (i) 5 CSIs specific for a clade comprising of the Scardovia-related genera; (ii) 3 CSIs and 2 CSPs specific for a clade consisting of the Bifidobacterium and Gardnerella spp.; (iii) multiple other signatures demarcating a number of clusters of the B. asteroides-and B. longum- related species. The described molecular markers provide novel and reliable means for distinguishing the Bifidobacteriales and a number of their clades in molecular terms and for the classification of these

  8. Phylogenomic Analyses and Comparative Studies on Genomes of the Bifidobacteriales: Identification of Molecular Signatures Specific for the Order Bifidobacteriales and Its Different Subclades.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Grace; Gao, Beile; Adeolu, Mobolaji; Khadka, Bijendra; Gupta, Radhey S

    2016-01-01

    The order Bifidobacteriales comprises a diverse variety of species found in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and other animals, some of which are opportunistic pathogens, whereas a number of others exhibit health-promoting effects. However, currently very few biochemical or molecular characteristics are known which are specific for the order Bifidobacteriales, or specific clades within this order, which distinguish them from other bacteria. This study reports the results of detailed comparative genomic and phylogenetic studies on 62 genome-sequenced species/strains from the order Bifidobacteriales. In a robust phylogenetic tree for the Bifidobacteriales constructed based on 614 core proteins, a number of well-resolved clades were observed including a clade separating the Scarodvia-related genera (Scardovia clade) from the genera Bifidobacterium and Gardnerella, as well as a number of previously reported clusters of Bifidobacterium spp. In parallel, our comparative analyses of protein sequences from the Bifidobacteriales genomes have identified numerous molecular markers that are specific for this group of bacteria. Of these markers, 32 conserved signature indels (CSIs) in widely distributed proteins and 10 signature proteins are distinctive characteristics of all sequenced Bifidobacteriales species and provide novel and highly specific means for distinguishing these bacteria. In addition, multiple other molecular signatures are specific for the following clades of Bifidobacteriales: (i) 5 CSIs specific for a clade comprising of the Scardovia-related genera; (ii) 3 CSIs and 2 CSPs specific for a clade consisting of the Bifidobacterium and Gardnerella spp.; (iii) multiple other signatures demarcating a number of clusters of the B. asteroides-and B. longum- related species. The described molecular markers provide novel and reliable means for distinguishing the Bifidobacteriales and a number of their clades in molecular terms and for the classification of these

  9. Solubilization, molecular forms, purification and substrate specificity of two acetylcholinesterases in the medicinal leech (Hirudo medicinalis).

    PubMed Central

    Talesa, V; Grauso, M; Giovannini, E; Rosi, G; Toutant, J P

    1995-01-01

    Two acetylcholinesterases (AChE) differing in substrate and inhibitor specificities have been characterized in the medical leech (Hirudo medicinalis). A 'spontaneously-soluble' portion of AChE activity (SS-AChE) was recovered from haemolymph and from tissues dilacerated in low-salt buffer. A second portion of AChE activity was obtained after extraction of tissues in low-salt buffer alone or containing 1% Triton X-100 [detergent-soluble (DS-) AChE). Both enzymes were purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography on edrophonium- and concanavalin A-Sepharose columns. Denaturing SDS/PAGE under reducing conditions gave one band at 30 kDa for purified SS-AChE and 66 kDa for DS-AChE. Sephadex G-200 chromatography indicated a molecular mass of 66 kDa for native SS-AChE and of 130 kDa for DS-AChE. SS-AChE showed a single peak sedimenting at 5.0 S in sucrose gradients with or without Triton X-100, suggesting that it was a hydrophylic monomer (G1). DS-AChE sedimented as a single 6.1-6.5 S peak in the presence of Triton X-100 and aggregated in the absence of detergent. A treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C suppressed aggregation and gave a 7 S peak. DS-AChE was thus an amphiphilic glycolipid-anchored dimer. Substrate specificities were studied using p-nitrophenyl esters (acetate, propionate and butyrate) and corresponding thiocholine esters as substrates. SS-AChE displayed only limited variations in Km values with charged and uncharged substrates, suggesting a reduced influence of electrostatic interactions in the enzyme substrate affinity. By contrast, DS-AChE displayed higher Km values with uncharged than with charged substrates. SS-AChE was more sensitive to eserine and di-isopropyl fluorophosphate (IC50 5 x 10(-8) and 10(-8) M respectively) than DS-AChE (5 x 10(-7) and 5 x 10(-5) M. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:7702560

  10. Molecular and biochemical characterization of a Coccidioides immitis-specific antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Pan, S; Cole, G T

    1995-01-01

    Results of earlier investigations have indicated that the saprobic phase of Coccidioides immitis produces a heat-stable, 19-kDa antigen with serine proteinase activity which has been suggested to be specific for this pathogenic fungus. In the present study we have determined the N-terminal and partial internal amino acid sequences of the purified, 19-kDa antigen, cloned the gene which encodes this polypeptide, and confirmed that the secreted proteinase is a Coccidioides-specific antigen (CS-Ag). Both the genomic and cDNA sequences are reported and reveal that the csa gene which encodes this antigen has no introns. A 543-bp open reading frame encodes a 181-amino-acid-containing protein with a predicted molecular mass of 19.8 kDa and an isoelectric point of 8.3. The csa gene was localized on chromosome I of three representative C. immitis clinical isolates on the basis of Southern hybridizations. Expression of the csa gene in Escherichia coli using the pET21a plasmid vector yielded a recombinant protein that was recognized in immunoblot assays by antibody raised to the purified 19-kDa CS-Ag. Secretion of the native antigen is suggested to occur by cleavage of a putative 23-residue signal peptide. The native CS-Ag showed a low degree of glycosylation. Analysis of the carbohydrate composition of the CS-Ag revealed xylose, mannose, galactose, and glucose. However, the purified antigen showed no affinity for concanavalin A. A PCR method with specificity and high sensitivity for detection of C. immitis genomic DNA, using a pair of synthetic oligonucleotide primers whose sequences were based on that of the csa gene, was developed. A 520-bp product was amplified only when C. immitis genomic DNA was used as the template. The lower limits of DNA detection using this PCR method were 1 pg of C. immitis genomic DNA by ethidium bromide staining and 100 fg after Southern hybridization. The csa gene-based PCR method for detection of C. immitis DNA is useful for culture

  11. Responses of absolute and specific soil enzyme activities to long term additions of organic and mineral fertilizer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyu; Dong, Wenyi; Dai, Xiaoqin; Schaeffer, Sean; Yang, Fengting; Radosevich, Mark; Xu, Lili; Liu, Xiyu; Sun, Xiaomin

    2015-12-01

    Long-term phosphorus (P) and nitrogen (N) applications may seriously affect soil microbial activity. A long-term field fertilizer application trial was established on reddish paddy soils in the subtropical region of southern China in 1998. We assessed the effects of swine manure and seven different rates or ratios of NPK fertilizer treatments on (1) the absolute and specific enzyme activities per unit of soil organic carbon (SOC) or microbial biomass carbon (MBC) involved in C, N, and P transformations and (2) their relationships with soil environmental factors and soil microbial community structures. The results showed that manure applications led to increases in the absolute and specific activities of soil β-1,4-glucosidase(βG), β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG), and leucine aminopeptidase (LAP). The absolute and specific acid phosphatase (AP) activities decreased as mineral P fertilizer application rates and ratios increased. Redundancy analysis (RDA) showed that there were negative correlations between absolute and specific AP activities, pH, and total P contents, while there were positive correlations between soil absolute and specific βG, NAG, and LAP enzyme activities, and SOC and total N contents. RDA showed that the contents of actinomycete and Gram-positive bacterium PLFA biomarkers are more closely related to the absolute and specific enzyme activities than the other PLFA biomarkers (P<0.01). Our results suggest that both the absolute and specific enzyme activities could be used as sensitive soil quality indicators that provide useful linkages with the microbial community structures and environmental factors. To maintain microbial activity and to minimize environmental impacts, P should be applied as a combination of inorganic and organic forms, and total P fertilizer application rates to subtropical paddy soils should not exceed 44 kg P ha(-1) year(-1). PMID:26196069

  12. Divergent transducer-specific molecular efficacies generate biased agonism at a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR).

    PubMed

    Strachan, Ryan T; Sun, Jin-peng; Rominger, David H; Violin, Jonathan D; Ahn, Seungkirl; Rojas Bie Thomsen, Alex; Zhu, Xiao; Kleist, Andrew; Costa, Tommaso; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2014-05-16

    The concept of "biased agonism" arises from the recognition that the ability of an agonist to induce a receptor-mediated response (i.e. "efficacy") can differ across the multiple signal transduction pathways (e.g. G protein and β-arrestin (βarr)) emanating from a single GPCR. Despite the therapeutic promise of biased agonism, the molecular mechanism(s) whereby biased agonists selectively engage signaling pathways remain elusive. This is due in large part to the challenges associated with quantifying ligand efficacy in cells. To address this, we developed a cell-free approach to directly quantify the transducer-specific molecular efficacies of balanced and biased ligands for the angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R), a prototypic GPCR. Specifically, we defined efficacy in allosteric terms, equating shifts in ligand affinity (i.e. KLo/KHi) at AT1R-Gq and AT1R-βarr2 fusion proteins with their respective molecular efficacies for activating Gq and βarr2. Consistent with ternary complex model predictions, transducer-specific molecular efficacies were strongly correlated with cellular efficacies for activating Gq and βarr2. Subsequent comparisons across transducers revealed that biased AT1R agonists possess biased molecular efficacies that were in strong agreement with the signaling bias observed in cellular assays. These findings not only represent the first measurements of the thermodynamic driving forces underlying differences in ligand efficacy between transducers but also support a molecular mechanism whereby divergent transducer-specific molecular efficacies generate biased agonism at a GPCR. PMID:24668815

  13. Molecular Characterization of the Toxic Cyanobacterium Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii and Design of a Species-Specific PCR

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kim M.; Schembri, Mark A.; Baker, Peter D.; Saint, Christopher P.

    2000-01-01

    Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii is a toxic-bloom-forming cyanobacterium that is commonly found in tropical to subtropical climatic regions worldwide, but it is also recognized as a common component of cyanobacterial communities in temperate climates. Genetic profiles of C. raciborskii were examined in 19 cultured isolates originating from geographically diverse regions of Australia and represented by two distinct morphotypes. A 609-bp region of rpoC1, a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene, was amplified by PCR from these isolates with cyanobacterium-specific primers. Sequence analysis revealed that all isolates belonged to the same species, including morphotypes with straight or coiled trichomes. Additional rpoC1 gene sequences obtained for a range of cyanobacteria highlighted clustering of C. raciborskii with other heterocyst-producing cyanobacteria (orders Nostocales and Stigonematales). In contrast, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and short tandemly repeated repetitive sequence profiles revealed a greater level of genetic heterogeneity among C. raciborskii isolates than did rpoC1 gene analysis, and unique band profiles were also found among each of the cyanobacterial genera examined. A PCR test targeting a region of the rpoC1 gene unique to C. raciborskii was developed for the specific identification of C. raciborskii from both purified genomic DNA and environmental samples. The PCR was evaluated with a number of cyanobacterial isolates, but a PCR-positive result was only achieved with C. raciborskii. This method provides an accurate alternative to traditional morphological identification of C. raciborskii. PMID:10618244

  14. Molecular recognition of malachite green by hemoglobin and their specific interactions: insights from in silico docking and molecular spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei; Ding, Fei; Peng, Yu-Kui; Sun, Ying

    2014-01-01

    Malachite green is an organic compound that can be widely used as a dyestuff for various materials; it has also emerged as a controversial agent in aquaculture. Since malachite green is proven to be carcinogenic and mutagenic, it may become a hazard to public health. For this reason, it is urgently required to analyze this controversial dye in more detail. In our current research, the interaction between malachite green and hemoglobin under physiological conditions was investigated by the methods of molecular modeling, fluorescence spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) as well as hydrophobic ANS displacement experiments. From the molecular docking, the central cavity of hemoglobin was assigned to possess high-affinity for malachite green, this result was corroborated by time-resolved fluorescence and hydrophobic ANS probe results. The recognition mechanism was found to be of static type, or rather the hemoglobin-malachite green complex formation occurred via noncovalent interactions such as π-π interactions, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions with an association constant of 10(4) M(-1). Moreover, the results also show that the spatial structure of the biopolymer was changed in the presence of malachite green with a decrease of the α-helix and increase of the β-sheet, turn and random coil suggesting protein damage, as derived from far-UV CD and three-dimensional fluorescence. Results of this work will help to further comprehend the molecular recognition of malachite green by the receptor protein and the possible toxicological profiles of other compounds, which are the metabolites and ramifications of malachite green. PMID:24226412

  15. Resolving Non-Specific and Specific Adhesive Interactions of Catechols at Solid/Liquid Interfaces at the Molecular Scale.

    PubMed

    Utzig, Thomas; Stock, Philipp; Valtiner, Markus

    2016-08-01

    The adhesive system of mussels evolved into a powerful and adaptive system with affinity to a wide range of surfaces. It is widely known that thereby 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) plays a central role. However underlying binding energies remain unknown at the single molecular scale. Here, we use single-molecule force spectroscopy to estimate binding energies of single catechols with a large range of opposing chemical functionalities. Our data demonstrate significant interactions of Dopa with all functionalities, yet most interactions fall within the medium-strong range of 10-20 kB T. Only bidentate binding to TiO2 surfaces exhibits a higher binding energy of 29 kB T. Our data also demonstrate at the single-molecule level that oxidized Dopa and amines exhibit interaction energies in the range of covalent bonds, confirming the important role of Dopa for cross-linking in the bulk mussel adhesive. We anticipate that our approach and data will further advance the understanding of biologic and technologic adhesives. PMID:27374053

  16. 77 FR 58499 - Substitution of Term in a Definition; Addition and Adoption of the Use of Specific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... 51-1 continues to read as follows: Authority: 56 FR 48976, Sept. 26, 1991, unless otherwise noted. 0... ``disabled'' for ``handicapped'' in a term defined in its regulation. Additionally, the Committee has... program; however, within the Committee's regulation, the terms other severely handicapped and...

  17. Functional dissection of a strong and specific microbe-associated molecular pattern-responsive synthetic promoter.

    PubMed

    Lehmeyer, Mona; Kanofsky, Konstantin; Hanko, Erik K R; Ahrendt, Sarah; Wehrs, Maren; Machens, Fabian; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic promoters are important for temporal and spatial gene expression in transgenic plants. To identify novel microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP)-responsive cis-regulatory sequences for synthetic promoter design, a combination of bioinformatics and experimental approaches was employed. One cis-sequence was identified which confers strong MAMP-responsive reporter gene activity with low background activity. The 35-bp-long cis-sequence was identified in the promoter of the Arabidopsis thaliana DJ1E gene, a homologue of the human oncogene DJ1. In this study, this cis-sequence is shown to be a tripartite cis-regulatory module (CRM). A synthetic promoter with four copies of the CRM linked to a minimal promoter increases MAMP-responsive reporter gene expression compared to the wild-type DJ1E promoter. The CRM consists of two WT-boxes (GGACTTTT and GGACTTTG) and a variant of the GCC-box (GCCACC), all required for MAMP and salicylic acid (SA) responsivity. Yeast one-hybrid screenings using a transcription factor (TF)-only prey library identified two AP2/ERFs, ORA59 and ERF10, interacting antagonistically with the CRM. ORA59 activates reporter gene activity and requires the consensus core sequence GCCNCC for gene expression activation. ERF10 down-regulates MAMP-responsive gene expression. No TFs interacting with the WT-boxes GGACTTTT and GGACTTTG were selected in yeast one-hybrid screenings with the TF-only prey library. In transgenic Arabidopsis, the synthetic promoter confers strong and specific reporter gene activity in response to biotrophs and necrotrophs as well as SA. PMID:25819608

  18. Molecular Specificity, Convergence and Constraint Shape Adaptive Evolution in Nutrient-Poor Environments

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jungeui; Gresham, David

    2014-01-01

    One of the central goals of evolutionary biology is to explain and predict the molecular basis of adaptive evolution. We studied the evolution of genetic networks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast) populations propagated for more than 200 generations in different nitrogen-limiting conditions. We find that rapid adaptive evolution in nitrogen-poor environments is dominated by the de novo generation and selection of copy number variants (CNVs), a large fraction of which contain genes encoding specific nitrogen transporters including PUT4, DUR3 and DAL4. The large fitness increases associated with these alleles limits the genetic heterogeneity of adapting populations even in environments with multiple nitrogen sources. Complete identification of acquired point mutations, in individual lineages and entire populations, identified heterogeneity at the level of genetic loci but common themes at the level of functional modules, including genes controlling phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate metabolism and vacuole biogenesis. Adaptive strategies shared with other nutrient-limited environments point to selection of genetic variation in the TORC1 and Ras/PKA signaling pathways as a general mechanism underlying improved growth in nutrient-limited environments. Within a single population we observed the repeated independent selection of a multi-locus genotype, comprised of the functionally related genes GAT1, MEP2 and LST4. By studying the fitness of individual alleles, and their combination, as well as the evolutionary history of the evolving population, we find that the order in which these mutations are acquired is constrained by epistasis. The identification of repeatedly selected variation at functionally related loci that interact epistatically suggests that gene network polymorphisms (GNPs) may be a frequent outcome of adaptive evolution. Our results provide insight into the mechanistic basis by which cells adapt to nutrient-limited environments and suggest that

  19. Two exopolyphosphatases with distinct molecular architectures and substrate specificities from the thermophilic green-sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum TLS.

    PubMed

    Albi, Tomás; Serrano, Aurelio

    2014-09-01

    The genome of the thermophilic green-sulfur bacterium Chlorobium tepidum TLS possesses two genes encoding putative exopolyphosphatases (PPX; EC 3.6.1.11), namely CT0099 (ppx1, 993 bp) and CT1713 (ppx2, 1557 bp). The predicted polypeptides of 330 and 518 aa residues are Ppx-GppA phosphatases of different domain architectures - the largest one has an extra C-terminal HD domain - which may represent ancient paralogues. Both ppx genes were cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3). While CtPPX1 was validated as a monomeric enzyme, CtPPX2 was found to be a homodimer. Both PPX homologues were functional, K(+)-stimulated phosphohydrolases, with an absolute requirement for divalent metal cations and a marked preference for Mg(2+). Nevertheless, they exhibited remarkably different catalytic specificities with regard to substrate classes and chain lengths. Even though both enzymes were able to hydrolyse the medium-size polyphosphate (polyP) P13-18 (polyP mix with mean chain length of 13-18 phosphate residues), CtPPX1 clearly reached its highest catalytic efficiency with tripolyphosphate and showed substantial nucleoside triphosphatase (NTPase) activity, while CtPPX2 preferred long-chain polyPs (>300 Pi residues) and did not show any detectable NTPase activity. These catalytic features, taken together with the distinct domain architectures and molecular phylogenies, indicate that the two PPX homologues of Chl. tepidum belong to different Ppx-GppA phosphatase subfamilies that should play specific biochemical roles in nucleotide and polyP metabolisms. In addition, these results provide an example of the remarkable functional plasticity of the Ppx-GppA phosphatases, a family of proteins with relatively simple structures that are widely distributed in the microbial world. PMID:24969471

  20. Crystal Structure of the Golgi-Associated Human Nα-Acetyltransferase 60 Reveals the Molecular Determinants for Substrate-Specific Acetylation.

    PubMed

    Støve, Svein Isungset; Magin, Robert S; Foyn, Håvard; Haug, Bengt Erik; Marmorstein, Ronen; Arnesen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    N-Terminal acetylation is a common and important protein modification catalyzed by N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs). Six human NATs (NatA-NatF) contain one catalytic subunit each, Naa10 to Naa60, respectively. In contrast to the ribosome-associated NatA to NatE, NatF/Naa60 specifically associates with Golgi membranes and acetylates transmembrane proteins. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the function of Naa60, we developed an Naa60 bisubstrate CoA-peptide conjugate inhibitor, determined its X-ray structure when bound to CoA and inhibitor, and carried out biochemical experiments. We show that Naa60 adapts an overall fold similar to that of the catalytic subunits of ribosome-associated NATs, but with the addition of two novel elongated loops that play important roles in substrate-specific binding. One of these loops mediates a dimer to monomer transition upon substrate-specific binding. Naa60 employs a catalytic mechanism most similar to Naa50. Collectively, these data reveal the molecular basis for Naa60-specific acetyltransferase activity with implications for its Golgi-specific functions. PMID:27320834

  1. A petal-specific InMYB1 promoter from Japanese morning glory: a useful tool for molecular breeding of floricultural crops.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Mirai; Morimoto, Reina; Hirose, Mana; Morita, Yasumasa; Hoshino, Atsushi; Iida, Shigeru; Oshima, Yoshimi; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru; Shiratake, Katsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Production of novel transgenic floricultural crops with altered petal properties requires transgenes that confer a useful trait and petal-specific promoters. Several promoters have been shown to control transgenes in petals. However, all suffer from inherent drawbacks such as low petal specificity and restricted activity during the flowering stage. In addition, the promoters were not examined for their ability to confer petal-specific expression in a wide range of plant species. Here, we report the promoter of InMYB1 from Japanese morning glory as a novel petal-specific promoter for molecular breeding of floricultural crops. First, we produced stable InMYB1_1kb::GUS transgenic Arabidopsis and Eustoma plants and characterized spatial and temporal expression patterns under the control of the InMYB1 promoter by histochemical β-glucuronidase (GUS) staining. GUS staining patterns were observed only in petals. This result showed that the InMYB1 promoter functions as a petal-specific promoter. Second, we transiently introduced the InMYB1_1 kb::GUS construct into Eustoma, chrysanthemum, carnation, Japanese gentian, stock, rose, dendrobium and lily petals by particle bombardment. GUS staining spots were observed in Eustoma, chrysanthemum, carnation, Japanese gentian and stock. These results showed that the InMYB1 promoter functions in most dicots. Third, to show the InMYB1 promoter utility in molecular breeding, a MIXTA-like gene function was suppressed or enhanced under the control of InMYB1 promoter in Arabidopsis. The transgenic plant showed a conspicuous morphological change only in the form of wrinkled petals. Based on these results, the InMYB1 promoter can be used as a petal-specific promoter in molecular breeding of floricultural crops. PMID:25923400

  2. Specific serum microRNA profile in the molecular diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Weibing; Li, Hongxing; Tang, Junwei; Wu, Wei; Qin, Jingjing; Lei, Hao; Cai, Peng; Huo, Weiwei; Li, Bo; Rehan, Virender; Xu, Xiaoqun; Geng, Qiming; Zhang, Hongwei; Xia, Yankai

    2014-08-01

    Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR), a congenital gastrointestinal disorder, is one of the most common causes of neonatal bowel obstruction. Without an early screening and diagnosis, some patients develop serious complications, such as toxic megacolon or acute enterocolitis. We sought to identify specific serum microRNAs (miRNAs) that can serve as novel early, non-invasive screening signature and then to test their specificity and sensitivity in diagnosing Hirschsprung's disease. We obtained serum samples from 95 HSCR cases and 104 matched controls. An initial screening of miRNA expression was performed through TaqMan Low Density Array. The candidate miRNAs were validated by individual reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR arranged in the training and a two-stage validation set. Additional double-blind testing was performed in 23 patients with clinically suspected HSCR to evaluate the diagnostic value and accuracy of the serum miRNA profile in predicting HSCR. Following a multi-stage evaluation approach, five miRNAs were significantly increased in HSCR cases compared with controls. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of this five-serum miRNA signature were 0.895, 0.893 and 0.925 in training set and two validation sets, respectively. The accuracy rate of the five-miRNA profile as HSCR signature was 82.6%, which, in the double-blind testing set, was markedly higher than that of contrast enema (70%), the most commonly used test performed to diagnose HSCR. Our results indicate that a five-serum miRNA signature may be linked to HSCR, representing a potential, novel, non-invasive diagnostic approach for early screening of HSCR. PMID:24974861

  3. Molecular basis of the selectivity of the immunoproteasome catalytic subunit LMP2-specific inhibitor revealed by molecular modeling and dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Lei, Beilei; Abdul Hameed, Mohamed Diwan M; Hamza, Adel; Wehenkel, Marie; Muzyka, Jennifer L; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Kim, Kyung-Bo; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2010-09-30

    Given that immunoproteasome inhibitors are currently being developed for a variety of potent therapeutic purposes, the unique specificity of an α',β'-epoxyketone peptide (UK101) toward the LMP2 subunit of the immunoproteasome (analogous to β5 subunit of the constitutive proteasome) has been investigated in this study for the first time by employing homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) binding free energy calculations. On the basis of the simulated binding structures, the calculated binding free energies are in qualitative agreement with the corresponding experimental data, and the selectivity of UK101 is explained reasonably. The observed selectivity of UK101 for the LMP2 subunit is rationalized by the requirement for both a linear hydrocarbon chain at the N terminus and a bulky group at the C terminus of the inhibitor, because the LMP2 subunit has a much more favorable hydrophobic pocket interacting with the linear hydrocarbon chain, and the bulky group at the C terminus has a steric clash with the Tyr 169 in β5 subunit. Finally, our results help to clarify why UK101 is specific to the LMP2 subunit of immunoproteasome, and this investigation should be valuable for rational design of more potent LMP2-specific inhibitors. PMID:20812720

  4. Molecular Basis of the Selectivity of the Immunoproteasome Catalytic Subunit LMP2-Specific Inhibitor Revealed by Molecular Modeling and Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Beilei; AbdulHameed, Mohamed Diwan M.; Hamza, Adel; Wehenkel, Marie; Muzyka, Jennifer L.; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Kim, Kyung-Bo; Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2010-01-01

    Given that immunoproteasome inhibitors are currently being developed for a variety of potent therapeutic purposes, the unique specificity of an α′,β′-epoxyketone peptide (UK101) towards the LMP2 subunit of the immunoproteasome (analogous to β5 subunit of the constitutive proteasome) has been investigated in this study for the first time by employing homology modeling, molecular docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) binding free energy calculations. Based on the simulated binding structures, the calculated binding free energies are in qualitative agreement with the corresponding experimental data and the selectivity of UK101 is explained reasonably. The observed selectivity of UK101 for the LMP2 subunit is rationalized by the requirement for both a linear hydrocarbon chain at the N-terminus and a bulky group at the C-terminus of the inhibitor, because that LMP2 subunit has a much more favorable hydrophobic pocket interacting with the linear hydrocarbon chain, and the bulky group at the C-terminus has a steric clash with the Tyr 169 in β5 subunit. Finally, our results help to clarify why UK101 is specific to the LMP2 subunit of immunoproteasome, and this investigation should be valuable for rational design of more potent LMP2-specific inhibitors. PMID:20812720

  5. Structure of P-Glycoprotein Reveals a Molecular Basis for Poly-Specific Drug Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Aller, Stephen G.; Yu, Jodie; Ward, Andrew; Weng, Yue; Chittaboina, Srinivas; Zhuo, Rupeng; Harrell, Patina M.; Trinh, Yenphuong T.; Zhang, Qinghai; Urbatsch, Ina L.; Chang, Geoffrey

    2009-04-22

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp) detoxifies cells by exporting hundreds of chemically unrelated toxins but has been implicated in multidrug resistance (MDR) in the treatment of cancers. Substrate promiscuity is a hallmark of P-gp activity, thus a structural description of poly-specific drug-binding is important for the rational design of anticancer drugs and MDR inhibitors. The x-ray structure of apo P-gp at 3.8 angstroms reveals an internal cavity of -6000 angstroms cubed with a 30 angstrom separation of the two nucleotide-binding domains. Two additional P-gp structures with cyclic peptide inhibitors demonstrate distinct drug-binding sites in the internal cavity capable of stereoselectivity that is based on hydrophobic and aromatic interactions. Apo and drug-bound P-gp structures have portals open to the cytoplasm and the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer for drug entry. The inward-facing conformation represents an initial stage of the transport cycle that is competent for drug binding.

  6. Molecular cloning and functional analysis of duck ubiquitin-specific protease 18 (USP18) gene.

    PubMed

    Qian, Wei; Wei, Xiaoqin; Zhou, Hongbo; Jin, Meilin

    2016-09-01

    In mammals, ubiquitin-specific protease 18 (USP18) is an interferon (IFN)-inducible gene and is a negative regulator of Toll-like receptor-mediated nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation. The role of USP18 in ducks (duUSP18) remains poorly understood. In the present study, we cloned and characterized the full-length coding sequence of duUSP18 from duck embryo fibroblasts (DEFs). In healthy ducks, duUSP18 transcripts were broadly expressed in different tissues, with higher expression levels in the spleen, lung and kidney. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis revealed that duUSP18 could be induced by treatment with Poly(I:C) or LPS. Overexpression of duUSP18 inhibited NF-κB and IFN-β expression. Furthermore, deletion mutant analysis revealed that the duUSP18 region between aa 75 and 304 was essential for inhibiting NF-κB. In addition, overexpression of duUSP18 also suppressed the secretion of NF-κB-dependent proinflammatory cytokines. Taken together, these results suggest that duUSP18 regulates duck innate immune responses. PMID:27133094

  7. Fast molecular beacon hybridization in organic solvents with improved target specificity.

    PubMed

    Dave, Neeshma; Liu, Juewen

    2010-12-01

    DNA hybridization is of tremendous importance in biology, bionanotechnology, and biophysics. Molecular beacons are engineered DNA hairpins with a fluorophore and a quencher labeled on each of the two ends. A target DNA can open the hairpin to give an increased fluorescence signal. To date, the majority of molecular beacon detections have been performed only in aqueous buffers. We describe herein DNA detection in nine different organic solvents, methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, acetonitrile, formamide, dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ethylene glycol, and glycerol, varying each up to 75% (v/v). In comparison with detection in water, the detection in organic solvents showed several important features. First, the molecular beacon hybridizes to its target DNA in the presence of all nine solvents up to a certain percentage. Second, the rate of this hybridization was significantly faster in most organic solvents compared with water. For example, in 56% ethanol, the beacon showed a 70-fold rate enhancement. Third, the ability of the molecular beacon to discriminate single-base mismatch is still maintained. Lastly, the DNA melting temperature in the organic solvents showed a solvent concentration-dependent decrease. This study suggests that molecular beacons can be used for applications where organic solvents must be involved or organic solvents can be intentionally added to improve the molecular beacon performance. PMID:21062084

  8. Building Disease-Specific Drug-Protein Connectivity Maps from Molecular Interaction Networks and PubMed Abstracts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jake Yue

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed concept of molecular connectivity maps enables researchers to integrate experimental measurements of genes, proteins, metabolites, and drug compounds under similar biological conditions. The study of these maps provides opportunities for future toxicogenomics and drug discovery applications. We developed a computational framework to build disease-specific drug-protein connectivity maps. We integrated gene/protein and drug connectivity information based on protein interaction networks and literature mining, without requiring gene expression profile information derived from drug perturbation experiments on disease samples. We described the development and application of this computational framework using Alzheimer's Disease (AD) as a primary example in three steps. First, molecular interaction networks were incorporated to reduce bias and improve relevance of AD seed proteins. Second, PubMed abstracts were used to retrieve enriched drug terms that are indirectly associated with AD through molecular mechanistic studies. Third and lastly, a comprehensive AD connectivity map was created by relating enriched drugs and related proteins in literature. We showed that this molecular connectivity map development approach outperformed both curated drug target databases and conventional information retrieval systems. Our initial explorations of the AD connectivity map yielded a new hypothesis that diltiazem and quinidine may be investigated as candidate drugs for AD treatment. Molecular connectivity maps derived computationally can help study molecular signature differences between different classes of drugs in specific disease contexts. To achieve overall good data coverage and quality, a series of statistical methods have been developed to overcome high levels of data noise in biological networks and literature mining results. Further development of computational molecular connectivity maps to cover major disease areas will likely set up a new model for

  9. Building disease-specific drug-protein connectivity maps from molecular interaction networks and PubMed abstracts.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jake Yue

    2009-07-01

    The recently proposed concept of molecular connectivity maps enables researchers to integrate experimental measurements of genes, proteins, metabolites, and drug compounds under similar biological conditions. The study of these maps provides opportunities for future toxicogenomics and drug discovery applications. We developed a computational framework to build disease-specific drug-protein connectivity maps. We integrated gene/protein and drug connectivity information based on protein interaction networks and literature mining, without requiring gene expression profile information derived from drug perturbation experiments on disease samples. We described the development and application of this computational framework using Alzheimer's Disease (AD) as a primary example in three steps. First, molecular interaction networks were incorporated to reduce bias and improve relevance of AD seed proteins. Second, PubMed abstracts were used to retrieve enriched drug terms that are indirectly associated with AD through molecular mechanistic studies. Third and lastly, a comprehensive AD connectivity map was created by relating enriched drugs and related proteins in literature. We showed that this molecular connectivity map development approach outperformed both curated drug target databases and conventional information retrieval systems. Our initial explorations of the AD connectivity map yielded a new hypothesis that diltiazem and quinidine may be investigated as candidate drugs for AD treatment. Molecular connectivity maps derived computationally can help study molecular signature differences between different classes of drugs in specific disease contexts. To achieve overall good data coverage and quality, a series of statistical methods have been developed to overcome high levels of data noise in biological networks and literature mining results. Further development of computational molecular connectivity maps to cover major disease areas will likely set up a new model for

  10. Generalizing the Concept of Specific Compound Formulation Additives towards Non-Fluorescent Drugs: A Solubilization Study on Potential Anti-Alzheimer-Active Small-Molecule Compounds.

    PubMed

    Lawatscheck, Carmen; Pickhardt, Marcus; Wieczorek, Sebastian; Grafmüller, Andrea; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Börner, Hans G

    2016-07-18

    Tailor-made compound formulation additives enable the testing of potential drugs with undesirable pharmacological profiles. A combinatorial approach using Raman microscopy as the readout method is presented to select peptide sequences from large one-bead-one-compound libraries. The resulting peptide-PEG conjugates solubilize potential prophylactic and therapeutic anti-Alzheimer compounds and can be used as specific additives not only for fluorescent but also for non-fluorescent compounds. PMID:27282127

  11. Systematic Dissection of Coding Exons at Single Nucleotide Resolution Supports an Additional Role in Cell-Specific Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mee J.; Findlay, Gregory M.; Martin, Beth; Zhao, Jingjing; Bell, Robert J. A.; Smith, Robin P.; Ku, Angel A.; Shendure, Jay; Ahituv, Nadav

    2014-01-01

    In addition to their protein coding function, exons can also serve as transcriptional enhancers. Mutations in these exonic-enhancers (eExons) could alter both protein function and transcription. However, the functional consequence of eExon mutations is not well known. Here, using massively parallel reporter assays, we dissect the enhancer activity of three liver eExons (SORL1 exon 17, TRAF3IP2 exon 2, PPARG exon 6) at single nucleotide resolution in the mouse liver. We find that both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations have similar effects on enhancer activity and many of the deleterious mutation clusters overlap known liver-associated transcription factor binding sites. Carrying a similar massively parallel reporter assay in HeLa cells with these three eExons found differences in their mutation profiles compared to the liver, suggesting that enhancers could have distinct operating profiles in different tissues. Our results demonstrate that eExon mutations could lead to multiple phenotypes by disrupting both the protein sequence and enhancer activity and that enhancers can have distinct mutation profiles in different cell types. PMID:25340400

  12. Counter-ion specificity explored in abnormal expansion of supra-molecular aggregates in aqueous solution of alkaline metal salts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ningdong; Tao, Jiaojiao; Wei, Shenghui; Chen, Mingming; Wei, Chengsha; Li, Liangbin

    2015-09-21

    Ionic effects in aqueous solution of macro-ions showing specificity and unconventional characters, respectively, receive a lot of interests recently; however, the complexity of specific ion effects in unconventional phenomena remains ambiguous. In this study, the effects of univalent ions on aggregation of supra-molecular nano-fibrils with charged carboxylate groups on the surface as a prototype of macro-ions are investigated by Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) in aqueous solutions of alkaline metal chlorides. It is found that the columnar bundles of charged fibrils are expanded in certain salt concentration range contradicting the conventional screening effects of salts. The degree of expansion is dominated by cations as Na(+) induces drastic effects in comparison to rather gentle changes from K(+) and Cs(+). The specific cations effects observed by SAXS correlate with the pH behavior of the solutions, an indicator of surface charge, or number of carboxylate groups along the supra-molecular fibrils. It is postulated that while Na(+) with stronger affinity to carboxylates apparently reduces the surface charge, K(+) and Cs(+) only weakly interact with carboxylates and induce minor changes, accounting for the cation-sensitive aggregation behavior of fibrils observed by SAXS. By probing the bundling aggregation of charged supra-molecular nano-fibrils in salty water, we provide direct evidence of specific counter-ion effects in unusual expansion caused by univalent salts. PMID:26395732

  13. Molecular-Level Thermodynamic Switch Controls Chemical Equilibrium in Sequence-Specific Hydrophobic Interaction of 35 Dipeptide Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Paul W.

    2003-01-01

    Applying the Planck-Benzinger methodology, the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions of 35 dipeptide pairs were examined over a temperature range of 273–333 K, based on data reported by Nemethy and Scheraga in 1962. The hydrophobic interaction in these sequence-specific dipeptide pairs is highly similar in its thermodynamic behavior to that of other biological systems. The results imply that the negative Gibbs free energy change minimum at a well-defined stable temperature, 〈Ts〉, where the bound unavailable energy, TΔSo = 0, has its origin in the sequence-specific hydrophobic interactions, are highly dependent on details of molecular structure. Each case confirms the existence of a thermodynamic molecular switch wherein a change of sign in ΔCpo(T)reaction (change in specific heat capacity of reaction at constant pressure) leads to true negative minimum in the Gibbs free energy change of reaction, ΔGo(T)reaction, and hence a maximum in the related equilibrium constant, Keq. Indeed, all interacting biological systems examined to date by Chun using the Planck-Benzinger methodology have shown such a thermodynamic switch at the molecular level, suggesting its existence may be universal. PMID:12547816

  14. Quantum ring-polymer contraction method: Including nuclear quantum effects at no additional computational cost in comparison to ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Christopher; Spura, Thomas; Habershon, Scott; Kühne, Thomas D.

    2016-04-01

    We present a simple and accurate computational method which facilitates ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics simulations, where the quantum-mechanical nature of the nuclei is explicitly taken into account, at essentially no additional computational cost in comparison to the corresponding calculation using classical nuclei. The predictive power of the proposed quantum ring-polymer contraction method is demonstrated by computing various static and dynamic properties of liquid water at ambient conditions using density functional theory. This development will enable routine inclusion of nuclear quantum effects in ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of condensed-phase systems.

  15. Canine parvovirus host range is determined by the specific conformation of an additional region of the capsid.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, J S; Parrish, C R

    1997-01-01

    We analyzed a region of the capsid of canine parvovirus (CPV) which determines the ability of the virus to infect canine cells. This region is distinct from those previously shown to determine the canine host range differences between CPV and feline panleukopenia virus. It lies on a ridge of the threefold spike of the capsid and is comprised of five interacting loops from three capsid protein monomers. We analyzed 12 mutants of CPV which contained amino acid changes in two adjacent loops exposed on the surface of this region. Nine mutants infected and grew in feline cells but were restricted in replication in one or the other of two canine cell lines tested. Three other mutants whose genomes contain mutations which affect one probable interchain bond were nonviable and could not be propagated in either canine or feline cells, although the VP1 and VP2 proteins from those mutants produced empty capsids when expressed from a plasmid vector. Although wild-type and mutant capsids bound to canine and feline cells in similar amounts, infection or viral DNA replication was greatly reduced after inoculation of canine cells with most of the mutants. The viral genomes of two host range-restricted mutants and two nonviable mutants replicated to wild-type levels in both feline and canine cells upon transfection with plasmid clones. The capsids of wild-type CPV and two mutants were similar in susceptibility to heat inactivation, but one of those mutants and one other were more stable against urea denaturation. Most mutations in this structural region altered the ability of monoclonal antibodies to recognize epitopes within a major neutralizing antigenic site, and that site could be subdivided into a number of distinct epitopes. These results argue that a specific structure of this region is required for CPV to retain its canine host range. PMID:9371580

  16. Nanosilica-based molecularly imprinted polymer nanoshell for specific recognition and determination of rhodamine B in red wine and beverages.

    PubMed

    Long, Zerong; Xu, Weiwei; Lu, Yi; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-09-01

    A new and facile rhodamine B (RhB)-imprinted polymer nanoshell coating for SiO2 nanoparticles was readily prepared by a combination of silica gel modification and molecular surface imprinting. The RhB-imprinted polymers (RhB-MIPs) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and UV-vis spectroscopy; the binding properties and selectivity of these MIPs were investigated in detail. The uniformly imprinted nanoparticles displayed a rather thin shell thickness (23nm) with highly effective recognition sites, showing homogenous distribution and monolayer adsorption. The maximum MIP adsorption capacity (Qm) was as high as 45.2mgg(-1), with an adsorption equilibrium time of about 15min at ambient temperature. Dynamic rebinding experiments showed that chemical adsorption is crucial for RhB binding to RhB-MIPs. The adsorption isotherm for RhB-MIPs binding could also be described by the Langmuir equation at different temperatures and pH values. Increasing temperature led to an enhanced Qm, a decreased dissociation constant (K'd), and a more negative free energy (ΔG), indicating that adsorption is favored at higher temperatures. Moreover, the adsorption capacity of RhB was remarkably affected by pH. At pH>7, the adsorption of RhB was driven by hydrogen bonding interactions, while at pH<7 electrostatic forces were dominant. Additionally, the MIPs also showed specific recognition of RhB from the standard mixture solution containing five structurally analogs. This method was also successfully employed to determine RhB content in red wine and beverages using three levels of spiking, with recoveries in the range of 91.6-93.1% and relative standard deviations lower than 4.1%. PMID:27372912

  17. Insights into the Molecular Activation Mechanism of the RhoA-specific Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor, PDZRhoGEF

    SciTech Connect

    Bielnicki, Jakub A.; Shkumatov, Alexander V.; Derewenda, Urszula; Somlyo, Avril V.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Derewenda, Zygmunt S.

    2012-10-09

    PDZRhoGEF (PRG) belongs to a small family of RhoA-specific nucleotide exchange factors that mediates signaling through select G-protein-coupled receptors via G{alpha}{sub 12/13} and activates RhoA by catalyzing the exchange of GDP to GTP. PRG is a multidomain protein composed of PDZ, regulators of G-protein signaling-like (RGSL), Dbl-homology (DH), and pleckstrin-homology (PH) domains. It is autoinhibited in cytosol and is believed to undergo a conformational rearrangement and translocation to the membrane for full activation, although the molecular details of the regulation mechanism are not clear. It has been shown recently that the main autoregulatory elements of PDZRhoGEF, the autoinhibitory 'activation box' and the 'GEF switch,' which is required for full activation, are located directly upstream of the catalytic DH domain and its RhoA binding surface, emphasizing the functional role of the RGSL-DH linker. Here, using a combination of biophysical and biochemical methods, we show that the mechanism of PRG regulation is yet more complex and may involve an additional autoinhibitory element in the form of a molten globule region within the linker between RGSL and DH domains. We propose a novel, two-tier model of autoinhibition where the activation box and the molten globule region act synergistically to impair the ability of RhoA to bind to the catalytic DH-PH tandem. The molten globule region and the activation box become less ordered in the PRG-RhoA complex and dissociate from the RhoA-binding site, which may constitute a critical step leading to PRG activation.

  18. Molecular Form Differences Between Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Standards Create Quantitative Discordances in PSA ELISA Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McJimpsey, Erica L.

    2016-02-01

    The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays currently employed for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) lack the specificity needed to differentiate PCa from benign prostatic hyperplasia and have high false positive rates. The PSA calibrants used to create calibration curves in these assays are typically purified from seminal plasma and contain many molecular forms (intact PSA and cleaved subforms). The purpose of this study was to determine if the composition of the PSA molecular forms found in these PSA standards contribute to the lack of PSA test reliability. To this end, seminal plasma purified PSA standards from different commercial sources were investigated by western blot (WB) and in multiple research grade PSA ELISAs. The WB results revealed that all of the PSA standards contained different mass concentrations of intact and cleaved molecular forms. Increased mass concentrations of intact PSA yielded higher immunoassay absorbance values, even between lots from the same manufacturer. Standardization of seminal plasma derived PSA calibrant molecular form mass concentrations and purification methods will assist in closing the gaps in PCa testing measurements that require the use of PSA values, such as the % free PSA and Prostate Health Index by increasing the accuracy of the calibration curves.

  19. Molecular Form Differences Between Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Standards Create Quantitative Discordances in PSA ELISA Measurements

    PubMed Central

    McJimpsey, Erica L.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate-specific antigen (PSA) assays currently employed for the detection of prostate cancer (PCa) lack the specificity needed to differentiate PCa from benign prostatic hyperplasia and have high false positive rates. The PSA calibrants used to create calibration curves in these assays are typically purified from seminal plasma and contain many molecular forms (intact PSA and cleaved subforms). The purpose of this study was to determine if the composition of the PSA molecular forms found in these PSA standards contribute to the lack of PSA test reliability. To this end, seminal plasma purified PSA standards from different commercial sources were investigated by western blot (WB) and in multiple research grade PSA ELISAs. The WB results revealed that all of the PSA standards contained different mass concentrations of intact and cleaved molecular forms. Increased mass concentrations of intact PSA yielded higher immunoassay absorbance values, even between lots from the same manufacturer. Standardization of seminal plasma derived PSA calibrant molecular form mass concentrations and purification methods will assist in closing the gaps in PCa testing measurements that require the use of PSA values, such as the % free PSA and Prostate Health Index by increasing the accuracy of the calibration curves. PMID:26911983

  20. Universality and specificity in molecular orientation in anisotropic gels prepared by diffusion method.

    PubMed

    Maki, Yasuyuki; Furusawa, Kazuya; Yasuraoka, Sho; Okamura, Hideki; Hosoya, Natsuki; Sunaga, Mari; Dobashi, Toshiaki; Sugimoto, Yasunobu; Wakabayashi, Katsuzo

    2014-08-01

    Molecular orientation in anisotropic gels of chitosan, Curdlan and DNA obtained by dialysis of those aqueous solutions in gelation-inducing solutions was investigated. In this diffusion method (or dialysis method), the gel formation was induced by letting small molecules diffuse in or out of the polymer solutions through the surface. For the gels of DNA and chitosan, the polymer chains aligned perpendicular to the diffusion direction. The same direction of molecular orientation was observed for the Curdlan gel prepared in the dialysis cell. On the other hand, a peculiar nature was observed for the Curdlan gel prepared in the dialysis tube: the molecular orientation was perpendicular to the diffusion direction in the outermost layer of the gel, while the orientation was parallel to the diffusion direction in the inner translucent layer. The orientation parallel to the diffusion direction is attributed to a small deformation of the inner translucent layer caused by a slight shrinkage of the central region after the gel formation. At least near the surface of the gel, the molecular orientation perpendicular to the diffusion direction is a universal characteristic for the gels prepared by the diffusion method. PMID:24751255

  1. Size Matters: Molecular Weight Specificity of Hyaluronan Effects in Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Cyphert, Jaime M.; Trempus, Carol S.; Garantziotis, Stavros

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan signaling properties are unique among other biologically active molecules, that they are apparently not influenced by postsynthetic molecular modification, but by hyaluronan fragment size. This review summarizes the current knowledge about the generation of hyaluronan fragments of different size and size-dependent differences in hyaluronan signaling as well as their downstream biological effects. PMID:26448754

  2. Induction of a germination specific, low molecular weight, acid phosphatase isozyme with specific phosphotyrosine phosphatase activity in lentil (Lens esculenta) seeds.

    PubMed

    Bose, S K; Taneja, V

    1998-09-29

    A germination specific isozyme of acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2) hydrolysing O-phospho-L-Tyrosine, pH optima 5.5 is induced in lentil seeds. When seeds at 0 h, 24 h and 36 h of germination are electrophorezed, native PAGE on specific enzyme staining shows several constitutive isozymes of acid phosphatases. At 48 h, an isozyme is induced which gradually decreases and then disappears at 108 h of germination. The short lived, induced isozyme is present in the embryo and seed-coat but not in the plumule and the radical. Induction of this isozyme is inhibited by cycloheximide and actinomycin-D and increased by plant growth regulators such as heteroauxin and gibbrellic acid treatment during germination. The induced isozyme is a single 30 kD polypeptide, with subunit molecular mass of 25 kD, shows activity for O-phospho-L-Tyrosine. It is strongly inhibited by vanadate (microM), molybdate, tungustate as also by iodoacetate, p-chloromercuribenzoate and diethylpyrocarbonate. This study shows for the first time that the germination induced low molecular weight Acid phosphatase is a Tyrosine phosphatase super family class IV enzyme, having a role in cellular differentiation and development during seed germination. PMID:9784397

  3. Effect of minimizing amount of template by addition of macromolecular crowding agent on preparation of molecularly imprinted monolith.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guang-Ying; Zhong, Dan-Dan; Li, Xiang-Jie; Luo, Yu-Qing; Ba, Hang; Liu, Zhao-Sheng; Aisa, Haji Akber

    2015-09-01

    One of the main challenges in the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) is the substantial initial amount of template needed because of the requirement of high load capacities for most applications. A new strategy of macromolecular crowding was suggested to solve this problem by reducing the amount of template in the polymerization recipe. In a ternary porogenic system of polystyrene (PS) (crowding agent), tetrahydrofuran, and toluene, an imprinted monolithic column with high porosity and good permeability was synthesized using a mixture of ellagic acid (template), acrylamide, and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate. The effect of polymerization factors, including monomer-template molar ratio and the molecular weight and concentration of PS, on the imprinting effect of the resulting MIP monoliths was systematically investigated. At a high ratio of monomer-template (120:1), the greatest imprinting factor of 32.4 was obtained on the MIP monolith with the aid of macromolecular crowding agent. The PS-based imprinted monolith had imprinting even at the extremely high ratio of functional monomer to template of 1510:1. Furthermore, an off-line solid-phase extraction based on the ground MIP was conducted, and the purification recovery of ellagic acid from pomegranate-rind extract was up to 80 %. In conclusion, this approach based on macromolecular crowding is simple, and is especially valuable for those applications of MIP preparation for which a rare template is used. PMID:26210545

  4. Theoretical study of the molecular force field and vibration analysis of the hydrogen cyanide addition compound with boron tribromide.

    PubMed

    Hase, Y

    2010-01-01

    An extensive HF, MP2, B3LYP and CCSD study of the molecular structure, force field and normal vibrations has been carried out for the hydrogen cyanide compound with boron tribromide. Most of the calculations agree that the HCN-BBr(3) molecule belongs to C(3v) point group and has a N-B length of 1.55-1.70 A and a N-B-Br angle of 103-105 degrees. These calculations also have estimated the missing low-wavenumber fundamentals in the 190 (nu(5)), 150 (nu(9)) and 105 cm(-1) (nu(10)) regions, instead of the supposed fundamentals at 207, 188 and 150 cm(-1), respectively, based on the combination bands. The quantum chemical force constants, by the B3LYP/6-31G and CCSD/3-21G calculations, have been adjusted by the scaling factors to reproduce the fundamentals in the literature [3] to include the bands below 200 cm(-1) proposed in this study. Normal coordinate analysis using the scaled force constants has been performed to interpret the molecular vibrations of four isotopic molecules, HCN-(10)BBr(3), HCN-(11)BBr(3), DCN-(10)BBr(3) and DCN-(11)BBr(3). PMID:19955013

  5. Theoretical study of the molecular force field and vibration analysis of the hydrogen cyanide addition compound with boron tribromide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hase, Y.

    2010-01-01

    An extensive HF, MP2, B3LYP and CCSD study of the molecular structure, force field and normal vibrations has been carried out for the hydrogen cyanide compound with boron tribromide. Most of the calculations agree that the HCN-BBr 3 molecule belongs to C3v point group and has a N-B length of 1.55-1.70 Å and a N-B-Br angle of 103-105°. These calculations also have estimated the missing low-wavenumber fundamentals in the 190 ( ν5), 150 ( ν9) and 105 cm -1 ( ν10) regions, instead of the supposed fundamentals at 207, 188 and 150 cm -1, respectively, based on the combination bands. The quantum chemical force constants, by the B3LYP/6-31G and CCSD/3-21G calculations, have been adjusted by the scaling factors to reproduce the fundamentals in the literature [3] to include the bands below 200 cm -1 proposed in this study. Normal coordinate analysis using the scaled force constants has been performed to interpret the molecular vibrations of four isotopic molecules, HCN- 10BBr 3, HCN- 11BBr 3, DCN- 10BBr 3 and DCN- 11BBr 3.

  6. Molecular Profile of Tumor-Specific CD8+ T Cell Hypofunction in a Transplantable Murine Cancer Model.

    PubMed

    Waugh, Katherine A; Leach, Sonia M; Moore, Brandon L; Bruno, Tullia C; Buhrman, Jonathan D; Slansky, Jill E

    2016-08-15

    Mechanisms of self-tolerance often result in CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) with a hypofunctional phenotype incapable of tumor clearance. Using a transplantable colon carcinoma model, we found that CD8(+) T cells became tolerized in <24 h in an established tumor environment. To define the collective impact of pathways suppressing TIL function, we compared genome-wide mRNA expression of tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells from the tumor and periphery. Notably, gene expression induced during TIL hypofunction more closely resembled self-tolerance than viral exhaustion. Differential gene expression was refined to identify a core set of genes that defined hypofunctional TIL; these data comprise the first molecular profile of tumor-specific TIL that are naturally responding and represent a polyclonal repertoire. The molecular profile of TIL was further dissected to determine the extent of overlap and distinction between pathways that collectively restrict T cell functions. As suggested by the molecular profile of TIL, protein expression of inhibitory receptor LAG-3 was differentially regulated throughout prolonged late-G1/early-S phase of the cell cycle. Our data may accelerate efficient identification of combination therapies to boost anti-tumor function of TIL specifically against tumor cells. PMID:27371726

  7. Efficient assembly of threaded molecular machines for sequence-specific synthesis.

    PubMed

    De Bo, Guillaume; Kuschel, Sonja; Leigh, David A; Lewandowski, Bartosz; Papmeyer, Marcus; Ward, John W

    2014-04-16

    We report on an improved strategy for the preparation of artificial molecular machines that can pick up and assemble reactive groups in sequence by traveling along a track. In the new approach a preformed rotaxane synthon is attached to the end of an otherwise fully formed strand of building blocks. This "rotaxane-capping" protocol is significantly more efficient than the "final-step-threading" method employed previously and enables the synthesis of threaded molecular machines that operate on extended oligomer, and potentially polymer, tracks. The methodology is exemplified through the preparation of a machine that adds four amino acid building blocks from a strand in sequence, featuring up to 20-membered ring native chemical ligation transition states. PMID:24678971

  8. Site-specific basicities regulate molecular recognition in receptor binding: in silico docking of thyroid hormones.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Gergő; Baska, Ferenc; Schretner, András; Rácz, Akos; Noszál, Béla

    2013-09-01

    Interactions between thyroid hormone α and β receptors and the eight protonation microspecies of each of the main thyroid hormones (thyroxine, liothyronine, and reverse liothyronine) were investigated and quantitated by molecular modeling. Flexible docking of the various protonation forms of thyroid hormones and high-affinity thyromimetics to the two thyroid receptors was carried out. In this method the role of the ionization state of each basic site could be studied in the composite process of molecular recognition. Our results quantitate at the molecular level how the ionization state and the charge distribution influence the protein binding. The anionic form of the carboxyl group (i.e., carboxylate site) is essential for protein binding, whereas the protonated form of amino group worsens the binding. The protonation state of the phenolate plays a less important role in the receptor affinity; its protonation, however, alters the electron density and the concomitant stacking propensity of the aromatic rings, resulting in a different binding score. The combined results of docking and microspeciation studies show that microspecies with the highest concentration at the pH of blood are not the strongest binding ones. The calculated binding free energy values can be well interpreted in terms of the interactions between the actual sites of the microspecies and the receptor amino acids. Our docking results were validated and compared with biological data from the literature. Since the thyroid hormone receptors influence several physiologic functions, such as metabolic rate, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, and heart frequency, our binding results provide a molecular basis for drug design and development in related therapeutic indications. PMID:23907234

  9. atpE gene as a new useful specific molecular target to quantify Mycobacterium in environmental samples

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The environment is the likely source of many pathogenic mycobacterial species but detection of mycobacteria by bacteriological tools is generally difficult and time-consuming. Consequently, several molecular targets based on the sequences of housekeeping genes, non-functional RNA and structural ribosomal RNAs have been proposed for the detection and identification of mycobacteria in clinical or environmental samples. While certain of these targets were proposed as specific for this genus, most are prone to false positive results in complex environmental samples that include related, but distinct, bacterial genera. Nowadays the increased number of sequenced genomes and the availability of software for genomic comparison provide tools to develop novel, mycobacteria-specific targets, and the associated molecular probes and primers. Consequently, we conducted an in silico search for proteins exclusive to Mycobacterium spp. genomes in order to design sensitive and specific molecular targets. Results Among the 3989 predicted proteins from M. tuberculosis H37Rv, only 11 proteins showed 80% to 100% of similarity with Mycobacterium spp. genomes, and less than 50% of similarity with genomes of closely related Corynebacterium, Nocardia and Rhodococcus genera. Based on DNA sequence alignments, we designed primer pairs and a probe that specifically detect the atpE gene of mycobacteria, as verified by quantitative real-time PCR on a collection of mycobacteria and non-mycobacterial species. The real-time PCR method we developed was successfully used to detect mycobacteria in tap water and lake samples. Conclusions The results indicate that this real-time PCR method targeting the atpE gene can serve for highly specific detection and precise quantification of Mycobacterium spp. in environmental samples. PMID:24299240

  10. Monoclonal antibodies with equal specificity to D-dimer and high-molecular-weight fibrin degradation products

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, Alexander E.; Mukharyamova, Kadriya S.; Bereznikova, Anastasia V.; Filatov, Vladimir L.; Koshkina, Ekaterina V.; Bloshchitsyna, Marina N.; Katrukha, Alexey G.

    2016-01-01

    Fibrin degradation results in the formation of fibrin degradation products (FDPs) of different molecular weights, which include D-dimer. Commercial D-dimer assays recognize multiple forms of FDP with different specificity. As a result, the absence of an international D-dimer standard and the marked discrepancy in the D-dimer values in the same samples measured by assays from different manufacturers have become the primary problems that clinicians face in the D-dimer determination. We consider that an assay with equal specificity to all FDP forms regardless of their molecular weights could help to solve these problems. We aimed to produce mAbs that could equally recognize high-molecular-weight FDP (HMW FDP) and D-dimer. mAbs against D-dimer were produced. The HMW FDP/D-dimer ratios in plasma samples were analyzed following protein separation by gel filtration using the developed fluoroimmunoassay. A sandwich immunoassay with equal specificity to HMW FDP and D-dimer was developed and applied to determine HMW FDP/D-dimer ratios in patients with different diseases. Although the HMW FDP levels prevailed in thrombotic patients, the FDP and D-dimer levels were comparable in septic patients. Meanwhile, the D-dimer levels often exceeded the HMW FDP levels in patients who had undergone surgery. The ‘D-dimer’ levels that were detected by different assays also varied greatly depending on the assay specificities to FDP and D-dimer. Our findings show that the introduction of assays with equal specificities to FDP and D-dimer in clinical practice is a possible way of standardizing D-dimer measurements. PMID:26656897

  11. Cytological and Molecular Characterization of Homoeologous Group-1 Chromosomes in Hybrid Derivatives of a Durum Disomic Alien Addition Line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fusarium head blight (FHB) is a devastating disease of durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L., 2n = 4x = 28; AABB). To incorporate FHB resistance from diploid wheatgrass (Lophopyrum elongatum (Host) Á. Löve, 2n = 2x = 14; EE) we produced earlier a stable alien disomic addition line, DGE-1, incorporating...

  12. Molecular characterization of a bovine Y-specific DNA sequence conserved in taurine and zebu breeds.

    PubMed

    Alves, Beatriz C A; Mayer, Mário G; Taber, Anna Paula; Egito, Andréa A; Fagundes, Valéria; McElreavey, Ken; Moreira-Filho, Carlos A

    2006-06-01

    The identification of new bovine male-specific DNA sequences is of great interest because the bovine Y chromosome remains poorly characterized in terms of physical and genetic maps. Since taurine and zebu Y chromosomes are structurally different, the identification of Y-specific sequences present in both sub-species is particularly important: these sequences are of evolutionary significance and can be broadly used for embryo sexing. In this work, we initially used the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique to search for male-specific sequences present as monomorphic markers in genomic DNA from zebu and taurine bulls. A male-specific RAPD band was found to be present and highly conserved in both sub-species, as demonstrated by Southern blotting, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) and DNA sequencing. In a previous work, a pair of primers derived from this marker was successfully used in taurine and zebu embryo sexing. PMID:17286047

  13. Specific interactions between lactose repressor protein and DNA affected by ligand binding: ab initio molecular orbital calculations.

    PubMed

    Ohyama, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Masato; Nishikawa, Shin; Kurita, Noriyuki

    2011-06-01

    Transcription mechanisms of gene information from DNA to mRNA are essentially controlled by regulatory proteins such as a lactose repressor (LacR) protein and ligand molecules. Biochemical experiments elucidated that a ligand binding to LacR drastically changes the mechanism controlled by LacR, although the effect of ligand binding has not been clarified at atomic and electronic levels. We here investigated the effect of ligand binding on the specific interactions between LacR and operator DNA by the molecular simulations combined with classical molecular mechanics and ab initio fragment molecular orbital methods. The results indicate that the binding of anti-inducer ligand strengthens the interaction between LacR and DNA, which is consistent with the fact that the binding of anti-inducer enhances the repression of gene transcription by LacR. It was also elucidated that hydrating water molecules existing between LacR and DNA contribute to the specific interactions between LacR and DNA. PMID:21328406

  14. A non-invasive tissue-specific molecular delivery method of cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Tetsuya; Aoi, Atsuko; Vassaux, Georges; Mori, Shiro; Morikawa, Hidehiro; Koshiyama, Keni-Chiro; Yano, Takeru; Fujikawa, Shigeo; Tomita, Yukio

    2006-01-01

    A Japanese word, monozukuri (literally translated "making things") is the philosophy of first having the idea and then the faith in the technical expertise and experience to accomplish the result. We believe that the concept of engineering is monozukuri. Through the process of monozukuri, engineered natural science based on mathematics and physics has been developed. Medicine is the field of study which has been developed for maintaining daily healthy life with diagnosis, treatment, examination, and protection. Biomedical engineering is the interdisciplinary study of engineering and medicine, and should be developed based on monozukuri. In this particular research, we have developed a physical molecular delivery method for cancer gene therapy using nano/microbubbles and ultrasound. First, the behavior of cavitation bubbles and subsequent shock wave phenomena involved in the mechanism of molecular delivery were analyzed, combining theory and computer simulation. In a second step, the methodology was optimized in vitro and in vivo. Finally, the therapeutic potential of the method in pre-clinical models was evaluated using transgenes relevant to cancer gene therapy instead of reporter genes, and whole body, non-invasive imaging using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT/CT) was used to evaluate the selectivity of gene delivery in vivo. PMID:16966136

  15. Molecular characterization of the body site-specific human epidermal cytokeratin 9: cDNA cloning, amino acid sequence, and tissue specificity of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Langbein, L; Heid, H W; Moll, I; Franke, W W

    1993-12-01

    Differentiation of human plantar and palmar epidermis is characterized by the suprabasal synthesis of a major special intermediate-sized filament (IF) protein, the type I (acidic) cytokeratin 9 (CK 9). Using partial amino acid (aa) sequence information obtained by direct Edman sequencing of peptides resulting from proteolytic digestion of purified CK 9, we synthesized several redundant primers by 'back-translation'. Amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of cDNAs obtained by reverse transcription of mRNAs from human foot sole epidermis, including 5'-primer extension, resulted in multiple overlapping cDNA clones, from which the complete cDNA (2353 bp) could be constructed. This cDNA encoded the CK 9 polypeptide with a calculated molecular weight of 61,987 and an isoelectric point at about pH 5.0. The aa sequence deduced from cDNA was verified in several parts by comparison with the peptide sequences and showed the typical structure of type I CKs, with a head (153 aa), and alpha-helical coiled-coil-forming rod (306 aa), and a tail (163 aa) domain. The protein displayed the highest homology to human CK 10, not only in the highly conserved rod domain but also in large parts of the head and the tail domains. On the other hand, the aa sequence revealed some remarkable differences from CK 10 and other CKs, even in the most conserved segments of the rod domain. The nuclease digestion pattern seen on Southern blot analysis of human genomic DNA indicated the existence of a unique CK 9 gene. Using CK 9-specific riboprobes for hybridization on Northern blots of RNAs from various epithelia, a mRNA of about 2.4 kb in length could be identified only in foot sole epidermis, and a weaker cross-hybridization signal was seen in RNA from bovine heel pad epidermis at about 2.0 kb. A large number of tissues and cell cultures were examined by PCR of mRNA-derived cDNAs, using CK 9-specific primers. But even with this very sensitive signal amplification, only palmar

  16. Understanding the molecular circuitry of cell lineage specification in the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Bergsmedh, Anna; Donohoe, Mary E; Hughes, Rebecca-Ayme; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. However, critical to understanding and exploiting mechanisms of cell lineage specification, epigenetic reprogramming, and the optimal environment for maintaining and differentiating pluripotent stem cells is a fundamental knowledge of how these events occur in normal embryogenesis. The early mouse embryo has provided an excellent model to interrogate events crucial in cell lineage commitment and plasticity, as well as for embryo-derived lineage-specific stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Here we provide an overview of cell lineage specification in the early (preimplantation) mouse embryo focusing on the transcriptional circuitry and epigenetic marks necessary for successive differentiation events leading to the formation of the blastocyst. PMID:24710206

  17. Molecular Basis of Signaling Specificity of Insulin and IGF Receptors: Neglected Corners and Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    Siddle, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptors utilize common phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and Ras/extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways to mediate a broad spectrum of “metabolic” and “mitogenic” responses. Specificity of insulin and IGF action in vivo must in part reflect expression of receptors and responsive pathways in different tissues but it is widely assumed that it is also determined by the ligand binding and signaling mechanisms of the receptors. This review focuses on receptor-proximal events in insulin/IGF signaling and examines their contribution to specificity of downstream responses. Insulin and IGF receptors may differ subtly in the efficiency with which they recruit their major substrates (IRS-1 and IRS-2 and Shc) and this could influence effectiveness of signaling to “metabolic” and “mitogenic” responses. Other substrates (Grb2-associated binder, downstream of kinases, SH2Bs, Crk), scaffolds (RACK1, β-arrestins, cytohesins), and pathways (non-receptor tyrosine kinases, phosphoinositide kinases, reactive oxygen species) have been less widely studied. Some of these components appear to be specifically involved in “metabolic” or “mitogenic” signaling but it has not been shown that this reflects receptor-preferential interaction. Very few receptor-specific interactions have been characterized, and their roles in signaling are unclear. Signaling specificity might also be imparted by differences in intracellular trafficking or feedback regulation of receptors, but few studies have directly addressed this possibility. Although published data are not wholly conclusive, no evidence has yet emerged for signaling mechanisms that are specifically engaged by insulin receptors but not IGF receptors or vice versa, and there is only limited evidence for differential activation of signaling mechanisms that are common to both receptors. Cellular context, rather than intrinsic receptor activity, therefore appears

  18. Molecular Cytogenetic Identification of a New Wheat-Rye 6R Chromosome Disomic Addition Line with Powdery Mildew Resistance.

    PubMed

    An, Diaoguo; Zheng, Qi; Luo, Qiaoling; Ma, Pengtao; Zhang, Hongxia; Li, Lihui; Han, Fangpu; Xu, Hongxing; Xu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhou, Yilin

    2015-01-01

    Rye (Secale cereale L.) possesses many valuable genes that can be used for improving disease resistance, yield and environment adaptation of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). However, the documented resistance stocks derived from rye is faced severe challenge due to the variation of virulent isolates in the pathogen populations. Therefore, it is necessary to develop desirable germplasm and search for novel resistance gene sources against constantly accumulated variation of the virulent isolates. In the present study, a new wheat-rye line designated as WR49-1 was produced through distant hybridization and chromosome engineering protocols between common wheat cultivar Xiaoyan 6 and rye cultivar German White. Using sequential GISH (genomic in situ hybridization), mc-FISH (multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization), mc-GISH (multicolor GISH) and EST (expressed sequence tag)-based marker analysis, WR49-1 was proved to be a new wheat-rye 6R disomic addition line. As expected, WR49-1 showed high levels of resistance to wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt) pathogens prevalent in China at the adult growth stage and 19 of 23 Bgt isolates tested at the seedling stage. According to its reaction pattern to different Bgt isolates, WR49-1 may possess new resistance gene(s) for powdery mildew, which differed from the documented powdery mildew gene, including Pm20 on chromosome arm 6RL of rye. Additionally, WR49-1 was cytologically stable, had improved agronomic characteristics and therefore could serve as an important bridge for wheat breeding and chromosome engineering. PMID:26237413

  19. Molecular Cytogenetic Identification of a New Wheat-Rye 6R Chromosome Disomic Addition Line with Powdery Mildew Resistance

    PubMed Central

    An, Diaoguo; Zheng, Qi; Luo, Qiaoling; Ma, Pengtao; Zhang, Hongxia; Li, Lihui; Han, Fangpu; Xu, Hongxing; Xu, Yunfeng; Zhang, Xiaotian; Zhou, Yilin

    2015-01-01

    Rye (Secale cereale L.) possesses many valuable genes that can be used for improving disease resistance, yield and environment adaptation of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.). However, the documented resistance stocks derived from rye is faced severe challenge due to the variation of virulent isolates in the pathogen populations. Therefore, it is necessary to develop desirable germplasm and search for novel resistance gene sources against constantly accumulated variation of the virulent isolates. In the present study, a new wheat-rye line designated as WR49-1 was produced through distant hybridization and chromosome engineering protocols between common wheat cultivar Xiaoyan 6 and rye cultivar German White. Using sequential GISH (genomic in situ hybridization), mc-FISH (multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization), mc-GISH (multicolor GISH) and EST (expressed sequence tag)-based marker analysis, WR49-1 was proved to be a new wheat-rye 6R disomic addition line. As expected, WR49-1 showed high levels of resistance to wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt) pathogens prevalent in China at the adult growth stage and 19 of 23 Bgt isolates tested at the seedling stage. According to its reaction pattern to different Bgt isolates, WR49-1 may possess new resistance gene(s) for powdery mildew, which differed from the documented powdery mildew gene, including Pm20 on chromosome arm 6RL of rye. Additionally, WR49-1 was cytologically stable, had improved agronomic characteristics and therefore could serve as an important bridge for wheat breeding and chromosome engineering. PMID:26237413

  20. Molecular cloning and functional expression of a brain-specific somatostatin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, J F; Xu, Y; Song, J; Berelowitz, M

    1992-01-01

    The PCR and conventional library screening were used to clone the brain-specific somatostatin receptor rSSTR-4 from a rat genomic library. The deduced amino acid sequence encodes a protein of 384 amino acids and displays structural and sequence homologies with members of the G protein-receptor superfamily. The amino acid sequence of rSSTR-4 is 60% and 48% identical to that of somatostatin receptors SSTR-1 and SSTR-2, respectively, two recently cloned subtypes. Competition curve analysis of the binding properties of the receptor transiently expressed in COS-1 cells revealed a higher apparent affinity for somatostatin 14 than for somatostatin 28. In contrast, the somatostatin analogs SMS 201-995, IM 4-28, and MK-678 failed to displace specific binding in transfected cells. These characteristics resemble the pharmacological binding properties of the previously described brain-specific somatostatin-receptor subtype. Examination of the tissue distribution of mRNA for rSSTR-4 revealed expression limited to various brain regions with highest levels in the cortex and hippocampus. Thus, based on the pharmacology and tissue localization of this receptor, we conclude that rSSTR-4 represents a brain-specific somatostatin receptor. Images PMID:1360663

  1. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a Geranyl Diphosphate-Specific Aromatic Prenyltransferase from Lemon1[W

    PubMed Central

    Munakata, Ryosuke; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Koeduka, Takao; Karamat, Fazeelat; Olry, Alexandre; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Takanashi, Kojiro; Dugrand, Audray; Froelicher, Yann; Tanaka, Ryo; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Azuma, Jun-Ichi; Hehn, Alain; Bourgaud, Frédéric; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2014-01-01

    Prenyl residues confer divergent biological activities such as antipathogenic and antiherbivorous activities on phenolic compounds, including flavonoids, coumarins, and xanthones. To date, about 1,000 prenylated phenolics have been isolated, with these compounds containing various prenyl residues. However, all currently described plant prenyltransferases (PTs) have been shown specific for dimethylallyl diphosphate as the prenyl donor, while most of the complementary DNAs encoding these genes have been isolated from the Leguminosae. In this study, we describe the identification of a novel PT gene from lemon (Citrus limon), ClPT1, belonging to the homogentisate PT family. This gene encodes a PT that differs from other known PTs, including flavonoid-specific PTs, in polypeptide sequence. This membrane-bound enzyme was specific for geranyl diphosphate as the prenyl donor and coumarin as the prenyl acceptor. Moreover, the gene product was targeted to plastid in plant cells. To our knowledge, this is the novel aromatic PT specific to geranyl diphosphate from citrus species. PMID:25077796

  2. Molecular and Behavioral Changes Associated with Adult Hippocampus-Specific SynGAP1 Knockout

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhia, Mary; Willadt, Silvia; Yee, Benjamin K.; Feldon, Joram; Paterna, Jean-Charles; Schwendener, Severin; Vogt, Kaspar; Kennedy, Mary B.; Knuesel, Irene

    2012-01-01

    The synaptic Ras/Rap-GTPase-activating protein (SynGAP1) plays a unique role in regulating specific downstream intracellular events in response to N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation. Constitutive heterozygous loss of SynGAP1 disrupts NMDAR-mediated physiological and behavioral processes, but the disruptions might be of developmental…

  3. A Molecular Assay for Sensitive Detection of Pathogen-Specific T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Mitchell, Jessica E.; Chetty, Shivan; Govender, Pamla; Huang, Kuan-Hsiang Gary; Fletcher, Helen A.; Webster, Daniel P.; Brown, Sebastian; Kasmar, Anne; Millington, Kerry; Day, Cheryl L.; Mkhwanazi, Nompumelelo; McClurg, Cheryl; Chonco, Fundisiwe; Lalvani, Ajit; Walker, Bruce D.; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Klenerman, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe the development and validation of a highly sensitive assay of antigen-specific IFN-γ production using real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for two reporters - monokine-induced by IFN-γ (MIG) and the IFN-γ inducible protein-10 (IP10). We developed and validated the assay and applied it to the detection of CMV, HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) specific responses, in a cohort of HIV co-infected patients. We compared the sensitivity of this assay to that of the ex vivo RD1 (ESAT-6 and CFP-10)-specific IFN-γ Elispot assay. We observed a clear quantitative correlation between the two assays (P<0.001). Our assay proved to be a sensitive assay for the detection of MTB-specific T cells, could be performed on whole blood samples of fingerprick (50 uL) volumes, and was not affected by HIV-mediated immunosuppression. This assay platform is potentially of utility in diagnosis of infection in this and other clinical settings. PMID:21853018

  4. Molecular Cloning, Carbohydrate Specificity and the Crystal Structure of Two Sclerotium rolfsii Lectin Variants.

    PubMed

    Peppa, Vassiliki I; Venkat, Hemalatha; Kantsadi, Anastassia L; Inamdar, Shashikala R; Bhat, Ganapati G; Eligar, Sachin; Shivanand, Anupama; Chachadi, Vishwanath B; Satisha, Gonchigar J; Swamy, Bale M; Skamnaki, Vassiliki T; Zographos, Spyridon E; Leonidas, Demetres D

    2015-01-01

    SRL is a cell wall associated developmental-stage specific lectin secreted by Sclerotium rolfsii, a soil-born pathogenic fungus. SRL displays specificity for TF antigen (Galβ1→3GalNAc-α-Ser//Thr) expressed in all cancer types and has tumour suppressing effects in vivo. Considering the immense potential of SRL in cancer research, we have generated two variant gene constructs of SRL and expressed in E. coli to refine the sugar specificity and solubility by altering the surface charge. SSR1 and SSR2 are two different recombinant variants of SRL, both of which recognize TF antigen but only SSR1 binds to Tn antigen (GalNAcα-Ser/Thr). The glycan array analysis of the variants demonstrated that SSR1 recognizes TF antigen and their derivative with high affinity similar to SRL but showed highest affinity towards the sialylated Tn antigen, unlike SRL. The carbohydrate binding property of SSR2 remains unaltered compared to SRL. The crystal structures of the two variants were determined in free form and in complex with N-acetylglucosamine at 1.7 Å and 1.6 Å resolution, respectively. Structural analysis highlighted the structural basis of the fine carbohydrate specificity of the two SRL variants and results are in agreement with glycan array analysis. PMID:26076107

  5. Structural and Functional Analysis of JMJD2D Reveals Molecular Basis for Site-Specific Demethylation among JMJD2 Demethylases

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, Swathi; Trievel, Raymond C.

    2013-01-08

    We found that JMJD2 lysine demethylases (KDMs) participate in diverse genomic processes. Most JMJD2 homologs display dual selectivity toward H3K9me3 and H3K36me3, with the exception of JMJD2D, which is specific for H3K9me3. Here, we report the crystal structures of the JMJD2D•2-oxoglutarate•H3K9me3 ternary complex and JMJD2D apoenzyme. Utilizing structural alignments with JMJD2A, molecular docking, and kinetic analysis with an array of histone peptide substrates, we elucidate the specific signatures that permit efficient recognition of H3K9me3 by JMJD2A and JMJD2D, and the residues in JMJD2D that occlude H3K36me3 demethylation. Surprisingly, these results reveal that JMJD2A and JMJD2D exhibit subtle yet important differences in H3K9me3 recognition, despite the overall similarity in the substrate-binding conformation. Further, we show that H3T11 phosphorylation abrogates demethylation by JMJD2 KDMs. These studies reveal the molecular basis for JMJD2 site specificity and provide a framework for structure-based design of selective inhibitors of JMJD2 KDMs implicated in disease.

  6. In vivo quantifying molecular specificity of Cy5.5-labeled cyclic 9-mer peptide probe with dynamic fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yunpeng; Yin, Jipeng; Huang, Yu; Chen, Xueli; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Yajun; Zhang, Xianghan; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Liang, Jimin

    2016-04-01

    We quantified molecular specificity of Cy5.5-GX1 in vivo with dynamic fluorescence imaging to better understand its kinetic properties. According to whether or not free GX1 was injected and when it was injected, twelve of BGC-823 xenografted mice were randomly divided into three groups and underwent a 60 minute dynamic fluorescence scanning. Combined with a principal-component analysis, the binding potential (Bp) of the probe was determined by both Logan graphical analysis with reference tissue model (GARTM) and Lammertsma simplified reference tissue model (SRTM). The sum of the pharmacokinetic rate constants (SKRC) was quantified by the Gurfinkel exponential model (GEXPM). Cy5.5-GX1 specifically targeted tumor both in vitro and in vivo. We obtained similar quantification results of Bp (GARTM Bp = 0.582 ± 0.2655, SRTM Bp = 0.618 ± 0.2923), and obtained a good linear relation between the Bp value and the SKRC value. Our results indicate that the SKRC value is more suitable for an early-stage kinetic data analysis, and the Bp value depicts kinetic characteristics under the equilibrium state. Dynamic fluorescence imaging in conjunction with various kinetic models are optimal tools to quantify molecular specificity of the Cy5.5-GX1 probe in vivo. PMID:27446643

  7. In vivo quantifying molecular specificity of Cy5.5-labeled cyclic 9-mer peptide probe with dynamic fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yunpeng; Yin, Jipeng; Huang, Yu; Chen, Xueli; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Yajun; Zhang, Xianghan; Nie, Yongzhan; Wu, Kaichun; Liang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    We quantified molecular specificity of Cy5.5-GX1 in vivo with dynamic fluorescence imaging to better understand its kinetic properties. According to whether or not free GX1 was injected and when it was injected, twelve of BGC-823 xenografted mice were randomly divided into three groups and underwent a 60 minute dynamic fluorescence scanning. Combined with a principal-component analysis, the binding potential (Bp) of the probe was determined by both Logan graphical analysis with reference tissue model (GARTM) and Lammertsma simplified reference tissue model (SRTM). The sum of the pharmacokinetic rate constants (SKRC) was quantified by the Gurfinkel exponential model (GEXPM). Cy5.5-GX1 specifically targeted tumor both in vitro and in vivo. We obtained similar quantification results of Bp (GARTM Bp = 0.582 ± 0.2655, SRTM Bp = 0.618 ± 0.2923), and obtained a good linear relation between the Bp value and the SKRC value. Our results indicate that the SKRC value is more suitable for an early-stage kinetic data analysis, and the Bp value depicts kinetic characteristics under the equilibrium state. Dynamic fluorescence imaging in conjunction with various kinetic models are optimal tools to quantify molecular specificity of the Cy5.5-GX1 probe in vivo. PMID:27446643

  8. Hybrid plasmonic magnetic nanoparticles as molecular specific agents for MRI/optical imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Timothy A.; Bankson, James; Aaron, Jesse; Sokolov, Konstantin

    2007-08-01

    Nanoparticles which consist of a plasmonic layer and an iron oxide moiety could provide a promising platform for development of multimodal imaging and therapy approaches in future medicine. However, the feasibility of this platform has yet to be fully explored. In this study we demonstrated the use of gold-coated iron oxide hybrid nanoparticles for combined molecular specific MRI/optical imaging and photothermal therapy of cancer cells. The gold layer exhibits a surface plasmon resonance that provides optical contrast due to light scattering in the visible region and also presents a convenient surface for conjugating targeting moieties, while the iron oxide cores give strong T2 (spin-spin relaxation time) contrast. The strong optical absorption of the plasmonic gold layer also makes these nanoparticles a promising agent for photothermal therapy. We synthesized hybrid nanoparticles which specifically target epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a common biomarker for many epithelial cancers. We demonstrated molecular specific MRI and optical imaging in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells. Furthermore, we showed that receptor-mediated aggregation of anti-EGFR hybrid nanoparticles allows selective destruction of highly proliferative cancer cells using a nanosecond pulsed laser at 700 nm wavelength, a significant shift from the peak absorbance of isolated hybrid nanoparticles at 532 nm.

  9. Triazole-based Zn²⁺-specific molecular marker for fluorescence bioimaging.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Sougata; Mukherjee, Trinetra; Mathew, Jomon; Mukhopadhyay, Subhra K; Ghosh, Subrata

    2014-04-25

    Fluorescence bioimaging potential, both in vitro and in vivo, of a yellow emissive triazole-based molecular marker has been investigated and demonstrated. Three different kinds of cells, viz Bacillus thuringiensis, Candida albicans, and Techoma stans pollen grains were used to investigate the intracellular zinc imaging potential of 1 (in vitro studies). Fluorescence imaging of translocation of zinc through the stem of small herb, Peperomia pellucida, having transparent stem proved in vivo bioimaging capability of 1. This approach will enable in screening cell permeability and biostability of a newly developed probe. Similarly, the current method for detection and localization of zinc in Gram seed sprouts could be an easy and potential alternative of the existing analytical methods to investigate the efficiency of various strategies applied for increasing zinc-content in cereal crops. The probe-zinc ensemble has efficiently been applied for detecting phosphate-based biomolecules. PMID:24725748

  10. Morphology and kinetic modeling of molecularly imprinted organosilanol polymer matrix for specific uptake of creatinine.

    PubMed

    Ang, Qian Yee; Low, Siew Chun

    2015-09-01

    Molecular imprinting is an emerging technique to create imprinted polymers that can be applied in affinity-based separation, in particular, biomimetic sensors. In this study, the matrix of siloxane bonds prepared from the polycondensation of hydrolyzed tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) was employed as the inorganic monomer for the formation of a creatinine (Cre)-based molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP). Doped aluminium ion (Al(3+)) was used as the functional cross-linker that generated Lewis acid sites in the confined silica matrix to interact with Cre via sharing of lone pair electrons. Surface morphologies and pore characteristics of the synthesized MIP were determined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) analyses, respectively. The imprinting efficiency of MIPs was then evaluated through the adsorption of Cre with regard to molar ratios of Al(3+). A Cre adsorption capacity of up to 17.40 mg Cre g(-1) MIP was obtained and adsorption selectivity of Cre to its analogues creatine (Cr) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (N-hyd) were found to be 3.90 ± 0.61 and 4.17 ± 3.09, respectively. Of all the studied MIP systems, chemisorption was predicted as the rate-limiting step in the binding of Cre. The pseudo-second-order chemical reaction kinetic provides the best correlation of the experimental data. Furthermore, the equilibrium adsorption capacity of MIP fit well with a Freundlich isotherm (R (2) = 0.98) in which the heterogeneous surface was defined. PMID:26163132

  11. Insights into affinity and specificity in the complexes of α-lytic protease and its inhibitor proteins: binding free energy from molecular dynamics simulation†

    PubMed Central

    Cieplak, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    We report the binding free energy calculation and its decomposition for the complexes of α-lytic protease and its protein inhibitors using molecular dynamics simulation. Standard mechanism serine protease inhibitors eglin C and OMTKY3 are known to have strong binding affinity for many serine proteases. Their binding loops have significant similarities, including a common P1 Leu as the main anchor in the binding interface. However, recent experiments demonstrate that the two inhibitors have vastly different affinity towards α-lytic protease (ALP), a bacterial serine protease. OMTKY3 inhibits the enzyme much more weakly (by ~106 times) than eglin C. Moreover, a variant of OMTKY3 with five mutations, OMTKY3M, has been shown to inhibit 104 times more strongly than the wild-type inhibitor. The underlying mechanisms for the unusually large difference in binding affinities and the effect of mutation are not well understood. Here we use molecular dynamics simulation with molecular mechanics–Poisson Boltzmann/surface area method (MM-PB/SA) to investigate quantitatively the binding specificity. The calculated absolute binding free energies correctly differentiate the thermodynamic stabilities of these protein complexes, but the magnitudes of the binding affinities are systematically overestimated. Analysis of the binding free energy components provides insights into the molecular mechanism of binding specificity. The large ΔΔGbind between eglin C and wild type OMTKY3 towards ALP is mainly attributable to the stronger nonpolar interactions in the ALP-eglin C complex, arising from a higher degree of structural complementarity. Here the electrostatic interaction contributes to a lesser extent. The enhanced inhibition in the penta-mutant OMTKY3M over its wild type is entirely due to an overall improvement in the solvent-mediated electrostatic interactions in the ALP-OMTKY3M complex. The results suggest that for these protein-complexes and similar enzyme-inhibitor systems

  12. Insights into affinity and specificity in the complexes of alpha-lytic protease and its inhibitor proteins: binding free energy from molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Nan-Jie; Cieplak, Piotr

    2009-07-01

    We report the binding free energy calculation and its decomposition for the complexes of alpha-lytic protease and its protein inhibitors using molecular dynamics simulation. Standard mechanism serine protease inhibitors eglin C and OMTKY3 are known to have strong binding affinity for many serine proteases. Their binding loops have significant similarities, including a common P1 Leu as the main anchor in the binding interface. However, recent experiments demonstrate that the two inhibitors have vastly different affinity towards alpha-lytic protease (ALP), a bacterial serine protease. OMTKY3 inhibits the enzyme much more weakly (by approximately 10(6) times) than eglin C. Moreover, a variant of OMTKY3 with five mutations, OMTKY3M, has been shown to inhibit 10(4) times more strongly than the wild-type inhibitor. The underlying mechanisms for the unusually large difference in binding affinities and the effect of mutation are not well understood. Here we use molecular dynamics simulation with molecular mechanics-Poisson Boltzmann/surface area method (MM-PB/SA) to investigate quantitatively the binding specificity. The calculated absolute binding free energies correctly differentiate the thermodynamic stabilities of these protein complexes, but the magnitudes of the binding affinities are systematically overestimated. Analysis of the binding free energy components provides insights into the molecular mechanism of binding specificity. The large DeltaDeltaG(bind) between eglin C and wild type OMTKY3 towards ALP is mainly attributable to the stronger nonpolar interactions in the ALP-eglin C complex, arising from a higher degree of structural complementarity. Here the electrostatic interaction contributes to a lesser extent. The enhanced inhibition in the penta-mutant OMTKY3M over its wild type is entirely due to an overall improvement in the solvent-mediated electrostatic interactions in the ALP-OMTKY3M complex. The results suggest that for these protein-complexes and

  13. Molecular differentiation of Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae based on species-specific sequence differences in a protein coding gene.

    PubMed

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2013-05-01

    Nosema apis and Nosema ceranae are two microsporidian pathogens of the European honey bee, Apis mellifera. There is evidence that N. ceranae is more virulent than N. apis subject to environmental factors like climate. This makes N. ceranae one of the suspects in the increasing colony losses recently observed in many regions of the world. Correct differentiation between N. apis and N. ceranae is important and best accomplished by molecular methods. So far only protocols based on species-specific sequence differences in the 16S rRNA gene are available. However, recent studies indicated that these methods may lead to confusing results due to polymorphisms in and recombination between the multi-copy 16S rRNA genes. To solve this problem and to provide a reliable molecular tool for the differentiation between the two bee pathogenic microsporidia we here present and evaluate a duplex-PCR protocol based on species-specific sequence differences in the highly conserved gene coding for the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II largest subunit. A total of 102 honey bee samples were analyzed by the novel PCR protocol and the results were compared with the results of the originally published PCR-RFLP analysis and two recently published differentiation protocols, based on 16S rRNA sequence differences. Although the novel PCR protocol proved to be as reliable as the 16S rRNA gene based PCR-RFLP it was superior to simple 16S rRNA based PCR protocols which tended to overestimate the rate of N. ceranae infections. Therefore, we propose that species-specific sequence differences of highly conserved protein coding genes should become the preferred molecular tool for differentiation of Nosema spp. PMID:23352902

  14. Molecular characterization of bsg25D: a blastoderm-specific locus of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Boyer, P D; Mahoney, P A; Lengyel, J A

    1987-01-01

    The blastoderm stage of Drosophila embryogenesis is a time of crucial transitions in RNA transcription, the cell cycle and segment determination. We have previously identified three loci encoding RNAs specific to this stage (Roark et al., Dev. Biol. 109, 476-488, 1985). We present here the complete nucleotide sequence of one of these loci, bsg25D, which encodes a 2.7 kb blastoderm-specific RNA. The primary structure of this RNA, and that of an overlapping 4.5 kb RNA, has been determined. The amino acid sequence of the predicted bsg25D protein has been compared to the NBRF protein database. Structural similarities between domains in the bsg25D, fos, and tropomyosin proteins, and their possible significance for early embryogenesis are discussed. Images PMID:3104878

  15. Are all species of Pseudorhabdosynochus strictly host specific? A molecular study.

    PubMed

    Schoelinck, Charlotte; Cruaud, Corinne; Justine, Jean-Lou

    2012-06-01

    Species of the diplectanid monogenean genus Pseudorhabdosynochus are strictly host-specific (specialist), with the exception of P. cyanopodus, which was reported in New Caledonia, South Pacific, from two host species, Epinephelus cyanopodus and E. chlorostigma. We sequenced the COI gene of both host fish species and of their monogeneans. Morphological identification and pairwise distances showed that the two fish species were distinct (difference 6.1-6.6%), but that their monogeneans were not (difference 0-1.5%). A morphological study of sclerotised parts showed that specimens of P. cyanopodus are similar in both fish. Most species of groupers and their associated Pseudorhabdosynochus species are from warm surface waters, but the two groupers E. cyanopodus and E. chlorostigma are usually caught in deep-sea on the outer slope of the coral reef. This suggests that acquisition of a less strict host specificity is an adaptation of P. cyanopodus to deep-sea hosts. PMID:22326703

  16. Molecular tracking of antigen-specific T cell clones in neurological immune-mediated disorders

    PubMed Central

    Muraro, Paolo A.; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bielekova, Bibiana; Gran, Bruno; Marques, Adriana; Utz, Ursula; McFarland, Henry F.; Jacobson, Steve; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Summary T cells recognizing self or microbial antigens may trigger or reactivate immune-mediated diseases. Monitoring the frequency of specific T cell clonotypes to assess a possible link with the course of disease has been a difficult task with currently available technology. Our goal was to track individual candidate pathogenic T cell clones, selected on the basis of previous extensive studies from patients with immune-mediated disorders of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis, HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/ TSP) and chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. We developed and applied a highly specific and sensitive technique to track single CD4+ and CD8+ T cell clones through the detection and quantification of T cell receptor (TCR) α or β chain complementarity-determining region 3 transcripts by real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. We examined the frequency of the candidate pathogenic T cell clones in the peripheral blood and CSF during the course of neurological disease. Using this approach, we detected variations of clonal frequencies that appeared to be related to clinical course, significant enrichment in the CSF, or both. By integrating clono-type tracking with direct visualization of antigen-specific staining, we showed that a single T cell clone contributed substantially to the overall recognition of the viral peptide/MHC complex in a patient with HAM/ TSP. T cell clonotype tracking is a powerful new technology enabling further elucidation of the dynamics of expansion of autoreactive or pathogen-specific T cells that mediate pathological or protective immune responses in neurological disorders. PMID:12477694

  17. Molecular Mechanisms of Substrate Recognition and Specificity of New Delhi Metallo-β-Lactamase

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Jiachi; Leung, Thomas Yun-Chung

    2014-01-01

    Carbapenems are one of the last lines of defense for Gram-negative pathogens, such as members of the Enterobacteriaceae. Despite the fact that most carbapenems are resistant to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL), emerging metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), including New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1), that can hydrolyze carbapenems have become prevalent and are frequently associated with the so-called “superbugs,” for which treatments are extremely limited. Crystallographic study sheds light on the modes of antibiotic binding to NDM-1, yet the mechanisms governing substrate recognition and specificity are largely unclear. This study provides a connection between crystallographic study and the functional significance of NDM-1, with an emphasis on the substrate specificity and catalysis of various β-lactams. L1 loop residues L59, V67, and W87 were important for the activity of NDM-1, most likely through maintaining the partial folding of the L1 loop or active site conformation through hydrophobic interaction with the R groups of β-lactams or the β-lactam ring. Substitution of alanine for L59 showed greater reduction of MICs to ampicillin and selected cephalosporins, whereas substitutions of alanine for V67 had more impact on the MICs of carbapenems. K224 and N233 on the L3 loop played important roles in the recognition of substrate and contributed to substrate hydrolysis. These data together with the structure comparison of the B1 and B2 subclasses of MBLs revealed that the broad substrate specificity of NDM-1 could be due to the ability of its wide active site cavity to accommodate a wide range of β-lactams. This study provides insights into the development of efficient inhibitors for NDM-1 and offers an efficient tactic with which to study the substrate specificities of other β-lactamases. PMID:24982075

  18. Molecular insight of isotypes specific β-tubulin interaction of tubulin heterodimer with noscapinoids.

    PubMed

    Santoshi, Seneha; Naik, Pradeep K

    2014-07-01

    Noscapine and its derivatives bind stoichiometrically to tubulin, alter its dynamic instability and thus effectively inhibit the cellular proliferation of a wide variety of cancer cells including many drug-resistant variants. The tubulin molecule is composed of α- and β-tubulin, which exist as various isotypes whose distribution and drug-binding properties are significantly different. Although the noscapinoids bind to a site overlapping with colchicine, their interaction is more biased towards β-tubulin. In fact, their precise interaction and binding affinity with specific isotypes of β-tubulin in the αβ-heterodimer has never been addressed. In this study, the binding affinity of a panel of noscapinoids with each type of tubulin was investigated computationally. We found that the binding score of a specific noscapinoid with each type of tubulin isotype is different. Specifically, amino-noscapine has the highest binding score of -6.4, -7.2, -7.4 and -7.3 kcal/mol with αβI, αβII, αβIII and αβIV isotypes, respectively. Similarly 10 showed higher binding affinity of -6.8 kcal/mol with αβV, whereas 8 had the highest binding affinity of -7.2, -7.1 and -7.2 kcal/mol, respectively with αβVI, αβVII and αβVIII isotypes. More importantly, both amino-noscapine and its clinical derivative, bromo-noscapine have the highest binding affinity of -46.2 and -38.1 kcal/mol against αβIII (overexpression of αβIII has been associated with resistance to a wide range of chemotherapeutic drugs for several human malignancies) as measured using MM-PBSA. Knowledge of the isotype specificity of the noscapinoids may allow for development of novel therapeutic agents based on this class of drugs. PMID:24916062

  19. Molecular Dipole Moments within the Incremental Scheme Using the Domain-Specific Basis-Set Approach.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Benjamin; Coriani, Sonia; Friedrich, Joachim

    2016-07-12

    We present the first implementation of the fully automated incremental scheme for CCSD unrelaxed dipole moments using the domain-specific basis-set approach. Truncation parameters are varied, and the accuracy of the method is statistically analyzed for a test set of 20 molecules. The local approximations introduce small errors at second order and negligible ones at third order. For a third-order incremental CCSD expansion with a CC2 error correction, a cc-pVDZ/SV domain-specific basis set (tmain = 3.5 Bohr), and the truncation parameter f = 30 Bohr, we obtain a mean error of 0.00 mau (-0.20 mau) and a standard deviation of 1.95 mau (2.17 mau) for the total dipole moments (Cartesian components of the dipole vectors). By analyzing incremental CCSD energies, we demonstrate that the MP2 and CC2 error correction schemes are an exclusive correction for the domain-specific basis-set error. Our implementation of the incremental scheme provides fully automated computations of highly accurate dipole moments at reduced computational cost and is fully parallelized in terms of the calculation of the increments. Therefore, one can utilize the incremental scheme, on the same hardware, to extend the basis set in comparison to standard CCSD and thus obtain a better total accuracy. PMID:27300371

  20. A molecular mechanism realizing sequence-specific recognition of nucleic acids by TDP-43

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yoh; Fukuoka, Mami; Nagasawa, Kenichi; Nakagome, Kenta; Shimizu, Hideaki; Mukaiyama, Atsushi; Akiyama, Shuji

    2016-01-01

    TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) is a DNA/RNA-binding protein containing two consecutive RNA recognition motifs (RRM1 and RRM2) in tandem. Functional abnormality of TDP-43 has been proposed to cause neurodegeneration, but it remains obscure how the physiological functions of this protein are regulated. Here, we show distinct roles of RRM1 and RRM2 in the sequence-specific substrate recognition of TDP-43. RRM1 was found to bind a wide spectrum of ssDNA sequences, while no binding was observed between RRM2 and ssDNA. When two RRMs are fused in tandem as in native TDP-43, the fused construct almost exclusively binds ssDNA with a TG-repeat sequence. In contrast, such sequence-specificity was not observed in a simple mixture of RRM1 and RRM2. We thus propose that the spatial arrangement of multiple RRMs in DNA/RNA binding proteins provides steric effects on the substrate-binding site and thereby controls the specificity of its substrate nucleotide sequences. PMID:26838063

  1. Transcriptome Analysis in Tardigrade Species Reveals Specific Molecular Pathways for Stress Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Frank; Beisser, Daniela; Grohme, Markus A.; Liang, Chunguang; Mali, Brahim; Siegl, Alexander Matthias; Engelmann, Julia C.; Shkumatov, Alexander V.; Schokraie, Elham; Müller, Tobias; Schnölzer, Martina; Schill, Ralph O.; Frohme, Marcus; Dandekar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Tardigrades have unique stress-adaptations that allow them to survive extremes of cold, heat, radiation and vacuum. To study this, encoded protein clusters and pathways from an ongoing transcriptome study on the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum were analyzed using bioinformatics tools and compared to expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from Hypsibius dujardini, revealing major pathways involved in resistance against extreme environmental conditions. ESTs are available on the Tardigrade Workbench along with software and databank updates. Our analysis reveals that RNA stability motifs for M. tardigradum are different from typical motifs known from higher animals. M. tardigradum and H. dujardini protein clusters and conserved domains imply metabolic storage pathways for glycogen, glycolipids and specific secondary metabolism as well as stress response pathways (including heat shock proteins, bmh2, and specific repair pathways). Redox-, DNA-, stress- and protein protection pathways complement specific repair capabilities to achieve the strong robustness of M. tardigradum. These pathways are partly conserved in other animals and their manipulation could boost stress adaptation even in human cells. However, the unique combination of resistance and repair pathways make tardigrades and M. tardigradum in particular so highly stress resistant. PMID:22563243

  2. The Molecular Basis for Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin-like Specificities in Bacterial Effector Proteases.

    PubMed

    Pruneda, Jonathan N; Durkin, Charlotte H; Geurink, Paul P; Ovaa, Huib; Santhanam, Balaji; Holden, David W; Komander, David

    2016-07-21

    Pathogenic bacteria rely on secreted effector proteins to manipulate host signaling pathways, often in creative ways. CE clan proteases, specific hydrolases for ubiquitin-like modifications (SUMO and NEDD8) in eukaryotes, reportedly serve as bacterial effector proteins with deSUMOylase, deubiquitinase, or, even, acetyltransferase activities. Here, we characterize bacterial CE protease activities, revealing K63-linkage-specific deubiquitinases in human pathogens, such as Salmonella, Escherichia, and Shigella, as well as ubiquitin/ubiquitin-like cross-reactive enzymes in Chlamydia, Rickettsia, and Xanthomonas. Five crystal structures, including ubiquitin/ubiquitin-like complexes, explain substrate specificities and redefine relationships across the CE clan. Importantly, this work identifies novel family members and provides key discoveries among previously reported effectors, such as the unexpected deubiquitinase activity in Xanthomonas XopD, contributed by an unstructured ubiquitin binding region. Furthermore, accessory domains regulate properties such as subcellular localization, as exemplified by a ubiquitin-binding domain in Salmonella Typhimurium SseL. Our work both highlights and explains the functional adaptations observed among diverse CE clan proteins. PMID:27425412

  3. Screening targeted testis‑specific genes for molecular assessment of aberrant sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue Xia; Shen, Xiao Fang; Liu, Fu-Jun

    2016-08-01

    Teratospermia is a heterogeneous and complex disorder, which is closely associated with male fertility. Genes and gene products associated with teratospermia may serve as targeted biomarkers that help understand the underlying mechanisms of male infertility; however, systematic information on the subject remains to be elucidated. The present study performed a comparative bioinformatics analysis to identify biomarkers associated with sperm quality, particular focusing on testis‑specific biomarkers. A stepwise screening approach identified 1,085 testis/epididymis‑specific genes and 3,406 teratospermia‑associated genes, resulting in 348 testis‑specific genes associated with aberrant sperm quality. These genes were functionally associated with the reproduction process. Gene products corresponding to heat shock protein family A (Hsp70) member 4 like (HSPA4L) and phosphoglycerate kinase 2 were characterized at the cellular level in human testes and ejaculated spermatozoa. HSPA4L expression in sperm was revealed to be associated with sperm quality. The present study provided a novel insight into the understanding of sperm quality, and a potential method for the diagnosis and assessment of sperm quality in the event of male infertility. PMID:27356588

  4. Screening targeted testis-specific genes for molecular assessment of aberrant sperm quality

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xue Xia; Shen, Xiao Fang; Liu, Fu-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Teratospermia is a heterogeneous and complex disorder, which is closely associated with male fertility. Genes and gene products associated with teratospermia may serve as targeted biomarkers that help understand the underlying mechanisms of male infertility; however, systematic information on the subject remains to be elucidated. The present study performed a comparative bioinformatics analysis to identify biomarkers associated with sperm quality, particular focusing on testis-specific biomarkers. A stepwise screening approach identified 1,085 testis/epididymis-specific genes and 3,406 teratospermia-associated genes, resulting in 348 testis-specific genes associated with aberrant sperm quality. These genes were functionally associated with the reproduction process. Gene products corresponding to heat shock protein family A (Hsp70) member 4 like (HSPA4L) and phosphoglycerate kinase 2 were characterized at the cellular level in human testes and ejaculated spermatozoa. HSPA4L expression in sperm was revealed to be associated with sperm quality. The present study provided a novel insight into the understanding of sperm quality, and a potential method for the diagnosis and assessment of sperm quality in the event of male infertility. PMID:27356588

  5. Molecular Phylogeny, Homology Modeling, and Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Race-Specific Bacterial Blight Disease Resistance Protein (xa5) of Rice: A Comparative Agriproteomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Dehury, Budheswar; Sahu, Mousumi; Sarma, Kishore; Sahu, Jagajjit; Sen, Priyabrata; Modi, Mahendra Kumar; Sharma, Gauri Dutta; Choudhury, Manabendra Dutta

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Rice (Oryza sativa L.), a model plant belonging to the family Poaceae, is a staple food for a majority of the people worldwide. Grown in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world, this important cereal crop is under constant and serious threat from both biotic and abiotic stresses. Among the biotic threats, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae, causing the damaging bacterial blight disease in rice, is a prominent pathogen. The xa5 gene in the host plant rice confers race-specific resistance to this pathogen. This recessive gene belongs to the Xa gene family of rice and encodes a gamma subunit of transcription factor IIA (TFIIAγ). In view of the importance of this gene in conferring resistance to the devastating disease, we reconstructed the phylogenetic relationship of this gene, developed a three-dimensional protein model, followed by long-term molecular dynamics simulation studies to gain a better understanding of the evolution, structure, and function of xa5. The modeled structure was found to fit well with the small subunit of TFIIA from human, suggesting that it may also act as a small subunit of TFIIA in rice. The model had a stable conformation in response to the atomic flexibility and interaction, when subjected to MD simulation at 20 nano second in aqueous solution. Further structural analysis of xa5 indicated that the protein retained its basic transcription factor function, suggesting that it might govern a novel pathway responsible for bacterial blight resistance. Future molecular docking studies of xa5 underway with its corresponding avirulence gene is expected to shed more direct light into plant–pathogen interactions at the molecular level and thus pave the way for richer agriproteomic insights. PMID:23758479

  6. RNA-Seq reveals genotype-specific molecular responses to water deficit in eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In a context of climate change, phenotypic plasticity provides long-lived species, such as trees, with the means to adapt to environmental variations occurring within a single generation. In eucalyptus plantations, water availability is a key factor limiting productivity. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the adaptation of eucalyptus to water shortage remain unclear. In this study, we compared the molecular responses of two commercial eucalyptus hybrids during the dry season. Both hybrids differ in productivity when grown under water deficit. Results Pyrosequencing of RNA extracted from shoot apices provided extensive transcriptome coverage - a catalog of 129,993 unigenes (49,748 contigs and 80,245 singletons) was generated from 398 million base pairs, or 1.14 million reads. The pyrosequencing data enriched considerably existing Eucalyptus EST collections, adding 36,985 unigenes not previously represented. Digital analysis of read abundance in 14,460 contigs identified 1,280 that were differentially expressed between the two genotypes, 155 contigs showing differential expression between treatments (irrigated vs. non irrigated conditions during the dry season), and 274 contigs with significant genotype-by-treatment interaction. The more productive genotype displayed a larger set of genes responding to water stress. Moreover, stress signal transduction seemed to involve different pathways in the two genotypes, suggesting that water shortage induces distinct cellular stress cascades. Similarly, the response of functional proteins also varied widely between genotypes: the most productive genotype decreased expression of genes related to photosystem, transport and secondary metabolism, whereas genes related to primary metabolism and cell organisation were over-expressed. Conclusions For the most productive genotype, the ability to express a broader set of genes in response to water availability appears to be a key characteristic in the maintenance

  7. Molecular mechanism of age-specific hepatic lipid accumulation in PPARalpha (+/-):LDLR (+/-) mice, an obese mouse model.

    PubMed

    Li, Yufeng; Sugiyama, Eiko; Yokoyama, Shin; Jiang, Lingling; Tanaka, Naoki; Aoyama, Toshifumi

    2008-04-01

    This study aimed to clarify the molecular mechanisms of age-specific hepatic lipid accumulation accompanying hyperinsulinemia in a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARalpha) (+/-):low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) (+/-) mouse line. The hepatic fat content, protein amounts, and mRNA levels of genes involved in hepatic lipid metabolism were analyzed in 25-, 50-, 75- and 100-week-old mice. Severe fatty liver was confirmed only in 50- and 75-week-old mice. The hepatic expression of proteins that function in lipid transport and catabolism did not differ among the groups. In contrast, the mRNA levels and protein amounts of lipogenic enzymes, including acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase-1, fatty acid synthase, and glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, enhanced in the mice with fatty liver. Elevated mRNA and protein levels of lipoprotein lipase and fatty acid translocase, which are involved in hepatic lipid uptake, were also detected in mice with fatty liver. Moreover, both protein and mRNA levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), a transcription factor regulating lipid synthesis, had age-specific patterns similar to those of the proteins described above. Therefore, the age-specific fatty liver found in the PPARalpha (+/-):LDLR (+/-) mouse line is probably caused by age-specific expression of SREBP-1 and its downstream lipogenic genes, coordinated by the increased uptake of lipids. All of these factors might be affected by age-specific changes in serum insulin concentration. PMID:18335269

  8. Molecular Characterization of Subject-Specific Oral Microflora during Initial Colonization of Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Patricia I.; Chalmers, Natalia I.; Rickard, Alexander H.; Kong, Colin; Milburn, Craig L.; Palmer, Robert J.; Kolenbrander, Paul E.

    2006-01-01

    The initial microbial colonization of tooth surfaces is a repeatable and selective process, with certain bacterial species predominating in the nascent biofilm. Characterization of the initial microflora is the first step in understanding interactions among community members that shape ensuing biofilm development. Using molecular methods and a retrievable enamel chip model, we characterized the microbial diversity of early dental biofilms in three subjects. A total of 531 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed, and 97 distinct phylotypes were identified. Microbial community composition was shown to be statistically different among subjects. In all subjects, however, 4-h and 8-h communities were dominated by Streptococcus spp. belonging to the Streptococcus oralis/Streptococcus mitis group. Other frequently observed genera (comprising at least 5% of clone sequences in at least one of the six clone libraries) were Actinomyces, Gemella, Granulicatella, Neisseria, Prevotella, Rothia, and Veillonella. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) confirmed that the proportion of Streptococcus sp. sequences in the clone libraries coincided with the proportion of streptococcus probe-positive organisms on the chip. FISH also revealed that, in the undisturbed plaque, not only Streptococcus spp. but also the rarer Prevotella spp. were usually seen in small multigeneric clusters of cells. This study shows that the initial dental plaque community of each subject is unique in terms of diversity and composition. Repetitive and distinctive community composition within subjects suggests that the spatiotemporal interactions and ecological shifts that accompany biofilm maturation also occur in a subject-dependent manner. PMID:16597990

  9. High-capacity magnetic hollow porous molecularly imprinted polymers for specific extraction of protocatechuic acid.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Hu, Xin; Zhang, Yuping; Shi, Shuyun; Jiang, Xinyu; Chen, Xiaoqin

    2015-07-24

    Magnetic hollow porous molecularly imprinted polymers (HPMIPs) with high binding capacity, fast mass transfer, and easy magnetic separation have been fabricated for the first time. In this method, HPMIPs was firstly synthesized using protocatechuic acid (PCA) as template, 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) as functional monomer, glycidilmethacrylate (GMA) as co-monomer, and MCM-48 as sacrificial support. After that, epoxide ring of GMA was opened for chemisorbing Fe3O4 nanoparticles to prepare magnetic HPMIPs. The results of characterization indicated that magnetic HPMIPs exhibited large surface area (548m(2)/g) with hollow porous structure and magnetic sensitivity (magnetic saturation at 2.9emu/g). The following adsorption characteristics investigation exhibited surprisingly higher adsorption capacity (37.7mg/g), and faster kinetic binding (25min) than any previously reported PCA imprinted MIPs by traditional or surface imprinting technology. The equilibrium data fitted well to Langmuir equation and the adsorption process could be described by pseudo-second order model. The selective recognition experiments also demonstrated the high selectivity of magnetic HPMIPs towards PCA over analogues. The results of the real sample analysis confirmed the superiority of the proposed magnetic HPMIPs for selective and efficient enrichment of trace PCA from complex matrices. PMID:26044378

  10. Tissue-specific molecular immune response to lipopolysaccharide challenge in emaciated anadromous Arctic charr.

    PubMed

    Philip, Anju M; Jørgensen, Even H; Maule, Alec G; Vijayan, Mathilakath M

    2014-07-01

    Anadromous Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus) undergo voluntary winter fasting for months in the Arctic. We tested the hypothesis that extended fasting will compromise the ability of this species to evoke an immune response. Charr were either fed or fasted for 85 days and challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the molecular immune response in the liver and spleen assessed at 8 and 96 h post-injection. LPS increased IL-1β, IL-8, and serum amyloid protein A (SAA) mRNA levels in both groups, but the liver IL-1β and IL-8, and spleen IL-8 responses were reduced in the fasted group. Fasting upregulated SOCS-1 and SOCS-2 mRNA abundance, while LPS stimulated SOCS-3 mRNA abundance and this response was higher in the fasted liver. Collectively, extended fasting and emaciation does not curtail the capacity of charr to evoke an immune response, whereas upregulation of SOCS may be a key adaptation to conserve energy by restricting the inflammatory response. PMID:24594135

  11. Molecular interactions and trafficking of influenza A virus polymerase proteins analyzed by specific monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, Leslie A.; Aggarwal, Shilpa; Bussey, Kendra A.; Desmet, Emily A.; Kim, Baek; Takimoto, Toru

    2012-04-25

    The influenza polymerase complex composed of PA, PB1 and PB2, plays a key role in viral replication and pathogenicity. Newly synthesized components must be translocated to the nucleus, where replication and transcription of viral genomes take place. Previous studies suggest that while PB2 is translocated to the nucleus independently, PA and PB1 subunits could not localize to the nucleus unless in a PA-PB1 complex. To further determine the molecular interactions between the components, we created a panel of 16 hybridoma cell lines, which produce monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against each polymerase component. We showed that, although PB1 interacts with both PA and PB2 individually, nuclear localization of PB1 is enhanced only when co-expressed with PA. Interestingly, one of the anti-PA mAbs reacted much more strongly with PA when co-expressed with PB1. These results suggest that PA-PB1 interactions induce a conformational change in PA, which could be required for its nuclear translocation.

  12. Multimodal molecular imaging system for pathway-specific reporter gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Marco; Massai, Luisa; Diamanti, Daniela; Fiengo, Pasquale; De Rosa, Antonella; Magrini, Roberta; Magnoni, Letizia; Chellini, Sara; Coniglio, Silvia; Diodato, Enrica; Pilli, Elena; Caradonna, Nicola Pasquale; Sardone, Gianluca; Monti, Martina; Roggeri, Riccardo; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Recchia, Fabio; Tunici, Patrizia; Valensin, Silvia; Scali, Carla; Pollio, Giuseppe; Porcari, Valentina

    2016-04-30

    Preclinical imaging modalities represent an essential tool to develop a modern and translational biomedical research. To date, Optical Imaging (OI) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) are used principally in separate studies for molecular imaging studies. We decided to combine OI and MRI together through the development of a lentiviral vector to monitor the Wnt pathway response to Lithium Chloride (LiCl) treatment. The construct was stably infected in glioblastoma cells and, after intracranial transplantation in mice, serial MRI and OI imaging sessions were performed to detect human ferritin heavy chain protein (hFTH) and firefly luciferase enzyme (FLuc) respectively. The system allowed also ex vivo analysis using a constitutive fluorescence protein expression. In mice, LiCl administration has shown significantly increment of luminescence signal and a lower signal of T2 values (P<0.05), recorded noninvasively with OI and a 7 Tesla MRI scanner. This study indicates that OI and MRI can be performed in a single in vivo experiment, providing an in vivo proof-of-concept for drug discovery projects in preclinical phase. PMID:26987608

  13. Muscle disuse alters skeletal muscle contractile function at the molecular and cellular levels in older adult humans in a sex-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Damien M; Miller, Mark S; Sweeny, Andrew P; Tourville, Timothy W; Slauterbeck, James R; Savage, Patrick D; Maugan, David W; Ades, Philip A; Beynnon, Bruce D; Toth, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Physical inactivity that accompanies ageing and disease may hasten disability by reducing skeletal muscle contractility. To characterize skeletal muscle functional adaptations to muscle disuse, we compared contractile performance at the molecular, cellular and whole-muscle levels in healthy active older men and women (n = 15) and inactive older men and women with advanced-stage, symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) (n = 16). OA patients showed reduced (P < 0.01) knee extensor function. At the cellular level, single muscle fibre force production was reduced in OA patients in myosin heavy chain (MHC) I and IIA fibres (both P < 0.05) and differences in IIA fibres persisted after adjustments for fibre cross-sectional area (P < 0.05). Although no group differences in contractile velocity or power output were found for any fibre type, sex was found to modify the effect of OA, with a reduction in MHC IIA power output and a trend towards reduced shortening velocity in women, but increases in both variables in men (P < 0.05 and P = 0.07, respectively). At the molecular level, these adaptations in MHC IIA fibre function were explained by sex-specific differences (P ≤ 0.05) in myosin–actin cross-bridge kinetics. Additionally, cross-bridge kinetics were slowed in MHC I fibres in OA patients (P < 0.01), attributable entirely to reductions in women with knee OA (P < 0.05), a phenotype that could be reproduced in vitro by chemical modification of protein thiol residues. Our results identify molecular and cellular functional adaptations in skeletal muscle that may contribute to reduced physical function with knee OA-associated muscle disuse, with sex-specific differences that may explain a greater disposition towards disability in women. PMID:25038243

  14. Molecular genetic perspectives on cross-talk and specificity in abiotic stress signalling in plants.

    PubMed

    Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Schumaker, Karen; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2004-01-01

    The perception of abiotic stresses and signal transduction to switch on adaptive responses are critical steps in determining the survival and reproduction of plants exposed to adverse environments. Plants have stress-specific adaptive responses as well as responses which protect the plants from more than one environmental stress. There are multiple stress perception and signalling pathways, some of which are specific, but others may cross-talk at various steps. Recently, progress has been made in identifying components of signalling pathways involved in salt, drought and cold stresses. Genetic analysis has defined the Salt-Overly-Sensitive (SOS) pathway, in which a salt stress-induced calcium signal is probably sensed by the calcium-binding protein SOS3 which then activates the protein kinase SOS2. The SOS3-SOS2 kinase complex regulates the expression and activity of ion transporters such as SOS1 to re-establish cellular ionic homeostasis under salinity. The ICE1 (Inducer of CBF Expression 1)-CBF (C-Repeat Binding Protein) pathway is critical for the regulation of the cold-responsive transcriptome and acquired freezing tolerance, although at present the signalling events that activate the ICE1 transcription factor during cold stress are not known. Both ABA-dependent and -independent signalling pathways appear to be involved in osmotic stress tolerance. Components of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades may act as converging points of multiple abiotic as well as biotic stress signalling pathways. Forward and reverse genetic analysis in combination with expression profiling will continue to uncover many signalling components, and biochemical characterization of the signalling complexes will be required to determine specificity and cross-talk in abiotic stress signalling pathways. PMID:14673035

  15. Molecular Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Nepal: Specific Ancestor Root

    PubMed Central

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Sharma, Rabi Prakash; Shrestha, Pradeep Krishna; Suzuki, Rumiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Nepal, a low-risk country for gastric cancer, is debatable. To our knowledge, no studies have examined H. pylori virulence factors in Nepal. We determined the prevalence of H. pylori infection by using three different tests, and the genotypes of virulence factors were determined by PCR followed by sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing was used to analyze the population structure of the Nepalese strains. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients was 38.4% (56/146), and was significantly related with source of drinking water. In total, 51 strains were isolated and all were cagA-positive. Western-type-cagA (94.1%), cagA pre-EPIYA type with no deletion (92.2%), vacA s1a (74.5%), and m1c (54.9%) were the predominant genotypes. Antral mucosal atrophy levels were significantly higher in patients infected with vacA s1 than in those infected with s2 genotypes (P = 0.03). Several Nepalese strains were H. pylori recombinants with genetic features of South Asian and East Asian genotypes. These included all East-Asian-type-cagA strains, with significantly lesser activity and inflammation in the corpus than the strains of the specific South Asian genotype (P = 0.03 and P = 0.005, respectively). Although the population structure confirmed that most Nepalese strains belonged to the hpAsia2 population, some strains shared hpEurope- and Nepalese-specific components. Nepalese patients infected with strains belonging to hpEurope showed higher inflammation in the antrum than strains from the Nepalese specific population (P = 0.05). These results support that ancestor roots of Kathmandu`s people not only connected with India alone. PMID:26226153

  16. Molecular Epidemiology of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Nepal: Specific Ancestor Root.

    PubMed

    Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Sharma, Rabi Prakash; Shrestha, Pradeep Krishna; Suzuki, Rumiko; Uchida, Tomohisa; Yamaoka, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection in Nepal, a low-risk country for gastric cancer, is debatable. To our knowledge, no studies have examined H. pylori virulence factors in Nepal. We determined the prevalence of H. pylori infection by using three different tests, and the genotypes of virulence factors were determined by PCR followed by sequencing. Multilocus sequence typing was used to analyze the population structure of the Nepalese strains. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in dyspeptic patients was 38.4% (56/146), and was significantly related with source of drinking water. In total, 51 strains were isolated and all were cagA-positive. Western-type-cagA (94.1%), cagA pre-EPIYA type with no deletion (92.2%), vacA s1a (74.5%), and m1c (54.9%) were the predominant genotypes. Antral mucosal atrophy levels were significantly higher in patients infected with vacA s1 than in those infected with s2 genotypes (P = 0.03). Several Nepalese strains were H. pylori recombinants with genetic features of South Asian and East Asian genotypes. These included all East-Asian-type-cagA strains, with significantly lesser activity and inflammation in the corpus than the strains of the specific South Asian genotype (P = 0.03 and P = 0.005, respectively). Although the population structure confirmed that most Nepalese strains belonged to the hpAsia2 population, some strains shared hpEurope- and Nepalese-specific components. Nepalese patients infected with strains belonging to hpEurope showed higher inflammation in the antrum than strains from the Nepalese specific population (P = 0.05). These results support that ancestor roots of Kathmandu`s people not only connected with India alone. PMID:26226153

  17. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test this strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.

  18. Quantification of the transferability of a designed protein specificity switch reveals extensive epistasis in molecular recognition

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Melero, Cristina; Ollikainen, Noah; Harwood, Ian; Karpiak, Joel; Kortemme, Tanja

    2014-10-13

    Re-engineering protein–protein recognition is an important route to dissecting and controlling complex interaction networks. Experimental approaches have used the strategy of “second-site suppressors,” where a functional interaction is inferred between two proteins if a mutation in one protein can be compensated by a mutation in the second. Mimicking this strategy, computational design has been applied successfully to change protein recognition specificity by predicting such sets of compensatory mutations in protein–protein interfaces. To extend this approach, it would be advantageous to be able to “transplant” existing engineered and experimentally validated specificity changes to other homologous protein–protein complexes. Here, we test thismore » strategy by designing a pair of mutations that modulates peptide recognition specificity in the Syntrophin PDZ domain, confirming the designed interaction biochemically and structurally, and then transplanting the mutations into the context of five related PDZ domain–peptide complexes. We find a wide range of energetic effects of identical mutations in structurally similar positions, revealing a dramatic context dependence (epistasis) of designed mutations in homologous protein–protein interactions. To better understand the structural basis of this context dependence, we apply a structure-based computational model that recapitulates these energetic effects and we use this model to make and validate forward predictions. The context dependence of these mutations is captured by computational predictions, our results both highlight the considerable difficulties in designing protein–protein interactions and provide challenging benchmark cases for the development of improved protein modeling and design methods that accurately account for the context.« less

  19. Molecular cytogenetics by polymerase catalyzed amplification or in situ labelling of specific nucleic acid sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Bolund, L.; Brandt, C.; Hindkjaer, J.; Koch, J.; Koelvraa, S.; Pedersen, S. )

    1993-01-01

    The Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) can be performed on isolated cells or chromosomes and the product can be analyzed by DNA technology or by FISH to test metaphases. The authors have good experiences analyzing aberrant chromosomes by FACS sorting, PCR with degenerated primers and painting of test metaphases with the PCR product. They also utilize polymerases for PRimed IN Situ labelling (PRINS) of specific nucleic acid sequences. In PRINS oligonucleotides are hybridized to their target sequences and labeled nucleotides are incorporated at the site of hybridization with the oligonucleotide as primer. PRINS may eventually allow the study of individual genes, gene expression and even somatic mutations (in mRNA) in single cells.

  20. Molecular and Functional Characterization of ssDNA Aptamers that Specifically Bind Leishmania infantum PABP

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Pérez, Natalia; Ramos, Edurne; García-Hernández, Marta; Pinto, Celia; Soto, Manuel; Martín, M. Elena; González, Víctor M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A poly (A)-binding protein from Leishmania infantum (LiPABP) has been recently cloned and characterized in our laboratory. Although this protein shows a very high homology with PABPs from other eukaryotic organisms including mammals and other parasites, exist divergences along the sequence that convert them in potential diagnostic markers and/or therapeutics targets. Aptamers are oligonucleotide ligands that are selected in vitro by their affinity and specificity for the target as a consequence of the particular tertiary structure that they are able to acquire depending on their sequence. Development of high-affinity molecules with the ability to recognize specifically Leishmania proteins is essential for the progress of this kind of study. Results We have selected a ssDNA aptamer population against a recombinant 6xHIS–LiPABP protein (rLiPABP) that is able to recognize the target with a low Kd. Cloning, sequencing and in silico analysis of the aptamers obtained from the population yielded three aptamers (ApPABP#3, ApPABP#7 and ApPABP#11) that significantly bound to PABP with higher affinity than the naïve population. These aptamers were analyzed by ELONA and slot blot to establish affinity and specificity for rLiPABP. Results demonstrated that the three aptamers have high affinity and specificity for the target and that they are able to detect an endogenous LiPABP (eLiPABP) protein amount corresponding to 2500 L. infantum promastigotes in a significant manner. The functional analysis of the aptamers also revealed that ApPABP#11 disrupts the binding of both Myc-LiPABP and eLiPABP to poly (A) in vitro. On the other hand, these aptamers are able to bind and purify LiPABP from complex mixes. Conclusion Results presented here demonstrate that aptamers represent new reagents for characterization of LiPABP and that they can affect LiPABP activity. At this respect, the use of these aptamers as therapeutic tool affecting the physiological role of PABP has to be

  1. Of arrows and flows. Causality, determination, and specificity in the Central Dogma of molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Fantini, Bernardino

    2006-01-01

    From its first proposal, the Central Dogma had a graphical form, complete with arrows of different types, and this form quickly became its standard presentation. In different scientific contexts, arrows have different meanings and in this particular case the arrows indicated the flow of information among different macromolecules. A deeper analysis illustrates that the arrows also imply a causal statement, directly connected to the causal role of genetic information. The author suggests a distinction between two different kinds of causal links, defined as 'physical causality' and 'biological determination', both implied in the production of biological specificity. PMID:18351053

  2. An organelle-specific protein landscape identifies novel diseases and molecular mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Boldt, Karsten; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Lu, Qianhao; Koutroumpas, Konstantinos; Nguyen, Thanh-Minh T.; Texier, Yves; van Beersum, Sylvia E. C.; Horn, Nicola; Willer, Jason R.; Mans, Dorus A.; Dougherty, Gerard; Lamers, Ideke J. C.; Coene, Karlien L. M.; Arts, Heleen H.; Betts, Matthew J.; Beyer, Tina; Bolat, Emine; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Haidari, Khatera; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Iaconis, Daniela; Jenkins, Dagan; Klose, Franziska; Knapp, Barbara; Latour, Brooke; Letteboer, Stef J. F.; Marcelis, Carlo L.; Mitic, Dragana; Morleo, Manuela; Oud, Machteld M.; Riemersma, Moniek; Rix, Susan; Terhal, Paulien A.; Toedt, Grischa; van Dam, Teunis J. P.; de Vrieze, Erik; Wissinger, Yasmin; Wu, Ka Man; Apic, Gordana; Beales, Philip L.; Blacque, Oliver E.; Gibson, Toby J.; Huynen, Martijn A.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Kremer, Hannie; Omran, Heymut; van Wijk, Erwin; Wolfrum, Uwe; Kepes, François; Davis, Erica E.; Franco, Brunella; Giles, Rachel H.; Ueffing, Marius; Russell, Robert B.; Roepman, Ronald; Al-Turki, Saeed; Anderson, Carl; Antony, Dinu; Barroso, Inês; Bentham, Jamie; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Carss, Keren; Chatterjee, Krishna; Cirak, Sebahattin; Cosgrove, Catherine; Danecek, Petr; Durbin, Richard; Fitzpatrick, David; Floyd, Jamie; Reghan Foley, A.; Franklin, Chris; Futema, Marta; Humphries, Steve E.; Hurles, Matt; Joyce, Chris; McCarthy, Shane; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Muddyman, Dawn; Muntoni, Francesco; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Onoufriadis, Alexandros; Payne, Felicity; Plagnol, Vincent; Raymond, Lucy; Savage, David B.; Scambler, Peter; Schmidts, Miriam; Schoenmakers, Nadia; Semple, Robert; Serra, Eva; Stalker, Jim; van Kogelenberg, Margriet; Vijayarangakannan, Parthiban; Walter, Klaudia; Whittall, Ros; Williamson, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Cellular organelles provide opportunities to relate biological mechanisms to disease. Here we use affinity proteomics, genetics and cell biology to interrogate cilia: poorly understood organelles, where defects cause genetic diseases. Two hundred and seventeen tagged human ciliary proteins create a final landscape of 1,319 proteins, 4,905 interactions and 52 complexes. Reverse tagging, repetition of purifications and statistical analyses, produce a high-resolution network that reveals organelle-specific interactions and complexes not apparent in larger studies, and links vesicle transport, the cytoskeleton, signalling and ubiquitination to ciliary signalling and proteostasis. We observe sub-complexes in exocyst and intraflagellar transport complexes, which we validate biochemically, and by probing structurally predicted, disruptive, genetic variants from ciliary disease patients. The landscape suggests other genetic diseases could be ciliary including 3M syndrome. We show that 3M genes are involved in ciliogenesis, and that patient fibroblasts lack cilia. Overall, this organelle-specific targeting strategy shows considerable promise for Systems Medicine. PMID:27173435

  3. The rotational specific heat of molecular hydrogen in the old quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gearhart, Clayton

    2005-04-01

    ``Astonishing successes'' and ``bitter disappointment'': Thus did the German physicist Fritz Reiche portray the state of quantum theory in his 1921 text. His words apply in miniature to early descriptions of the fall in the specific heat of hydrogen gas at low temperatures---among the first systems studied in the old quantum theory. The earliest measurements were made in 1912 by Arnold Eucken in Walther Nernst's laboratory in Berlin. The possibility of applying a theory of quantized rotators to diatomic gases had emerged even earlier, at the first Solvay conference in 1911. Eucken's experiment was the first of many. Paul Ehrenfest, Erwin Schrödinger, Edwin C. Kemble, and John Van Vleck, among others, attempted theoretical descriptions of the rotational specific heat, as did Reiche himself in a widely cited 1919 paper. Despite these efforts, the problem proved intractable---its explanation involves identical particles in ways unsuspected before modern quantum mechanics. Nevertheless, the older theory worked reasonably well to describe the infrared spectra of other diatomic molecules. I will sketch the history of this intriguing problem in early quantum theory.

  4. Molecular investigation of Cryptosporidium in small caged pets in northeast China: host specificity and zoonotic implications.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiao; Li, Lu; Tao, Wei; Jiang, Yanxue; Wan, Qiang; Lin, Yongchao; Li, Wei

    2016-07-01

    This study screened 151 pet-derived fecal specimens randomly collected from four commercial markets in northeast China for the presence of Cryptosporidium by genus-specific nested PCRs of the small subunit rRNA gene. Of these, 14 specimens (9.3 %) from nine species of birds, two types of rodents, and a hedgehog were positive for Cryptosporidium. Sequence analysis on the PCR-positive isolates facilitated identification of three Cryptosporidium species (C. baileyi, C. galli, and C. ubiquitum) and two Cryptosporidium genotypes (ferret genotype and avian genotype V). The study birds were affected predominantly with bird-specific C. baileyi (Atlantic canary, budgerigar, crested myna, rock dove, and silky fowl), C. galli (Chinese hwamei), and Cryptosporidium avian genotype V (Fischer's lovebird and rosy-faced lovebird). Cryptosporidium ferret genotype previously considered rodent-adapted was identified in three specimens from budgerigar, chipmunk, and red squirrel. Two specimens collected from common hill myna and hedgehog were positive for C. ubiquitum. The species of birds that can be colonized by Cryptosporidium were extended. Moreover, the data expanded the host range of Cryptosporidium ferret genotype and C. ubiquitum, especially the birds. The carriage of zoonotic C. ubiquitum in small caged pets is of public health importance. PMID:27107987

  5. An organelle-specific protein landscape identifies novel diseases and molecular mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Boldt, Karsten; van Reeuwijk, Jeroen; Lu, Qianhao; Koutroumpas, Konstantinos; Nguyen, Thanh-Minh T; Texier, Yves; van Beersum, Sylvia E C; Horn, Nicola; Willer, Jason R; Mans, Dorus A; Dougherty, Gerard; Lamers, Ideke J C; Coene, Karlien L M; Arts, Heleen H; Betts, Matthew J; Beyer, Tina; Bolat, Emine; Gloeckner, Christian Johannes; Haidari, Khatera; Hetterschijt, Lisette; Iaconis, Daniela; Jenkins, Dagan; Klose, Franziska; Knapp, Barbara; Latour, Brooke; Letteboer, Stef J F; Marcelis, Carlo L; Mitic, Dragana; Morleo, Manuela; Oud, Machteld M; Riemersma, Moniek; Rix, Susan; Terhal, Paulien A; Toedt, Grischa; van Dam, Teunis J P; de Vrieze, Erik; Wissinger, Yasmin; Wu, Ka Man; Apic, Gordana; Beales, Philip L; Blacque, Oliver E; Gibson, Toby J; Huynen, Martijn A; Katsanis, Nicholas; Kremer, Hannie; Omran, Heymut; van Wijk, Erwin; Wolfrum, Uwe; Kepes, François; Davis, Erica E; Franco, Brunella; Giles, Rachel H; Ueffing, Marius; Russell, Robert B; Roepman, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Cellular organelles provide opportunities to relate biological mechanisms to disease. Here we use affinity proteomics, genetics and cell biology to interrogate cilia: poorly understood organelles, where defects cause genetic diseases. Two hundred and seventeen tagged human ciliary proteins create a final landscape of 1,319 proteins, 4,905 interactions and 52 complexes. Reverse tagging, repetition of purifications and statistical analyses, produce a high-resolution network that reveals organelle-specific interactions and complexes not apparent in larger studies, and links vesicle transport, the cytoskeleton, signalling and ubiquitination to ciliary signalling and proteostasis. We observe sub-complexes in exocyst and intraflagellar transport complexes, which we validate biochemically, and by probing structurally predicted, disruptive, genetic variants from ciliary disease patients. The landscape suggests other genetic diseases could be ciliary including 3M syndrome. We show that 3M genes are involved in ciliogenesis, and that patient fibroblasts lack cilia. Overall, this organelle-specific targeting strategy shows considerable promise for Systems Medicine. PMID:27173435

  6. Molecular and Enzymatic Characterization of Three Phosphoinositide-Specific Phospholipase C Isoforms from Potato1

    PubMed Central

    Kopka, Joachim; Pical, Christophe; Gray, Julie E.; Müller-Röber, Bernd

    1998-01-01

    Many cellular responses to stimulation of cell-surface receptors by extracellular signals are transmitted across the plasma membrane by hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2), which is cleaved into diacylglycerol and inositol-1,4,5-tris-phosphate by phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC). We present structural, biochemical, and RNA expression data for three distinct PI-PLC isoforms, StPLC1, StPLC2, and StPLC3, which were cloned from a guard cell-enriched tissue preparation of potato (Solanum tuberosum) leaves. All three enzymes contain the catalytic X and Y domains, as well as C2-like domains also present in all PI-PLCs. Analysis of the reaction products obtained from PIP2 hydrolysis unequivocally identified these enzymes as genuine PI-PLC isoforms. Recombinant StPLCs showed an optimal PIP2-hydrolyzing activity at 10 μm Ca2+ and were inhibited by Al3+ in equimolar amounts. In contrast to PI-PLC activity in plant plasma membranes, however, recombinant enzymes could not be activated by Mg2+. All three stplc genes are expressed in various tissues of potato, including leaves, flowers, tubers, and roots, and are affected by drought stress in a gene-specific manner. PMID:9449844

  7. Lineage-specific molecular probing reveals novel diversity and ecological partitioning of haplosporidians

    PubMed Central

    Hartikainen, Hanna; Ashford, Oliver S; Berney, Cédric; Okamura, Beth; Feist, Stephen W; Baker-Austin, Craig; Stentiford, Grant D; Bass, David

    2014-01-01

    Haplosporidians are rhizarian parasites of mostly marine invertebrates. They include the causative agents of diseases of commercially important molluscs, including MSX disease in oysters. Despite their importance for food security, their diversity and distributions are poorly known. We used a combination of group-specific PCR primers to probe environmental DNA samples from planktonic and benthic environments in Europe, South Africa and Panama. This revealed several highly distinct novel clades, novel lineages within known clades and seasonal (spring vs autumn) and habitat-related (brackish vs littoral) variation in assemblage composition. High frequencies of haplosporidian lineages in the water column provide the first evidence for life cycles involving planktonic hosts, host-free stages or both. The general absence of haplosporidian lineages from all large online sequence data sets emphasises the importance of lineage-specific approaches for studying these highly divergent and diverse lineages. Combined with host-based field surveys, environmental sampling for pathogens will enhance future detection of known and novel pathogens and the assessment of disease risk. PMID:23966100

  8. Assembly, molecular organization, and membrane-binding properties of development-specific septins.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Galo; Finnigan, Gregory C; Heasley, Lydia R; Sterling, Sarah M; Aggarwal, Adeeti; Pearson, Chad G; Nogales, Eva; McMurray, Michael A; Thorner, Jeremy

    2016-02-29

    Septin complexes display remarkable plasticity in subunit composition, yet how a new subunit assembled into higher-order structures confers different functions is not fully understood. Here, this question is addressed in budding yeast, where during meiosis Spr3 and Spr28 replace the mitotic septin subunits Cdc12 and Cdc11 (and Shs1), respectively. In vitro, the sole stable complex that contains both meiosis-specific septins is a linear Spr28-Spr3-Cdc3-Cdc10-Cdc10-Cdc3-Spr3-Spr28 hetero-octamer. Only coexpressed Spr3 and Spr28 colocalize with Cdc3 and Cdc10 in mitotic cells, indicating that incorporation requires a Spr28-Spr3 protomer. Unlike their mitotic counterparts, Spr28-Spr3-capped rods are unable to form higher-order structures in solution but assemble to form long paired filaments on lipid monolayers containing phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, mimicking presence of this phosphoinositide in the prospore membrane. Spr28 and Spr3 fail to rescue the lethality of a cdc11Δ cdc12Δ mutant, and Cdc11 and Cdc12 fail to restore sporulation proficiency to spr3Δ/spr3Δ spr28Δ/spr28Δ diploids. Thus, specific meiotic and mitotic subunits endow septin complexes with functionally distinct properties. PMID:26929450

  9. Assembly, molecular organization, and membrane-binding properties of development-specific septins

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Galo; Finnigan, Gregory C.; Heasley, Lydia R.; Sterling, Sarah M.; Aggarwal, Adeeti; Pearson, Chad G.

    2016-01-01

    Septin complexes display remarkable plasticity in subunit composition, yet how a new subunit assembled into higher-order structures confers different functions is not fully understood. Here, this question is addressed in budding yeast, where during meiosis Spr3 and Spr28 replace the mitotic septin subunits Cdc12 and Cdc11 (and Shs1), respectively. In vitro, the sole stable complex that contains both meiosis-specific septins is a linear Spr28–Spr3–Cdc3–Cdc10–Cdc10–Cdc3–Spr3–Spr28 hetero-octamer. Only coexpressed Spr3 and Spr28 colocalize with Cdc3 and Cdc10 in mitotic cells, indicating that incorporation requires a Spr28-Spr3 protomer. Unlike their mitotic counterparts, Spr28-Spr3–capped rods are unable to form higher-order structures in solution but assemble to form long paired filaments on lipid monolayers containing phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate, mimicking presence of this phosphoinositide in the prospore membrane. Spr28 and Spr3 fail to rescue the lethality of a cdc11Δ cdc12Δ mutant, and Cdc11 and Cdc12 fail to restore sporulation proficiency to spr3Δ/spr3Δ spr28Δ/spr28Δ diploids. Thus, specific meiotic and mitotic subunits endow septin complexes with functionally distinct properties. PMID:26929450

  10. Tumor-Specific Proteolytic Processing of Cyclin E Generates Hyperactive Lower-Molecular-Weight Forms

    PubMed Central

    Porter, Donald C.; Zhang, Ning; Danes, Christopher; McGahren, Mollianne J.; Harwell, Richard M.; Faruki, Shamsa; Keyomarsi, Khandan

    2001-01-01

    Cyclin E is a G1 cyclin essential for S-phase entry and has a profound role in oncogenesis. Previously this laboratory found that cyclin E is overexpressed and present in lower-molecular-weight (LMW) isoforms in breast cancer cells and tumor tissues compared to normal cells and tissues. Such alteration of cyclin E is linked to poor patient outcome. Here we report that the LMW forms of cyclin E are hyperactive biochemically and they can more readily induce G1-to-S progression in transfected normal cells than the full-length form of the protein can. Through biochemical and mutational analyses we have identified two proteolytically sensitive sites in the amino terminus of human cyclin E that are cleaved to generate the LMW isoforms found in tumor cells. Not only are the LMW forms of cyclin E functional, as they phosphorylate substrates such as histone H1 and GST-Rb, but also their activities are higher than the full-length cyclin E. These nuclear localized LMW forms of cyclin E are also biologically functional, as their overexpression in normal cells increases the ability of these cells to enter S and G2/M. Lastly, we show that cyclin E is selectively cleaved in vitro by the elastase class of serine proteases to generate LMW forms similar to those observed in tumor cells. These studies suggest that the defective entry into and exit from S phase by tumor cells is in part due to the proteolytic processing of cyclin E, which generates hyperactive LMW isoforms whose activities have been modified from that of the full-length protein. PMID:11509668

  11. Molecular characterization and tissue-specific expression of invariant chain isoform in Muscovy Duck (Cairina moschata).

    PubMed

    Liu, S J; Chen, F F; Wu, C; Ni, Q S; Yu, W Y

    2014-01-01

    Invariant chain (Ii) isoform, through its thyroglobulin-like (Tg) domain, inhibits cysteine proteases during antigen presentation in vertebrates. In birds, the Ii of Muscovy Duck (MDIi) has 2 forms: MDIi-1 and MDIi-2 (MDIi isoform). To understand the genetic information and expression characteristics of MDIi-2, polymerase chain reaction, and bioinformatic analysis were performed for MDIi-2 from healthy adult Muscovy Duck. The full-length MDIi-2 cDNA sequence was found to be 1377-base pairs, encoding a 285-amino acid protein. MDIi-2 contains 63 amino acids with an insertion sequence in the Tg domain. MDIi-2 shares high identity (72.51-94.74%) with the same protein in other birds. The Tg domain of MDIi-2 is highly conserved and showed relatively high identity (96.83%) among all tested birds. The molecular structure of the Tg domain supports this conservation. MDIi-2 expression was measured in various tissues using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Similar to MDIi-1, MDIi-2 was detected in all tissues but at different levels. Higher expression level was observed in the spleen, intestinal mucosa, and bursa stipe (bursa of Fabricius stipe) than in other tissues. This suggests that MDIi-2, like MDIi-1, plays an essential role in all tissues and that its differential expression may be related to its functions in these tissues. The coexistence of 2 MDIi isoforms indicates that their functions are correlated in Muscovy Duck. This study improves the understanding of poultry immunology and may be used to improve measures to protect Muscovy Duck from disease. PMID:25366788

  12. Kawasaki Disease-Specific Molecules in the Sera Are Linked to Microbe-Associated Molecular Patterns in the Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kenji; Kanno, Shunsuke; Nishio, Hisanori; Saito, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Tamami; Yamamura, Kenichiro; Sakai, Yasunari; Takada, Hidetoshi; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Mizuno, Yumi; Ouchi, Kazunobu; Waki, Kenji; Hara, Toshiro

    2014-01-01

    Background Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis of unknown etiology. The innate immune system is involved in its pathophysiology at the acute phase. We have recently established a novel murine model of KD coronary arteritis by oral administration of a synthetic microbe-associated molecular pattern (MAMP). On the hypothesis that specific MAMPs exist in KD sera, we have searched them to identify KD-specific molecules and to assess the pathogenesis. Methods We performed liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis of fractionated serum samples from 117 patients with KD and 106 controls. Microbiological and LC-MS evaluation of biofilm samples were also performed. Results KD samples elicited proinflammatory cytokine responses from human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs). By LC-MS analysis of KD serum samples collected at 3 different periods, we detected a variety of KD-specific molecules in the lipophilic fractions that showed distinct m/z and MS/MS fragmentation patterns in each cluster. Serum KD-specific molecules showed m/z and MS/MS fragmentation patterns almost identical to those of MAMPs obtained from the biofilms formed in vitro (common MAMPs from Bacillus cereus, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus) at the 1st study period, and from the biofilms formed in vivo (common MAMPs from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis/Bacillus cereus/Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus) at the 2nd and 3rd periods. The biofilm extracts from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Staphylococcus aureus also induced proinflammatory cytokines by HCAECs. By the experiments with IgG affinity chromatography, some of these serum KD-specific molecules bound to IgG. Conclusions We herein conclude that serum KD-specific molecules were mostly derived from biofilms and possessed molecular structures common to MAMPs from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis and Staphylococcus

  13. RNA sequencing reveals region-specific molecular mechanisms associated with epileptogenesis in a model of classical hippocampal sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, A. S.; de Matos, A. H.; do Canto, A. M.; Rocha, C. S.; Carvalho, B. S.; Pascoal, V. D. B.; Norwood, B.; Bauer, S.; Rosenow, F.; Gilioli, R.; Cendes, F.; Lopes-Cendes, I.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete transcriptome analysis of the dorsal (dDG) and ventral dentate gyrus (vDG) of a rat epilepsy model presenting a hippocampal lesion with a strict resemblance to classical hippocampal sclerosis (HS). We collected the dDG and vDG by laser microdissection 15 days after electrical stimulation and performed high-throughput RNA-sequencing. There were many differentially regulated genes, some of which were specific to either of the two sub-regions in stimulated animals. Gene ontology analysis indicated an enrichment of inflammation-related processes in both sub-regions and of axonal guidance and calcium signaling processes exclusively in the vDG. There was also a differential regulation of genes encoding molecules involved in synaptic function, neural electrical activity and neuropeptides in stimulated rats. The data presented here suggests, in the time point analyzed, a remarkable interaction among several molecular components which takes place in the damaged hippocampi. Furthermore, even though similar mechanisms may function in different regions of the DG, the molecular components involved seem to be region specific. PMID:26935982

  14. Characteristics of Sucrose Transport through the Sucrose-Specific Porin ScrY Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liping; Bertelshofer, Franziska; Greiner, Günther; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose-specific porin (ScrY) is a transmembrane protein that allows for the uptake of sucrose under growth-limiting conditions. The crystal structure of ScrY was resolved before by X-ray crystallography, both in its uncomplexed form and with bound sucrose. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of the transport mechanism of ScrY. To date, there has not yet been any clear demonstration for sucrose transport through the ScrY. Here, the dynamics of the ScrY trimer embedded in a phospholipid bilayer as well as the characteristics of sucrose translocation were investigated by means of atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The potential of mean force (PMF) for sucrose translocation through the pore showed two main energy barriers within the constriction region of ScrY. Energy decomposition allowed to pinpoint three aspartic acids as key residues opposing the passage of sucrose, all located within the L3 loop. Mutation of two aspartic acids to uncharged residues resulted in an accordingly modified electrostatics and decreased PMF barrier. The chosen methodology and results will aid in the design of porins with modified transport specificities. PMID:26913282

  15. Protein-specific force field derived from the fragment molecular orbital method can improve protein-ligand binding interactions.

    PubMed

    Chang, Le; Ishikawa, Takeshi; Kuwata, Kazuo; Takada, Shoji

    2013-05-30

    Accurate computational estimate of the protein-ligand binding affinity is of central importance in rational drug design. To improve accuracy of the molecular mechanics (MM) force field (FF) for protein-ligand simulations, we use a protein-specific FF derived by the fragment molecular orbital (FMO) method and by the restrained electrostatic potential (RESP) method. Applying this FMO-RESP method to two proteins, dodecin, and lysozyme, we found that protein-specific partial charges tend to differ more significantly from the standard AMBER charges for isolated charged atoms. We did not see the dependence of partial charges on the secondary structure. Computing the binding affinities of dodecin with five ligands by MM PBSA protocol with the FMO-RESP charge set as well as with the standard AMBER charges, we found that the former gives better correlation with experimental affinities than the latter. While, for lysozyme with five ligands, both charge sets gave similar and relatively accurate estimates of binding affinities. PMID:23420697

  16. Characteristics of Sucrose Transport through the Sucrose-Specific Porin ScrY Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liping; Bertelshofer, Franziska; Greiner, Günther; Böckmann, Rainer A.

    2016-01-01

    Sucrose-specific porin (ScrY) is a transmembrane protein that allows for the uptake of sucrose under growth-limiting conditions. The crystal structure of ScrY was resolved before by X-ray crystallography, both in its uncomplexed form and with bound sucrose. However, little is known about the molecular characteristics of the transport mechanism of ScrY. To date, there has not yet been any clear demonstration for sucrose transport through the ScrY. Here, the dynamics of the ScrY trimer embedded in a phospholipid bilayer as well as the characteristics of sucrose translocation were investigated by means of atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The potential of mean force (PMF) for sucrose translocation through the pore showed two main energy barriers within the constriction region of ScrY. Energy decomposition allowed to pinpoint three aspartic acids as key residues opposing the passage of sucrose, all located within the L3 loop. Mutation of two aspartic acids to uncharged residues resulted in an accordingly modified electrostatics and decreased PMF barrier. The chosen methodology and results will aid in the design of porins with modified transport specificities. PMID:26913282

  17. Morphological and molecular analyses support the existence of host-specific Peronospora species infecting Chenopodium.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Joon; Denchev, Cvetomir M; Shin, Hyeon-Dong

    2008-03-01

    About 20 species of Peronospora have been reported to cause downy mildew on Chenopodium, but, particularly in plant pathology literature, only one species, P. farinosa, is considered to be involved. We performed sequence analysis of the ITS rDNA to reveal the phylogenetic relationships of Peronospora specimens from five species of Chenopodium, viz. C. album, C. ambrosioides, C. bonus-henricus, C. hybridum, and C. polyspermum. The five clades corresponded to particular Chenopodium species, and showed a high level of sequence divergence. Differences in the morphology of the conidia and ultimate branchlets also supported the separation of the five groups at the host species level. These results suggest that the names P. variabilis, P. boni-henrici, P. chenopodii, and P. chenopodii-polyspermi should be used for the four downy mildew pathogens specific to C. album, C. bonus-henricus, C. hybridum, and C. polyspermum, respectively. The Peronospora on C. ambrosioides was found to be an independent species. PMID:18270803

  18. Molecular and functional characterization of riboflavin specific transport system in rat brain capillary endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Mitesh; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2012-01-01

    Riboflavin is an important water soluble vitamin (B2) required for metabolic reactions, normal cellular growth, differentiation and function. Mammalian brain cells cannot synthesize riboflavin and must import from systemic circulation. However, the uptake mechanism, cellular translocation and intracellular trafficking of riboflavin in brain capillary endothelial cells are poorly understood. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the existence of riboflavin-specific transport system and delineate the uptake and intracellular regulation of riboflavin in immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBE4). The uptake of [3H]-Riboflavin is sodium, temperature and energy dependent but pH independent. [3H]-Riboflavin uptake is saturable with Km and Vmax values of 19 ± 3 µM and 0.235 ± 0.012 picomoles/min/mg protein, respectively. The uptake process is inhibited by unlabelled structural analogs (lumiflavin, lumichrome) but not by structurally unrelated vitamins. Ca++/calmodulin and protein kinase A (PKA) pathways are found to play an important role in the intracellular regulation of [3H]-Riboflavin. Apical and baso-lateral uptake of [3H]-Riboflavin clearly indicate that riboflavin specific transport system is predominantly localized on the apical side of RBE4 cells. A 628 bp band corresponding to riboflavin transporter is revealed in RT-PCR analysis. These findings, for the first time report the existence of a specialized and high affinity transport system for riboflavin in RBE4 cells. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle limiting drug transport inside the brain as it regulates drug permeation from systemic circulation. This transporter can be utilized for targeted delivery in enhancing brain permeation of highly potent drugs on systemic administration. PMID:22683359

  19. The retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain: from molecular structure to biological activity

    SciTech Connect

    Redzic, Jasmina S.; Armstrong, Geoffrey S.; Isern, Nancy G.; Jones, David N.M.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Eisenmesser, Elan Z.

    2011-06-18

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane protein that is involved in inflammatory diseases, cancer progression, and multiple human pathogens utilize CD147 for efficient infection. In several cancers, CD147 expression is so high that it is now used as a prognostic marker. The two primary isoforms of CD147 that are related to cancer progression have been identified, differing in their number of immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. These include CD147 Ig1-Ig2 that is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues and CD147 Ig0-Ig1-Ig2 that is retinal specific and implicated in retinoblastoma. However, little is known in regard to the retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain despite its potential role in retinoblastoma. Thus, here we have extensively characterized the CD147 Ig0 domain by elucidating its three-dimensional structure through crystallography and its solution behavior through several biophysical methods that include nuclear magnetic resonance. Furthermore, we have utilized this data together with mutagenesis to probe the biological activity of CD147-containing proteins both with and without the CD147 Ig0 domain within several model cell lines. Our findings reveal that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a potent stimulator of interleukin-6, which is a well-known contributor to retinoblastoma and suggest that the CD147 Ig0 domain has its own receptor distinct from that of the other CD147 Ig-like domains, CD147 Ig1-Ig2. Furthermore, we show that the CD147 Ig0 dimer is the functional unit required for activity and can be disrupted by a single point mutation.

  20. The retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain: from molecular structure to biological activity.

    PubMed

    Redzic, Jasmina S; Armstrong, Geoffrey S; Isern, Nancy G; Jones, David N M; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Eisenmesser, Elan Zohar

    2011-08-01

    CD147 is a type I transmembrane protein that is involved in inflammatory diseases, cancer progression, and multiple human pathogens utilize CD147 for efficient infection. CD147 expression is so high in several cancers that it is now used as a prognostic marker. The two primary isoforms of CD147 that are related to cancer progression have been identified, differing in their number of immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. These include CD147 Ig1-Ig2, which is ubiquitously expressed in most tissues, and CD147 Ig0-Ig1-Ig2, which is retinal specific and implicated in retinoblastoma. However, little is known in regard to the retinal specific CD147 Ig0 domain despite its potential role in retinoblastoma. We present the first crystal structure of the human CD147 Ig0 domain and show that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a crystallographic dimer with an I-type domain structure, which maintained in solution. Furthermore, we have utilized our structural data together with mutagenesis to probe the biological activity of CD147-containing proteins, both with and without the CD147 Ig0 domain, within several model cell lines. Our findings reveal that the CD147 Ig0 domain is a potent stimulator of interleukin-6 and suggest that the CD147 Ig0 domain has its own receptor distinct from that of the other CD147 Ig-like domains, CD147 Ig1-Ig2. Finally, we show that the CD147 Ig0 dimer is the functional unit required for activity and can be disrupted by a single point mutation. PMID:21620857

  1. Tubulin-specific Chaperones: Components of a Molecular Machine that Assembles the α/β Heterodimer

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Guoling; Cowan, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    The tubulin heterodimer consists of one α- and one β-tubulin polypeptide. Neither protein can partition to the native state or assemble into polymerization competent heterodimers without the concerted action of a series of chaperone proteins including five tubulin-specific chaperones termed TBCA-TBCE. TBCA and TBCB bind to and stabilize newly synthesized quasi-native β- and α-tubulin polypeptides following their generation via multiple rounds of ATP-dependent interaction with the cytosolic chaperonin, CCT. There is free exchange β-tubulin between TBCA and TBCD, and of α-tubulin between TBCB and TBCE, resulting in the formation of TBCD/β and TBCE/α, respectively. The latter two complexes interact, forming a supercomplex (TBCD/α/TBCD/β). Discharge of the native α/β heterodimer occurs via interaction of the supercomplex with TBCC, which results in the triggering of TBC-bound β-tubulin-bound (E-site) GTP hydrolysis. This reaction acts as a switch for disassembly of the supercomplex and the release of GDP-bound heterodimer, which becomes polymerization competent following spontaneous E-site exchange with GTP. The tubulin-specific chaperones thus function together as a tubulin assembly machine, marrying the α- and β-tubulin subunits into a tightly associated heterodimer. The existence of this evolutionarily conserved pathway explains why it has never proved possible to isolate α- or β-tubulin as stable independent entities in the absence of their cognate partners, and implies that each exists and is maintained in the heterodimer in a non-minimal energy state. Here we describe methods for the purification of recombinant TBC’s as biologically active proteins following their expression in a variety of host/vector systems. PMID:23973072

  2. Molecular and functional characterization of riboflavin specific transport system in rat brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Patel, Mitesh; Vadlapatla, Ramya Krishna; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2012-08-15

    Riboflavin is an important water soluble vitamin (B2) required for metabolic reactions, normal cellular growth, differentiation and function. Mammalian brain cells cannot synthesize riboflavin and must import from systemic circulation. However, the uptake mechanism, cellular translocation and intracellular trafficking of riboflavin in brain capillary endothelial cells are poorly understood. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the existence of a riboflavin-specific transport system and delineate the uptake and intracellular regulation of riboflavin in immortalized rat brain capillary endothelial cells (RBE4). The uptake of [3H]-riboflavin is sodium, temperature and energy dependent but pH independent. [3H]-Riboflavin uptake is saturable with K(m) and V(max) values of 19 ± 3 μM and 0.235 ± 0.012 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. The uptake process is inhibited by unlabelled structural analogs (lumiflavin, lumichrome) but not by structurally unrelated vitamins. Ca(++)/calmodulin and protein kinase A (PKA) pathways are found to play an important role in the intracellular regulation of [3H]-riboflavin. Apical and baso-lateral uptake of [3H]-riboflavin clearly indicates that a riboflavin specific transport system is predominantly localized on the apical side of RBE4 cells. A 628 bp band corresponding to a riboflavin transporter is revealed in RT-PCR analysis. These findings, for the first time report the existence of a specialized and high affinity transport system for riboflavin in RBE4 cells. The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a major obstacle limiting drug transport inside the brain as it regulates drug permeation from systemic circulation. This transporter can be utilized for targeted delivery in enhancing brain permeation of highly potent drugs on systemic administration. PMID:22683359

  3. Molecular Determinants of Substrate Specificity for Semliki Forest Virus Nonstructural Protease

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Aleksei; Lulla, Valeria; Tints, Kairit; Ahola, Tero; Merits, Andres

    2006-01-01

    The C-terminal cysteine protease domain of Semliki Forest virus nonstructural protein 2 (nsP2) regulates the virus life cycle by sequentially cleaving at three specific sites within the virus-encoded replicase polyprotein P1234. The site between nsP3 and nsP4 (the 3/4 site) is cleaved most efficiently. Analysis of Semliki Forest virus-specific cleavage sites with shuffled N-terminal and C-terminal half-sites showed that the main determinants of cleavage efficiency are located in the region preceding the cleavage site. Random mutagenesis analysis revealed that amino acid residues in positions P4, P3, P2, and P1 of the 3/4 cleavage site cannot tolerate much variation, whereas in the P5 position most residues were permitted. When mutations affecting cleavage efficiency were introduced into the 2/3 and 3/4 cleavage sites, the resulting viruses remained viable but had similar defects in P1234 processing as observed in the in vitro assay. Complete blockage of the 3/4 cleavage was found to be lethal. The amino acid in position P1′ had a significant effect on cleavage efficiency, and in this regard the protease markedly preferred a glycine residue over the tyrosine natively present in the 3/4 site. Therefore, the cleavage sites represent a compromise between protease recognition and other requirements of the virus life cycle. The protease recognizes at least residues P4 to P1′, and the P4 arginine residue plays an important role in the fast cleavage of the 3/4 site. PMID:16699022

  4. Growth of Thin, Anisotropic, π-Conjugated Molecular Films by Stepwise "Click" Assembly of Molecular Building Blocks: Characterizing Reaction Yield, Surface Coverage, and Film Thickness versus Addition Step Number.

    PubMed

    Demissie, Abel T; Haugstad, Greg; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2015-07-15

    We report the systematic characterization of anisotropic, π-conjugated oligophenyleneimine (OPI) films synthesized using stepwise imine condensation, or "click" chemistry. Film synthesis began with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 4-formylthiophenol or 4-aminothiophenol on Au, followed by repetitive, alternate addition of terephthalaldehyde (benzene-1,4-dicarbaldehyde) or 1,4-benzenediamine to form π-conjugated films ranging from 0.6-5.5 nm in thickness. By systematically capping the OPI films with a redox or halogen label, we were able to measure the relative surface coverage after each monomer addition via Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, and cyclic voltammetry. Nuclear reaction analysis was also employed for the first time on a SAM to calculate the surface coverage of carbon atoms after each stepwise addition. These six different analysis methods indicate that the average extent of reaction is 99% for each addition step. The high yield and molecular surface coverage confirm the efficacy of Schiff base chemistry, at least with the terephthalaldehyde and 1,4-benzenediamine monomers, for preparing high-quality molecular films with π conjugation normal to the substrate. PMID:26098519

  5. Elucidating the evolutionary conserved DNA-binding specificities of WRKY transcription factors by molecular dynamics and in vitro binding assays

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Luise H.; Fischer, Nina M.; Harter, Klaus; Kohlbacher, Oliver; Wanke, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors constitute a large protein family in plants that is involved in the regulation of developmental processes and responses to biotic or abiotic stimuli. The question arises how stimulus-specific responses are mediated given that the highly conserved WRKY DNA-binding domain (DBD) exclusively recognizes the ‘TTGACY’ W-box consensus. We speculated that the W-box consensus might be more degenerate and yet undetected differences in the W-box consensus of WRKYs of different evolutionary descent exist. The phylogenetic analysis of WRKY DBDs suggests that they evolved from an ancestral group IIc-like WRKY early in the eukaryote lineage. A direct descent of group IIc WRKYs supports a monophyletic origin of all other group II and III WRKYs from group I by loss of an N-terminal DBD. Group I WRKYs are of paraphyletic descent and evolved multiple times independently. By homology modeling, molecular dynamics simulations and in vitro DNA–protein interaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with AtWRKY50 (IIc), AtWRKY33 (I) and AtWRKY11 (IId) DBDs, we revealed differences in DNA-binding specificities. Our data imply that other components are essentially required besides the W-box-specific binding to DNA to facilitate a stimulus-specific WRKY function. PMID:23975197

  6. Molecular analysis of volatile metabolites released specifically by staphylococcus aureus and pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The routinely used microbiological diagnosis of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP) is time consuming and often requires invasive methods for collection of human specimens (e.g. bronchoscopy). Therefore, it is of utmost interest to develop a non-invasive method for the early detection of bacterial infection in ventilated patients, preferably allowing the identification of the specific pathogens. The present work is an attempt to identify pathogen-derived volatile biomarkers in breath that can be used for early and non- invasive diagnosis of ventilator associated pneumonia (VAP). For this purpose, in vitro experiments with bacteria most frequently found in VAP patients, i.e. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, were performed to investigate the release or consumption of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Results Headspace samples were collected and preconcentrated on multibed sorption tubes at different time points and subsequently analyzed with gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). As many as 32 and 37 volatile metabolites were released by S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, respectively. Distinct differences in the bacteria-specific VOC profiles were found, especially with regard to aldehydes (e.g. acetaldehyde, 3-methylbutanal), which were taken up only by P. aeruginosa but released by S. aureus. Differences in concentration profiles were also found for acids (e.g. isovaleric acid), ketones (e.g. acetoin, 2-nonanone), hydrocarbons (e.g. 2-butene, 1,10-undecadiene), alcohols (e.g. 2-methyl-1-propanol, 2-butanol), esters (e.g. ethyl formate, methyl 2-methylbutyrate), volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs, e.g. dimethylsulfide) and volatile nitrogen compounds (VNCs, e.g. 3-methylpyrrole). Importantly, a significant VOC release was found already 1.5 hours after culture start, corresponding to cell numbers of ~8*106 [CFUs/ml]. Conclusions The results obtained provide strong evidence that the detection and perhaps even identification of bacteria

  7. A gene-specific DNA sequencing chip for exploring molecular evolutionary change.

    PubMed

    Fedrigo, Olivier; Naylor, Gavin

    2004-01-01

    Sequencing by hybridization (SBH) approaches to DNA sequencing face two conflicting constraints. First, in order to ensure that the target DNA binds reliably, the oligonucleotide probes that are attached to the chip array must be >15 bp in length. Secondly, the total number of possible 15 bp oligonucleotides is too large (>4(15)) to fit on a chip with current technology. To circumvent the conflict between these two opposing constraints, we present a novel gene-specific DNA chip design. Our design is based on the idea that not all conceivable oligonucleotides need to be placed on a chip--only those that capture sequence combinations occurring in nature. Our approach uses a training set of aligned sequences that code for the gene in question. We compute the minimum number of oligonucleotides (generally 15-30 bp in length) that need to be placed on a DNA chip to capture the variation implied by the training set using a graph search algorithm. We tested the approach in silico using cytochrome-b sequences. Results indicate that on average, 98% of the sequence of an unknown target can be determined using the approach. PMID:14973200

  8. Shox2 is a molecular determinant of depot-specific adipocyte function.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kevin Y; Yamamoto, Yuji; Boucher, Jeremie; Winnay, Jonathon N; Gesta, Stephane; Cobb, John; Blüher, Matthias; Kahn, C Ronald

    2013-07-01

    Visceral and s.c. fat exhibit different intrinsic properties, including rates of lipolysis, and are associated with differential risk for the development of type 2 diabetes. These effects are in part related to cell autonomous differences in gene expression. In the present study, we show that expression of Shox2 (Short stature homeobox 2) is higher in s.c. than visceral fat in both rodents and humans and that levels are further increased in humans with visceral obesity. Fat-specific disruption of Shox2 in male mice results in protection from high fat diet-induced obesity, with a preferential loss of s.c. fat. The reduced adipocyte size is secondary to a twofold increase in the expression of β3 adrenergic receptor (Adrb3) at both the mRNA and protein level and a parallel increase in lipolytic rate. These effects are mimicked by knockdown of Shox2 in C3H10T1/2 cells. Conversely, overexpression of Shox2 leads to a repression of Adrb3 expression and decrease lipolytic rate. Shox2 does not affect differentiation but directly interacts with CCAAT/enhancer binding protein alpha and attenuates its transcriptional activity of the Adrb3 promoter. Thus, Shox2 can regulate the expression of Adrb3 and control the rate of lipolysis and, in this way, exerts control of the phenotypic differences between visceral and s.c. adipocytes. PMID:23798383

  9. Molecular Basis for Lysine Specificity in the Yeast Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzyme Cdc34 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sadowski, Martin; Suryadinata, Randy; Lai, Xianning; Heierhorst, Jörg; Sarcevic, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugating enzymes (E2s) and ubiquitin ligases (E3s) catalyze the attachment of Ub to lysine residues in substrates and Ub during monoubiquitination and polyubiquitination. Lysine selection is important for the generation of diverse substrate-Ub structures, which provides versatility to this pathway in the targeting of proteins to different fates. The mechanisms of lysine selection remain poorly understood, with previous studies suggesting that the ubiquitination site(s) is selected by the E2/E3-mediated positioning of a lysine(s) toward the E2/E3 active site. By studying the polyubiquitination of Sic1 by the E2 protein Cdc34 and the RING E3 Skp1/Cul1/F-box (SCF) protein, we now demonstrate that in addition to E2/E3-mediated positioning, proximal amino acids surrounding the lysine residues in Sic1 and Ub are critical for ubiquitination. This mechanism is linked to key residues composing the catalytic core of Cdc34 and independent of SCF. Changes to these core residues altered the lysine preference of Cdc34 and specified whether this enzyme monoubiquitinated or polyubiquitinated Sic1. These new findings indicate that compatibility between amino acids surrounding acceptor lysine residues and key amino acids in the catalytic core of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes is an important mechanism for lysine selection during ubiquitination. PMID:20194622

  10. Molecular characterization of fruit-specific class III peroxidase genes in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chii-Jeng; Chan, Yuan-Li; Shien, Chin Hui; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2015-04-01

    In this study, expression of four peroxidase genes, LePrx09, LePrx17, LePrx35 and LePrxA, was identified in immature tomato fruits, and the function in the regulation of fruit growth was characterized. Analysis of amino acid sequences revealed that these genes code for class III peroxidases, containing B, D and F conserved domains, which bind heme groups, and a buried salt bridge motif. LePrx35 and LePrxA were identified as novel peroxidase genes in Solanum lycopersicum (L.). The temporal expression patterns at various fruit growth stages revealed that LePrx35 and LePrxA were expressed only in immature green (IMG) fruits, whereas LePrx17 and LePrx09 were expressed in both immature and mature green fruits. Tissue-specific expression profiles indicated that only LePrx09 was expressed in the mesocarp but not the inner tissue of immature fruits. The effects of hormone treatments and stresses on the four genes were examined; only the expression levels of LePrx17 and LePrx09 were altered. Transcription of LePrx17 was up-regulated by jasmonic acid (JA) and pathogen infection and expression of LePrx09 was induced by ethephon, salicylic acid (SA) and JA, in particular, as well as wounding, pathogen infection and H2O2 stress. Tomato plants over-expressing LePrx09 displayed enhanced resistance to H2O2 stress, suggesting that LePrx09 may participate in the H2O2 signaling pathway to regulate fruit growth and disease resistance in tomato fruits. PMID:25703772

  11. In silico evidence for the species-specific conservation of mosquito retroposons: implications as a molecular biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Byarugaba, Wilson; Kajumbula, Henry; Wayengera, Misaki

    2009-01-01

    Background Mosquitoes are the transmissive vectors for several infectious pathogens that affect man. However, the control of mosquitoes through insecticide and pesticide spraying has proved difficult in the past. We hypothesized that, by virtue of their reported vertical inheritance among mosquitoes, group II introns – a class of small coding ribonucleic acids (scRNAs) – may form a potential species-specific biomarker. Structurally, introns are a six-moiety complex. Depending on the function of the protein encoded within the IV moiety, the highly mobile class of group II introns or retroposons is sub-divided into two: Restriction Endonuclease (REase)-like and Apurinic aPyramydinic Endonuclease (APE)-like. REase-like retroposons are thought to be the ancestors of APE retroposons. Our aim in this study was to find evidence for the highly species-specific conservation of the APE subclass of mosquito retroposons. Methods and Results In silico targeted sequence alignments were conducted across a 1,779-organism genome database (1,518 bacterial, 59 archeal, 201 eukaryotic, and the human), using three mosquito retroposon sequence tags (RST) as BLASTN queries [AJ970181 and AJ90201 of Culex pipien origin and AJ970301 of Anoplese sinensis origin]. At a calibration of E = 10, A & D = 100, default filtration and a homology cut-off of >95% identity, no hits were found on any of the 1,518 bacterial genomes. Eleven (100%) and 15 (100%) hits obtained on the 201-eukaryote genome database were homologs (>95% score) of C.pipien quinquefasciatus JHB retroposons, but none of An. sinensis. Twenty and 221 low score (30–43% identity) spurious hits were found at flanking ends of genes and contigs in the human genome with the C.pipien and An. sinensis RSTs respectively. Functional and positional inference revealed these to be possible relatives of human genomic spliceosomes. We advance two models for the application of mosquito RST: as precursors for developing molecular biomarkers for

  12. Site-Specifically Labeled Immunoconjugates for Molecular Imaging—Part 2: Peptide Tags and Unnatural Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Adumeau, Pierre; Sharma, Sai Kiran; Brent, Colleen; Zeglis, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular imaging using radioisotope- or fluorophore-labeled antibodies is increasingly becoming a critical component of modern precision medicine. Yet despite this promise, the vast majority of these immunoconjugates are synthesized via the random coupling of amine-reactive bifunctional probes to lysines within the antibody, a process that can result in heterogeneous and poorly defined constructs with suboptimal pharmacological properties. In an effort to circumvent these issues, the last 5 years have played witness to a great deal of research focused on the creation of effective strategies for the site-specific attachment of payloads to antibodies. These chemoselective modification methods yield immunoconjugates that are more homogenous and better defined than constructs created using traditional synthetic approaches. Moreover, site-specifically labeled immunoconjugates have also been shown to exhibit superior in vivo behavior compared to their randomly modified cousins. The over-arching goal of this two-part review is to provide a broad yet detailed account of the various site-specific bioconjugation approaches that have been used to create immunoconjugates for positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and fluorescence imaging. In Part 1, we covered site-specific bioconjugation techniques based on the modification of cysteine residues and the chemoenzymatic manipulation of glycans. In Part 2, we will detail two families of bioconjugation approaches that leverage biochemical tools to achieve site-specificity. First, we will discuss modification methods that employ peptide tags either as sites for enzyme-catalyzed ligations or as radiometal coordination architectures. And second, we will examine bioconjugation strategies predicated on the incorporation of unnatural or non-canonical amino acids into antibodies via genetic engineering. Finally, we will compare the advantages and disadvantages of the modification

  13. Site-Specifically Labeled Immunoconjugates for Molecular Imaging--Part 2: Peptide Tags and Unnatural Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Adumeau, Pierre; Sharma, Sai Kiran; Brent, Colleen; Zeglis, Brian M

    2016-04-01

    Molecular imaging using radioisotope- or fluorophore-labeled antibodies is increasingly becoming a critical component of modern precision medicine. Yet despite this promise, the vast majority of these immunoconjugates are synthesized via the random coupling of amine-reactive bifunctional probes to lysines within the antibody, a process that can result in heterogeneous and poorly defined constructs with suboptimal pharmacological properties. In an effort to circumvent these issues, the last 5 years have played witness to a great deal of research focused on the creation of effective strategies for the site-specific attachment of payloads to antibodies. These chemoselective modification methods yield immunoconjugates that are more homogenous and better defined than constructs created using traditional synthetic approaches. Moreover, site-specifically labeled immunoconjugates have also been shown to exhibit superior in vivo behavior compared to their randomly modified cousins. The over-arching goal of this two-part review is to provide a broad yet detailed account of the various site-specific bioconjugation approaches that have been used to create immunoconjugates for positron emission tomography (PET), single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and fluorescence imaging. In Part 1, we covered site-specific bioconjugation techniques based on the modification of cysteine residues and the chemoenzymatic manipulation of glycans. In Part 2, we will detail two families of bioconjugation approaches that leverage biochemical tools to achieve site-specificity. First, we will discuss modification methods that employ peptide tags either as sites for enzyme-catalyzed ligations or as radiometal coordination architectures. And second, we will examine bioconjugation strategies predicated on the incorporation of unnatural or non-canonical amino acids into antibodies via genetic engineering. Finally, we will compare the advantages and disadvantages of the modification

  14. Substrate Binding Mode and Molecular Basis of a Specificity Switch in Oxalate Decarboxylase

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Oxalate decarboxylase (OxDC) catalyzes the conversion of oxalate into formate and carbon dioxide in a remarkable reaction that requires manganese and dioxygen. Previous studies have shown that replacing an active-site loop segment Ser161-Glu162-Asn163-Ser164 in the N-terminal domain of OxDC with the cognate residues Asp161-Ala162-Ser-163-Asn164 of an evolutionarily related, Mn-dependent oxalate oxidase gives a chimeric variant (DASN) that exhibits significantly increased oxidase activity. The mechanistic basis for this change in activity has now been investigated using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS) and isotope effect (IE) measurements. Quantitative analysis of the reaction stoichiometry as a function of oxalate concentration, as determined by MIMS, suggests that the increased oxidase activity of the DASN OxDC variant is associated with only a small fraction of the enzyme molecules in solution. In addition, IE measurements show that C–C bond cleavage in the DASN OxDC variant proceeds via the same mechanism as in the wild-type enzyme, even though the Glu162 side chain is absent. Thus, replacement of the loop residues does not modulate the chemistry of the enzyme-bound Mn(II) ion. Taken together, these results raise the possibility that the observed oxidase activity of the DASN OxDC variant arises from an increased level of access of the solvent to the active site during catalysis, implying that the functional role of Glu162 is to control loop conformation. A 2.6 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a complex between oxalate and the Co(II)-substituted ΔE162 OxDC variant, in which Glu162 has been deleted from the active site loop, reveals the likely mode by which the substrate coordinates the catalytically active Mn ion prior to C–C bond cleavage. The “end-on” conformation of oxalate observed in the structure is consistent with the previously published V/K IE data and provides an empty coordination site for the dioxygen ligand that is thought to

  15. Molecular Engineering of Thiazole Orange Dye: Change of Fluorescent Signaling from Universal to Specific upon Binding with Nucleic Acids in Bioassay.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yu-Jing; Deng, Qiang; Hou, Jin-Qiang; Hu, Dong-Ping; Wang, Zheng-Ya; Zhang, Kun; Luyt, Leonard G; Wong, Wing-Leung; Chow, Cheuk-Fai

    2016-04-15

    The universal fluorescent staining property of thiazole orange (TO) dye was adapted in order to be specific for G-quadruplex DNA structures, through the introduction of a styrene-like substituent at the ortho-position of the TO scaffold. This extraordinary outcome was determined from experimental studies and further explored through molecular docking studies. The molecular docking studies help understand how such a small substituent leads to remarkable fluorescent signal discrimination between G-quadruplex DNA and other types of nucleic acids. The results reveal that the modified dyes bind to the G-quadruplex or duplex DNA in a similar fashion as TO, but exhibit either enhanced or quenched fluorescent signal, which is determined by the spatial length and orientation of the substituent and has never been known. The new fluorescent dye modified with a p-(dimethylamino)styryl substituent offers 10-fold more selectivity toward telomeric G-quadruplexes than double-stranded DNA substrates. In addition, native PAGE experiments, FRET, CD analysis, and live cell imaging were also studied and demonstrated the potential applications of this class of thiazole-orange-based fluorescent probes in bioassays and cell imaging. PMID:26752011

  16. Molecular identification of the economically important freshwater mussels (Mollusca-Bivalvia-Unionoida) of Thailand: developing species-specific markers from AFLPs.

    PubMed

    Vannarattanarat, S; Zieritz, A; Kanchanaketu, T; Kovitvadhi, U; Kovitvadhi, S; Hongtrakul, V

    2014-04-01

    Shells of certain freshwater mussel (Unionoida) species are highly demanded and serve as raw material for a range of decorative and pharmaceutical products. In Thailand, most animals for this purpose are currently harvested from wild populations, with unionoid culture still being in its infancy. Whilst reliable species identification is a prerequisite for developing a large-scale industry, identification by morphological means is hampered by extensive phenotypic plasticity and poor knowledge of species delimitations. To facilitate alternative molecular identification, we developed species-specific markers for the three Thai unionoids with considerable economic potential (CEP): that is, Chamberlainia hainesiana, Hyriopsis desowitzi and Hyriopsis myersiana. For this purpose, amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) fingerprints using 24 specific primer pairs were generated for eight samples of each CEP species and four samples of the closely related, non-CEP species Contradens contradens. Cloning and sequencing of 13 CEP species-specific AFLP bands revealed fragment collision at three occasions. In total, 16 species-specific primer pairs were designed and tested on 92 Thai specimens spanning seven species and four genera. Thereby, specificity of (1) three primers to C. hainesiana, (2) one primer to H. desowitzi + Hyriopsis bialata, (3) one primer to H. myersiana + H. bialata and (4) four primers to all three Hyriopsis species tested was confirmed. Respective multiplex PCR protocols are provided. The developed primers enable cheap, quick and reliable identification of the Thai CEP species by one to three PCRs and offer a tool for a range of additional applications within mussel culture and ecological and evolutionary research on these important organisms. PMID:24313464

  17. Inhibition of HSP70 and a Collagen-Specific Molecular Chaperone (HSP47) Expression in Rat Osteoblasts by Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumei, Yasuhiro; Morita, Sadao; Shimokawa, Hitoyata; Ohya, Kei'ichi; Akiyama, Hideo; Hirano, Masahiko; Sams, Clarence F.; Whitson, Peggy A.

    2003-01-01

    Rat osteoblasts were cultured aboard a space shuttle for 4 or 5 days. Cells were exposed to 1alpha, 25 dihydroxyvitamin D(3) during the last 20 h and then solubilized by guanidine solution. The mRNA levels for molecular chaperones were analyzed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. ELISA was used to quantify TGF-beta1 in the conditioned medium. The HSP70 mRNA levels in the flight cultures were almost completely suppressed, as compared to the ground (1 x g) controls. The inducible HSP70 is known as the major heat shock protein that prevents stress-induced apoptosis. The mean mRNA levels for the constitutive HSC73 in the flight cultures were reduced to 69%, approximately 60% of the ground controls. HSC73 is reported to prevent the pathological state that is induced by disruption of microtubule network. The mean HSP47 mRNA levels in the flight cultures were decreased to 50% and 19% of the ground controls on the 4th and 5th days. Concomitantly, the concentration of TGF-beta1 in the conditioned medium of the flight cultures was reduced to 37% and 19% of the ground controls on the 4th and 5th days. HSP47 is the collagen-specific molecular chaperone that controls collagen processing and quality and is regulated by TGF-beta1. Microgravity differentially modulated the expression of molecular chaperones in osteoblasts, which might be involved in induction and/or prevention of osteopenia in space.

  18. Curcumin specifically binds to the human calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: fluorescence and molecular dynamics simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Hoda, Nasimul; Naz, Huma; Jameel, Ehtesham; Shandilya, Ashutosh; Dey, Sharmistha; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Ahmad, Faizan; Jayaram, B

    2016-03-01

    Calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMK4) plays significant role in the regulation of calcium-dependent gene expression, and thus, it is involved in varieties of cellular functions such as cell signaling and neuronal survival. On the other hand, curcumin, a naturally occurring yellow bioactive component of turmeric possesses wide spectrum of biological actions, and it is widely used to treat atherosclerosis, diabetes, cancer, and inflammation. It also acts as an antioxidant. Here, we studied the interaction of curcumin with human CAMK4 at pH 7.4 using molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, fluorescence binding, and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) methods. We performed MD simulations for both neutral and anionic forms of CAMK4-curcumin complexes for a reasonably long time (150 ns) to see the overall stability of the protein-ligand complex. Molecular docking studies revealed that the curcumin binds in the large hydrophobic cavity of kinase domain of CAMK4 through several hydrophobic and hydrogen-bonded interactions. Additionally, MD simulations studies contributed in understanding the stability of protein-ligand complex system in aqueous solution and conformational changes in the CAMK4 upon binding of curcumin. A significant increase in the fluorescence intensity at 495 nm was observed (λexc = 425 nm), suggesting a strong interaction of curcumin to the CAMK4. A high binding affinity (KD = 3.7 × 10(-8) ± .03 M) of curcumin for the CAMK4 was measured by SPR further indicating curcumin as a potential ligand for the CAMK4. This study will provide insights into designing a new inspired curcumin derivatives as therapeutic agents against many life-threatening diseases. PMID:25929263

  19. Broad-Specificity Chemiluminescence Enzyme Immunoassay for (Fluoro)quinolones: Hapten Design and Molecular Modeling Study of Antibody Recognition.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Haopeng; Chen, Jiahong; Zhang, Chijian; Huang, Xin-An; Sun, Yuanming; Xu, Zhenlin; Lei, Hongtao

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of the structural features of (fluoro)quinolones (FQs), pazufloxacin was first used as a generic immunizing hapten to raise a broad-specificity antibody. The obtained polyclonal antibody exhibited broad cross-reactivity ranging from 5.19% to 478.77% with 21 FQs. Furthermore, the antibody was able to recognize these FQs below their maximum residue limits (MRLs) in an indirect competitive chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay (ic-CLEIA), with the limit of detection (LOD) ranging from 0.10 to 33.83 ng/mL. For simply pretreated milk samples with spiked FQs, the ic-CLEIA exhibited an excellent recovery with a range of 84.6-106.9% and an acceptable coefficient of variation below 15%, suggesting its suitability and reliability for the use of a promising tool to detect FQs. Meanwhile, comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) models, with statistically significant correlation coefficients (q(2)CoMFA = 0.559, r(2)CoMFA = 0.999; q(2)CoMSIA = 0.559, r(2)CoMSIA = 0.994), were established to investigate the antibody recognition mechanism. These two models revealed that in the antibody, the active cavity binding FQs' 7-position substituents worked together with another cavity (binding FQs' 1-position groups) to crucially endow the high cross-reactivity. This investigation will be significant for better exploring the recognition mechanism and for designing new haptens. PMID:26976361

  20. Cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte/molecular beacon complex for sensitive, sequence-specific, real-time DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xuli; Duan, Xinrui; Liu, Libin; An, Lingling; Feng, Fude; Wang, Shu

    2008-11-01

    A new fluorescence method has been developed for DNA detection at room temperature in a sensitive, selective, economical, and real-time manner that interfaces the superiority of a molecular beacon in mismatch discrimination with the light-harvesting property of water-soluble conjugated polyelectrolytes. The probe solution contains a cationic conjugated polyelectrolyte (PFP-NMe3+), a molecular beacon with a five base pairs double-stranded stem labeled at the 5'-terminus with fluorescein (DNA P-Fl), and ethidium bromide (EB, a specific intercalator of dsDNA). The electrostatic interactions between DNA P-Fl and PFP-NMe3+ keep them in close proximity, facilitating the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from PFP-NMe3+ to fluorescein. Upon adding a complementary strand to the probe solution, the conformation of DNA P-Fl transits into dsDNA followed by the intercalation of EB into the grooves. Two-step FRET, from PFP-NMe3+ to DNA P-Fl (FRET-1), followed by FRET from DNA P-Fl to EB (FRET-2) takes place. In view of the observed fluorescein or EB emission changes, DNA can be detected in aqueous solution. Because the base mismatch in target DNA inhibits the transition of DNA P-Fl from the stem-loop to duplex structure, single nucleotide mismatch can be clearly detected. PMID:18834161

  1. Immune cell-specific transcriptional profiling highlights distinct molecular pathways controlled by Tob1 upon experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Didonna, Alessandro; Cekanaviciute, Egle; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Baranzini, Sergio E

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by focal lymphocytic infiltration, demyelination and neurodegeneration. Despite the recent advances in understanding MS molecular basis, no reliable biomarkers have been identified yet to monitor disease progression. Our group has previously reported that low levels of TOB1 in CD4(+) T cells are strongly associated with a higher risk of MS conversion in individuals experiencing an initial demyelinating event. Consistently, Tob1 ablation in mice exacerbates the clinical phenotype of the MS model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). To shed light on Tob1 molecular functions in the immune system, we have conducted the first cell-based transcriptomic analysis in Tob1(-/-) and wildtype mice upon EAE. Next-generation sequencing was employed to characterize the changes in gene expression in T and B cells at pre- and post-symptomatic EAE stages. Remarkably, we found only modest overlap among the different genetic signatures, suggesting that Tob1 may control distinct genetic programs in the different cytotypes. This hypothesis was corroborated by gene ontology and global interactome analyses, which highlighted specific cellular pathways in each cellular subset before and after EAE induction. In summary, our work pinpoints a multifaceted activity of Tob1 in both homeostasis and disease progression. PMID:27546286

  2. Immune cell-specific transcriptional profiling highlights distinct molecular pathways controlled by Tob1 upon experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Didonna, Alessandro; Cekanaviciute, Egle; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Baranzini, Sergio E.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disease of the central nervous system characterized by focal lymphocytic infiltration, demyelination and neurodegeneration. Despite the recent advances in understanding MS molecular basis, no reliable biomarkers have been identified yet to monitor disease progression. Our group has previously reported that low levels of TOB1 in CD4+ T cells are strongly associated with a higher risk of MS conversion in individuals experiencing an initial demyelinating event. Consistently, Tob1 ablation in mice exacerbates the clinical phenotype of the MS model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). To shed light on Tob1 molecular functions in the immune system, we have conducted the first cell-based transcriptomic analysis in Tob1−/− and wildtype mice upon EAE. Next-generation sequencing was employed to characterize the changes in gene expression in T and B cells at pre- and post-symptomatic EAE stages. Remarkably, we found only modest overlap among the different genetic signatures, suggesting that Tob1 may control distinct genetic programs in the different cytotypes. This hypothesis was corroborated by gene ontology and global interactome analyses, which highlighted specific cellular pathways in each cellular subset before and after EAE induction. In summary, our work pinpoints a multifaceted activity of Tob1 in both homeostasis and disease progression. PMID:27546286

  3. Competitive fluorescence assay for specific recognition of atrazine by magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer based on Fe3O4-chitosan.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangyang; Li, Tengfei; Yang, Xin; She, Yongxin; Wang, Miao; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Min; Wang, Shanshan; Jin, Fen; Jin, Maojun; Shao, Hua; Jiang, Zejun; Yu, Hailong

    2016-02-10

    A novel fluorescence sensing strategy for determination of atrazine in tap water involving direct competition between atrazine and 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinyl) aminofluorescein (5-DTAF), and which exploits magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (MMIP), has been developed. The MMIP, based on Fe3O4-chitosan nanoparticles, was synthesized to recognize specific binding sites of atrazine. The recognition capability and selectivity of the MMIP for atrazine and other triazine herbicides was investigated. Under optimal conditions, the competitive reaction between 5-DTAF and atrazine was performed to permit quantitation. Fluorescence intensity changes at 515 nm was linearly related to the logarithm of the atrazine concentration for the range 2.32-185.4 μM. The detection limit for atrazine was 0.86μM (S/N=3) and recoveries were 77.6-115% in spiked tap water samples. PMID:26686107

  4. Effects of eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR) on non-specific chronic back pain: a randomized controlled trial with additional exploration of the underlying mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-specific chronic back pain (CBP) is often accompanied by psychological trauma, but treatment for this associated condition is often insufficient. Nevertheless, despite the common co-occurrence of pain and psychological trauma, a specific trauma-focused approach for treating CBP has been neglected to date. Accordingly, eye movement desensitization and reprocessing (EMDR), originally developed as a treatment approach for posttraumatic stress disorders, is a promising approach for treating CBP in patients who have experienced psychological trauma. Thus, the aim of this study is to determine whether a standardized, short-term EMDR intervention added to treatment as usual (TAU) reduces pain intensity in CBP patients with psychological trauma vs. TAU alone. Methods/design The study will recruit 40 non-specific CBP patients who have experienced psychological trauma. After a baseline assessment, the patients will be randomized to either an intervention group (n = 20) or a control group (n = 20). Individuals in the EMDR group will receive ten 90-minute sessions of EMDR fortnightly in addition to TAU. The control group will receive TAU alone. The post-treatment assessments will take place two weeks after the last EMDR session and six months later. The primary outcome will be the change in the intensity of CBP within the last four weeks (numeric rating scale 0–10) from the pre-treatment assessment to the post-treatment assessment two weeks after the completion of treatment. In addition, the patients will undergo a thorough assessment of the change in the experience of pain, disability, trauma-associated distress, mental co-morbidities, resilience, and quality of life to explore distinct treatment effects. To explore the mechanisms of action that are involved, changes in pain perception and pain processing (quantitative sensory testing, conditioned pain modulation) will also be assessed. The statistical analysis of the primary outcome will be performed

  5. Plasmodium-specific molecular assays produce uninterpretable results and non-Plasmodium spp. sequences in field-collected Anopheles vectors.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Genelle F; Foley, Desmond H; Rueda, Leopoldo M; Melanson, Vanessa R; Wilkerson, Richard C; Long, Lewis S; Richardson, Jason H; Klein, Terry A; Kim, Heung-Chul; Lee, Won-Ja

    2013-12-01

    The Malaria Research and Reference Reagent Resource-recommended PLF/UNR/VIR polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect Plasmodium vivax in Anopheles spp. mosquitoes collected in South Korea. Samples that were amplified were sequenced and compared with known Plasmodium spp. by using the PlasmoDB.org Basic Local Alignment Search Tool/n and the National Center for Biotechnology Information Basic Local Alignment Search Tool/n tools. Results show that the primers PLF/UNR/VIR used in this PCR can produce uninterpretable results and non-specific sequences in field-collected mosquitoes. Three additional PCRs (PLU/VIV, specific for 18S small subunit ribosomal DNA; Pvr47, specific for a nuclear repeat; and GDCW/PLAS, specific for the mitochondrial marker, cytB) were then used to find a more accurate and interpretable assay. Samples that were amplified were again sequenced. The PLU/VIV and Pvr47 assays showed cross-reactivity with non-Plasmodium spp. and an arthropod fungus (Zoophthora lanceolata). The GDCW/PLAS assay amplified only Plasmodium spp. but also amplified the non-human specific parasite P. berghei from an Anopheles belenrae mosquito. Detection of P. berghei in South Korea is a new finding. PMID:24189365

  6. Effect of Ag addition to L1{sub 0} FePt and L1{sub 0} FePd films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Tokuoka, Y.; Seto, Y.; Kato, T.; Iwata, S.

    2014-05-07

    L1{sub 0} ordered FePt-Ag (5 nm) and FePd-Ag (5 nm) films were grown on MgO (001) substrate at temperatures of 250–400 °C by using molecular beam epitaxy method, and their crystal and surface structures, perpendicular magnetic anisotropies and Curie temperatures were investigated. In the case of FePt-Ag, Ag addition with the amount of 10–20 at. % was effective to promote L1{sub 0} ordering and granular growth, resulting in the increase of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy and coercivity of the FePt-Ag films. On the other hand, in the case of FePd-Ag, Ag addition changed the surface morphology from island to continuous film associated with the reductions of its coercivity and perpendicular anisotropy. The variations of lattice constants and Curie temperature with Ag addition were significantly different between FePt-Ag and FePd-Ag. For FePd-Ag, the c and a axes lattice spacings and Curie temperature gradually changed with increasing Ag content, while they unchanged for FePt-Ag. These results suggest the possibility of the formation of FePdAg alloy in FePd-Ag, while Ag segregation in FePt-Ag.

  7. Molecularly imprinted polymers for the pre-concentration of polar organic micropollutants for compound-specific isotope analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkour, Rani; Hofstetter, Thomas B.

    2014-05-01

    Compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) is a promising tool for assessing transformations of polar organic micropollutants such as pesticides, pharmaceuticals and consumer chemicals in aquatic systems. There are, however, two major challenges: (1) Polar organic micropollutants occur at very low levels and, as a consequence, large amounts of water are required to achieve analyte enrichment with factors of 50'000 and more, inevitably leading to large interferences from the aqueous matrix. (2) The polarity of these micropollutants impedes the use of typical non-polar sorbates for solid-phase enrichment. In view of these challenges, the use of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) is a promising approach to produce tailor-made materials for highly selective enrichment of polar organic micropollutants with reduced matrix interferences. In this work, we explore the use of MIP to selectively enrich benzotriazoles, an important class of polar aquatic micropollutants. Polymers were synthesized in the presence of 5,6-dimethyl-1H-benzotriazole as a template, which leaves cavities in the polymer matrix with a very high affinity to the template and closely related structures including our main target analyte, 1H-benzotrizole. After extraction of the template, specific recognition of substituted benzotriazoles is expected by the synthesized MIPs. As the MIP has no specific affinity to the matrix, there is also expected to be negligible enrichment of the matrix. Retention factors of the MIP are compared for different synthetic procedures and to non-imprinted polymers where no specific intermolecular interactions with benzotriazoles are expected. Optimum performance of the MIP is demonstrated in this study in terms of the selectivity of enrichment, recoveries of analytes and the goodness of carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios measured by gas chromatography isotopic ratio mass spectrometry (GC/IRMS). This approach will enable us to enrich large amounts of aqueous samples while

  8. Additive effects of levonorgestrel and ethinylestradiol on brain aromatase (cyp19a1b) in zebrafish specific in vitro and in vivo bioassays.

    PubMed

    Hinfray, N; Tebby, C; Garoche, C; Piccini, B; Bourgine, G; Aït-Aïssa, S; Kah, O; Pakdel, F; Brion, F

    2016-09-15

    Estrogens and progestins are widely used in combination in human medicine and both are present in aquatic environment. Despite the joint exposure of aquatic wildlife to estrogens and progestins, very little information is available on their combined effects. In the present study we investigated the effect of ethinylestradiol (EE2) and Levonorgestrel (LNG), alone and in mixtures, on the expression of the brain specific ER-regulated cyp19a1b gene. For that purpose, recently established zebrafish-derived tools were used: (i) an in vitro transient reporter gene assay in a human glial cell line (U251-MG) co-transfected with zebrafish estrogen receptors (zfERs) and the luciferase gene under the control of the zebrafish cyp19a1b gene promoter and (ii) an in vivo bioassay using a transgenic zebrafish expressing GFP under the control of the zebrafish cyp19a1b gene promoter (cyp19a1b-GFP). Concentration-response relationships for single chemicals were modeled and used to design the mixture experiments following a ray design. The results from mixture experiments were analyzed to predict joint effects according to concentration addition and statistical approaches were used to characterize the potential interactions between the components of the mixtures (synergism/antagonism). We confirmed that some progestins could elicit estrogenic effects in fish brain. In mixtures, EE2 and LNG exerted additive estrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that some environmental progestin could exert effects that will add to those of environmental (xeno-)estrogens. Moreover, our zebrafish specific assays are valuable tools that could be used in risk assessment for both single chemicals and their mixtures. PMID:27491593

  9. A structural comparison of the colicin immunity proteins Im7 and Im9 gives new insights into the molecular determinants of immunity-protein specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, C A; Videler, H; Pauptit, R A; Wallis, R; James, R; Moore, G R; Kleanthous, C

    1998-01-01

    We report the first detailed comparison of two immunity proteins which, in conjunction with recent protein engineering data, begins to explain how these structurally similar proteins are able to bind and inhibit the endonuclease domain of colicin E9 (E9 DNase) with affinities that differ by 12 orders of magnitude. In the present work, we have determined the X-ray structure of the Escherichia coli colicin E7 immunity protein Im7 to 2.0 A resolution by molecular replacement, using as a trial model the recently determined NMR solution structure of Im9. Whereas the two proteins adopt similar four-helix structures, subtle structural differences, in particular involving a conserved tyrosine residue critical for E9 DNase binding, and the identity of key residues in the specificity helix, lie at the heart of their markedly different ability to bind the E9 DNase. Two other crystal structures were reported recently for Im7; in one, Im7 was a monomer and was very similar to the structure reported here, whereas in the other it was a dimer to which functional significance was assigned. Since this previous work suggested that Im7 could exist either as a monomer or a dimer, we used analytical ultracentrifugation to investigate this question further. Under a variety of solution conditions, we found that Im7 only ever exists in solution as a monomer, even up to protein concentrations of 15 mg/ml, casting doubt on the functional significance of the crystallographically observed dimer. This work provides a structural framework with which we can understand immunity-protein specificity, and in addition we believe it to be the first successfully refined crystal structure solved by molecular replacement using an NMR trial model with less than 100% sequence identity. PMID:9639578

  10. Integrative View of α2,3-Sialyltransferases (ST3Gal) Molecular and Functional Evolution in Deuterostomes: Significance of Lineage-Specific Losses

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Daniel; Teppa, Elin; Mir, Anne-Marie; Vicogne, Dorothée; Thisse, Christine; Thisse, Bernard; Filloux, Cyril; Harduin-Lepers, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Sialyltransferases are responsible for the synthesis of a diverse range of sialoglycoconjugates predicted to be pivotal to deuterostomes’ evolution. In this work, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of the metazoan α2,3-sialyltransferases family (ST3Gal), a subset of sialyltransferases encompassing six subfamilies (ST3Gal I–ST3Gal VI) functionally characterized in mammals. Exploration of genomic and expressed sequence tag databases and search of conserved sialylmotifs led to the identification of a large data set of st3gal-related gene sequences. Molecular phylogeny and large scale sequence similarity network analysis identified four new vertebrate subfamilies called ST3Gal III-r, ST3Gal VII, ST3Gal VIII, and ST3Gal IX. To address the issue of the origin and evolutionary relationships of the st3gal-related genes, we performed comparative syntenic mapping of st3gal gene loci combined to ancestral genome reconstruction. The ten vertebrate ST3Gal subfamilies originated from genome duplication events at the base of vertebrates and are organized in three distinct and ancient groups of genes predating the early deuterostomes. Inferring st3gal gene family history identified also several lineage-specific gene losses, the significance of which was explored in a functional context. Toward this aim, spatiotemporal distribution of st3gal genes was analyzed in zebrafish and bovine tissues. In addition, molecular evolutionary analyses using specificity determining position and coevolved amino acid predictions led to the identification of amino acid residues with potential implication in functional divergence of vertebrate ST3Gal. We propose a detailed scenario of the evolutionary relationships of st3gal genes coupled to a conceptual framework of the evolution of ST3Gal functions. PMID:25534026

  11. OH-Radical Specific Addition to Glutathione S-Atom at the Air-Water Interface: Relevance to the Redox Balance of the Lung Epithelial Lining Fluid.

    PubMed

    Enami, Shinichi; Hoffmann, Michael R; Colussi, Agustín J

    2015-10-01

    Antioxidants in epithelial lining fluids (ELF) prevent inhaled air pollutants from reaching lung tissue. This process, however, may upset ELF's redox balance, which is deemed to be expressed by the ratio of the major antioxidant glutathione (GSH) to its putative oxidation product GSSG. Previously, we found that at physiological pH O3(g) rapidly oxidizes GS(2-)(aq) (but not GSH(-)) to GSO3(-) rather than GSSG. Here, we report that in moderately acidic pH ≤ 5 media ·OH(g) oxidizes GSH(-)(aq) to sulfenic GSOH(-), sulfinic GSO2(-), and sulfonic GSO3(-) acids via ·OH specific additions to reduced S-atoms. The remarkable specificity of ·OH on water versus its lack of selectivity in bulk water implicates an unprecedented steering process during [OH···GSH] interfacial encounters. Thus, both O3 and ·OH oxidize GSH to GSOH(-) under most conditions, and since GSOH(-) is reduced back to GSH in vivo by NADPH, redox balance may be in fact signaled by GSH/GSOH ratios. PMID:26722895

  12. Cell-specific CO2 fixation rates of two distinct groups of plastidic protists in the Atlantic Ocean remain unchanged after nutrient addition.

    PubMed

    Grob, Carolina; Jardillier, Ludwig; Hartmann, Manuela; Ostrowski, Martin; Zubkov, Mikhail V; Scanlan, David J

    2015-04-01

    To assess the role of open-ocean ecosystems in global CO2 fixation, we investigated how picophytoplankton, which dominate primary production, responded to episodic increases in nutrient availability. Previous experiments have shown nitrogen alone, or in combination with phosphorus or iron, to be the proximate limiting nutrient(s) for total phytoplankton grown over several days. Much less is known about how nutrient upshift affects picophytoplankton CO2 fixation over the duration of the light period. To address this issue, we performed a series of small volume (8-60 ml) - short term (10-11 h) nutrient addition experiments in different regions of the Atlantic Ocean using NH4 Cl, FeCl3 , K medium, dust and nutrient-rich water from 300 m depth. We found no significant nutrient stimulation of group-specific CO2 fixation rates of two taxonomically and size-distinct groups of plastidic protists. The above was true regardless of the region sampled or nutrient added, suggesting that this is a generic phenomenon. Our findings show that at least in the short term (i.e. daylight period), nutrient availability does not limit CO2 fixation by the smallest plastidic protists, while their taxonomic composition does not determine their response to nutrient addition. PMID:25345650

  13. The expression pattern of small nucleolar and small Cajal body-specific RNAs characterizes distinct molecular subtypes of multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Ronchetti, D; Todoerti, K; Tuana, G; Agnelli, L; Mosca, L; Lionetti, M; Fabris, S; Colapietro, P; Miozzo, M; Ferrarini, M; Tassone, P; Neri, A

    2012-01-01

    Small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and small Cajal body-specific RNAs (scaRNAs) are non-coding RNAs involved in the maturation of other RNA molecules and generally located in the introns of host genes. It is now emerging that altered sno/scaRNAs expression may have a pathological role in cancer. This study elucidates the patterns of sno/scaRNAs expression in multiple myeloma (MM) by profiling purified malignant plasma cells from 55 MMs, 8 secondary plasma cell leukemias (sPCLs) and 4 normal controls. Overall, a global sno/scaRNAs downregulation was found in MMs and, even more, in sPCLs compared with normal plasma cells. Whereas SCARNA22 resulted the only sno/scaRNA characterizing the translocation/cyclin D4 (TC4) MM, TC2 group displayed a distinct sno/scaRNA signature overexpressing members of SNORD115 and SNORD116 families located in a region finely regulated by an imprinting center at 15q11, which, however, resulted overall hypomethylated in MMs independently of the SNORD115 and SNORD116 expression levels. Finally, integrative analyses with available gene expression and genome-wide data revealed the occurrence of significant sno/scaRNAs/host genes co-expression and the putative influence of allelic imbalances on specific snoRNAs expression. Our data extend the current view of sno/scaRNAs deregulation in cancer and add novel information to the bio-molecular complexity of plasma cell dyscrasias. PMID:23178508

  14. Molecular and classical genetic analyses of his-3 mutants of Neurospora crassa. I. Tests for allelic complementation and specific revertibility.

    PubMed

    Overton, L K; Dubins, J S; de Serres, F J

    1989-10-01

    A collection of 81 his-3 mutants of Neurospora crassa was analyzed in assays for allelic complementation and specific revertibility. In these studies, the linearity of the complementation map of the his-3 cistron (Webber, 1965) was confirmed and mutants were classified as complementing with non-polarized or polarized complementation patterns, or non-complementing. In the assays for spontaneous or induced revertibility, 89% (71/80) of the mutants reverted either spontaneously or after treatment with the chemical mutagens N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, ethyl methanesulfonate, 2-methoxy-6-chloro-9-(3-[ethyl-2-chloroethyl]aminopropylamino) acridine dihydrochloride, nitrous acid or hydroxylamine. The frequency of revertible mutants among the non-polarized complementing mutants was 96% (45/47), and 79% (15/19) for the polarized complementing and 79% (11/14) for the non-complementing mutants. The results of these classical genetic assays for allelic complementation and specific revertibility suggest a correlation between complementation pattern and presumptive genetic alterations at the molecular level among his-3 mutants similar to that found with ad-3B mutants induced by nitrous acid (Malling and de Serres, 1967), ethyl methanesulfonate (Malling and de Serres, 1968), or ultraviolet (Kilbey et al., 1971). PMID:2529437

  15. Identification of Barramundi (Lates calcarifer) DC-SCRIPT, a Specific Molecular Marker for Dendritic Cells in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Zoccola, Emmanuelle; Delamare-Deboutteville, Jérôme; Barnes, Andrew C.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen presentation is a critical step bridging innate immune recognition and specific immune memory. In mammals, the process is orchestrated by dendritic cells (DCs) in the lymphatic system, which initiate clonal proliferation of antigen-specific lymphocytes. However, fish lack a classical lymphatic system and there are currently no cellular markers for DCs in fish, thus antigen-presentation in fish is poorly understood. Recently, antigen-presenting cells similar in structure and function to mammalian DCs were identified in various fish, including rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). The present study aimed to identify a potential molecular marker for DCs in fish and therefore targeted DC-SCRIPT, a well-conserved zinc finger protein that is preferentially expressed in all sub-types of human DCs. Putative dendritic cells were obtained in culture by maturation of spleen and pronephros-derived monocytes. DC-SCRIPT was identified in barramundi by homology using RACE PCR and genome walking. Specific expression of DC-SCRIPT was detected in barramundi cells by Stellaris mRNA FISH, in combination with MHCII expression when exposed to bacterial derived peptidoglycan, suggesting the presence of DCs in L. calcarifer. Moreover, morphological identification was achieved by light microscopy of cytospins prepared from these cultures. The cultured cells were morphologically similar to mammalian and trout DCs. Migration assays determined that these cells have the ability to move towards pathogens and pathogen associated molecular patterns, with a preference for peptidoglycans over lipopolysaccharides. The cells were also strongly phagocytic, engulfing bacteria and rapidly breaking them down. Barramundi DCs induced significant proliferation of responder populations of T-lymphocytes, supporting their role as antigen presenting cells. DC-SCRIPT expression in head kidney was higher 6 and 24 h following intraperitoneal challenge with peptidoglycan and

  16. Use of mouse models to understand the molecular basis of tissue-specific tumorigenesis in the Carney complex.

    PubMed

    Kirschner, L S

    2009-07-01

    Carney complex (CNC) is an autosomal dominant, multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome comprised of spotty skin pigmentation, myxomatosis, endocrine tumours and schwannomas. The majority of cases are due to inactivating mutations in PRKAR1A, the gene encoding the type 1A regulatory subunit of the 3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase, PKA (protein kinase A). In order to understand the molecular basis for tumorigenesis associated with PRKAR1A mutations, we have developed conventional and conditional Prkar1a knockout (KO) mice as well as primary cell culture models corresponding to these genetic manipulations. At the biochemical level, removal of Prkar1a from cells causes enhanced PKA activity, the same effect which has been observed in tumours isolated from CNC patients. Mice heterozygous for Prkar1a mutations (the exact genetic model for CNC patients) are born at expected frequencies and are tumour prone, developing neoplasms in cAMP-responsive cell types such as Schwann cells, osteoblasts and thyrocytes. In order to understand the basis of tissue-specific tumour formation, we have created tissue-specific KOs of the gene from three different tissues: the neural crest (Schwann cells), the pituitary gland and the heart. In the neural crest and the pituitary, ablation of Prkar1a leads to excess proliferation and tumorigenesis, whereas the same manipulation in developing cardiomyocytes leads to reduced proliferation and embryonic demise. The KO hearts also exhibit myxomatous changes suggesting a connection between PKA activation and myxomagenesis, although the nature of this relationship has not yet been determined. This work confirms the role of Prkar1a as a tissue-specific tumour suppressor, and ongoing work is focused on identifying the key downstream signalling targets affected by dysregulation of PKA. PMID:19522826

  17. Molecular cloning of AtRS4, a seed specific multifunctional RFO synthase/galactosylhydrolase in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Gangl, Roman; Behmüller, Robert; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Stachyose is among the raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) one of the major water-soluble carbohydrates next to sucrose in seeds of a number of plant species. Especially in leguminous seeds, e.g. chickpea, stachyose is reported as the major component. In contrast to their ambiguous potential as essential source of carbon for germination, RFOs are indigestible for humans and can contribute to diverse abdominal disorders. In the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, six putative raffinose synthase genes are reported, whereas little is known about these putative raffinose synthases and their biochemical characteristics or their contribution to the RFO physiology in A. thaliana. In this paper, we report on the molecular cloning, functional expression in Escherichia coli and purification of recombinant AtRS4 from A. thaliana and the biochemical characterisation of the putative stachyose synthase (AtSTS, At4g01970) as a raffinose and high affinity stachyose synthase (Km for raffinose 259.2 ± 21.15 μM) as well as stachyose and galactinol specific galactosylhydrolase. A T-DNA insertional mutant in the AtRS4 gene was isolated. Only semi-quantitative PCR from WT siliques showed a specific transcriptional AtRS4 PCR product. Metabolite measurements in seeds of ΔAtRS4 mutant plants revealed a total loss of stachyose in ΔAtRS4 mutant seeds. We conclude that AtRS4 is the only stachyose synthase in the genome of A. thaliana that AtRS4 represents a key regulation mechanism in the RFO physiology of A. thaliana due to its multifunctional enzyme activity and that AtRS4 is possibly the second seed specific raffinose synthase beside AtRS5, which is responsible for Raf accumulation under abiotic stress. PMID:26483807

  18. Molecular cloning of five individual stage- and tissue-specific mRNA sequences from sea urchin pluteus embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Fregien, N; Dolecki, G J; Mandel, M; Humphreys, T

    1983-01-01

    Five developmentally regulated sea urchin mRNA sequences which increase in abundance between the blastula and pluteus stages of development were isolated by molecular cloning of cDNA. The regulated sequences all appeared in moderately abundant mRNA molecules of pluteus cells and represented 4% of the clones tested. There were no regulated sequences detected in the 40% of the clones which hybridized to the most abundant mRNA, and the screening procedures were inadequate to detect possible regulation in the 20 to 30% of the clones presumably derived from rare-class mRNA. The reaction of 32P[cDNA] from blastula and pluteus mRNA to dots of the cloned DNAs on nitrocellulose filters indicated that the mRNAs complementary to the different cloned pluteus-specific sequences were between 3- and 47-fold more prevalent at the pluteus stage than at the blastula stage. Polyadenylated RNA from different developmental stages was transferred from electrophoretic gels to nitrocellulose filters and reacted to the different cloned sequences. The regulated mRNAs were undetectable in the RNA of 3-h embryos, became evident at the hatching blastula stage, and reached a maximum in abundance by the gastrula or pluteus stage. Certain of the clones reacted to two sizes of mRNA which did not vary coordinately with development. Transfers of RNA isolated from each of the three cell layers of pluteus embryos that were reacted to the cloned sequences revealed that two of the sequences were found in the mRNA of all three layers, two were ectoderm specific, and one was endoderm specific. Four of the regulated sequences were complementary to one or two major bands and one to at least 50 bands on Southern transfers of restriction endonuclease-digested total sea urchin DNA. Images PMID:6688291

  19. Characterization of molecular and cellular functions of the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK9 using a novel specific inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Albert, T K; Rigault, C; Eickhoff, J; Baumgart, K; Antrecht, C; Klebl, B; Mittler, G; Meisterernst, M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The cyclin-dependent kinase CDK9 is an important therapeutic target but currently available inhibitors exhibit low specificity and/or narrow therapeutic windows. Here we have used a new highly specific CDK9 inhibitor, LDC000067 to interrogate gene control mechanisms mediated by CDK9. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The selectivity of LDC000067 was established in functional kinase assays. Functions of CDK9 in gene expression were assessed with in vitro transcription experiments, single gene analyses and genome-wide expression profiling. Cultures of mouse embryonic stem cells, HeLa cells, several cancer cell lines, along with cells from patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia were also used to investigate cellular responses to LDC000067. KEY RESULTS The selectivity of LDC000067 for CDK9 over other CDKs exceeded that of the known inhibitors flavopiridol and DRB. LDC000067 inhibited in vitro transcription in an ATP-competitive and dose-dependent manner. Gene expression profiling of cells treated with LDC000067 demonstrated a selective reduction of short-lived mRNAs, including important regulators of proliferation and apoptosis. Analysis of de novo RNA synthesis suggested a wide ranging positive role of CDK9. At the molecular and cellular level, LDC000067 reproduced effects characteristic of CDK9 inhibition such as enhanced pausing of RNA polymerase II on genes and, most importantly, induction of apoptosis in cancer cells. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our study provides a framework for the mechanistic understanding of cellular responses to CDK9 inhibition. LDC000067 represents a promising lead for the development of clinically useful, highly specific CDK9 inhibitors. PMID:24102143

  20. Molecular cloning of AtRS4, a seed specific multifunctional RFO synthase/galactosylhydrolase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Gangl, Roman; Behmüller, Robert; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Stachyose is among the raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) one of the major water-soluble carbohydrates next to sucrose in seeds of a number of plant species. Especially in leguminous seeds, e.g. chickpea, stachyose is reported as the major component. In contrast to their ambiguous potential as essential source of carbon for germination, RFOs are indigestible for humans and can contribute to diverse abdominal disorders. In the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, six putative raffinose synthase genes are reported, whereas little is known about these putative raffinose synthases and their biochemical characteristics or their contribution to the RFO physiology in A. thaliana. In this paper, we report on the molecular cloning, functional expression in Escherichia coli and purification of recombinant AtRS4 from A. thaliana and the biochemical characterisation of the putative stachyose synthase (AtSTS, At4g01970) as a raffinose and high affinity stachyose synthase (Km for raffinose 259.2 ± 21.15 μM) as well as stachyose and galactinol specific galactosylhydrolase. A T-DNA insertional mutant in the AtRS4 gene was isolated. Only semi-quantitative PCR from WT siliques showed a specific transcriptional AtRS4 PCR product. Metabolite measurements in seeds of ΔAtRS4 mutant plants revealed a total loss of stachyose in ΔAtRS4 mutant seeds. We conclude that AtRS4 is the only stachyose synthase in the genome of A. thaliana that AtRS4 represents a key regulation mechanism in the RFO physiology of A. thaliana due to its multifunctional enzyme activity and that AtRS4 is possibly the second seed specific raffinose synthase beside AtRS5, which is responsible for Raf accumulation under abiotic stress. PMID:26483807

  1. The molecular basis for the post-translational addition of amino acids by L/F transferase in the N-end rule pathway.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai S; Fahlman, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    The N-end rule pathway is a conserved targeted proteolytic process observed in organisms ranging from eubacteria to mammals. The N-end rule relates the metabolic stability of a protein to its N-terminal amino acid residue. The identity of the N-terminal amino acid residue is a primary degradation signal, often referred to as an N-degron, which is recognized by the components of the N-end rule when it is a destabilizing N-terminus. N-degrons may be exposed by non-processive proteolytic cleavages or by post-translational modifications. One modification is the post-translational addition of amino acids to the N-termini of proteins, a reaction catalyzed by aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferases. The aminoacyl-tRNA protein transferase in eubacteria like Escherichia coli is L/F transferase. Recent investigations have reported unexpected observations regarding the L/F transferase catalytic mechanism and its mechanisms of substrate recognition. Additionally, recent proteome-wide identification of putative in vivo substrates facilitates hypothesis into the yet elusive biological functions of the prokaryotic N-end rule pathway. Here we summarize the recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of catalysis and substrate recognition by the E. coli L/F transferase in the prokaryotic N-end rule pathway. PMID:25692952

  2. Sporadic Early-Onset Colorectal Cancer Is a Specific Sub-Type of Cancer: A Morphological, Molecular and Genetics Study

    PubMed Central

    Kirzin, Sylvain; Marisa, Laetitia; Guimbaud, Rosine; De Reynies, Aurélien; Legrain, Michèle; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Cordelier, Pierre; Pradère, Bernard; Bonnet, Delphine; Meggetto, Fabienne; Portier, Guillaume; Brousset, Pierre; Selves, Janick

    2014-01-01

    Sporadic early onset colorectal carcinoma (EOCRC) which has by definition no identified hereditary predisposition is a growing problem that remains poorly understood. Molecular analysis could improve identification of distinct sub-types of colorectal cancers (CRC) with therapeutic implications and thus can help establish that sporadic EOCRC is a distinct entity. From 954 patients resected for CRC at our institution, 98 patients were selected. Patients aged 45–60 years were excluded to help define “young” and “old” groups. Thirty-nine cases of sporadic EOCRC (patients≤45 years with microsatellite stable tumors) were compared to both microsatellite stable tumors from older patients (36 cases, patients>60 years) and to groups of patients with microsatellite instability. Each group was tested for TP53, KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA mutations and the presence of a methylator phenotype. Gene expression profiles were also used for pathway analysis. Compared to microsatellite stable CRC from old patients, sporadic EOCRC were characterized by distal location, frequent synchronous metastases and infrequent synchronous adenomas but did not have specific morphological characteristics. A familial history of CRC was more common in sporadic EOCRC patients despite a lack of identified hereditary conditions (p = 0.013). Genetic studies also showed the absence of BRAF mutations (p = 0.022) and the methylator phenotype (p = 0.005) in sporadic EOCRC compared to older patients. Gene expression analysis implicated key pathways such as Wnt/beta catenin, MAP Kinase, growth factor signaling (EGFR, HGF, PDGF) and the TNFR1 pathway in sporadic EOCRC. Wnt/beta catenin signaling activation was confirmed by aberrant nuclear beta catenin immunostaining (p = 0.01). This study strongly suggests that sporadic EOCRC is a distinct clinico-molecular entity presenting as a distal and aggressive disease associated with chromosome instability. Furthermore, several signaling pathways

  3. Tissue-Specific Changes in Molecular Clocks During the Transition from Pregnancy to Lactation in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Theresa M.; Crodian, Jennifer; Erickson, Emily; Kuropatwinski, Karen K.; Gleiberman, Anatoli S.; Antoch, Marina P.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circadian clocks regulate homeostasis and mediate responses to stressors. Lactation is one of the most energetically demanding periods of an adult female's life. Peripartum changes occur in almost every organ so the dam can support neonatal growth through milk production while homeostasis is maintained. How circadian clocks are involved in adaptation to lactation is currently unknown. The abundance and temporal pattern of core clock genes' expression were measured in suprachiasmatic nucleus, liver, and mammary from late pregnant and early lactation mice. Tissue-specific changes in molecular clocks occurred between physiological states. Amplitude and robustness of rhythms increased in suprachiasmatic nucleus and liver. Mammary rhythms of core molecular clock genes were suppressed. Attenuated rhythms appeared to be a physiological adaptation of mammary to lactation, because manipulation of timing of suckling resulting in significant differences in plasma prolactin and corticosterone had no effect on amplitude. Analysis of core clock proteins revealed that the stoichiometric relationship between positive (CLOCK) and negative (PER2) components remained 1:1 in liver but was increased to 4:1 in mammary during physiological transition. Induction of differentiation of mammary epithelial cell line HC11 with dexamethasone, insulin, and prolactin resulted in similar stoichiometric changes among positive and negative clock regulators, and prolactin induced phase shifts in HC11 Arntl expression rhythm. Data support that distinct mechanisms drive periparturient changes in mammary clock. Stoichiometric change in clock regulators occurs with gland differentiation. Suppression of mammary clock gene expression rhythms represents a physiological adaptation to suckling cues. Adaptations in mammary clock are likely needed in part to support suckling demands of neonates. PMID:24759789

  4. Structure Prediction, Molecular Dynamics Simulation and Docking Studies of D-Specific Dehalogenase from Rhizobium sp. RC1

    PubMed Central

    Sudi, Ismaila Yada; Wong, Ee Lin; Joyce-Tan, Kwee Hong; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Huyop, Fahrul

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is no three-dimensional structure of D-specific dehalogenase (DehD) in the protein database. We modeled DehD using ab initio technique, performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and docking of D-2-chloropropionate (D-2CP), D-2-bromopropionate (D-2BP), monochloroacetate (MCA), monobromoacetate (MBA), 2,2-dichloropropionate (2,2-DCP), D,L-2,3-dichloropropionate (D,L-2,3-DCP), and 3-chloropropionate (3-CP) into the DehD active site. The sequences of DehD and D-2-haloacid dehalogenase (HadD) from Pseudomonas putida AJ1 have 15% sequence similarity. The model had 80% of the amino acid residues in the most favored region when compared to the crystal structure of DehI from Pseudomonas putida PP3. Docking analysis revealed that Arg107, Arg134 and Tyr135 interacted with D-2CP, and Glu20 activated the water molecule for hydrolytic dehalogenation. Single residue substitutions at 25–30 °C showed that polar residues of DehD were stable when substituted with nonpolar residues and showed a decrease in activity within the same temperature range. The molecular dynamics simulation of DehD and its variants showed that in R134A variant, Arg107 interacted with D-2CP, while in Y135A, Gln221 and Arg231 interacted with D-2CP. It is our emphatic belief that the new model will be useful for the rational design of DehDs with enhanced potentials. PMID:23443090

  5. Structure prediction, molecular dynamics simulation and docking studies of D-specific dehalogenase from Rhizobium sp. RC1.

    PubMed

    Sudi, Ismaila Yada; Wong, Ee Lin; Joyce-Tan, Kwee Hong; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Jamaluddin, Haryati; Huyop, Fahrul

    2012-01-01

    Currently, there is no three-dimensional structure of D-specific dehalogenase (DehD) in the protein database. We modeled DehD using ab initio technique, performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and docking of D-2-chloropropionate (D-2CP), D-2-bromopropionate (D-2BP), monochloroacetate (MCA), monobromoacetate (MBA), 2,2-dichloropropionate (2,2-DCP), d,l-2,3-dichloropropionate (d,l-2,3-DCP), and 3-chloropropionate (3-CP) into the DehD active site. The sequences of DehD and D-2-haloacid dehalogenase (HadD) from Pseudomonas putida AJ1 have 15% sequence similarity. The model had 80% of the amino acid residues in the most favored region when compared to the crystal structure of DehI from Pseudomonas putida PP3. Docking analysis revealed that Arg107, Arg134 and Tyr135 interacted with D-2CP, and Glu20 activated the water molecule for hydrolytic dehalogenation. Single residue substitutions at 25-30 °C showed that polar residues of DehD were stable when substituted with nonpolar residues and showed a decrease in activity within the same temperature range. The molecular dynamics simulation of DehD and its variants showed that in R134A variant, Arg107 interacted with D-2CP, while in Y135A, Gln221 and Arg231 interacted with D-2CP. It is our emphatic belief that the new model will be useful for the rational design of DehDs with enhanced potentials. PMID:23443090

  6. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. R.; St. Clair, T. L.; Burks, H. D.; Stoakley, D. M.

    1987-01-01

    A method has been found for enhancing the melt flow of thermoplastic polyimides during processing. A high molecular weight 422 copoly(amic acid) or copolyimide was fused with approximately 0.05 to 5 pct by weight of a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive, and this melt was studied by capillary rheometry. Excellent flow and improved composite properties on graphite resulted from the addition of a PMDA-aniline additive to LARC-TPI. Solution viscosity studies imply that amic acid additives temporarily lower molecular weight and, hence, enlarge the processing window. Thus, compositions containing the additive have a lower melt viscosity for a longer time than those unmodified.

  7. Apportioning sources of organic matter in streambed sediments: an integrated molecular and compound-specific stable isotope approach.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Richard J; Pedentchouk, Nikolai; Hiscock, Kevin M; Disdle, Paul; Krueger, Tobias; Rawlins, Barry G

    2015-07-01

    We present a novel application for quantitatively apportioning sources of organic matter in streambed sediments via a coupled molecular and compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of long-chain leaf wax n-alkane biomarkers using a Bayesian mixing model. Leaf wax extracts of 13 plant species were collected from across two environments (aquatic and terrestrial) and four plant functional types (trees, herbaceous perennials, and C3 and C4 graminoids) from the agricultural River Wensum catchment, UK. Seven isotopic (δ13C27, δ13C29, δ13C31, δ13C27-31, δ2H27, δ2H29, and δ2H27-29) and two n-alkane ratio (average chain length (ACL), carbon preference index (CPI)) fingerprints were derived, which successfully differentiated 93% of individual plant specimens by plant functional type. The δ2H values were the strongest discriminators of plants originating from different functional groups, with trees (δ2H27-29=-208‰ to -164‰) and C3 graminoids (δ2H27-29=-259‰ to -221‰) providing the largest contrasts. The δ13C values provided strong discrimination between C3 (δ13C27-31=-37.5‰ to -33.8‰) and C4 (δ13C27-31=-23.5‰ to -23.1‰) plants, but neither δ13C nor δ2H values could uniquely differentiate aquatic and terrestrial species, emphasizing a stronger plant physiological/biochemical rather than environmental control over isotopic differences. ACL and CPI complemented isotopic discrimination, with significantly longer chain lengths recorded for trees and terrestrial plants compared with herbaceous perennials and aquatic species, respectively. Application of a comprehensive Bayesian mixing model for 18 streambed sediments collected between September 2013 and March 2014 revealed considerable temporal variability in the apportionment of organic matter sources. Median organic matter contributions ranged from 22% to 52% for trees, 29% to 50% for herbaceous perennials, 17% to 34% for C3 graminoids and 3% to 7% for C4 graminoids. The results presented here

  8. Proteotranscriptomic Analysis Reveals Stage Specific Changes in the Molecular Landscape of Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Neely, Benjamin A; Wilkins, Christopher E; Marlow, Laura A; Malyarenko, Dariya; Kim, Yunee; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Sasinowska, Heather; Sasinowski, Maciek; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Kislinger, Thomas; Copland, John A; Drake, Richard R

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma comprises 2 to 3% of malignancies in adults with the most prevalent subtype being clear-cell RCC (ccRCC). This type of cancer is well characterized at the genomic and transcriptomic level and is associated with a loss of VHL that results in stabilization of HIF1. The current study focused on evaluating ccRCC stage dependent changes at the proteome level to provide insight into the molecular pathogenesis of ccRCC progression. To accomplish this, label-free proteomics was used to characterize matched tumor and normal-adjacent tissues from 84 patients with stage I to IV ccRCC. Using pooled samples 1551 proteins were identified, of which 290 were differentially abundant, while 783 proteins were identified using individual samples, with 344 being differentially abundant. These 344 differentially abundant proteins were enriched in metabolic pathways and further examination revealed metabolic dysfunction consistent with the Warburg effect. Additionally, the protein data indicated activation of ESRRA and ESRRG, and HIF1A, as well as inhibition of FOXA1, MAPK1 and WISP2. A subset analysis of complementary gene expression array data on 47 pairs of these same tissues indicated similar upstream changes, such as increased HIF1A activation with stage, though ESRRA and ESRRG activation and FOXA1 inhibition were not predicted from the transcriptomic data. The activation of ESRRA and ESRRG implied that HIF2A may also be activated during later stages of ccRCC, which was confirmed in the transcriptional analysis. This combined analysis highlights the importance of HIF1A and HIF2A in developing the ccRCC molecular phenotype as well as the potential involvement of ESRRA and ESRRG in driving these changes. In addition, cofilin-1, profilin-1, nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase A were identified as candidate markers of late stage ccRCC. Utilization of data collected from heterogeneous biological domains strengthened the findings from

  9. Proteotranscriptomic Analysis Reveals Stage Specific Changes in the Molecular Landscape of Clear-Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Christopher E.; Marlow, Laura A.; Malyarenko, Dariya; Kim, Yunee; Ignatchenko, Alexandr; Sasinowska, Heather; Sasinowski, Maciek; Nyalwidhe, Julius O.; Kislinger, Thomas; Copland, John A.; Drake, Richard R.

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma comprises 2 to 3% of malignancies in adults with the most prevalent subtype being clear-cell RCC (ccRCC). This type of cancer is well characterized at the genomic and transcriptomic level and is associated with a loss of VHL that results in stabilization of HIF1. The current study focused on evaluating ccRCC stage dependent changes at the proteome level to provide insight into the molecular pathogenesis of ccRCC progression. To accomplish this, label-free proteomics was used to characterize matched tumor and normal-adjacent tissues from 84 patients with stage I to IV ccRCC. Using pooled samples 1551 proteins were identified, of which 290 were differentially abundant, while 783 proteins were identified using individual samples, with 344 being differentially abundant. These 344 differentially abundant proteins were enriched in metabolic pathways and further examination revealed metabolic dysfunction consistent with the Warburg effect. Additionally, the protein data indicated activation of ESRRA and ESRRG, and HIF1A, as well as inhibition of FOXA1, MAPK1 and WISP2. A subset analysis of complementary gene expression array data on 47 pairs of these same tissues indicated similar upstream changes, such as increased HIF1A activation with stage, though ESRRA and ESRRG activation and FOXA1 inhibition were not predicted from the transcriptomic data. The activation of ESRRA and ESRRG implied that HIF2A may also be activated during later stages of ccRCC, which was confirmed in the transcriptional analysis. This combined analysis highlights the importance of HIF1A and HIF2A in developing the ccRCC molecular phenotype as well as the potential involvement of ESRRA and ESRRG in driving these changes. In addition, cofilin-1, profilin-1, nicotinamide N-methyltransferase, and fructose-bisphosphate aldolase A were identified as candidate markers of late stage ccRCC. Utilization of data collected from heterogeneous biological domains strengthened the findings from

  10. Addition of a Single gp120 Glycan Confers Increased Binding to Dendritic Cell-Specific ICAM-3-Grabbing Nonintegrin and Neutralization Escape to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Lue, James; Hsu, Mayla; Yang, David; Marx, Preston; Chen, Zhiwei; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2002-01-01

    The potential role of dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) binding in human immunodeficiency virus transmission across the mucosal barrier was investigated by assessing the ability of simian-human immunodeficiency chimeric viruses (SHIVs) showing varying degrees of mucosal transmissibility to bind the DC-SIGN expressed on the surface of transfected cells. We found that gp120 of the highly transmissible, pathogenic CCR5-tropic SHIVSF162P3 bound human and rhesus DC-SIGN with an efficiency threefold or greater than that of gp120 of the nonpathogenic, poorly transmissible parental SHIVSF162, and this increase in binding to the DC-SIGN of the SHIVSF162P3 envelope gp120 translated into an enhancement of T-cell infection in trans. The presence of an additional glycan at the N-terminal base of the V2 loop of SHIVSF162P3 gp120 compared to that of the parental virus was shown to be responsible for the increase in binding to DC-SIGN. Interestingly, this glycan also conferred escape from autologous neutralization, raising the possibility that the modification occurred as a result of immune selection. Our data suggest that more-efficient binding of envelope gp120 to DC-SIGN could be relevant to the enhanced mucosal transmissibility of SHIVSF162P3 compared to that of parental SHIVSF162. PMID:12239306

  11. Molecular cloning, sequence characterization and heterologous expression of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) oviduct-specific glycoprotein in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Janjanam, Jagadeesh; Singh, Surender; Choudhary, Suman; Pradeep, Mangottil A; Kumar, Sudarshan; Kumaresan, A; Das, Subrata K; Kaushik, Jai K; Mohanty, Ashok K

    2012-12-01

    Oviductin is a high molecular weight oviduct-specific glycoprotein secreted by the non-ciliated epithelial cells of oviduct during estrous cycle and early pregnancy. It plays an important role during fertilization and early embryonic development. The oviductin gene from oviductal tissues of buffalo was successfully cloned and sequenced. The sequence analysis revealed that buffalo and cattle oviductin share very high homology between their cDNA sequences. The predicted amino acid sequences of the buffalo oviductin exhibited the highest percent of identity of 97 % with bovine followed by 94 % with goat, 93 % with sheep, 78 % with porcine, 72 % with human, 67 % with hamster and rabbit and 65 % with mouse. Oviductin was also observed to share high similarity with the mammalian chitinase, however oviductins do not show chitinase activity due to Glu→Ile mutation in the active site responsible for chitinase activity. The phylogenetic tree based on amino acid sequences of oviductin indicated that buffalo oviductin was closely related to its cattle counterpart, and this clustering is in accordance with the classic taxonomic relationship. Tissue specific expression of the transcripts for buffalo oviductin revealed a high level expression in oviduct and ovary followed by testis, mammary gland, kidney, while in mammary epithelial cells and liver its expression was very low. The full length matured oviductin and its domains constituting chitinase-like domain and mucin-like domain were cloned into pET and pGEX series of expression vectors and over expressed in E. coli. The soluble recombinant oviductin was successfully purified to homogeneity. Full length recombinant oviductin was expressed partially in soluble form, where as the chitinase-like and mucin-like domains of oviductin were expressed in insoluble form and aggregating to form inclusion bodies at both 37 and 16 °C induction temperatures. PMID:22782592

  12. Different low-molecular-mass organic acids specifically control leaching of arsenic and lead from contaminated soil.

    PubMed

    Ash, Christopher; Tejnecký, Václav; Borůvka, Luboš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2016-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass organic acids (LMMOA) are of key importance for mobilisation and fate of metals in soil, by functioning as ligands that increase the amount of dissolved metal in solution or by dissociation of metal binding minerals. Column leaching experiments were performed on soil polluted with As and Pb, in order to determine the specificity of LMMOA related release for individual elements, at varying organic acid concentrations. Acetic, citric and oxalic acids were applied in 12h leaching experiments over a concentration range (0.5-25 mM) to soil samples that represent organic and mineral horizons. The leaching of As followed the order: oxalic>citric>acetic acid in both soils. Arsenic leaching was attributed primarily to ligand-enhanced dissolution of mineral oxides followed by As released into solution, as shown by significant correlation between oxalic and citric acids and content of Al and Fe in leaching solutions. Results suggest that subsurface mineral soil layers are more vulnerable to As toxicity. Leaching of Pb from both soils followed the order: citric>oxalic>acetic acid. Mineral soil samples were shown to be more susceptible to leaching of Pb than samples characterised by a high content of organic matter. The leaching efficiency of citric acid was attributed to formation of stable complexes with Pb ions, which other acids are not capable of. Results obtained in the study are evidence that the extent of As and Pb leaching in contaminated surface and subsurface soil depends significantly on the types of carboxylic acid involved. The implications of the type of acid and the specific element that can be mobilised become increasingly significant where LMMOA concentrations are highest, such as in rhizosphere soil. PMID:26849837

  13. Different low-molecular-mass organic acids specifically control leaching of arsenic and lead from contaminated soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ash, Christopher; Tejnecký, Václav; Borůvka, Luboš; Drábek, Ondřej

    2016-04-01

    Low-molecular-mass organic acids (LMMOA) are of key importance for mobilisation and fate of metals in soil, by functioning as ligands that increase the amount of dissolved metal in solution or by dissociation of metal binding minerals. Column leaching experiments were performed on soil polluted with As and Pb, in order to determine the specificity of LMMOA related release for individual elements, at varying organic acid concentrations. Acetic, citric and oxalic acids were applied in 12 h leaching experiments over a concentration range (0.5-25 mM) to soil samples that represent organic and mineral horizons. The leaching of As followed the order: oxalic > citric > acetic acid in both soils. Arsenic leaching was attributed primarily to ligand-enhanced dissolution of mineral oxides followed by As released into solution, as shown by significant correlation between oxalic and citric acids and content of Al and Fe in leaching solutions. Results suggest that subsurface mineral soil layers are more vulnerable to As toxicity. Leaching of Pb from both soils followed the order: citric > oxalic > acetic acid. Mineral soil samples were shown to be more susceptible to leaching of Pb than samples characterised by a high content of organic matter. The leaching efficiency of citric acid was attributed to formation of stable complexes with Pb ions, which other acids are not capable of. Results obtained in the study are evidence that the extent of As and Pb leaching in contaminated surface and subsurface soil depends significantly on the types of carboxylic acid involved. The implications of the type of acid and the specific element that can be mobilised become increasingly significant where LMMOA concentrations are highest, such as in rhizosphere soil.

  14. The molecular mode of action and species specificity of canakinumab, a human monoclonal antibody neutralizing IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Rondeau, Jean-Michel; Ramage, Paul; Zurini, Mauro; Gram, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) plays a key role in autoinflammatory diseases, such as systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) or cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS). Canakinumab, a human monoclonal anti-IL-1β antibody, was recently approved for human use under the brand name Ilaris®. Canakinumab does not cross-react with IL-1β from mouse, rat, rabbit, or macaques. The crystal structure of the canakinumab Fab bound to human IL-1β was determined in an attempt to rationalize the species specificity. The X-ray analysis reveals a complex surface epitope with an intricate network of well-ordered water molecules at the antibody-antigen interface. The canakinumab paratope is largely pre-organized, as demonstrated by the structure determination of the free Fab. Glu 64 of human IL-1β is a pivotal epitope residue explaining the exquisite species specificity of canakinumab. We identified marmoset as the only non-human primate species that carries Glu 64 in its IL-1β and demonstrates full cross-reactivity of canakinumab, thereby enabling toxicological studies in this species. As demonstrated by the X-ray structure of the complex with IL-1β, canakinumab binds IL-1β on the opposite side with respect to the IL-1RAcP binding site, and in an approximately orthogonal orientation with respect to IL-1RI. However, the antibody and IL-1RI binding sites slightly overlap and the VH region of canakinumab would sterically interfere with the D1 domain of IL-1RI, as shown by a structural overlay with the IL-1β:IL-1RI complex. Therefore, direct competition with IL-1RI for IL-1β binding is the molecular mechanism of neutralization by canakinumab, which is also confirmed by competition assays with recombinant IL-1RI and IL-1RII. PMID:26284424

  15. Molecular and Ecological Evidence for Species Specificity and Coevolution in a Group of Marine Algal-Bacterial Symbioses

    PubMed Central

    Ashen, Jon B.; Goff, Lynda J.

    2000-01-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of bacterial symbionts from three gall-bearing species in the marine red algal genus Prionitis (Rhodophyta) were inferred from 16S rDNA sequence analysis and compared to host phylogeny also inferred from sequence comparisons (nuclear ribosomal internal-transcribed-spacer region). Gall formation has been described previously on two species of Prionitis, P. lanceolata (from central California) and P. decipiens (from Peru). This investigation reports gall formation on a third related host, Prionitis filiformis. Phylogenetic analyses based on sequence comparisons place the bacteria as a single lineage within the Roseobacter grouping of the α subclass of the division Proteobacteria (99.4 to 98.25% sequence identity among phylotypes). Comparison of symbiont and host molecular phylogenies confirms the presence of three gall-bearing algal lineages and is consistent with the hypothesis that these red seaweeds and their bacterial symbionts are coevolving. The species specificity of these associations was investigated in nature by whole-cell hybridization of gall bacteria and in the laboratory by using cross-inoculation trials. Whole-cell in situ hybridization confirmed that a single bacterial symbiont phylotype is present in galls on each host. In laboratory trials, bacterial symbionts were incapable of inducing galls on alternate hosts (including two non-gall-bearing species). Symbiont-host specificity in Prionitis gall formation indicates an effective ecological separation between these closely related symbiont phylotypes and provides an example of a biological context in which to consider the organismic significance of 16S rDNA sequence variation. PMID:10877801

  16. [Sequence of Escherichia coli O11 O-antigen gene cluster and identification of molecular markers specific to O11].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Peng, Xia; Wang, Quan; Cheng, Jian-Song; Wang, Lei

    2006-06-01

    Escherichia coli O11 belongs to Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC), which can cause food-borne disease, hemorrhagic colitis, and hemolytic-uremic syndrome (HUS) in humans. Because of its character of specificity, the O-antigen gene cluster provides the best material for the selection of molecular markers which can be used for rapid genotyping of bacterial strain. In this study, the E.coli O11 O-antigen gene cluster was amplified by Long-range PCR and was sequenced using Shotgun-sequencing approach. Twelve open reading frames were assigned functions on the basis of homology in the E. coli O11 O-antigen gene cluster, including UDP-N-acetyl glucosamine-4-epimerase gene (gne), genes responsible for the biosynthesis of GDP-L-fucose (gmd, fcl, gmm, manC, manB), glycosyl transferase genes, O-unit flippase gene (wzx) and O-antigen polymerase gene (wzy). By polymerase chain reaction against representative stains for all the 166 E. coli and 43 Shigella O serotypes, two genes and four pairs of primers were identified to be specific to E. coli O11. Further PCR was done to detect E. coli O11 from the environmental specimens, and the sensitivities for detecting E.coli O11 from the pork and dejecta specimens were 0.25 cfu/g and 2.5 x 10(3) cfu/g, respectively. Moreover, eight probes were designed and proved to be unique to E. coli O11, which provides the basis for a sensitive test of the rapid detection of E. coli O11 by DNA microarray method. PMID:16933598

  17. Transcriptome analyses reveal genotype- and developmental stage-specific molecular responses to drought and salinity stresses in chickpea.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rohini; Shankar, Rama; Thakkar, Bijal; Kudapa, Himabindu; Krishnamurthy, Lakshmanan; Mantri, Nitin; Varshney, Rajeev K; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Jain, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Drought and salinity are the major factors that limit chickpea production worldwide. We performed whole transcriptome analyses of chickpea genotypes to investigate the molecular basis of drought and salinity stress response/adaptation. Phenotypic analyses confirmed the contrasting responses of the chickpea genotypes to drought or salinity stress. RNA-seq of the roots of drought and salinity related genotypes was carried out under control and stress conditions at vegetative and/or reproductive stages. Comparative analysis of the transcriptomes revealed divergent gene expression in the chickpea genotypes at different developmental stages. We identified a total of 4954 and 5545 genes exclusively regulated in drought-tolerant and salinity-tolerant genotypes, respectively. A significant fraction (~47%) of the transcription factor encoding genes showed differential expression under stress. The key enzymes involved in metabolic pathways, such as carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, lipid metabolism, generation of precursor metabolites/energy, protein modification, redox homeostasis and cell wall component biogenesis, were affected by drought and/or salinity stresses. Interestingly, transcript isoforms showed expression specificity across the chickpea genotypes and/or developmental stages as illustrated by the AP2-EREBP family members. Our findings provide insights into the transcriptome dynamics and components of regulatory network associated with drought and salinity stress responses in chickpea. PMID:26759178

  18. One-pot synthesis of carbon dots-embedded molecularly imprinted polymer for specific recognition of sterigmatocystin in grains.

    PubMed

    Xu, Longhua; Fang, Guozhen; Pan, Mingfei; Wang, Xuefeng; Wang, Shuo

    2016-03-15

    A novel sensitive fluorescent sensor for determination of sterigmatocystin (ST), which was based on carbon dots-embedded molecularly imprinted polymer (CDs@MIP), was prepared by an efficient one-pot reaction. First, highly blue luminescent CDs were synthesized via a one-step reaction. Then, through a non-hydrolytic sol-gel process, MIP was formed on the CDs surface in the presence of 1,8-dihydroxyanthraquinone as an alternative template molecule to obtain CDs@MIP. The CDs acted as antennas for signal amplification and optical readout, and the MIP coated on the CDs surface provided specific binding sites for ST. The performance of CDs@MIP was compared with that of CDs embedded in non-imprinted polymer (CDs@NIP). CDs@MIP exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity toward ST. Under optimized conditions, the relative fluorescence intensity of CDs@MIP decreased linearly with the concentration of ST from 0.05 to 2.0 mgL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.019 mgL(-1) (S/N=3) and the precision for five replicate detections of 0.10 mgL(-1) ST was 2.31%. The sensor was also used to determine the content of ST in grains with satisfactory results. PMID:26544869

  19. Arraying prostate specific antigen PSA and Fab anti-PSA using light-assisted molecular immobilization technology

    PubMed Central

    Parracino, Antonietta; Neves-Petersen, Maria Teresa; di Gennaro, Ane Kold; Pettersson, Kim; Lövgren, Timo; Petersen, Steffen B

    2010-01-01

    We here report for the first time the creation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) and Fab anti-PSA biosensor arrays using UV light-assisted molecular immobilization (LAMI), aiming at the detection and quantification of PSA, a cancer marker. The technology involves formation of free, reactive thiol groups upon UV excitation of protein aromatic residues located in spatial proximity of disulphide bridges, a conserved structural feature in both PSA and Fab molecules. The created thiol groups bind onto thiol reactive surfaces leading to oriented covalent protein immobilization. Protein activity was confirmed carrying out immunoassays: immobilized PSA was recognized by Fab anti-PSA in solution and immobilized Fab anti-PSA cross-reacted with PSA in solution. LAMI technology proved successful in immobilizing biomedically relevant molecules while preserving their activity, highlighting that insight into how light interacts with biomolecules may lead to new biophotonic technologies. Our work focused on the application of our new engineering principles to the design, analysis, construction, and manipulation of biological systems, and on the discovery and application of new engineering principles inspired by the properties of biological systems. PMID:20665692

  20. Magnetic tweezers measurement of the bond lifetime-force behavior of the IgG-protein A specific molecular interaction.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hao; Lee, Gil U

    2007-05-23

    The bond lifetime-force behavior of the immunoglobulin G (IgG)-protein A interaction has been studied with magnetic tweezers to characterize the physical properties of the bond under nonequilibrium conditions. Super-paramagnetic microparticles were developed that have a high and uniform magnetization to simultaneously apply a piconewton-scale tensile force to many thousands of IgG-protein A bonds. A strong and a weak slip bond were detected with an effective bond length that is characteristic of short-range, stiff intermolecular interactions. These bonds are attributed to the interaction of protein A with the constant region (Fc) and heavy chain variable domain (VH) of IgG, respectively. The IgG-VH interaction appears to be one of the weakest specific molecular interactions that has been identified with a single molecule force measurement technique. This study demonstrates that magnetic tweezers can be used to rapidly characterize very weak biomolecular interactions as well as strong biomolecular interactions with a high degree of accuracy. PMID:17465553

  1. Transcriptome analyses reveal genotype- and developmental stage-specific molecular responses to drought and salinity stresses in chickpea

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rohini; Shankar, Rama; Thakkar, Bijal; Kudapa, Himabindu; Krishnamurthy, Lakshmanan; Mantri, Nitin; Varshney, Rajeev K.; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Jain, Mukesh

    2016-01-01

    Drought and salinity are the major factors that limit chickpea production worldwide. We performed whole transcriptome analyses of chickpea genotypes to investigate the molecular basis of drought and salinity stress response/adaptation. Phenotypic analyses confirmed the contrasting responses of the chickpea genotypes to drought or salinity stress. RNA-seq of the roots of drought and salinity related genotypes was carried out under control and stress conditions at vegetative and/or reproductive stages. Comparative analysis of the transcriptomes revealed divergent gene expression in the chickpea genotypes at different developmental stages. We identified a total of 4954 and 5545 genes exclusively regulated in drought-tolerant and salinity-tolerant genotypes, respectively. A significant fraction (~47%) of the transcription factor encoding genes showed differential expression under stress. The key enzymes involved in metabolic pathways, such as carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, lipid metabolism, generation of precursor metabolites/energy, protein modification, redox homeostasis and cell wall component biogenesis, were affected by drought and/or salinity stresses. Interestingly, transcript isoforms showed expression specificity across the chickpea genotypes and/or developmental stages as illustrated by the AP2-EREBP family members. Our findings provide insights into the transcriptome dynamics and components of regulatory network associated with drought and salinity stress responses in chickpea. PMID:26759178

  2. Comparison of specificity and sensitivity of immunochemical and molecular techniques for determination of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

    PubMed

    Kokosková, B; Mráz, I; Fousek, J

    2010-05-01

    Detection of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm), causing bacterial canker of tomato, was verified using PTA-ELISA and IFAS with PAbs of Neogen Europe Ltd. (UK), and with published and also laboratory-generated PCR primers from the Cmm tomatinase gene. The specificity of this technique was determined with 15 plant-pathogenic and 4 common, saprophytic bacteria. With IFAS, crossreactions were found for Pantoea dispersa, P. agglomerans and Rahnella aquatilis, and with PTA-ELISA for Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens, Pectobacterium atrosepticum and Dickeya sp. Cross-reactions with subspecies other than michiganensis were also found using both methods. Molecular methods were optimized by verification of annealing temperatures and times for both primers. Conditions were finally adjusted to 30 s at 65 degrees C for Dreier's and 10 s at 69 degrees C for our primer set. After this optimization, both primer pairs produced positive reaction only with Cmm. By means of PTA-ELISA and IFAS, Cmm strains were detected at a concentration up to 10(5) CFU/mL and 10(3) CFU/mL, respectively. The PCR test with bacterial cell suspensions reached a sensitivity of 10(3) CFU/mL with our designed primers and 104 CFU/mL with Dreier's primer pair. PMID:20526836

  3. Specific effects of Ca(2+) ions and molecular structure of β-lactoglobulin interfacial layers that drive macroscopic foam stability.

    PubMed

    Braunschweig, Björn; Schulze-Zachau, Felix; Nagel, Eva; Engelhardt, Kathrin; Stoyanov, Stefan; Gochev, Georgi; Khristov, Khr; Mileva, Elena; Exerowa, Dotchi; Miller, Reinhard; Peukert, Wolfgang

    2016-07-01

    β-Lactoglobulin (BLG) adsorption layers at air-water interfaces were studied in situ with vibrational sum-frequency generation (SFG), tensiometry, surface dilatational rheology and ellipsometry as a function of bulk Ca(2+) concentration. The relation between the interfacial molecular structure of adsorbed BLG and the interactions with the supporting electrolyte is additionally addressed on higher length scales along the foam hierarchy - from the ubiquitous air-water interface through thin foam films to macroscopic foam. For concentrations <1 mM, a strong decrease in SFG intensity from O-H stretching bands and a slight increase in layer thickness and surface pressure are observed. A further increase in Ca(2+) concentrations above 1 mM causes an apparent change in the polarity of aromatic C-H stretching vibrations from interfacial BLG which we associate to a charge reversal at the interface. Foam film measurements show formation of common black films at Ca(2+) concentrations above 1 mM due to considerable decrease of the stabilizing electrostatic disjoining pressure. These observations also correlate with a minimum in macroscopic foam stability. For concentrations >30 mM Ca(2+), micrographs of foam films show clear signatures of aggregates which tend to increase the stability of foam films. Here, the interfacial layers have a higher surface dilatational elasticity. In fact, macroscopic foams formed from BLG dilutions with high Ca(2+) concentrations where aggregates and interfacial layers with higher elasticity are found, showed the highest stability with much smaller bubble sizes. PMID:27337699

  4. Origins of the specificity of inhibitor P218 toward wild-type and mutant PfDHFR: a molecular dynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Abbat, Sheenu; Jain, Vaibhav; Bharatam, Prasad V

    2015-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to evaluate the origin of the antimalarial effect of the lead compound P218. The simulations of the ligand in the cavities of wild-type, mutant Plasmodium falciparum Dihydrofolate Reductase (PfDHFR) and the human DHFR revealed the differences in the atomic-level interactions and also provided explanation for the specificity of this ligand toward PfDHFR. The binding free energy estimation using Molecular Mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann Surface Area method revealed that P218 has higher binding affinity (~ -30 to -35 kcal/mol) toward PfDHFR (both in wild-type and mutant forms) than human DHFR (~ -22 kcal/mol), corroborating the experimental observations. Intermolecular hydrogen bonding analysis of the trajectories showed that P218 formed two stable hydrogen bonds with human DHFR (Ile7 and Glu30), wild-type and double-mutant PfDHFR's (Asp54 and Arg122), while it formed three stable hydrogen bonds with quadruple-mutant PfDHFR (Asp54, Arg59, and Arg122). Additionally, P218 binding in PfDHFR is stabilized by hydrogen bonds with residues Ile14 and Ile164. It was found that mutant residues do not reduce the binding affinity of P218 to PfDHFR, in contrast, Cys59Arg mutation strongly favors inhibitor binding to quadruple-mutant PfDHFR. The atomistic-level details explored in this work will be highly useful for the design of non-resistant novel PfDHFR inhibitors as antimalarial agents. PMID:25333695

  5. Improving the mining soil quality for a vegetation cover after addition of sewage sludges: inorganic ions and low-molecular-weight organic acids in the soil solution.

    PubMed

    Peña, Aránzazu; Mingorance, Ma Dolores; Guzmán-Carrizosa, Ignacio; Fernández-Espinosa, Antonio J

    2015-03-01

    We assessed the effects of applying stabilized sewage sludge (SSL) and composted sewage sludge (CLV), at 5 and 10% to an acid mining soil. Limed soil (NCL) amended or not with SSL and CLV was incubated for 47 days. We studied the cations and organic and inorganic anions in the soil solution by means of ion chromatography. Liming led to big increases in Ca(2+) and SO4(2-) and to significant decreases in K(+), Mg(2+), NH4(+) and NO3(-). Addition of both organic amendments increased some cations (NH4(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Na(+)) and anions (Cl(-), NO3(-) only with CLV and PO4(3-) only with SSL) and provided a greater amount of low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) (SSL more than CLV). Incubation led to decreases in all cations, particularly remarkable for Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in SSL-10. A decrease in NH4(+) was associated with variations in NO2(-) and NO3(-) resulting from nitrification reactions. During incubation the LMWOAs content tended to decrease similarly to the cations, especially in SSL-10. Chemometric tools revealed a clear discrimination between SSL, CLV and NCL. Furthermore, treatment effects depended upon dose, mainly in SSL. Amendment nature and dose affect the quality of a mining soil and improve conditions for plant establishment. PMID:25506677

  6. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer strategy and its application in the Sudan dyes residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liang; Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Sicen

    2015-07-31

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have become a hotspot owing to the dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the MMIPs were obtained by the surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using Sudan I as the template. The resultant MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and X-ray diffraction. Benefiting from the controlled/living property of the RAFT strategy, the uniform MIP layer was successfully grafted on the surface of RAFT agent-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, favoring the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four Sudan dyes (Sudan I, II, III, and IV) from chili powder samples. The recoveries of the spiked samples in chili powder samples ranged from 74.1 to 93.3% with RSD lower than 6.4% and the relative standard uncertainty lower than 0.029. This work provided a good platform for the extraction and removal of Sudan dyes in complicated matrixes and demonstrated a bright future for the application of the well-constructed MMIPs in the field of solid-phase extraction. PMID:26077971

  7. Improvement in enzyme activity and stability by addition of low molecular weight polyethylene glycol to sodium bis(2-ethyl-L-hexyl)sulfosuccinate/isooctane reverse micellar system.

    PubMed

    Talukder, M M R; Takeyama, T; Hayashi, Y; Wu, J C; Kawanishi, T; Shimizu, N; Ogino, C

    2003-08-01

    The activity and stability of Chromobacterium viscosum lipase (glycerolester hydrolase, EC 3.1.1.3)-catalyzed olive oil hydrolysis in sodium bis (2-ethyl-l-hexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT)/isooctane reverse micelles is increased appreciably when low molecular weight polyethylene glycol (PEG 400) is added to the reverse micelles. To understand the effect of PEG 400 on the phase behavior of the reverse micellar system, the phase diagram of AOT/ PEG 400/water/isooctane system was studied. The influences of relevant parameters on the catalytic activity in AOT/PEG 400 reverse micelles were investigated and compared with the results in the simple AOT reverse micelles. In the presence of PEG 400, the linear decreasing trend of the lipase activity with AOT concentration, which is observed in the simple AOT reverse micelles, disappeared. Enzyme entrapped in AOT/PEG reverse micelles was very stable, retaining >75% of its initial activity after 60 d, whereas the half-life in simple AOT reverse micelles was 38 d. The kinetics parameter maximum velocity (Vmax) exhibiting the temperature dependence and the activation energy obtained by Arrhenius plot was suppressed significantly by the addition of PEG 400. PMID:14515025

  8. Increased sampling reveals novel lineages of Entamoeba: consequences of genetic diversity and host specificity for taxonomy and molecular detection.

    PubMed

    Stensvold, C Rune; Lebbad, Marianne; Victory, Emma L; Verweij, Jaco J; Tannich, Egbert; Alfellani, Mohammed; Legarraga, Paulette; Clark, C Graham

    2011-07-01

    To expand the representation for phylogenetic analysis, ten additional complete Entamoeba small-subunit rRNA gene sequences were obtained from humans, non-human primates, cattle and a tortoise. For some novel sequences no corresponding morphological data were available, and we suggest that these organisms should be referred to as ribosomal lineages (RL) rather than being assigned species names at present. To investigate genetic diversity and host specificity of selected Entamoeba species, a total of 91 new partial small subunit rRNA gene sequences were obtained, including 49 from Entamoeba coli, 18 from Entamoeba polecki, and 17 from Entamoeba hartmanni. We propose a new nomenclature for significant variants within established Entamoeba species. Based on current data we propose that the uninucleated-cyst-producing Entamoeba infecting humans is called Entamoeba polecki and divided into four subtypes (ST1-ST4) and that Entamoeba coli is divided into two subtypes (ST1-ST2). New hosts for several species were detected and, while host specificity and genetic diversity of several species remain to be clarified, it is clear that previous reliance on cultivated material has given us a misleading and incomplete picture of variation within the genus Entamoeba. PMID:21295520

  9. Molecular and biochemical identification of alien chromosome additions in shallot (Allium cepa L. Aggregatum group) carrying extra chromosome(s) of bunching onion (A. fistulosum L.).

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Shigenori; Hang, Tran Thi Minh; Tsukazaki, Hikaru; Hoa, Vu Quynh; Masuzaki, Shin-ichi; Wako, Tadayuki; Masamura, Noriya; Onodera, Shuichi; Shiomi, Norio; Yamauchi, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

    2009-02-01

    To develop the bunching onion (Allium fistulosum L.; genomes, FF) chromosome-specific genetic markers for identifying extra chromosomes, eight shallot (A. cepa L. Aggregatum group; genomes, AA)--A. fistulosum monosomic addition plants (AA+nF) and 62 shallot--A. fistulosum single-alien deletion plants (AAF-nF) were analyzed by 23 different chromosome-specific genetic markers of shallot. The eight monosomic addition plants consisted of one AA+2F, two AA+6F, and five AA+8F. Of the 62 single-alien deletion plants, 60 could be identified as six different single-alien deletion lines (AAF-1F, -3F, -4F, -6F, -7F, and -8F) out of the eight possible types. Several single-alien deletion lines were classified on the basis of leaf and bulb characteristics. AAF-8F had the largest number of expanded leaves of five deletion plants. AAF-7F grew most vigorously, as expressed by its long leaf blade and biggest bulb size. AAF-4F had very small bulbs. AAF-7F and AAF-8F had different bulbs from those of shallot as well as other types of single-alien deletion lines in skin and outer scale color. Regarding the sugar content of the bulb tissues, the single-alien deletion lines showed higher fructan content than shallot. Moreover, shallot could not produce fructan with degree of polymerization (DP) 12 or higher, although the single-alien deletion lines showed DP 20 or higher. The content of S-alk(en)yl-L-cysteine sulfoxide (ACSO) in the single-alien deletion lines was significantly lower than that in shallot. These results indicated that chromosomes from A. fistulosum might carry anonymous factors to increase the highly polymerized fructan production and inhibit the synthesis of ACSO in shallot bulbs. Accordingly, alien chromosomes from A. fistulosum in shallot would contribute to modify the quality of shallot bulbs. PMID:19420800

  10. Isoform-specific Prolongation of Kv7 (KCNQ) Potassium Channel Opening Mediated by New Molecular Determinants for Drug-Channel Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhaobing; Zhang, Tangzhi; Wu, Meng; Xiong, Qiaojie; Sun, Haiyan; Zhang, Yinan; Zu, Liansuo; Wang, Wei; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    Kv7 channels, especially Kv7.2 (KCNQ2) and Kv7.3 (KCNQ3), are key determinants for membrane excitability in the brain. Some chemical modulators of KCNQ channels are in development for use as anti-epileptic drugs, such as retigabine (D-23129, N-(2-amino-4-(4-fluorobenzylamino)-phenyl)), which was recently approved for clinical use. In addition, several other compounds were also reported to potentiate activity of the Kv7 channels. It is therefore of interest to investigate compound-channel interactions, so that more insights may be gained to aid future development of therapeutics. We have conducted a screen of 20,000 compounds for KCNQ2 potentiators using rubidium flux combined with atomic absorption spectrometry. Here, we report the characterization of a series of new structures that display isoform specificity and induce a marked reduction of deactivation distinct from that of retigabine. Furthermore, KCNQ2(W236L), a previously reported mutation that abolishes sensitivity to retigabine, remains fully sensitive to these compounds. This result, together with mutagenesis and other studies, suggests that the reported compounds confer a unique mode of action and involve new molecular determinants on the channel protein, consistent with the idea of recognizing a new site on channel protein. PMID:20584905

  11. Breast-specific gamma-imaging: molecular imaging of the breast using 99mTc-sestamibi and a small-field-of-view gamma-camera.

    PubMed

    Jones, Elizabeth A; Phan, Trinh D; Blanchard, Deborah A; Miley, Abbe

    2009-12-01

    Breast-specific gamma-imaging (BSGI), also known as molecular breast imaging, is breast scintigraphy using a small-field-of-view gamma-camera and (99m)Tc-sestamibi. There are many different types of breast cancer, and many have characteristics making them challenging to detect by mammography and ultrasound. BSGI is a cost-effective, highly sensitive and specific technique that complements other imaging modalities currently being used to identify malignant lesions in the breast. Using the current Society of Nuclear Medicine guidelines for breast scintigraphy, Legacy Good Samaritan Hospital began conducting BSGI, breast scintigraphy with a breast-optimized gamma-camera. In our experience, optimal imaging has been conducted in the Breast Center by a nuclear medicine technologist. In addition, the breast radiologists read the BSGI images in correlation with the mammograms, ultrasounds, and other imaging studies performed. By modifying the current Society of Nuclear Medicine protocol to adapt it to the practice of breast scintigraphy with these new systems and by providing image interpretation in conjunction with the other breast imaging studies, our center has found BSGI to be a valuable adjunctive procedure in the diagnosis of breast cancer. The development of a small-field-of-view gamma-camera, designed to optimize breast imaging, has resulted in improved detection capabilities, particularly for lesions less than 1 cm. Our experience with this procedure has proven to aid in the clinical work-up of many of our breast patients. After reading this article, the reader should understand the history of breast scintigraphy, the pharmaceutical used, patient preparation and positioning, imaging protocol guidelines, clinical indications, and the role of breast scintigraphy in breast cancer diagnosis. PMID:19914975

  12. An integrated approach to the ligand binding specificity of Neisseria meningitidis M1 alanine aminopeptidase by fluorogenic substrate profiling, inhibitory studies and molecular modeling.

    PubMed

    Węglarz-Tomczak, Ewelina; Poręba, Marcin; Byzia, Anna; Berlicki, Łukasz; Nocek, Bogusław; Mulligan, Rory; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Drąg, Marcin; Mucha, Artur

    2013-02-01

    Neisseria meningitides is a gram-negative diplococcus bacterium and is the main causative agent of meningitis and other meningococcal diseases. Alanine aminopeptidase from N. meningitides (NmAPN) belongs to the family of metallo-exopeptidase enzymes, which catalyze the removal of amino acids from the N-terminus of peptides and proteins, and are found among all the kingdoms of life. NmAPN is suggested to be mostly responsible for proteolysis and nutrition delivery, similar to the orthologs from other bacteria. To explore the possibility of NmAPN being a potential drug target for inhibition and development of novel therapeutic agents, the specificity of the S1 and S1' binding sites was explored using an integrated approach. Initially, an extensive library consisting of almost 100 fluorogenic substrates derived from both natural and unnatural amino acids, were used to obtain a detailed substrate fingerprint of the S1 pocket of NmAPN. A broad substrate tolerance of NmAPN was revealed, with bulky basic and hydrophobic ligands being the most favored substrates. Additionally, the potency of a set of organophosphorus inhibitors of neutral aminopeptidases, amino acid and dipeptide analogs was determined. Inhibition constants in the nanomolar range, determined for phosphinic dipeptides, proves the positive increase in inhibition impact of the P1' ligand elongation. The results were further verified via molecular modeling and docking of canonical aminopeptidase phosphinic dipeptide inhibitors in the NmAPN active site. These studies present comprehensive characterization of interactions responsible for specific ligand binding. This knowledge provides invaluable insight into understanding of the enzyme and development of novel NmAPN inhibitors. PMID:23131591

  13. Molecular basis for the affinity and specificity in the binding of five-membered iminocyclitols with glycosidases: an experimental and theoretical synergy.

    PubMed

    Shandilya, Ashutosh; Ganesan, Muthupandian; Parveen, Firdaus; Ramesh, Namakkal G; Jayaram, B

    2016-06-24

    An unusual substituent dictated complementarity in the inhibition of amino-modified five-membered iminocyclitols toward various glycosidases was reported by us. These intriguing results encouraged us to seek a molecular level explanation for the observation that may facilitate the design of specific iminocyclitol inhibitors against glycosidases of choice. We present here a detailed theoretical account that is substantiated with some new experimental investigations on the molecular origins of the differential affinities of iminocyclitols with various glycosidases. The studies involve docking/scoring, molecular dynamics simulations followed by syntheses of a few novel five-membered iminocyclitols and their in vitro binding assays. Directional hydrogen bonds and snug fit of the ligands are implicated as contributory to the observed selectivities. The observed synergy between the computations and experiment is likely to spur further research in the design of novel iminocyclitols with specific inhibitory activities. PMID:27085905

  14. Broad-specificity immunoassay for O,O-diethyl organophosphorus pesticides: Application of molecular modeling to improve assay sensitivity and study antibody recognition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb) against 4-(diethoxyphosphorothioyloxy)benzoic acid (hapten 1) was raised and used to develop a broad-specificity competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA) for 14 O,O-diethyl organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). Computer-assisted molecular modeling was...

  15. Thermodynamic analysis of progesterone receptor-promoter interactions reveals a molecular model for isoform-specific function.

    PubMed

    Connaghan-Jones, Keith D; Heneghan, Aaron F; Miura, Michael T; Bain, David L

    2007-02-13

    Human progesterone receptors (PR) exist as two functionally distinct isoforms, PR-A and PR-B. The proteins are identical except for an additional 164 residues located at the N terminus of PR-B. To determine the mechanisms responsible for isoform-specific functional differences, we present here a thermodynamic dissection of PR-A-promoter interactions and compare the results to our previous work on PR-B. This analysis has generated a number of results inconsistent with the traditional, biochemically based model of receptor function. Specifically, statistical models invoking preformed PR-A dimers as the active binding species demonstrate that intrinsic binding energetics are over an order of magnitude greater than is apparent. High-affinity binding is opposed, however, by a large energetic penalty. The consequences of this penalty are 2-fold: Successive monomer binding to a palindromic response element is thermodynamically favored over preformed dimer binding, and DNA-induced dimerization of the monomers is largely abolished. Furthermore, PR-A binding to multiple PREs is only weakly cooperative, as judged by a 5-fold increase in overall stability. Comparison of these results to our work on PR-B demonstrates that whereas both isoforms appear to have similar DNA binding affinities, PR-B in fact has a greatly increased intrinsic binding affinity and cooperative binding ability relative to PR-A. These differences thus suggest that residues unique to PR-B allosterically regulate the energetics of cooperative promoter assembly. From a functional perspective, the differences in microscopic affinities predict receptor-promoter occupancies that accurately correlate with the transcriptional activation profiles seen for each isoform. PMID:17277083

  16. In situ molecular hybridization for detection of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus DNA by using strand-specific probes: identification of target cells for viral replication in cell cultures and in mink kits with virus-induced interstitial pneumonia.

    PubMed Central

    Alexandersen, S; Bloom, M E; Wolfinbarger, J; Race, R E

    1987-01-01

    Strand-specific hybridization probes were utilized in in situ molecular hybridization specifically to localize replicative form DNA of Aleutian mink disease parvovirus (ADV). Throughout in vitro infection, duplex replicative form DNA of ADV was located in the cell nuclei. Single-stranded virion DNA and capsid proteins were present in the nuclei early in infection, but were later translocated to the cytoplasm. In neonatal mink, ADV causes acute interstitial pneumonia, and replicative forms of viral DNA were found predominantly in alveolar type II cells of the lung. Viral DNA was also found in other organs, but strand-specific probes made it possible to show that most of this DNA represented virus sequestration. In addition, glomerular immune complexes containing intact virions were detected, suggesting that ADV virions may have a role in the genesis of ADV-induced glomerulonephritis. Images PMID:3037104

  17. In vitro analysis of the cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of antioxidant compounds used as additives in ultra high-molecular weight polyethylene in total joint replacement components

    PubMed Central

    Bladen, C L; Tzu-Yin, L; Fisher, J; Tipper, J L

    2013-01-01

    Ultra high-molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) remains the most commonly used material in modern joint replacement prostheses. However, UHMWPE wear particles, formed as the bearing articulates, are one of the main factors leading to joint replacement failure via the induction of osteolysis and subsequent aseptic loosening. Previous studies have shown that the addition of antioxidants such as vitamin E to UHMWPE can improve wear resistance of the polymer and reduce oxidative fatigue. However, little is known regarding the biological consequences of such antioxidant chemicals. This study investigated the cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory effects of a variety of antioxidant compounds currently being tested experimentally for use in hip and knee prostheses, including nitroxides, hindered phenols, and lanthanides on U937 human histocyte cells and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) in vitro. After addition of the compounds, cell viability was determined by dose response cytotoxicity studies. Anti-inflammatory effects were determined by quantitation of TNF-α release in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated cells. This study has shown that many of these compounds were cytotoxic to U937 cells and PBMNCs, at relatively low concentrations (micromolar), specifically the hindered phenol 3,5-di-tert-butyl-4-hydroxyhydrocinnamate (HPAO1), and the nitroxide 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO). Lanthanides were only cytotoxic at very high concentrations and were well tolerated by the cells at lower concentrations. Cytotoxic compounds also showed reduced anti-inflammatory effects, particularly in PBMNCs. Careful consideration should therefore be given to the use of any of these compounds as potential additives to UHMWPE. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 101B: 407–413, 2013. PMID:22915524

  18. Molecular Characterization of an Arabidopsis Gene Encoding a Phospholipid-Specific Inositol Polyphosphate 5-Phosphatase1[w

    PubMed Central

    Ercetin, Mustafa E.; Gillaspy, Glenda E.

    2004-01-01

    Phosphoinositides are important molecules that serve as second messengers and bind to a complex array of proteins modulating their subcellular location and activity. The enzymes that metabolize phosphoinositides can in some cases serve to terminate the signaling actions of phosphoinositides. The inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatases (5PTases) comprise a large protein family that hydrolyzes 5-phosphates from a variety of inositol phosphate and phosphoinositide substrates. We previously reported the identification of 15 putative 5PTase genes in Arabidopsis and have shown that overexpression of the At5PTase1 gene can alter abscisic acid signaling. At5PTase1 and At5PTase2 have been shown to hydrolyze the 5-phosphate from inositol phosphate substrates. We have examined the substrate specificity of the At5PTase11 protein, which is one of the smallest predicted 5PTases found in any organism. We report here that the At5PTase11 gene encodes an active 5PTase enzyme that can only dephosphorylate phosphoinositide substrates containing a 5-phosphate. In addition to hydrolyzing known substrates of 5PTase enzymes, At5PTase11 also hydrolyzes the 5-phosphate from phosphatidylinositol (3,5) bisphosphate. We also show that the At5PTase11 gene is regulated by abscisic acid, jasmonic acid, and auxin, suggesting a role for phosphoinositide action in these signal transduction pathways. PMID:15181205

  19. Molecular cloning, sequence analysis, prokaryotic expression, and function prediction of foot-specific peroxidase in Hydra magnipapillata Chinese strain.

    PubMed

    Pan, H C; Yang, H Q; Zhao, F X; Qian, X C

    2014-01-01

    The cDNA sequence of foot-specific peroxidase PPOD1 from the Chinese strain of Hydra magnipapillata was cloned by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The cDNA sequence contained a coding region with an 873-bp open reading frame, a 31-bp 5'-untranslated region, and a 36-bp 3'-untranslated region. The structure prediction results showed that PPOD1 contains 10.34% of α-helix, 38.62% of extended strand, 12.41% of β-turn, and 38.62% of random coil. The structural core was α-helix at the N terminus. The GenBank protein blast server showed that PPOD1 contains 2 fascin-like domains. In addition, high-level PPOD1 activity was only present in the ectodermal epithelial cells located on the edge of the adhesive face of the basal disc, and that these cells extended lamellipodia and filopodia when the basal disc was tightly attached to a glass slide. The fascin-like domains of Hydra PPOD1 might contribute to the bundling of the actin filament of these cells, and hence, the formation of filopodia. In conclusion, these cells might play an important role in strengthening the adsorbability of the basal disc to substrates. PMID:25177942

  20. “A draft Musa balbisiana genome sequence for molecular genetics in polyploid, inter- and intra-specific Musa hybrids”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Modern banana cultivars are primarily interspecific triploid hybrids of two species, Musa acuminata and Musa balbisiana, which respectively contribute the A- and B-genomes. The M. balbisiana genome has been associated with improved vigour and tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses and is thus a target for Musa breeding programs. However, while a reference M. acuminata genome has recently been released (Nature 488:213–217, 2012), little sequence data is available for the corresponding B-genome. To address these problems we carried out Next Generation gDNA sequencing of the wild diploid M. balbisiana variety ‘Pisang Klutuk Wulung’ (PKW). Our strategy was to align PKW gDNA reads against the published A-genome and to extract the mapped consensus sequences for subsequent rounds of evaluation and gene annotation. Results The resulting B-genome is 79% the size of the A-genome, and contains 36,638 predicted functional gene sequences which is nearly identical to the 36,542 of the A-genome. There is substantial sequence divergence from the A-genome at a frequency of 1 homozygous SNP per 23.1 bp, and a high degree of heterozygosity corresponding to one heterozygous SNP per 55.9 bp. Using expressed small RNA data, a similar number of microRNA sequences were predicted in both A- and B-genomes, but additional novel miRNAs were detected, including some that are unique to each genome. The usefulness of this B-genome sequence was evaluated by mapping RNA-seq data from a set of triploid AAA and AAB hybrids simultaneously to both genomes. Results for the plantains demonstrated the expected 2:1 distribution of reads across the A- and B-genomes, but for the AAA genomes, results show they contain regions of significant homology to the B-genome supporting proposals that there has been a history of interspecific recombination between homeologous A and B chromosomes in Musa hybrids. Conclusions We have generated and annotated a draft reference Musa B-genome and

  1. Pan-cancer subtyping in a 2D-map shows substructures that are driven by specific combinations of molecular characteristics.

    PubMed

    Taskesen, Erdogan; Huisman, Sjoerd M H; Mahfouz, Ahmed; Krijthe, Jesse H; de Ridder, Jeroen; van de Stolpe, Anja; van den Akker, Erik; Verheagh, Wim; Reinders, Marcel J T

    2016-01-01

    The use of genome-wide data in cancer research, for the identification of groups of patients with similar molecular characteristics, has become a standard approach for applications in therapy-response, prognosis-prediction, and drug-development. To progress in these applications, the trend is to move from single genome-wide measurements in a single cancer-type towards measuring several different molecular characteristics across multiple cancer-types. Although current approaches shed light on molecular characteristics of various cancer-types, detailed relationships between patients within cancer clusters are unclear. We propose a novel multi-omic integration approach that exploits the joint behavior of the different molecular characteristics, supports visual exploration of the data by a two-dimensional landscape, and inspection of the contribution of the different genome-wide data-types. We integrated 4,434 samples across 19 cancer-types, derived from TCGA, containing gene expression, DNA-methylation, copy-number variation and microRNA expression data. Cluster analysis revealed 18 clusters, where three clusters showed a complex collection of cancer-types, squamous-cell-carcinoma, colorectal cancers, and a novel grouping of kidney-cancers. Sixty-four samples were identified outside their tissue-of-origin cluster. Known and novel patient subgroups were detected for Acute Myeloid Leukemia's, and breast cancers. Quantification of the contributions of the different molecular types showed that substructures are driven by specific (combinations of) molecular characteristics. PMID:27109935

  2. Pan-cancer subtyping in a 2D-map shows substructures that are driven by specific combinations of molecular characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Taskesen, Erdogan; Huisman, Sjoerd M. H.; Mahfouz, Ahmed; Krijthe, Jesse H.; de Ridder, Jeroen; van de Stolpe, Anja; van den Akker, Erik; Verheagh, Wim; Reinders, Marcel J. T.

    2016-01-01

    The use of genome-wide data in cancer research, for the identification of groups of patients with similar molecular characteristics, has become a standard approach for applications in therapy-response, prognosis-prediction, and drug-development. To progress in these applications, the trend is to move from single genome-wide measurements in a single cancer-type towards measuring several different molecular characteristics across multiple cancer-types. Although current approaches shed light on molecular characteristics of various cancer-types, detailed relationships between patients within cancer clusters are unclear. We propose a novel multi-omic integration approach that exploits the joint behavior of the different molecular characteristics, supports visual exploration of the data by a two-dimensional landscape, and inspection of the contribution of the different genome-wide data-types. We integrated 4,434 samples across 19 cancer-types, derived from TCGA, containing gene expression, DNA-methylation, copy-number variation and microRNA expression data. Cluster analysis revealed 18 clusters, where three clusters showed a complex collection of cancer-types, squamous-cell-carcinoma, colorectal cancers, and a novel grouping of kidney-cancers. Sixty-four samples were identified outside their tissue-of-origin cluster. Known and novel patient subgroups were detected for Acute Myeloid Leukemia’s, and breast cancers. Quantification of the contributions of the different molecular types showed that substructures are driven by specific (combinations of) molecular characteristics. PMID:27109935

  3. Evaluation of Swine-Specific PCR Assays Used for Fecal Source Tracking and Analysis of Molecular Diversity of Swine-Specific "Bacteroidales" Populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study we evaluated specificity, distribution, and sensitivity of Bacteroidales – (PF163 and PigBac1) and methanogen-based (P23-2) assays proposed to detect swine fecal pollution in environmental waters. The assays were tested against 220 fecal DNA extracts derived from t...

  4. Short Term Feeding of a High Fat Diet Exerts an Additive Effect on Hepatocellular Damage and Steatosis in Liver-Specific PTEN Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shearn, Colin T.; Mercer, Kelly E.; Orlicky, David J.; Hennings, Leah; Smathers-McCullough, Rebecca L.; Stiles, Bangyan L.; Ronis, Martin J. J.; Petersen, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hepatospecific deletion of PTEN results in constitutive activation of Akt and increased lipogenesis. In mice, the addition of a high fat diet (HFD) downregulates lipogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a HFD on hepatocellular damage induced by deletion of PTEN. Methods 12 Week old male flox/flox hepatospecific PTEN mice (PTENf/f) or Alb-Cre controls were fed a HFD composed of 45% fat-derived calories (from corn oil) or a normal chow. Animals were then analyzed for hepatocellular damage, oxidative stress and expression of enzymes involved in fatty acid metabolism. Results In the Alb-Cre animals, the addition of a HFD resulted in a significant increase in liver triglycerides and altered REDOX capacity as evidenced by increased GPX activity, decreased GST activity and decreased hepatic concentrations of GSSG. In addition, SCD2, ACLY and FASN were all downregulated by the addition of HFD. Furthermore, expression of PPARα and PPARα-dependent proteins Cyp4a and ACSL1 were upregulated. In the PTENf/f mice, HFD resulted in significant increased in ALT, serum triglycerides and decreased REDOX capacity. Although expression of fatty acid synthetic enzymes was elevated in the chow fed PTENf/f group, the addition of HFD resulted in SCD2, ACLY and FASN downregulation. Compared to the Alb-Cre HFD group, expression of PGC1α, PPARα and its downstream targets ACSL and Cyp4a were upregulated in PTENf/f mice. Conclusions These data suggest that during conditions of constitutive Akt activation and increased steatosis, the addition of a HFD enhances hepatocellular damage due to increased CD36 expression and altered REDOX status. In addition, this work indicates HFD-induced hepatocellular damage occurs in part, independently of Akt signaling. PMID:24818992

  5. Molecular identification of zoonotic and livestock-specific Giardia-species in faecal samples of calves in Southern Germany

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Giardia-infection in cattle is often subclinical or asymptomatic, but it can also cause diarrhoea. The livestock-specific species Giardia bovis is the most frequently observed in cattle, however, the two zoonotic species Giardia duodenalis and Giardia enterica have also been found. Therefore calves are thought to be of public health significance. The aim of this study was to obtain current data about the frequency of the different Giardia-species in calves in Southern Germany. Findings Faecal samples of calves (diarrhoeic and healthy) in Southern Germany, diagnosed Giardia-positive by microscopy, were characterised by multi-locus PCR and sequencing. Of 152 microscopically Giardia-positive samples 110 (72.4%) were positive by PCR and successfully sequenced. G. bovis (Assemblage E) was detected in 101/110 (91.8%) PCR-positive samples, whilst G. duodenalis (Assemblage A) was detected in 8/110 (7.3%) samples and a mixed infection with G. duodenalis and G. bovis (Assemblage A+E) was identified in 1/110 (0.9%) samples. The sub-genotypes A1, E2 and E3 were identified with the β-giardin and the glutamate dehydrogenase genes. In the majority of diarrhoeic faecal samples a co-infection with Cryptosporidium spp. or Eimeria spp. was present, however, there were some in which G. bovis was the only protozoan pathogen found. Conclusions The results suggest that there is potentially a risk for animal handlers as calves in Southern Germany are, at a low percentage, infected with the zoonotic species G. duodenalis. In addition, it was found that G. bovis was the only pathogen identified in some samples of diarrhoeic calves, indicating that this parasite may be a contributing factor to diarrhoea in calves. PMID:24326081

  6. Byte structure variable length coding (BS-VLC): a new specific algorithm applied in the compression of trajectories generated by molecular dynamics

    PubMed

    Melo; Puga; Gentil; Brito; Alves; Ramos

    2000-05-01

    Molecular dynamics is a well-known technique very much used in the study of biomolecular systems. The trajectory files produced by molecular dynamics simulations are extensive, and the classical lossless algorithms give poor efficiencies in their compression. In this work, a new specific algorithm, named byte structure variable length coding (BS-VLC), is introduced. Trajectory files, obtained by molecular dynamics applied to trypsin and a trypsin:pancreatic trypsin inhibitor complex, were compressed using four classical lossless algorithms (Huffman, adaptive Huffman, LZW, and LZ77) as well as the BS-VLC algorithm. The results obtained show that BS-VLC nearly triplicates the compression efficiency of the best classical lossless algorithm, preserving a near lossless behavior. Compression efficiencies close to 50% can be obtained with a high degree of precision, and the maximum efficiency possible (75%), within this algorithm, can be performed with good precision. PMID:10850759

  7. Contrasting root associated fungi of three common oak-woodland plant species based on molecular identification: host specificity or non-specific amplification?

    PubMed

    Douhan, Greg W; Petersen, Carolyn; Bledsoe, Caroline S; Rizzo, David M

    2005-07-01

    An increasingly popular approach used to identify arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in planta is to amplify a portion of AM fungal small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSU-rDNA) from whole root DNA extractions using the primer pair AM1-NS31, followed by cloning and sequencing. We used this approach to study the AM fungal community composition of three common oak-woodland plant species: a grass (Cynosurus echinatus), blue oak (Quercus douglasii), and a forb (Torilis arvensis). Significant diversity of AM fungi were found in the roots of C. echinatus, which is consistent with previous studies demonstrating a high degree of AM fungal diversity from the roots of various hosts. In contrast, clones from Q. douglasii and T. arvensis were primarily from non-AM fungi of diverse origins within the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota. This work demonstrates that caution must be taken when using this molecular approach to determine in planta AM fungal diversity if non-sequence based methods such as terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, or temperature gradient gel electrophoresis are used. PMID:15772816

  8. Short term feeding of a high fat diet exerts an additive effect on hepatocellular damage and steatosis in liver-specific PTEN knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepatospecific deletion of PTEN results in constitutive activation of Akt and increased lipogenesis. In mice, the addition of a high fat diet (HFD) downregulates lipogenesis. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of a HFD on hepatocellular damage induced by deletion of PTEN. Twelve-week...

  9. Integrated analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors and target genes expression discloses a specific molecular architecture of hyperdiploid multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Maria Teresa; Guzzi, Pietro Hiram; Caracciolo, Daniele; Agnelli, Luca; Neri, Antonino; Walker, Brian A; Morgan, Gareth J; Cannataro, Mario; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro

    2015-08-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a malignancy characterized by the hyperdiploid (HD-MM) and the non-hyperdiploid (nHD-MM) subtypes. To shed light within the molecular architecture of these subtypes, we used a novel integromics approach. By annotated MM patient mRNA/microRNA (miRNA) datasets, we investigated mRNAs and miRNAs profiles with relation to changes in transcriptional regulators expression. We found that HD-MM displays specific gene and miRNA expression profiles, involving the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)3 pathway as well as the Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGFβ) and the transcription regulator Nuclear Protein-1 (NUPR1). Our data define specific molecular features of HD-MM that may translate in the identification of novel relevant druggable targets. PMID:26056083

  10. Integrated analysis of microRNAs, transcription factors and target genes expression discloses a specific molecular architecture of hyperdiploid multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Caracciolo, Daniele; Agnelli, Luca; Neri, Antonino; Walker, Brian A.; Morgan, Gareth J.; Cannataro, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is a malignancy characterized by the hyperdiploid (HD-MM) and the non-hyperdiploid (nHD-MM) subtypes. To shed light within the molecular architecture of these subtypes, we used a novel integromics approach. By annotated MM patient mRNA/microRNA (miRNA) datasets, we investigated mRNAs and miRNAs profiles with relation to changes in transcriptional regulators expression. We found that HD-MM displays specific gene and miRNA expression profiles, involving the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (STAT)3 pathway as well as the Transforming Growth Factor–beta (TGFβ) and the transcription regulator Nuclear Protein-1 (NUPR1). Our data define specific molecular features of HD-MM that may translate in the identification of novel relevant druggable targets. PMID:26056083

  11. Specific Transformation of Assembly with Actin Filaments and Molecular Motors in a Cell-Sized Self-Emerged Liposome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Kingo; Negishi, Makiko; Tanaka-Takiguchi, Yohko; Hayashi, Masahito; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2014-12-01

    Eukaryotes, by the same combination of cytoskeleton and molecular motor, for example actin filament and myosin, can generate a variety of movements. For this diversity, the organization of biological machineries caused by the confinement and/or crowding effects of internal living cells, may play very important roles.

  12. Molecular characterization and a multiplex allele-specific PCR method for detection of thiabendazole resistance in Penicillium expansum from apple

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Thiabendazole (TBZ) is commonly used as a postharvest treatment for control of blue mold in apples caused by Penicillium expansum. Different point mutations in the ß-tubulin gene conferring benzimidazole resistance have been reported in plant pathogens, but molecular mechanisms of TBZ resistance in ...

  13. Levan as a new additive for colon-specific films: a new approach in the use of exopolysaccharides in time-dependent free films (Aminoalkyl Methacrylate Copolymer RS).

    PubMed

    dos-Santos, Leandro Freire; Gómez-Pineda, Edgardo Alfonso; Colabone-Celligoi, Maria Antonia-Pedrine; Cavalcanti, Osvaldo Albuquerque

    2013-09-01

    Time-dependent films, augmented with prebiotics, offer potential strategy for colon-specific controlled drug release. In this study, we produced films containing levan (L) and Aminoalkyl Methacrylate Copolymer RS (ER). Free films of ER combined with levan were produced by the casting process and characterized by the mobility of the polymeric matrix, hydration, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetry (TGA). The results of this study suggest that the exopolysaccharide levan can be used in combination with ER for colon specific materials. No evidence of incompatibilities between the levan and the synthetic polymer were detected, and levan improved the mobility of the polymeric matrix and the hydrophilicity of the system. Levan may have positively altered the density of the polymeric matrix, as visualized by thermal characterization. The endothermic decomposition peak was shifted with increasing amounts of levan. This new barrier polymer utilized a combination of time-dependent enzymatic mechanisms and can be considered promising for use in the coating of solid oral drugs for specific release. PMID:24035950

  14. Addition of GM-CSF to a peptide/KLH vaccine results in increased frequencies of CXCR3-expressing KLH-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Na, Il-Kang; Keilholz, Ulrich; Letsch, Anne; Bauer, Sandra; Asemissen, Anne Marie; Nagorsen, Dirk; Thiel, Eckhard; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2007-03-01

    T-cell trafficking is determined by expression patterns of chemokine receptors. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 is expressed on a subpopulation of type 1 T cells and plays an important role for migration of T cells into inflamed and tumor tissues. Here, we studied the chemokine receptor expression on specific T cells generated against the neoantigen keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) in patients who had been immunized in the context of a tumor peptide vaccination trial with or without the adjuvant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). In patients immunized in the presence of GM-CSF the fraction of CXCR3(+) KLH-specific T cells was significantly higher than in patients immunized in the absence of GM-CSF (median 45 vs. 20%, P = 0.001). In contrast, the chemokine receptor CCR4, associated with migration to the skin was found in both cohorts on less than 10% of KLH-specific T cells. These results show that CXCR3 expression on vaccine-induced T cells can be modulated by modifying the local vaccine milieu. PMID:16850346

  15. Fish allergy in patients with parvalbumin-specific immunoglobulin E depends on parvalbumin content rather than molecular differences in the protein among fish species.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Ayako; Kobayashi, Yukihiro; Shiomi, Kazuo

    2016-10-01

    Allergenic characteristics of purified parvalbumins from different fish species have not been thoroughly investigated. We revealed that purified parvalbumins from nine different fish species have identical IgE-reactivities and high cross-reactivities. We also showed that fish allergenicity is associated with the parvalbumin content of the fish species, rather than species-specific differences in the molecular characteristics of the individual parvalbumin proteins. PMID:27251554

  16. Characterization of high molecular weight glutenin subunits in Thinopyrum intermedium, Th. bessarabicum, Lophopyrum elongatum, Aegilops markgrafii, and their addition lines in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High molecular weight (HMW) glutenin subunits (GSs) play an important role in determining dough viscoelastic properties and end-use quality in cultivated wheat, and they are also excellent protein markers for genotype identification. The HMW-GSs in wheat species (Triticum ssp.) and Aegilops tauschii...

  17. Utilization of elongation factor Tu gene (tuf) sequencing and species-specific PCR (SS-PCR) for the molecular identification of Acetobacter species complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chien-Hsun; Chang, Mu-Tzu; Huang, Lina; Chu, Wen-Shen

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to use tuf gene as a molecular target for species discrimination in the Acetobacter genus, as well as to develop species-specific PCR method for direct species identification of Acetobacter aceti. The results showed that most Acetobacter species could be clearly distinguished, and the average sequence similarity for the tuf gene (89.5%) among type strains was significantly lower than that of the 16S rRNA gene sequence (98.0%). A pair of species-specific primers were designed and used to specifically identify A. aceti, but none of the other Acetobacter strains. Our data indicate that the phylogenetic relationships of most strains in the Acetobacter genus can be resolved using tuf gene sequencing, and the novel species-specific primer pair could be used to rapidly and accurately identify the species of A. aceti by the PCR based assay. PMID:23969032

  18. The molecular, temporal and region-specific requirements of the beta isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 2 (CAMK2B) in mouse locomotion.

    PubMed

    Kool, Martijn J; van de Bree, Jolet E; Bodde, Hanna E; Elgersma, Ype; van Woerden, Geeske M

    2016-01-01

    Genetic approaches using temporal and brain region-specific restricted gene deletions have provided a wealth of insight in the brain regions and temporal aspects underlying spatial and associative learning. However, for locomotion such extensive studies are still scarce. Previous studies demonstrated that Camk2b(-/-) mice, which lack the β isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2B), show very severe locomotion deficits. However, where these locomotion deficits originate is unknown. Here we made use of novel Camk2b mutants (Camk2b(f/f) and Camk2b(T287A)), to explore the molecular, temporal and brain region-specific requirements of CAMK2B for locomotion. At the molecular level we found that normal locomotion requires Calcium/Calmodulin mediated activation of CAMK2B, but CAMK2B autonomous activity is largely dispensable. At a systems level, we found that global deletion of Camk2b in the adult mouse causes only mild locomotion deficits, suggesting that the severe locomotion deficits of Camk2b(-/-) mice are largely of developmental origin. However, early onset deletion of Camk2b in cerebellum, striatum or forebrain did not recapitulate the locomotion deficits, suggesting that these deficits cannot be attributed to a single brain area. Taken together, these results provide the first insights into the molecular, temporal and region-specific role of CAMK2B in locomotion. PMID:27244486

  19. The molecular, temporal and region-specific requirements of the beta isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type 2 (CAMK2B) in mouse locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Kool, Martijn J.; van de Bree, Jolet E.; Bodde, Hanna E.; Elgersma, Ype; van Woerden, Geeske M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic approaches using temporal and brain region-specific restricted gene deletions have provided a wealth of insight in the brain regions and temporal aspects underlying spatial and associative learning. However, for locomotion such extensive studies are still scarce. Previous studies demonstrated that Camk2b–/– mice, which lack the β isoform of Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 2 (CAMK2B), show very severe locomotion deficits. However, where these locomotion deficits originate is unknown. Here we made use of novel Camk2b mutants (Camk2bf/f and Camk2bT287A), to explore the molecular, temporal and brain region-specific requirements of CAMK2B for locomotion. At the molecular level we found that normal locomotion requires Calcium/Calmodulin mediated activation of CAMK2B, but CAMK2B autonomous activity is largely dispensable. At a systems level, we found that global deletion of Camk2b in the adult mouse causes only mild locomotion deficits, suggesting that the severe locomotion deficits of Camk2b–/– mice are largely of developmental origin. However, early onset deletion of Camk2b in cerebellum, striatum or forebrain did not recapitulate the locomotion deficits, suggesting that these deficits cannot be attributed to a single brain area. Taken together, these results provide the first insights into the molecular, temporal and region-specific role of CAMK2B in locomotion. PMID:27244486

  20. [Specific features of gene amplification on the long arm of chromosome 17 in different molecular genetic subtypes of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Zavalishina, L E; Danilova, N V; Matsionis, A E; Pavlenko, I A

    2014-01-01

    The frequency of gene amplification and coamplification of HER2/neu, TOP2A and the centromeric region of chromosome 17 (CEP17) was examined in 265 breast cancer (BC) cases belonging to different molecular genetic subgroups. Luminal B breast cancer was found to be characterized by the increased probability of coamplifications (CEP17 and HER/neu, HER2/neu, and TOP2A) on chromosome 17. At the same time, the amplification of just three loci on one chromosome is a rare event and encountered in 17% of luminal B breast cancer cases (or 1.1% of all BC cases). That of HER2/neu in conjunction with elevated CEP17 count is statistically significantly more rarely accompanied by deletion of TOP2A rather than its amplification. The findings suggest that there are different amplification mechanisms in different BC molecular genetic subgroups. PMID:25051718

  1. [Specific molecular and morphological changes in cardiomyocytes of hibernating ground squirrels in different periods of annual cycle].

    PubMed

    Karaduleva, E V; Santalova, I M; Zakharova, N M

    2014-01-01

    Structural and molecular changes in cardiomyocytes of hibernating ground squirrels in different periods of the annual cycle were analyzed by means of electron microscopy and polymerase chain reaction. Morphological analysis showed an increase in relative area of sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac muscle of ground squirrels preparing to torpor compared to active summer animals. The size of sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiomyocytes of torpid animals was reliably less than in any other condition of ground squirrels in the annual cycle. The results of molecular analysis showed the decrease in sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase gene (SERCA2a) expression .at all stages of hibernation process and also in periods of autumn activity compared to control mRNA level in active summer animals. The revealed season changes in structure of sarcoplasmic reticulum and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase gene expression are discussed in regard to adaptation of ground squirrels to hibernation. PMID:25730975

  2. Quantitative, real-time analysis of base excision repair activity in cell lysates utilizing lesion-specific molecular beacons.

    PubMed

    Svilar, David; Vens, Conchita; Sobol, Robert W

    2012-01-01

    We describe a method for the quantitative, real-time measurement of DNA glycosylase and AP endonuclease activities in cell nuclear lysates using base excision repair (BER) molecular beacons. The substrate (beacon) is comprised of a deoxyoligonucleotide containing a single base lesion with a 6-Carboxyfluorescein (6-FAM) moiety conjugated to the 5'end and a Dabcyl moiety conjugated to the 3' end of the oligonucleotide. The BER molecular beacon is 43 bases in length and the sequence is designed to promote the formation of a stem-loop structure with 13 nucleotides in the loop and 15 base pairs in the stem. When folded in this configuration the 6-FAM moiety is quenched by Dabcyl in a non-fluorescent manner via Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET). The lesion is positioned such that following base lesion removal and strand scission the remaining 5 base oligonucleotide containing the 6-FAM moiety is released from the stem. Release and detachment from the quencher (Dabcyl) results in an increase of fluorescence that is proportionate to the level of DNA repair. By collecting multiple reads of the fluorescence values, real-time assessment of BER activity is possible. The use of standard quantitative real-time PCR instruments allows the simultaneous analysis of numerous samples. The design of these BER molecular beacons, with a single base lesion, is amenable to kinetic analyses, BER quantification and inhibitor validation and is adaptable for quantification of DNA Repair activity in tissue and tumor cell lysates or with purified proteins. The analysis of BER activity in tumor lysates or tissue aspirates using these molecular beacons may be applicable to functional biomarker measurements. Further, the analysis of BER activity with purified proteins using this quantitative assay provides a rapid, high-throughput method for the discovery and validation of BER inhibitors. PMID:22895410

  3. Rheological behavior of clay-nanoparticle hybrid-added bentonite suspensions: specific role of hybrid additives on the gelation of clay-based fluids.

    PubMed

    Jung, Youngsoo; Son, You-Hwan; Lee, Jung-Kun; Phuoc, Tran X; Soong, Yee; Chyu, Minking K

    2011-09-01

    Two different types of clay nanoparticle hybrid, iron oxide nanoparticle clay hybrid (ICH) and Al(2)O(3)-SiO(2) nanoparticle clay hybrid (ASCH), were synthesized and their effects on the rheological properties of aqueous bentonite fluids in steady state and dynamic state were explored. When ICH particles were added, bentonite particles in the fluid cross-link to form relatively well-oriented porous structure. This is attributed to the development of positively charged edge surfaces in ICH that leads to strengthening of the gel structure of the bentonite susensions. The role of ASCH particles on the interparticle association of the bentonite fluids is different from that of ICH and sensitive to pH. As pH of ASCH-added bentonite suspensions increased, the viscosity, yield stress, storage modulus, and flow stress decreased. In contrast, at low pH, the clay suspensions containing ASCH additives were coagulated and their rheological properties become close to those of ICH added bentonite fluids. A correlation between the net surface charge of the hybrid additives and the rheological properties of the fluids indicates that the embedded nanoparticles within the interlayer space control the variable charge of the edge surfaces of the platelets and determine the particles association behavior of the clay fluids. PMID:21888313

  4. Enhancing specificity in the Janus kinases: a study on the thienopyridine JAK2 selective mechanism combined molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao Jiao; Cheng, Peng; Tu, Jing; Zhai, Hong Lin; Zhang, Xiao Yun

    2016-02-01

    The selective inhibition for JAK2 over the other JAK family kinases (JAK1, JAK3 and TYK2) has shared an immense challenge due to high conservatism. In this paper, the highly JAK2 selective mechanism of the thienopyridine derivative was identified at the molecular level, based on insights into the inhibitory effects of compound on four JAK kinases by molecular docking, molecular dynamic simulations, free energy calculation and decomposition. The results clearly indicated that the nonpolar contribution and the H-bond network in the hinge region played a critical selective role in stabilizing ligand JAK2, and the residues Glu930, Leu932 and Gly935 in JAK2 kinase were the key differences compared to the equivalence residues of JAK1, JAK3 and TYK2, which were further verified by simulating four complexes of JAK kinases with another highly selective thienopyridine JAK2 inhibitor . Finally, several novel molecules were designed according to above findings and further verified by the same comprehensive modeling protocol. The obtained results not only demonstrated the rationality of our models and analyses, but also suggested that the designed molecules with higher JAK2 selectivity and bioactivity potential would provide an update of JAK2 inhibitors. PMID:26687880

  5. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  6. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  7. Food additives

    MedlinePlus

    Food additives are substances that become part of a food product when they are added during the processing or making of that food. "Direct" food additives are often added during processing to: Add nutrients ...

  8. A systematic review of image segmentation methodology, used in the additive manufacture of patient-specific 3D printed models of the cardiovascular system

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, N; Velasco Forte, M; Tandon, A; Valverde, I

    2016-01-01

    Background Shortcomings in existing methods of image segmentation preclude the widespread adoption of patient-specific 3D printing as a routine decision-making tool in the care of those with congenital heart disease. We sought to determine the range of cardiovascular segmentation methods and how long each of these methods takes. Methods A systematic review of literature was undertaken. Medical imaging modality, segmentation methods, segmentation time, segmentation descriptive quality (SDQ) and segmentation software were recorded. Results Totally 136 studies met the inclusion criteria (1 clinical trial; 80 journal articles; 55 conference, technical and case reports). The most frequently used image segmentation methods were brightness thresholding, region growing and manual editing, as supported by the most popular piece of proprietary software: Mimics (Materialise NV, Leuven, Belgium, 1992–2015). The use of bespoke software developed by individual authors was not uncommon. SDQ indicated that reporting of image segmentation methods was generally poor with only one in three accounts providing sufficient detail for their procedure to be reproduced. Conclusions and implication of key findings Predominantly anecdotal and case reporting precluded rigorous assessment of risk of bias and strength of evidence. This review finds a reliance on manual and semi-automated segmentation methods which demand a high level of expertise and a significant time commitment on the part of the operator. In light of the findings, we have made recommendations regarding reporting of 3D printing studies. We anticipate that these findings will encourage the development of advanced image segmentation methods. PMID:27170842

  9. Additive antileukemia effects by GFI1B- and BCR-ABL-specific siRNA in advanced phase chronic myeloid leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Koldehoff, M; Zakrzewski, J L; Beelen, D W; Elmaagacli, A H

    2013-07-01

    Previous studies demonstrated selective inhibition of the BCR-ABL (breakpoint cluster region-Abelson murine leukemia oncogene) tyrosine kinase by RNA interference in leukemic cells. In this study, we evaluated the effect of BCR-ABL small interfering RNA (siRNA) and GFI1B siRNA silencing on chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells in myeloid blast crises. The GFI1B gene was mapped to chromosome 9 and is, therefore, located downstream of the BCR-ABL translocation in CML cells. Co-transfection of BCR-ABL siRNA and GFI1B siRNA dramatically decreased cell viability and significantly induced apoptosis and inhibited proliferation in K562 cells (P<0.0001) and primary advanced phase CML cells (P<0.0001) versus controls. Furthermore, combining of BCR-ABL siRNA and GFI1B siRNA significantly modified the expression of several relevant genes including Myc, MDR1, MRP1 and tyrosyl-phosphoproteins in primary CML cells. Our data suggest that silencing of both BCR-ABL siRNA and GFI1B siRNA is associated with an additive antileukemic effect against K562 cells and primary advanced CML cells, further validating these genes as attractive therapeutic targets. PMID:23788109

  10. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  11. Addition of 10-Day Decitabine to Fludarabine/Total Body Irradiation Conditioning is Feasible and Induces Tumor-Associated Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Cruijsen, Marjan; Hobo, Willemijn; van der Velden, Walter J F M; Bremmers, Manita E J; Woestenenk, Rob; Bär, Brigitte; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Kester, Michel; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Jansen, Joop; Blijlevens, Nicole N M; Dolstra, Harry; Huls, Gerwin

    2016-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers the possibility of curative therapy for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), chronic myelomonocytic leukemia (CMML), and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). However, post-HCT relapse remains a major problem, particularly in patients with high-risk cytogenetics and in patients who cannot tolerate consolidation chemotherapy (eg, due to previous toxicity). We assessed the toxicity and efficacy of 10-day decitabine (Dec), fludarabine (Flu), and 2 Gy total body irradiation (TBI) as a new conditioning regimen for allogeneic HCT in patients with MDS, CMML, or AML. Thirty patients were enrolled, including 11 with MDS, 2 with CMML, and 17 with AML. Patients received 20 mg/m(2)/day Dec on days -11 to -2, 30 mg/m(2)/day Flu on days -4 to -2, and 2 Gy TBI on day -1, followed by infusion of a donor stem cell graft on day 0. Postgrafting immunosuppression consisted of cyclosporin A and mycophenolate mofetil. At a median follow-up of 443 days, the overall survival was 53%, relapse incidence was 27%, and nonrelapse mortality was 27%. The incidence of severe acute (grade III/IV) graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 27%, and that of (predominantly mild) chronic GVHD was 60%. Immunomonitoring studies revealed that specific CD8(+) T cell responses against epigenetically silenced tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), including cancer-testis antigens (MAGE-A1/A2/A3 and PRAME) and RHAMM, occurred more frequently in patients who had received Dec/Flu/TBI conditioning (8 of 11 patients) compared with a control group of patients who had received only Flu/TBI conditioning (2 of 9 patients). In summary, Dec/Flu/TBI conditioning proved feasible and effective and enhanced the induction of TAA-reactive CD8(+) T cell responses in vivo, which may contribute to disease control post-transplantation. PMID:26860635

  12. Specific binding and inhibition of 6-benzylaminopurine to catalase: multiple spectroscopic methods combined with molecular docking study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qin; Lu, Yanni; Jing, Longyun; Cai, Lijuan; Zhu, Xinfeng; Xie, Ju; Hu, Xiaoya

    2014-04-01

    6-Benzylaminopurine (6-BA) is a kind of cytokinin which could regulate the activities of the antioxidant defense system of plants. In this work, its interaction with and inhibition of beef liver catalase have been systematically investigated using spectroscopic, isothermal titration calorimetric and molecular docking methods under physiological conditions. The fluorescence quenching of beef liver catalase (BLC) by 6-BA is due to the formation of 6-BA-BLC complex. Hydrogen bonds and van der Waals interactions play major roles in stabilizing the complex. The Stern-Volmer quenching constant, binding constant, the corresponding thermodynamic parameters and binding numbers were measured. The results of UV-vis absorption, three-dimensional fluorescence, synchronous fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopic results demonstrate that the binding of 6-BA results in the micro-environment change around tyrosine (Tyr) and tryptophan (Trp) residues of BLC. The BLC-mediated conversion of H2O2 to H2O and O2, in the presence and absence of 6-BA, was also studied. Lineweaver-Burk plot indicates a noncompetitive type of inhibition. Molecular docking study was used to find the binding sites. PMID:24412785

  13. IP6K Structure and the Molecular Determinants of Catalytic Specificity in an Inositol Phosphate Kinase Family

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huanchen; DeRose, Eugene F.; London, Robert E.; Shears, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    IP3Ks and IP6Ks each regulate specialized signaling activities by phosphorylating either InsP3 or InsP6 respectively; what are the molecular determinants of these different kinase activities? We address this question by determining the crystal structure of an enzymatic parallel to a “living fossil”: an Entamoeba histolytica hybrid IP6K/IP3K. Through molecular modeling and mutagenesis, we also extrapolated our findings to human IP6K2, which retains vestigial IP3K activity. Two structural elements, an α-helical pair and a rare, two-turn 310 helix, together forge a substrate-binding pocket with an open-clamshell geometry. InsP6 forms substantial contacts with both structural elements. Relative to InsP6, enzyme-bound InsP3 rotates 55° closer to the α-helices, which provide most of the protein’s interactions with InsP3. These non-overlapping substrate orientations are unprecedented for an inositol phosphate kinase. This arrangement also suggests an unusual evolutionary trajectory for a primordial kinase that could have favored efficient bi-functionality, prior to propagation of separate IP3Ks and IP6Ks. PMID:24956979

  14. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing.

    PubMed

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-01-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ(13)C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19-C36), fatty acids (C8-C32) and n-alcohols (C16-C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ(13)C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from -34.1 to -24.7% and -26.9 to -24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China. PMID:27270951

  15. High atomic weight, high-energy radiation (HZE) induces transcriptional responses shared with conventional stresses in addition to a core “DSB” response specific to clastogenic treatments

    PubMed Central

    Missirian, Victor; Conklin, Phillip A.; Culligan, Kevin M.; Huefner, Neil D.; Britt, Anne B.

    2014-01-01

    Plants exhibit a robust transcriptional response to gamma radiation which includes the induction of transcripts required for homologous recombination and the suppression of transcripts that promote cell cycle progression. Various DNA damaging agents induce different spectra of DNA damage as well as “collateral” damage to other cellular components and therefore are not expected to provoke identical responses by the cell. Here we study the effects of two different types of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment, HZE (1 GeV Fe26+ high mass, high charge, and high energy relativistic particles) and gamma photons, on the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Both types of IR induce small clusters of radicals that can result in the formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), but HZE also produces linear arrays of extremely clustered damage. We performed these experiments across a range of time points (1.5–24 h after irradiation) in both wild-type plants and in mutants defective in the DSB-sensing protein kinase ATM. The two types of IR exhibit a shared double strand break-repair-related damage response, although they differ slightly in the timing, degree, and ATM-dependence of the response. The ATM-dependent, DNA metabolism-related transcripts of the “DSB response” were also induced by other DNA damaging agents, but were not induced by conventional stresses. Both Gamma and HZE irradiation induced, at 24 h post-irradiation, ATM-dependent transcripts associated with a variety of conventional stresses; these were overrepresented for pathogen response, rather than DNA metabolism. In contrast, only HZE-irradiated plants, at 1.5 h after irradiation, exhibited an additional and very extensive transcriptional response, shared with plants experiencing “extended night.” This response was not apparent in gamma-irradiated plants. PMID:25136344

  16. A novel and versatile nanomachine for ultrasensitive and specific detection of microRNAs based on molecular beacon initiated strand displacement amplification coupled with catalytic hairpin assembly with DNAzyme formation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yurong; Shen, Bo; Wang, Hong; Sun, Xue; Cheng, Wei; Zhao, Hua; Ju, Huangxian; Ding, Shijia

    2015-08-21

    MicroRNAs are small regulatory molecules that can be used as potential biomarkers of clinical diagnosis, and efforts have been directed towards the development of a simple, rapid, and sequence-selective analysis of microRNAs. Here, we report a simple and versatile colorimetric strategy for ultrasensitive and specific determination of microRNAs based on molecular beacon initiated strand displacement amplification (SDA) and catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) with DNAzyme formation. The presence of target microRNAs triggers strand displacement amplification to release nicking DNA triggers, which initiate CHA to produce large amounts of CHA products. Meanwhile, the numerous CHA products can combine with hemin to form G-quadruplex/hemin DNAzyme, a well-known horseradish peroxidase (HRP) mimic, catalyzing a colorimetric reaction. Moreover, the purification of the SDA mixture has been developed for eliminating matrix interference to decrease nonspecific CHA products. Under the optimal conditions and using the promising amplification strategy, the established colorimetric nanomachine (biosensor) shows high sensitivity and selectivity in a dynamic response range from 5 fM to 5 nM with a detection limit as low as 1.7 fM (S/N = 3). In addition, a versatile colorimetric biosensor has been developed for detection of different miRNAs by only changing the miRNA-recognition domain of molecular beacon. Thus, this colorimetric biosensor may become a potential alternative tool for biomedical research and clinical molecular diagnostics. PMID:26134555

  17. Characterization of differences in substrate specificity among CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1: an integrated approach employing molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Kesharwani, Siddharth S; Nandekar, Prajwal P; Pragyan, Preeti; Rathod, Vijay; Sangamwar, Abhay T

    2016-08-01

    Recent trends in new drug discovery of anticancer drugs have made oncologists more aware of the fact that the new drug discovery must target the developing mechanism of tumorigenesis to improve the therapeutic efficacy of antineoplastic drugs. The drugs designed are expected to have high affinity towards the novel targets selectively. Current research highlights overexpression of CYP450s, particularly cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), in tumour cells, representing a novel target for anticancer therapy. However, the CYP1 family is identified as posing significant problems in selectivity of anticancer molecules towards CYP1A1. Three members have been identified in the human CYP1 family: CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP1B1. Although sequences of the three isoform have high sequence identity, they have distinct substrate specificities. The understanding of macromolecular features that govern substrate specificity is required to understand the interplay between the protein function and dynamics, design novel antitumour compounds that could be specifically metabolized by only CYP1A1 to mediate their antitumour activity and elucidate the reasons for differences in substrate specificity profile among the three proteins. In the present study, we employed a combination of computational methodologies: molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations. We utilized eight substrates for elucidating the difference in substrate specificity of the three isoforms. Lastly, we conclude that the substrate specificity of a particular substrate depends upon the type of the active site residues, the dynamic motions in the protein structure upon ligand binding and the physico-chemical characteristics of a particular ligand. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26916064

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations of norcamphor-cytochrome P-450 sub cam and mutations of P-450 sub cam designed to alter the product specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Bass, M.B.; Paulsen, M.D.; Ornstein, R.L.

    1991-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the possibility of altering the product specificity of cytochrome P-450{sub cam}. The design aims were to alter the product ratios of norcamphor to yield predominately 3-hydroxynorcamphor and to increase the coupling efficiency between NADH consumption and product formation. Two simulations of P-450{sub cam} mutations, Y96F and V247A, were conducted to test the predictive ability of the molecular dynamics simulations with this enzyme-substrate system. The theoretical results agree with the experimental results. Two further mutations were simulated: F87W and the double mutant F87W/Y96F. The results from these novel mutations suggest that the coupling of electron consumption to substrate hydroxylation can be increased. Further these mutations lead to substrate orientations which are consistent with substrate hydroxylation at the 3-position. 8 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Dual NRASQ61R and BRAFV600E mutation-specific immunohistochemistry completes molecular screening in melanoma samples in a routine practice.

    PubMed

    Uguen, Arnaud; Guéguen, Paul; Legoupil, Delphine; Bouvier, Stéphanie; Costa, Sebastian; Duigou, Sandrine; Lemasson, Gilles; Ledé, Françoise; Sassolas, Bruno; Talagas, Matthieu; Férec, Claude; Le Maréchal, Cédric; De Braekeleer, Marc; Marcorelles, Pascale

    2015-11-01

    NRAS and BRAF mutational status has become mandatory to treat patients with metastatic melanomas. Mutation-specific immunohistochemistry (IHC) can help analyze challenging tumor samples. We report our experience integrating NRASQ61R (SP174) and BRAFV600E (VE1) IHC in routine practice in a cancer molecular genetic platform. All samples screened for BRAF and NRAS mutations during the year 2014 were analyzed by IHC and pyrosequencing, with an independent analysis of the 2 methods. Cases with first-line discordant results benefited from a complementary second-round IHC and next-generation sequencing (NGS) with a final interpretation taking into account the results of pyrosequencing, IHC, NGS, and quantification of the tumor cells. We analyzed 111 consecutive formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded melanoma samples from 101 patients. Twenty-two and 11 samples were concordant for BRAFV600E and NRASQ61R mutations, respectively. Second-round analyses of 9 discordant and 1 molecularly inconclusive samples allowed conclusion in 4 further mutated samples (2 BRAFV600E and 2 NRASQ61R). A sample remained NRASQ61R IHC negative but NRASQ61R mutated with molecular methods. Overall, BRAFV600 and NRASQ61 mutation frequencies were 31.7% and 30.7%, respectively. When compared to molecular results, the sensitivity and specificity of IHC were 100% for BRAFV600E IHC and 92.3% and 98.9% for NRASQ61R IHC, respectively. IHC interpretation required a more stringent cutoff for BRAFV600E IHC than NRASQ61R to minimize false results. We conclude that NRASQ61R and BRAFV600E IHC coupled with NGS allow detection of mutations in melanoma challenging samples. PMID:26297254

  20. Molecular Mapping of Adult-Plant Race-Specific Leaf Rust Resistance Gene Lr12 in Bread Wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum) gene Lr12 provides adult-plant race-specific resistance to leaf rust caused by Puccinia triticina. It is completely linked or identical to Lr31, which confers seedling resistance only when the complementary gene Lr27 is also present. F2 and F2-derived F3 families were devel...

  1. The Involvement of Neuron-Specific Factors in Dendritic Spinogenesis: Molecular Regulation and Association with Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hsiao-Tang; Shih, Pu-Yun; Shih, Yu-Tzu; Hsueh, Yi-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic spines are the location of excitatory synapses in the mammalian nervous system and are neuron-specific subcellular structures essential for neural circuitry and function. Dendritic spine morphology is determined by the F-actin cytoskeleton. F-actin remodeling must coordinate with different stages of dendritic spinogenesis, starting from dendritic filopodia formation to the filopodia-spines transition and dendritic spine maturation and maintenance. Hundreds of genes, including F-actin cytoskeleton regulators, membrane proteins, adaptor proteins, and signaling molecules, are known to be involved in regulating synapse formation. Many of these genes are not neuron-specific, but how they specifically control dendritic spine formation in neurons is an intriguing question. Here, we summarize how ubiquitously expressed genes, including syndecan-2, NF1 (encoding neurofibromin protein), VCP, and CASK, and the neuron-specific gene CTTNBP2 coordinate with neurotransmission, transsynaptic signaling, and cytoskeleton rearrangement to control dendritic filopodia formation, filopodia-spines transition, and dendritic spine maturation and maintenance. The aforementioned genes have been associated with neurological disorders, such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), mental retardation, learning difficulty, and frontotemporal dementia. We also summarize the corresponding disorders in this report. PMID:26819769

  2. Anti-RAINBOW dye-specific antibodies as universal tools for the visualization of prestained protein molecular weight markers in Western blot analysis

    PubMed Central

    Schüchner, Stefan; Andorfer, Peter; Mudrak, Ingrid; Ogris, Egon

    2016-01-01

    Western blotting is one of the most widely used techniques in molecular biology and biochemistry. Prestained proteins are used as molecular weight standards in protein electrophoresis. In the chemiluminescent Western blot analysis, however, these colored protein markers are invisible leaving researchers with the unsatisfying situation that the signal for the protein of interest and the signal for the markers are not captured simultaneously and have to be merged in an error-prone step. To allow the simultaneous detection of marker proteins we generated monoclonal antibodies specific for the protein dyes. To elicit a dye rather than protein specific immune response we immunized mice sequentially with dye-carrier protein complexes, in which a new carrier protein was used for each subsequent immunization. Moreover, by sequentially immunizing with dye-carrier protein complexes, in which different but structurally related dyes were used, we could also generate an antibody, termed anti-RAINBOW, that cross-reacted even with structurally related dyes not used in the immunizations. Our novel antibodies represent convenient tools for the simultaneous Western blot detection of commercially available prestained marker proteins in combination with the detection of any specific protein of interest. These antibodies will render obsolete the anachronistic tradition of manually charting marker bands on film. PMID:27531616

  3. Ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for specific detection of DNA based on molecular beacon mediated circular strand displacement polymerization and hyperbranched rolling circle amplification.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaolu; Guo, Jing; Zhai, Qian; Xia, Jing; Yi, Gang

    2016-08-31

    Using a cascade signal amplification strategy, an ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for specific detection of DNA based on molecular beacon (MB) mediated circular strand displacement polymerization (CSDP) and hyperbranched rolling circle amplification (HRCA) was proposed. The hybridization of MB probe to target DNA resulted in a conformational change of the MB and triggered the CSDP in the presence of bio-primer and Klenow fragment (KF exo(-)), leading to multiple biotin-tagged DNA duplex. Furthermore, the HRCA was implemented to product amounts of double-stranded DNA (ds-DNA) fragments using phi29 DNA polymerase via biotin-streptavidin interaction. After the product of HRCA binded numerous biotinylated detection probes, an ultrasensitive electrochemical readout by further employing the streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase. The proposed biosensor exhibited excellent detection sensitivity and specificity with a log-linear response to target DNA from 0.01 fM to 10 pM as low as 8.9 aM. The proposed method allowed DNA detection with simplicity, rapidness, low cost and high specificity, which might have the potential for application in clinical molecular diagnostics and environmental monitoring. PMID:27506343

  4. Anti-RAINBOW dye-specific antibodies as universal tools for the visualization of prestained protein molecular weight markers in Western blot analysis.

    PubMed

    Schüchner, Stefan; Andorfer, Peter; Mudrak, Ingrid; Ogris, Egon

    2016-01-01

    Western blotting is one of the most widely used techniques in molecular biology and biochemistry. Prestained proteins are used as molecular weight standards in protein electrophoresis. In the chemiluminescent Western blot analysis, however, these colored protein markers are invisible leaving researchers with the unsatisfying situation that the signal for the protein of interest and the signal for the markers are not captured simultaneously and have to be merged in an error-prone step. To allow the simultaneous detection of marker proteins we generated monoclonal antibodies specific for the protein dyes. To elicit a dye rather than protein specific immune response we immunized mice sequentially with dye-carrier protein complexes, in which a new carrier protein was used for each subsequent immunization. Moreover, by sequentially immunizing with dye-carrier protein complexes, in which different but structurally related dyes were used, we could also generate an antibody, termed anti-RAINBOW, that cross-reacted even with structurally related dyes not used in the immunizations. Our novel antibodies represent convenient tools for the simultaneous Western blot detection of commercially available prestained marker proteins in combination with the detection of any specific protein of interest. These antibodies will render obsolete the anachronistic tradition of manually charting marker bands on film. PMID:27531616

  5. A magnetic mesoporous nanocomposite modified with a ruthenium complex for site-specific molecular oxygen sensing: Construction and characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-qing, Zhao; Xi, Chen; De-jun, Wan

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we constructed a core-shell structured organic-inorganic hybrid composite, where superparamagnetic ferroferric oxide and silica molecular sieve MCM-41 were used as the inner core and the outer shell, respectively. A Ru(II) complex was covalently grafted into these MCM-41 tunnels. Electron microscopy images, XRD analysis, IR spectra, thermogravimetry and N2 adsorption/desorption analysis were applied to confirm this Ru(II)-functionalized hybrid composite. Emission of this composite decreased with increasing O2 concentrations, which made itself an O2 sensing system. High selectivity (12.2), linear working curve (linearity = 0.99) and short response time (12 s) were obtained from this composite.

  6. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-01-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19–C36), fatty acids (C8–C32) and n-alcohols (C16–C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ13C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from –34.1 to −24.7% and −26.9 to −24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China. PMID:27270951

  7. Molecular distributions and compound-specific stable carbon isotopic compositions of lipids in wintertime aerosols from Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lujie; Fu, Pingqing; He, Yue; Hou, Juzhi; Chen, Jing; Pavuluri, Chandra Mouli; Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa

    2016-06-01

    Molecular distributions and stable carbon isotopic compositions (δ13C) of n-alkanes, fatty acids and n-alcohols were investigated in urban aerosols from Beijing, northern China to better understand the sources and long-range atmospheric transport of terrestrial organic matter during polluted and clear days in winter. n-Alkanes (C19–C36), fatty acids (C8–C32) and n-alcohols (C16–C32) detected in Beijing aerosols are characterized by the predominance of C23, C16 and C28, respectively. Carbon preference index (CPI) values of n-alkanes, the ratios of the sum of odd-numbered n-alkanes to the sum of even-numbered n-alkanes, are close to 1, indicating a heavy influence of fossil fuel combustion. Relatively higher ratios of C(18:0+16:0)/C(18:n+16:1) (fatty acids) on clear days than polluted days indicate that long-distance transport and/or photochemical aging are more significant during clear days. δ13C values of n-alkanes and low molecular weight fatty acids (C16:0, C18:0) ranged from –34.1 to ‑24.7% and ‑26.9 to ‑24.6%, respectively, which are generally heavier on polluted days than those on clear days. Such a wide range suggests that atmospheric lipids in Beijing aerosols originate from multiple sources and encounter complicated atmospheric processes during long-range transport in North China.

  8. Molecular identification of prey in the stomach contents of Harp Seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus) using species-specific oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Marshall, H D; Hart, K A; Yaskowiak, E S; Stenson, G B; McKinnon, D; Perry, E A

    2010-01-01

    All methods of diet analysis in marine mammals, including hard part analysis (HPA), have biases affecting the accuracy of prey-species identification and frequency in the estimated diet due to differential consumption, digestion and retention. Using PCR amplification of specific prey DNA with species-specific primers, we developed a DNA-based method that complements HPA and provides an alternative means to detect prey from stomach contents of Harp Seals (Pagophilus groenlandicus). The target size that could be reliably amplified was determined using a digestion time-series of Atlantic Cod (Gadus morhua) tissue in simulated seal stomachs. Various target lengths were trialed using general teleost primers; amplicons of approximately 800 bp or less were consistently obtained. Prey species-specific PCR primers for Atlantic Cod, Arctic Cod (Boreogadus saida) and Capelin (Mallotus villosus) were designed and tested with DNA from the stomach contents of 31 Harp Seals. Amplicons were obtained for all three species-specific primer sets. Amplification results compared with HPA revealed: (i) Atlantic Cod hard parts were found in five stomachs where no Atlantic Cod DNA amplified, suggesting that Atlantic Cod may be over-represented in the estimated diet, (ii) amplification of Arctic Cod DNA occurred for 17 stomachs, including all 12 stomachs with, and five stomachs without, Arctic Cod hard parts, and (iii) Capelin DNA amplified for four of five stomachs with Capelin hard parts and for one stomach without Capelin hard parts. We conclude that PCR amplification of specific prey DNA provides a viable means to complement Harp Seal diet analysis by HPA, but suggest that valuable information for quantitative diet analysis rests in a quantitative PCR approach. PMID:21565007

  9. Molecular characterisation and chromosomal mapping of transcripts having tissue-specific expression in the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae: possible involvement in visual or olfactory processes.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Irene; Santolamazza, Federica; Costantini, Carlo; Favia, Guido

    2002-01-01

    We have compared the transcriptional activity of heads, antennae + palps, and carcasses in the mosquito Anopheles gambiae by means of differential display PCR (DD-PCR). Three transcripts specifically or preferentially expressed in the heads and in the antennae + palps have been selected. All are very similar to genes related to visual and olfactory mechanisms of several different organisms. They have been named Ag arrestin, Ag rLDL, and Ag dynamin. The potential of the DD-PCR technique in identifying genes involved in mosquito behaviour and the usefulness of the molecular characterisation of these transcripts are discussed. PMID:11822731

  10. Specific ion interactions with aromatic rings in aqueous solutions: Comparison of molecular dynamics simulations with a thermodynamic solute partitioning model and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Jordan C.; Matt, Sarah M.; Rankin, Blake M.; D'Auria, Raffaella; Freites, J. Alfredo; Ben-Amotz, Dor; Tobias, Douglas J.

    2015-10-01

    Specific ion interactions of KF, and the Na+ salts of SO42-, F-, Cl-, NO3-, I-, and ClO4- with benzene in aqueous solutions were investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and compared with experimental Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) and thermodynamic results. Good agreement is found with the hydration-shell partition coefficients of salts obtained from the thermodynamic analysis and of halogen anions obtained from the Raman-MCR spectra of benzene and pyridine. Larger discrepancies between the simulation and thermodynamic cation partitioning results point to the influence of counter-ion interaction on cation partitioning.

  11. Molecular Insights into the Fungus-Specific Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase Z1 in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Emily; Choy, Meng S.; Petrényi, Katalin; Kónya, Zoltán; Erdődi, Ferenc; Dombrádi, Viktor; Peti, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The opportunistic pathogen Candida is one of the most common causes of nosocomial bloodstream infections. Because candidemia is associated with high mortality rates and because the incidences of multidrug-resistant Candida are increasing, efforts to identify novel targets for the development of potent antifungals are warranted. Here, we describe the structure and function of the first member of a family of protein phosphatases that is specific to fungi, protein phosphatase Z1 (PPZ1) from Candida albicans. We show that PPZ1 not only is active but also is as susceptible to inhibition by the cyclic peptide inhibitor microcystin-LR as its most similar human homolog, protein phosphatase 1α (PP1α [GLC7 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae]). Unexpectedly, we also discovered that, despite its 66% sequence identity to PP1α, the catalytic domain of PPZ1 contains novel structural elements that are not present in PP1α. We then used activity and pulldown assays to show that these structural differences block a large subset of PP1/GLC7 regulatory proteins from effectively binding PPZ1, demonstrating that PPZ1 does not compete with GLC7 for its regulatory proteins. Equally important, these unique structural elements provide new pockets suitable for the development of PPZ1-specific inhibitors. Together, these studies not only reveal why PPZ1 does not negatively impact GLC7 activity in vivo but also demonstrate that the family of fungus-specific phosphatases—especially PPZ1 from C. albicans—are highly suitable targets for the development of novel drugs that specifically target C. albicans without cross-reacting with human phosphatases. PMID:27578752

  12. New pathogen-specific immunoPET/MR tracer for molecular imaging of a systemic bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Wiehr, Stefan; Warnke, Philipp; Rolle, Anna-Maria; Schütz, Monika; Oberhettinger, Philipp; Kohlhofer, Ursula; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia; Maurer, Andreas; Thornton, Christopher; Boschetti, Frederic; Reischl, Gerald; Autenrieth, Ingo B.; Pichler, Bernd J.; Autenrieth, Stella E.

    2016-01-01

    The specific and rapid detection of Enterobacteriaceae, the most frequent cause of gram-negative bacterial infections in humans, remains a major challenge. We developed a non-invasive method to rapidly detect systemic Yersinia enterocolitica infections using immunoPET (antibody-targeted positron emission tomography) with [64Cu]NODAGA-labeled Yersinia-specific polyclonal antibodies targeting the outer membrane protein YadA. In contrast to the tracer [18F]FDG, [64Cu]NODAGA-YadA uptake co-localized in a dose dependent manner with bacterial lesions of Yersinia-infected mice, as detected by magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. This was accompanied by elevated uptake of [64Cu]NODAGA-YadA in infected tissues, in ex vivo biodistribution studies, whereas reduced uptake was observed following blocking with unlabeled anti-YadA antibody. We show, for the first time, a bacteria-specific, antibody-based, in vivo imaging method for the diagnosis of a Gram-negative enterobacterial infection as a proof of concept, which may provide new insights into pathogen-host interactions. PMID:26934329

  13. V{delta}1 T cell receptor binds specifically to MHC I chain related A: Molecular and biochemical evidences

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jianqing; Huang Jie; Chen Hui; Cui Lianxian; He Wei . E-mail: heweiimu@public.bta.net.cn

    2006-01-06

    Human MHC class I chain-related A (MICA) is a tumor-associated antigen that can be recognized by V{delta}1 subset of tumor-infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells. We previously reported that immobilized recombinant MICA protein could induce the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating V{delta}1 {gamma}{delta} T cells in vitro. But there has been no direct evidence showing the engagement of {gamma}{delta} T cell receptors (TCR) of the induced cells with MICA. In the current investigation, we show that MICA induces specific cytolytic activity of the expanded {gamma}{delta} T cells. We expressed the coupled V domains from the MICA-induced T cells as a single polypeptide chain V{delta}V{gamma} TCR ({gamma}{delta} scTCR). Such scTCR can specifically bind MICA of HeLa cells. Direct interaction of {gamma}{delta} scTCRs with in vitro expressed MICA was monitored using an IAsys biosensor. We found that the V{delta}1 scTCR can specifically bind to immobilized MICA molecule and MICA{alpha}1{alpha}2 domains are responsible for the binding reaction.

  14. Molecular genetic dissection of the sex-specific and vital functions of the Drosophila melanogaster sex determination gene fruitless.

    PubMed Central

    Anand, A; Villella, A; Ryner, L C; Carlo, T; Goodwin, S F; Song, H J; Gailey, D A; Morales, A; Hall, J C; Baker, B S; Taylor, B J

    2001-01-01

    A multibranched hierarchy of regulatory genes controls all aspects of somatic sexual development in Drosophila melanogaster. One branch of this hierarchy is headed by the fruitless (fru) gene and functions in the central nervous system, where it is necessary for male courtship behavior as well as the differentiation of a male-specific abdominal structure, the muscle of Lawrence (MOL). A preliminary investigation of several of the mutations described here showed that the fru gene also has a sex-nonspecific vital function. The fru gene produces a complex set of transcripts through the use of four promoters and alternative splicing. Only the primary transcripts produced from the most distal (P1) promoter are sex-specifically spliced under direction of the sex-determination hierarchy. We have analyzed eight new fru mutations, created by X-ray mutagenesis and P-element excision, to try to gain insight into the relationship of specific transcript classes to specific fru functions. Males that lack the P1-derived fru transcripts show a complete absence of sexual behavior, but no other defects besides the loss of the MOL. Both males and females that have reduced levels of transcripts from the P3 promoter develop into adults but frequently die after failing to eclose. Analysis of the morphology and behavior of adult escapers showed that P3-encoded functions are required for the proper differentiation and eversion of imaginal discs. Furthermore, the reduction in the size of the neuromuscular junctions on abdominal muscles in these animals suggests that one of fru's sex-nonspecific functions involves general aspects of neuronal differentiation. In mutants that lack all fru transcripts as well as a small number of adjacent genes, animals die at an early pupal stage, indicating that fru's function is required only during late development. Thus, fru functions both in the sex-determination regulatory hierarchy to control male sexual behavior through sex-specific transcripts and

  15. Molecular dynamics assignment of NMR correlation times to specific motions in a "basket-handle porphyrin" heme.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Razvan; Mispelter, Joël; Gallay, Jacques; Mouawad, Liliane

    2005-02-24

    Iron (II) basket-handle porphyrins (BHP) are a series of encumbered heme models designed several years ago to mimic the ligand binding site of hemoproteins. Contrary to expectations, kinetic investigations have revealed that the k(on) rates for CO and/or O2 binding were only marginally affected by the assumed central steric hindrance of the iron atom. Thus, it was hypothesized that the internal dynamics of the molecule might be at the origin of the poor steric protection. To address this issue, measurements of nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation rates, fluorescence anisotropy experiments, and molecular dynamics simulations were undertaken. The size of BHP is small enough to allow the simulation in explicit chloroform with an almost complete sampling of the conformational space. The order parameters calculated from the MD trajectory compare well with the NMR experimental data and the predicted rotational correlation time corresponding to the Brownian motion of the molecule is in good agreement with the fluorescence measurements. Moreover, combining the results obtained using the three techniques allows the attribution of each internal NMR correlation time to a particular internal motion, revealing that even such medium-sized molecules are able to display quite complex internal dynamics. In particular, the handle phenyls that were assumed to sandwich the porphyrin have in fact a vanishing probability to be found in the proximity of the iron atom. They are therefore unable to reduce ligand accessibility significantly, which may explain the behavior of the k(on) rates. PMID:16851314

  16. Signatures of protein thermal denaturation and local hydrophobicity in domain specific hydration behavior: a comparative molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Prathit; Sengupta, Neelanjana

    2016-04-22

    We investigate, using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations, the association of surface hydration accompanying local unfolding in the mesophilic protein Yfh1 under a series of thermal conditions spanning its cold and heat denaturation temperatures. The results are benchmarked against the thermally stable protein, Ubq, and behavior at the maximum stability temperature. Local unfolding in Yfh1, predominantly in the beta sheet regions, is in qualitative agreement with recent solution NMR studies; the corresponding Ubq unfolding is not observed. Interestingly, all domains, except for the beta sheet domains of Yfh1, show increased effective surface hydrophobicity with increase in temperature, as reflected by the density fluctuations of the hydration layer. Velocity autocorrelation functions (VACF) of oxygen atoms of water within the hydration layers and the corresponding vibrational density of states (VDOS) are used to characterize alteration in dynamical behavior accompanying the temperature dependent local unfolding. Enhanced caging effects accompanying transverse oscillations of the water molecules are found to occur with the increase in temperature preferentially for the beta sheet domains of Yfh1. Helical domains of both proteins exhibit similar trends in VDOS with changes in temperature. This work demonstrates the existence of key signatures of the local onset of protein thermal denaturation in solvent dynamical behavior. PMID:26876051

  17. Molecular characteristics of representatives of the genus Brachylecithum Shtrom, 1940 (Digenea, Dicrocoeliidae) with comments on life cycle and host specificity.

    PubMed

    Hildebrand, Joanna; Sitko, Jilji; Zaleśny, Grzegorz; Jeżewski, Witold; Laskowski, Zdzisław

    2016-04-01

    The genus Brachylecithum was for the first time subject to molecular taxonomic phylogenetic analysis in order to ascertain relationships among its component taxa. We used two markers-the nuclear ribosomal 28S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene and the mitochondrial cox1 gene, for six species of the genus; 11 sequences of partial 28S rDNA and partial cox1 were obtained from adult B. capilliformis, B. glareoli, B. kakea, B. laniicola, B. lobatum, and B. strigis, and from larval stages obtained from snails of the genus Cepaea. We propose to synonymize B. strigis with B. lobatum, while the genetic differences in the 28S rDNA gene and mitochondrial cox1 gene confirm the species status of B. capilliformis and indicate a distinct group within Brachylecithum, including B. kakea and B. laniicola. Cercarial and metacercarial isolates from the snails showed 100 % similarity to B. lobatum; thus, it is the first record of Cepaea snails as intermediate hosts of this species and the first report on life cycle abbreviation within the Dicrocoeliidae. PMID:26711451

  18. Integrated transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of P. falciparum gametocytes: molecular insight into sex-specific processes and translational repression.

    PubMed

    Lasonder, Edwin; Rijpma, Sanna R; van Schaijk, Ben C L; Hoeijmakers, Wieteke A M; Kensche, Philip R; Gresnigt, Mark S; Italiaander, Annet; Vos, Martijn W; Woestenenk, Rob; Bousema, Teun; Mair, Gunnar R; Khan, Shahid M; Janse, Chris J; Bártfai, Richárd; Sauerwein, Robert W

    2016-07-27

    Sexual differentiation of malaria parasites into gametocytes in the vertebrate host and subsequent gamete fertilization in mosquitoes is essential for the spreading of the disease. The molecular processes orchestrating these transitions are far from fully understood. Here, we report the first transcriptome analysis of male and female Plasmodium falciparum gametocytes coupled with a comprehensive proteome analysis. In male gametocytes there is an enrichment of proteins involved in the formation of flagellated gametes; proteins involved in DNA replication, chromatin organization and axoneme formation. On the other hand, female gametocytes are enriched in proteins required for zygote formation and functions after fertilization; protein-, lipid- and energy-metabolism. Integration of transcriptome and proteome data revealed 512 highly expressed maternal transcripts without corresponding protein expression indicating large scale translational repression in P. falciparum female gametocytes for the first time. Despite a high degree of conservation between Plasmodium species, 260 of these 'repressed transcripts' have not been previously described. Moreover, for some of these genes, protein expression is only reported in oocysts and sporozoites indicating that repressed transcripts can be partitioned into short- and long-term storage. Finally, these data sets provide an essential resource for identification of vaccine/drug targets and for further mechanistic studies. PMID:27298255

  19. Drinking water biofilms on copper and stainless steel exhibit specific molecular responses towards different disinfection regimes at waterworks.

    PubMed

    Jungfer, Christina; Friedrich, Frank; Varela Villarreal, Jessica; Brändle, Katharina; Gross, Hans-Jürgen; Obst, Ursula; Schwartz, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Biofilms growing on copper and stainless steel substrata in natural drinking water were investigated. A modular pilot-scale distribution facility was installed at four waterworks using different raw waters and disinfection regimes. Three-month-old biofilms were analysed using molecular biology and microscopy methods. High total cell numbers, low counts of actively respiring cells and low numbers of cultivable bacteria indicated the high abundance of viable but not cultivable bacteria in the biofilms. The expression of the recA SOS responsive gene was detected and underlined the presence of transcriptionally active bacteria within the biofilms. This effect was most evident after UV disinfection, UV oxidation and UV disinfection with increased turbidity at waterworks compared to chemically treated and non-disinfected systems. Furthermore, live/dead staining techniques and environmental scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed the presence of living and intact bacteria in biofilms on copper substrata. Cluster analyses of DGGE profiles demonstrated differences in the composition of biofilms on copper and steel materials. PMID:23875760

  20. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Inv Dup(15) chromosomes, using probes specific for the Pradar-Willi/Angelman syndrome region: Clinical implications

    SciTech Connect

    Leana-Cox, J. ); Jenkins, L. ); Palmer, C.G.; Plattner, R. ); Sheppard, L. ); Flejter, W.L. ); Zackowski, J. ); Tsien, F. ); Schwartz, S. )

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-seven cases of inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup[15]) were investigated by FISH with two DNA probes specific for the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on proximal 15q. Sixteen of the marker chromosomes displayed two copies of each probe, while in the remaining 11 markers no hybridization was observed. A significant association was found between the presence of this region and an abnormal phenotype (P<.01). This is the largest study to date of inv dup(15) chromosomes, that uses molecular cytogenetic methods and is the first to report a significant association between the presence of a specific chromosomal region in such markers and an abnormal phenotype. 30 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. Synthesis and evaluation of dummy molecularly imprinted microspheres for the specific solid-phase extraction of six anthraquinones from slimming tea.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xingqiang; Liang, Shuxuan; Ge, Xusheng; Lv, Yunkai; Sun, Hanwen

    2015-05-01

    Dummy molecularly imprinted microspheres with danthron as template were synthesized and their performance was evaluated. Accelerated solvent extraction can rapidly and effectively remove template molecules from the microspheres. The microspheres were applied as a specific sorbent for solid-phase extraction of six anthraquinones from slimming tea, showing excellent affinity and high selectivity to danthron and the target analytes. The molecular recognition mechanisms were discussed by the experimental validation with IR spectroscopy. The sample was treated using accelerated solvent extraction followed by dummy molecularly imprinted microspheres solid-phase extraction. Under the optimized ultra high performance liquid chromatographic conditions, the six target analytes can be baseline separated in 8 min, and good linearity was obtained in a range of 0.1-40 μg/mL with the correlation coefficient (r(2)) of ≥0.9998. The method limit of quantification was in a range of 1-2 mg/kg, it can ensure analysis of anthraquinones at mg/kg level. The intra- and interday precision (RSD, n = 6) for the analysis of the six analytes in a slimming tea was less than 4.5 and 5.4%, respectively. The developed method can be applied for the selective extraction, effective separation, and rapid determination of six anthraquinones in slimming tea. PMID:25677958

  2. Formation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears: Quantum Chemistry and Molecular Mechanics Study of the Electrophilic Addition of o-Benzyne to Fullerenes, Graphene, and Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in chemical functionalization of fullerene molecules. In some cases, the predominant reaction products are different from those obtained (using the same reactants) from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). One such example is the cycloaddition of o-benzyne to C60. It is well established that benzyne adds across one of the rings in naphthalene, anthracene and other PAHs forming the [2+4] cycloaddition product (benzobicyclo[2.2.2.]-octatriene with naphthalene and triptycene with anthracene). However, Hoke et al demonstrated that the only reaction path for o-benzyne with C60 leads to the [2+2] cycloaddition product in which benzyne adds across one of the interpentagonal bonds (forming a cyclobutene ring in the process). Either reaction product results in a loss of aromaticity and distortion of the PAH or fullerene substrate, and in a loss of strain in the benzyne. It is not clear, however, why different products are preferred in these cases. In the current paper, we consider the stability of benzyne-nanotube adducts and the ability of Brenner's potential energy model to describe the structure and stability of these adducts. The Brenner potential has been widely used for describing diamondoid and graphitic carbon. Recently it has also been used for molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations of fullerenes and nanotubes. However, it has not been tested for the case of functionalized fullerenes (especially with highly strained geometries). We use the Brenner potential for our companion nanogear simulations and believe that it should be calibrated to insure that those simulations are physically reasonable. In the present work, Density Functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to determine the preferred geometric structures and energetics for this calibration. The DFT method is a kind of ab initio quantum chemistry method for determining the electronic structure of molecules. For a given basis set

  3. Rapid and Specific Detection, Molecular Epidemiology, and Experimental Virulence of the O16 Subgroup within Escherichia coli Sequence Type 131

    PubMed Central

    Clermont, Olivier; Johnston, Brian; Clabots, Connie; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Junka, Adam F.; Maczynska, Beata; Denamur, Erick

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli sequence type 131 (ST131), a widely disseminated multidrug-resistant extraintestinal pathogen, typically exhibits serotype O25b:H4. However, certain ST131 isolates exhibit serotype O16:H5 and derive from a phylogenetic clade that is distinct from the classic O25b:H4 ST131 clade. Both clades are assigned to ST131 by the Achtman multilocus sequence typing (MLST) system and a screening PCR assay that targets ST131-specific sequence polymorphisms in the mdh and gyrB genes. However, they are classified as separate STs by the Pasteur Institute MLST system, and an ST131 PCR method that targets the O25b rfb region and an ST131-specific polymorphism in pabB detects only the O25b-associated clade. Here, we describe a novel PCR-based method that allows for rapid and specific detection of the O16-associated ST131 clade. The clade members uniformly contained allele 41 of fimH (type 1 fimbrial adhesin) and a narrow range of alleles of gyrA and parC (fluoroquinolone target genes). The virulence genotypes of the clade members resembled those of classic O25b:H4 ST131 isolates; representative isolates were variably lethal in a mouse subcutaneous sepsis model. Several pulsotypes spanned multiple sources (adults, children, pets, and human fecal samples) and locales. An analysis of recent clinical E. coli collections showed that the O16 ST131 clade is globally distributed, accounts for 1 to 5% of E. coli isolates overall, and, when compared with other ST131 isolates, it is associated with resistance to ampicillin, gentamicin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and with susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and extended-spectrum cephalosporins. Attention to this O16-associated ST131 clade, which is facilitated by our novel PCR-based assay, is warranted in future epidemiological studies of ST131 and, conceivably, in clinical applications. PMID:24501035

  4. Molecular Determinants of Species Specificity in the Coronavirus Receptor Aminopeptidase N (CD13): Influence of N-Linked Glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Wentworth, David E.; Holmes, Kathryn V.

    2001-01-01

    Aminopeptidase N (APN), a 150-kDa metalloprotease also called CD13, serves as a receptor for serologically related coronaviruses of humans (human coronavirus 229E [HCoV-229E]), pigs, and cats. These virus-receptor interactions can be highly species specific; for example, the human coronavirus can use human APN (hAPN) but not porcine APN (pAPN) as its cellular receptor, and porcine coronaviruses can use pAPN but not hAPN. Substitution of pAPN amino acids 283 to 290 into hAPN for the corresponding amino acids 288 to 295 introduced an N-glycosylation sequon at amino acids 291 to 293 that blocked HCoV-229E receptor activity of hAPN. Substitution of two amino acids that inserted an N-glycosylation site at amino acid 291 also resulted in a mutant hAPN that lacked receptor activity because it failed to bind HCoV-229E. Single amino acid revertants that removed this sequon at amino acids 291 to 293 but had one or five pAPN amino acid substitution(s) in this region all regained HCoV-229E binding and receptor activities. To determine if other N-linked glycosylation differences between hAPN, feline APN (fAPN), and pAPN account for receptor specificity of pig and cat coronaviruses, a mutant hAPN protein that, like fAPN and pAPN, lacked a glycosylation sequon at 818 to 820 was studied. This sequon is within the region that determines receptor activity for porcine and feline coronaviruses. Mutant hAPN lacking the sequon at amino acids 818 to 820 maintained HCoV-229E receptor activity but did not gain receptor activity for porcine or feline coronaviruses. Thus, certain differences in glycosylation between coronavirus receptors from different species are critical determinants in the species specificity of infection. PMID:11559807

  5. Molecular Basis for the Catalytic Specificity of the CTX-M Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases

    SciTech Connect

    Adamski, Carolyn J.; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Brown, Nicholas G.; Horton, Lori B.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Gilbert, Hiram F.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2014-12-09

    We report that extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) pose a threat to public health because of their ability to confer resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins such as cefotaxime. The CTX-M β-lactamases are the most widespread ESBL enzymes among antibiotic resistant bacteria. Many of the active site residues are conserved between the CTX-M family and non-ESBL β-lactamases such as TEM-1, but the residues Ser237 and Arg276 are specific to the CTX-M family, suggesting that they may help to define the increased specificity for cefotaxime hydrolysis. To test this hypothesis, site-directed mutagenesis of these positions was performed in the CTX-M-14 β-lactamase. Substitutions of Ser237 and Arg276 with their TEM-1 counterparts, Ala237 and Asn276, had a modest effect on cefotaxime hydrolysis, as did removal of the Arg276 side chain in an R276A mutant. The S237A:R276N and S237A:R276A double mutants, however, exhibited 29- and 14-fold losses in catalytic efficiency for cefotaxime hydrolysis, respectively, while the catalytic efficiency for benzylpenicillin hydrolysis was unchanged. Therefore, together, the Ser237 and Arg276 residues are important contributors to the cefotaximase substrate profile of the enzyme. High-resolution crystal structures of the CTX-M-14 S70G, S70G:S237A, and S70G:S237A:R276A variants alone and in complex with cefotaxime show that residues Ser237 and Arg276 in the wild-type enzyme promote the expansion of the active site to accommodate cefotaxime and favor a conformation of cefotaxime that allows optimal contacts between the enzyme and substrate. In conclusion, the conservation of these residues, linked to their effects on structure and catalysis, imply that their coevolution is an important specificity determinant in the CTX-M family.

  6. Molecular cloning of a ripening-specific lipoxygenase and its expression during wild-type and mutant tomato fruit development.

    PubMed Central

    Kausch, K D; Handa, A K

    1997-01-01

    A 94-kD protein that accumulates predominately in tomato (Ly-copersicon esculentum) fruit during ripening was purified, and antibodies specific for the purified protein were used to isolate cDNA clones from a red-ripe fruit cDNA library. A sequence analysis of these cDNAs and cross-reactivity of the 94-kD-specific antibodies to the soybean lipoxygenase (LOX) L-1, L-2, and L-3 proteins and soybean LOX L-1-specific antibodies to the 94-kD protein identified it as a member of the LOX gene family. Maximum levels of the 94-kD LOX mRNA and protein are present in breaker to ripe and red-ripe stages, respectively. Expression of 94-kD LOX in different tissues from mature green and red-ripe tomato fruits was found to be greatest in the radial walls of ripe fruit, but immunocytolocalization using tissue printing suggests that the highest accumulation of its protein occurs in locular jelly. None of 94-kD LOX is expressed in nonripening mutant fruits of any age. Never-ripe mutant fruit accumulate the 94-kD LOX mRNA to levels similar to those obtained in wild-type fruit, but fail to accumulate the 94-kD LOX protein. Collectively, the results show that expression of 94-kD LOX is regulated by the ripening process, and ethylene may play a role in its protein accumulation. PMID:9112767

  7. Insight into the Molecular Evolution of Non-Specific Lipid Transfer Proteins via Comparative Analysis Between Rice and Sorghum

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong Wei; Hwang, Sun-Goo; Karuppanapandian, Thirupathi; Liu, Aihua; Kim, Wook; Jang, Cheol Seong

    2012-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis was conducted on 9 kDa non-specific lipid transfer protein (nsLTP) genes from nine plant species. Each of the five classified types in angiosperms exhibited eight conserved cysteine patterns. The most abundant nsLTP genes fell into the type I category, which was particularly enriched in a grass-specific lineage of clade I.1. Six pairs of tandem copies of nsLTP genes on the distal region of rice chromosomes 11 and 12 were well-preserved under concerted evolution, which was not observed in sorghum. The transgenic promoter–reporter assay revealed that both rice and sorghum nsLTP genes of type I displayed a relatively conserved expression feature in the epidermis of growing tissue, supporting its functional roles in cutin synthesis or defence against phytopathogens. For type I, the frequent expression in the stigma and seed are indicative of functional involvement in pistil–pollen interactions and seed development. By way of contrast, several type V genes were observed, mainly in the vascular bundle of the rosette as well as the young shoots, which might be related with vascular tissue differentiation or defence signalling. Compared with sorghum, the highly redundant tissue-specific expression pattern among members of rice nsLTP genes in clade I.1 suggests that concerted evolution via gene conversion favours the preservation of crucial expression motifs via the homogenization of proximal promoter sequences under high selection constraints. However, extensive regulatory subfunctionalization might also have occurred under relative low selection constraints, resulting in functional divergence at the expression level. PMID:22368182

  8. Bioinspired Protein Channel-Based Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy (Bio-SICM) for Simultaneous Conductance and Specific Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Macazo, Florika C; White, Ryan J

    2016-03-01

    The utility of stochastic single-molecule detection using protein nanopores has found widespread application in bioanalytical sensing as a result of the inherent signal amplification of the resistive pulse method. Integration of protein nanopores with high-resolution scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM) extends the utility of SICM by enabling selective chemical imaging of specific target molecules, while simultaneously providing topographical information about the net ion flux through a pore under a concentration gradient. In this study, we describe the development of a bioinspired scanning ion conductance microscopy (bio-SICM) approach that couples the imaging ability of SICM with the sensitivity and chemical selectivity of protein channels to perform simultaneous pore imaging and specific molecule mapping. To establish the framework of the bio-SICM platform, we utilize the well-studied protein channel α-hemolysin (αHL) to map the presence of β-cyclodextrin (βCD) at a substrate pore opening. We demonstrate concurrent pore and specific molecule imaging by raster scanning an αHL-based probe over a glass membrane containing a single 25-μm-diameter glass pore while recording the lateral positions of the probe and channel activity via ionic current. We use the average channel current to create a conductance image and the raw current-time traces to determine spatial localization of βCD. With further optimization, we believe that the bio-SICM platform will provide a powerful analytical methodology that is generalizable, and thus offers significant utility in a myriad of bioanalytical applications. PMID:26848947

  9. Structural and Biochemical Studies of a Fluoroacetyl-CoA-Specific Thioesterase Reveal a Molecular Basis for Fluorine Selectivity†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Weeks, Amy M.; Coyle, Scott M.; Jinek, Martin; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Chang, Michelle C. Y.

    2012-01-01

    We have initiated a broad-based program aimed at understanding the molecular basis of fluorine specificity in enzymatic systems, and in this context, we report crystallographic and biochemical studies on a fluoroacetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) specific thioesterase (FlK) from Streptomyces cattleya. Our data establish that FlK is competent to protect its host from fluoroacetate toxicity in vivo and demonstrate a 106-fold discrimination between fluoroacetyl-CoA(kcat/KM=5×107M−1 s−1) and acetyl-CoA(kcat/KM=30 M−1 s−1) based on a single fluorine substitution that originates from differences in both substrate reactivity and binding. We show that Thr 42, Glu 50, and His 76 are key catalytic residues and identify several factors that influence substrate selectivity. We propose that FlK minimizes interaction with the thioester carbonyl, leading to selection against acetyl-CoA binding that can be recovered in part by new C=O interactions in the T42S and T42C mutants. We hypothesize that the loss of these interactions is compensated by the entropic driving force for fluorinated substrate binding in a hydrophobic binding pocket created by a lid structure, containing Val 23, Leu 26, Phe 33, and Phe 36, that is not found in other structurally characterized members of this superfamily. We further suggest that water plays a critical role in fluorine specificity based on biochemical and structural studies focused on the unique Phe 36 “gate” residue, which functions to exclude water from the active site. Taken together, the findings from these studies offer molecular insights into organofluorine recognition and design of fluorine-specific enzymes. PMID:20836570

  10. A MORPHOLOGICAL AND MOLECULAR STUDY OF AUSTRAL SARGASSUM (FUCALES, PHAEOPHYCEAE) SUPPORTS THE RECOGNITION OF PHYLLOTRICHA AT GENUS LEVEL, WITH FURTHER ADDITIONS TO THE GENUS SARGASSOPSIS(1).

    PubMed

    Dixon, Rainbo R M; Huisman, John M; Buchanan, Joe; Gurgel, Carlos Frederico D; Spencer, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Sargassum subgenus Phyllotricha currently includes seven species restricted to Australian and New Zealand coasts. A recent study of Cystoseira and other Sargassaceae genera based on mitochondrial 23S DNA and chloroplast-encoded psbA sequences resulted in the most widely distributed species of subgenus Phyllotricha, Sargassum decurrens, being transferred to the reinstated monospecific Sargassopsis Trevisan. The fate of the residual six Phyllotricha species, however, was not considered. The present study examines these Phyllotricha species, alongside other Sargassum subgenera, Sargassopsis, Sirophysalis trinodis (formerly Cystoseira trinodis) and the New Zealand endemic Carpophyllum Greville, using morphological evidence and the molecular phylogenetic markers cox3, ITS-2 and the rbcL-S spacer. Our results suggest both the genus Sargassum and Sargassum subgenus Phyllotricha are polyphyletic as currently circumscribed. Four S. subgen. Phyllotricha species, i.e. S. sonderi, S. decipiens, S. varians and S. verruculosum, form a monophyletic group sister to the genus Carpophyllum, and S. peronii is genetically identical to S. decurrens with regard to all three loci. We propose the resurrection of the genus Phyllotricha Areschoug, with type species Phyllotricha sonderi, and include the new combinations Phyllotricha decipiens, Phyllotricha varians and Phyllotricha verruculosum. Sargassum peronii, S. heteromorphum and S. kendrickii are transferred to Sargassopsis and Sargassum peronii is considered a synonym of Sargassopsis decurrens. PMID:27011273

  11. The combined effect of salinity and heat reveals a specific physiological, biochemical and molecular response in tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Rivero, Rosa M; Mestre, Teresa C; Mittler, Ron; Rubio, Francisco; Garcia-Sanchez, Francisco; Martinez, Vicente

    2014-05-01

    Many studies have described the response mechanisms of plants to salinity and heat applied individually; however, under field conditions some abiotic stresses often occur simultaneously. Recent studies revealed that the response of plants to a combination of two different stresses is specific and cannot be deduced from the stresses applied individually. Here, we report on the response of tomato plants to a combination of heat and salt stress. Interestingly, and in contrast to the expected negative effect of the stress combination on plant growth, our results show that the combination of heat and salinity provides a significant level of protection to tomato plants from the effects of salinity. We observed a specific response of plants to the stress combination that included accumulation of glycine betaine and trehalose. The accumulation of these compounds under the stress combination was linked to the maintenance of a high K(+) concentration and thus a lower Na(+) /K(+) ratio, with a better performance of the cell water status and photosynthesis as compared with salinity alone. Our findings unravel new and unexpected aspects of the response of plants to stress combination and provide a proposed list of enzymatic targets for improving crop tolerance to the abiotic field environment. PMID:24028172

  12. Molecular heterogeneity for bovine alpha-mannosidosis: PCR based assays for detection of breed-specific mutations.

    PubMed

    Berg, T; Healy, P J; Tollersrud, O K; Nilssen, O

    1997-01-01

    DNA tests, based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), were developed for the detection of two breed-specific mutations responsible for the autosomal recessive disorder bovine alpha-mannosidosis. The tests involve separate amplification of two exons of the lysosomal alpha-mannosidase gene followed by restriction enzyme digestion of the amplicons. We demonstrate that one of the mutations, the 662G-->A transition, is responsible for alpha-mannosidosis in Galloway cattle. The other mutation, the 961T-->C transition, is uniquely associated with alpha-mannosidosis in Angus, Murray Grey and Brangus cattle from Australia. The 961T-->C mutation was also detected in Red Angus cattle exported from Canada to Australia as embryos. All 39 animals classified as heterozygotes on the basis of biochemical assays were heterozygous for one of the two mutations. None of 102 animals classified as homozygous-normal on the basis of biochemical assays possessed the mutations. Our results indicate that the two breed-specific mutations may have arisen in Scotland and by the export of animals and germplasm disseminated to America, New Zealand and Australia. PMID:9491457

  13. Single photon simultaneous K-shell ionization and K-shell excitation. II. Specificities of hollow nitrogen molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Carniato, S. Selles, P.; Andric, L.; Palaudoux, J.; Penent, F.; Lablanquie, P.; Žitnik, M.; Bučar, K.; Nakano, M.; Hikosaka, Y.; Ito, K.

    2015-01-07

    The formalism developed in the companion Paper I is used here for the interpretation of spectra obtained recently on the nitrogen molecule. Double core-hole ionization K{sup −2} and core ionization-core excitation K{sup −2}V processes have been observed by coincidence electron spectroscopy after ionization by synchrotron radiation at different photon energies. Theoretical and experimental cross sections reported on an absolute scale are in satisfactory agreement. The evolution with photon energy of the relative contribution of shake-up and conjugate shake-up processes is discussed. The first main resonance in the K{sup −2}V spectrum is assigned to a K{sup −2}π{sup ∗} state mainly populated by the 1s→ lowest unoccupied molecular orbital dipolar excitation, as it is in the K{sup −1}V NEXAFS (Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) signals. Closer to the K{sup −2} threshold Rydberg resonances have been also identified, and among them a K{sup −2}σ{sup ∗} resonance characterized by a large amount of 2s/2p hybridization, and double K{sup −2}(2σ{sup ∗}/1π/3σ){sup −1}1π{sup ∗2} shake-up states. These resonances correspond in NEXAFS spectra to, respectively, the well-known σ{sup ∗} shape resonance and double excitation K{sup −1}(2σ{sup ∗}/1π/3σ){sup −1}1π{sup ∗2} resonances, all being positioned above the threshold.

  14. Specific glucose-to-SPR signal transduction at physiological pH by molecularly imprinted responsive hybrid microgels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weitai; Shen, Jing; Li, Yaoxin; Zhu, Hongbo; Banerjee, Probal; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2012-10-01

    We design a class of imprinted hybrid microgels that can optically monitor glucose levels with high sensitivity and selectivity in complex media at physiological pH, acting like a "glucose-indicator". Such imprinted hybrid microgels were made of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) in situ immobilized in molecularly imprinted glucose-responsive polymeric microgel templates containing phenylboronic acids in such a way that the Ag NPs were confined in the immediate vicinity to each other, thus enabling their efficient plasmon coupling. The glucose-responsive gel-actuated tunable plasmon coupling effects among the Ag NPs immobilized inside the microgels were investigated in both phosphate buffer solution and artificial tear fluid. The visually evident color shift from yellow to red of the hybrid microgel dispersion in response to a glucose concentration change from 0 to 20.0 mm allows one to see the glucose levels without instrumental aid. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) response of the imprinted hybrid microgels at appropriate loading amount of Ag NPs is free of the significant interferences from the major non-glucose constituents, enabling the optical glucose sensing in artificial tear fluids with the achieved root-mean-squared error of predication (RMSEC) as low as 13.7 μM (~0.2 mg/dL) over a clinically relevant glucose concentration range of 0.1-20 mm (1.8-360 mg/dL). The highly versatile imprinted hybrid microgels could potentially be used for continuous glucose monitoring in clinical diagnostic and bioprocess applications. PMID:22800540

  15. Molecularly imprinted electrochemical sensing interface based on in-situ-polymerization of amino-functionalized ionic liquid for specific recognition of bovine serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanying; Han, Miao; Liu, Guishen; Hou, Xiaodong; Huang, Yina; Wu, Kangbing; Li, Chunya

    2015-12-15

    A molecularly imprinted polymer film was in situ polymerized on a carboxyl functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode surface under room temperature. This technique provides a promising imprinting approach for protein in an aqueous solution using 3-(3-aminopropyl)-1-vinylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ionic liquid as functional monomer, N, N'-methylenebisacrylamide as crossing linker, ammonium persulfate and N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine as initiator, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) as template. The molecularly imprinted polymerized ionic liquid film shows enhanced accessibility, high specificity and sensitivity towards BSA. Electrochemical sensing performance of the imprinted sensor was thoroughly investigated using K3Fe[CN]6/K4Fe[CN]6 as electroactive probes. Under optimal conditions, the current difference before and after specific recognition of BSA was found linearly related to its concentration in the range from 1.50×10(-9) to 1.50×10(-6) mol L(-1). The detection limit was calculated to be 3.91×10(-10) mol L(-1) (S/N=3). The practical application of the imprinted sensor was demonstrated by determining BSA in liquid milk samples. PMID:26232004

  16. Molecular Basis for the Selectivity and Specificity of Ligand Recognition by the Family 16 Carbohydrate-binding Modules from Thermoanaerobacterium polysaccharolyticum ManA

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Brian; Ohene-Adjei, Samuel; Kocherginskaya, Svetlana; Mackie, Roderick I.; Spies, M. Ashley; Cann, Isaac K.O.; Nair, Satish K.

    2008-06-06

    Enzymes that hydrolyze complex polysaccharides into simple sugars are modular in architecture and consist of single or multiple catalytic domains fused to targeting modules called carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). CBMs bind to their ligands with high affinity and increase the efficiency of the catalytic components by targeting the enzymes to its substrate. Here we utilized a multidisciplinary approach to characterize each of the two family 16 carbohydrate-binding domain components of the highly active mannanase from the thermophile Thermoanaerobacterium polysaccharolyticum. These represent the first crystal structures of family 16 CBMs. Calorimetric analysis showed that although these CBMs demonstrate high specificity toward {beta}-1,4-linked sugars, they can engage both cello- and mannopolysaccharides. To elucidate the molecular basis for this specificity and selectivity, we have determined high resolution crystal structures of each of the two CBMs, as well as of binary complexes of CBM16-1 bound to either mannopentaose or cellopentaose. These results provide detailed molecular insights into ligand recognition and yield a framework for rational engineering experiments designed to expand the natural repertoire of these targeting modules.

  17. Molecular Basis for the Catalytic Specificity of the CTX-M Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adamski, Carolyn J.; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Brown, Nicholas G.; Horton, Lori B.; Sankaran, Banumathi; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Gilbert, Hiram F.; Palzkill, Timothy

    2014-12-09

    We report that extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) pose a threat to public health because of their ability to confer resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins such as cefotaxime. The CTX-M β-lactamases are the most widespread ESBL enzymes among antibiotic resistant bacteria. Many of the active site residues are conserved between the CTX-M family and non-ESBL β-lactamases such as TEM-1, but the residues Ser237 and Arg276 are specific to the CTX-M family, suggesting that they may help to define the increased specificity for cefotaxime hydrolysis. To test this hypothesis, site-directed mutagenesis of these positions was performed in the CTX-M-14 β-lactamase. Substitutions of Ser237 andmore » Arg276 with their TEM-1 counterparts, Ala237 and Asn276, had a modest effect on cefotaxime hydrolysis, as did removal of the Arg276 side chain in an R276A mutant. The S237A:R276N and S237A:R276A double mutants, however, exhibited 29- and 14-fold losses in catalytic efficiency for cefotaxime hydrolysis, respectively, while the catalytic efficiency for benzylpenicillin hydrolysis was unchanged. Therefore, together, the Ser237 and Arg276 residues are important contributors to the cefotaximase substrate profile of the enzyme. High-resolution crystal structures of the CTX-M-14 S70G, S70G:S237A, and S70G:S237A:R276A variants alone and in complex with cefotaxime show that residues Ser237 and Arg276 in the wild-type enzyme promote the expansion of the active site to accommodate cefotaxime and favor a conformation of cefotaxime that allows optimal contacts between the enzyme and substrate. In conclusion, the conservation of these residues, linked to their effects on structure and catalysis, imply that their coevolution is an important specificity determinant in the CTX-M family.« less

  18. Food additives.

    PubMed

    Berglund, F

    1978-01-01

    The use of additives to food fulfils many purposes, as shown by the index issued by the Codex Committee on Food Additives: Acids, bases and salts; Preservatives, Antioxidants and antioxidant synergists; Anticaking agents; Colours; Emulfifiers; Thickening agents; Flour-treatment agents; Extraction solvents; Carrier solvents; Flavours (synthetic); Flavour enhancers; Non-nutritive sweeteners; Processing aids; Enzyme preparations. Many additives occur naturally in foods, but this does not exclude toxicity at higher levels. Some food additives are nutrients, or even essential nutritents, e.g. NaCl. Examples are known of food additives causing toxicity in man even when used according to regulations, e.g. cobalt in beer. In other instances, poisoning has been due to carry-over, e.g. by nitrate in cheese whey - when used for artificial feed for infants. Poisonings also occur as the result of the permitted substance being added at too high levels, by accident or carelessness, e.g. nitrite in fish. Finally, there are examples of hypersensitivity to food additives, e.g. to tartrazine and other food colours. The toxicological evaluation, based on animal feeding studies, may be complicated by impurities, e.g. orthotoluene-sulfonamide in saccharin; by transformation or disappearance of the additive in food processing in storage, e.g. bisulfite in raisins; by reaction products with food constituents, e.g. formation of ethylurethane from diethyl pyrocarbonate; by metabolic transformation products, e.g. formation in the gut of cyclohexylamine from cyclamate. Metabolic end products may differ in experimental animals and in man: guanylic acid and inosinic acid are metabolized to allantoin in the rat but to uric acid in man. The magnitude of the safety margin in man of the Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) is not identical to the "safety factor" used when calculating the ADI. The symptoms of Chinese Restaurant Syndrome, although not hazardous, furthermore illustrate that the whole ADI

  19. The novel R347g pathogenic mutation of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase provides additional molecular insights into enzyme catalysis and deficiency.

    PubMed

    Montioli, Riccardo; Paiardini, Alessandro; Kurian, Manju A; Dindo, Mirco; Rossignoli, Giada; Heales, Simon J R; Pope, Simon; Voltattorni, Carla Borri; Bertoldi, Mariarita

    2016-06-01

    We report here a clinical case of a patient with a novel mutation (Arg347→Gly) in the gene encoding aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) that is associated with AADC deficiency. The variant R347G in the purified recombinant form exhibits, similarly to the pathogenic mutation R347Q previously studied, a 475-fold drop of kcat compared to the wild-type enzyme. In attempting to unravel the reason(s) for this catalytic defect, we have carried out bioinformatics analyses of the crystal structure of AADC-carbidopa complex with the modelled catalytic loop (residues 328-339). Arg347 appears to interact with Phe103, as well as with both Leu333 and Asp345. We have then prepared and characterized the artificial F103L, R347K and D345A mutants. F103L, D345A and R347K exhibit about 13-, 97-, and 345-fold kcat decrease compared to the wild-type AADC, respectively. However, unlike F103L, the R347G, R347K and R347Q mutants as well as the D345A variant appear to be more defective in catalysis than in protein folding. Moreover, the latter mutants, unlike the wild-type protein and the F103L variant, share a peculiar binding mode of dopa methyl ester consisting of formation of a quinonoid intermediate. This finding strongly suggests that their catalytic defects are mainly due to a misplacement of the substrate at the active site. Taken together, our results highlight the importance of the Arg347-Leu333-Asp345 hydrogen-bonds network in the catalysis of AADC and reveal the molecular basis for the pathogenicity of the variants R347. Following the above results, a therapeutic treatment for patients bearing the mutation R347G is proposed. PMID:26994895

  20. Nanobiophotonics for molecular imaging of cancer: Au- and Ag-based Epidermal Growth Factor receptor (EGFR) specific nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, Leanne J.; Hewitt, Kevin C.

    2012-03-01

    Our aim is to create and validate a novel SERS-based nanoprobe for optical imaging of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Gold and silver nanoparticles (Au/AgNPs) of various sizes were synthesized and coupled to epidermal growth factor (EGF) via a short ligand, α-lipoic acid (206 g/mol), which binds strongly to both Au and Ag nanoparticles via its disulfide end group. We used carbodiimide chemistry to couple EGF to α-lipoic acid. These nanoprobes were tested for binding affinity using Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay (ELISA) and, in-vitro, using EGFRoverexpressing A431 cells. The nanoprobes show excellent EGFR-specific binding. Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry demonstrate the carbodiimide based linking of the carboxylic acid end-group of α-lipoic acid to one or more of the three (terminal, or 2 lysine) amine groups on EGF. ELISA confirms that the linked EGF is active by itself, and following conjugation with gold or silver nanoparticles. Compared with bare nanoparticles, UV-Vis spectroscopy of Ag-based nanoprobes exhibit significant plasmon red-shift, while there was no discernable shift for Au-based ones. Dark field microscopy shows abundant uptake by EGFR overexpressing A431 cells, and serves to further confirm the excellent binding affinity. Nanoprobe internalization and consequent aggregation is thought to be the basis of enhanced light scattering in the dark field images, supporting the notion that these nanoprobes should provide excellent SERS signals at all nanoprobe sizes. In summary, novel EGFR-specific nanoprobes have been synthesized and validated by standard assay and in cell culture for use as SERS optical imaging probes.

  1. Competition among Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+ Monovalent Ions for DNA in Molecular Dynamics Simulations using the Additive CHARMM36 and Drude Polarizable Force Fields

    PubMed Central

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2015-01-01

    In the present study we report on interactions of and competition between monovalent ions for two DNA sequences in MD simulations. Efforts included the development and validation of parameters for interactions among the first-group monovalent cations, Li+, Na+, K+ and Rb+, and DNA in the Drude polarizable and additive CHARMM36 force fields (FF). The optimization process targeted gas-phase QM interaction energies of various model compounds with ions and osmotic pressures of bulk electrolyte solutions of chemically relevant ions. The optimized ionic parameters are validated against counterion condensation theory and buffer exchange-atomic emission spectroscopy measurements providing quantitative data on the competitive association of different monovalent ions with DNA. Comparison between experimental and MD simulation results demonstrates that, compared to the additive CHARMM36 model, the Drude FF provides an improved description of the general features of the ionic atmosphere around DNA and leads to closer agreement with experiment on the ionic competition within the ion atmosphere. Results indicate the importance of extended simulation systems on the order of 25 Å beyond the DNA surface to obtain proper convergence of ion distributions. PMID:25751286

  2. MOLECULAR EXPRESSION AND FUNCTIONAL ACTIVITY OF VITAMIN C SPECIFIC TRANSPORT SYSTEM (SVCT2) IN HUMAN BREAST CANCER CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Varun; Kwatra, Deep; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K.

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this study is to investigate the expression of sodium dependent vitamin C transport system (SVCT2). Moreover this investigation has been carried out to define uptake mechanism and intracellular regulation of ascorbic acid (AA) in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1). Uptake of [14C] AA was studied in MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1 cells. Functional parameters of [14C] AA uptake were delineated in the presence of different concentrations of unlabeled AA, pH, temperature, metabolic inhibitors, substrates and structural analogs. Molecular identification of SVCT2 was carried out with reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Uptake of [14C] AA was studied and found to be sodium, chloride, temperature, pH and energy dependent in all breast cancer cell lines. [14C] AA uptake was found to be saturable, with Km values of 53.85±6.24, 49.69±2.83 and 45.44±3.16 μM and Vmax values of 18.45±0.50, 32.50±0.43 and 33.25±0.53 pmol/min/mg protein, across MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1, respectively. The process is inhibited by structural analogs (L-AA and D-Iso AA) but not by structurally unrelated substrates (glucose and PAHA). Ca++/calmodulin and protein kinase pathways appeared to play a crucial role in modulating AA uptake. A 626 bp band corresponding to a vitamin C transporter (SVCT2) based on the primer design was detected by RT-PCR analysis in all breast cancer cell lines. This research article describes AA uptake mechanism, kinetics, and regulation by sodium dependent vitamin C transporter (SVCT2) in MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1 cells. Also, MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1 cell lines can be utilized as a valuable in vitro model to investigate absorption and permeability of AA-conjugated chemotherapeutics. PMID:25102111

  3. Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retnakumari, Archana; Setua, Sonali; Menon, Deepthy; Ravindran, Prasanth; Muhammed, Habeeb; Pradeep, Thalappil; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-02-01

    Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au25 nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au25 clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au+ ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of ~5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f7/2~83.97 eV and Au 4f5/2~87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size ~1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size ~8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at ~674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 µg ml-1. Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR+ve oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au25 clusters were found internalized in significantly higher concentrations compared to the negative control cell lines. This study demonstrates the potential of using

  4. Molecular-receptor-specific, non-toxic, near-infrared-emitting Au cluster-protein nanoconjugates for targeted cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Retnakumari, Archana; Setua, Sonali; Menon, Deepthy; Ravindran, Prasanth; Muhammed, Habeeb; Pradeep, Thalappil; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2010-02-01

    Molecular-receptor-targeted imaging of folate receptor positive oral carcinoma cells using folic-acid-conjugated fluorescent Au(25) nanoclusters (Au NCs) is reported. Highly fluorescent Au(25) clusters were synthesized by controlled reduction of Au(+) ions, stabilized in bovine serum albumin (BSA), using a green-chemical reducing agent, ascorbic acid (vitamin-C). For targeted-imaging-based detection of cancer cells, the clusters were conjugated with folic acid (FA) through amide linkage with the BSA shell. The bioconjugated clusters show excellent stability over a wide range of pH from 4 to 14 and fluorescence efficiency of approximately 5.7% at pH 7.4 in phosphate buffer saline (PBS), indicating effective protection of nanoclusters by serum albumin during the bioconjugation reaction and cell-cluster interaction. The nanoclusters were characterized for their physico-chemical properties, toxicity and cancer targeting efficacy in vitro. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) suggests binding energies correlating to metal Au 4f(7/2) approximately 83.97 eV and Au 4f(5/2) approximately 87.768 eV. Transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy revealed the formation of individual nanoclusters of size approximately 1 nm and protein cluster aggregates of size approximately 8 nm. Photoluminescence studies show bright fluorescence with peak maximum at approximately 674 nm with the spectral profile covering the near-infrared (NIR) region, making it possible to image clusters at the 700-800 nm emission window where the tissue absorption of light is minimum. The cell viability and reactive oxygen toxicity studies indicate the non-toxic nature of the Au clusters up to relatively higher concentrations of 500 microg ml(-1). Receptor-targeted cancer detection using Au clusters is demonstrated on FR(+ve) oral squamous cell carcinoma (KB) and breast adenocarcinoma cell MCF-7, where the FA-conjugated Au(25) clusters were found internalized in significantly higher

  5. Molecular expression and functional activity of vitamin C specific transport system (SVCT2) in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Varun; Kwatra, Deep; Pal, Dhananjay; Mitra, Ashim K

    2014-10-20

    The main goal of this study is to investigate the expression of sodium dependent vitamin C transport system (SVCT2). Moreover, this investigation has been carried out to define uptake mechanism and intracellular regulation of ascorbic acid (AA) in human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1). Uptake of [(14)C] AA was studied in MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1 cells. Functional parameters of [(14)C] AA uptake were delineated in the presence of different concentrations of unlabeled AA, pH, temperature, metabolic inhibitors, substrates and structural analogs. Molecular identification of SVCT2 was carried out with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Uptake of [(14)C] AA was studied and found to be sodium, chloride, temperature, pH and energy dependent in all breast cancer cell lines. [(14)C] AA uptake was found to be saturable, with Km values of 53.85 ± 6.24, 49.69 ± 2.83 and 45.44 ± 3.16 μM and Vmax values of 18.45 ± 0.50, 32.50 ± 0.43 and 33.25 ± 0.53 pmol/min/mg protein, across MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1, respectively. The process is inhibited by structural analogs (l-AA and d-iso AA) but not by structurally unrelated substrates (glucose and PAHA). Ca(++)/calmodulin and protein kinase pathways appeared to play a crucial role in modulating AA uptake. A 626 bp band corresponding to a vitamin C transporter (SVCT2) based on the primer design was detected by RT-PCR analysis in all breast cancer cell lines. This research article describes AA uptake mechanism, kinetics, and regulation by sodium dependent vitamin C transporter (SVCT2) in MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1 cells. Also, MDA-MB231, T47D and ZR-75-1 cell lines can be utilized as a valuable in vitro model to investigate absorption and permeability of AA-conjugated chemotherapeutics. PMID:25102111

  6. Molecular cloning and subcellular distribution of the novel PDE4B4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase isoform.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Malcolm; McSorley, Theresa; Olsen, Aileen E; Johnston, Lee Ann; Thomson, Neil C; Baillie, George S; Houslay, Miles D; Bolger, Graeme B

    2003-01-01

    We have isolated cDNAs encoding PDE4B4, a new cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE4) isoform with novel properties. The amino acid sequence of PDE4B4 demonstrates that it is encoded by the PDE4B gene, but that it differs from the previously isolated PDE4B1, PDE4B2 and PDE4B3 isoforms by the presence of a novel N-terminal region of 17 amino acids. PDE4B4 contains both of the upstream conserved region 1 (UCR1) and UCR2 regulatory units that are characteristic of 'long' PDE4 isoforms. RNase protection demonstrated that PDE4B4 mRNA is expressed preferentially in liver, skeletal muscle and various regions of the brain, which differs from the pattern of tissue distribution of the other known PDE4B long forms, PDE4B1 and PDE4B3. Expression of PDE4B4 cDNA in COS7 cells produced a protein of 85 kDa under denaturing conditions. Subcellular fractionation of recombinant, COS7-cell expressed PDE4B4 showed that the protein was localized within the cytosol, which was confirmed by confocal microscopic analysis of living COS7 cells transfected with a green fluorescent protein-PDE4B4 chimaera. PDE4B4 exhibited a K(m) for cAMP of 5.4 microM and a V(max), relative to that of the long PDE4B1 isoform, of 2.1. PDE4B4 was inhibited by the prototypical PDE4 inhibitor rolipram [4-[3-(cyclopentoxyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-pyrrolidinone] with an IC(50) of 83 nM. Treatment of COS7 cells with forskolin, to elevate cAMP levels, produced activation of PDE4B4, which was associated with the phosphorylation of PDE4B4 on Ser-56 within UCR1. The unique tissue distribution and intracellular targeting of PDE4B4 suggests that this isoform may have a distinct functional role in regulating cAMP levels in specific cell types. PMID:12441002

  7. Bulked segregant analysis of the pirarucu (Arapaima gigas) genome for identification of sex-specific molecular markers.

    PubMed

    Almeida, I G; Ianella, P; Faria, M T; Paiva, S R; Caetano, A R

    2013-01-01

    Arapaima gigas (Osteoglossidae) is one of the largest fish species in the Amazon Basin, attaining lengths of over 2.5 m and weights of over 100 kg. Its flesh is prized, and it has great potential for production in aquaculture systems. However, live pirarucu cannot be reliably sexed visually, even after sexual development, since this species does not have clear external sexual dimorphism. Simple and inexpensive methods for sexing immature pirarucu based on DNA markers would facilitate production of this species in commercial operations. We analyzed A. gigas male and female DNA pools with 566 RAPD primers, generating 2609 fragments, with an estimated 1341 segregating polymorphic markers, and an estimated average spacing of 714 kb, which corresponds to less than 0.1% of the species' genome. Two putative sex-specific fragments were initially identified in bulked samples; but they were not confirmed in a study of individual male and female samples. We suggest that A. gigas has developed a non-chromosomal system of sex determination or, alternatively, that the species has undergone a recent loss of the chromosome carrying the sex-determining locus. PMID:24338425

  8. Molecular cloning and activity analysis of a seed-specific FAD2-1B gene promoter from Glycine max.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Sha, W; Wang, Q Y; Zhai, Y; Zhao, Y; Shao, S L

    2015-01-01

    Microsomal omega-6 fatty acid desaturase (FAD2-1B) is an enzyme that regulates the polyunsaturated fatty acid content in soybeans (Glycine max). In this study, the FAD2-1B gene was determined to be highly expressed in soybean seeds using quantitative real-time PCR(qRT-PCR). To investigate the expression pattern and activity of the FAD2-1B promoter, a 1929 bp 5'-upstream genomic DNA fragment, named PF, was isolated according to the soybean genomic sequence. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of many motifs related to seed-specific promoters in the PF fragment, such as E-box, SEF4, Skn-1 motif, AACACA, AATAAA and so on. Tobacco transgenics carrying the gus reporter gene driven by the PF and/or 35S promoters were confirmed by PCR and RT-PCR. qRT-PCR and histochemical GUS assays showed that the PF promoter could regulate gus gene accumulation in seeds and the expression level was higher than in other organs. In the meantime, it exhibited similar activity to the 35S promoter in seeds, which could be associated with seed-related cis-elements found in the 1-248 bp, 451-932 bp, and 1627-1803 bp regions of the promoter. PMID:26386665

  9. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution

    PubMed Central

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  10. Molecular Determinants Underlying Binding Specificities of the ABL Kinase Inhibitors: Combining Alanine Scanning of Binding Hot Spots with Network Analysis of Residue Interactions and Coevolution.

    PubMed

    Tse, Amanda; Verkhivker, Gennady M

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying binding specificity and drug resistance of protein kinase inhibitors is of fundamental importance and remains highly challenging due to complex interplay of structural and thermodynamic factors. In this work, molecular simulations and computational alanine scanning are combined with the network-based approaches to characterize molecular determinants underlying binding specificities of the ABL kinase inhibitors. The proposed theoretical framework unveiled a relationship between ligand binding and inhibitor-mediated changes in the residue interaction networks. By using topological parameters, we have described the organization of the residue interaction networks and networks of coevolving residues in the ABL kinase structures. This analysis has shown that functionally critical regulatory residues can simultaneously embody strong coevolutionary signal and high network centrality with a propensity to be energetic hot spots for drug binding. We have found that selective (Nilotinib) and promiscuous (Bosutinib, Dasatinib) kinase inhibitors can use their energetic hot spots to differentially modulate stability of the residue interaction networks, thus inhibiting or promoting conformational equilibrium between inactive and active states. According to our results, Nilotinib binding may induce a significant network-bridging effect and enhance centrality of the hot spot residues that stabilize structural environment favored by the specific kinase form. In contrast, Bosutinib and Dasatinib can incur modest changes in the residue interaction network in which ligand binding is primarily coupled only with the identity of the gate-keeper residue. These factors may promote structural adaptability of the active kinase states in binding with these promiscuous inhibitors. Our results have related ligand-induced changes in the residue interaction networks with drug resistance effects, showing that network robustness may be compromised by targeted mutations of key mediating

  11. Molecular Cloning and Functional Studies of Two Kazal-Type Serine Protease Inhibitors Specifically Expressed by Nasonia vitripennis Venom Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Qian, Cen; Fang, Qi; Wang, Lei; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2015-08-01

    Two cDNA sequences of Kazal-type serine protease inhibitors (KSPIs) in Nasonia vitripennis, NvKSPI-1 and NvKSPI-2, were characterized and their open reading frames (ORFs) were 198 and 264 bp, respectively. Both NvKSPI-1 and NvKSPI-2 contained a typical Kazal-type domain. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) results revealed that NvKSPI-1 and NvKSPI-2 mRNAs were mostly detected specifically in the venom apparatus, while they were expressed at lower levels in the ovary and much lower levels in other tissues tested. In the venom apparatus, both NvKSPI-1 and NvKSPI-2 transcripts were highly expressed on the fourth day post eclosion and then declined gradually. The NvKSPI-1 and NvKSPI-2 genes were recombinantly expressed utilizing a pGEX-4T-2 vector, and the recombinant products fused with glutathione S-transferase were purified. Inhibition of recombinant GST-NvKSPI-1 and GST-NvKSPI-2 to three serine protease inhibitors (trypsin, chymotrypsin, and proteinase K) were tested and results showed that only NvKSPI-1 could inhibit the activity of trypsin. Meanwhile, we evaluated the influence of the recombinant GST-NvKSPI-1 and GST-NvKSPI-2 on the phenoloxidase (PO) activity and prophenoloxidase (PPO) activation of hemolymph from a host pupa, Musca domestica. Results showed PPO activation in host hemolymph was inhibited by both recombinant proteins; however, there was no significant inhibition on the PO activity. Our results suggested that NvKSPI-1 and NvKSPI-2 could inhibit PPO activation in host hemolymph and trypsin activity in vitro. PMID:26248077

  12. Molecular Cloning and Functional Studies of Two Kazal-Type Serine Protease Inhibitors Specifically Expressed by Nasonia vitripennis Venom Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Cen; Fang, Qi; Wang, Lei; Ye, Gong-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Two cDNA sequences of Kazal-type serine protease inhibitors (KSPIs) in Nasonia vitripennis, NvKSPI-1 and NvKSPI-2, were characterized and their open reading frames (ORFs) were 198 and 264 bp, respectively. Both NvKSPI-1 and NvKSPI-2 contained a typical Kazal-type domain. Real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) results revealed that NvKSPI-1 and NvKSPI-2 mRNAs were mostly detected specifically in the venom apparatus, while they were expressed at lower levels in the ovary and much lower levels in other tissues tested. In the venom apparatus, both NvKSPI-1 and NvKSPI-2 transcripts were highly expressed on the fourth day post eclosion and then declined gradually. The NvKSPI-1 and NvKSPI-2 genes were recombinantly expressed utilizing a pGEX-4T-2 vector, and the recombinant products fused with glutathione S-transferase were purified. Inhibition of recombinant GST-NvKSPI-1 and GST-NvKSPI-2 to three serine protease inhibitors (trypsin, chymotrypsin, and proteinase K) were tested and results showed that only NvKSPI-1 could inhibit the activity of trypsin. Meanwhile, we evaluated the influence of the recombinant GST-NvKSPI-1 and GST-NvKSPI-2 on the phenoloxidase (PO) activity and prophenoloxidase (PPO) activation of hemolymph from a host pupa, Musca domestica. Results showed PPO activation in host hemolymph was inhibited by both recombinant proteins; however, there was no significant inhibition on the PO activity. Our results suggested that NvKSPI-1 and NvKSPI-2 could inhibit PPO activation in host hemolymph and trypsin activity in vitro. PMID:26248077

  13. Molecular Characterization and Phylogenetic Analysis of Two Novel Regio-specific Flavonoid Prenyltransferases from Morus alba and Cudrania tricuspidata*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ruishan; Chen, Ridao; Li, Jianhua; Liu, Xiao; Xie, Kebo; Chen, Dawei; Yin, Yunze; Tao, Xiaoyu; Xie, Dan; Zou, Jianhua; Yang, Lin; Dai, Jungui

    2014-01-01

    Prenylated flavonoids are attractive specialized metabolites with a wide range of biological activities and are distributed in several plant families. The prenylation catalyzed by prenyltransferases represents a Friedel-Crafts alkylation of the flavonoid skeleton in the biosynthesis of natural prenylated flavonoids and contributes to the structural diversity and biological activities of these compounds. To date, all identified plant flavonoid prenyltransferases (FPTs) have been identified in Leguminosae. In the present study two new FPTs, Morus alba isoliquiritigenin 3′-dimethylallyltransferase (MaIDT) and Cudrania tricuspidata isoliquiritigenin 3′-dimethylallyltransferase (CtIDT), were identified from moraceous plants M. alba and C. tricuspidata, respectively. MaIDT and CtIDT shared low levels of homology with the leguminous FPTs. MaIDT and CtIDT are predicted to be membrane-bound proteins with predicted transit peptides, seven transmembrane regions, and conserved functional domains that are similar to other homogentisate prenyltransferases. Recombinant MaIDT and CtIDT were able to regioselectively introduce dimethylallyl diphosphate into the A ring of three flavonoids with different skeleton types (chalcones, isoflavones, and flavones). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that MaIDT and CtIDT are distantly related to their homologs in Leguminosae, which suggests that FPTs in Moraceae and Leguminosae might have evolved independently. MaIDT and CtIDT represent the first two non-Leguminosae FPTs to be identified in plants and could thus lead to the identification of additional evolutionarily varied FPTs in other non-Leguminosae plants and could elucidate the biosyntheses of prenylated flavonoids in various plants. Furthermore, MaIDT and CtIDT might be used for regiospecific prenylation of flavonoids to pr