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Sample records for addition subtraction multiplication

  1. Continuous-variable quantum teleportation with non-Gaussian entangled states generated via multiple-photon subtraction and addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuai; Hou, Li-Li; Chen, Xian-Feng; Xu, Xue-Fen

    2015-06-01

    We theoretically analyze the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) correlation, the quadrature squeezing, and the continuous-variable quantum teleportation when considering non-Gaussian entangled states generated by applying multiple-photon subtraction and multiple-photon addition to a two-mode squeezed vacuum state (TMSVs). Our results indicate that in the case of the multiple-photon-subtracted TMSVs with symmetric operations, the corresponding EPR correlation, the two-mode squeezing degree, the sum squeezing, and the fidelity of teleporting a coherent state or a squeezed vacuum state can be enhanced for any squeezing parameter r and these enhancements increase with the number of subtracted photons in the low-squeezing regime, while asymmetric multiple-photon subtractions will generally reduce these quantities. For the multiple-photon-added TMSVs, although it holds stronger entanglement, its EPR correlation, two-mode squeezing, sum squeezing, and the fidelity of a coherent state are always smaller than that of the TMSVs. Only when considering the case of teleporting a squeezed vacuum state does the symmetric photon addition make somewhat of an improvement in the fidelity for large-squeezing parameters. In addition, we analytically prove that a one-mode multiple-photon-subtracted TMSVs is equivalent to that of the one-mode multiple-photon-added one. And one-mode multiple-photon operations will diminish the above four quantities for any squeezing parameter r .

  2. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-10-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step in understanding mathematical representations of RGB color. Finally, color addition and subtraction are presented for the X11 colors from web design to illustrate yet another real-life application of color mixing.

  3. Color Addition and Subtraction Apps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Frances; Ruiz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Color addition and subtraction apps in HTML5 have been developed for students as an online hands-on experience so that they can more easily master principles introduced through traditional classroom demonstrations. The evolution of the additive RGB color model is traced through the early IBM color adapters so that students can proceed step by step…

  4. Contexts for Column Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez Fernandez, Jorge M.; Velazquez Estrella, Aileen

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss their approach to column addition and subtraction algorithms. Adapting an original idea of Paul Cobb and Erna Yackel's from "A Contextual Investigation of Three-Digit Addition and Subtraction" related to packing and unpacking candy in a candy factory, the authors provided an analogous context by…

  5. Addition and Subtraction, and Algorithms in General

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielker, David

    2007-01-01

    The juxtaposition of articles by Ian Thompson and Ian Sugarman in "MT202" on addition and subtraction respectively engendered some bemused thoughts in this author, who for some years has been sheltered from controversy by retirement. In this article, Fielker shares some thoughts on addition and subtraction raised by Thompson and Sugarman in their…

  6. Simple circuit performs binary addition and subtraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cliff, R. A.; Schaefer, D. H.

    1965-01-01

    Ripple adder reduces the number of logic circuits required to preform binary addition and subtraction. The adder uses dual input and delayed output flip-flops in one register. The contents of this register are summed with those of a standard register through conventional AND/gates.

  7. Children's Understanding of Addition and Subtraction Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Katherine M.; Dube, Adam K.

    2009-01-01

    After the onset of formal schooling, little is known about the development of children's understanding of the arithmetic concepts of inversion and associativity. On problems of the form a+b-b (e.g., 3+26-26), if children understand the inversion concept (i.e., that addition and subtraction are inverse operations), then no calculations are needed…

  8. Children's Profiles of Addition and Subtraction Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canobi, Katherine H.

    2005-01-01

    The current research explored children's ability to recognize and explain different concepts both with and without reference to physical objects so as to provide insight into the development of children's addition and subtraction understanding. In Study 1, 72 7- to 9-year-olds judged and explained a puppet's activities involving three conceptual…

  9. Children's Use of Subtraction by Addition on Large Single-Digit Subtractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Greet; De Smedt, Bert; Torbeyns, Joke; Ghesquiere, Pol; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2012-01-01

    Subtractions of the type M - S = ? can be solved by various strategies, including subtraction by addition. In this study, we investigated children's use of subtraction by addition by means of reaction time analyses. We presented 106 third to sixth graders with 32 large non-tie single-digit problems in both subtraction (12 - 9 = .) and addition…

  10. Enriching Addition and Subtraction Fact Mastery through Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay-Williams, Jennifer M.; Kling, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The learning of "basic facts"--single-digit combinations for addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division--has long been a focus of elementary school mathematics. Many people remember completing endless worksheets, timed tests, and flash card drills as they attempted to "master" their basic facts as children. However,…

  11. Additive and subtractive transparent depth displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kooi, Frank L.; Toet, Alexander

    2003-09-01

    Image fusion is the generally preferred method to combine two or more images for visual display on a single screen. We demonstrate that perceptual image separation may be preferable over perceptual image fusion for the combined display of enhanced and synthetic imagery. In this context image separation refers to the simultaneous presentation of images on different depth planes of a single display. Image separation allows the user to recognize the source of the information that is displayed. This can be important because synthetic images are more liable to flaws. We have examined methods to optimize perceptual image separation. A true depth difference between enhanced and synthetic imagery works quite well. A standard stereoscopic display based on convergence is less suitable since the two images tend to interfere: the image behind is masked (occluded) by the image in front, which results in poor viewing comfort. This effect places 3D systems based on 3D glasses, as well as most autostereoscopic displays, at a serious disadvantage. A 3D display based on additive or subtractive transparency is acceptable: both the perceptual separation and the viewing comfort are good, but the color of objects depends on the color in the other depth layer(s). A combined additive and subtractive transparent display eliminates this disadvantage and is most suitable for the combined display of enhanced and synthetic imagery. We suggest that the development of such a display system is of a greater practical value than increasing the number of depth planes in autostereoscopic displays.

  12. Children's understanding of addition and subtraction concepts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Katherine M; Dubé, Adam K

    2009-08-01

    After the onset of formal schooling, little is known about the development of children's understanding of the arithmetic concepts of inversion and associativity. On problems of the form a+b-b (e.g., 3+26-26), if children understand the inversion concept (i.e., that addition and subtraction are inverse operations), then no calculations are needed to solve the problem. On problems of the form a+b-c (e.g., 3+27-23), if children understand the associativity concept (i.e., that the addition and subtraction can be solved in any order), then the second part of the problem can be solved first. Children in Grades 2, 3, and 4 solved both types of problems and then were given a demonstration of how to apply both concepts. Approval of each concept and preference of a conceptual approach versus an algorithmic approach were measured. Few grade differences were found on either task. Conceptual understanding was greater for inversion than for associativity on both tasks. Clusters of participants in all grades showed that some had strong understanding of both concepts, some had strong understanding of the inversion concept only, and others had weak understanding of both concepts. The findings highlight the lack of developmental increases and the large individual differences in conceptual understanding on two arithmetic concepts during the early school years.

  13. Improvements in floating point addition/subtraction operations

    DOEpatents

    Farmwald, P.M.

    1984-02-24

    Apparatus is described for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point addition and subtraction in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.

  14. Navy Additive Manufacturing: Adding Parts, Subtracting Steps

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    DOD Department of Defense DON Department of Navy DREAMS Design, Research, and Education for Additive Manufacturing EBM electron beam melting...Current market leader in SLM technology is the German company EOS (Lou & Grosvenor, 2012, “Sold and Sold Again: 1997-Present”).  Electron Beam Melting...EBM): EBM was invented by the Swedish corporation Arcam. Unlike other Powder Bed Techniques, “EBM uses an electron beam rather than a laser and

  15. Teaching Addition and Subtraction Facts: A Chinese Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Wei; Zhang, Joanne Y.

    2001-01-01

    Presents an issue that arises in every country: How can teachers best help children master basic addition and subtraction facts? Discusses how this is handled in China and highlights the impact that language has on how children think about numbers. (KHR)

  16. Teaching Children about the Inverse Relation between Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunes, Terezinha; Bryant, Peter; Hallett, Darcy; Bell, Daniel; Evans, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    Two intervention studies are described. Both were designed to study the effects of teaching children about the inverse relation between addition and subtraction. The interventions were successful with 8-year-old children in Study 1 and to a limited extent with 5-year-old children in Study 2. In Study 1 teaching children about inversion increased…

  17. Children's Understanding of the Addition/Subtraction Complement Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbeyns, Joke; Peters, Greet; De Smedt, Bert; Ghesquière, Pol; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    Background: In the last decades, children's understanding of mathematical principles has become an important research topic. Different from the commutativity and inversion principles, only few studies have focused on children's understanding of the addition/subtraction complement principle (if a - b = c, then c + b = a), mainly relying on verbal…

  18. On the Standard Rounding Rule for Addition and Subtraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Wei; Mulliss, Christopher L.; Chu, Hung-Chih

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the commonly suggested rounding rule for addition and subtraction including its derivation from a basic assumption. Uses Monte-Carlo simulations to show that this rule predicts the minimum number of significant digits needed to preserve precision 100% of the time. (Author/KHR)

  19. Addition and Subtraction by Students with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Aurelia Noda; Bruno, Alicia; Gonzalez, Carina; Moreno, Lorenzo; Sanabria, Hilda

    2011-01-01

    We present a research report on addition and subtraction conducted with Down syndrome students between the ages of 12 and 31. We interviewed a group of students with Down syndrome who executed algorithms and solved problems using specific materials and paper and pencil. The results show that students with Down syndrome progress through the same…

  20. Children's Understanding of the Relationship between Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Camilla K.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2008-01-01

    In learning mathematics, children must master fundamental logical relationships, including the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction. At the start of elementary school, children lack generalized understanding of this relationship in the context of exact arithmetic problems: they fail to judge, for example, that 12 + 9 - 9 yields…

  1. Realization of arithmetic addition and subtraction in a quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Um, Mark; Zhang, Junhua; Lv, Dingshun; Lu, Yao; An, Shuoming; Zhang, Jing-Ning; Kim, Kihwan; Kim, M. S.; Nha, Hyunchul

    2015-05-01

    We report an experimental realization of the conventional arithmetic on a bosonic system, in particular, phonons of a 171Yb+ ion trapped in a harmonic potential. The conventional addition and subtraction are totally different from the quantum operations of creation ↠and annihilation â that have the modification of √{ n } factor due to the symmetric nature of bosons. In our realization, the addition and subtraction do not depend on the number of particles originally in the system and nearly deterministically bring a classical state into a non-classical state. We implement such operations by applying the scheme of transitionless shortcuts to adiabaticity on anti-Jaynes-Cummings transition. This technology enables quantum state engineering and can be applied to many other experimental platforms. This work was supported by the National Basic Research Program of China under Grants No. 2011CBA00300 (No. 2011CBA00301), the National Natural Science Foundation of China 11374178.

  2. Addition and subtraction in wild New Zealand robins.

    PubMed

    Garland, Alexis; Low, Jason

    2014-11-01

    This experiment aimed to investigate proto-arithmetic ability in a wild population of New Zealand robins. We investigated numerical competence from the context of computation: behavioural responses to arithmetic operations over small numbers of prey objects (mealworms). Robins' behavioural responses (such as search time) to the simple addition and subtraction problems presented in a Violation of Expectancy (VoE) paradigm were measured. Either a congruent (expected) or incongruent (unexpected) quantity of food items were hidden in a trap door out of view of the subject. Within view of the subject, a quantity of items were added into (and in some cases subtracted from) the apparatus which was either the same as that hidden, or different. Robins were then allowed them to find a quantity that either preserved or violated addition and subtraction outcomes. Robins searched around the apparatus longer when presented with an incongruent scenario violating arithmetic rules, demonstrating potential proto-arithmetic awareness of changes in prey quantity. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cognition in the wild.

  3. Additive and subtractive scrambling in optional randomized response modeling.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Zawar; Al-Sobhi, Mashail M; Al-Zahrani, Bander

    2014-01-01

    This article considers unbiased estimation of mean, variance and sensitivity level of a sensitive variable via scrambled response modeling. In particular, we focus on estimation of the mean. The idea of using additive and subtractive scrambling has been suggested under a recent scrambled response model. Whether it is estimation of mean, variance or sensitivity level, the proposed scheme of estimation is shown relatively more efficient than that recent model. As far as the estimation of mean is concerned, the proposed estimators perform relatively better than the estimators based on recent additive scrambling models. Relative efficiency comparisons are also made in order to highlight the performance of proposed estimators under suggested scrambling technique.

  4. Addition and subtraction by students with Down syndrome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda Herrera, Aurelia; Bruno, Alicia; González, Carina; Moreno, Lorenzo; Sanabria, Hilda

    2011-01-01

    We present a research report on addition and subtraction conducted with Down syndrome students between the ages of 12 and 31. We interviewed a group of students with Down syndrome who executed algorithms and solved problems using specific materials and paper and pencil. The results show that students with Down syndrome progress through the same procedural levels as those without disabilities though they have difficulties in reaching the most abstract level (numerical facts). The use of fingers or concrete representations (balls) appears as a fundamental process among these students. As for errors, these vary widely depending on the students, and can be attributed mostly to an incomplete knowledge of the decimal number system.

  5. Number Words in Young Children's Conceptual and Procedural Knowledge of Addition, Subtraction and Inversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canobi, Katherine H.; Bethune, Narelle E.

    2008-01-01

    Three studies addressed children's arithmetic. First, 50 3- to 5-year-olds judged physical demonstrations of addition, subtraction and inversion, with and without number words. Second, 20 3- to 4-year-olds made equivalence judgments of additions and subtractions. Third, 60 4- to 6-year-olds solved addition, subtraction and inversion problems that…

  6. Addition Table of Colours: Additive and Subtractive Mixtures Described Using a Single Reasoning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mota, A. R.; Lopes dos Santos, J. M. B.

    2014-01-01

    Students' misconceptions concerning colour phenomena and the apparent complexity of the underlying concepts--due to the different domains of knowledge involved--make its teaching very difficult. We have developed and tested a teaching device, the addition table of colours (ATC), that encompasses additive and subtractive mixtures in a single…

  7. Efficiency and Flexibility of Indirect Addition in the Domain of Multi-Digit Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbeyns, Joke; Ghesquiere, Pol; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the characteristics of the indirect addition strategy (IA) in the domain of multi-digit subtraction. In two studies, adults' use of IA on three-digit subtractions with a small, medium, or large difference between the integers was analysed using the choice/no-choice method. Results from both studies indicate that adults…

  8. Putting Essential Understanding of Addition and Subtraction into Practice: Pre-K-2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Janet H.; Kobett, Beth; Karp, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Do your students have the incorrect idea that addition "makes numbers bigger" and subtraction "makes numbers smaller"? Do they believe that subtraction is always "taking away"? What tasks can you offer--what questions can you ask--to determine what your students know or don't know--and move them forward in their…

  9. The functional architectures of addition and subtraction: Network discovery using fMRI and DCM.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhong, Ning; Friston, Karl; Imamura, Kazuyuki; Lu, Shengfu; Li, Mi; Zhou, Haiyan; Wang, Haiyuan; Li, Kuncheng; Hu, Bin

    2017-03-27

    The neuronal mechanisms underlying arithmetic calculations are not well understood but the differences between mental addition and subtraction could be particularly revealing. Using fMRI and dynamic causal modeling (DCM), this study aimed to identify the distinct neuronal architectures engaged by the cognitive processes of simple addition and subtraction. Our results revealed significantly greater activation during subtraction in regions along the dorsal pathway, including the left inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), middle portion of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (mDLPFC), and supplementary motor area (SMA), compared with addition. Subsequent analysis of the underlying changes in connectivity - with DCM - revealed a common circuit processing basic (numeric) attributes and the retrieval of arithmetic facts. However, DCM showed that addition was more likely to engage (numeric) retrieval-based circuits in the left hemisphere, while subtraction tended to draw on (magnitude) processing in bilateral parietal cortex, especially the right intraparietal sulcus (IPS). Our findings endorse previous hypotheses about the differences in strategic implementation, dominant hemisphere, and the neuronal circuits underlying addition and subtraction. Moreover, for simple arithmetic, our connectivity results suggest that subtraction calls on more complex processing than addition: auxiliary phonological, visual, and motor processes, for representing numbers, were engaged by subtraction, relative to addition. Hum Brain Mapp, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Additive-subtractive phase-modulated electronic speckle interferometry: analysis of fringe visibility.

    PubMed

    Pouet, B F; Krishnaswamy, S

    1994-10-01

    Fringe-visibility issues of additive-subtractive phase-modulated (ASPM) electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) are explored. ASPM ESPI is a three-step method in which additive-speckle images are acquired rapidly in an analog fashion in every frame of a video sequence, a speckle phase modulation is intentionally introduced between frames, and a digital subtraction of consecutive pairs of additive-speckle images is performed. We show that this scheme has the good high-frequency noise immunity associated with additive-ESPI techniques as well as the good fringe visibility associated with subtractive-ESPI techniques. The method has better fringe visibility than can be obtained with purely additive ESPI and also does not suffer from the fringe distortions that can occur with subtractive ESPI in the presence of high-frequency noise. We show that even if full speckle decorrelation were to occur between the two additive speckle images that are to be subtracted, the visibility of ASPM ESPI fringes can be made to approach unity by suitable adjustment of the reference-to-object beam-intensity ratio.

  11. DNA Subtraction of In Vivo Selected Phage Repertoires for Efficient Peptide Pathology Biomarker Identification in Neuroinflammation Multiple Sclerosis Model

    PubMed Central

    Vargas-Sanchez, Karina; Vekris, Antonios; Petry, Klaus G.

    2016-01-01

    To streamline in vivo biomarker discovery, we developed a suppression subtractive DNA hybridization technique adapted for phage-displayed combinatorial libraries of 12 amino acid peptides (PhiSSH). Physical DNA subtraction is performed in a one-tube-all-reactions format by sequential addition of reagents, producing the enrichment of specific clones of one repertoire. High-complexity phage repertoires produced by in vivo selections in the multiple sclerosis rat model (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, EAE) and matched healthy control rats were used to evaluate the technique. The healthy repertoire served as a physical DNA subtractor from the EAE repertoire to produce the subtraction repertoire. Full next-generation sequencing (NGS) of the three repertoires was performed to evaluate the efficiency of the subtraction technique. More than 96% of the clones common to the EAE and healthy repertoires were absent from the subtraction repertoire, increasing the probability of randomly selecting various specific peptides for EAE pathology to about 70%. Histopathology experiments were performed to confirm the quality of the subtraction repertoire clones, producing distinct labeling of the blood–brain barrier (BBB) affected by inflammation among healthy nervous tissue or the preferential binding to IL1-challenged vs. resting human BBB model. Combining PhiSSH with NGS will be useful for controlled in vivo screening of small peptide combinatorial libraries to discover biomarkers of specific molecular alterations interspersed within healthy tissues. PMID:26917946

  12. Enhancing quantum entanglement for continuous variables by a coherent superposition of photon subtraction and addition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Su-Yong; Kim, Ho-Joon; Ji, Se-Wan; Nha, Hyunchul

    2011-07-15

    We investigate how the entanglement properties of a two-mode state can be improved by performing a coherent superposition operation ta+ra{sup {dagger}} of photon subtraction and addition, proposed by Lee and Nha [Phys. Rev. A 82, 053812 (2010)], on each mode. We show that the degree of entanglement, the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen-type correlation, and the performance of quantum teleportation can be all enhanced for the output state when the coherent operation is applied to a two-mode squeezed state. The effects of the coherent operation are more prominent than those of the mere photon subtraction a and the addition a{sup {dagger}} particularly in the small-squeezing regime, whereas the optimal operation becomes the photon subtraction (case of r=0) in the large-squeezing regime.

  13. Operational Momentum in Large-Number Addition and Subtraction by 9-Month-Olds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCrink, Koleen; Wynn, Karen

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies on nonsymbolic arithmetic have illustrated that under conditions that prevent exact calculation, adults display a systematic tendency to overestimate the answers to addition problems and underestimate the answers to subtraction problems. It has been suggested that this "operational momentum" results from exposure to a…

  14. Generating Scenarios of Addition and Subtraction: A Study of Japanese University Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinda, Shigehiro

    2013-01-01

    Students are presented with problems involving three scenario types of addition and subtraction in elementary mathematics: one dynamic ("Change") and two static ("Combine, Compare"). Previous studies have indicated that the dynamic type is easier for school children, whereas the static types are more difficult and comprehended only gradually…

  15. Fostering Taiwanese Preschoolers' Understanding of the Addition-Subtraction Inverse Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Meng-Lung; Baroody, Arthur J.; Johnson, Amanda R.

    2008-01-01

    The present research involved gauging preschoolers' learning potential for a key arithmetic concept, the addition-subtraction inverse principle (e.g., 2+1-1=2). Sixty 4- and 5-year-old Taiwanese children from two public preschools serving low- and middle-income families participated in the training experiment. Half were randomly assigned to an…

  16. Performance on Addition and Subtraction Problems: Results from Individual Interviews - Sandy Bay Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romberg, Thomas A.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to relate children's cognitive processing capabilities and their grade level to their performance and to the strategies they used when working addition and subtraction problems. From two sets of data which assessed memory capacity and cognitive processing capacities, six groups of children with different cognitive…

  17. Brief Report: Additive and Subtractive Counterfactual Reasoning of Children with High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Begeer, Sander; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Lunenburg, Patty; Stegge, Hedy

    2009-01-01

    The development of additive ("If only I had done...") and subtractive ("If only I had not done....") counterfactual reasoning was examined in children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders (HFASD) (n = 72) and typically developing controls (n = 71), aged 6-12 years. Children were presented four stories where they could generate…

  18. Preschoolers' Nonsymbolic Arithmetic with Large Sets: Is Addition More Accurate than Subtraction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shinskey, Jeanne L.; Chan, Cindy Ho-man; Coleman, Rhea; Moxom, Lauren; Yamamoto, Eri

    2009-01-01

    Adult and developing humans share with other animals analog magnitude representations of number that support nonsymbolic arithmetic with large sets. This experiment tested the hypothesis that such representations may be more accurate for addition than for subtraction in children as young as 3 1/2 years of age. In these tasks, the experimenter hid…

  19. Developing Prospective Teachers' Understanding of Addition and Subtraction with Whole Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, George J.

    2014-01-01

    This study was situated in a semester-long classroom teaching experiment examining prospective teachers' understanding of number concepts and operations. The purpose of this paper is to describe the learning goals, tasks, and tools used to cultivate prospective teachers' understanding of addition and subtraction with whole numbers. Research…

  20. Utilizing a Collaborative Cross Number Puzzle Game to Develop the Computing Ability of Addition and Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Yen-Hua; Looi, Chee-Kit; Lin, Chiu-Pin; Shao, Yin-Juan; Chan, Tak-Wai

    2012-01-01

    While addition and subtraction is a key mathematical skill for young children, a typical activity for them in classrooms involves doing repetitive arithmetic calculation exercises. In this study, we explore a collaborative way for students to learn these skills in a technology-enabled way with wireless computers. Two classes, comprising a total of…

  1. Teaching Arithmetic: Lessons for Addition and Subtraction. Grades 2-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tank, Bonnie; Zolli, Lynne

    This book contains a collection of addition and subtraction lessons that support curriculum and instruction. The activities are rich with child-friendly contexts that are fun and engaging and give students opportunities to gain computational skills while developing their own confidence in and enjoyment of mathematics. Three elements are regarded…

  2. Engineering of Schroedinger cat states by a sequence of displacements and photon additions or subtractions

    SciTech Connect

    Podoshvedov, S. A.

    2011-04-15

    A method to generate Schroedinger cat states in free propagating optical fields based on the use of displaced states (or displacement operators) is developed. Some optical schemes with photon-added coherent states are studied. The schemes are modifications of the general method based on a sequence of displacements and photon additions or subtractions adjusted to generate Schroedinger cat states of a larger size. The effects of detection inefficiency are taken into account.

  3. Additive-Subtractive Two-Wavelength ESPI Contouring by Using a Synthetic Wavelength Phase Shift.

    PubMed

    Hack, E; Frei, B; Kästle, R; Sennhauser, U

    1998-05-01

    The addition correlation of two speckle fields by simultaneousillumination at different wavelengths is used for object contouring ina Twyman-Green-type interferometer. Fringe visibility is enhancedwhen the stochastic speckle background intensity obtained from areference plane modulation is subtracted. We calculate the contourphase map by using a phase-shift algorithm in the syntheticwavelength. A comparison with a sequential illumination, phasedifference method based on a laser wavelength phase shift isgiven. The test setup does not need to be stable on aninterferometric scale, and therefore a method is provided that lendsitself to applications in noisy environments.

  4. Surface and internal multiple attenuation by prediction and subtraction: case studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benaïssa, Zahia; Bouchakour, Imene; Karcouche, Sakina; Benaïssa, Abdelkader; Boudella, Amar; Ouadfeul, Sid Ali

    2015-04-01

    In seismic records, there are coherent noises that we can better attenuate with the technological headway (algorithms and computer equipments). Multiples remain a complicated coherent noise to attenuate, particularly the internal multiples. The techniques based on velocity discrimination or statistical methods showed their limits. For that purpose, a new approach known as SRME/IME (Surface-Related or Internal Multiple Elimination) was elaborated; the multiples are modeled and then adaptively subtracted from seismic data. A model corresponding to multiples is predicted from seismic record that makes it more credible. These last years, this technique showed its efficiency in the industry and the algorithms are more and more improved with the progress of computers power. It is becoming a standard technique. In this study, two applications were performed in order to attenuate internal multiples which remain problematic in seismic land data preprocessing. The first one is on 2D Algerian onshore seismic data, using the Omega software module called IMP, and the second one on 3D Algerian onshore seismic data, using the Omega software module called XIMP (Extended Interbed Multiple Prediction), designed for marine data but whose corresponding workflow we had adapted for our land data. Both approaches worked well and gave good results. Key words: Internal multiple - Surface multiple - SRME/IME - Land seismic - Adaptive subtraction.

  5. Sex differences in number processing: Differential systems for subtraction and multiplication were confirmed in men, but not in women

    PubMed Central

    Pletzer, Belinda

    2016-01-01

    Neuroimaging studies suggest segregated neuronal systems underlying number magnitude processing (e.g. subtraction) and arithmetic fact retrieval (e.g. multiplication). While number magnitude processing is thought to rely on the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) bilaterally, arithmetic fact retrieval is thought to rely on the left angular gyrus (AG). However, evidence from brain damaged patients and brain stimulation challenges this view and suggests considerable overlap between the systems underlying number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval. This study investigates, whether sex differences in number processing can account for these conflicting findings. A subtraction and a multiplication task were administered to 40 men and 34 women in their luteal phase during functional MRI. Replicating previous studies in men, we found the IPS to be more strongly activated during subtraction than multiplication, and the AG to be more strongly activated during multiplication than subtraction. However, no differences between the two tasks were observed in women. PMID:27966612

  6. Sex differences in number processing: Differential systems for subtraction and multiplication were confirmed in men, but not in women.

    PubMed

    Pletzer, Belinda

    2016-12-14

    Neuroimaging studies suggest segregated neuronal systems underlying number magnitude processing (e.g. subtraction) and arithmetic fact retrieval (e.g. multiplication). While number magnitude processing is thought to rely on the intraparietal sulcus (IPS) bilaterally, arithmetic fact retrieval is thought to rely on the left angular gyrus (AG). However, evidence from brain damaged patients and brain stimulation challenges this view and suggests considerable overlap between the systems underlying number magnitude processing and arithmetic fact retrieval. This study investigates, whether sex differences in number processing can account for these conflicting findings. A subtraction and a multiplication task were administered to 40 men and 34 women in their luteal phase during functional MRI. Replicating previous studies in men, we found the IPS to be more strongly activated during subtraction than multiplication, and the AG to be more strongly activated during multiplication than subtraction. However, no differences between the two tasks were observed in women.

  7. Multiscale 3D manufacturing: combining thermal extrusion printing with additive and subtractive direct laser writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malinauskas, Mangirdas; Lukoševičius, Laurynas; MackevičiÅ«tÄ--, DovilÄ--; BalčiÅ«nas, Evaldas; RekštytÄ--, Sima; Paipulas, Domas

    2014-05-01

    A novel approach for efficient manufacturing of three-dimensional (3D) microstructured scaffolds designed for cell studies and tissue engineering applications is presented. A thermal extrusion (fused filament fabrication) 3D printer is employed as a simple and low-cost tabletop device enabling rapid materialization of CAD models out of biocompatible and biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA). Here it was used to produce cm- scale microporous (pore size varying from 100 to 400 µm) scaffolds. The fabricated objects were further laser processed in a direct laser writing (DLW) subtractive (ablation) and additive (lithography) manners. The first approach enables precise surface modification by creating micro-craters, holes and grooves thus increasing the surface roughness. An alternative way is to immerse the 3D PLA scaffold in a monomer solution and use the same DLW setup to refine its inner structure by fabricating dots, lines or a fine mesh on top as well as inside the pores of previously produced scaffolds. The DLW technique is empowered by ultrafast lasers - it allows 3D structuring with high spatial resolution in a great variety of photosensitive materials. Structure geometry on macro- to micro- scales could be finely tuned by combining these two fabrication techniques. Such artificial 3D substrates could be used for cell growth or as biocompatible-biodegradable implants. This combination of distinct material processing techniques enables rapid fabrication of diverse functional micro- featured and integrated devices. Hopefully, the proposed approach will find numerous applications in the field of ms, microfluidics, microoptics and many others.

  8. All-optical digital logic: Full addition or subtraction on a three-state system

    SciTech Connect

    Remacle, F.; Levine, R. D.

    2006-03-15

    Stimulated Raman adiabatic passage (STIRAP) is a well-studied pump-probe control scheme for manipulating the population of quantum states of atoms or molecules. By encoding the digits to be operated on as 'on' or 'off' laser input signals we show how STIRAP can be used to implement a finite-state logic machine. The physical conditions required for an effective STIRAP operation are related to the physical conditions expected for a logic machine. In particular, a condition is derived on the mean number of photons that represent an on pulse. A finite-state machine computes Boolean expressions that depend both on the input and on the present state of the machine. With two input signals we show how to implement a full adder where the carry-in digit is stored in the state of the machine. Furthermore, we show that it is possible to store the carry-out digit as the next state and thereby return the machine to a state ready for the next full addition. Such a machine operates as a cyclical full adder. We further show how this full adder can equally well be operated as a full subtractor. To the best of our knowledge this is the first example of a nanosized system that implements a full subtraction.

  9. An Analysis of Incorrect Procedures Used by Primary Grade Pupils in Solving Open Addition and Subtraction Sentences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindvall, C. Mauritz; Ibarra, Cheryl Gibbons

    This study involved the extensive testing and interviewing of 102 primary grade pupils, representing a sampling from diverse school environments, to study the capabilities and difficulties evidenced by primary-grade pupils in solving open addition and subtraction sentences. Phase 1 of the study identified the specific incorrect procedures commonly…

  10. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Student Achievement in Addition and Subtraction at First Grade Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivey, Patsy M.

    This study was conducted to determine whether the traditional classroom approach to instruction involving the addition and subtraction of number facts (digits 0-6) is more or less effective than the traditional classroom approach plus a commercially-prepared computer game. A pretest-posttest control group design was used with two groups of first…

  11. Une Introduction Non Classique aux Algorithmes d'Addition et de Soustraction (A Non-Classical Introduction to Algorithms of Addition and Subtraction).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arsenault, Cathy; Lemoyne, Gisele

    2000-01-01

    Analyzes a didactical sequence for the teaching of addition and subtraction procedures and algorithms. Uses didactical procedures by children in problem solving activities in order to gain a better understanding of the interaction between numbers, numeration, and operations knowledge which are involved in the construction of addition and…

  12. A Cognitive Tool for Teaching the Addition/Subtraction of Common Fractions: A Model of Affordances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kong, Siu Cheung; Kwok, Lam For

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this research is to devise a cognitive tool for meeting the diverse needs of learners for comprehending new procedural knowledge. A model of affordances on teaching fraction equivalence for developing procedural knowledge for adding/subtracting fractions with unlike denominators was derived from the results of a case study of an initial…

  13. Fostering First Graders' Fluency with Basic Subtraction and Larger Addition Combinations via Computer-Assisted Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroody, Arthur J.; Purpura, David J.; Eiland, Michael D.; Reid, Erin E.

    2014-01-01

    Achieving fluency with basic subtraction and add-with-8 or -9 combinations is difficult for primary grade children. A 9-month training experiment entailed evaluating the efficacy of software designed to promote such fluency via guided learning of reasoning strategies. Seventy-five eligible first graders were randomly assigned to one of three…

  14. "Addition" and "Subtraction": Selectivity Design for Type II Maternal Embryonic Leucine Zipper Kinase Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Giraldes, John; Sprague, Elizabeth R; Shakya, Subarna; Chen, Zhuoliang; Wang, Yaping; Joud, Carol; Mathieu, Simon; Chen, Christine Hiu-Tung; Straub, Christopher; Duca, Jose; Hurov, Kristen; Yuan, Yanqiu; Shao, Wenlin; Touré, B Barry

    2017-03-09

    While adding the structural features that are more favored by on-target activity is the more common strategy in selectivity optimization, the opposite strategy of subtracting the structural features that contribute more to off-target activity can also be very effective. Reported here is our successful effort of improving the kinase selectivity of type II maternal embryonic leucine zipper kinase inhibitors by applying these two complementary approaches together, which clearly demonstrates the powerful synergy between them.

  15. Model Evaluation and Multiple Strategies in Cognitive Diagnosis: An Analysis of Fraction Subtraction Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Jimmy; Douglas, Jeffrey A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies three models for cognitive diagnosis, each illustrated with an application to fraction subtraction data. The objective of each of these models is to classify examinees according to their mastery of skills assumed to be required for fraction subtraction. We consider the DINA model, the NIDA model, and a new model that extends the…

  16. Addition and subtraction of spin pumping voltages in magnetic hybrid structures

    SciTech Connect

    Azevedo, A. Alves Santos, O.; Cunha, R. O.; Rezende, S. M.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R.

    2014-04-14

    We report an investigation of the spin pumping voltage generated in bilayers of ferromagnetic/normal metal in which the ferromagnetic layer is yttrium iron garnet or Permalloy and the normal-metal layer is Pt or Ta. We also investigated a special case in which the voltage is detected in single layer of Permalloy under ferromagnetic resonance condition. It is shown that the spin pumping voltage generated in metallic bilayers have contributions from both layers and the resulting voltage depends on the relative signs of charge currents generated by the inverse spin Hall effect. For instance, the spin pumping voltage generated in Ta has the same sign as the one generate in single layer of Permalloy, but contrary to the voltage generated in Pt. When the voltage is measured in shunted metallic bilayers, the resulting voltage can be a sum or a subtraction of the voltages generated in both layers.

  17. Developing Multiplicative Thinking from Additive Reasoning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Jennifer M.; Andreasen, Janet B.

    2013-01-01

    As students progress through elementary school, they encounter mathematics concepts that shift from additive to multiplicative situations (NCTM 2000). When they encounter fraction problems that require multiplicative thinking, they tend to incorrectly extend additive properties from whole numbers (Post et al. 1985). As a result, topics such as …

  18. Assessing the use of an infrared spectrum hyperpixel array imager to measure temperature during additive and subtractive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitenton, Eric; Heigel, Jarred; Lane, Brandon; Moylan, Shawn

    2016-05-01

    Accurate non-contact temperature measurement is important to optimize manufacturing processes. This applies to both additive (3D printing) and subtractive (material removal by machining) manufacturing. Performing accurate single wavelength thermography suffers numerous challenges. A potential alternative is hyperpixel array hyperspectral imaging. Focusing on metals, this paper discusses issues involved such as unknown or changing emissivity, inaccurate greybody assumptions, motion blur, and size of source effects. The algorithm which converts measured thermal spectra to emissivity and temperature uses a customized multistep non-linear equation solver to determine the best-fit emission curve. Emissivity dependence on wavelength may be assumed uniform or have a relationship typical for metals. The custom software displays residuals for intensity, temperature, and emissivity to gauge the correctness of the greybody assumption. Initial results are shown from a laser powder-bed fusion additive process, as well as a machining process. In addition, the effects of motion blur are analyzed, which occurs in both additive and subtractive manufacturing processes. In a laser powder-bed fusion additive process, the scanning laser causes the melt pool to move rapidly, causing a motion blur-like effect. In machining, measuring temperature of the rapidly moving chip is a desirable goal to develop and validate simulations of the cutting process. A moving slit target is imaged to characterize how the measured temperature values are affected by motion of a measured target.

  19. Dissociation of Subtraction and Multiplication in the Right Parietal Cortex: Evidence from Intraoperative Cortical Electrostimulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Xiaodan; Chen, Chuansheng; Pu, Song; Wu, Chenxing; Li, Yongnian; Jiang, Tao; Zhou, Xinlin

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has consistently shown that the left parietal cortex is critical for numerical processing, but the role of the right parietal lobe has been much less clear. This study used the intraoperative cortical electrical stimulation approach to investigate neural dissociation in the right parietal cortex for subtraction and…

  20. Learning to Solve Addition and Subtraction Word Problems in English as an Imported Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verzosa, Debbie Bautista; Mulligan, Joanne

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an intervention phase of a design study aimed to assist second-grade Filipino children in solving addition word problems in English, a language they primarily encounter only in school. With Filipino as the medium of instruction, an out-of-school pedagogical intervention providing linguistic and representational scaffolds was…

  1. Behavior subtraction.

    PubMed

    Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Saligrama, Venkatesh; Konrad, Janusz

    2012-09-01

    Background subtraction has been a driving engine for many computer vision and video analytics tasks. Although its many variants exist, they all share the underlying assumption that photometric scene properties are either static or exhibit temporal stationarity. While this works in many applications, the model fails when one is interested in discovering changes in scene dynamics instead of changes in scene's photometric properties; the detection of unusual pedestrian or motor traffic patterns are but two examples. We propose a new model and computational framework that assume the dynamics of a scene, not its photometry, to be stationary, i.e., a dynamic background serves as the reference for the dynamics of an observed scene. Central to our approach is the concept of an event, which we define as short-term scene dynamics captured over a time window at a specific spatial location in the camera field of view. Unlike in our earlier work, we compute events by time-aggregating vector object descriptors that can combine multiple features, such as object size, direction of movement, speed, etc. We characterize events probabilistically, but use low-memory, low-complexity surrogates in a practical implementation. Using these surrogates amounts to behavior subtraction, a new algorithm for effective and efficient temporal anomaly detection and localization. Behavior subtraction is resilient to spurious background motion, such as due to camera jitter, and is content-blind, i.e., it works equally well on humans, cars, animals, and other objects in both uncluttered and highly cluttered scenes. Clearly, treating video as a collection of events rather than colored pixels opens new possibilities for video analytics.

  2. Taking Away and Determining the Difference--A Longitudinal Perspective on Two Models of Subtraction and the Inverse Relation to Addition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selter, Christoph; Prediger, Susanne; Nuhrenborger, Marcus; Hussmann, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Subtraction can be understood by two basic models--taking away (ta) and determining the difference (dd)--and by its inverse relation to addition. Epistemological analyses and empirical examples show that the two models are not relevant only in single-digit arithmetic. As curricula should be developed in a longitudinal perspective on mathematics…

  3. Las Matematicas: Lenguaje Universal. Nivel 2a: Suma y Resta de Numeros Enteros (Mathematics: A Universal Language. Level 2a: Addition and Subtraction of Whole Numbers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    This is one of a series of student booklets designed for use in a bilingual mathematics program in grades 6-8. The general format is to present each page in both Spanish and English. The mathematical topics in this booklet include addition and subtraction. (MK)

  4. Observation of the Effectiveness of Drama Method in Helping to Acquire the Addition-Subtraction Skills by Children at Preschool Phase

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soydan, Sema; Quadir, Seher Ersoy

    2013-01-01

    Principal aim of this study is to show the effectiveness of the program prepared by researchers in order to enable 6 year-old children attending pre-school educational institutions to effectively gain addition subtraction skills through a drama-related method. The work group in the research comprised of 80 kids who continued their education in…

  5. Fabrication of Thermoelectric Devices Using Additive-Subtractive Manufacturing Techniques: Application to Waste-Heat Energy Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewolde, Mahder

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid-state devices that convert heat directly into electricity. They are well suited for waste-heat energy harvesting applications as opposed to primary energy generation. Commercially available thermoelectric modules are flat, inflexible and have limited sizes available. State-of-art manufacturing of TEG devices relies on assembling prefabricated parts with soldering, epoxy bonding, and mechanical clamping. Furthermore, efforts to incorporate them onto curved surfaces such as exhaust pipes, pump housings, steam lines, mixing containers, reaction chambers, etc. require custom-built heat exchangers. This is costly and labor-intensive, in addition to presenting challenges in terms of space, thermal coupling, added weight and long-term reliability. Additive manufacturing technologies are beginning to address many of these issues by reducing part count in complex designs and the elimination of sub-assembly requirements. This work investigates the feasibility of utilizing such novel manufacturing routes for improving the manufacturing process of thermoelectric devices. Much of the research in thermoelectricity is primarily focused on improving thermoelectric material properties by developing of novel materials or finding ways to improve existing ones. Secondary to material development is improving the manufacturing process of TEGs to provide significant cost benefits. To improve the device fabrication process, this work explores additive manufacturing technologies to provide an integrated and scalable approach for TE device manufacturing directly onto engineering component surfaces. Additive manufacturing techniques like thermal spray and ink-dispenser printing are developed with the aim of improving the manufacturing process of TEGs. Subtractive manufacturing techniques like laser micromachining are also studied in detail. This includes the laser processing parameters for cutting the thermal spray materials efficiently by

  6. From a Subtractive to Multiplicative Approach: A concept-driven interactive pathway on the selective absorption of light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, Laurence; de Hosson, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    This research documents the aims and the impact of a teaching experiment on how the absorption of light depends on the thickness of the absorbing medium. This teaching experiment is more specifically characterized as bringing to bear a 'concept-driven interactive pathway'. It is designed to make students analyse the absorption of light by a medium as a selective multiplication (i.e. one depending on the wavelength) of the intensity by a factor smaller than one. Six teaching interviews conducted with fourth-year university students were recorded, transcribed and coded. Their analysis led us to evaluate the importance of the main obstacle expected, that is, of restricting the interpretation of absorption/transmission phenomena to the idea of 'less light', or, equivalently, of seeing a multiplication by a factor smaller than one as just a subtraction. The students' comments at the end of the interview introduce a discussion about the links between their intellectual satisfaction, critical attitude and comprehension of the topic.

  7. Cerebral Circulation Time is Prolonged and Not Correlated with EDSS in Multiple Sclerosis Patients: A Study Using Digital Subtracted Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Lucia; Donati, Donatella; Menci, Elisabetta; Cioni, Samuele; Bellini, Matteo; Grazzini, Irene; Leonini, Sara; Galluzzi, Paolo; Severi, Sauro; Burroni, Luca; Casasco, Alfredo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Piu, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Literature has suggested that changes in brain flow circulation occur in patients with multiple sclerosis. In this study, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to measure the absolute CCT value in MS patients and to correlate its value to age at disease onset and duration, and to expand disability status scale (EDSS). DSA assessment was performed on eighty MS patients and on a control group of forty-four age-matched patients. CCT in MS and control groups was calculated by analyzing the angiographic images. Lesion and brain volumes were calculated in a representative group of MS patients. Statistical correlations among CCT and disease duration, age at disease onset, lesion load, brain volumes and EDSS were considered. A significant difference between CCT in MS patients (mean = 4.9s; sd = 1.27s) and control group (mean = 2.8s; sd = 0.51s) was demonstrated. No significant statistical correlation was found between CCT and the other parameters in all MS patients. Significantly increased CCT value in MS patients suggests the presence of microvascular dysfunctions, which do not depend on clinical and MRI findings. Hemodynamic changes may not be exclusively the result of a late chronic inflammatory process. PMID:25679526

  8. Cerebral circulation time is prolonged and not correlated with EDSS in multiple sclerosis patients: a study using digital subtracted angiography.

    PubMed

    Monti, Lucia; Donati, Donatella; Menci, Elisabetta; Cioni, Samuele; Bellini, Matteo; Grazzini, Irene; Leonini, Sara; Galluzzi, Paolo; Bracco, Sandra; Severi, Sauro; Burroni, Luca; Casasco, Alfredo; Morbidelli, Lucia; Santarnecchi, Emiliano; Piu, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Literature has suggested that changes in brain flow circulation occur in patients with multiple sclerosis. In this study, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to measure the absolute CCT value in MS patients and to correlate its value to age at disease onset and duration, and to expand disability status scale (EDSS). DSA assessment was performed on eighty MS patients and on a control group of forty-four age-matched patients. CCT in MS and control groups was calculated by analyzing the angiographic images. Lesion and brain volumes were calculated in a representative group of MS patients. Statistical correlations among CCT and disease duration, age at disease onset, lesion load, brain volumes and EDSS were considered. A significant difference between CCT in MS patients (mean = 4.9s; sd = 1.27 s) and control group (mean = 2.8s; sd = 0.51 s) was demonstrated. No significant statistical correlation was found between CCT and the other parameters in all MS patients. Significantly increased CCT value in MS patients suggests the presence of microvascular dysfunctions, which do not depend on clinical and MRI findings. Hemodynamic changes may not be exclusively the result of a late chronic inflammatory process.

  9. Tuckshop Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Roger; Graham, Alan; Johnston-Wilder, Sue

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a recent and successful initiative on teaching place value and the decomposition method of subtraction to pupils having difficulty with this technique in the 9-12-year age range. The aim of the research was to explore whether using the metaphor of selling chews (i.e., sweets) in a tuck shop and developing this into an iconic…

  10. Elementary subtraction.

    PubMed

    Seyler, Donald J; Kirk, Elizabeth P; Ashcraft, Mark H

    2003-11-01

    Four experiments examined performance on the 100 "basic facts" of subtraction and found a discontinuous "stair step" function for reaction times and errors beginning with 11 - n facts. Participants' immediate retrospective reports of nonretrieval showed the same pattern in Experiment 3. The degree to which elementary subtraction depends on working memory (WM) was examined in a dual-task paradigm in Experiment 4. The reconstructive processing used with larger basic facts was strongly associated with greater WM disruption, as evidenced by errors in the secondary task: this was especially the case for participants with lower WM spans. The results support the R. S. Siegler and E. Jenkins (1989) distribution of associations model, although discriminating among the alternative solution processes appears to be a serious challenge.

  11. A handheld mid-infrared methane sensor using a dual-step differential method for additive/multiplicative noise suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yue; Dang, Peipei; Zheng, Chuantao; Ye, Weilin; Wang, Yiding

    2016-11-01

    A miniature mid-infrared (mid-IR) methane (CH4) sensor system was developed by employing a wide-band wire-source and a semi-ellipsoid multi-pass gas cell. A dual-step differential method instead of the traditional one-step differential method was adopted by this sensor to tune measuring range/zero point and to suppress the additive/multiplicative noise. This method included a first subtraction operation between the two output signals (including a detection signal and a reference signal) from the dual-channel detector and a second subtraction operation on the amplitudes of the first-subtraction signal and the reference signal, followed by a ratio operation between the amplitude of the second-subtraction signal and the reference signal. Detailed experiments were performed to assess the performance of the sensor system. The detection range is 0-50 k ppm, and as the concentration gets larger than 12 k ppm, the relative detection error falls into the range of -3% to +3%. The Allan deviation is about 4.65 ppm with an averaging time of 1 s, and such value can be further improved to 0.45 ppm with an averaging time of 124 s. Due to the cost-effective incandescence wire-source, the small-size ellipsoid multi-pass gas cell and the miniature structure of the sensor, the developed standalone device shows potential applications of CH4 detection under coal-mine environment.

  12. Dissociated brain organization for single-digit addition and multiplication.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xinlin; Chen, Chuansheng; Zang, Yufeng; Dong, Qi; Chen, Chunhui; Qiao, Sibing; Gong, Qiyong

    2007-04-01

    This study compared the patterns of brain activation elicited by single-digit addition and multiplication problems. 20 Chinese undergraduates were asked to verify whether arithmetic equations were true or false during functional magnetic resonance imaging. Results showed that both addition and multiplication were supported by a broad neural system that involved regions within SMA, precentral gyrus, intraparietal sulcus, occipital gyri, superior temporal gyrus, and middle frontal gyrus, as well as some subcortical structures. Nevertheless, addition problems elicited more activation in the intraparietal sulcus and middle occipital gyri at the right hemisphere, and superior occipital gyri at both hemispheres, whereas multiplication had more activation in precentral gyrus, supplementary motor areas, and posterior and anterior superior temporal gyrus at the left hemisphere. This pattern of dissociated activation supports our hypothesis that addition has greater reliance on visuospatial processing and multiplication on verbal processing.

  13. Preschoolers' Understanding of Subtraction-Related Principles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baroody, Arthur J.; Lai, Meng-lung; Li, Xia; Baroody, Alison E.

    2009-01-01

    Little research has focused on an informal understanding of subtractive negation (e.g., 3 - 3 = 0) and subtractive identity (e.g., 3 - 0 = 3). Previous research indicates that preschoolers may have a fragile (i.e., unreliable or localized) understanding of the addition-subtraction inverse principle (e.g., 2 + 1 - 1 = 2). Recognition of a small…

  14. Addition and Subtraction Theory of TCM Using Xiao-Chaihu-Decoction and Naturopathy in Predicting Survival Outcomes of Primary Liver Cancer Patients: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Min; Yang, Yue-Wu; Guo, Wen-Hai; Wang, Feng-Lin; Xiao, Ge-Min; Li, Yang-Mei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the therapeutic effect of combined Xiao-Chaihu-Decoction and naturopathic medicine therapy on survival outcomes of patients' PLC. In XCHD group (n = 76), patients were treated with Xiao-Chaihu-Decoction in accordance with the addition and subtraction theory of TCM; in NM group (n = 89), patients were managed by naturopathic medicine; in combined group (n = 70), the same volume of Xiao-Chaihu-Decoction combined with naturopathic medicine procedures was applied. There were no evident statistical differences of age, gender, KPS score, body weight, smoking status, AFP levels, HbsAg status, TBIL levels, tumor diameters, and numbers among different groups, showing comparability among groups. No significant difference was found regarding the total remission rate and stability rate of tumors in patients treated by Xiao-Chaihu-Decoction and naturopathic medicine, except the combined therapy. KPS scores were significantly improved after treatment among groups. After treatment, 52.8% cases maintained a stable or slight increase in weight, of which 42.1%, 48.3%, and 70.0% cases maintained weight stably in the XCHD group, NM group, and combined treatment group, respectively. Xiao-Chaihu-Decoction associated with naturopathy may predict improved prognostic outcomes in PLC patients, along with improved remission and stability rates, increased KPS scores, and stable weight maintenance. PMID:27843477

  15. Additive and subtractive resilience strategies as enablers of biographical reinvention: a qualitative study of ex-smokers and never-smokers.

    PubMed

    Ward, Paul Russell; Muller, Robert; Tsourtos, George; Hersh, Deborah; Lawn, Sharon; Winefield, Anthony H; Coveney, John

    2011-04-01

    The notion of developing resilience is becoming increasingly important as a way of responding to the social determinants of poor health, particularly in disadvantaged groups. It is hypothesized that resilient individuals and communities are able to 'bounce back' from the adversities they face. This paper explores the processes involved in building resilience as an outcome in relation to both quitting smoking and never smoking. The study involved 93 qualitative, oral-history interviews with participants from population groups with high and enduring smoking rates in Adelaide, Australia, and was essentially interested in how some people in these groups managed to quit or never start smoking in the face of adversities, in comparison to a group of smokers. Our key findings relate to what we call additive and subtractive resilience strategies, which focus on the practices, roles and activities that individuals either 'took on' or 'left behind' in order to quit smoking or remain abstinent. The theoretical lenses we use to understand these resilience strategies relate to biographical reinforcement and biographical reinvention, which situate the resilience strategies in a broader 'project of the self', often in relation to attempting to develop 'healthy bodies' and 'healthy biographies'.

  16. The use of additive and subtractive approaches to examine the nuclear localization sequence of the polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, D.; Haynes, J. I. 2nd; Brady, J. N.; Consigli, R. A.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    A nuclear localization signal (NLS) has been identified in the N-terminal (Ala1-Pro-Lys-Arg-Lys-Ser-Gly-Val-Ser-Lys-Cys11) amino acid sequence of the polyomavirus major capsid protein VP1. The importance of this amino acid sequence for nuclear transport of VP1 protein was demonstrated by a genetic "subtractive" study using the constructs pSG5VP1 (full-length VP1) and pSG5 delta 5'VP1 (truncated VP1, lacking amino acids Ala1-Cys11). These constructs were used to transfect COS-7 cells, and expression and intracellular localization of the VP1 protein was visualized by indirect immunofluorescence. These studies revealed that the full-length VP1 was expressed and localized in the nucleus, while the truncated VP1 protein was localized in the cytoplasm and not transported to the nucleus. These findings were substantiated by an "additive" approach using FITC-labeled conjugates of synthetic peptides homologous to the NLS of VP1 cross-linked to bovine serum albumin or immunoglobulin G. Both conjugates localized in the nucleus after microinjection into the cytoplasm of 3T6 cells. The importance of individual amino acids found in the basic sequence (Lys3-Arg-Lys5) of the NLS was also investigated. This was accomplished by synthesizing three additional peptides in which lysine-3 was substituted with threonine, arginine-4 was substituted with threonine, or lysine-5 was substituted with threonine. It was found that lysine-3 was crucial for nuclear transport, since substitution of this amino acid with threonine prevented nuclear localization of the microinjected, FITC-labeled conjugate.

  17. Modeling Errors in Daily Precipitation Measurements: Additive or Multiplicative?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, Yudong; Huffman, George J.; Adler, Robert F.; Tang, Ling; Sapiano, Matthew; Maggioni, Viviana; Wu, Huan

    2013-01-01

    The definition and quantification of uncertainty depend on the error model used. For uncertainties in precipitation measurements, two types of error models have been widely adopted: the additive error model and the multiplicative error model. This leads to incompatible specifications of uncertainties and impedes intercomparison and application.In this letter, we assess the suitability of both models for satellite-based daily precipitation measurements in an effort to clarify the uncertainty representation. Three criteria were employed to evaluate the applicability of either model: (1) better separation of the systematic and random errors; (2) applicability to the large range of variability in daily precipitation; and (3) better predictive skills. It is found that the multiplicative error model is a much better choice under all three criteria. It extracted the systematic errors more cleanly, was more consistent with the large variability of precipitation measurements, and produced superior predictions of the error characteristics. The additive error model had several weaknesses, such as non constant variance resulting from systematic errors leaking into random errors, and the lack of prediction capability. Therefore, the multiplicative error model is a better choice.

  18. Addition of multiple limiting resources reduces grassland diversity.

    PubMed

    Harpole, W Stanley; Sullivan, Lauren L; Lind, Eric M; Firn, Jennifer; Adler, Peter B; Borer, Elizabeth T; Chase, Jonathan; Fay, Philip A; Hautier, Yann; Hillebrand, Helmut; MacDougall, Andrew S; Seabloom, Eric W; Williams, Ryan; Bakker, Jonathan D; Cadotte, Marc W; Chaneton, Enrique J; Chu, Chengjin; Cleland, Elsa E; D'Antonio, Carla; Davies, Kendi F; Gruner, Daniel S; Hagenah, Nicole; Kirkman, Kevin; Knops, Johannes M H; La Pierre, Kimberly J; McCulley, Rebecca L; Moore, Joslin L; Morgan, John W; Prober, Suzanne M; Risch, Anita C; Schuetz, Martin; Stevens, Carly J; Wragg, Peter D

    2016-09-01

    Niche dimensionality provides a general theoretical explanation for biodiversity-more niches, defined by more limiting factors, allow for more ways that species can coexist. Because plant species compete for the same set of limiting resources, theory predicts that addition of a limiting resource eliminates potential trade-offs, reducing the number of species that can coexist. Multiple nutrient limitation of plant production is common and therefore fertilization may reduce diversity by reducing the number or dimensionality of belowground limiting factors. At the same time, nutrient addition, by increasing biomass, should ultimately shift competition from belowground nutrients towards a one-dimensional competitive trade-off for light. Here we show that plant species diversity decreased when a greater number of limiting nutrients were added across 45 grassland sites from a multi-continent experimental network. The number of added nutrients predicted diversity loss, even after controlling for effects of plant biomass, and even where biomass production was not nutrient-limited. We found that elevated resource supply reduced niche dimensionality and diversity and increased both productivity and compositional turnover. Our results point to the importance of understanding dimensionality in ecological systems that are undergoing diversity loss in response to multiple global change factors.

  19. How to retrieve additional information from the multiplicity distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, Grzegorz; Włodarczyk, Zbigniew

    2017-01-01

    Multiplicity distributions (MDs) P(N) measured in multiparticle production processes are most frequently described by the negative binomial distribution (NBD). However, with increasing collision energy some systematic discrepancies have become more and more apparent. They are usually attributed to the possible multi-source structure of the production process and described using a multi-NBD form of the MD. We investigate the possibility of keeping a single NBD but with its parameters depending on the multiplicity N. This is done by modifying the widely known clan model of particle production leading to the NBD form of P(N). This is then confronted with the approach based on the so-called cascade-stochastic formalism which is based on different types of recurrence relations defining P(N). We demonstrate that a combination of both approaches allows the retrieval of additional valuable information from the MDs, namely the oscillatory behavior of the counting statistics apparently visible in the high energy data.

  20. Successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication spectrophotometric method for determination of hydroquinone in complex mixture with its degradation products, tretinoin and methyl paraben.

    PubMed

    Elghobashy, Mohamed R; Bebawy, Lories I; Shokry, Rafeek F; Abbas, Samah S

    2016-03-15

    A sensitive and selective stability-indicating successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication (SRS-CM) spectrophotometric method was studied and developed for the spectrum resolution of five component mixture without prior separation. The components were hydroquinone in combination with tretinoin, the polymer formed from hydroquinone alkali degradation, 1,4 benzoquinone and the preservative methyl paraben. The proposed method was used for their determination in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The zero order absorption spectra of hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben were determined at 293, 357.5, 245 and 255.2 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 4.00-46.00, 1.00-7.00, 0.60-5.20, and 1.00-7.00 μg mL(-1) for hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben, respectively. The pharmaceutical formulation was subjected to mild alkali condition and measured by this method resulting in the polymerization of hydroquinone and the formation of toxic 1,4 benzoquinone. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the reported method.

  1. Successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication spectrophotometric method for determination of hydroquinone in complex mixture with its degradation products, tretinoin and methyl paraben

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elghobashy, Mohamed R.; Bebawy, Lories I.; Shokry, Rafeek F.; Abbas, Samah S.

    2016-03-01

    A sensitive and selective stability-indicating successive ratio subtraction coupled with constant multiplication (SRS-CM) spectrophotometric method was studied and developed for the spectrum resolution of five component mixture without prior separation. The components were hydroquinone in combination with tretinoin, the polymer formed from hydroquinone alkali degradation, 1,4 benzoquinone and the preservative methyl paraben. The proposed method was used for their determination in their pure form and in pharmaceutical formulation. The zero order absorption spectra of hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben were determined at 293, 357.5, 245 and 255.2 nm, respectively. The calibration curves were linear over the concentration ranges of 4.00-46.00, 1.00-7.00, 0.60-5.20, and 1.00-7.00 μg mL- 1 for hydroquinone, tretinoin, 1,4 benzoquinone and methyl paraben, respectively. The pharmaceutical formulation was subjected to mild alkali condition and measured by this method resulting in the polymerization of hydroquinone and the formation of toxic 1,4 benzoquinone. The proposed method was validated according to ICH guidelines. The results obtained were statistically analyzed and compared with those obtained by applying the reported method.

  2. A geometric approach to spectral subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yang; Loizou, Philipos C.

    2008-01-01

    The traditional power spectral subtraction algorithm is computationally simple to implement but suffers from musical noise distortion. In addition, the subtractive rules are based on incorrect assumptions about the cross terms being zero. A new geometric approach to spectral subtraction is proposed in the present paper that addresses these shortcomings of the spectral subtraction algorithm. A method for estimating the cross terms involving the phase differences between the noisy (and clean) signals and noise is proposed. Analysis of the gain function of the proposed algorithm indicated that it possesses similar properties as the traditional MMSE algorithm. Objective evaluation of the proposed algorithm showed that it performed significantly better than the traditional spectral subtractive algorithm. Informal listening tests revealed that the proposed algorithm had no audible musical noise. PMID:19122867

  3. An additional monogenic disorder that masquerades as multiple sclerosis

    SciTech Connect

    Vahedi, K.; Tournier-Lasserve, E.; Vahedi, K.

    1996-11-11

    In their comprehensive differential diagnosis of monogenic diseases that can mimic multiple sclerosis, Natowicz and Bejjani did not include a newly recognized monogenic disorder known under the acronym of CADASIL (Cerebral Autosomal Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy); this disorder can mimic MS clinically and radiologically to a remarkable extent. The underlying histopathological lesion of CADASIL is a non-atherosclerotic, non-amyloid arteriopathy affecting mainly the penetrating medullary arteries to the subcortical white matter and basal ganglia. Electron microscopy shows an abnormal deposit of granular osmiophilic material in the arterial wall. These arterial changes are observed in various tissues even though clinical manifestations seem to be restricted to the central nervous system. The CADASIL gene was mapped recently to chromosome 19 and gene identification is ongoing. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  4. The Effect of Emphasizing Mathematical Structure in the Acquisition of Whole Number Computation Skills (Addition and Subtraction) By Seven- and Eight-Year Olds: A Clinical Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uprichard, A. Edward; Collura, Carolyn

    This investigation sought to determine the effect of emphasizing mathematical structure in the acquisition of computational skills by seven- and eight-year-olds. The meaningful development-of-structure approach emphasized closure, commutativity, associativity, and the identity element of addition; the inverse relationship between addition and…

  5. Suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Mohamed T; Murphy, David

    2011-01-01

    Comparing two RNA populations that differ from the effects of a single independent variable, such as a drug treatment or a specific genetic defect, can establish differences in the abundance of specific transcripts that vary in a population dependent manner. There are different methods for identifying differentially expressed genes. These methods include microarray, Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), and quantitative Reverse-Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). Herein, the protocol describes an easy and cost-effective alternative that does not require prior knowledge of the transcriptomes under examination. It is specifically relevant when low levels of RNA starting material are available. This protocol describes the use of Switching Mechanism At RNA Termini Polymerase Chain Reaction (SMART-PCR) to amplify cDNA from small amounts of RNA. The amplified cDNA populations under comparison are then subjected to Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH-PCR). SSH-PCR is a technique that couples subtractive hybridization with suppression PCR to selectively amplify fragments of differentially expressed genes. The resulting products are cDNA populations enriched for significantly overrepresented transcripts in either of the two input RNAs. These cDNA populations can then be cloned to generate subtracted cDNA library. Microarrays made with clones from the subtracted forward and reverse cDNA libraries are then screened for differentially expressed genes using targets generated from tester and driver total RNAs.

  6. Subtraction at NNLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frixione, Stefano; Grazzini, Massimiliano

    2005-06-01

    We propose a framework for the implementation of a subtraction formalism at NNLO in QCD, based on an observable- and process-independent cancellation of infrared singularities. As a first simple application, we present the calculation of the contribution to the e+e- dijet cross section proportional to CFTR.

  7. Speech enhancement using parametric spectral subtraction combined with generalized sidelobe canceller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaeyoun; Krishnamurthy, Ashok

    2003-10-01

    Speech enhancement is an important problem with applications in hearing aid design, speech recognition, speech coding, etc. Parametric spectral subtraction is a common method for speech enhancement when only a single channel of data is available. On the other hand, beamforming methods can be used when multiple channels of spatially separated data are available, such as from a microphone array. In previous work, we have shown that spectral subtraction combined with spatial averaging from multiple microphones leads to improvements in speech SNR and reduction of musical noise compared with either method used alone. In this talk, we extend the previous work to combine parametric spectral subtraction with adaptive beamforming, specifically the generalized sidelobe canceller. The proposed parametric spectral subtraction method determines the parameters adaptively so as to minimize speech distortion. In addition, it is shown that the major drawback of spectral subtraction, so-called musical noise, can be diminished by adaptive beamforming process. We show that the method leads to a reduction of musical noise and results in the enhanced speech having better quality and intelligibility.

  8. Polygenic inheritance of Tourette syndrome, stuttering, attention deficit hyperactivity, conduct, and oppositional defiant disorder: The additive and subtractive effect of the three dopaminergic genes - DRD2, D{beta}H, and DAT1

    SciTech Connect

    Comings, D.E.; Wu, S.; Chiu, C.; Ring, R.H.; Gade, R.; Ahn, C.; Dietz, G.; Muhleman, D.

    1996-05-31

    Polymorphisms of three different dopaminergic genes, dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (DRD2), dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase (D{beta}H), and dopamine transporter (DAT1), were examined in Tourette syndrome (TS) probands, their relatives, and controls. Each gene individually showed a significant correlation with various behavioral variables in these subjects. The additive and subtractive effects of the three genes were examined by genotyping all three genes in the same set of subjects. For 9 of 20 TS associated comorbid behaviors there was a significant linear association between the degree of loading for markers of three genes and the mean behavior scores. The behavior variables showing the significant associations were, in order, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), stuttering, oppositional defiant, tics, conduct, obsessive-compulsive, mania, alcohol abuse, and general anxiety - behaviors that constitute the most overt clinical aspects of TS. For 16 of the 20 behavior scores there was a linear progressive decrease in the mean score with progressively lesser loading for the three gene markers. These results suggest that TS, ADHD, stuttering, oppositional defiant and conduct disorder, and other behaviors associated with TS, are polygenic, due in part to these three dopaminergic genes, and that the genetics of other polygenic psychiatric disorders may be deciphered using this technique. 144 refs., 2 figs., 13 tabs.

  9. Influence of Additive and Multiplicative Structure and Direction of Comparison on the Reversal Error

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    González-Calero, José Antonio; Arnau, David; Laserna-Belenguer, Belén

    2015-01-01

    An empirical study has been carried out to evaluate the potential of word order matching and static comparison as explanatory models of reversal error. Data was collected from 214 undergraduate students who translated a set of additive and multiplicative comparisons expressed in Spanish into algebraic language. In these multiplicative comparisons…

  10. Langevin simulation of scalar fields: Additive and multiplicative noises and lattice renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassol-Seewald, N. C.; Farias, R. L. S.; Fraga, E. S.; Krein, G.; Ramos, Rudnei O.

    2012-08-01

    We consider the Langevin lattice dynamics for a spontaneously broken λϕ4 scalar field theory where both additive and multiplicative noise terms are incorporated. The lattice renormalization for the corresponding stochastic Ginzburg-Landau-Langevin and the subtleties related to the multiplicative noise are investigated.

  11. Intensity normalization of additive and multiplicative spatially multiplexed patterns with n encoded phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez-Salazar, Rigoberto; Robledo-Sanchez, Carlos; Guerrero-Sanchez, Fermin; Barcelata-Pinzon, Antonio; Gonzalez-Garcia, Jorge; Santiago-Alvarado, Agustin

    2016-02-01

    An efficient, robust and user-free intensity normalization method for patterns with n frequency-multiplexed phases of both additive and multiplicative types is proposed. For this, the parameter estimation approach by using the least-squares method is applied. The theoretical principles are given and the good performance of the proposal is verified by computer simulation and experimental results. Because the proposed method has good features such as robustness, simplicity, fast and user-free execution, it could be implemented in a wide variety of applications. This contribution motivates future generalization in both phase demodulation algorithms and experimental setups to exploit the benefits of additive/multiplicative patterns with multiple phases.

  12. Pediatric digital subtraction angiography

    SciTech Connect

    Amundson, G.M.; Wesenberg, R.L.; Mueller, D.L.; Reid, R.H.

    1984-12-01

    Experience with intravenous digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in infants and children is limited, although its relative rate of performance, low complication rate, and diagnostic accuracy indicate great potential. The authors performed 87 DSA examinations (74 patients) and obtained sufficient detail to facilitate diagnosis in most cases. The major problems of patient movement and overlapping vessels can be minimized by judicious use of sedation and strict attention to technique. Exposure of patients to radiation has not been a limiting factor since our system uses low exposure factors. Our results demonstrate that DSA has wide applicability to many organ systems and is especially useful in intracranial disease and for preoperative evaluation of neoplasms.

  13. Strategies in Subtraction Problem Solving in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrouillet, Pierre; Mignon, Mathilde; Thevenot, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the strategies used by third graders in solving the 81 elementary subtractions that are the inverses of the one-digit additions with addends from 1 to 9 recently studied by Barrouillet and Lepine. Although the pattern of relationship between individual differences in working memory, on the one hand, and…

  14. Developing a Model to Support Students in Solving Subtraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdiyani, Nila Mareta; Zulkardi; Putri, Ratu Ilma Indra; van Eerde, Dolly; van Galen, Frans

    2013-01-01

    Subtraction has two meanings and each meaning leads to the different strategies. The meaning of "taking away something" suggests a direct subtraction, while the meaning of "determining the difference between two numbers" is more likely to be modeled as indirect addition. Many prior researches found that the second meaning and…

  15. Stochastic Vortex Dynamics in Two-Dimensional Easy Plane Ferromagnets: Multiplicative Versus Additive Noise

    SciTech Connect

    Kamppeter, T.; Mertens, F.G.; Moro, E.; Sanchez, A.; Bishop, A.R.

    1998-09-01

    We study how thermal fluctuations affect the dynamics of vortices in the two-dimensional anisotropic Heisenberg model depending on their additive or multiplicative character. Using a collective coordinate theory, we analytically show that multiplicative noise, arising from fluctuations in the local field term of the Landau-Lifshitz equations, and Langevin-like additive noise have the same effect on vortex dynamics (within a very plausible assumption consistent with the collective coordinate approach). This is a highly non-trivial result as multiplicative and additive noises usually modify the dynamics in very different ways. We also carry out numerical simulations of both versions of the model finding that they indeed give rise to very similar vortex dynamics.

  16. Pulse subtraction Doppler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahue, Veronique; Mari, Jean Martial; Eckersley, Robert J.; Caro, Colin G.; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances have demonstrated the feasibility of molecular imaging using targeted microbubbles and ultrasound. One technical challenge is to selectively detect attached bubbles from those freely flowing bubbles and surrounding tissue. Pulse Inversion Doppler is an imaging technique enabling the selective detection of both static and moving ultrasound contrast agents: linear scatterers generate a single band Doppler spectrum, while non-linear scatterers generate a double band spectrum, one being uniquely correlated with the presence of contrast agents and non-linear tissue signals. We demonstrate that similar spectrums, and thus the same discrimination, can be obtained through a Doppler implementation of Pulse Subtraction. This is achieved by reconstructing a virtual echo using the echo generated from a short pulse transmission. Moreover by subtracting from this virtual echo the one generated from a longer pulse transmission, it is possible to fully suppress the echo from linear scatterers, while for non-linear scatterers, a signal will remain, allowing classical agent detection. Simulations of a single moving microbubble and a moving linear scatterer subject to these pulses show that when the virtual echo and the long pulse echo are used to perform pulsed Doppler, the power Doppler spectrum allows separation of linear and non-linear moving scattering. Similar results are obtained on experimental data acquired on a flow containing either microbubble contrast agents or linear blood mimicking fluid. This new Doppler method constitutes an alternative to Pulse Inversion Doppler and preliminary results suggest that similar dual band spectrums could be obtained by the combination of any non-linear detection technique with Doppler demodulation.

  17. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  18. Whole Number Subtraction -- An Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilpin, John B.

    This document is intended as a resource for persons using, designing, or evaluating instructional materials in whole number subtraction. Its purpose is to provide conceptual machinery: (1) for describing/specifying subtraction tests and exercises and (2) for formulating related questions and conjectures. It is mainly a logical analysis subject to…

  19. Visualization and quantitation of coronary arteries using multiple-view energy subtraction digital radiography. Interim report 30 September 1983-29 September 1984

    SciTech Connect

    Macovski, A.

    1984-08-27

    The authors have studied a general approach to the imaging of coronary arteries using minimally invasive intravenous administration of contrast material. Using conventional DSA techniques this visualization would fail due to motion, low SNR, and intervening iodinated structures. The authors have implemented the digital fluoroscopy system with a rotating gantry and tested it on phantoms. Evaluation of stenosis in coronary arteries is difficult with low SNR images. The authors have studied and implemented a vessel outlining system using a global estimation procedure. The most recent approach has significantly improved computational efficiency. The processing of multiple-energy data to eliminate the moving soft tissue results in a noise penalty. The authors have studied and implemented an approach to restore the original SNR by deriving the high frequency components from a non-selective image. The authors have also implemented a scatter-cancellation system for minimizing this source of error.

  20. Multiplicative calculus and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashirov, Agamirza E.; Kurpinar, Emine Misirli; Özyapici, Ali

    2008-01-01

    Two operations, differentiation and integration, are basic in calculus and analysis. In fact, they are the infinitesimal versions of the subtraction and addition operations on numbers, respectively. In the period from 1967 till 1970 Michael Grossman and Robert Katz gave definitions of a new kind of derivative and integral, moving the roles of subtraction and addition to division and multiplication, and thus established a new calculus, called multiplicative calculus. In the present paper our aim is to bring up this calculus to the attention of researchers and demonstrate its usefulness.

  1. Subtraction of Positive and Negative Numbers: The Difference and Completion Approaches with Chips

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Alfinio

    2008-01-01

    Diverse contexts such as "take away," comparison," and "completion" give rise to subtraction problems. The take-away interpretation of subtraction has been explored using two-colored chips to help students understand addition and subtraction of integers. This article illustrates how the difference and completion (or missing addend) interpretations…

  2. Rainfall estimation by rain gauge-radar combination: A concurrent multiplicative-additive approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    GarcíA-Pintado, Javier; Barberá, Gonzalo G.; Erena, Manuel; Castillo, Victor M.

    2009-01-01

    A procedure (concurrent multiplicative-additive objective analysis scheme [CMA-OAS]) is proposed for operational rainfall estimation using rain gauges and radar data. On the basis of a concurrent multiplicative-additive (CMA) decomposition of the spatially nonuniform radar bias, within-storm variability of rainfall and fractional coverage of rainfall are taken into account. Thus both spatially nonuniform radar bias, given that rainfall is detected, and bias in radar detection of rainfall are handled. The interpolation procedure of CMA-OAS is built on Barnes' objective analysis scheme (OAS), whose purpose is to estimate a filtered spatial field of the variable of interest through a successive correction of residuals resulting from a Gaussian kernel smoother applied on spatial samples. The CMA-OAS, first, poses an optimization problem at each gauge-radar support point to obtain both a local multiplicative-additive radar bias decomposition and a regionalization parameter. Second, local biases and regionalization parameters are integrated into an OAS to estimate the multisensor rainfall at the ground level. The procedure is suited to relatively sparse rain gauge networks. To show the procedure, six storms are analyzed at hourly steps over 10,663 km2. Results generally indicated an improved quality with respect to other methods evaluated: a standard mean-field bias adjustment, a spatially variable adjustment with multiplicative factors, and ordinary cokriging.

  3. One-pot construction of multiple contiguous chiral centers using Michael addition of chiral amine.

    PubMed

    Ozeki, Minoru; Ochi, Shunsuke; Hayama, Noboru; Hosoi, Shinzo; Kajimoto, Tetsuya; Node, Manabu

    2010-06-18

    Multiple contiguous chiral centers were constructed in one pot using three types of multistep reactions initiated with the Michael addition of N-benzyl-2(R)-methoxy-(+)-10-bornylamide to alpha,beta-unsaturated esters, i.e., asymmetric Michael-aldol reaction, double Michael addition, and double Michael-aldol reaction. The chiral 2-methoxy-10-bornyl group as well as the benzyl group on the amino group of the products in the Michael-aldol reaction could be easily cleaved by treatment with NIS (4 equiv), and beta-amino esters with multiple contiguous chiral centers were obtained in good yield. As an application, the beta-amino-beta'-hydroxy ester obtained in the asymmetric Michael-aldol reaction was converted to the beta-lactam derivative in good yield.

  4. Impression technique for a complete-arch prosthesis with multiple implants using additive manufacturing technologies.

    PubMed

    Revilla-León, Marta; Sánchez-Rubio, José Luis; Oteo-Calatayud, Jesús; Özcan, Mutlu

    2016-11-23

    This article describes an impression technique for a complete-arch prosthesis supported by multiple implants where additive manufacturing technologies were used to fabricate a splinting framework and a custom tray. The technique presented uses a shim method to control the homogenous splinting acrylic resin and impression material during the procedure, thereby reducing laboratory and chairside time and the number of impression copings and laboratory analogs needed.

  5. Additivity of Feature-Based and Symmetry-Based Grouping Effects in Multiple Object Tracking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chundi; Zhang, Xuemin; Li, Yongna; Lyu, Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple object tracking (MOT) is an attentional process wherein people track several moving targets among several distractors. Symmetry, an important indicator of regularity, is a general spatial pattern observed in natural and artificial scenes. According to the "laws of perceptual organization" proposed by Gestalt psychologists, regularity is a principle of perceptual grouping, such as similarity and closure. A great deal of research reported that feature-based similarity grouping (e.g., grouping based on color, size, or shape) among targets in MOT tasks can improve tracking performance. However, no additive feature-based grouping effects have been reported where the tracking objects had two or more features. "Additive effect" refers to a greater grouping effect produced by grouping based on multiple cues instead of one cue. Can spatial symmetry produce a similar grouping effect similar to that of feature similarity in MOT tasks? Are the grouping effects based on symmetry and feature similarity additive? This study includes four experiments to address these questions. The results of Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated the automatic symmetry-based grouping effects. More importantly, an additive grouping effect of symmetry and feature similarity was observed in Experiments 3 and 4. Our findings indicate that symmetry can produce an enhanced grouping effect in MOT and facilitate the grouping effect based on color or shape similarity. The "where" and "what" pathways might have played an important role in the additive grouping effect.

  6. Additivity of Feature-Based and Symmetry-Based Grouping Effects in Multiple Object Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chundi; Zhang, Xuemin; Li, Yongna; Lyu, Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple object tracking (MOT) is an attentional process wherein people track several moving targets among several distractors. Symmetry, an important indicator of regularity, is a general spatial pattern observed in natural and artificial scenes. According to the “laws of perceptual organization” proposed by Gestalt psychologists, regularity is a principle of perceptual grouping, such as similarity and closure. A great deal of research reported that feature-based similarity grouping (e.g., grouping based on color, size, or shape) among targets in MOT tasks can improve tracking performance. However, no additive feature-based grouping effects have been reported where the tracking objects had two or more features. “Additive effect” refers to a greater grouping effect produced by grouping based on multiple cues instead of one cue. Can spatial symmetry produce a similar grouping effect similar to that of feature similarity in MOT tasks? Are the grouping effects based on symmetry and feature similarity additive? This study includes four experiments to address these questions. The results of Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated the automatic symmetry-based grouping effects. More importantly, an additive grouping effect of symmetry and feature similarity was observed in Experiments 3 and 4. Our findings indicate that symmetry can produce an enhanced grouping effect in MOT and facilitate the grouping effect based on color or shape similarity. The “where” and “what” pathways might have played an important role in the additive grouping effect. PMID:27199875

  7. Subtractive Structural Modification of Morpho Butterfly Wings.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qingchen; He, Jiaqing; Ni, Mengtian; Song, Chengyi; Zhou, Lingye; Hu, Hang; Zhang, Ruoxi; Luo, Zhen; Wang, Ge; Tao, Peng; Deng, Tao; Shang, Wen

    2015-11-11

    Different from studies of butterfly wings through additive modification, this work for the first time studies the property change of butterfly wings through subtractive modification using oxygen plasma etching. The controlled modification of butterfly wings through such subtractive process results in gradual change of the optical properties, and helps the further understanding of structural optimization through natural evolution. The brilliant color of Morpho butterfly wings is originated from the hierarchical nanostructure on the wing scales. Such nanoarchitecture has attracted a lot of research effort, including the study of its optical properties, its potential use in sensing and infrared imaging, and also the use of such structure as template for the fabrication of high-performance photocatalytic materials. The controlled subtractive processes provide a new path to modify such nanoarchitecture and its optical property. Distinct from previous studies on the optical property of the Morpho wing structure, this study provides additional experimental evidence for the origination of the optical property of the natural butterfly wing scales. The study also offers a facile approach to generate new 3D nanostructures using butterfly wings as the templates and may lead to simpler structure models for large-scale man-made structures than those offered by original butterfly wings.

  8. Mass dependence of instabilities of an oscillator with multiplicative and additive noise.

    PubMed

    Gitterman, Moshe; Kessler, David A

    2013-02-01

    We study the instabilities of a harmonic oscillator subject to additive and dichotomous multiplicative noise, focusing on the dependence of the instability threshold on the mass. For multiplicative noise in the damping, the energy instability threshold is crossed as the mass is decreased, as long as the smaller damping is in fact negative. For multiplicative noise in the stiffness, the situation is more complicated and in fact the energy transition is reentrant for intermediate noise strength and damping. For multiplicative noise in the mass, the results depend on the implementation of the noise. One can take the velocity or the momentum to be conserved as the mass is changed. In these cases increasing the mass destabilizes the system. Alternatively, if the change in mass is caused by the accretion and loss of particles to the Brownian particle, these processes are asymmetric with momentum conserved upon accretion and velocity upon loss. In this case, there is no instability, as opposed to the other two implementations. We also present the mass dependence of the instability threshold for the first moment. Finally, we study the distribution of the energy, finding a power-law cutoff at a value that increases with time.

  9. A multiple additive regression tree analysis of three exposure measures during Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Andrew; Li, Bin; Marx, Brian D; Mills, Jacqueline W; Pine, John

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyses structural and personal exposure to Hurricane Katrina. Structural exposure is measured by flood height and building damage; personal exposure is measured by the locations of 911 calls made during the response. Using these variables, this paper characterises the geography of exposure and also demonstrates the utility of a robust analytical approach in understanding health-related challenges to disadvantaged populations during recovery. Analysis is conducted using a contemporary statistical approach, a multiple additive regression tree (MART), which displays considerable improvement over traditional regression analysis. By using MART, the percentage of improvement in R-squares over standard multiple linear regression ranges from about 62 to more than 100 per cent. The most revealing finding is the modelled verification that African Americans experienced disproportionate exposure in both structural and personal contexts. Given the impact of exposure to health outcomes, this finding has implications for understanding the long-term health challenges facing this population.

  10. The Addition of Low-dose Thalidomide to Bortezomib and Dexamethasone for Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shigeo; Kuroha, Takashi; Yano, Toshio; Sato, Naoko; Furukawa, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Five cases were treated by adding daily low-dose thalidomide (50 mg) to bortezomib and dexamethasone therapy for refractory multiple myeloma. This therapy was effective in four cases, with an improvement of bone pain and regression of M-protein. One case was treated with cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, and dexamethasone, adding bortezomib after starting the three-drug combination therapy. This patient has remained in a stable disease state since the beginning of this therapy. Regarding the other four cases, a partial response and a prolonged survival for approximately one year were noted. Peripheral neuropathy did not increase after thalidomide addition. Adding low-dose thalidomide may safely improve the responses for multiple myeloma refractory to bortezomib and dexamethasone. PMID:27746443

  11. The Addition of Low-dose Thalidomide to Bortezomib and Dexamethasone for Refractory Multiple Myeloma.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shigeo; Kuroha, Takashi; Yano, Toshio; Sato, Naoko; Furukawa, Tatsuo

    Five cases were treated by adding daily low-dose thalidomide (50 mg) to bortezomib and dexamethasone therapy for refractory multiple myeloma. This therapy was effective in four cases, with an improvement of bone pain and regression of M-protein. One case was treated with cyclophosphamide, thalidomide, and dexamethasone, adding bortezomib after starting the three-drug combination therapy. This patient has remained in a stable disease state since the beginning of this therapy. Regarding the other four cases, a partial response and a prolonged survival for approximately one year were noted. Peripheral neuropathy did not increase after thalidomide addition. Adding low-dose thalidomide may safely improve the responses for multiple myeloma refractory to bortezomib and dexamethasone.

  12. The concurrent multiplicative-additive approach for gauge-radar/satellite multisensor precipitation estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Pintado, J.; Barberá, G. G.; Erena Arrabal, M.; Castillo, V. M.

    2010-12-01

    Objective analysis schemes (OAS), also called ``succesive correction methods'' or ``observation nudging'', have been proposed for multisensor precipitation estimation combining remote sensing data (meteorological radar or satellite) with data from ground-based raingauge networks. However, opposite to the more complex geostatistical approaches, the OAS techniques for this use are not optimized. On the other hand, geostatistical techniques ideally require, at the least, modelling the covariance from the rain gauge data at every time step evaluated, which commonly cannot be soundly done. Here, we propose a new procedure (concurrent multiplicative-additive objective analysis scheme [CMA-OAS]) for operational rainfall estimation using rain gauges and meteorological radar, which does not require explicit modelling of spatial covariances. On the basis of a concurrent multiplicative-additive (CMA) decomposition of the spatially nonuniform radar bias, within-storm variability of rainfall and fractional coverage of rainfall are taken into account. Thus both spatially nonuniform radar bias, given that rainfall is detected, and bias in radar detection of rainfall are handled. The interpolation procedure of CMA-OAS is built on the OAS, whose purpose is to estimate a filtered spatial field of the variable of interest through a successive correction of residuals resulting from a Gaussian kernel smoother applied on spatial samples. The CMA-OAS, first, poses an optimization problem at each gauge-radar support point to obtain both a local multiplicative-additive radar bias decomposition and a regionalization parameter. Second, local biases and regionalization parameters are integrated into an OAS to estimate the multisensor rainfall at the ground level. The approach considers radar estimates as background a priori information (first guess), so that nudging to observations (gauges) may be relaxed smoothly to the first guess, and the relaxation shape is obtained from the sequential

  13. Inverse reference in subtraction performance: an analysis from arithmetic word problems.

    PubMed

    Orrantia, Josetxu; Rodríguez, Laura; Múñez, David; Vicente, Santiago

    2012-01-01

    Studies of elementary calculation have shown that adults solve basic subtraction problems faster with problems presented in addition format (e.g., 6 ± = 13) than in standard subtraction format (e.g., 13 - 6 = ). Therefore, it is considered that adults solve subtraction problems by reference to the inverse operation (e.g., for 13 - 6 = 7, "I know that 13 is 6 + 7") because presenting the subtraction problem in addition format does not require the mental rearrangement of the problem elements into the addition format. In two experiments, we examine whether adults' use of addition to solve subtractions is modulated by the arrangement of minuend and subtrahend, regardless of format. To this end, we used arithmetic word problems since single-digit problems in subtraction format would not allow the subtrahend to appear before the minuend. In Experiment 1, subtractions were presented by arranging minuend and subtrahend according to previous research. In Experiment 2, operands were reversed. The overall results showed that participants benefited from word problems where the subtrahend appears before the minuend, including subtractions in standard subtraction format. These findings add to a growing body of literature that emphasizes the role of inverse reference in adults' performance on subtractions.

  14. Hardware Implementation of a Bilateral Subtraction Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huertas, Andres; Watson, Robert; Villalpando, Carlos; Goldberg, Steven

    2009-01-01

    its position in the window as well as the pixel value for the central pixel of the window. The absolute difference between these two pixel values is calculated and used as an address in a lookup table. Each processing element has a lookup table, unique for its position in the window, containing the weight coefficients for the Gaussian function for that position. The pixel value is multiplied by the weight, and the outputs of the processing element are the weight and pixel-value weight product. The products and weights are fed to the adder tree. The sum of the products and the sum of the weights are fed to the divider, which computes the sum of products the sum of weights. The output of the divider is denoted the bilateral smoothed image. The smoothing function is a simple weighted average computed over a 3 3 subwindow centered in the 9 9 window. After smoothing, the image is delayed by an additional amount of time needed to match the processing time for computing the bilateral smoothed image. The bilateral smoothed image is then subtracted from the 3 3 smoothed image to produce the final output. The prototype filter as implemented in a commercially available FPGA processes one pixel per clock cycle. Operation at a clock speed of 66 MHz has been demonstrated, and results of a static timing analysis have been interpreted as suggesting that the clock speed could be increased to as much as 100 MHz.

  15. Sufficient conditions for the additivity of stall forces generated by multiple filaments or motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bameta, Tripti; Das, Dipjyoti; Das, Dibyendu; Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Inamdar, Mandar M.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular motors and cytoskeletal filaments work collectively most of the time under opposing forces. This opposing force may be due to cargo carried by motors or resistance coming from the cell membrane pressing against the cytoskeletal filaments. Some recent studies have shown that the collective maximum force (stall force) generated by multiple cytoskeletal filaments or molecular motors may not always be just a simple sum of the stall forces of the individual filaments or motors. To understand this excess or deficit in the collective force, we study a broad class of models of both cytoskeletal filaments and molecular motors. We argue that the stall force generated by a group of filaments or motors is additive, that is, the stall force of N number of filaments (motors) is N times the stall force of one filament (motor), when the system is reversible at stall. Conversely, we show that this additive property typically does not hold true when the system is irreversible at stall. We thus present a novel and unified understanding of the existing models exhibiting such non-addivity, and generalise our arguments by developing new models that demonstrate this phenomena. We also propose a quantity similar to thermodynamic efficiency to easily predict this deviation from stall-force additivity for filament and motor collectives.

  16. "Subtractive" Bilingualism in Northern Belize.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubinstein, Robert A.

    "Subtractive" bilingualism in Northern Belize is analyzed based on an extension of a model by Wallace Lambert. The impact of English language instruction on Spanish speaking children in Corozal Town, the northernmost urban center in the British colony of Belize, Central America, is described. This description extends an earlier account…

  17. Is the structural diversity of tripeptides sufficient for developing functional food additives with satisfactory multiple bioactivities?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian-Hui; Liu, Yong-Le; Ning, Jing-Heng; Yu, Jian; Li, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Fa-Xiang

    2013-05-01

    Multifunctional peptides have attracted increasing attention in the food science community because of their therapeutic potential, low toxicity and rapid intestinal absorption. However, previous study demonstrated that the limited structural variations make it difficult to optimize dipeptide molecules in a good balance between desirable and undesirable properties (F. Tian, P. Zhou, F. Lv, R. Song, Z. Li, J. Pept. Sci. 13 (2007) 549-566). In the present work, we attempt to answer whether the structural diversity is sufficient for a tripeptide to have satisfactory multiple bioactivities. Statistical test, structural examination and energetic analysis confirm that peptides of three amino acids long can bind tightly to human angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and thus exert significant antihypertensive efficacy. Further quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling and prediction of all 8000 possible tripeptides reveal that their ACE-inhibitory potency exhibits a good (positive) relationship to antioxidative activity, but has only a quite modest correlation with bitterness. This means that it is possible to find certain tripeptide entities possessing the optimal combination of strong ACE-inhibitory potency, high antioxidative activity and weak bitter taste, which are the promising candidates for developing multifunctional food additives with satisfactory multiple bioactivities. The marked difference between dipeptide and tripeptide can be attributed to the fact that the structural diversity of peptides increases dramatically with a slight change in sequence length.

  18. Generalized Additive Mixed-Models for Pharmacology Using Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-Culture.

    PubMed

    Ingersoll, Thomas; Cole, Stephanie; Madren-Whalley, Janna; Booker, Lamont; Dorsey, Russell; Li, Albert; Salem, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-culture (IDMOC) is emerging as an in-vitro alternative to in-vivo animal models for pharmacology studies. IDMOC allows dose-response relationships to be investigated at the tissue and organoid levels, yet, these relationships often exhibit responses that are far more complex than the binary responses often measured in whole animals. To accommodate departure from binary endpoints, IDMOC requires an expansion of analytic techniques beyond simple linear probit and logistic models familiar in toxicology. IDMOC dose-responses may be measured at continuous scales, exhibit significant non-linearity such as local maxima or minima, and may include non-independent measures. Generalized additive mixed-modeling (GAMM) provides an alternative description of dose-response that relaxes assumptions of independence and linearity. We compared GAMMs to traditional linear models for describing dose-response in IDMOC pharmacology studies.

  19. Generalized Additive Mixed-Models for Pharmacology Using Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-Culture

    PubMed Central

    Ingersoll, Thomas; Cole, Stephanie; Madren-Whalley, Janna; Booker, Lamont; Dorsey, Russell; Li, Albert; Salem, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Integrated Discrete Multiple Organ Co-culture (IDMOC) is emerging as an in-vitro alternative to in-vivo animal models for pharmacology studies. IDMOC allows dose-response relationships to be investigated at the tissue and organoid levels, yet, these relationships often exhibit responses that are far more complex than the binary responses often measured in whole animals. To accommodate departure from binary endpoints, IDMOC requires an expansion of analytic techniques beyond simple linear probit and logistic models familiar in toxicology. IDMOC dose-responses may be measured at continuous scales, exhibit significant non-linearity such as local maxima or minima, and may include non-independent measures. Generalized additive mixed-modeling (GAMM) provides an alternative description of dose-response that relaxes assumptions of independence and linearity. We compared GAMMs to traditional linear models for describing dose-response in IDMOC pharmacology studies. PMID:27110941

  20. Stochastic responses of a viscoelastic-impact system under additive and multiplicative random excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xiangrong; Xu, Wei; Yang, Yongge; Wang, Xiying

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the stochastic responses of a viscoelastic-impact system under additive and multiplicative random excitations. The viscoelastic force is replaced by a combination of stiffness and damping terms. The non-smooth transformation of the state variables is utilized to transform the original system to a new system without the impact term. The stochastic averaging method is applied to yield the stationary probability density functions. The validity of the analytical method is verified by comparing the analytical results with the numerical results. It is invaluable to note that the restitution coefficient, the viscoelastic parameters and the damping coefficients can induce the occurrence of stochastic P-bifurcation. Furthermore, the joint stationary probability density functions with three peaks are explored.

  1. A new approach to handle additive and multiplicative uncertainties in the measurement for ? LPV filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerda, Márcio J.; Tognetti, Eduardo S.; Oliveira, Ricardo C. L. F.; Peres, Pedro L. D.

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a general framework to cope with full-order ? linear parameter-varying (LPV) filter design subject to inexactly measured parameters. The main novelty is the ability of handling additive and multiplicative uncertainties in the measurements, for both continuous and discrete-time LPV systems, in a unified approach. By conveniently modelling scheduling parameters and uncertainties affecting the measurements, the ? filter design problem can be expressed in terms of robust matrix inequalities that become linear when two scalar parameters are fixed. Therefore, the proposed conditions can be efficiently solved through linear matrix inequality relaxations based on polynomial solutions. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the improved efficiency of the proposed approach when compared to other methods and, more important, its capability to deal with scenarios where the available strategies in the literature cannot be used.

  2. Cadmium Subtraction Method for the Active Albedo Neutron Interrogation of Uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Worrall, Louise G.; Croft, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    This report describes work performed under the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) Cadmium Subtraction Project. The project objective was to explore the difference between the traditional cadmium (Cd) ratio signature and a proposed alternative Cd subtraction (or Cd difference) approach. The thinking behind the project was that a Cd subtraction method would provide a more direct measure of multiplication than the existing Cd ratio method. At the same time, it would be relatively insensitive to changes in neutron detection efficiency when properly calibrated. This is the first published experimental comparison and evaluation of the Cd ratio and Cd subtraction methods.

  3. Stochastic resonance subject to multiplicative and additive noise: The influence of potential asymmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zijian; Lei, Yaguo; Lin, Jing; Niu, Shantao

    2016-11-01

    The influence of potential asymmetries on stochastic resonance (SR) subject to both multiplicative and additive noise is studied by using two-state theory, where three types of asymmetries are introduced in double-well potential by varying the depth, the width, and both the depth and the width of the left well alone. The characteristics of SR in the asymmetric cases are different from symmetric ones, where asymmetry has a strong influence on output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and optimal noise intensity. Even optimal noise intensity is also associated with the steepness of the potential-barrier wall, which is generally ignored. Moreover, the largest SNR in asymmetric SR is found to be relatively larger than the symmetric one, which also closely depends on noise intensity ratio. In addition, a moderate cross-correlation intensity between two noises is good for improving the output SNR. More interestingly, a double SR phenomenon is observed in certain cases for two correlated noises, whereas it disappears for two independent noises. The above clues are helpful in achieving weak signal detection under heavy background noise.

  4. Arithmetic on Your Phone: A Large Scale Investigation of Simple Additions and Multiplications

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Federico; Shalom, Diego; Gonzalez, Pablo A.; Garrido, Juan Manuel; Alvarez Heduan, Facundo; Dehaene, Stanislas; Sigman, Mariano; Rieznik, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a gamified mobile device arithmetic application which allowed us to collect vast amount of data in simple arithmetic operations. Our results confirm and replicate, on a large sample, six of the main principles derived in a long tradition of investigation: size effect, tie effect, size-tie interaction effect, five-effect, RTs and error rates correlation effect, and most common error effect. Our dataset allowed us to perform a robust analysis of order effects for each individual problem, for which there is controversy both in experimental findings and in the predictions of theoretical models. For addition problems, the order effect was dominated by a max-then-min structure (i.e 7+4 is easier than 4+7). This result is predicted by models in which additions are performed as a translation starting from the first addend, with a distance given by the second addend. In multiplication, we observed a dominance of two effects: (1) a max-then-min pattern that can be accounted by the fact that it is easier to perform fewer additions of the largest number (i.e. 8x3 is easier to compute as 8+8+8 than as 3+3+…+3) and (2) a phonological effect by which problems for which there is a rhyme (i.e. "seis por cuatro es veinticuatro") are performed faster. Above and beyond these results, our study bares an important practical conclusion, as proof of concept, that participants can be motivated to perform substantial arithmetic training simply by presenting it in a gamified format. PMID:28033357

  5. Arithmetic on Your Phone: A Large Scale Investigation of Simple Additions and Multiplications.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Federico; Shalom, Diego; Gonzalez, Pablo A; Garrido, Juan Manuel; Alvarez Heduan, Facundo; Dehaene, Stanislas; Sigman, Mariano; Rieznik, Andres

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a gamified mobile device arithmetic application which allowed us to collect vast amount of data in simple arithmetic operations. Our results confirm and replicate, on a large sample, six of the main principles derived in a long tradition of investigation: size effect, tie effect, size-tie interaction effect, five-effect, RTs and error rates correlation effect, and most common error effect. Our dataset allowed us to perform a robust analysis of order effects for each individual problem, for which there is controversy both in experimental findings and in the predictions of theoretical models. For addition problems, the order effect was dominated by a max-then-min structure (i.e 7+4 is easier than 4+7). This result is predicted by models in which additions are performed as a translation starting from the first addend, with a distance given by the second addend. In multiplication, we observed a dominance of two effects: (1) a max-then-min pattern that can be accounted by the fact that it is easier to perform fewer additions of the largest number (i.e. 8x3 is easier to compute as 8+8+8 than as 3+3+…+3) and (2) a phonological effect by which problems for which there is a rhyme (i.e. "seis por cuatro es veinticuatro") are performed faster. Above and beyond these results, our study bares an important practical conclusion, as proof of concept, that participants can be motivated to perform substantial arithmetic training simply by presenting it in a gamified format.

  6. Additive effects prevail: The response of biota to multiple stressors in an intensively monitored watershed.

    PubMed

    Gieswein, Alexander; Hering, Daniel; Feld, Christian K

    2017-03-21

    Freshwater ecosystems are impacted by a range of stressors arising from diverse human-caused land and water uses. Identifying the relative importance of single stressors and understanding how multiple stressors interact and jointly affect biology is crucial for River Basin Management. This study addressed multiple human-induced stressors and their effects on the aquatic flora and fauna based on data from standard WFD monitoring schemes. For altogether 1095 sites within a mountainous catchment, we used 12 stressor variables covering three different stressor groups: riparian land use, physical habitat quality and nutrient enrichment. Twenty-one biological metrics calculated from taxa lists of three organism groups (fish, benthic invertebrates and aquatic macrophytes) served as response variables. Stressor and response variables were subjected to Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) analysis to identify stressor hierarchy and stressor interactions and subsequently to Generalised Linear Regression Modelling (GLM) to quantify the stressors standardised effect size. Our results show that riverine habitat degradation was the dominant stressor group for the river fauna, notably the bed physical habitat structure. Overall, the explained variation in benthic invertebrate metrics was higher than it was in fish and macrophyte metrics. In particular, general integrative (aggregate) metrics such as % Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT) taxa performed better than ecological traits (e.g. % feeding types). Overall, additive stressor effects dominated, while significant and meaningful stressor interactions were generally rare and weak. We concluded that given the type of stressor and ecological response variables addressed in this study, river basin managers do not need to bother much about complex stressor interactions, but can focus on the prevailing stressors according to the hierarchy identified.

  7. Sky subtraction with fiber spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lissandrini, C.; Cristiani, S.; La Franca, F.

    1994-11-01

    The sky-subtraction performance of multifiber spectrographs is discussed, analyzing in detail the case of the OPTOPUS system at the 3.6-m European Space Observatory (ESO) telescope at La Silla. A standard technique, based on flat fields obtained with a uniformly illuminated screen on the dome, provides poor results. A new method has been developed, using the (O I) emission line at 5577 A as a calibrator of the fiber transmittance, taking into account the diffuse light and the influence of each fiber on the adjacent ones, and correcting for the effects of the image distortions on the sky sampling. In this way the accuracy of the sky subtraction improves from 2%-8% to 1.3%-1.6%.

  8. Automated microbial metabolism laboratory. [design of advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into test chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design and rationale of an advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into each of four test chambers are outlined. The feasibility for multiple addition tests was established and various details of the methodology were studied. The four chamber battery of tests include: (1) determination of the effect of various atmospheric gases and selection of that gas which produces an optimum response; (2) determination of the effect of incubation temperature and selection of the optimum temperature for performing Martian biochemical tests; (3) sterile soil is dosed with a battery of C-14 labeled substrates and subjected to experimental temperature range; and (4) determination of the possible inhibitory effects of water on Martian organisms is performed initially by dosing with 0.01 ml and 0.5 ml of medium, respectively. A series of specifically labeled substrates are then added to obtain patterns in metabolic 14CO2 (C-14)O2 evolution.

  9. Al2O3 Nanoparticle Addition to Commercial Magnesium Alloys: Multiple Beneficial Effects

    PubMed Central

    Paramsothy, Muralidharan; Chan, Jimmy; Kwok, Richard; Gupta, Manoj

    2012-01-01

    The multiple beneficial effects of Al2O3 nanoparticle addition to cast magnesium based systems (followed by extrusion) were investigated, constituting either: (a) enhanced strength; or (b) simultaneously enhanced strength and ductility of the corresponding magnesium alloys. AZ31 and ZK60A nanocomposites containing Al2O3 nanoparticle reinforcement were each fabricated using solidification processing followed by hot extrusion. Compared to monolithic AZ31 (tension levels), the corresponding nanocomposite exhibited higher yield strength (0.2% tensile yield strength (TYS)), ultimate strength (UTS), failure strain and work of fracture (WOF) (+19%, +21%, +113% and +162%, respectively). Compared to monolithic AZ31 (compression levels), the corresponding nanocomposite exhibited higher yield strength (0.2% compressive yield strength (CYS)) and ultimate strength (UCS), lower failure strain and higher WOF (+5%, +5%, −4% and +11%, respectively). Compared to monolithic ZK60A (tension levels), the corresponding nanocomposite exhibited lower 0.2% TYS and higher UTS, failure strain and WOF (−4%, +13%, +170% and +200%, respectively). Compared to monolithic ZK60A (compression levels), the corresponding nanocomposite exhibited lower 0.2% CYS and higher UCS, failure strain and WOF (−10%, +7%, +15% and +26%, respectively). The capability of Al2O3 nanoparticles to enhance the properties of cast magnesium alloys in a way never seen before with micron length scale reinforcements is clearly demonstrated.

  10. Does NASA's Constellation Architecture Offer Opportunities to Achieve Multiple Additional Goals in Space?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley A.; Lester, Daniel F.

    2008-01-01

    Every major NASA human spaceflight program in the last four decades has been modified to achieve goals in space not incorporated within the original design goals: the Apollo Applications Program, Skylab, Space Shuttle, and International Space Station. Several groups in the US have been identifying major future science goals, the science facilities necessary to investigate them, as well as possible roles for augmented versions of elements of NASA's Constellation program. Specifically, teams in the astronomy community have been developing concepts for very capable missions to follow the James Webb Space Telescope that could take advantage of - or require - free-space operations by astronauts and/or robots. Taking as one example, the Single-Aperture Far-InfraRed (SAFIR) telescope with a approx.10+ m aperture proposed for operation in the 2020 timeframe. According to current NASA plans, the Ares V launch vehicle (or a variant) will be available about the same time, as will the capability to transport astronauts to the vicinity of the Moon via the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and associated systems. [As the lunar surface offers no advantages - and major disadvantages - for most major optical systems, the expensive system for landing and operating on the lunar surface is not required.] Although as currently conceived, SAFIR and other astronomical missions will operate at the Sun-Earth L2 location, it appears trivial to travel for servicing to the more accessible Earth-Moon L1,2 locations. Moreover, as the recent Orbital Express and Automated Transfer Vehicle missions have demonstrated, future robotic capabilities should offer capabilities that would (remotely) extend human presence far beyond the vicinity of the Earth. In addition to multiplying the value of NASA's architecture for future human spaceflight to achieve the goals multiple major stakeholders, if humans one day travel beyond the Earth-Moon system - say, to Mars - technologies and capabilities for operating

  11. Does NASA's Constellation Architecture Offer Opportunities to Achieve Multiple Additional Goals in Space?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thronson, Harley; Lester, Daniel F.

    2008-01-01

    Every major NASA human spaceflight program in the last four decades has been modified to achieve goals in space not incorporated within the original design goals: the Apollo Applications Program, Skylab, Space Shuttle, and International Space Station. Several groups in the US have been identifying major future science goals, the science facilities necessary to investigate them, as well as possible roles for augmented versions of elements of NASA's Constellation program. Specifically, teams in the astronomy community have been developing concepts for very capable missions to follow the James Webb Space Telescope that could take advantage of - or require - free-space operations by astronauts and/or robots. Taking as one example, the Single-Aperture Far-InfraRed (SAFIR) telescope with a approx. 10+ m aperture proposed for operation in the 2020 timeframe. According to current NASA plans, the Ares V launch vehicle (or a variant) will be available about the same time, as will the capability to transport astronauts to the vicinity of the Moon via the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle and associated systems. [As the lunar surface offers no advantages - and major disadvantages - for most major optical systems, the expensive system for landing and operating on the lunar surface is not required.] Although as currently conceived, SAFIR and other astronomical missions will operate at the Sun-Earth L2 location, it appears trivial to travel for servicing to the more accessible Earth-Moon L1,2 locations. Moreover. as the recent Orbital Express and Automated Transfer Vehicle missions have demonstrated, future robotic capabilities should offer capabilities that would (remotely) extend human presence far beyond the vicinity of the Earth. In addition to multiplying the value of NASA's architecture for future human spaceflight to achieve the goals multiple major stakeholders. if humans one day travel beyond the Earth-Moon system - say, to Mars - technologies and capabilities for operating

  12. Transitioning from Additive to Multiplicative Thinking: A Design and Teaching Experiment with Third through Fifth Graders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brickwedde, James

    2011-01-01

    The maturation of multiplicative thinking is key to student progress in middle school as rational number, ratio, and proportion concepts are encountered. But many students arrive from the intermediate grades and falter in developing this essential disposition. Elementary students have historically learned multiplication and division as operation…

  13. Blind Source Separation Algorithms for PSF Subtraction from Direct Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shapiro, Jacob; Ranganathan, Nikhil; Savransky, Dmitry; Ruffio, Jean-Baptise; Macintosh, Bruce; GPIES Team

    2017-01-01

    The principal difficulty with detecting planets via direct imaging is that the target signal is similar in magnitude, or fainter, than the noise sources in the image. To compensate for this, several methods exist to subtract the PSF of the host star and other confounding noise sources. One of the most effective methods is Karhunen-Loève Image Processing (KLIP). The core algorithm within KLIP is Principal Component Analysis, which is a member of a class of algorithms called Blind Source Separation (BSS).We examine three other BSS algorithms that may potentially also be used for PSF subtraction: Independent Component Analysis, Stationary Subspace Analysis, and Common Spatial Pattern Filtering. The underlying principles of each of the algorithms is discussed, as well as the processing steps needed to achieve PSF subtraction. The algorithms are examined both as primary PSF subtraction techniques, as well as additional postprocessing steps used with KLIP.These algorithms have been used on data from the Gemini Planet Imager, analyzing images of β Pic b. To build a reference library, both Angular Differential Imaging and Spectral Differential Imaging were used. To compare to KLIP, three major metrics are examined: computation time, signal-to-noise ratio, and astrometric and photometric biases in different image regimes (e.g., speckle-dominated compared to Poisson-noise dominated). Preliminary results indicate that these BSS algorithms improve performance when used as an enhancement for KLIP, and that they can achieve similar SNR when used as the primary method of PSF subtraction.

  14. Digital subtraction angiography in children

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, M.L.; Singleton, E.B.; Egan, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    Preliminary results with digital subtraction angiography in infants and children have shown this to be an excellent screening procedure and often diagnostic. The examination can be performed satisfactorily on outpatients. Sixty patients have undergone this examination for evaluation of suspected abnormalities of the aortic arch and its branches, intracranial arteries, pulmonary arteries, abdominal aorta and its branches, and peripheral vessels. Adequate sedation is mandatory to prevent motion artifacts. While the literature reports increasing use of central venous catheters for delivery of contrast material, the use of short catheters placed in an antecubital vein is satisfactory for the pediatric patient. Techniques of the procedures are described along with seven appropriate case examples.

  15. pyKLIP: PSF Subtraction for Exoplanets and Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jason J.; Ruffio, Jean-Baptise; De Rosa, Robert J.; Aguilar, Jonathan; Wolff, Schuyler G.; Pueyo, Laurent

    2015-06-01

    pyKLIP subtracts out the stellar PSF to search for directly-imaged exoplanets and disks using a Python implementation of the Karhunen-Loève Image Projection (KLIP) algorithm. pyKLIP supports ADI, SDI, and ADI+SDI to model the stellar PSF and offers a large array of PSF subtraction parameters to optimize the reduction. pyKLIP relies on a minimal amount of dependencies (numpy, scipy, and astropy) and parallelizes the KLIP algorithm to speed up the reduction. pyKLIP supports GPI and P1640 data and can interface with other data sources with the addition of new modules. It also can inject simulated planets and disks as well as automatically search for point sources in PSF-subtracted data.

  16. Adding and Subtracting Vectors: The Problem with the Arrow Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Scaife, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    A small number of studies have investigated student understanding of vector addition and subtraction in generic or introductory physics contexts, but in almost all cases the questions posed were in the vector arrow representation. In a series of experiments involving over 1000 students and several semesters, we investigated student understanding…

  17. Highly enantioselective direct Michael addition of nitroalkanes to nitroalkenes catalyzed by amine-thiourea bearing multiple hydrogen-bonding donors.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiu-Qin; Teng, Huai-Long; Wang, Chun-Jiang

    2009-03-19

    A highly diastereoselective and enantioselective Michael addition of nitroalkanes to nitroalkenes has been achieved by chiral bifunctional amine-thiourea catalyst bearing multiple hydrogen-bonding donors. This catalytic system performs well over a broad scope of substrates, furnishing various 1,3-dinitro compounds in high diastereoselectivity (up to 98:2) and excellent enantioselectivity (up to 99% ee) under mild conditions. Multiple hydrogen bonding donors play a significant role in accelerating reactions, improving diastereoselectivities and enantioselectivities.

  18. Astronomical Image Subtraction by Cross-Convolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang; Akerlof, Carl W.

    2008-04-01

    In recent years, there has been a proliferation of wide-field sky surveys to search for a variety of transient objects. Using relatively short focal lengths, the optics of these systems produce undersampled stellar images often marred by a variety of aberrations. As participants in such activities, we have developed a new algorithm for image subtraction that no longer requires high-quality reference images for comparison. The computational efficiency is comparable with similar procedures currently in use. The general technique is cross-convolution: two convolution kernels are generated to make a test image and a reference image separately transform to match as closely as possible. In analogy to the optimization technique for generating smoothing splines, the inclusion of an rms width penalty term constrains the diffusion of stellar images. In addition, by evaluating the convolution kernels on uniformly spaced subimages across the total area, these routines can accommodate point-spread functions that vary considerably across the focal plane.

  19. USING DOSE ADDITION TO ESTIMATE CUMULATIVE RISKS FROM EXPOSURES TO MULTIPLE CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA) of 1996 requires the EPA to consider the cumulative risk from exposure to multiple chemicals that have a common mechanism of toxicity. Three methods, hazard index (HI), point-of-departure index (PODI), and toxicity equivalence factor (TEF), ...

  20. Digital Subtraction Fluoroscopic System With Tandem Video Processing Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Robert G.; Lipton, Martin J.; Mengers, Paul; Dahlberg, Roger

    1981-07-01

    A real-time digital fluoroscopic system utilizing two video processing units (Quantex) in tandem to produce continuous subtraction images of peripheral and internal vessels following intravenous contrast media injection has been inves-tigated. The first processor subtracts a mask image consisting of an exponentially weighted moving average of N1 frames (N1 = 2k where k = 0.7) from each incoming video frame, divides by N1, and outputs the resulting difference image to the second processor. The second unit continuously averages N2 incoming frames (N2 = 2k) and outputs to a video monitor and analog disc recorder. The contrast of the subtracted images can be manipulated by changing gain or by a non-linear output transform. After initial equipment adjustments, a subtraction sequence can be produced without operator interaction with the processors. Alternatively, the operator can freeze the mask and/or the subtracted output image at any time during the sequence. Raw data is preserved on a wide band video tape recorder permitting retrospective viewing of an injection sequence with different processor settings. The advantage of the tandem arrangement is that it has great flexibility in varying the duration and the time of both the mask and injection images thereby minimizing problems of registration between them. In addition, image noise is reduced by compiling video frames rather than by using a large radiation dose for a single frame, which requires a wide dynamic range video camera riot commonly available in diagnostic x-ray equipment. High quality subtraction images of arteries have been obtained in 15 anesthetized dogs using relatively low exposure rates (10-12 μR/video frame) modest volumes of contrast medium (0.5-1 ml/kg), and low injection flow rates (6-10 ml/sec). The results/ achieved so far suggest that this system has direct clinical applications.

  1. Precise quantitative addition of multiple reagents into droplets in sequence using glass fiber-induced droplet coalescence.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyu; Xu, Jian; Ma, Bo

    2015-02-07

    Precise quantitative addition of multiple reagents into droplets in sequence is still a bottleneck in droplet-based analysis. To address this issue, we presented a simple and robust glass fiber-induced droplet coalescence method. The hydrophilic glass fiber embedded in the microchannels can induce the deformation of droplets and trigger the coalescence. Serial addition of reagents with controlled volumes was performed by this method without the requirement for an external power source.

  2. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and major changes to the final management plan, including state laws or regulations promulgated specifically for the... management plan change. Changes in the boundary of a Reserve involving the acquisition of properties...

  3. 15 CFR 921.33 - Boundary changes, amendments to the management plan, and addition of multiple-site components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... management plan, and addition of multiple-site components. (a) Changes in the boundary of a Reserve and major changes to the final management plan, including state laws or regulations promulgated specifically for the... management plan change. Changes in the boundary of a Reserve involving the acquisition of properties...

  4. A Longitudinal Field Study Comparing a Multiplicative and an Additive Model of Motivation and Ability. Technical Report No. 11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Gerald V.; And Others

    The relative contribution of motivation to ability measures in predicting performance criteria of sales personnel from successive fiscal periods was investigated. In this context, the merits of a multiplicative and additive combination of motivation and ability measures were examined. The relationship between satisfaction and motivation and…

  5. Digital subtraction angiography of the heart and lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Moodie, D.S.; Yiannikas, J.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Physical Principles of Cardiac Digital Subtraction Angiography, The Use of Intravenous Digital Subtraction Angiography in Evaluating Patients with Complex Congenital Heart Disease, Exercise Intravenous Digital Subtraction Angiograpny, Cardiomyopathic and Cardiac Neoplastic Disease, Digital Subtraction Angiography in the Catheterization Laboratory, and Cardiac Digital Subtraction Angiography - Future Directions.

  6. Teaching Math: Extending the Meaning of Addition and Subtraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Lola J.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three approaches teachers can use to help students understand the computation of numbers: calculator explorations, problem solving, and discussion topics. Specific examples are provided for primary and upper grades. (MDM)

  7. Additive/Subtractive Manufacturing Research and Development in Europe

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-12-01

    century played key roles in the successful outcomes of both World War II and the Cold War, sparing the world the twin horrors of fascism and...92 IVF Industrial Research and Development Corporation...MetalCopy™ at the IVF ...........................................................................................................................10 2.6. The

  8. Addition and Subtraction. Mathematics-Methods Program Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, John F.; And Others

    This unit is 1 of 12 developed for the university classroom portion of the Mathematics-Methods Program (MMP), created by the Indiana University Mathematics Education Development Center (MEDC) as an innovative program for the mathematics training of prospective elementary school teachers (PSTs). Each unit is written in an activity format that…

  9. FPGA-specific decimal sign-magnitude addition and subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, Martín; Todorovich, Elías

    2016-07-01

    The interest in sign-magnitude (SM) representation in decimal numbers lies in the IEEE 754-2008 standard, where the significand in floating-point numbers is coded as SM. However, software implementations do not meet performance constraints in some applications and more development is required in programmable logic, a key technology for hardware acceleration. Thus, in this work, two strategies for SM decimal adder/subtractors are studied and six new Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA)-specific circuits are derived from these strategies. The first strategy is based on ten's complement (C10) adder/subtractors and the second one is based on parallel computation of an unsigned adder and an unsigned subtractor. Four of these alternative circuits are useful for at least one area-time-trade-off and specific operand size. For example, the fastest SM adder/subtractor for operand sizes of 7 and 16 decimal digits is based on the second proposed strategy with delays of 3.43 and 4.33 ns, respectively, but the fastest circuit for 34-digit operands is one of the three specific implementations based on C10 adder/subtractors with a delay of 4.65 ns.

  10. Multiple Pathways Suppress Telomere Addition to DNA Breaks in the Drosophila Germline

    PubMed Central

    Beaucher, Michelle; Zheng, Xiao-Feng; Amariei, Flavia; Rong, Yikang S.

    2012-01-01

    Telomeres protect chromosome ends from being repaired as double-strand breaks (DSBs). Just as DSB repair is suppressed at telomeres, de novo telomere addition is suppressed at the site of DSBs. To identify factors responsible for this suppression, we developed an assay to monitor de novo telomere formation in Drosophila, an organism in which telomeres can be established on chromosome ends with essentially any sequence. Germline expression of the I-SceI endonuclease resulted in precise telomere formation at its cut site with high efficiency. Using this assay, we quantified the frequency of telomere formation in different genetic backgrounds with known or possible defects in DNA damage repair. We showed that disruption of DSB repair factors (Rad51 or DNA ligase IV) or DSB sensing factors (ATRIP or MDC1) resulted in more efficient telomere formation. Interestingly, partial disruption of factors that normally regulate telomere protection (ATM or NBS) also led to higher frequencies of telomere formation, suggesting that these proteins have opposing roles in telomere maintenance vs. establishment. In the ku70 mutant background, telomere establishment was preceded by excessive degradation of DSB ends, which were stabilized upon telomere formation. Most strikingly, the removal of ATRIP caused a dramatic increase in telomeric retrotransposon attachment to broken ends. Our study identifies several pathways thatsuppress telomere addition at DSBs, paving the way for future mechanistic studies. PMID:22446318

  11. Entanglement entropy of subtracted geometry black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Saleem, Zain H.; Satz, Alejandro

    2014-09-01

    We compute the entanglement entropy of minimally coupled scalar fields on subtracted geometry black hole backgrounds, focusing on the logarithmic corrections. We notice that matching between the entanglement entropy of original black holes and their subtracted counterparts is only at the order of the area term. The logarithmic correction term is not only different but also, in general, changes sign in the subtracted case. We apply Harrison transformations to the original black holes and find out the choice of the Harrison parameters for which the logarithmic corrections vanish.

  12. Multiple Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping Methods to Validate Additive Quantitative Trait Loci in Korean Native Cattle (Hanwoo)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yi; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) depends on power of detection for quantitative trait loci (QTL) and precision for QTL mapping. In this study, three different strategies for GWAS were applied to detect QTL for carcass quality traits in the Korean cattle, Hanwoo; a linkage disequilibrium single locus regression method (LDRM), a combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium analysis (LDLA) and a BayesCπ approach. The phenotypes of 486 steers were collected for weaning weight (WWT), yearling weight (YWT), carcass weight (CWT), backfat thickness (BFT), longissimus dorsi muscle area, and marbling score (Marb). Also the genotype data for the steers and their sires were scored with the Illumina bovine 50K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips. For the two former GWAS methods, threshold values were set at false discovery rate <0.01 on a chromosome-wide level, while a cut-off threshold value was set in the latter model, such that the top five windows, each of which comprised 10 adjacent SNPs, were chosen with significant variation for the phenotype. Four major additive QTL from these three methods had high concordance found in 64.1 to 64.9Mb for Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 7 for WWT, 24.3 to 25.4Mb for BTA14 for CWT, 0.5 to 1.5Mb for BTA6 for BFT and 26.3 to 33.4Mb for BTA29 for BFT. Several candidate genes (i.e. glutamate receptor, ionotropic, ampa 1 [GRIA1], family with sequence similarity 110, member B [FAM110B], and thymocyte selection-associated high mobility group box [TOX]) may be identified close to these QTL. Our result suggests that the use of different linkage disequilibrium mapping approaches can provide more reliable chromosome regions to further pinpoint DNA makers or causative genes in these regions. PMID:26104396

  13. Multiple Linkage Disequilibrium Mapping Methods to Validate Additive Quantitative Trait Loci in Korean Native Cattle (Hanwoo).

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Kim, Jong-Joo

    2015-07-01

    The efficiency of genome-wide association analysis (GWAS) depends on power of detection for quantitative trait loci (QTL) and precision for QTL mapping. In this study, three different strategies for GWAS were applied to detect QTL for carcass quality traits in the Korean cattle, Hanwoo; a linkage disequilibrium single locus regression method (LDRM), a combined linkage and linkage disequilibrium analysis (LDLA) and a BayesCπ approach. The phenotypes of 486 steers were collected for weaning weight (WWT), yearling weight (YWT), carcass weight (CWT), backfat thickness (BFT), longissimus dorsi muscle area, and marbling score (Marb). Also the genotype data for the steers and their sires were scored with the Illumina bovine 50K single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) chips. For the two former GWAS methods, threshold values were set at false discovery rate <0.01 on a chromosome-wide level, while a cut-off threshold value was set in the latter model, such that the top five windows, each of which comprised 10 adjacent SNPs, were chosen with significant variation for the phenotype. Four major additive QTL from these three methods had high concordance found in 64.1 to 64.9Mb for Bos taurus autosome (BTA) 7 for WWT, 24.3 to 25.4Mb for BTA14 for CWT, 0.5 to 1.5Mb for BTA6 for BFT and 26.3 to 33.4Mb for BTA29 for BFT. Several candidate genes (i.e. glutamate receptor, ionotropic, ampa 1 [GRIA1], family with sequence similarity 110, member B [FAM110B], and thymocyte selection-associated high mobility group box [TOX]) may be identified close to these QTL. Our result suggests that the use of different linkage disequilibrium mapping approaches can provide more reliable chromosome regions to further pinpoint DNA makers or causative genes in these regions.

  14. Escape through an unstable limit cycle driven by multiplicative colored non-Gaussian and additive white Gaussian noises.

    PubMed

    Bag, Bidhan Chandra; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2007-04-01

    In a previous paper [Bag and Hu, Phys. Rev. E 73, 061107 (2006)], we studied the mean lifetime (MLT) for the escape of a Brownian particle through an unstable limit cycle driven by multiplicative colored Gaussian and additive Gaussian white noises and found resonant activation (RA) behavior. In the present paper we switch from Gaussian to non-Gaussian multiplicative colored noise. We find that in the RA phenomenon, the minimum appears at a smaller noise correlation time (tau) for non-Gaussian noises compared to Gaussian noises in the plot of MLT vs tau for a fixed noise variance; the same plot for a given noise strength increases linearly and the increasing rate is smaller for non-Gaussian noises than for the Gaussian noises; the plot of logarithm of inverse of MLT vs inverse of the strength of additive noise is Arrhenius-like for Gaussian colored noise and it becomes similar to the quantum-Kramers rate if the multiplicative noise is non-Gaussian.

  15. Comparison of iodine K-edge subtraction and fluorescence subtraction imaging in an animal system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Zhu, Y.; Bewer, B.; Zhang, L.; Korbas, M.; Pickering, I. J.; George, G. N.; Gupta, M.; Chapman, D.

    2008-09-01

    K-Edge Subtraction (KES) utilizes the discontinuity in the X-ray absorption across the absorption edge of the selected contrast element and creates an image of the projected density of the contrast element from two images acquired just above and below the K-edge of the contrast element. KES has proved to be powerful in coronary angiography, micro-angiography, bronchography, and lymphatic imaging. X-ray fluorescence imaging is a successful technique for the detection of dilute quantities of elements in specimens. However, its application at high X-ray energies (e.g. at the iodine K-edge) is complicated by significant Compton background, which may enter the energy window set for the contrast material's fluorescent X-rays. Inspired by KES, Fluorescence Subtraction Imaging (FSI) is a technique for high-energy (>20 keV) fluorescence imaging using two different incident beam energies just above and below the absorption edge of a contrast element (e.g. iodine). The below-edge image can be assumed as a "background" image, which includes Compton scatter and fluorescence from other elements. The above-edge image will contain nearly identical spectral content as the below-edge image but will contain the additional fluorescence of the contrast element. This imaging method is especially promising with thick objects with dilute contrast materials, significant Compton background, and/or competing fluorescence lines from other materials. A quality factor is developed to facilitate the comparison. The theoretical value of the quality factor sets the upper limit that an imaging method can achieve when the noise is Poisson limited. The measured value of this factor makes two or more imaging methods comparable. Using the Hard X-ray Micro-Analysis (HXMA) beamline at the Canadian Light Source (CLS), the techniques of FSI and KES were critically compared, with reference to radiation dose, image acquisition time, resolution, signal-to-noise ratios, and quality factor.

  16. Minimal subtraction and momentum subtraction in quantum chromodynamics at two-loop order

    SciTech Connect

    Braaten, E.; Leveille, J.P.

    1981-09-01

    The momentum-subtraction coupling constant ..cap alpha../sub MOM/ yields consistently smaller one-loop corrections to many quantum-chromodynamics (QCD) processes than the minimal-subtraction couplings ..cap alpha../sub MS/ and ..cap alpha../sub M/S. By shifting the renormalization scale ..mu.. of ..cap alpha../sub MS/(..mu..), we obtain a minimal-subtraction coupling with the same small one-loop corrections. It is shown, by studying the effective charges of QCD, that at two-loop order this coupling constant will continue to yield corrections to physical quantities that are comparable to those obtained by momentum subtraction. We also introduce a momentum-subtraction scheme which treats the triple-gluon, quark, and ghost vertices equally at one-loop order and is more convenient for higher-order calculations than the MOM scheme.

  17. Analysis of immune system gene expression in small rheumatoid arthritis biopsies using a combination of subtractive hybridization and high-density cDNA arrays.

    PubMed

    Zanders, E D; Goulden, M G; Kennedy, T C; Kempsell, K E

    2000-01-13

    Subtractive hybridization of cDNAs generated from synovial RNA which had been isolated from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or normal controls was used in conjunction with high-density array hybridization to identify genes of immunological interest. The method was designed to detect gene expression in small needle biopsy specimens by means of a prior amplification of nanogram amounts of total RNA to full-length cDNA using PCR. The latter was cut with Rsa I, ligated with adapters, hybridized with unmodified driver cDNA, and subjected to suppression subtraction PCR. Differentially expressed products were cloned into E. coli and picked into 384 well plates. Inserts were obtained by PCR across the multiple cloning site, and the products arrayed at high density on nylon filters. The subtracted cDNAs were also labelled by random priming for use as probes for library screening. The libraries chosen were the subtracted one described above and a set of 45,000 ESTs from the I.M. A.G.E consortium. Clones showing positive hybridization were identified by sequence analysis and homology searching. The results showed that the subtracted hybridization approach could identify many gene fragments expressed at different levels, the most abundant being immunoglobulins and HLA-DR. The expression profile was characteristic of macrophage, B cell and plasma cell infiltration with evidence of interferon induction. In addition, a significant number of sequences without matches in the nucleotide databases were obtained, this demonstrates the utility of the method in finding novel gene fragments for further characterisation as potential members of the immune system. Although RA was studied here, the technology is applicable to any disease process even in cases where amounts of tissue may be limited.

  18. Magnitude subtraction vs. complex subtraction in dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D-MR angiography: basic experiments and clinical evaluation.

    PubMed

    Naganawa, S; Ito, T; Iwayama, E; Fukatsu, H; Ishiguchi, T; Ishigaki, T; Ichinose, N

    1999-11-01

    Magnitude subtraction and complex subtraction in dynamic contrast-enhanced three-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) angiography were compared using a phantom and 23 human subjects. In phantom studies, complex subtraction showed far better performance than magnitude subtraction, especially for longer echo times, with thicker slices, and without fat suppression. With complex subtraction, non-fat-suppressed studies showed contrast-to-noise ratios comparable to those in fat-suppressed studies. In human subjects, complex subtraction was superior to magnitude subtraction in 9 subjects, but comparable to magnitude subtraction in 14 subjects. There were no cases in which magnitude subtraction was superior to complex subtraction. Although the differences observed in human studies when complex subtraction was applied with thinner slices, shorter echo times, and the fat-suppression technique were not as pronounced as those seen in phantom studies, complex subtraction should be performed in dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D-MR angiography because there are no drawbacks in complex subtraction. Further research is necessary to assess the feasibility of dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D-MR angiography without fat suppression in human subjects using complex subtraction, as suggested by the results of phantom studies. If it is found to be feasible, dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D-MR angiography without fat suppression using complex subtraction may prove to be a robust technique that eliminates the need for shimming and can reduce the acquisition time. J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 1999;10:813-820.

  19. A multiple imputation approach to the analysis of clustered interval-censored failure time data with the additive hazards model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ling; Sun, Jianguo; Xiong, Chengjie

    2016-01-01

    Clustered interval-censored failure time data can occur when the failure time of interest is collected from several clusters and known only within certain time intervals. Regression analysis of clustered interval-censored failure time data is discussed assuming that the data arise from the semiparametric additive hazards model. A multiple imputation approach is proposed for inference. A major advantage of the approach is its simplicity because it avoids estimating the correlation within clusters by implementing a resampling-based method. The presented approach can be easily implemented by using the existing software packages for right-censored failure time data. Extensive simulation studies are conducted, indicating that the proposed imputation approach performs well for practical situations. The proposed approach also performs well compared to the existing methods and can be more conveniently applied to various types of data representation. The proposed methodology is further demonstrated by applying it to a lymphatic filariasis study. PMID:27773956

  20. Modeling probability and additive summation for detection across multiple mechanisms under the assumptions of signal detection theory.

    PubMed

    Kingdom, Frederick A A; Baldwin, Alex S; Schmidtmann, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have investigated how multiple stimuli combine to reach threshold. There are broadly speaking two ways this can occur: additive summation (AS) where inputs from the different stimuli add together in a single mechanism, or probability summation (PS) where different stimuli are detected independently by separate mechanisms. PS is traditionally modeled under high threshold theory (HTT); however, tests have shown that HTT is incorrect and that signal detection theory (SDT) is the better framework for modeling summation. Modeling the equivalent of PS under SDT is, however, relatively complicated, leading many investigators to use Monte Carlo simulations for the predictions. We derive formulas that employ numerical integration to predict the proportion correct for detecting multiple stimuli assuming PS under SDT, for the situations in which stimuli are either equal or unequal in strength. Both formulas are general purpose, calculating performance for forced-choice tasks with M alternatives, n stimuli, in Q monitored mechanisms, each subject to a non-linear transducer with exponent τ. We show how the probability (and additive) summation formulas can be used to simulate psychometric functions, which when fitted with Weibull functions make signature predictions for how thresholds and psychometric function slopes vary as a function of τ, n, and Q. We also show how one can fit the formulas directly to real psychometric functions using data from a binocular summation experiment, and show how one can obtain estimates of τ and test whether binocular summation conforms more to PS or AS. The methods described here can be readily applied using software functions newly added to the Palamedes toolbox.

  1. LUT REVEALS AN ALGOL-TYPE ECLIPSING BINARY WITH THREE ADDITIONAL STELLAR COMPANIONS IN A MULTIPLE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhou, X.; Qian, S.-B.; Li, L.-J.; Liao, W.-P.; Tian, X.-M.; Wang, Z.-H.; Hu, J.-Y.

    2016-04-15

    A complete light curve of the neglected eclipsing binary Algol V548 Cygni in the UV band was obtained with the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope in 2014 May. Photometric solutions are obtained using the Wilson–Devinney method. It is found that solutions with and without third light are quite different. The mass ratio without third light is determined to be q = 0.307, while that derived with third light is q = 0.606. It is shown that V548 Cygni is a semi-detached binary where the secondary component is filling the critical Roche lobe. An analysis of all available eclipse times suggests that there are three cyclic variations in the O–C diagram that are interpreted by the light travel-time effect via the presence of three additional stellar companions. This is in agreement with the presence of a large quantity of third light in the system. The masses of these companions are estimated as m sin i′ ∼ 1.09, 0.20, and 0.52 M{sub ⊙}. They are orbiting the central binary with orbital periods of about 5.5, 23.3, and 69.9 years, i.e., in 1:4:12 resonance orbit. Their orbital separations are about 4.5, 13.2, and 26.4 au, respectively. Our photometric solutions suggest that they contribute about 32.4% to the total light of the multiple system. No obvious long-term changes in the orbital period were found, indicating that the contributions of the mass transfer and the mass loss due to magnetic braking to the period variations are comparable. The detection of three possible additional stellar components orbiting a typical Algol in a multiple system make V548 Cygni a very interesting binary to study in the future.

  2. LUT Reveals an Algol-type Eclipsing Binary With Three Additional Stellar Companions in a Multiple System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, L.-Y.; Zhou, X.; Hu, J.-Y.; Qian, S.-B.; Li, L.-J.; Liao, W.-P.; Tian, X.-M.; Wang, Z.-H.

    2016-04-01

    A complete light curve of the neglected eclipsing binary Algol V548 Cygni in the UV band was obtained with the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope in 2014 May. Photometric solutions are obtained using the Wilson-Devinney method. It is found that solutions with and without third light are quite different. The mass ratio without third light is determined to be q = 0.307, while that derived with third light is q = 0.606. It is shown that V548 Cygni is a semi-detached binary where the secondary component is filling the critical Roche lobe. An analysis of all available eclipse times suggests that there are three cyclic variations in the O-C diagram that are interpreted by the light travel-time effect via the presence of three additional stellar companions. This is in agreement with the presence of a large quantity of third light in the system. The masses of these companions are estimated as m sin i‧ ˜ 1.09, 0.20, and 0.52 M⊙. They are orbiting the central binary with orbital periods of about 5.5, 23.3, and 69.9 years, i.e., in 1:4:12 resonance orbit. Their orbital separations are about 4.5, 13.2, and 26.4 au, respectively. Our photometric solutions suggest that they contribute about 32.4% to the total light of the multiple system. No obvious long-term changes in the orbital period were found, indicating that the contributions of the mass transfer and the mass loss due to magnetic braking to the period variations are comparable. The detection of three possible additional stellar components orbiting a typical Algol in a multiple system make V548 Cygni a very interesting binary to study in the future.

  3. Adding and subtracting vectors: The problem with the arrow representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckler, Andrew F.; Scaife, Thomas M.

    2015-06-01

    A small number of studies have investigated student understanding of vector addition and subtraction in generic or introductory physics contexts, but in almost all cases the questions posed were in the vector arrow representation. In a series of experiments involving over 1000 students and several semesters, we investigated student understanding of vector addition and subtraction in both the arrow and algebraic notation (using i ^, j ^, k ^) in generic mathematical and physics contexts. First, we replicated a number of previous findings of student difficulties in the arrow format and discovered several additional difficulties, including the finding that different relative arrow orientations can prompt different solution paths and different kinds of mistakes, which suggests that students need to practice with a variety of relative orientations. Most importantly, we found that average performance in the i j k format was typically excellent and often much better than performance in the arrow format in either the generic or physics contexts. Further, while we find that the arrow format tends to prompt students to a more physically intuitive solution path, we also find that, when prompted, student solutions in the i j k format also display significant physical insights into the problem. We also find a hierarchy in correct answering between the two formats, with correct answering in the i j k format being more fundamental than for the arrow format. Overall, the results suggest that many student difficulties with these simple vector problems lie with the arrow representation itself. For instruction, these results imply that introducing the i j k notation (or some equivalent) with the arrow notation concurrently may be a very useful way to improve student performance as well as help students to learn physics concepts involving vector addition and subtraction.

  4. Robust baseline subtraction for ultrasonic full wavefield analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alguri, K. Supreet; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Harley, Joel B.

    2017-02-01

    Full wavefield analysis is used to study and characterize the interaction between waves and structural damage. Yet, as wavefields are measured and as damage evolves in a structure, environmental and operational variations can significantly affect wave propagation. Several approaches, including time-stretching and optimal baseline selection methods, can reduce variations, but these methods are often limited to specific effects, are ineffective for large environmental variations, or require an impractical number of prior baseline measurements. This paper presents a robust methodology for subtracting wavefields and isolating wave-damage interactions. The method is based on dictionary learning. It is robust to multiple types of environmental and operational variations and requires only one initial baseline. We learn the dictionary, which describes wave propagation for a particular wavefield, based on multiple frequencies of a baseline wavefield. We then use the dictionary and sparse regression to create new baselines for measurements with different environmental and operational conditions. The new baseline is then subtracted from the new wavefield to isolate damage wavefield.

  5. The Iterative Structure Analysis of Montgomery Modular Multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinbo, Wang

    2007-09-01

    Montgomery modular multiplication (MMM) plays a crucial role in the implementation of modular exponentiations of public-key cryptography. In this paper, we discuss the iterative structure and extend the iterative bound condition of MMM. It can be applied to complicated modular exponentiations. Based on the iterative condition of MMM, we can directly use non-modular additions, subtractions and even simple multiplications instead of the modular forms, which make modular exponentiation operation very efficient but more importantly iterative applicability of MMM.

  6. Preventing Return of Fear in an Animal Model of Anxiety: Additive Effects of Massive Extinction and Extinction in Multiple Contexts

    PubMed Central

    Laborda, Mario A.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2013-01-01

    Fear conditioning and experimental extinction have been presented as models of anxiety disorders and exposure therapy, respectively. Moreover, the return of fear serves as a model of relapse after exposure therapy. Here we present two experiments, with rats as subjects in a lick suppression preparation, in which we assessed the additive effects of two different treatments to attenuate the return of fear. First, we evaluated whether two phenomena known to generate return of fear (i.e., spontaneous recovery and renewal) summate to produce a stronger reappearance of extinguished fear. At test, rats evaluated outside the extinction context following a long delay after extinction (i.e., a delayed context shift) exhibited greater return of extinguished fear than rats evaluated outside the extinction context alone, but return of extinguished fear following a delayed context shift did not significantly differ from the return of fear elicited in rats tested following a long delay after extinction alone. Additionally, extinction in multiple contexts and a massive extinction treatment each attenuated the strong return of fear produced by a delayed context shift. Moreover, the conjoint action of these treatments was significantly more successful in preventing the reappearance of extinguished fear, suggesting that extensive cue exposure administered in several different therapeutic settings has the potential to reduce relapse after therapy for anxiety disorders, more than either manipulation alone. PMID:23611075

  7. Preventing return of fear in an animal model of anxiety: additive effects of massive extinction and extinction in multiple contexts.

    PubMed

    Laborda, Mario A; Miller, Ralph R

    2013-06-01

    Fear conditioning and experimental extinction have been presented as models of anxiety disorders and exposure therapy, respectively. Moreover, the return of fear serves as a model of relapse after exposure therapy. Here we present two experiments, with rats as subjects in a lick suppression preparation, in which we assessed the additive effects of two different treatments to attenuate the return of fear. First, we evaluated whether two phenomena known to generate return of fear (i.e., spontaneous recovery and renewal) summate to produce a stronger reappearance of extinguished fear. At test, rats evaluated outside the extinction context following a long delay after extinction (i.e., a delayed context shift) exhibited greater return of extinguished fear than rats evaluated outside the extinction context alone, but return of extinguished fear following a delayed context shift did not significantly differ from the return of fear elicited in rats tested following a long delay after extinction alone. Additionally, extinction in multiple contexts and a massive extinction treatment each attenuated the strong return of fear produced by a delayed context shift. Moreover, the conjoint action of these treatments was significantly more successful in preventing the reappearance of extinguished fear, suggesting that extensive cue exposure administered in several different therapeutic settings has the potential to reduce relapse after therapy for anxiety disorders, more than either manipulation alone.

  8. Molecular cytogenetic identification of a wheat-rye 1R addition line with multiple spikelets and resistance to powdery mildew.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wujuan; Wang, Changyou; Chen, Chunhuan; Wang, Yajuan; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Xinlun; Ji, Wanquan

    2016-04-01

    Alien addition lines are important for transferring useful genes from alien species into common wheat. Rye is an important and valuable gene resource for improving wheat disease resistance, yield, and environment adaptation. A new wheat-rye addition line, N9436B, was developed from the progeny of the cross of common wheat (Triticum aestivum L., 2n = 6x = 42, AABBDD) cultivar Shaanmai 611 and rye (Secale cereal L., 2n = 2x = 14, RR) accession Austrian rye. We characterized this new line by cytology, genomic in situ hybridization (GISH), fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), molecular markers, and disease resistance screening. N9436B was stable in morphology and cytology, with a chromosome composition of 2n = 42 + 2t = 22II. GISH investigations showed that this line contained two rye chromosomes. GISH, FISH, and molecular maker identification suggested that the introduced R chromosome and the missing wheat chromosome arms were 1R chromosome and 2DL chromosome arm, respectively. N9436B exhibited 30-37 spikelets per spike and a high level of resistance to powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici, Bgt) isolate E09 at the seedling stage. N9436B was cytologically stable, had the trait of multiple spikelets, and was resistant to powdery mildew; this line should thus be useful in wheat improvement.

  9. Polygon Subtraction in 2 or 3 Dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, John E.

    2013-10-01

    When searching for computer code to perform the ubiquitous task of subtracting one polygon from another, it is difficult to find real examples and detailed explanations. This paper outlines the step-by-step process necessary to accomplish this basic task.

  10. An experimental implementation of chemical subtraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Nong; Turner, Allison; Jaki, Birgit U; Nikolic, Dejan; van Breemen, Richard B; Friesen, J Brent; Pauli, Guido F

    2008-03-13

    A preparative analytical method was developed to selectively remove ("chemically subtract") a single compound from a complex mixture, such as a natural extract or fraction, in a single step. The proof of concept is demonstrated by the removal of pure benzoic acid (BA) from cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) juice fractions that exhibit anti-adhesive effects versus uropathogenic Escherichia coli. Chemical subtraction of BA, representing a major constituent of the fractions, eliminates the potential in vitro interference of the bacteriostatic effect of BA on the E. coli anti-adherence action measured in bioassays. Upon BA removal, the anti-adherent activity of the fraction was fully retained, 36% inhibition of adherence in the parent fraction at 100mug/mL increased to 58% in the BA-free active fraction. The method employs countercurrent chromatography (CCC) and operates loss-free for both the subtracted and the retained portions as only liquid-liquid partitioning is involved. While the high purity (97.47% by quantitative (1)H NMR) of the subtracted BA confirms the selectivity of the method, one minor impurity was determined to be scopoletin by HR-ESI-MS and (q)HNMR and represents the first coumarin reported from cranberries. A general concept for the selective removal of phytoconstituents by CCC is presented, which has potential broad applicability in the biological evaluation of medicinal plant extracts and complex pharmaceutical preparations.

  11. Diagnosis of Subtraction Bugs Using Bayesian Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jihyun; Corter, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Diagnosis of misconceptions or "bugs" in procedural skills is difficult because of their unstable nature. This study addresses this problem by proposing and evaluating a probability-based approach to the diagnosis of bugs in children's multicolumn subtraction performance using Bayesian networks. This approach assumes a causal network relating…

  12. Transactional Algorithm for Subtracting Fractions: Go Shopping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinckard, James Seishin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this quasi-experimental research study was to examine the effects of an alternative or transactional algorithm for subtracting mixed numbers within the middle school setting. Initial data were gathered from the student achievement of four mathematics teachers at three different school sites. The results indicated students who…

  13. Suppressive Subtractive Hybridization Detects Extensive Genomic Diversity in Thermotoga maritima

    PubMed Central

    Nesbø, Camilla L.; Nelson, Karen E.; Doolittle, W. Ford

    2002-01-01

    Comparisons between genomes of closely related bacteria often show large variations in gene content, even between strains of the same species. Such studies have focused mainly on pathogens; here, we examined Thermotoga maritima, a free-living hyperthermophilic bacterium, by using suppressive subtractive hybridization. The genome sequence of T. maritima MSB8 is available, and DNA from this strain served as a reference to obtain strain-specific sequences from Thermotoga sp. strain RQ2, a very close relative (∼96% identity for orthologous protein-coding genes, 99.7% identity in the small-subunit rRNA sequence). Four hundred twenty-six RQ2 subtractive clones were sequenced. One hundred sixty-six had no DNA match in the MSB8 genome. These differential clones comprise, in sum, 48 kb of RQ2-specific DNA and match 72 genes in the GenBank database. From the number of identical clones, we estimated that RQ2 contains 350 to 400 genes not found in MSB8. Assuming a similar genome size, this corresponds to 20% of the RQ2 genome. A large proportion of the RQ2-specific genes were predicted to be involved in sugar transport and polysaccharide degradation, suggesting that polysaccharides are more important as nutrients for this strain than for MSB8. Several clones encode proteins involved in the production of surface polysaccharides. RQ2 encodes multiple subunits of a V-type ATPase, while MSB8 possesses only an F-type ATPase. Moreover, an RQ2-specific MutS homolog was found among the subtractive clones and appears to belong to a third novel archaeal type MutS lineage. Southern blot analyses showed that some of the RQ2 differential sequences are found in some other members of the order Thermotogales, but the distribution of these variable genes is patchy, suggesting frequent lateral gene transfer within the group. PMID:12142418

  14. Stochastic resonance in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and additive white noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yongfeng; Shen, Yajun; Tan, Jianguo

    2016-09-01

    The phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR) in a piecewise nonlinear model driven by a periodic signal and correlated noises for the cases of a multiplicative non-Gaussian noise and an additive Gaussian white noise is investigated. Applying the path integral approach, the unified colored noise approximation and the two-state model theory, the analytical expression of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is derived. It is found that conventional stochastic resonance exists in this system. From numerical computations we obtain that: (i) As a function of the non-Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is increased when the non-Gaussian noise deviation parameter q is increased. (ii) As a function of the Gaussian noise intensity, the SNR is decreased when q is increased. This demonstrates that the effect of the non-Gaussian noise on SNR is different from that of the Gaussian noise in this system. Moreover, we further discuss the effect of the correlation time of the non-Gaussian noise, cross-correlation strength, the amplitude and frequency of the periodic signal on SR.

  15. The Inverse Relation between Multiplication and Division: Concepts, Procedures, and a Cognitive Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Katherine M.; LeFevre, Jo-Anne

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have speculated that children find it more difficult to acquire conceptual understanding of the inverse relation between multiplication and division than that between addition and subtraction. We reviewed research on children and adults' use of shortcut procedures that make use of the inverse relation on two kinds of problems:…

  16. New perspectives for diagnosis of nodular goiter by technetium-thallium subtraction scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Katagiri, M.; Harada, T.; Fukunaga, M.; Furukawa, J.; Yamane, Y.; Yasuda, K.; Yanagimoto, S.; Tomomitsu, T.; Otsuka, N.; Morita, R. )

    1989-12-01

    To improve the scintigraphic differential diagnosis of thyroid nodules, Tc-99m pertechnetate-Tl-201 Cl subtraction scintigraphy (Tc-Tl subtraction scanning) was performed in 106 patients with various histologically proven thyroid nodules. Results were evaluated by comparison with surgical findings and preoperative ultrasonographic results. Thyroid nodules were more successfully detected by Tc-Tl subtraction scanning than by either Tc-99m pertechnetate or Tl-201 Cl scintigraphy alone. Detection of nodules was further improved when images recorded by the three methods were integrally observed (sensitivity 83%, accuracy 89%), with detectability approaching that of ultrasonography. False-positive or -negative Tc-Tl subtraction scans were obtained principally when multiple nodules were present (7 cases) or when no discrepancy existed between the accumulations of Tc-99m pertechnetate and Tl-201 Cl (18 cases). Most colloid nodules exhibited irregular margins, heterogeneous internal accumulations of Tl-201 Cl, and distorted shapes on Tc-Tl subtraction scans, while the majority of adenoma were oval-shaped with smooth margins. Carcinoma were characterized by homogeneous internal accumulation of Tl-201 Cl and distorted shapes.

  17. Liquid-Crystal-Television Image Subtracters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1988-01-01

    Two image-subtraction systems from output images that show differences between input images of two objects. First: differences appear as bright regions in otherwise dark output image. Second: differences and similarities shown by colors. All parts of two images processed simultaneously by optical components only; digital electronic processing of data not required. Concept offers potential for rapid, inexpensive comparison of images in such applications as automatic inspection, medical diagnosis, and robotic vision.

  18. Optimal fractionation and bioassay plans for isolation of synergistic chemicals: The subtractive-combination method.

    PubMed

    Byers, J A

    1992-09-01

    Studies of chemical ecology of an organism are founded on the isolation and identification of a semiochemical, often comprised of two or more synergistic compounds (each Synergist alone has little activity, but presented together they are bioactive). Chromatographie fractionation and bioassay methods of binary splitting, additive combination, and subtractive combination are compared for efficiency in isolating synergists. Formulas are derived for the latter two methods that calculate the expected number of bioassay tests required for isolation of from two to five synergists from biological extracts with any number of compounds, depending on the number of initial (major) Chromatographic fractions. A computer program based on the formulas demonstrates the superiority of the subtractive-combination method. Simulations with the program were used to determine the optimal number of initial fractions for the additive- and subtractive-combination methods when isolating two to five synergists from extracts of from 25 to 1200 compounds. Methods of bioassay, isolation, identification, and field testing of semiochemicals are discussed.

  19. Subtraction CT angiography for the detection of intracranial aneurysms: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    FENG, TIAN-YING; HAN, XUE-FENG; LANG, RUI; WANG, FEI; WU, QIONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this meta-analysis was to investigate the accuracy of subtraction computed tomography angiography (CTA) for diagnosing intracranial aneurysms. A systematic literature search up to January 1, 2013 was performed in PubMed. Two independent reviewers selected 8 studies that compared subtraction CTA with digital subtraction angiography. Data from the studies were used to construct a 2×2 contingency table on a per-patient basis in ≥5 diseased and 5 non-diseased patients, with additional data on a per-aneurysm basis. Overall, subtraction CTA had a pooled sensitivity of 99% [95% confidence interval (CI), 95–100%] and specificity of 94% (95% CI, 86–97%) for detecting and ruling out cerebral aneurysms, respectively, on a per-patient basis. On a per-aneurysm basis, the pooled sensitivity was 96% (95% CI, 90–99%), and the specificity was 91% (95% CI, 85–95%). In conclusion, subtraction CTA is a highly sensitive, specific and non-invasive method for the diagnosis and evaluation of intracranial aneurysms. PMID:27168830

  20. The Various Challenges of Subtracting Speckles and Planet Detection/Characterization in High Contrast Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marois, Christian

    2015-08-01

    Significant progresses have been achieved over the last 20 years in the field of speckle subtraction and planet detection. From the early days of simple “reference star subtraction”, astronomers are now using more advance observing techniques, such as the SDI and ADI, that are combined with complex image processing algorithms to gain more than two orders of magnitude of contrast. I will review the various observing techniques and algorithms now used in the field, as well as the various challenges when trying to optimize the speckle subtraction to maximize planet detection and characterization. In addition, I will review the difficult problem of identifying faint planets in noisy speckle-limited images.

  1. Digital subtraction angiography of the thoracic aorta

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, L.B.; Buonocore, E.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.

    1984-02-01

    Forty-three patients with acquired and congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta were studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after an intravenous bolus injection of 40 ml of contrast material. Abnormalities studied included coarctation, pseudocoarctation, Marfan syndrome, cervical aorta, double aortic arch, aneurysm, dissection, and tumor. Twenty-four patients also had conventional angiography. DSA was accurate in 95% of cases; in the other 5%, involving patients with acute type I dissection, the coronary arteries could not be seen. The authors concluded that in 92% of their patients, DSA could have replaced the standard aortogram.

  2. Digital subtraction angiography of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Gattoni, F; Avogadro, A; Baldini, U; Pozzato, C; Bonfanti, M T; Gandini, D; Franch, L; Uslenghi, C

    1988-09-01

    Intravenous and intra-arterial digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was performed in 88 patients: 34 with tumours, 10 with renal trauma, 26 with suspected renovascular hypertension, 6 with vascular impression on the renal pelvis, 8 with nephrolithiasis and 4 with sonographically abnormal kidneys. Venous and arterial DSA always gave diagnostically useful images. Intravenous DSA is valuable in patients with suspected renovascular hypertension or after vascular surgery, percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and transcatheter embolisation. Arterial DSA is preferable to venous DSA in other clinical situations, particularly in the evaluation of renal tumours, and may be recommended in preference to conventional angiography.

  3. Dynamic powerline interference subtraction from biosignals.

    PubMed

    Christov, I I

    2000-01-01

    The performance of a previously developed and widely used method for powerline interference subtraction from the ECG is slightly reduced in the presence of continuous well-expressed EMG noise. Applying automatic adaptation of the 'linearity criterion' value in accordance to the ECG/noise ratio, the best conditions for application of the procedure can be obtained. The proposed method allows for reduction of possible distortions when applied on noise-free ECG and enhances its efficiency in the presence of non-powerline noise. Apart from ECG, it is applicable to impedance-cardiogram, plethysmogram, EEG and other biosignals.

  4. Effect of relative nanohole position on colour purity of ultrathin plasmonic subtractive colour filters.

    PubMed

    Sun, L B; Hu, X L; Zeng, Beibei; Wang, L S; Yang, S M; Tai, R Z; Fecht, H J; Zhang, D X; Jiang, J Z

    2015-07-31

    Plasmonic subtractive color filters through patterning periodic nanostructures on ultrathin Ag films deposited on a glass substrate, exhibiting good durability, simple fabrication, and flexible color tunability, have attracted considerable attention due to their tremendous potential applications. While previous studies have mainly focused on their extraordinary physical mechanisms, color purity, which is another key parameter for high quality imaging applications, has been much less investigated. In this work, we demonstrate that the relative position of nanoholes patterned on ultrathin Ag films can largely affect the color purity of plasmonic subtractive color filters. The calculated results agree reasonably well with the experimental data, revealing that the purity of subtractive colors can be improved by changing the nanohole arrays from square lattice to triangular lattice without reducing transmission at visible frequencies. In addition, underlying mechanisms are clarified by systematically analyzing the dominant valley in transmission spectra.

  5. "Bunched Black Swans" in Complex Geosystems: Cross-Disciplinary Approaches to the Additive and Multiplicative Modelling of Correlated Extreme Bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, N. W.; Rypdal, M.; Lovsletten, O.

    2012-12-01

    -stationarity explicitly built in. In record breaking statistics, a record is defined in the sense used in everyday language, to be the largest value yet recorded in a time series, for example, the 2004 Sumatran Boxing Day earthquake was at the time the largest to be digitally recorded. The third group of approaches (e.g. avalanches) are explicitly spatiotemporal and so also include spatial structure. This presentation will discuss two examples of our recent work on the burst problem. We will show numerical results extending the preliminary results presented in [Watkins et al, PRE, 2009] using a standard additive model, linear fractional stable motion (LFSM). LFSM explicitly includes both heavy tails and long range dependence, allowing us to study how these 2 effects compete in determining the burst duration and size exponent probability distributions. We will contrast these simulations with new analytical studies of bursts in a multiplicative process, the multifractal random walk (MRW). We will present an analytical derivation for the scaling of the burst durations and make a preliminary comparison with data from the AE index from solar-terrestrial physics. We believe our result is more generally applicable than the MRW model, and that it applies to a broad class of multifractal processes.

  6. A Mathematical Model for Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Gadgil, Chetan; Rink, Anette; Beattie, Craig

    2002-01-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) is frequently used to unearth differentially expressed genes on a whole-genome scale. Its versatility is based on combining cDNA library subtraction and normalization, which allows the isolation of sequences of varying degrees of abundance and differential expression. SSH is a complex process with many adjustable parameters that affect the outcome of gene isolation.We present a mathematical model of SSH based on DNA hybridization kinetics for assessing the effect of various parameters to facilitate its optimization. We derive an equation for the probability that a particular differentially expressed species is successfully isolated and use this to quantify the effect of the following parameters related to the cDNA sample: (a) mRNA abundance; (b) partial sequence complementarity to other species; and (3) degree of differential expression. We also evaluate the effect of parameters related to the process, including: (a) reaction times; and (b) extent of driver excess used in the two hybridization reactions. The optimum set of process parameters for successful isolation of differentially expressed species depends on transcript abundance. We show that the reaction conditions have a significant effect on the occurrence of false-positives and formulate strategies to isolate specific subsets of differentially expressed genes. We also quantify the effect of non-specific hybridization on the false-positive results and present strategies for spiking cDNA sequences to address this problem. PMID:18629052

  7. Multinuclide digital subtraction imaging in symptomatic prostnetic joints

    SciTech Connect

    Chafetz, N.; Hattner, R.S.; Ruarke, W.C.; Helms, C.A.; Genant, H.K.; Murray, W.R.

    1985-06-01

    One hundred eleven patients with symptomatic prosthetic joints (86 hips, 23 knees, and two shoulders) were evaluated for prosthetic loosening and infection by combined technetium-99m-MDP/gallium-67 digital subtraction imaging. Clinical correlation was based on the assessment of loosening and bacterial cultures obtained at the time of surgery in 54 patients, joint aspiration cultures obtained in 37 patients, and long-term clinical follow-up for greater than 1.5 years in an additional 15 patients. Results revealed an 80-90% predictive value of a positive test for loosening, and a 95% predictive value of a negative test for infection. However, because of the low sensitivities and specificities observed, this approach to the evaluation of symptomatic prosthetic joints does not seem cost effective.

  8. Operational Momentum in Multiplication and Division?

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Curren; Knops, André

    2014-01-01

    Biases are commonly seen in numerical cognition. The operational momentum (OM) effect shows that responses to addition and subtraction problems are biased in the whole-number direction of the operation. It is not known if this bias exists for other arithmetic operations. To determine whether OM exists in scalar operations, we measured response bias in adults performing symbolic (Arabic digits) and non-symbolic (dots) multiplication and division problems. After seeing two operands, with either a multiplication (×) or division (÷) sign, participants chose among five response choices. Both non-random performance profiles and the significant contribution of both operands in a multiple regression analysis predicting the chosen values, suggest that adults were able to use numerical information to approximate the outcomes in both notations, though they were more accurate on symbolic problems. Performance on non-symbolic problems was influenced by the size of the correct choice relative to alternatives. Reminiscent of the bias in addition and subtraction, we found a significant response bias for non-symbolic problems. Non-symbolic multiplication problems were overestimated and division problems were underestimated. These results indicate that operational momentum is present in non-symbolic multiplication and division. Given the influence of the size of the correct choice relative to alternatives, an interaction between heuristic bias and approximate calculation is possible. PMID:25121951

  9. Volumetric display containing multiple two-dimensional color motion pictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, R.; Shiraki, A.; Nakayama, H.; Kakue, T.; Shimobaba, T.; Ito, T.

    2014-06-01

    We have developed an algorithm which can record multiple two-dimensional (2-D) gradated projection patterns in a single three-dimensional (3-D) object. Each recorded pattern has the individual projected direction and can only be seen from the direction. The proposed algorithm has two important features: the number of recorded patterns is theoretically infinite and no meaningful pattern can be seen outside of the projected directions. In this paper, we expanded the algorithm to record multiple 2-D projection patterns in color. There are two popular ways of color mixing: additive one and subtractive one. Additive color mixing used to mix light is based on RGB colors and subtractive color mixing used to mix inks is based on CMY colors. We made two coloring methods based on the additive mixing and subtractive mixing. We performed numerical simulations of the coloring methods, and confirmed their effectiveness. We also fabricated two types of volumetric display and applied the proposed algorithm to them. One is a cubic displays constructed by light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in 8×8×8 array. Lighting patterns of LEDs are controlled by a microcomputer board. The other one is made of 7×7 array of threads. Each thread is illuminated by a projector connected with PC. As a result of the implementation, we succeeded in recording multiple 2-D color motion pictures in the volumetric displays. Our algorithm can be applied to digital signage, media art and so forth.

  10. Increased effect of IMiDs by addition of cytokine-induced killer cells in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Bullok, Katharina F; Sippel, Christoph; Schmidt-Wolf, Ingo G H

    2016-12-01

    Immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), such as thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide, represent the basic principle of multiple myeloma treatment. However, the development of resistance is a limiting factor. Over the last years, the efficient application of cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells has been reported as an alternative strategy to treat hematological neoplasms. In this study, we tested for a potential synergistic effect by combining the IMiDs thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide with CIK cells in different myeloma cell lines in vitro. Myeloma cells tested with CIK cells were significantly reduced. In the combination, myeloma cells were significantly reduced compared with cells only tested with IMiDs but not to the cells tested with CIK cells. Otherwise, the number of CIK cells was significantly reduced when treated with IMiDs. Because IMiDs are active in patients with myeloma, these results lead to the expectation that combination of IMiDs and CIK cells achieve better results in the treatment of multiple myeloma compared with the single use of IMiDs. Therefore, further examinations in an in vivo setting are necessary to have a closer look on the cellular interactions. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. [Myocardial perfusion imaging by digital subtraction angiography].

    PubMed

    Kadowaki, H; Ishikawa, K; Ogai, T; Katori, R

    1986-03-01

    Several methods of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were compared to determine which could better visualize regional myocardial perfusion using coronary angiography in seven patients with myocardial infarction, two with angina pectoris and five with normal coronary arteries. Satisfactory DSA was judged to be achieved if the shape of the heart on the mask film was identical to that on the live film and if both films were exactly superimposed. To obtain an identical mask film in the shape of each live film, both films were selected from the following three phases of the cardiac cycle; at the R wave of the electrocardiogram, 100 msec before the R wave, and 200 msec before the R wave. The last two were superior for obtaining mask and live films which were similar in shape, because the cardiac motion in these phases was relatively small. Using these mask and live films, DSA was performed either with the continuous image mode (CI mode) or the time interval difference mode (TID mode). The overall perfusion of contrast medium through the artery to the vein was adequately visualized using the CI mode. Passage of contrast medium through the artery, capillary and vein was visualized at each phase using TID mode. Subtracted images were displayed and photographed, and the density of the contrast medium was adequate to display contour lines as in a relief map. Using this DSA, it was found that regional perfusion of the contrast medium was not always uniform in normal subjects, depending on the typography of the coronary artery.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Formation of peptides from amino acids by single or multiple additions of ATP to suspensions of nucleoproteinoid microparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakashima, T.; Fox, S. W.

    1981-01-01

    The synthesis of peptides from individual amino acids or pairs of amino acids and ATP in the presence of catalysis by nucleoproteinoid microparticles is investigated. Experiments were performed with suspensions formed from the condensation of lysine-rich and acidic proteinoids with polyadenylic acid, to which were added glycine, phenylalanine, proline, lysine or glycine-phenylalanine mixtures, and ATP either at once or serially. Peptide yields are found to be greatest for equal amounts of acidic and basic proteinoids. The addition of imidazole is found to alter the preference of glycine-phenylalanine mixtures to form mixed heteropeptides rather than homopeptides. A rapid ATP decay in the peptide synthesis reaction is observed, and a greater yield is obtained for repeated small additions than for a single addition of ATP. The experimental system has properties similar to modern cells, and represents an organizational unit ready for the evolution of associated biochemical pathways.

  13. Renormalization of quark bilinear operators in a momentum-subtraction scheme with a nonexceptional subtraction point

    SciTech Connect

    Sturm, C.; Soni, A.; Aoki, Y.; Christ, N. H.; Izubuchi, T.; Sachrajda, C. T. C.

    2009-07-01

    We extend the Rome-Southampton regularization independent momentum-subtraction renormalization scheme (RI/MOM) for bilinear operators to one with a nonexceptional, symmetric subtraction point. Two-point Green's functions with the insertion of quark bilinear operators are computed with scalar, pseudoscalar, vector, axial-vector and tensor operators at one-loop order in perturbative QCD. We call this new scheme RI/SMOM, where the S stands for 'symmetric'. Conversion factors are derived, which connect the RI/SMOM scheme and the MS scheme and can be used to convert results obtained in lattice calculations into the MS scheme. Such a symmetric subtraction point involves nonexceptional momenta implying a lattice calculation with substantially suppressed contamination from infrared effects. Further, we find that the size of the one-loop corrections for these infrared improved kinematics is substantially decreased in the case of the pseudoscalar and scalar operator, suggesting a much better behaved perturbative series. Therefore it should allow us to reduce the error in the determination of the quark mass appreciably.

  14. Evolutionary Processes in the Development of Errors in Subtraction Algorithms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fernandez, Ricardo Lopez; Garcia, Ana B. Sanchez

    2008-01-01

    The study of errors made in subtraction is a research subject approached from different theoretical premises that affect different components of the algorithmic process as triggers of their generation. In the following research an attempt has been made to investigate the typology and nature of errors which occur in subtractions and their evolution…

  15. Anaerobic alkane biodegradation by cultures enriched from oil sands tailings ponds involves multiple species capable of fumarate addition.

    PubMed

    Tan, BoonFei; Semple, Kathleen; Foght, Julia

    2015-05-01

    A methanogenic short-chain alkane-degrading culture (SCADC) was enriched from oil sands tailings and transferred several times with a mixture of C6, C7, C8 and C10 n-alkanes as the predominant organic carbon source, plus 2-methylpentane, 3-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane as minor components. Cultures produced ∼40% of the maximum theoretical methane during 18 months incubation while depleting the n-alkanes, 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane. Substrate depletion correlated with detection of metabolites characteristic of fumarate activation of 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane, but not n-alkane metabolites. During active methanogenesis with the mixed alkanes, reverse-transcription PCR confirmed the expression of functional genes (assA and bssA) associated with hydrocarbon addition to fumarate. Pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes amplified during active alkane degradation revealed enrichment of Clostridia (particularly Peptococcaceae) and methanogenic Archaea (Methanosaetaceae and Methanomicrobiaceae). Methanogenic cultures transferred into medium containing sulphate produced sulphide, depleted n-alkanes and produced the corresponding succinylated alkane metabolites, but were slow to degrade 2-methylpentane and methylcyclopentane; these cultures were enriched in Deltaproteobacteria rather than Clostridia. 3-Methylpentane was not degraded by any cultures. Thus, nominally methanogenic oil sands tailings harbour dynamic and versatile hydrocarbon-degrading fermentative syntrophs and sulphate reducers capable of degrading n-, iso- and cyclo-alkanes by addition to fumarate.

  16. Transition-metal-catalyzed additions of C-H bonds to C-X (X = N, O) multiple bonds via C-H bond activation.

    PubMed

    Yan, Guobing; Wu, Xiangmei; Yang, Minghua

    2013-09-14

    Chemical transformations via catalytic C-H bond activation have been established as one of the most powerful tools in organic synthetic chemistry. Transition-metal-catalyzed addition reactions of C-H bonds to polar C-X (X = N, O) multiple bonds, such as aldehydes, ketones, imines, isocyanates, nitriles, isocyanides, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, have undergone a rapid development in recent years. In this review, recent advances in this active area have been highlighted and their mechanisms have been discussed.

  17. Correlated noise in networks of gravitational-wave detectors: Subtraction and mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thrane, E.; Christensen, N.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Effler, A.

    2014-07-01

    One of the key science goals of advanced gravitational-wave detectors is to observe a stochastic gravitational-wave background. However, recent work demonstrates that correlated magnetic fields from Schumann resonances can produce correlated strain noise over global distances, potentially limiting the sensitivity of stochastic background searches with advanced detectors. In this paper, we estimate the correlated noise budget for the worldwide advanced detector network and conclude that correlated noise may affect upcoming measurements. We investigate the possibility of a Wiener filtering scheme to subtract correlated noise from Advanced LIGO searches, and estimate the required specifications. We also consider the possibility that residual correlated noise remains following subtraction, and we devise an optimal strategy for measuring astronomical parameters in the presence of correlated noise. Using this new formalism, we estimate the loss of sensitivity for a broadband, isotropic stochastic background search using 1 yr of LIGO data at design sensitivity. Given our current noise budget, the uncertainty with which LIGO can estimate energy density will likely increase by a factor of ≈12—if it is impossible to achieve significant subtraction. Additionally, narrow band cross-correlation searches may be severely affected at low frequencies f ≲70 Hz without effective subtraction.

  18. Combined action of time-delay and colored cross-associated multiplicative and additive noises on stability and stochastic resonance for a stochastic metapopulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Kang; Zong, De-Cai; Wang, Ya-Jun; Li, Sheng-Hong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the transition between the stable state of a big density and the extinction state and stochastic resonance (SR) for a time-delayed metapopulation system disturbed by colored cross-correlated noises are investigated. By applying the fast descent method, the small time-delay approximation and McNamara and Wiesenfeld's SR theory, we investigate the impacts of time-delay, the multiplicative, additive noises and colored cross-correlated noise on the SNR and the shift between the two states of the system. Numerical results show that the multiplicative, additive noises and time-delay can all speed up the transition from the stable state to the extinction state, while the correlation noise and its correlation time can slow down the extinction process of the population system. With respect to SNR, the multiplicative noise always weakens the SR effect, while noise correlation time plays a dual role in motivating the SR phenomenon. Meanwhile, time-delay mainly plays a negative role in stimulating the SR phenomenon. Conversely, it could motivate the SR effect to increase the strength of the cross-correlation noise in the SNR-β plot, while the increase of additive noise intensity will firstly excite SR, and then suppress the SR effect.

  19. A clinical audit of thallium-technetium subtraction parathyroid scans.

    PubMed Central

    Samanta, A.; Wilson, B.; Iqbal, J.; Burden, A. C.; Walls, J.; Cosgriff, P.

    1990-01-01

    Eighty six consecutive thallium-technetium subtraction parathyroid scans performed over a three year period for hypercalcaemia have been evaluated. Twelve had chronic renal failure, 11 had hypercalcaemia due to non-hyperparathyroid causes and in 10 the imaging study was technically inadequate. The remaining 53 technically adequate studies performed for hypercalcaemia clinically thought to be possibly due to hyperparathyroidism have been analysed. Of 20 (38%) positive scans, 13 came to surgery (10 correctly localized parathyroid adenomas, 2 with multiple gland hyperplasia, and 1 papillary carcinoma of the thyroid). Of 33 (62%) negative scans, 9 had surgical exploration on the basis of strong clinical grounds and all had parathyroid adenomas. Multiple biochemical parameters have been assessed in relation to a positive outcome on scan. The adjusted calcium-phosphate product and the ratio of the adjusted calcium-phosphate product to creatinine (Ca x P/Cr) were both significantly lower in the scan positive group (P less than 0.01). The scan positive group had a significantly higher mean level of PTH (P less than 0.001) and lower mean level of phosphate (P less than 0.001). The present experience shows that parathyroid imaging is useful in localizing parathyroid adenomas in 50% of cases (10 out of 19). This figure is at the lower end of the range of previously published results. It is less effective in demonstrating multiple gland hyperplasia. The decision as to whether to undertake surgical exploration when the scan is negative has been based successfully on clinical judgement. We feel that an analysis of this nature is important, as it gives insights into the practical relevance of parathyroid imaging in the context of routine clinical work. PMID:2170959

  20. Multiple Stressors in Agricultural Streams: A Mesocosm Study of Interactions among Raised Water Temperature, Sediment Addition and Nutrient Enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Piggott, Jeremy J.; Lange, Katharina; Townsend, Colin R.; Matthaei, Christoph D.

    2012-01-01

    Changes to land use affect streams through nutrient enrichment, increased inputs of sediment and, where riparian vegetation has been removed, raised water temperature. We manipulated all three stressors in experimental streamside channels for 30 days and determined the individual and pair-wise combined effects on benthic invertebrate and algal communities and on leaf decay, a measure of ecosystem functioning. We added nutrients (phosphorus+nitrogen; high, intermediate, natural) and/or sediment (grain size 0.2 mm; high, intermediate, natural) to 18 channels supplied with water from a nearby stream. Temperature was increased by 1.4°C in half the channels, simulating the loss of upstream and adjacent riparian shade. Sediment affected 93% of all biological response variables (either as an individual effect or via an interaction with another stressor) generally in a negative manner, while nutrient enrichment affected 59% (mostly positive) and raised temperature 59% (mostly positive). More of the algal components of the community responded to stressors acting individually than did invertebrate components, whereas pair-wise stressor interactions were more common in the invertebrate community. Stressors interacted often and in a complex manner, with interactions between sediment and temperature most common. Thus, the negative impact of high sediment on taxon richness of both algae and invertebrates was stronger at raised temperature, further reducing biodiversity. In addition, the decay rate of leaf material (strength loss) accelerated with nutrient enrichment at ambient but not at raised temperature. A key implication of our findings for resource managers is that the removal of riparian shading from streams already subjected to high sediment inputs, or land-use changes that increase erosion or nutrient runoff in a landscape without riparian buffers, may have unexpected effects on stream health. We highlight the likely importance of intact or restored buffer strips, both

  1. The association between children's numerical magnitude processing and mental multi-digit subtraction.

    PubMed

    Linsen, Sarah; Verschaffel, Lieven; Reynvoet, Bert; De Smedt, Bert

    2014-01-01

    Children apply various strategies to mentally solve multi-digit subtraction problems and the efficient use of some of them may depend more or less on numerical magnitude processing. For example, the indirect addition strategy (solving 72-67 as "how much do I have to add up to 67 to get 72?"), which is particularly efficient when the two given numbers are close to each other, requires to determine the proximity of these two numbers, a process that may depend on numerical magnitude processing. In the present study, children completed a numerical magnitude comparison task and a number line estimation task, both in a symbolic and nonsymbolic format, to measure their numerical magnitude processing. We administered a multi-digit subtraction task, in which half of the items were specifically designed to elicit indirect addition. Partial correlational analyses, controlling for intellectual ability and motor speed, revealed significant associations between numerical magnitude processing and mental multi-digit subtraction. Additional analyses indicated that numerical magnitude processing was particularly important for those items for which the use of indirect addition is expected to be most efficient. Although this association was observed for both symbolic and nonsymbolic tasks, the strongest associations were found for the symbolic format, and they seemed to be more prominent on numerical magnitude comparison than on number line estimation.

  2. Technical innovation: Multidimensional computerized software enabled subtraction computed tomographic angiography.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Mona; Rosset, Antoine; Platon, Alexandra; Didier, Dominique; Becker, Christoph D; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre

    2010-01-01

    Computed tomographic angiography (CTA) is a frequent noninvasive alternative to digital subtraction angiography. We previously reported the development of a new subtraction software to overcome limitations of adjacent bone and calcification in CT angiographic subtraction. Our aim was to further develop and improve this fast and automated computerized software, universally available for free use and compatible with most CT scanners, thus enabling better delineation of vascular structures, artifact reduction, and shorter reading times with potential clinical benefits. This computer-based free software will be available as an open source in the next release of OsiriX at the Web site http://www.osirix-viewer.com.

  3. Computed tomography lung iodine contrast mapping by image registration and subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goatman, Keith; Plakas, Costas; Schuijf, Joanne; Beveridge, Erin; Prokop, Mathias

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a relatively common and potentially life threatening disease, affecting around 600,000 people annually in the United States alone. Prompt treatment using anticoagulants is effective and saves lives, but unnecessary treatment risks life threatening haemorrhage. The specificity of any diagnostic test for PE is therefore as important as its sensitivity. Computed tomography (CT) angiography is routinely used to diagnose PE. However, there are concerns it may over-report the condition. Additional information about the severity of an occlusion can be obtained from an iodine contrast map that represents tissue perfusion. Such maps tend to be derived from dual-energy CT acquisitions. However, they may also be calculated by subtracting pre- and post-contrast CT scans. Indeed, there are technical advantages to such a subtraction approach, including better contrast-to-noise ratio for the same radiation dose, and bone suppression. However, subtraction relies on accurate image registration. This paper presents a framework for the automatic alignment of pre- and post-contrast lung volumes prior to subtraction. The registration accuracy is evaluated for seven subjects for whom pre- and post-contrast helical CT scans were acquired using a Toshiba Aquilion ONE scanner. One hundred corresponding points were annotated on the pre- and post-contrast scans, distributed throughout the lung volume. Surface-to-surface error distances were also calculated from lung segmentations. Prior to registration the mean Euclidean landmark alignment error was 2.57mm (range 1.43-4.34 mm), and following registration the mean error was 0.54mm (range 0.44-0.64 mm). The mean surface error distance was 1.89mm before registration and 0.47mm after registration. There was a commensurate reduction in visual artefacts following registration. In conclusion, a framework for pre- and post-contrast lung registration has been developed that is sufficiently accurate for lung subtraction

  4. Prokaryotic suppression subtractive hybridization PCR cDNA subtraction, a targeted method to identify differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    De Long, Susan K; Kinney, Kerry A; Kirisits, Mary Jo

    2008-01-01

    Molecular biology tools can be used to monitor and optimize biological treatment systems, but the application of nucleic acid-based tools has been hindered by the lack of available sequences for environmentally relevant biodegradation genes. The objective of our work was to extend an existing molecular method for eukaryotes to prokaryotes, allowing us to rapidly identify differentially expressed genes for subsequent sequencing. Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) PCR cDNA subtraction is a technique that can be used to identify genes that are expressed under specific conditions (e.g., growth on a given pollutant). While excellent methods for eukaryotic SSH PCR cDNA subtraction are available, to our knowledge, no methods previously existed for prokaryotes. This work describes our methodology for prokaryotic SSH PCR cDNA subtraction, which we validated using a model system: Pseudomonas putida mt-2 degrading toluene. cDNA from P. putida mt-2 grown on toluene (model pollutant) or acetate (control substrate) was subjected to our prokaryotic SSH PCR cDNA subtraction protocol to generate subtraction clone libraries. Over 90% of the sequenced clones contained gene fragments encoding toluene-related enzymes, and 20 distinct toluene-related genes from three key operons were sequenced. Based on these results, prokaryotic SSH PCR cDNA subtraction shows promise as a targeted method for gene identification.

  5. Research of the Additional Losses Occurring in Optical Fiber at its Multiple Bends in the Range Waves 1310nm, 1550nm and 1625nm Long

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurchenko, A. V.; Gorlov, N. I.; Alkina, A. D.; Mekhtiev, A. D.; Kovtun, A. A.

    2016-01-01

    Article is devoted to research of the additional losses occurring in the optical fiber at its multiple bends in the range waves of 1310 nanometers, 1550 nanometers and 1625 nanometers long. Article is directed on creation of the external factors methods which allow to estimate and eliminate negative influence. The automated way of calculation of losses at a bend is developed. Results of scientific researches are used by engineers of “Kazaktelekom” AS for practical definition of losses service conditions. For modeling the Wolfram|Alpha environment — the knowledge base and a set of computing algorithms was chosen. The greatest losses are noted on wavelength 1310nm and 1625nm. All dependences are nonlinear. Losses with each following excess are multiplicative.

  6. A phase retrieval method of interferograms add-subtracting based on two-step phase shifting.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yawei; Ji, Ying; Jin, Weifeng; Bu, Min; Shang, Xuefu

    2014-01-01

    A phase retrieval method is introduced in quantitative phase imaging (QPI) based on two-step phase-shifting technique. By acquiring two measured interferograms and calculating the addition and subtraction between them, the quantitative phase information can be directly retrieved. This method is illustrated by both theory and simulation experiments of a ball. The results of the simulation and the experiment of the red blood cell show a good agreement, demonstrating its application for studying cells.

  7. Soft-collinear factorization and zero-bin subtractions

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu Juiyu; Fuhrer, Andreas; Kelley, Randall; Manohar, Aneesh V.; Hoang, Andre H.

    2009-03-01

    We study the Sudakov form factor for a spontaneously broken gauge theory using a (new) {delta}-regulator. To be well defined, the effective theory requires zero-bin subtractions for the collinear sectors. The zero-bin subtractions depend on the gauge boson mass M and are not scaleless. They have both finite and 1/{epsilon} contributions and are needed to give the correct anomalous dimension and low-scale matching contributions. We also demonstrate the necessity of zero-bin subtractions for soft-collinear factorization. We find that after zero-bin subtractions the form factor is the sum of the collinear contributions minus a soft mass-mode contribution, in agreement with a previous result of Idilbi and Mehen in QCD. This appears to conflict with the method-of-regions approach, where one gets the sum of contributions from different regions.

  8. Advanced Background Subtraction Applied to Aeroacoustic Wind Tunnel Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahr, Christopher J.; Horne, William C.

    2015-01-01

    An advanced form of background subtraction is presented and applied to aeroacoustic wind tunnel data. A variant of this method has seen use in other fields such as climatology and medical imaging. The technique, based on an eigenvalue decomposition of the background noise cross-spectral matrix, is robust against situations where isolated background auto-spectral levels are measured to be higher than levels of combined source and background signals. It also provides an alternate estimate of the cross-spectrum, which previously might have poor definition for low signal-to-noise ratio measurements. Simulated results indicate similar performance to conventional background subtraction when the subtracted spectra are weaker than the true contaminating background levels. Superior performance is observed when the subtracted spectra are stronger than the true contaminating background levels. Experimental results show limited success in recovering signal behavior for data where conventional background subtraction fails. They also demonstrate the new subtraction technique's ability to maintain a proper coherence relationship in the modified cross-spectral matrix. Beam-forming and de-convolution results indicate the method can successfully separate sources. Results also show a reduced need for the use of diagonal removal in phased array processing, at least for the limited data sets considered.

  9. Dual energy subtraction method for breast calcification imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukou, Vaia; Martini, Niki; Fountos, George; Michail, Christos; Sotiropoulou, Panagiota; Bakas, Athanasios; Kalyvas, Nektarios; Kandarakis, Ioannis; Speller, Robert; Nikiforidis, George

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this work was to present an experimental dual energy (DE) method for the visualization of microcalcifications (μCs). A modified radiographic X-ray tube combined with a high resolution complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensor (APS) X-ray detector was used. A 40/70 kV spectral combination was filtered with 100 μm cadmium (Cd) and 1000 μm copper (Cu) for the low/high-energy combination. Homogenous and inhomogeneous breast phantoms and two calcification phantoms were constructed with various calcification thicknesses, ranging from 16 to 152 μm . Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) was calculated from the DE subtracted images for various entrance surface doses. A calcification thickness of 152 μm was visible, with mean glandular doses (MGD) in the acceptable levels (below 3 mGy). Additional post-processing on the DE images of the inhomogeneous breast phantom resulted in a minimum visible calcification thickness of 93 μm (MGD=1.62 mGy). The proposed DE method could potentially improve calcification visibility in DE breast calcification imaging.

  10. Children's understanding of additive concepts.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Katherine M; Dubé, Adam K; Beatch, Jacqueline-Ann

    2017-04-01

    Most research on children's arithmetic concepts is based on one concept at a time, limiting the conclusions that can be made about how children's conceptual knowledge of arithmetic develops. This study examined six arithmetic concepts (identity, negation, commutativity, equivalence, inversion, and addition and subtraction associativity) in Grades 3, 4, and 5. Identity (a-0=a) and negation (a-a=0) were well understood, followed by moderate understanding of commutativity (a+b=b+a) and inversion (a+b-b=a), with weak understanding of equivalence (a+b+c=a+[b+c]) and associativity (a+b-c=[b-c]+a). Understanding increased across grade only for commutativity and equivalence. Four clusters were found: The Weak Concept cluster understood only identity and negation; the Two-Term Concept cluster also understood commutativity; the Inversion Concept cluster understood identity, negation, and inversion; and the Strong Concept cluster had the strongest understanding of all of the concepts. Grade 3 students tended to be in the Weak and Inversion Concept clusters, Grade 4 students were equally likely to be in any of the clusters, and Grade 5 students were most likely to be in the Two-Term and Strong Concept clusters. The findings of this study highlight that conclusions about the development of arithmetic concepts are highly dependent on which concepts are being assessed and underscore the need for multiple concepts to be investigated at the same time.

  11. Treatment failure of intrathecal baclofen and supra-additive effect of nabiximols in multiple sclerosis-related spasticity: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Trampe, Nadine; Chan, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS)-related spasticity is associated with disability and impairment in quality of life. We report on a patient with secondary progressive MS and spastic tetraparesis (Expanded Disability Status Scale score 8.5). The right arm exhibited flexor spasticity resulting in functional disability despite multimodal symptomatic treatment. Intrathecal baclofen led to side effects despite decreasing efficacy. Low-dose nabiximols improved spasticity and function with recovery of daily-life activities and spasticity-related symptoms. Reduction of intrathecal baclofen ameliorated adverse drug reactions. Add-on cannabinoid therapy was effective in therapy-refractory spasticity with supra-additive effect in combining intrathecal baclofen and nabiximols, hypothetically explained by mutually complementing mechanisms of action. PMID:23634192

  12. Determination of additivity of apparent and standardized ileal digestibility of amino acids in diets containing multiple protein sources fed to growing pigs.

    PubMed

    Xue, P C; Ragland, D; Adeola, O

    2014-09-01

    An experiment was conducted in growing pigs to investigate the additivity of apparent ileal digestibility (AID) or standardized ileal digestibility (SID) of CP and AA in mixed diets containing multiple protein sources. Using the determined AID or SID for CP and AA in corn, soybean meal (SBM), corn distillers' dried grains with solubles (DDGS), or canola meal (CM), the AID or SID for 4 mixed diets based on corn-SBM, corn-SBM-DDGS, corn-SBM-CM, or corn-SBM-DDGS-CM were predicted and compared with determined AID or SID, respectively. Eighteen growing pigs (initial BW = 61.3 ± 5.5 kg) were surgically fitted with T-cannulas and assigned to a duplicated 9 × 4 incomplete Latin square design with 9 diets and 4 periods. The 9 experimental diets consisted of a nitrogen-free diet (NFD) to estimate basal ileal endogenous loss (BEL) of AA, 4 semipurified diets to determine the AID and SID of CP and AA in the 4 ingredients, and 4 mixed diets to test the additivity of AID and SID. Chromic oxide was added as an indigestible marker. Pigs were fed 1 of the 9 diets during each 7-d period, and ileal digesta were collected on d 6 and 7, from 0800 to 1800 h. The analyzed AA levels for the mixed diets were close to the calculated values based on the AA composition of each ingredient. The results revealed that the predicted SID were consistent with determined values, except for Leu, Thr, Asp, Cys, Pro, and Ser in the corn-SBM diet and Met and Cys in the corn-SBM-DDGS diet. The determined AID for total AA and Arg, His, Trp, Gly, and Pro in the corn-SBM diet were greater (P < 0.05) than predicted. For the corn-SBM-DDGS diet, the determined AID were greater (P < 0.05) than predicted AID for CP, total AA, and all AA except for Arg, Leu, and Pro. In the corn-SBM-CM diet, the determined AID were greater (P < 0.05) than predicted AID for Arg, Cys, and Gly. When compared with determined values, predicted AID in the corn-SBM-DDGS-CM diet were lower (P < 0.05) for total AA and Arg, Met, Cys, and

  13. Aluminum plasmonics based highly transmissive polarization-independent subtractive color filters exploiting a nanopatch array.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Vivek R; Lee, Sang-Shin; Kim, Eun-Soo; Choi, Duk-Yong

    2014-11-12

    Nanophotonic devices enabled by aluminum plasmonics are saliently advantageous in terms of their low cost, outstanding sustainability, and affordable volume production. We report, for the first time, aluminum plasmonics based highly transmissive polarization-independent subtractive color filters, which are fabricated just with single step electron-beam lithography. The filters feature selective suppression in the transmission spectra, which is realized by combining the propagating and nonpropagating surface plasmons mediated by an array of opaque and physically thin aluminum nanopatches. A broad palette of bright, high-contrast subtractive colors is successfully demonstrated by simply varying the pitches of the nanopatches. These subtractive color filters have twice the photon throughput of additive counterparts, ultimately providing elevated optical transmission and thus stronger color signals. Moreover, the filters are demonstrated to conspicuously feature a dual-mode operation, both transmissive and reflective, in conjunction with a capability to exhibit micron-scale colors in arbitrary shapes. They are anticipated to be diversely applied to digital display, digital imaging, color printing, and sensing.

  14. Fingerprinting the Asterid Species Using Subtracted Diversity Array Reveals Novel Species-Specific Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Mantri, Nitin; Olarte, Alexandra; Li, Chun Guang; Xue, Charlie; Pang, Edwin C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Background Asterids is one of the major plant clades comprising of many commercially important medicinal species. One of the major concerns in medicinal plant industry is adulteration/contamination resulting from misidentification of herbal plants. This study reports the construction and validation of a microarray capable of fingerprinting medicinally important species from the Asterids clade. Methodology/Principal Findings Pooled genomic DNA of 104 non-asterid angiosperm and non-angiosperm species was subtracted from pooled genomic DNA of 67 asterid species. Subsequently, 283 subtracted DNA fragments were used to construct an Asterid-specific array. The validation of Asterid-specific array revealed a high (99.5%) subtraction efficiency. Twenty-five Asterid species (mostly medicinal) representing 20 families and 9 orders within the clade were hybridized onto the array to reveal its level of species discrimination. All these species could be successfully differentiated using their hybridization patterns. A number of species-specific probes were identified for commercially important species like tea, coffee, dandelion, yarrow, motherwort, Japanese honeysuckle, valerian, wild celery, and yerba mate. Thirty-seven polymorphic probes were characterized by sequencing. A large number of probes were novel species-specific probes whilst some of them were from chloroplast region including genes like atpB, rpoB, and ndh that have extensively been used for fingerprinting and phylogenetic analysis of plants. Conclusions/Significance Subtracted Diversity Array technique is highly efficient in fingerprinting species with little or no genomic information. The Asterid-specific array could fingerprint all 25 species assessed including three species that were not used in constructing the array. This study validates the use of chloroplast genes for bar-coding (fingerprinting) plant species. In addition, this method allowed detection of several new loci that can be explored to solve

  15. Proposed smart integrated-optical preprocessor using holographic subtraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verber, C. M.; Vahey, D. W.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents a proposed integrated-optical preprocessor with a holographic subtraction. It is based on an optical analog of a set of N analog voltages formed by passing an optical plane wave, confined in an electrooptic waveguide, under a set of N electrodes to which the voltages are applied; in the limit in which diffraction is ignored, the wavefront of the emerging guided wave will have superimposed upon it N discrete phase shifts. Processors which operate upon voltages encoded in this manner are being fabricated; they include a comparator in which incoming data are compared to a holographic record of the optical analog of a reference set, and a 'smart' system based upon holographic self-subtraction, in which the processor can independently adapt to changes in background information. The preprocessor operation is described in the screening, identification, and the self-subtraction modes, and implementation of devices in an integrated optical configuration is discussed.

  16. Sky background subtraction with fiber-fed spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puech, M.; Rodrigues, M.; Yang, Y.; Flores, H.; Royer, F.; Disseau, K.; Gonçalves, T.; Hammer, F.; Cirasuolo, M.; Evans, C. J.; Li Causi, G.; Maiolino, R.; Melo, C.

    2014-08-01

    Fiber-fed spectrographs can now have throughputs equivalent to slit spectrographs. However, the sky subtraction accuracy that can be reached on such instruments has often been pinpointed as one of their major issues, in relation to difficulties in scattered light and flat-field corrections or throughput losses associated with fibers. Using technical time observations with FLAMES-GIRAFFE, two observing techniques, namely dual staring and cross beam switching modes, were tested and the resulting sky subtraction accuracy reached in both cases was quantified. Results indicate that an accuracy of 0.6% on the sky subtraction can be reached, provided that the cross beam switching mode is used. This is very encouraging regarding the detection of very faint sources with future fiber-fed spectrographs such as VLT/MOONS or E-ELT/MOSAIC.

  17. Digital subtraction angiography: principles and pitfalls of image improvement techniques.

    PubMed

    Levin, D C; Schapiro, R M; Boxt, L M; Dunham, L; Harrington, D P; Ergun, D L

    1984-09-01

    The technology of imaging methods in digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is discussed in detail. Areas covered include function of the video camera in both interlaced and sequential scan modes, digitization by the analog-to-digital converter, logarithmic signal processing, dose rates, and acquisition of images using frame integration and pulsed-sequential techniques. Also discussed are various methods of improving image content and quality by both hardware and software modifications. These include the development of larger image intensifiers, larger matrices, video camera improvements, reregistration, hybrid subtraction, matched filtering, recursive filtering, DSA tomography, and edge enhancement.

  18. Animal experiments by K-edge subtraction angiography by using SR (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anno, I.; Akisada, M.; Takeda, T.; Sugishita, Y.; Kakihana, M.; Ohtsuka, S.; Nishimura, K.; Hasegawa, S.; Takenaka, E.; Hyodo, K.; Ando, M.

    1989-07-01

    Ischemic heart disease is one of the most popular and lethal diseases for aged peoples in the world, and is usually diagnosed by transarterial selective coronary arteriography. However, it is rather invasive and somewhat dangerous, so that the selective coronary arteriography is not feasible for prospective screening of coronary occlusive heart disease. Conventional digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is widely known as a relatively noninvasive and useful technique is making a diagnosis of arterial occlusive disease, especially in making the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. Conventional intravenous subtraction angiography by temporal subtraction, however, has several problems when applying to the moving objects. Digital subtraction method using high-speed switching above and below the K edge could be the ideal approach to this solution. We intend to make a synchrotron radiation digital K-edge subtraction angiography in the above policy, and to apply it to the human coronary ischemic disease on an outpatient basis. The principles and experimental systems have already been described in detail by our coworkers. Our prototype experimental system is situated at the AR (accumulation ring) for TRISTAN project of high energy physics. The available beam size is 70 mm by 120 mm. The electron energy of AR is 6.5 GeV and average beam current is approximately 10 mA. This paper will show the animal experiments of our K-edge subtraction system, and discuss some problems and technical difficulties. Three dogs, weighing approximately 15 kg, were examined to evaluate the ability of our prototype synchrotron radiation DSA unit, that we are now constructing. The dogs were anaesthetized with pentobarbital sodium, intravenously (30 mg/kg). Six french-sized (1.52 mm i.d.) pigtail catheter with multiple side holes were introduced via the right femoral vein into the right atrium by the cutdown technique under conventional x-ray fluoroscopic control. Respiration of the dogs was

  19. Isolation of ultrasonic scattering by wavefield baseline subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Alexander J.; Michaels, Jennifer E.; Michaels, Thomas E.

    2016-03-01

    Wavefield imaging generally refers to the measurement of signals over a two-dimensional rectilinear grid that originate from a spatially fixed source. Subtraction of such wavefields is investigated as a means of separating scattered signals from the total wavefield; that is, baseline wavefield data acquired from a defect-free specimen are subtracted from analogous data acquired after introduction of a defect. The wavefields considered here are generated by a 5 MHz angle-beam probe and measured over an area of the accessible specimen surface using a laser vibrometer. The primary challenge in isolating the scattered waves is imperfect temporal and spatial alignment of the two wavefields. Two methods for aligning the wavefields in space and time prior to performing baseline subtraction are presented and their efficacy is evaluated using data acquired before and after introducing notches that originate from a through-hole. Although perfect baseline subtraction is not achieved, the improvement in performance after alignment using either method allows for scattered waves from small defects to be separated and visualized, even when their amplitudes are much smaller than those of the incident waves.

  20. A New Sky Subtraction Technique for Low Surface Brightness Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkov, I. Y.; Chilingarian, I. V.

    2011-07-01

    We present a new approach to the sky subtraction for long-slit spectra that is suitable for low-surface brightness objects based on the controlled reconstruction of the night sky spectrum in the Fourier space using twilight or arc-line frames as references. It can be easily adopted for FLAMINGOS-type multi-slit data. Compared to existing sky subtraction algorithms, our technique is taking into account variations of the spectral line spread along the slit thus qualitatively improving the sky subtraction quality for extended targets. As an example, we show how the stellar metallicity and stellar velocity dispersion profiles in the outer disc of the spiral galaxy NGC5440 are affected by the sky subtraction quality. Our technique is used in the survey of early-type galaxies carried out at the Russian 6-m telescope, and it strongly increases the scientific potential of large amounts of long-slit data for nearby galaxies available in major data archives.

  1. The Use of Taught and Invented Methods of Subtraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, A. D.; Stacey, Kaye

    1994-01-01

    Attempted to establish the incidence of using taught algorithms versus invented methods of subtraction in (n=1,370) male secondary school students and to relate the use of invented methods to age, mathematical achievement, and lateral thinking ability. Use of invented algorithms increased with age. (23 references) (MKR)

  2. "Abuelita" Epistemologies: Counteracting Subtractive Schools in American Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzales, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    This autoethnographic inquiry examines the intersection of elder epistemology and subtractive education, exploring how one "abuelita" countered her granddaughter's divestment of Mexican-ness. I demonstrate how the grandmother used "abuelita" epistemologies to navigate this tension and resist the assimilative pressures felt…

  3. Graphene-assisted multiple-input high-base optical computing

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiao; Wang, Andong; Zeng, Mengqi; Long, Yun; Zhu, Long; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    We propose graphene-assisted multiple-input high-base optical computing. We fabricate a nonlinear optical device based on a fiber pigtail cross-section coated with a single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. An approach to implementing modulo 4 operations of three-input hybrid addition and subtraction of quaternary base numbers in the optical domain using multiple non-degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) processes in graphene coated optical fiber device and (differential) quadrature phase-shift keying ((D)QPSK) signals is presented. We demonstrate 10-Gbaud modulo 4 operations of three-input quaternary hybrid addition and subtraction (A + B − C, A + C − B, B + C − A) in the experiment. The measured optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) penalties for modulo 4 operations of three-input quaternary hybrid addition and subtraction (A + B − C, A + C − B, B + C − A) are measured to be less than 7 dB at a bit-error rate (BER) of 2 × 10−3. The BER performance as a function of the relative time offset between three signals (signal offset) is also evaluated showing favorable performance. PMID:27604866

  4. Graphene-assisted multiple-input high-base optical computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiao; Wang, Andong; Zeng, Mengqi; Long, Yun; Zhu, Long; Fu, Lei; Wang, Jian

    2016-09-01

    We propose graphene-assisted multiple-input high-base optical computing. We fabricate a nonlinear optical device based on a fiber pigtail cross-section coated with a single-layer graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. An approach to implementing modulo 4 operations of three-input hybrid addition and subtraction of quaternary base numbers in the optical domain using multiple non-degenerate four-wave mixing (FWM) processes in graphene coated optical fiber device and (differential) quadrature phase-shift keying ((D)QPSK) signals is presented. We demonstrate 10-Gbaud modulo 4 operations of three-input quaternary hybrid addition and subtraction (A + B - C, A + C - B, B + C - A) in the experiment. The measured optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) penalties for modulo 4 operations of three-input quaternary hybrid addition and subtraction (A + B - C, A + C - B, B + C - A) are measured to be less than 7 dB at a bit-error rate (BER) of 2 × 10-3. The BER performance as a function of the relative time offset between three signals (signal offset) is also evaluated showing favorable performance.

  5. Finding Variable Stars in Planetary Nebula using the ISIS Subtraction Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Jacob; Nault, K.; Hillwig, T. C.

    2013-01-01

    In order to explain the great variety of observed shapes among planetary nebulae, we are examining the theory that binary central stars of planetary nebulae are a significant factor in their shaping. We determine if the central star of planetary nebulae is binary by looking for photometric periodic variability, a common feature of close binary systems. Using existing data we evaluate the variability using the ISIS image subtraction software. We have detected variability in the central star of Pe 1-9, a previously known close binary system. We also show results for a number of additional targets.

  6. A generic plant RNA isolation method suitable for RNA-Seq and suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y Q; Wu, W J; Xiao, H W; Chen, H B; Zheng, Y; Zhang, Y J; Wang, H X; Huang, L Q

    2013-11-18

    A recently developed revolutionary approach to transcriptomics, RNA-Seq, and suppression subtractive hybridization are powerful tools for gene expression research. However, currently, the difficulty of isolating high-quality RNAs from plant tissues bearing abundant complex polysaccharides, polyphenolics, and secondary metabolites is a serious problem that not only limits the application of these technologies but also hinders studies dealing with RNA in general. We have developed a consistent protocol to prepare highly intact and pure RNAs from tissues of a variety of field-grown plant species, with high yields, in 2 to 3 h. Additionally, this method can be readily applied to mammalian, yeast, and bacterial cells.

  7. Estimating breast thickness for dual-energy subtraction in contrast-enhanced digital mammography using calibration phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Kristen C.; Kwon, Young Joon; Aziz, Moez Karim; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2016-04-01

    Dual-energy contrast-enhanced digital mammography (DE CE-DM) uses an iodinated contrast agent to image the perfusion and vasculature of the breast. DE images are obtained by a weighted logarithmic subtraction of the high-energy (HE) and low-energy (LE) image pairs. We hypothesized that the optimal DE subtraction weighting factor is thickness-dependent, and developed a method for determining breast tissue composition and thickness in DE CE-DM. Phantoms were constructed using uniform blocks of 100% glandular-equivalent and 100% adipose-equivalent material. The thickness of the phantoms ranged from 3 to 8 cm, in 1 cm increments. For a given thickness, the glandular-adipose composition of the phantom was varied using different combinations of blocks. The logarithmic LE and logarithmic HE signal intensities were measured; they decrease linearly with increasing glandularity for a given thickness. The signals decrease with increasing phantom thickness and the x-ray signal decreases linearly with thickness for a given glandularity. As the thickness increases, the attenuation difference per additional glandular block decreases, indicating beam hardening. From the calibration mapping, we have demonstrated that we can predict percent glandular tissue and thickness when given two distinct signal intensities. Our results facilitate the subtraction of tissue at the boundaries of the breast, and aid in discriminating between contrast agent uptake in glandular tissue and subtraction artifacts.

  8. Effect of sucrose availability on wheel-running as an operant and as a reinforcing consequence on a multiple schedule: Additive effects of extrinsic and automatic reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Belke, Terry W; Pierce, W David

    2015-07-01

    As a follow up to Belke and Pierce's (2014) study, we assessed the effects of repeated presentation and removal of sucrose solution on the behavior of rats responding on a two-component multiple schedule. Rats completed 15 wheel turns (FR 15) for either 15% or 0% sucrose solution in the manipulated component and lever pressed 10 times on average (VR 10) for an opportunity to complete 15 wheel turns (FR 15) in the other component. In contrast to our earlier study, the components advanced based on time (every 8min) rather than completed responses. Results showed that in the manipulated component wheel-running rates were higher and the latency to initiate running longer when sucrose was present (15%) compared to absent (0% or water); the number of obtained outcomes (sucrose/water), however, did not differ with the presentation and withdrawal of sucrose. For the wheel-running as reinforcement component, rates of wheel turns, overall lever-pressing rates, and obtained wheel-running reinforcements were higher, and postreinforcement pauses shorter, when sucrose was present (15%) than absent (0%) in manipulated component. Overall, our findings suggest that wheel-running rate regardless of its function (operant or reinforcement) is maintained by automatically generated consequences (automatic reinforcement) and is increased as an operant by adding experimentally arranged sucrose reinforcement (extrinsic reinforcement). This additive effect on operant wheel-running generalizes through induction or arousal to the wheel-running as reinforcement component, increasing the rate of responding for opportunities to run and the rate of wheel-running per opportunity.

  9. Different sleep onset criteria at the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT): an additional marker to differentiate central nervous system (CNS) hypersomnias.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Detto, Stefania; Poli, Francesca; Franceschini, Christian; Montagna, Pasquale; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2011-03-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) has different correlates in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) [idiopathic hypersomnia (IH) without long sleep time] and REM sleep [narcolepsy without cataplexy (NwoC) and narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC)]-related hypersomnias of central origin. We analysed sleep onset characteristics at the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) applying simultaneously two sleep onset criteria in 44 NC, seven NwoC and 16 IH consecutive patients referred for subjective EDS complaint. Sleep latency (SL) at MSLT was assessed both as the time elapsed to the occurrence of a single epoch of sleep Stage 1 NREM (SL) and of unequivocal sleep [three sleep Stage 1 NREM epochs or any other sleep stage epoch, sustained SL (SusSL)]. Idiopathic hypersomnia patients showed significantly (P<0.0001) longer SusSL than SL (7.7±2.5 versus 5.6±1.3 min, respectively) compared to NwoC (5.8±2.5 versus 5.3±2.2 min) and NC patients (4.1±3 versus 3.9±3 min). A mean difference threshold between SusSL and SL ≥27 s reached a diagnostic value to discriminate IH versus NC and NwoC sufferers (sensitivity 88%; specificity 82%). Moreover, NC patients showed better subjective sleepiness perception than NwoC and IH cases in the comparison between naps with or without sleep occurrence. Simultaneous application of the two widely used sleep onset criteria differentiates IH further from NC and NwoC patients: IH fluctuate through a wake-Stage 1 NREM sleep state before the onset of sustained sleep, while NC and NwoC shift abruptly into a sustained sleep. The combination of SusSL and SL determination at MSLT should be tested as an additional objective differential criterion for EDS disorders.

  10. An optimal point spread function subtraction algorithm for high-contrast imaging: a demonstration with angular differential imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Lafreniere, D; Marois, C; Doyon, R; Artigau, E; Nadeau, D

    2006-09-19

    Direct imaging of exoplanets is limited by bright quasi-static speckles in the point spread function (PSF) of the central star. This limitation can be reduced by subtraction of reference PSF images. We have developed an algorithm to construct an optimal reference PSF image from an arbitrary set of reference images. This image is built as a linear combination of all available images and is optimized independently inside multiple subsections of the image to ensure that the absolute minimum residual noise is achieved within each subsection. The algorithm developed is completely general and can be used with many high contrast imaging observing strategies, such as angular differential imaging (ADI), roll subtraction, spectral differential imaging, reference star observations, etc. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated for ADI data. It is shown that for this type of data the new algorithm provides a gain in sensitivity by up 22 to a factor 3 at small separation over the algorithm previously used.

  11. Competing Biases in Mental Arithmetic: When Division Is More and Multiplication Is Less

    PubMed Central

    Shaki, Samuel; Fischer, Martin H.

    2017-01-01

    Mental arithmetic exhibits various biases. Among those is a tendency to overestimate addition and to underestimate subtraction outcomes. Does such “operational momentum” (OM) also affect multiplication and division? Twenty-six adults produced lines whose lengths corresponded to the correct outcomes of multiplication and division problems shown in symbolic format. We found a reliable tendency to over-estimate division outcomes, i.e., reverse OM. We suggest that anchoring on the first operand (a tendency to use this number as a reference for further quantitative reasoning) contributes to cognitive biases in mental arithmetic. PMID:28203152

  12. Development of Pooled Suppression Subtractive Hybridization to analyze the Pangenome of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Gerrish, Robert S.; Gill, Ann L.; Fowler, Vance G.; Gill, Steven R.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the development and application of a pooled Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (PSSH) method to describe differences between the genomic content of a pool of clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates and a sequenced reference strain. In comparative bacterial genomics, Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) is normally utilized to compare genomic features or expression profiles of one strain versus another, which limits its ability to analyze communities of isolates. However, a PSSH approach theoretically enables the user to characterize the entirety of gene content unique to a related group of isolates in a single reaction. These unique fragments may then be linked to individual isolates through standard PCR. This method was applied to examine the genomic diversity found in pools of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with complicated bacteremia infections leading to endocarditis and osteomyelitis. Across four pools of 10 isolates each, four hundred and twenty nine fragments not found in or significantly divergent from the S. aureus NCTC 8325 reference genome were detected. These fragments could be linked to individual strains within its pool by PCR. This is the first use of PSSH to examine the S. aureus pangenome. We propose that PSSH is a powerful tool for researchers interested in rapidly comparing the genomic content of multiple unstudied isolates. PMID:20138093

  13. Development of pooled suppression subtractive hybridization to analyze the pangenome of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Gerrish, Robert S; Gill, Ann L; Fowler, Vance G; Gill, Steven R

    2010-04-01

    We describe the development and application of a Pooled Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (PSSH) method to describe differences between the genomic content of a pool of clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates and a sequenced reference strain. In comparative bacterial genomics, Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) is normally utilized to compare genomic features or expression profiles of one strain versus another, which limits its ability to analyze communities of isolates. However, a PSSH approach theoretically enables the user to characterize the entirety of gene content unique to a related group of isolates in a single reaction. These unique fragments may then be linked to individual isolates through standard PCR. This method was applied to examine the genomic diversity found in pools of S.aureus isolates associated with complicated bacteremia infections leading to endocarditis and osteomyelitis. Across four pools of 10 isolates each, four hundred and twenty seven fragments not found in or significantly divergent from the S. aureus NCTC 8325 reference genome were detected. These fragments could be linked to individual strains within its pool by PCR. This is the first use of PSSH to examine the S. aureus pangenome. We propose that PSSH is a powerful tool for researchers interested in rapidly comparing the genomic content of multiple unstudied isolates.

  14. Activity Approach to the Formation of the Method of Addition and Subtraction in Elementary Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maksimov, L. K.; Maksimova, L. V.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main tasks in teaching mathematics to elementary students is to form calculating methods and techniques. The efforts of teachers and methodologists are aimed at solving this problem. Educational and psychological research is devoted to it. At the same time school teaching experience demonstrates some difficulties in learning methods of…

  15. Addition by Subtraction: The Relation between Dropout Rates and School-Level Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennie, Elizabeth; Bonneau, Kara; vanDellen, Michelle; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Efforts to improve student achievement should increase graduation rates. However, work investigating the effects of student-level accountability has consistently demonstrated that increases in the standards for high school graduation are correlated with increases in dropout rates. The most favored explanation for this finding…

  16. Incorrect Procedures Used by Primary Grade Pupils in Solving Open Addition and Subtraction Sentences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindvall, C. Mauritz; Ibarra, Cheryl Gibbons

    1980-01-01

    An exploratory investigation of various incorrect solution procedures used by students attempting to solve a variety of forms of open sentences is reported. The study identifies specific incorrect strategies, indicates their relative frequency of occurrence, and attempts to offer some explanation for certain of the incorrect procedures used. (MK)

  17. Population viability impacts of habitat additions and subtractions: A simulation experiment with endangered kangaroo rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Species viability is influenced by the quality, quantity and configuration of habitat. For species at risk, a principal challenge is to identify landscape configurations that, if realized, would improve a population’s viability or restoration potential. Critical habitat patche...

  18. Addition by Subtraction: The Relation Between Dropout Rates and School-Level Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    GLENNIE, ELIZABETH; BONNEAU, KARA; VANDELLEN, MICHELLE; DODGE, KENNETH A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context Efforts to improve student achievement should increase graduation rates. However, work investigating the effects of student-level accountability has consistently demonstrated that increases in the standards for high school graduation are correlated with increases in dropout rates. The most favored explanation for this finding is that high-stakes testing policies that mandate grade repetition and high school exit exams may be the tipping point for students who are already struggling academically. These extra demands may, in fact, push students out of school. Purpose/Objective/Focus This article examines two hypotheses regarding the relation between school-level accountability and dropout rates. The first posits that improvements in school performance lead to improved success for everyone. If school-level accountability systems improve a school for all students, then the proportion of students performing at grade level increases, and the dropout rate decreases. The second hypothesis posits that schools facing pressure to improve their overall accountability score may pursue this increase at the cost of other student outcomes, including dropout rate. Research Design Our approach focuses on the dynamic relation between school-level academic achievement and dropout rates over time—that is, between one year’s achievement and the subsequent year’s dropout rate, and vice versa. This article employs longitudinal data of records on all students in North Carolina public schools over an 8-year period. Analyses employ fixed-effects models clustering schools and districts within years and controls each year for school size, percentage of students who were free/reduced-price lunch eligible, percentage of students who are ethnic minorities, and locale. Findings/Results This study finds partial evidence that improvements in school-level academic performance will lead to improvements (i.e., decreases) in school-level dropout rates. Schools with improved performance saw decreased dropout rates following these successes. However, we find more evidence of a negative side of the quest for improved academic performance. When dropout rates increase, the performance composites in subsequent years increase. Conclusions/recommendations Accountability systems need to remove any indirect benefit a school may receive from increasing its dropout rate. Schools should be held accountable for those who drop out of school. Given the personal and social costs of dropping out, accountability systems need to place more emphasis on dropout prevention. Such an emphasis could encompass increasing the dropout age and having the school’s performance composite include scores of zero on end-of-grade tests for those who leave school. PMID:24013958

  19. Real Time Optical Interferometric Image Addition and Subtraction by Wave Polarization.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-10-15

    anal’ vs is of thei r experimental res u Its w-,i th reg: od to th)e var-ious opti cal components such as the lens and 1Wol lastor nri sm,. havo been...lens C. It was found that the ;.O iznrs F. ind P,, ...ore no! required. In that case, each input irane I t’V,( .) 1Vll v seurated images at the output...ti u sd n t - r a 7C I Ia t -!On , h2 6nIf 32 .3 nmii; t he i (-k tie s s o ft the i-e 1as t o 1 1;1 1110 ~ mjlfe cf the Wol laston nri -mi

  20. K-targeted metabolomic analysis extends chemical subtraction to DESIGNER extracts: selective depletion of extracts of hops (Humulus lupulus).

    PubMed

    Ramos Alvarenga, René F; Friesen, J Brent; Nikolić, Dejan; Simmler, Charlotte; Napolitano, José G; van Breemen, Richard; Lankin, David C; McAlpine, James B; Pauli, Guido F; Chen, Shao-Nong

    2014-12-26

    This study introduces a flexible and compound targeted approach to Deplete and Enrich Select Ingredients to Generate Normalized Extract Resources, generating DESIGNER extracts, by means of chemical subtraction or augmentation of metabolites. Targeting metabolites based on their liquid-liquid partition coefficients (K values), K targeting uses countercurrent separation methodology to remove single or multiple compounds from a chemically complex mixture, according to the following equation: DESIGNER extract = total extract ± target compound(s). Expanding the scope of the recently reported depletion of extracts by immunoaffinity or solid phase liquid chromatography, the present approach allows a more flexible, single- or multi-targeted removal of constituents from complex extracts such as botanicals. Chemical subtraction enables both chemical and biological characterization, including detection of synergism/antagonism by both the subtracted targets and the remaining metabolite mixture, as well as definition of the residual complexity of all fractions. The feasibility of the DESIGNER concept is shown by K-targeted subtraction of four bioactive prenylated phenols, isoxanthohumol (1), 8-prenylnaringenin (2), 6-prenylnaringenin (3), and xanthohumol (4), from a standardized hops (Humulus lupulus L.) extract using specific solvent systems. Conversely, adding K-targeted isolates allows enrichment of the original extract and hence provides an augmented DESIGNER material. Multiple countercurrent separation steps were used to purify each of the four compounds, and four DESIGNER extracts with varying depletions were prepared. The DESIGNER approach innovates the characterization of chemically complex extracts through integration of enabling technologies such as countercurrent separation, K-by-bioactivity, the residual complexity concepts, as well as quantitative analysis by (1)H NMR, LC-MS, and HiFSA-based NMR fingerprinting.

  1. Self-mixing differential vibrometer based on electronic channel subtraction.

    PubMed

    Donati, Silvano; Norgia, Michele; Giuliani, Guido

    2006-10-01

    An instrument for noncontact measurement of differential vibrations is developed, based on the self-mixing interferometer. As no reference arm is available in the self-mixing configuration, the differential mode is obtained by electronic subtraction of signals from two (nominally equal) vibrometer channels, taking advantage that channels are servo stabilized and thus insensitive to speckle and other sources of amplitude fluctuation. We show that electronic subtraction is nearly as effective as field superposition. Common-mode suppression is 25-30 dB, the dynamic range (amplitude) is in excess of 100 microm, and the minimum measurable (differential) amplitude is 20 nm on a B = 10 kHz bandwidth. The instrument has been used to measure vibrations of two metal samples kept in contact, revealing the hysteresis cycle in the microslip and gross-slip regimes, which are of interest in the study of friction induced vibration damping of gas turbine blades for aircraft applications.

  2. Removing Cardiac Artefacts in Magnetoencephalography with Resampled Moving Average Subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Ahlfors, Seppo P.; Hinrichs, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals are commonly contaminated by cardiac artefacts (CAs). Principle component analysis and independent component analysis have been widely used for removing CAs, but they typically require a complex procedure for the identification of CA-related components. We propose a simple and efficient method, resampled moving average subtraction (RMAS), to remove CAs from MEG data. Based on an electrocardiogram (ECG) channel, a template for each cardiac cycle was estimated by a weighted average of epochs of MEG data over consecutive cardiac cycles, combined with a resampling technique for accurate alignment of the time waveforms. The template was subtracted from the corresponding epoch of the MEG data. The resampling reduced distortions due to asynchrony between the cardiac cycle and the MEG sampling times. The RMAS method successfully suppressed CAs while preserving both event-related responses and high-frequency (>45 Hz) components in the MEG data. PMID:27503196

  3. ZAP - enhanced PCA sky subtraction for integral field spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Kurt T.; Lilly, Simon J.; Bacon, Roland; Richard, Johan; Conseil, Simon

    2016-05-01

    We introduce Zurich Atmosphere Purge (ZAP), an approach to sky subtraction based on principal component analysis (PCA) that we have developed for the Multi Unit Spectrographic Explorer (MUSE) integral field spectrograph. ZAP employs filtering and data segmentation to enhance the inherent capabilities of PCA for sky subtraction. Extensive testing shows that ZAP reduces sky emission residuals while robustly preserving the flux and line shapes of astronomical sources. The method works in a variety of observational situations from sparse fields with a low density of sources to filled fields in which the target source fills the field of view. With the inclusion of both of these situations, the method is generally applicable to many different science cases and should also be useful for other instrumentation. ZAP is available for download at http://muse-vlt.eu/science/tools.

  4. Robust Background Subtraction with Foreground Validation for Urban Traffic Video

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, S S; Kamath, C

    2004-01-15

    Identifying moving objects in a video sequence is a fundamental and critical task in many computer-vision applications. Background subtraction techniques are commonly used to separate foreground moving objects from the background. Most background subtraction techniques assume a single rate of adaptation, which is inadequate for complex scenes such as a traffic intersection where objects are moving at different and varying speeds. In this paper, we propose a foreground validation algorithm that first builds a foreground mask using a slow-adapting Kalman filter, and then validates individual foreground pixels by a simple moving object model, built using both the foreground and background statistics as well as the frame difference. Ground-truth experiments with urban traffic sequences show that our proposed algorithm significantly improves upon results using only Kalman filter or frame-differencing, and outperforms other techniques based on mixture of Gaussians, median filter, and approximated media filter.

  5. Planet detection down to a few λ/D: an RSDI/TLOCI approach to PSF subtraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerard, Benjamin L.; Marois, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Most current high contrast imaging point spread function (PSF) subtraction algorithms use some form of a least-squares noise minimization to find exoplanets that are, before post-processing, often hidden below the instrumental speckle noise. In the current standard PSF subtraction algorithms, a set of reference images is derived from the target image sequence to subtract each target image, using Angular and/or Simultaneous Spectral Differential Imaging (ADI, SSDI, respectively). However, to avoid excessive exoplanet self-subtraction, ADI and SSDI (in the absence of a strong spectral feature) severely limit the available number of reference images at small separations. This limits the performance of the least-squares algorithm, resulting in lower sensitivity to exoplanets at small angular separations. Possible solutions are to use additional reference images by acquiring longer sequences, use SSDI if the exoplanet is expected to show strong spectral features, or use images acquired on other targets. The latter option, known as Reference Star Differential Imaging (RSDI), which relies on the use of reference images that are highly correlated to the target image, has been ineffective in previous ground-based high contrast imaging surveys. The now >200 target reference library from the Gemini Planet Imager Exoplanet Survey (GPIES) allows for a detailed RSDI analysis to possibly improve contrast performance near the focal plane mask, at 2-7λ/D separations. We present the results of work to optimize PSF subtraction with the GPIES reference library using a least-squares algorithm designed to minimize speckle noise and maximize planet throughput, thus maximizing the planet signal to noise ratio (SNR). Using December 2014 51 Eri GPI data in the inner 100 mas to 300 mas annulus, we find no apparent improvement in SNR when using RSDI and/or our optimization scheme. This result, while still being investigated, seems to show that current algorithms on ADI+SSDI data sets are

  6. Digital subtraction angiography in pediatric cerebrovascular occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Faerber, E.N.; Griska, L.A.B.; Swartz, J.D.; Capitanio, M.A.; Popky, G.L.

    1984-08-01

    While conventional angiography has been used to demonstrate cerebrovascular occlusive disease in the past, digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is capable of showing progressive vascular involvement with ease, simplicity, and extremely low morbidity, making it particularly well suited for children and outpatients either alone or coordinated with computed tomography. The authors discuss the usefulness and advantages of DSA as demonstrated in 7 infants and children with hemiplegia, 4 of whom had sickle-cell disease.

  7. Subtraction Radiography for the Diagnosis of Bone Lesions in Dogs.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-05-31

    Avail ander Journal of Periodontology Dist Special Ř 211 East Chicago Avenue Room 924 Chicago, IL 60611 Dear Sirs: I m submitting an original...research article titled "Subtraction Radiography for the Diagnosis of Bone Lesions in Dogs" solely to the Journal of Periodontology for review and... clinical practice in our area. 60-70 Kvp would have produced more contrast in the radiographic films used for the conventional technique, but likely

  8. Subtractive Renormalization Group Invariance: Pionless EFT at NLO

    SciTech Connect

    Timoteo, Varese S.; Szpigel, Sergio; Duraes, Francisco O.

    2010-11-12

    We show some results concerning the renormalization group (RG) invariance of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction in pionless effective field theory at next-to-leading order (NLO), using a non-relativistic Callan-Symanzik equation (NRCS) for the driving term of the Lippmann-Schwinger (LS) equation with three recursive subtractions. The phase-shifts obtained for the RG evolved potential are same as those for the original potential, apart from relative differences of order 10{sup -15}.

  9. Subtractive Renormalization Group Invariance: Pionless EFT at NLO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timóteo, Varese S.; Szpigel, Sérgio; Durães, Francisco O.

    2010-11-01

    We show some results concerning the renormalization group (RG) invariance of the nucleon-nucleon (NN) interaction in pionless effective field theory at next-to-leading order (NLO), using a non-relativistic Callan-Symanzik equation (NRCS) for the driving term of the Lippmann-Schwinger (LS) equation with three recursive subtractions. The phase-shifts obtained for the RG evolved potential are same as those for the original potential, apart from relative differences of order 10-15.

  10. ROBUST TECHNIQUES FOR BACKGROUND SUBTRACTION IN URBAN TRAFFIC VIDEO

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, C; Cheung, S S

    2003-10-28

    Identifying moving objects from a video sequence is a fundamental and critical task in many computer-vision applications. A common approach is to perform background subtraction, which identifies moving objects from the portion of a video frame that differs significantly from a background model. There are many challenges in developing a good background subtraction algorithm. First, it must be robust against changes in illumination. Second, it should avoid detecting non-stationary background objects such as swinging leaves, rain, snow, and shadow cast by moving objects. Finally, its internal background model should react quickly to changes in background such as starting and stopping of vehicles. In this paper, we compare various background subtraction algorithms for detecting moving vehicles and pedestrians in urban traffic video sequences. We consider approaches varying from simple techniques such as frame differencing and adaptive median filtering, to more sophisticated probabilistic modeling techniques. While complicated techniques often produce superior performance, our experiments show that simple techniques such as adaptive median filtering can produce good results with much lower computational complexity.

  11. Image-Subtraction Photometry of Variable Stars in the Globular Clusters NGC 6388 and NGC 6441

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corwin, Michael T.; Sumerel, Andrew N.; Pritzl, Barton J.; Smith, Horace A.; Catelan, M.; Sweigart, Allen V.; Stetson, Peter B.

    2006-01-01

    We have applied Alard's image subtraction method (ISIS v2.1) to the observations of the globular clusters NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 previously analyzed using standard photometric techniques (DAOPHOT, ALLFRAME). In this reanalysis of observations obtained at CTIO, besides recovering the variables previously detected on the basis of our ground-based images, we have also been able to recover most of the RR Lyrae variables previously detected only in the analysis of Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 observations of the inner region of NGC 6441. In addition, we report five possible new variables not found in the analysis of the EST observations of NGC 6441. This dramatically illustrates the capabilities of image subtraction techniques applied to ground-based data to recover variables in extremely crowded fields. We have also detected twelve new variables and six possible variables in NGC 6388 not found in our previous groundbased studies. Revised mean periods for RRab stars in NGC 6388 and NGC 6441 are 0.676 day and 0.756 day, respectively. These values are among the largest known for any galactic globular cluster. Additional probable type II Cepheids were identified in NGC 6388, confirming its status as a metal-rich globular cluster rich in Cepheids.

  12. Digital Subtraction Phonocardiography (DSP) applied to the detection and characterization of heart murmurs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During the cardiac cycle, the heart normally produces repeatable physiological sounds. However, under pathologic conditions, such as with heart valve stenosis or a ventricular septal defect, blood flow turbulence leads to the production of additional sounds, called murmurs. Murmurs are random in nature, while the underlying heart sounds are not (being deterministic). Innovation We show that a new analytical technique, which we call Digital Subtraction Phonocardiography (DSP), can be used to separate the random murmur component of the phonocardiogram from the underlying deterministic heart sounds. Methods We digitally recorded the phonocardiogram from the anterior chest wall in 60 infants and adults using a high-speed USB interface and the program Gold Wave http://www.goldwave.com. The recordings included individuals with cardiac structural disease as well as recordings from normal individuals and from individuals with innocent heart murmurs. Digital Subtraction Analysis of the signal was performed using a custom computer program called Murmurgram. In essence, this program subtracts the recorded sound from two adjacent cardiac cycles to produce a difference signal, herein called a "murmurgram". Other software used included Spectrogram (Version 16), GoldWave (Version 5.55) as well as custom MATLAB code. Results Our preliminary data is presented as a series of eight cases. These cases show how advanced signal processing techniques can be used to separate heart sounds from murmurs. Note that these results are preliminary in that normal ranges for obtained test results have not yet been established. Conclusions Cardiac murmurs can be separated from underlying deterministic heart sounds using DSP. DSP has the potential to become a reliable and economical new diagnostic approach to screening for structural heart disease. However, DSP must be further evaluated in a large series of patients with well-characterized pathology to determine its clinical potential

  13. How number line estimation skills relate to neural activations in single digit subtraction problems.

    PubMed

    Berteletti, I; Man, G; Booth, J R

    2015-02-15

    The Number Line (NL) task requires judging the relative numerical magnitude of a number and estimating its value spatially on a continuous line. Children's skill on this task has been shown to correlate with and predict future mathematical competence. Neurofunctionally, this task has been shown to rely on brain regions involved in numerical processing. However, there is no direct evidence that performance on the NL task is related to brain areas recruited during arithmetical processing and that these areas are domain-specific to numerical processing. In this study, we test whether 8- to 14-year-old's behavioral performance on the NL task is related to fMRI activation during small and large single-digit subtraction problems. Domain-specific areas for numerical processing were independently localized through a numerosity judgment task. Results show a direct relation between NL estimation performance and the amount of the activation in key areas for arithmetical processing. Better NL estimators showed a larger problem size effect than poorer NL estimators in numerical magnitude (i.e., intraparietal sulcus) and visuospatial areas (i.e., posterior superior parietal lobules), marked by less activation for small problems. In addition, the direction of the activation with problem size within the IPS was associated with differences in accuracies for small subtraction problems. This study is the first to show that performance in the NL task, i.e. estimating the spatial position of a number on an interval, correlates with brain activity observed during single-digit subtraction problem in regions thought to be involved in numerical magnitude and spatial processes.

  14. Temporal subtraction contrast-enhanced dedicated breast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gazi, Peymon M.; Aminololama-Shakeri, Shadi; Yang, Kai; Boone, John M.

    2016-09-01

    The development of a framework of deformable image registration and segmentation for the purpose of temporal subtraction contrast-enhanced breast CT is described. An iterative histogram-based two-means clustering method was used for the segmentation. Dedicated breast CT images were segmented into background (air), adipose, fibroglandular and skin components. Fibroglandular tissue was classified as either normal or contrast-enhanced then divided into tiers for the purpose of categorizing degrees of contrast enhancement. A variant of the Demons deformable registration algorithm, intensity difference adaptive Demons (IDAD), was developed to correct for the large deformation forces that stemmed from contrast enhancement. In this application, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated in both mathematically-simulated and physically-acquired phantom images. Clinical usage and accuracy of the temporal subtraction framework was demonstrated using contrast-enhanced breast CT datasets from five patients. Registration performance was quantified using normalized cross correlation (NCC), symmetric uncertainty coefficient, normalized mutual information (NMI), mean square error (MSE) and target registration error (TRE). The proposed method outperformed conventional affine and other Demons variations in contrast enhanced breast CT image registration. In simulation studies, IDAD exhibited improvement in MSE (0-16%), NCC (0-6%), NMI (0-13%) and TRE (0-34%) compared to the conventional Demons approaches, depending on the size and intensity of the enhancing lesion. As lesion size and contrast enhancement levels increased, so did the improvement. The drop in the correlation between the pre- and post-contrast images for the largest enhancement levels in phantom studies is less than 1.2% (150 Hounsfield units). Registration error, measured by TRE, shows only submillimeter mismatches between the concordant anatomical target points in all patient studies. The algorithm was

  15. Influence of Al³⁺ addition on the flocculation and sedimentation of activated sludge: comparison of single and multiple dosing patterns.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yue; Zheng, Wanlin; Yang, Yundi; Cao, Asheng; Zhou, Qi

    2015-05-15

    In this study, the flocculation and sedimentation performance of activated sludge (AS) with single and multiple dosing of trivalent aluminum (Al(3+)) were studied. The AS samples were cultivated in sequencing batch reactors at 22 °C. The dosages of Al(3+) were 0.00, 0.125, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 meq/L for single dosing, and 0.1 meq/L for multiple dosing. Under single dosing conditions, as Al(3+) dosage increased, the zeta potential, total interaction energy, and effluent turbidity decreased, whereas the sludge volume index (SVI) increased, indicating that single Al(3+) dosing could enhance sludge flocculation, but deteriorate sedimentation. By comparison, adding an equal amount of Al(3+) through multiple dosing achieved a similar reduction in turbidity, but the zeta potential was higher, while the loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) content and SVI remarkably declined. Although the difference in the flocculation performances between the two dosing patterns was not significant, the underlying mechanisms were quite distinct: the interaction energy played a more important role under single dosing conditions, whereas multiple dosing was more effective in reducing the EPS content. Multiple dosing, which allows sufficient time for sludge restructuring and floc aggregation, could simultaneously optimize sludge flocculation and sedimentation.

  16. A design study to develop young children's understanding of multiplication and division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bicknell, Brenda; Young-Loveridge, Jenny; Nguyen, Nhung

    2016-12-01

    This design study investigated the use of multiplication and division problems to help 5-year-old children develop an early understanding of multiplication and division. One teacher and her class of 15 5-year-old children were involved in a collaborative partnership with the researchers. The design study was conducted over two 4-week periods in May-June and October-November. The focus in this article is on three key aspects of classroom teaching: instructional tasks, the use of representations, and discourse, including the mathematics register. Results from selected pre- and post-assessment tasks within a diagnostic interview showed that there were improvements in addition and subtraction as well as multiplication and division, even though the teaching had used multiplication and division problems. Students made progress on all four operational domains, with effect sizes ranging from approximately two thirds of a standard deviation to 2 standard deviations. Most of the improvement in students' number strategies was in moving from `counting all' to `counting on' and `skip counting'. The findings challenge the idea that learning experiences in addition and subtraction should precede those in multiplication and division as suggested in some curriculum documents.

  17. Migration of free-surface-related multiples: Removing artefacts using a water-layer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hao; Wang, Yibo; Chang, Xu; Xie, Songlei

    2015-01-01

    The migration of free-surface-related multiples has been developed for seismic data processing because such multiples can be utilised for imaging and sometimes provide additional subsurface illumination. Recently, the simultaneous migration of primaries and free-surface-related multiples has been proposed as an attractive approach for avoiding the costly prediction of multiples. However, the migration artefacts of multiples, generated by mismatched events, pollute the stacked image and degrade the image quality. We developed a new approach to attenuate the distinct migration artefacts of multiples using water-layer-related multiples. In addition to the original data, the only additional information required by this approach is the water-layer model, which can be acquired easily and accurately from sonar or the stacked profile. By using the predicted water-layer multiples, the distinct migration artefacts can be imaged and then subtracted from the migration image of multiples. Numerical experiments illustrate that the proposed approach can suppress most distinct artefacts in the migration of multiples while preserving the advantages. The proposed approach is an effective tool for the removal of artefacts from the migration of multiples and can be applied to different types of migration operators to produce better-illuminated images with fewer artefacts.

  18. Influence of the large-small split effect on strategy choice in complex subtraction.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yan Hui; Wu, Hao; Shang, Rui Hong; Chao, Xiaomei; Ren, Ting Ting; Zheng, Li Ling; Mo, Lei

    2016-03-31

    Two main theories have been used to explain the arithmetic split effect: decision-making process theory and strategy choice theory. Using the inequality paradigm, previous studies have confirmed that individuals tend to adopt a plausibility-checking strategy and a whole-calculation strategy to solve large and small split problems in complex addition arithmetic, respectively. This supports strategy choice theory, but it is unknown whether this theory also explains performance in solving different split problems in complex subtraction arithmetic. This study used small, intermediate and large split sizes, with each split condition being further divided into problems requiring and not requiring borrowing. The reaction times (RTs) for large and intermediate splits were significantly shorter than those for small splits, while accuracy was significantly higher for large and middle splits than for small splits, reflecting no speed-accuracy trade-off. Further, RTs and accuracy differed significantly between the borrow and no-borrow conditions only for small splits. This study indicates that strategy choice theory is suitable to explain the split effect in complex subtraction arithmetic. That is, individuals tend to choose the plausibility-checking strategy or the whole-calculation strategy according to the split size.

  19. A time-resolved subtraction method for evaluating the optical properties of layered turbid media (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milej, Daniel; Abdalmalak, Androu; Diop, Mamadou; Liebert, Adam; St. Lawrence, Keith

    2016-03-01

    The analysis of statistical moments of time-resolved (TR) diffuse optical signals can be used to evaluate the absorption and scattering coefficients of turbid media; however, this method requires careful measurement of the instrument response function. We propose an alternative approach that avoids this step by estimating the optical properties from the difference of TR measurements acquired at different source-detector separations. The efficiency of this method was validated using simulated data (from analytical model and Monte-Carlo simulations) and tissue-mimicking phantoms. Results for a homogenous and layered medium showed that the subtraction technique can accurately estimate the optical properties. Specifically, our preliminary results show that the method can estimate the optical properties of a homogeneous medium (simulated using μa = 0.1 mm-1, μs' = 10 mm-1) with an error less than 10 %. Accurate results were obtained at source-detector separations large enough (5 mm or greater) to resolve differences in the moments. Moreover, we also observed that the subtraction method has improved depth sensitivity compared to the classic method of moments. These results suggests that time-resolved subtraction is a simple but effective means of quantifying optical properties of turbid media, in addition to offering a new approach for obtaining spatially sensitive measurements, although additional studies are required to confirm the latter.

  20. Maternal MCG Interference Cancellation Using Splined Independent Component Subtraction

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Suhong

    2011-01-01

    Signal distortion is commonly observed when using independent component analysis (ICA) to remove maternal cardiac interference from the fetal magnetocardiogram. This can be seen even in the most conservative case where only the independent components dominated by maternal interference are subtracted from the raw signal, a procedure we refer to as independent component subtraction (ICS). Distortion occurs when the subspaces of the fetal and maternal signals have appreciable overlap. To overcome this problem, we employed splining to remove the fetal signal from the maternal source component. The maternal source components were downsampled and then interpolated to their original sampling rate using a cubic spline. A key aspect of the splining procedure is that the maternal QRS complexes are downsampled much less than the rest of the maternal signal so that they are not distorted, despite their higher bandwidth. The splined maternal source components were projected back onto the magnetic field measurement space and then subtracted from the raw signal. The method was evaluated using data from 24 subjects. We compared the results of conventional, i.e., unsplined, ICS with our method, splined ICS, using matched filtering as a reference. Correlation and subjective assessment of the P-wave and QRS complex were used to assess the performance. Using ICS, we found that the P-wave was adversely affected in 7 of 24 (29%) subjects, all having correlations less than 0.8. Splined ICS showed negligible distortion and improved the signal fidelity to some extent in all subjects. We also demonstrated that maternal T-wave interference could be problematic when the fetal and maternal heartbeats were synchronous. In these instances, splined ICS was more effective than matched filtering. PMID:21712157

  1. Quantitative Digital Subtraction Angiography in Pediatric Moyamoya Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Moyamoya disease is a unique cerebrovascular disorder characterized by idiopathic progressive stenosis at the terminal portion of the internal carotid artery (ICA) and fine vascular network. The aim of this review is to present the clinical application of quantitative digital subtraction angiography (QDSA) in pediatric moyamoya disease. Using conventional angiographic data and postprocessing software, QDSA provides time-contrast intensity curves and then displays the peak time (Tmax) and area under the curve (AUC). These parameters of QDSA can be used as surrogate markers for the hemodynamic evaluation of disease severity and quantification of postoperative neovascularization in moyamoya disease. PMID:26180611

  2. Peripheral NN scattering from subtractive renormalization of chiral interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Batista, E. F.; Szpigel, S.; Timóteo, V. S.

    2014-11-11

    We apply five subtractions in the Lippman-Schwinger (LS) equation in order to perform a non-perturbative renormalization of chiral N3LO nucleon-nucleon interactions. Here we compute the phase shifts for the uncoupled peripheral waves at renormalization scales between 0.1 fm{sup −1} and 1 fm{sup −1}. In this range, the results are scale invariant and provide an overall good agreement with the Nijmegen partial wave analysis up to at least E{sub lab} = 150 MeV, with a cutoff at Λ = 30 fm{sup −1}.

  3. WFPC2 photometry from subtraction of TinyTim PSFs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remy, M.; Surdej, J.; Baggett, S.; Wiggs, M.

    1997-01-01

    Based upon the subtraction of TinyTim Point Spread Function (PSFs) from Principle Component Image (PC1) point-like objects, a method has been developed to determine the optimal values for the telescope jitter and the Z4 relative focus during calibration or science observations. Using these jitter and focus values, an optimal TinyTim PSF, computed over a resampled grid, is then iteratively fitted to the object, yielding an improvement in the PSF centering, more accurate photometric results and a better detection of underlying structures. Preliminary results seem to indicate that appropriate synthetic TinyTim PSFs perform as well as observed PSFs.

  4. Direct comparison between genomic constitution and flavonoid contents in Allium multiple alien addition lines reveals chromosomal locations of genes related to biosynthesis from dihydrokaempferol to quercetin glucosides in scaly leaf of shallot (Allium cepa L.).

    PubMed

    Masuzaki, S; Shigyo, M; Yamauchi, N

    2006-02-01

    The extrachromosome 5A of shallot (Allium cepa L., genomes AA) has an important role in flavonoid biosynthesis in the scaly leaf of Allium fistulosum-shallot monosomic addition lines (FF+nA). This study deals with the production and biochemical characterisation of A. fistulosum-shallot multiple alien addition lines carrying at least 5A to determine the chromosomal locations of genes for quercetin formation. The multiple alien additions were selected from the crossing between allotriploid FFA (female symbol) and A. fistulosum (male symbol). The 113 plants obtained from this cross were analysed by a chromosome 5A-specific PGI isozyme marker of shallot. Thirty plants were preliminarily selected for an alien addition carrying 5A. The chromosome numbers of the 30 plants varied from 18 to 23. The other extrachromosomes in 19 plants were completely identified by using seven other chromosome markers of shallot. High-performance liquid chromatography analyses of the 19 multiple additions were conducted to identify the flavonoid compounds produced in the scaly leaves. Direct comparisons between the chromosomal constitution and the flavonoid contents of the multiple alien additions revealed that a flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H) gene for the synthesis of quercetin from kaempferol was located on 7A and that an anonymous gene involved in the glucosidation of quercetin was on 3A or 4A. As a result of supplemental SCAR analyses by using genomic DNAs from two complete sets of A. fistulosum-shallot monosomic additions, we have assigned F3'H to 7A and flavonol synthase to 4A.

  5. Motion compensation in digital subtraction angiography using graphics hardware.

    PubMed

    Deuerling-Zheng, Yu; Lell, Michael; Galant, Adam; Hornegger, Joachim

    2006-07-01

    An inherent disadvantage of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is its sensitivity to patient motion which causes artifacts in the subtraction images. These artifacts could often reduce the diagnostic value of this technique. Automated, fast and accurate motion compensation is therefore required. To cope with this requirement, we first examine a method explicitly designed to detect local motions in DSA. Then, we implement a motion compensation algorithm by means of block matching on modern graphics hardware. Both methods search for maximal local similarity by evaluating a histogram-based measure. In this context, we are the first who have mapped an optimizing search strategy on graphics hardware while paralleling block matching. Moreover, we provide an innovative method for creating histograms on graphics hardware with vertex texturing and frame buffer blending. It turns out that both methods can effectively correct the artifacts in most case, as the hardware implementation of block matching performs much faster: the displacements of two 1024 x 1024 images can be calculated at 3 frames/s with integer precision or 2 frames/s with sub-pixel precision. Preliminary clinical evaluation indicates that the computation with integer precision could already be sufficient.

  6. Background Subtraction Based on Three-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Transform.

    PubMed

    Han, Guang; Wang, Jinkuan; Cai, Xi

    2016-03-30

    Background subtraction without a separate training phase has become a critical task, because a sufficiently long and clean training sequence is usually unavailable, and people generally thirst for immediate detection results from the first frame of a video. Without a training phase, we propose a background subtraction method based on three-dimensional (3D) discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Static backgrounds with few variations along the time axis are characterized by intensity temporal consistency in the 3D space-time domain and, hence, correspond to low-frequency components in the 3D frequency domain. Enlightened by this, we eliminate low-frequency components that correspond to static backgrounds using the 3D DWT in order to extract moving objects. Owing to the multiscale analysis property of the 3D DWT, the elimination of low-frequency components in sub-bands of the 3D DWT is equivalent to performing a pyramidal 3D filter. This 3D filter brings advantages to our method in reserving the inner parts of detected objects and reducing the ringing around object boundaries. Moreover, we make use of wavelet shrinkage to remove disturbance of intensity temporal consistency and introduce an adaptive threshold based on the entropy of the histogram to obtain optimal detection results. Experimental results show that our method works effectively in situations lacking training opportunities and outperforms several popular techniques.

  7. Background Subtraction Based on Three-Dimensional Discrete Wavelet Transform

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guang; Wang, Jinkuan; Cai, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Background subtraction without a separate training phase has become a critical task, because a sufficiently long and clean training sequence is usually unavailable, and people generally thirst for immediate detection results from the first frame of a video. Without a training phase, we propose a background subtraction method based on three-dimensional (3D) discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Static backgrounds with few variations along the time axis are characterized by intensity temporal consistency in the 3D space-time domain and, hence, correspond to low-frequency components in the 3D frequency domain. Enlightened by this, we eliminate low-frequency components that correspond to static backgrounds using the 3D DWT in order to extract moving objects. Owing to the multiscale analysis property of the 3D DWT, the elimination of low-frequency components in sub-bands of the 3D DWT is equivalent to performing a pyramidal 3D filter. This 3D filter brings advantages to our method in reserving the inner parts of detected objects and reducing the ringing around object boundaries. Moreover, we make use of wavelet shrinkage to remove disturbance of intensity temporal consistency and introduce an adaptive threshold based on the entropy of the histogram to obtain optimal detection results. Experimental results show that our method works effectively in situations lacking training opportunities and outperforms several popular techniques. PMID:27043570

  8. Fast Image Subtraction Using Multi-cores and GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartung, Steven; Shukla, H.

    2013-01-01

    Many important image processing techniques in astronomy require a massive number of computations per pixel. Among them is an image differencing technique known as Optimal Image Subtraction (OIS), which is very useful for detecting and characterizing transient phenomena. Like many image processing routines, OIS computations increase proportionally with the number of pixels being processed, and the number of pixels in need of processing is increasing rapidly. Utilizing many-core graphical processing unit (GPU) technology in a hybrid conjunction with multi-core CPU and computer clustering technologies, this work presents a new astronomy image processing pipeline architecture. The chosen OIS implementation focuses on the 2nd order spatially-varying kernel with the Dirac delta function basis, a powerful image differencing method that has seen limited deployment in part because of the heavy computational burden. This tool can process standard image calibration and OIS differencing in a fashion that is scalable with the increasing data volume. It employs several parallel processing technologies in a hierarchical fashion in order to best utilize each of their strengths. The Linux/Unix based application can operate on a single computer, or on an MPI configured cluster, with or without GPU hardware. With GPU hardware available, even low-cost commercial video cards, the OIS convolution and subtraction times for large images can be accelerated by up to three orders of magnitude.

  9. Nonclassicality and decoherence of photon-subtracted squeezed states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Asoka; Agarwal, Girish S.

    2007-03-01

    Single-photon subtracted squeezed vacuum states are equivalent to Schrodinger kitten states and show non-Gaussian nature in phase space. Such states are useful in entanglement distillation, loophole-free test of Bell's inequality, and quantum computing. We discuss nonclassical properties of these states in terms of the sub-Poissonian statistics and the negativity of the Wigner function. We derive a compact expression for the Wigner function from which we find the region of phase space where Wigner function is negative. We find an upper bound on the squeezing parameter for the state to exhibit sub-Poissonian statistics. We then study the effect of decoherence on the single-photon subtracted squeezed states. We present results for two different models of decoherence, viz. amplitude decay model and the phase diffusion model. In each case we give analytical results for the time evolution of the state. We discuss the loss of nonclassicality as a result of decoherence. We show through the study of their phase-space properties how these states decay to vacuum due to the decay of photons. We show that phase damping leads to very slow decoherence than the photon-number decay and the state remains nonclassical at long times.

  10. Anatomically ordered tapping interferes more with one-digit addition than two-digit addition: a dual-task fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Soylu, Firat; Newman, Sharlene D

    2016-02-01

    Fingers are used as canonical representations for numbers across cultures. In previous imaging studies, it was shown that arithmetic processing activates neural resources that are known to participate in finger movements. Additionally, in one dual-task study, it was shown that anatomically ordered finger tapping disrupts addition and subtraction more than multiplication, possibly due to a long-lasting effect of early finger counting experiences on the neural correlates and organization of addition and subtraction processes. How arithmetic task difficulty and tapping complexity affect the concurrent performance is still unclear. If early finger counting experiences have bearing on the neural correlates of arithmetic in adults, then one would expect anatomically and non-anatomically ordered tapping to have different interference effects, given that finger counting is usually anatomically ordered. To unravel these issues, we studied how (1) arithmetic task difficulty and (2) the complexity of the finger tapping sequence (anatomical vs. non-anatomical ordering) affect concurrent performance and use of key neural circuits using a mixed block/event-related dual-task fMRI design with adult participants. The results suggest that complexity of the tapping sequence modulates interference on addition, and that one-digit addition (fact retrieval), compared to two-digit addition (calculation), is more affected from anatomically ordered tapping. The region-of-interest analysis showed higher left angular gyrus BOLD response for one-digit compared to two-digit addition, and in no-tapping conditions than dual tapping conditions. The results support a specific association between addition fact retrieval and anatomically ordered finger movements in adults, possibly due to finger counting strategies that deploy anatomically ordered finger movements early in the development.

  11. Lande subtraction method with finite integration limits and application to strong-field problems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tsin-Fu; Jheng, Shih-Da; Lee, Yun-Min; Su, Zheng-Yao

    2012-12-01

    The Lande subtraction method has been widely used in Coulomb problems, but the momentum coordinate p∈(0,∞) is assumed. In past applications, a very large range of p was used for accuracy. We derive the supplementary formulation with p∈(0,p_{max}) at reasonably small p_{max} for practical calculations. With the recipe, accuracy of the hydrogenic eigenspectrum is dramatically improved compared to the ordinary Lande formula by the same momentum grids. We apply the present formulation to strong-field atomic above-threshold ionization and high-order harmonic generations. We demonstrate that the proposed momentum space method can be another practical theoretical tool for atomic strong-field problems in addition to the existing methods.

  12. Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory: Realtime Image Subtraction Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi; Nugent, Peter E.; Kasliwal, Mansi M.

    2016-11-01

    A fast-turnaround pipeline for realtime data reduction plays an essential role in discovering and permitting follow-up observations to young supernovae and fast-evolving transients in modern time-domain surveys. In this paper, we present the realtime image subtraction pipeline in the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory. By using high-performance computing, efficient databases, and machine-learning algorithms, this pipeline manages to reliably deliver transient candidates within 10 minutes of images being taken. Our experience in using high-performance computing resources to process big data in astronomy serves as a trailblazer to dealing with data from large-scale time-domain facilities in the near future.

  13. Ambient-Light-Canceling Camera Using Subtraction of Frames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morookian, John Michael

    2004-01-01

    The ambient-light-canceling camera (ALCC) is a proposed near-infrared electronic camera that would utilize a combination of (1) synchronized illumination during alternate frame periods and (2) subtraction of readouts from consecutive frames to obtain images without a background component of ambient light. The ALCC is intended especially for use in tracking the motion of an eye by the pupil center corneal reflection (PCCR) method. Eye tracking by the PCCR method has shown potential for application in human-computer interaction for people with and without disabilities, and for noninvasive monitoring, detection, and even diagnosis of physiological and neurological deficiencies. In the PCCR method, an eye is illuminated by near-infrared light from a lightemitting diode (LED). Some of the infrared light is reflected from the surface of the cornea. Some of the infrared light enters the eye through the pupil and is reflected from back of the eye out through the pupil a phenomenon commonly observed as the red-eye effect in flash photography. An electronic camera is oriented to image the user's eye. The output of the camera is digitized and processed by algorithms that locate the two reflections. Then from the locations of the centers of the two reflections, the direction of gaze is computed. As described thus far, the PCCR method is susceptible to errors caused by reflections of ambient light. Although a near-infrared band-pass optical filter can be used to discriminate against ambient light, some sources of ambient light have enough in-band power to compete with the LED signal. The mode of operation of the ALCC would complement or supplant spectral filtering by providing more nearly complete cancellation of the effect of ambient light. In the operation of the ALCC, a near-infrared LED would be pulsed on during one camera frame period and off during the next frame period. Thus, the scene would be illuminated by both the LED (signal) light and the ambient (background) light

  14. Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) and its modifications in microbiological research.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiaowei; Li, Yunxia; Niu, Qiuhong; Zhang, Keqin

    2007-09-01

    Suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) is an effective approach to identify the genes that vary in expression levels during different biological processes. It is often used in higher eukaryotes to study the molecular regulation in complex pathogenic progress, such as tumorigenesis and other chronic multigene-associated diseases. Because microbes have relatively smaller genomes compared with eukaryotes, aside from the analysis at the mRNA level, SSH as well as its modifications have been further employed to isolate specific chromosomal locus, study genomic diversity related with exceptional bacterial secondary metabolisms or genes with special microbial function. This review introduces the SSH and its associated methods and focus on their applications to detect specific functional genes or DNA markers in microorganisms.

  15. Digital subtraction angiography for preoperative evaluation of extremity tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Paushter, D.M.; Borkowski, G.R.; Buonocore, E.; Belhobek, G.H.; Marks, K.E.

    1983-07-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the role of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) in the surgical planning of musculoskeletal neoplasms. Thirteen patients with primary bone and soft-tissue tumors were examined by CT and DSA. Three patients also had conventional angiography. DSA yielded surgically useful information in 10 patients, comparable to that expected from conventional angiography. DSA was most helpful in demonstrating the presence or absence of major vessel involvement by tumor when this could not be ascertained definitely on CT. Demonstration of mass extent by CT was accurate in 11 patients. Results of this study suggest that the combination of CT and DSA is useful in the preoperative evaluation of selected extremity tumors and should diminish the need for conventional angiography.

  16. Real-time image subtraction using phase reversal technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkateswara Rao, Vuyyuru; Krishna Mohan, Nandigana K.

    1999-10-01

    A simple coherent interferometric processing method for image subtraction in real-time is presented. The proposed method is based on interferometric principle using Mach- Zehnder interferometer. The phase reversal is accomplished by varying the pressure within an air-filled quartz cell inserted in one of the arms of the interferometer. Initially, the interferometer is aligned to obtain broad interference fringes in the cell region. Then the input imageries are introduced in both the arms of the interferometer and adjusted for exact registration as seen in the plane of observation. By introducing a phase change of (pi) -rad between the two arms of the interferometer, the difference between the inputs is detected in real-time on the monitor. Phase shift calibration and information processing of the proposed method is presented with the results.

  17. Background Subtraction Based on Color and Depth Using Active Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Sanchez, Enrique J.; Diaz, Javier; Ros, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Depth information has been used in computer vision for a wide variety of tasks. Since active range sensors are currently available at low cost, high-quality depth maps can be used as relevant input for many applications. Background subtraction and video segmentation algorithms can be improved by fusing depth and color inputs, which are complementary and allow one to solve many classic color segmentation issues. In this paper, we describe one fusion method to combine color and depth based on an advanced color-based algorithm. This technique has been evaluated by means of a complete dataset recorded with Microsoft Kinect, which enables comparison with the original method. The proposed method outperforms the others in almost every test, showing more robustness to illumination changes, shadows, reflections and camouflage. PMID:23857259

  18. An Improved Spectral Background Subtraction Method Based on Wavelet Energy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fengkui; Wang, Jian; Wang, Aimin

    2016-12-01

    Most spectral background subtraction methods rely on the difference in frequency response of background compared with characteristic peaks. It is difficult to extract accurately the background components from the spectrum when characteristic peaks and background have overlaps in frequency domain. An improved background estimation algorithm based on iterative wavelet transform (IWT) is presented. The wavelet entropy principle is used to select the best wavelet basis. A criterion based on wavelet energy theory to determine the optimal iteration times is proposed. The case of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy is discussed for illustration. A simulated spectrum with a prior known background and an experimental spectrum are tested. The processing results of the simulated spectrum is compared with non-IWT and it demonstrates the superiority of the IWT. It has great significance to improve the accuracy for spectral analysis.

  19. Plasma tomographic reconstruction from tangentially viewing camera with background subtraction

    SciTech Connect

    Odstrčil, M.; Mlynář, J.; Weinzettl, V.; Háček, P.; Verdoolaege, G.; Berta, M.

    2014-01-15

    Light reflections are one of the main and often underestimated issues of plasma emissivity reconstruction in visible light spectral range. Metallic and other specular components of tokamak generate systematic errors in the optical measurements that could lead to wrong interpretation of data. Our analysis is performed at data from the tokamak COMPASS. It is a D-shaped tokamak with specular metallic vessel and possibility of the H-mode plasma. Data from fast visible light camera were used for tomographic reconstruction with background reflections subtraction to study plasma boundary. In this article, we show that despite highly specular tokamak wall, it is possible to obtain a realistic reconstruction. The developed algorithm shows robust results despite of systematic errors in the optical measurements and calibration. The motivation is to obtain an independent estimate of the plasma boundary shape.

  20. Role of additional chromosomal changes in the prognostic value of t(4;14) and del(17p) in multiple myeloma: the IFM experience

    PubMed Central

    Hebraud, Benjamin; Magrangeas, Florence; Cleynen, Alice; Lauwers-Cances, Valerie; Chretien, Marie-Lorraine; Hulin, Cyrille; Leleu, Xavier; Yon, Edwige; Marit, Gerald; Karlin, Lionel; Roussel, Murielle; Stoppa, Anne-Marie; Belhadj, Karim; Voillat, Laurent; Garderet, Laurent; Macro, Margaret; Caillot, Denis; Mohty, Mohamad; Facon, Thierry; Moreau, Philippe; Attal, Michel; Munshi, Nikhil; Corre, Jill; Minvielle, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    In multiple myeloma, cytogenetic changes are important predictors of patient outcome. In this setting, the most important changes are deletion 17p, del(17p), and translocation of chromosomes 4 and 14, t(4;14), conferring a poor outcome. However, a certain degree of heterogeneity is observed in the survival of these high-risk patients. We hypothesized that other chromosomal changes may impact the outcome. We retrospectively analyzed a large series of 242 patients displaying either t(4;14) (157 patients) or del(17p) (110 patients), 25 patients presenting both abnormalities, using single nucleotide polymorphism array. In patients with t(4;14), del(1p32), del22q, and >30 chromosomal structural changes negatively impacted progression-free survival (PFS). For overall survival (OS), del(13q14), del(1p32), and the number of chromosomal structural changes worsened the prognosis of patients. For patients with del(17p), del6q worsened the prognosis of patients, whereas trisomy 15 and monosomy 14 were found to have a protective effect on PFS. For OS, del(1p32) worsened the prognosis of patients, whereas having >8 numerical changes was found to have a protective effect on survival. This study, which is the largest series of high-risk patients analyzed with the most modern genomic technique, identified 1 main factor negatively impacting survival: del(1p32). PMID:25636340

  1. Functional Neuroanatomy Involved in Automatic order Mental Arithmetic and Recitation of the Multiplication Table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Li-Qun; Saito, Masao

    We used 1.5T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to explore that which brain areas contribute uniquely to numeric computation. The BOLD effect activation pattern of metal arithmetic task (successive subtraction: actual calculation task) was compared with multiplication tables repetition task (rote verbal arithmetic memory task) response. The activation found in right parietal lobule during metal arithmetic task suggested that quantitative cognition or numeric computation may need the assistance of sensuous convert, such as spatial imagination and spatial sensuous convert. In addition, this mechanism may be an ’analog algorithm’ in the simple mental arithmetic processing.

  2. Suppression Subtractive Hybridization Reveals Transcript Profiling of Chlorella under Heterotrophy to Photoautotrophy Transition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianke; Wang, Weiliang; Yin, Weibo; Hu, Zanmin; Li, Yuanguang

    2012-01-01

    Background Microalgae have been extensively investigated and exploited because of their competitive nutritive bioproducts and biofuel production ability. Chlorella are green algae that can grow well heterotrophically and photoautotrophically. Previous studies proved that shifting from heterotrophy to photoautotrophy in light-induced environments causes photooxidative damage as well as distinct physiologic features that lead to dynamic changes in Chlorella intracellular components, which have great potential in algal health food and biofuel production. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the trophic transition remain unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, suppression subtractive hybridization strategy was employed to screen and characterize genes that are differentially expressed in response to the light-induced shift from heterotrophy to photoautotrophy. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained from 770 and 803 randomly selected clones among the forward and reverse libraries, respectively. Sequence analysis identified 544 unique genes in the two libraries. The functional annotation of the assembled unigenes demonstrated that 164 (63.1%) from the forward library and 62 (21.8%) from the reverse showed significant similarities with the sequences in the NCBI non-redundant database. The time-course expression patterns of 38 selected differentially expressed genes further confirmed their responsiveness to a diverse trophic status. The majority of the genes enriched in the subtracted libraries were associated with energy metabolism, amino acid metabolism, protein synthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, and stress defense. Conclusions/Significance The data presented here offer the first insights into the molecular foundation underlying the diverse microalgal trophic niche. In addition, the results can be used as a reference for unraveling candidate genes associated with the transition of Chlorella from heterotrophy to photoautotrophy, which holds

  3. Differential expression of genes identified by suppression subtractive hybridization in petals of opening carnation flowers.

    PubMed

    Harada, Taro; Torii, Yuka; Morita, Shigeto; Masumura, Takehiro; Satoh, Shigeru

    2010-05-01

    Flower opening is an event accompanied by morphological changes in petals which include elongation, expansion, and outward-curving. Petal cell growth is a fundamental process that underlies such phenomena, but its molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. Suppression subtractive hybridization was performed between petals during the early elongation period (stage 1) and during the opening period (stage 5) in carnation flowers and a pair of subtraction libraries abundant in differentially expressed genes was constructed at each stage. 393 cDNA clones picked up by differential screening out of 1728 clones were sequenced and 235 different cDNA fragments were identified, among which 211 did not match any known nucleotide sequence of carnation genes in the databases. BLASTX search of nucleotide sequences revealed that putative functions of the translational products can be classified into several categories including transcription, signalling, cell wall modification, lipid metabolism, and transport. Open reading frames of 15 selected genes were successfully determined by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). Time-course analysis of these genes by real-time RT-PCR showed that transcript levels of several genes correlatively fluctuate in petals of opening carnation flowers, suggesting an association with the morphological changes by elongation or curving. Based on the results, it is suggested that the growth of carnation petals is controlled by co-ordinated gene expression during the progress of flower opening. In addition, the possible roles of some key genes in the initiation of cell growth, the construction of the cell wall and cuticle, and transport across membranes were discussed.

  4. Improved Savitzky-Golay-method-based fluorescence subtraction algorithm for rapid recovery of Raman spectra.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kun; Zhang, Hongyuan; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we propose an improved subtraction algorithm for rapid recovery of Raman spectra that can substantially reduce the computation time. This algorithm is based on an improved Savitzky-Golay (SG) iterative smoothing method, which involves two key novel approaches: (a) the use of the Gauss-Seidel method and (b) the introduction of a relaxation factor into the iterative procedure. By applying a novel successive relaxation (SG-SR) iterative method to the relaxation factor, additional improvement in the convergence speed over the standard Savitzky-Golay procedure is realized. The proposed improved algorithm (the RIA-SG-SR algorithm), which uses SG-SR-based iteration instead of Savitzky-Golay iteration, has been optimized and validated with a mathematically simulated Raman spectrum, as well as experimentally measured Raman spectra from non-biological and biological samples. The method results in a significant reduction in computing cost while yielding consistent rejection of fluorescence and noise for spectra with low signal-to-fluorescence ratios and varied baselines. In the simulation, RIA-SG-SR achieved 1 order of magnitude improvement in iteration number and 2 orders of magnitude improvement in computation time compared with the range-independent background-subtraction algorithm (RIA). Furthermore the computation time of the experimentally measured raw Raman spectrum processing from skin tissue decreased from 6.72 to 0.094 s. In general, the processing of the SG-SR method can be conducted within dozens of milliseconds, which can provide a real-time procedure in practical situations.

  5. Mental Computation or Standard Algorithm? Children's Strategy Choices on Multi-Digit Subtractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Torbeyns, Joke; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed children's use of mental computation strategies and the standard algorithm on multi-digit subtractions. Fifty-eight Flemish 4th graders of varying mathematical achievement level were individually offered subtractions that either stimulated the use of mental computation strategies or the standard algorithm in one choice and two…

  6. Toddler Subtraction with Large Sets: Further Evidence for an Analog-Magnitude Representation of Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter, Virginia; Kamppi, Dorian; Paynter, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that toddlers have access to an analog-magnitude number representation that supports numerical reasoning about relatively large numbers. Three-year-olds were presented with subtraction problems in which initial set size and proportions subtracted were systematically varied. Two sets of cookies…

  7. How Do Manipulatives Help Students Communicate Their Understanding of Double-Digit Subtraction?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abi-Hanna, Rabab

    2016-01-01

    Multi-digit subtraction is difficult for students to learn. The purpose of this study is to explore how second-grade students communicate their understanding of double-digit subtraction through the use of manipulatives/tools. This qualitative study reports on six case studies of second-grade students where clinical interviews were the main source…

  8. Imaging of first-order surface-related multiples by reverse time migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuejian; Liu, Yike; Hu, Hao; Li, Peng; Khan, Majid

    2016-11-01

    SUMMARYSurface-related <span class="hlt">multiples</span> have been utilized in the reverse-time migration (RTM) procedures, and <span class="hlt">additional</span> illumination for subsurface can be provided. Meanwhile, many cross-talks are generated from undesired interactions between forward- and backward-propagated seismic-waves. In this paper, subsequent to analyzing and categorizing these cross-talks, we propose RTM of first-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span> to avoid most undesired interactions in RTM of all-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span>, where only primaries are forward-propagated and crosscorrelated with the backward-propagated first-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span>. With primaries and <span class="hlt">multiples</span> separated during regular seismic data processing as the input data, first-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span> can be obtained by a two-step scheme: (1) the dual-prediction of higher-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span>; and (2) the adaptive <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of predicted higher-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span> from all-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span> within local offset-time windows. In numerical experiments, two synthetic and a marine field datasets are used, where different cross-talks generated by RTM of all-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span> can be identified and the proposed RTM of first-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span> can provide a very interpretable image with a few cross-talks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017GeoJI.208.1077L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017GeoJI.208.1077L"><span>Imaging of first-order surface-related <span class="hlt">multiples</span> by reverse-time migration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Liu, Xuejian; Liu, Yike; Hu, Hao; Li, Peng; Khan, Majid</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p>Surface-related <span class="hlt">multiples</span> have been utilized in the reverse-time migration (RTM) procedures, and <span class="hlt">additional</span> illumination for subsurface can be provided. Meanwhile, many cross-talks are generated from undesired interactions between forward- and backward-propagated seismic waves. In this paper, subsequent to analysing and categorizing these cross-talks, we propose RTM of first-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span> to avoid most undesired interactions in RTM of all-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span>, where only primaries are forward-propagated and crosscorrelated with the backward-propagated first-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span>. With primaries and <span class="hlt">multiples</span> separated during regular seismic data processing as the input data, first-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span> can be obtained by a two-step scheme: (1) the dual-prediction of higher-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span>; and (2) the adaptive <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of predicted higher-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span> from all-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span> within local offset-time windows. In numerical experiments, two synthetic and a marine field data sets are used, where different cross-talks generated by RTM of all-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span> can be identified and the proposed RTM of first-order <span class="hlt">multiples</span> can provide a very interpretable image with a few cross-talks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866121','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866121"><span>Bifurcated method and apparatus for floating point <span class="hlt">addition</span> with decreased latency time</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Farmwald, Paul M.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Apparatus for decreasing the latency time associated with floating point <span class="hlt">addition</span> and <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> in a computer, using a novel bifurcated, pre-normalization/post-normalization approach that distinguishes between differences of floating point exponents.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1340926-additive-manufacturing-building-pathway-towards-process-material-qualification','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1340926-additive-manufacturing-building-pathway-towards-process-material-qualification"><span>“<span class="hlt">Additive</span> Manufacturing: Building the Pathway Towards Process and Material Qualification”</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Carpenter, John S.; Beese, Allison M.; Bourell, David L.; ...</p> <p>2016-06-14</p> <p>The potential benefits of metal <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing, as compared with more traditional, <span class="hlt">subtractive</span>-only approaches, has created excitement within design circles seeking to take advantage of the ability to build and repair complex shapes, to integrate or consolidate <span class="hlt">multiple</span> parts and minimize joining concerns, and to locally tailor material properties to increase functionality. Tempering the excitement of designers, however, has been concerns with the material deposited by the process. It is not enough for a part to ‘look’ right from a geometric perspective. Rather, the metallurgical aspects associated with the material being deposited must ‘look’ and ‘behave’ correctly along with themore » aforementioned geometric accuracy. Finally, without elucidation of the connections between processing, microstructure, properties, and performance from a materials science perspective, metal <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing will not realize its potential to change the manufacturing world for property and performance-critical engineering applications.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1340926','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1340926"><span>“<span class="hlt">Additive</span> Manufacturing: Building the Pathway Towards Process and Material Qualification”</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Carpenter, John S.; Beese, Allison M.; Bourell, David L.; Hamilton, Reginald F.; Herderick, Edward; Mishra, Rajiv S.; Sears, James</p> <p>2016-06-14</p> <p>The potential benefits of metal <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing, as compared with more traditional, <span class="hlt">subtractive</span>-only approaches, has created excitement within design circles seeking to take advantage of the ability to build and repair complex shapes, to integrate or consolidate <span class="hlt">multiple</span> parts and minimize joining concerns, and to locally tailor material properties to increase functionality. Tempering the excitement of designers, however, has been concerns with the material deposited by the process. It is not enough for a part to ‘look’ right from a geometric perspective. Rather, the metallurgical aspects associated with the material being deposited must ‘look’ and ‘behave’ correctly along with the aforementioned geometric accuracy. Finally, without elucidation of the connections between processing, microstructure, properties, and performance from a materials science perspective, metal <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing will not realize its potential to change the manufacturing world for property and performance-critical engineering applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=neural&pg=5&id=EJ1031099','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=neural&pg=5&id=EJ1031099"><span>Developmental Dissociation in the Neural Responses to Simple <span class="hlt">Multiplication</span> and <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Problems</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Prado, Jérôme; Mutreja, Rachna; Booth, James R.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Mastering single-digit arithmetic during school years is commonly thought to depend upon an increasing reliance on verbally memorized facts. An alternative model, however, posits that fluency in single-digit arithmetic might also be achieved via the increasing use of efficient calculation procedures. To test between these hypotheses, we used a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=arsenal&id=EJ1025587','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=arsenal&id=EJ1025587"><span>From Sailing Ships to <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Symbols: <span class="hlt">Multiple</span> Representations to Support Abstraction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jao, Limin</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Teachers are tasked with supporting students' learning of abstract mathematical concepts. Students can represent their mathematical understanding in a variety of modes, for example: manipulatives, pictures, diagrams, spoken languages, and written symbols. Although most students easily pick up rudimentary knowledge through the use of concrete…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/917221','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/917221"><span><span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> transcriptomics : establishing polarity drives human endothelial morphogenesis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Glesne, D. A.; Zhang, W.; Mandava, S.; Ursos, L.; Buell, M. E.; Makowski, L.; Rodi, D. J.; Biosciences Division</p> <p>2006-04-15</p> <p>Although investigations of mature normal and tumor-derived capillaries have resulted in characterization of these structures at the phenotypic level, less is known regarding the initial molecular cues for cellular assembly of endothelial cells into human capillaries. Here, we employ a novel combination of microenvironmental manipulation and microarray data filtration over narrowly delineated temporal data series to identify the morphogenesis component apart from the proliferation component, as pooled human microvascular-derived endothelial cells are induced to form capillary-like structures in vitro in a murine tumor-derived matrix. The 217 morphogenesis-specific genes identified using this <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> transcriptomics approach are mostly independent of the angiogenic proteins currently used as therapeutic targets for aberrant angiogenesis. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to validate 20% of these transcripts. Immunofluorescent analysis of proliferating and tube-forming cells validates at the protein level the morphogenesis-specific expression pattern of 16 of the 217 gene products identified. The transcripts that are selectively up-regulated in tube-forming endothelial cells reveal a temporal expression pattern of genes primarily associated with intracellular trafficking, guided migration, cytoskeletal reorganization, cellular adhesion, and proliferation inhibition. These data show that a sequential upregulation of genes that establish and maintain polarity occurs during migration and morphogenesis of in vitro human endothelial cells undergoing tubulogenesis; some of which may well be effective as novel antiangiogenic drug targets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2785812','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2785812"><span>Linear model for fast background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> in oligonucleotide microarrays</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Background One important preprocessing step in the analysis of microarray data is background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>. In high-density oligonucleotide arrays this is recognized as a crucial step for the global performance of the data analysis from raw intensities to expression values. Results We propose here an algorithm for background estimation based on a model in which the cost function is quadratic in a set of fitting parameters such that minimization can be performed through linear algebra. The model incorporates two effects: 1) Correlated intensities between neighboring features in the chip and 2) sequence-dependent affinities for non-specific hybridization fitted by an extended nearest-neighbor model. Conclusion The algorithm has been tested on 360 GeneChips from publicly available data of recent expression experiments. The algorithm is fast and accurate. Strong correlations between the fitted values for different experiments as well as between the free-energy parameters and their counterparts in aqueous solution indicate that the model captures a significant part of the underlying physical chemistry. PMID:19917117</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3254788','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3254788"><span>Removal of interference from fetal MEG by frequency dependent <span class="hlt">subtraction</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Vrba, J.; McCubbin, J.; Govindan, R.B.; Vairavan, S.; Murphy, P.; Preissl, H.; Lowery, C.L.; Eswaran, H.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Fetal magnetoencephalography (fMEG) recordings are contaminated by maternal and fetal magnetocardiography (MCG) signals and by other biological and environmental interference. Currently, all methods for the attenuation of these signals are based on a time-domain approach. We have developed and tested a frequency dependent procedure for removal of MCG and other interference from the fMEG recordings. The method uses a set of reference channels and performs <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of interference in the frequency domain (SUBTR). The interference-free frequency domain signals are converted back to the time domain. We compare the performance of the frequency dependent approach with our present approach for MCG attenuation based on orthogonal projection (OP). SUBTR has an advantage over OP and similar template approaches because it removes not only the MCG but also other small amplitude biological interference, avoids the difficulties with inaccurate determination of the OP operator, provides more consistent and stable fMEG results, does not cause signal redistribution, and if references are selected judiciously, it does not reduce fMEG signal amplitude. SUBTR was found to perform well in simulations and on real fMEG recordings, and has a potential to improve the detection of fetal brain signals. The SUBTR removes interference without the need for a model of the individual interference sources. The method may be of interest for any sensor array noise reduction application where signal-free reference channels are available. PMID:21930216</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22039431','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22039431"><span>SPECKLE NOISE <span class="hlt">SUBTRACTION</span> AND SUPPRESSION WITH ADAPTIVE OPTICS CORONAGRAPHIC IMAGING</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ren Deqing; Dou Jiangpei; Zhang Xi; Zhu Yongtian</p> <p>2012-07-10</p> <p>Future ground-based direct imaging of exoplanets depends critically on high-contrast coronagraph and wave-front manipulation. A coronagraph is designed to remove most of the unaberrated starlight. Because of the wave-front error, which is inherit from the atmospheric turbulence from ground observations, a coronagraph cannot deliver its theoretical performance, and speckle noise will limit the high-contrast imaging performance. Recently, extreme adaptive optics, which can deliver an extremely high Strehl ratio, is being developed for such a challenging mission. In this publication, we show that barely taking a long-exposure image does not provide much gain for coronagraphic imaging with adaptive optics. We further discuss a speckle <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> and suppression technique that fully takes advantage of the high contrast provided by the coronagraph, as well as the wave front corrected by the adaptive optics. This technique works well for coronagraphic imaging with conventional adaptive optics with a moderate Strehl ratio, as well as for extreme adaptive optics with a high Strehl ratio. We show how to substrate and suppress speckle noise efficiently up to the third order, which is critical for future ground-based high-contrast imaging. Numerical simulations are conducted to fully demonstrate this technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000SPIE.4129..207F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000SPIE.4129..207F"><span>Microwave detection of breast tumors: comparison of skin <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> algorithms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fear, Elise C.; Stuchly, Maria A.</p> <p>2000-07-01</p> <p>Early detection of breast cancer is an important part of effective treatment. Microwave detection of breast cancer is of interest due to the contrast in dielectric properties of normal and malignant breast tissues. We are investigating a confocal microwave imaging system that adapts ideas from ground penetrating radar to breast cancer detection. In the proposed system, the patient lies prone with the breast extending through a hole in the examining table and encircled by an array of antennas. The breast is illuminated sequentially by each antenna with an ultrawideband signal, and the returns are recorded at the same antenna. Because the antennas are offset from the breast, the dominant component of the recorded returns is the reflection from the thin layer of breast skin. Two methods of reducing this reflection are compared, namely approximation of the signal with two time shifted, scaled and summed returns from a cylinder of skin, and <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of the mean of the set of aligned returns. Both approaches provide effective decrease of the skin signal, allowing for tumor detection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2495648','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2495648"><span>Food <span class="hlt">additives</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Spencer, Michael</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>Food <span class="hlt">additives</span> are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food <span class="hlt">additives</span> are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour <span class="hlt">additives</span>, preservatives, and nutritional <span class="hlt">additives</span>. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of <span class="hlt">additives</span> is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15002121','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/15002121"><span>FY02 CBNP Annual Report: Discovery of DNA Signature of Biothreat Detection Using Suppression <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> Hybridization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Andersen, G L; Radnedge, L</p> <p>2002-11-19</p> <p>Our goal is to develop robust DNA signatures for rapid and specific DNA-based detection platforms that can be employed by CBNP to detect a wide range of potential agents. Our approach has resulted in highly specific DNA signatures for Yersina pestis, Bacillus anthracis and Brucella species. Furthermore, this approach can be applied to any genome (even uncharacterized ones), which facilitates DNA signature development for detection of newly emerging pathogens. We are using suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) as a tool to define large DNA regions specific to <span class="hlt">multiple</span> biothreat pathogens by comparing them to genomes of the most closely related organisms. This approach has become increasingly accurate as we continue to find new, distinctive strains and ever-closer near-neighbors. With the huge costs incurred by whole genome sequencing, it is not possible to sequence each new bacterial genome. However, it is completely practical to identify genome differences in the laboratory using SSH, and becomes especially useful when comparing new strains to previously sequenced genomes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21083630','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21083630"><span>Failing Hemodialysis Arteriovenous Fistula and Percutaneous Treatment: Imaging with CT, MRI and Digital <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Angiography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Cavagna, Enrico; D'Andrea, Paolo; Schiavon, Francesco; Tarroni, Giovanni</p> <p>2000-07-15</p> <p>Purpose: To evaluate failing hemodialysis arteriovenous fistulas with helical CT angiography (CTA), MR angiography (MRA), and digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography (DSA), and to compare the efficacy of the three techniques in detecting the number, location, grade, and extent of stenoses and in assessing the technical results of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) and stenting.Methods: Thirteen patients with Brescia-Cimino arteriovenous fistula malfunction underwent MRA and CTA of the fistula and, within 1 week, DSA. A total of 11 PTAs were performed; in three cases an MR-compatible stent was placed. DSA served as the gold standard for comparison in all patients. The presence, site, and number of stenoses or occlusions and the technical results of percutaneous procedures were assessed with DSA, CTA, and MRA.Results: MRA underestimated a single stenosis in one patient; CTA and MRA did not overestimate any stenosis. Significant artifacts related to stent geometry and/or underlying metal were seen in MRA sequences in two cases.Conclusions: CT and MRI can provide information regarding the degree of vascular impairment, helping to stratify patients into those who can have PTA (single or <span class="hlt">multiple</span> stenoses) versus those who require an operative procedure (occlusion). Conventional angiography can be reserved for candidates for percutaneous intervention.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1052924.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1052924.pdf"><span>Redefining the Whole: Common Errors in Elementary Preservice Teachers' Self-Authored Word Problems for Fraction <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dixon, Juli K.; Andreasen, Janet B.; Avila, Cheryl L.; Bawatneh, Zyad; Deichert, Deana L.; Howse, Tashana D.; Turner, Mercedes Sotillo</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>A goal of this study was to examine elementary preservice teachers' (PSTs) ability to contextualize and decontextualize fraction <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> by asking them to write word problems to represent fraction <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> expressions and to choose prewritten word problems to support given fraction <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> expressions. Three themes emerged from the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=5G&id=EJ1090464','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=5G&id=EJ1090464"><span>Ending up with Less: The Role of Working Memory in Solving Simple <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Problems with Positive and Negative Answers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Robert, Nicole D.; LeFevre, Jo-Anne</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Does solving <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> problems with negative answers (e.g., 5-14) require different cognitive processes than solving problems with positive answers (e.g., 14-5)? In a dual-task experiment, young adults (N=39) combined <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> with two working memory tasks, verbal memory and visual-spatial memory. All of the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> problems required…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4280114','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4280114"><span>K-Targeted Metabolomic Analysis Extends Chemical <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> to DESIGNER Extracts: Selective Depletion of Extracts of Hops (Humulus lupulus)⊥</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This study introduces a flexible and compound targeted approach to Deplete and Enrich Select Ingredients to Generate Normalized Extract Resources, generating DESIGNER extracts, by means of chemical <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> or augmentation of metabolites. Targeting metabolites based on their liquid–liquid partition coefficients (K values), K targeting uses countercurrent separation methodology to remove single or <span class="hlt">multiple</span> compounds from a chemically complex mixture, according to the following equation: DESIGNER extract = total extract ± target compound(s). Expanding the scope of the recently reported depletion of extracts by immunoaffinity or solid phase liquid chromatography, the present approach allows a more flexible, single- or multi-targeted removal of constituents from complex extracts such as botanicals. Chemical <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> enables both chemical and biological characterization, including detection of synergism/antagonism by both the <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> targets and the remaining metabolite mixture, as well as definition of the residual complexity of all fractions. The feasibility of the DESIGNER concept is shown by K-targeted <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of four bioactive prenylated phenols, isoxanthohumol (1), 8-prenylnaringenin (2), 6-prenylnaringenin (3), and xanthohumol (4), from a standardized hops (Humulus lupulus L.) extract using specific solvent systems. Conversely, adding K-targeted isolates allows enrichment of the original extract and hence provides an augmented DESIGNER material. <span class="hlt">Multiple</span> countercurrent separation steps were used to purify each of the four compounds, and four DESIGNER extracts with varying depletions were prepared. The DESIGNER approach innovates the characterization of chemically complex extracts through integration of enabling technologies such as countercurrent separation, K-by-bioactivity, the residual complexity concepts, as well as quantitative analysis by 1H NMR, LC-MS, and HiFSA-based NMR fingerprinting. PMID:25437744</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NIMPA.830..381L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NIMPA.830..381L"><span>A Monte Carlo simulation study of an improved K-edge log-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> X-ray imaging using a photon counting CdTe detector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lee, Youngjin; Lee, Amy Candy; Kim, Hee-Joung</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Recently, significant effort has been spent on the development of photons counting detector (PCD) based on a CdTe for applications in X-ray imaging system. The motivation of developing PCDs is higher image quality. Especially, the K-edge <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> (KES) imaging technique using a PCD is able to improve image quality and useful for increasing the contrast resolution of a target material by utilizing contrast agent. Based on above-mentioned technique, we presented an idea for an improved K-edge log-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> (KELS) imaging technique. The KELS imaging technique based on the PCDs can be realized by using different <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> energy width of the energy window. In this study, the effects of the KELS imaging technique and <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> energy width of the energy window was investigated with respect to the contrast, standard deviation, and CNR with a Monte Carlo simulation. We simulated the PCD X-ray imaging system based on a CdTe and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) phantom which consists of the various iodine contrast agents. To acquired KELS images, images of the phantom using above and below the iodine contrast agent K-edge absorption energy (33.2 keV) have been acquired at different energy range. According to the results, the contrast and standard deviation were decreased, when <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> energy width of the energy window is increased. Also, the CNR using a KELS imaging technique is higher than that of the images acquired by using whole energy range. Especially, the maximum differences of CNR between whole energy range and KELS images using a 1, 2, and 3 mm diameter iodine contrast agent were acquired 11.33, 8.73, and 8.29 times, respectively. <span class="hlt">Additionally</span>, the optimum <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> energy width of the energy window can be acquired at 5, 4, and 3 keV for the 1, 2, and 3 mm diameter iodine contrast agent, respectively. In conclusion, we successfully established an improved KELS imaging technique and optimized <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> energy width of the energy window, and based on</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/768416','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/768416"><span>Tumor volume, luxury perfusion, and regional blood volume changes in man visualized by <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> computerized tomography.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Penn, R D; Walser, R; Kurtz, D; Ackerman, L</p> <p>1976-04-01</p> <p>Computer and photographic methods for producing <span class="hlt">subtractions</span> of computerized axial tomographic (CAT) scans have been developed. By <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> point for point a normal scan from one taken after intravenous infusion of contrast material, a picture of the contrast in the cerebral vessels is created. By this method, tumor size and degree of vascularity may be assessed. Furthermore, abnormalities in perfusion and changes in blood volume due to mass effects and edema may be detected. <span class="hlt">Subtracting</span> scans should add to the diagnostic potential of CAT and provide a noninvasive way to study vascular changes in cerebral disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4699220','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4699220"><span>Quality Index for Stereoscopic Images by Separately Evaluating Adding and <span class="hlt">Subtracting</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Yang, Jiachen; Lin, Yancong; Gao, Zhiqun; Lv, Zhihan; Wei, Wei; Song, Houbing</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The human visual system (HVS) plays an important role in stereo image quality perception. Therefore, it has aroused many people’s interest in how to take advantage of the knowledge of the visual perception in image quality assessment models. This paper proposes a full-reference metric for quality assessment of stereoscopic images based on the binocular difference channel and binocular summation channel. For a stereo pair, the binocular summation map and binocular difference map are computed first by adding and <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> the left image and right image. Then the binocular summation is decoupled into two parts, namely <span class="hlt">additive</span> impairments and detail losses. The quality of binocular summation is obtained as the adaptive combination of the quality of detail losses and <span class="hlt">additive</span> impairments. The quality of binocular summation is computed by using the Contrast Sensitivity Function (CSF) and weighted multi-scale (MS-SSIM). Finally, the quality of binocular summation and binocular difference is integrated into an overall quality index. The experimental results indicate that compared with existing metrics, the proposed metric is highly consistent with the subjective quality assessment and is a robust measure. The result have also indirectly proved hypothesis of the existence of binocular summation and binocular difference channels. PMID:26717412</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21929718','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21929718"><span>Identification of immunity-related genes in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Vogel, H; Badapanda, C; Vilcinskas, A</p> <p>2011-12-01</p> <p>Burying beetles reproduce on small vertebrate cadavers which they bury in the soil after localization through volatiles emitted from the carcass. They then chemically preserve the carcass and prepare it as a diet for the adults and their offspring. It is predicted that exposure to high loads of soil and/or carrion-associated microbes necessitates an effective immune system. In the present paper, we report experimental screening for immunity-related genes in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides using the suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization approach. A total of 1179 putative gene objects were identified in the Nicrophorus cDNA library, which was enriched for transcripts differentially expressed upon challenge with heat-inactivated bacteria. In <span class="hlt">addition</span> to genes known to be involved in immunity-related recognition and signalling, we found transcripts encoding for antimicrobial peptides and for an array of enzymes that can be linked to immunity or to stress-induced pathways. We also determined proteins that may contribute to detoxification of toxins produced by microbial competitors. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, factors involved in mRNA stability determination and central components of the RNA interference machinery were identified, implying transcriptional reprogramming and potential stress-induced retrotransposon elimination. The identified candidate immune effector and stress-related genes may provide important information about the unusual ecology and evolution of the burying beetles.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ASAJ..117.1001Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005ASAJ..117.1001Y"><span>Spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>-based speech enhancement for cochlear implant patients in background noise</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yang, Li-Ping; Fu, Qian-Jie</p> <p>2005-03-01</p> <p>A single-channel speech enhancement algorithm utilizing speech pause detection and nonlinear spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> is proposed for cochlear implant patients in the present study. The spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> algorithm estimates the short-time spectral magnitude of speech by <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> the estimated noise spectral magnitude from the noisy speech spectral magnitude. The artifacts produced by spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> (such as ``musical noise'') were significantly reduced by combining variance-reduced gain function and spectral flooring. Sentence recognition by seven cochlear implant subjects was tested under different noisy listening conditions (speech-shaped noise and 6-talker speech babble at +9, +6, +3, and 0 dB SNR) with and without the speech enhancement algorithm. For speech-shaped noise, performance for all subjects at all SNRs was significantly improved by the speech enhancement algorithm; for speech babble, performance was only modestly improved. The results suggest that the proposed speech enhancement algorithm may be beneficial for implant users in noisy listening. .</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20532817','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20532817"><span>Tailed pooled suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (PSSH) adaptors do not alter efficiency.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gerrish, Robert S; Gill, Steven R</p> <p>2010-11-01</p> <p>Suppression <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> Hybridization (SSH) and its derivative, Pooled Suppression <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> hybridization (PSSH), are powerful tools used to study variances larger than ~100 bp in prokaryotic genome structure. The initial steps involve ligating an oligonucleotide of known sequence (the "adaptor") to a fragmented genome to facilitate amplification, <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> and downstream sequencing. SSH results in the creation of a library of unique DNA fragments which have been traditionally analyzed via Sanger sequencing. Numerous next generation sequencing technologies have entered the market yet SSH is incompatible with these platforms. This is due to the high level of sequence conservation of the oligonucleotide used for SSH. This rigid adherence is partly because it has yet to be determined if alteration of this oligonucleotide will have a deleterious impact on <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> efficiency. The <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> occurs when non-unique fragments are inhibited by a secondary self-pairing structure which requires exact nucleotide sequence. We determine if appending custom sequence to the 5' terminal ends of these oligonucleotides during the nested PCR stages of PSSH will reduce <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> efficiency. We compare a pool of ten S. aureus clinical isolates with a standard PSSH and custom tailed-PSSH. We detected no statistically significant difference between their <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> efficiencies. Our observations suggest that the adaptor's terminal ends may be labeled during the nested PCR step. This produces libraries labeled with custom sequence. This does not lead to loss of <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> efficiency and would be invaluable for groups wishing to combine SSH or PSSH with their own downstream applications, such as a high throughput sequencing platform.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6471662','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6471662"><span><span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> radiography for the diagnosis of bone lesions in dogs. Report for 1982-1984</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rethman, M.P.; Ruttiman, U.E.; O'Neal, R.B.; Webber, R.L.; Davis, A.A.</p> <p>1984-05-31</p> <p>Resolution of osseous wounds utilizing conventional radiographic techniques is dependent upon favorable angulation without superimposition of dense anatomical structures. A technique of computer <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> utilizing sequential radiographs has been demonstrated to enhance visualization of such defects in dry skulls, but usefulness in live animals had heretofore not been demonstrated. This investigation demonstrated the usefulness of computer <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> radiography in live animals, both error rate and diagnostic time being reduced significantly.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002435.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002435.htm"><span>Food <span class="hlt">additives</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... or natural. Natural food <span class="hlt">additives</span> include: Herbs or spices to add flavor to foods Vinegar for pickling ... Certain colors improve the appearance of foods. Many spices, as well as natural and man-made flavors, ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5481054','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5481054"><span>Value of blood-pool <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> in cardiac indium-111-labeled platelet imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Machac, J.; Vallabhajosula, S.; Goldman, M.E.; Goldsmith, S.J.; Palestro, C.; Strashun, A.; Vaquer, R.; Phillips, R.A.; Fuster, V. )</p> <p>1989-09-01</p> <p>Blood-pool <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> has been proposed to enhance {sup 111}In-labeled platelet imaging of intracardiac thrombi. We tested the accuracy of labeled platelet imaging, with and without blood-pool <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>, in ten subjects with cardiac thrombi of varying age, eight with endocarditis being treated with antimicrobial therapy and ten normal controls. Imaging was performed early after labeled platelet injection (24 hr or less) and late (48 hr or more). Blood-pool <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> was carried out. All images were graded subjectively by four experienced, blinded readers. Detection accuracy was measured by the sensitivity at three fixed levels of specificity estimated from receiver operator characteristic curve analysis and tested by three-way analysis of variance. Detection accuracy was generally improved on delayed images. Blood-pool <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> did not improve accuracy. Although blood-pool <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> increased detection sensitivity, this was offset by decreased specificity. For this population studied, blood-pool <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> did not improve subjective detection of abnormal platelet deposition by 111In platelet imaging.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=inversion&pg=7&id=EJ1007764','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=inversion&pg=7&id=EJ1007764"><span>Children's <span class="hlt">Additive</span> Concepts: Promoting Understanding and the Role of Inhibition</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Robinson, Katherine M.; Dube, Adam K.</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This study investigated the promotion of children's understanding and acquisition of arithmetic concepts and the effects of inhibitory skills. Children in Grades 3, 4, and 5 solved two sets of three-term <span class="hlt">addition</span> and <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> problems (e.g., 3 + 24 - 24, 3 + 24 - 22) and completed an inhibition task. Half of the participants received a…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22368487','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22368487"><span>FPGA implementation for real-time background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> based on Horprasert model.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rodriguez-Gomez, Rafael; Fernandez-Sanchez, Enrique J; Diaz, Javier; Ros, Eduardo</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> is considered the first processing stage in video surveillance systems, and consists of determining objects in movement in a scene captured by a static camera. It is an intensive task with a high computational cost. This work proposes an embedded novel architecture on FPGA which is able to extract the background on resource-limited environments and offers low degradation (produced because of the hardware-friendly model modification). In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, the original model is extended in order to detect shadows and improve the quality of the segmentation of the moving objects. We have analyzed the resource consumption and performance in Spartan3 Xilinx FPGAs and compared to others works available on the literature, showing that the current architecture is a good trade-off in terms of accuracy, performance and resources utilization. With less than a 65% of the resources utilization of a XC3SD3400 Spartan-3A low-cost family FPGA, the system achieves a frequency of 66.5 MHz reaching 32.8 fps with resolution 1,024 × 1,024 pixels, and an estimated power consumption of 5.76 W.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26914586','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26914586"><span>The association between symbolic and nonsymbolic numerical magnitude processing and mental versus algorithmic <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> in adults.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Linsen, Sarah; Torbeyns, Joke; Verschaffel, Lieven; Reynvoet, Bert; De Smedt, Bert</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>There are two well-known computation methods for solving multi-digit <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> items, namely mental and algorithmic computation. It has been contended that mental and algorithmic computation differentially rely on numerical magnitude processing, an assumption that has already been examined in children, but not yet in adults. Therefore, in this study, we examined how numerical magnitude processing was associated with mental and algorithmic computation, and whether this association with numerical magnitude processing was different for mental versus algorithmic computation. We also investigated whether the association between numerical magnitude processing and mental and algorithmic computation differed for measures of symbolic versus nonsymbolic numerical magnitude processing. Results showed that symbolic, and not nonsymbolic, numerical magnitude processing was associated with mental computation, but not with algorithmic computation. <span class="hlt">Additional</span> analyses showed, however, that the size of this association with symbolic numerical magnitude processing was not significantly different for mental and algorithmic computation. We also tried to further clarify the association between numerical magnitude processing and complex calculation by also including relevant arithmetical subskills, i.e. arithmetic facts, needed for complex calculation that are also known to be dependent on numerical magnitude processing. Results showed that the associations between symbolic numerical magnitude processing and mental and algorithmic computation were fully explained by individual differences in elementary arithmetic fact knowledge.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19296429','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19296429"><span>Effectiveness of an innovative prototype <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> diversity array (SDA) for fingerprinting plant species of medicinal importance.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jayasinghe, Ruchira; Hai Niu, Lin; Coram, Tristan E; Kong, Stephan; Kaganovitch, Janna; Xue, Charlie C L; Li, Chun G; Pang, Edwin C K</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>The accurate identification of medicinal plants is becoming increasingly important due to reported concerns about purity, quality and safety. The previously developed prototype <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> diversity array (SDA) had been validated for the ability to distinguish clade-level targets in a phylogenetically accurate manner. This study represents the rigorous investigation of the SDA for genotyping capabilities, including the genotyping of plant species not included during the construction of the SDA, as well as to lower classification levels including family and species. The results show that the SDA, in its current form, has the ability to accurately genotype species not included during SDA development to clade level. <span class="hlt">Additionally</span>, for those species that were included during SDA development, genotyping is successful to the family level, and to the species level with minor exceptions. Twenty polymorphic SDA features were sequenced in a first attempt to characterize the polymorphic DNA between species, which showed that transposon-like sequences may be valuable as polymorphic features to differentiate angiosperm families and species. Future refinements of the SDA to allow more sensitive genotyping are discussed with the overall goal of accurate medicinal plant identification in mind.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3279231','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3279231"><span>FPGA Implementation for Real-Time Background <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Based on Horprasert Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rodriguez-Gomez, Rafael; Fernandez-Sanchez, Enrique J.; Diaz, Javier; Ros, Eduardo</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> is considered the first processing stage in video surveillance systems, and consists of determining objects in movement in a scene captured by a static camera. It is an intensive task with a high computational cost. This work proposes an embedded novel architecture on FPGA which is able to extract the background on resource-limited environments and offers low degradation (produced because of the hardware-friendly model modification). In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, the original model is extended in order to detect shadows and improve the quality of the segmentation of the moving objects. We have analyzed the resource consumption and performance in Spartan3 Xilinx FPGAs and compared to others works available on the literature, showing that the current architecture is a good trade-off in terms of accuracy, performance and resources utilization. With less than a 65% of the resources utilization of a XC3SD3400 Spartan-3A low-cost family FPGA, the system achieves a frequency of 66.5 MHz reaching 32.8 fps with resolution 1,024 × 1,024 pixels, and an estimated power consumption of 5.76 W. PMID:22368487</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18018972','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18018972"><span>What dot clusters and bar graphs reveal: subitizing is fast counting and <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Boles, David B; Phillips, Jeffrey B; Givens, Somer M</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p>In two studies, we found that dot enumeration tasks resulted in shallow-sloped response time (RT) functions for displays of 1-4 dots and steep-sloped functions for displays of 5-8 dots, replicating results implicating subitizing and counting processes for low and high ranges of dots, respectively. Extracting number from a specific type of bar graph within the same numerical range produced a shallow-sloped but scallop-shaped RT function. Factor analysis confirmed two independent subranges for dots, but all bar graph values defined a unitary factor. Significantly, factor scores and asymmetries both showed correlations of bar graph recognition to dot subitizing but not to dot counting, strongly suggesting that subitizing was used in both enumeration of low numbers of dots and bar graph recognition. According to these results, subitizing appears to be a nonverbal process operating flexibly in either <span class="hlt">additive</span> or <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> fashion on analog quantities having spatial extent, a conclusion consistent with a fast-counting model of subitizing but not with other models of the subitizing process.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4453169','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4453169"><span>A microfabricated fixed path length silicon sample holder improves background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> for cryoSAXS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hopkins, Jesse B.; Katz, Andrea M.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Warkentin, Matthew A.; Thorne, Robert E.; Pollack, Lois</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The application of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) for high-throughput characterization of biological macromolecules in solution is limited by radiation damage. By cryocooling samples, radiation damage and required sample volumes can be reduced by orders of magnitude. However, the challenges of reproducibly creating the identically sized vitrified samples necessary for conventional background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> limit the widespread adoption of this method. Fixed path length silicon sample holders for cryoSAXS have been microfabricated to address these challenges. They have low background scattering and X-ray absorption, require only 640 nl of sample, and allow reproducible sample cooling. Data collected in the sample holders from a nominal illuminated sample volume of 2.5 nl are reproducible down to q ≃ 0.02 Å−1, agree with previous cryoSAXS work and are of sufficient quality for reconstructions that match measured crystal structures. These sample holders thus allow faster, more routine cryoSAXS data collection. <span class="hlt">Additional</span> development is required to reduce sample fracturing and improve data quality at low q. PMID:26089749</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22282950','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22282950"><span>Motion induced second order temperature and y-type anisotropies after the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of linear dipole in the CMB maps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sunyaev, Rashid A.; Khatri, Rishi E-mail: khatri@mpa-garching.mpg.de</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>y-type spectral distortions of the cosmic microwave background allow us to detect clusters and groups of galaxies, filaments of hot gas and the non-uniformities in the warm hot intergalactic medium. Several CMB experiments (on small areas of sky) and theoretical groups (for full sky) have recently published y-type distortion maps. We propose to search for two artificial hot spots in such y-type maps resulting from the incomplete <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of the effect of the motion induced dipole on the cosmic microwave background sky. This dipole introduces, at second order, <span class="hlt">additional</span> temperature and y-distortion anisotropy on the sky of amplitude few μK which could potentially be measured by Planck HFI and Pixie experiments and can be used as a source of cross channel calibration by CMB experiments. This y-type distortion is present in every pixel and is not the result of averaging the whole sky. This distortion, calculated exactly from the known linear dipole, can be <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> from the final y-type maps, if desired.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11313209','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11313209"><span>[Gene expression profiling by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH): a example for its application to the study of lymphomas].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Villalva, C; Trempat, P; Zenou, R C; Delsol, G; Brousset, P</p> <p>2001-03-01</p> <p>Suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) was used to isolate genes that were differentially expressed in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive and ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, this approach was applied to Hodgkin's disease cases with different clinical outcomes. SSH combines a normalization step that equalizes the abundance of cDNAs within the sequences to be tested and a <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> step that excludes the common sequences between the target and the control. In a model system, the SSH technique enriches for rare sequences up to 5,000-fold in one round. We have isolated several genes whose expression varied significantly with regard to the tumour subtypes. There were different genes with known or unknown functions. We aim to compare the results of the SSH approach with those obtained with high density filters. In a near future, we would like to design DNA chips specific of each pathology that could be used for clinical purposes (evaluation of prognosis and therapeutic response).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24807678','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24807678"><span>Differentially-expressed genes identified by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization in the bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells of patients with psoriasis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Zhenying; Yu, Zhen; Tian, Pan; Hou, Suchun; Han, Shixin; Tan, Xuejing; Piao, Yongjun; Liu, Xiaoming</p> <p>2014-07-01</p> <p>Psoriasis is a T cell-mediated, chronic, relapsing and inflammatory cutaneous disorder. The dysfunctional activity of T cells in patients with psoriasis is attributed to bone marrow hematopoietic stem cells (BMHSCs). To understand the pathogenic roles of BMHSCs in psoriasis, a differential gene expression analysis was performed using suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization of the BMHSCs from a patient with psoriasis and a healthy control. Using a cDNA array dot blot screening to screen 600 genes from forward- and reverse-<span class="hlt">subtracted</span> cDNA libraries, 17 differentially-expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified. The genes within the ESTs were observed to be the homologs of genes that are involved in various cellular processes, including hormone signaling, RNA catabolism, protein ADP DNA base melting, transcriptional regulation, cell cycle regulation and metabolism. CD45, which was overexpressed in the psoriatic BMHSCs, was further analyzed using relative quantitative polymerase chain reaction. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, the levels of CD45 in the peripheral blood cells (PBCs) of the patients with psoriasis were markedly increased and closely associated with disease severity. An abnormality of hematopoietic progenitor cells, e.g., CD45 overexpression, may be transferred to PBCs via hematopoiesis, and may account for the psoriasis-inducing properties of activated T cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8711E..09R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8711E..09R"><span>A multi-band spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>-based algorithm for real-time noise cancellation applied to gunshot acoustics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ramos, António L. L.; Holm, Sverre; Gudvangen, Sigmund; Otterlei, Ragnvald</p> <p>2013-06-01</p> <p>Acoustical sniper positioning is based on the detection and direction-of-arrival estimation of the shockwave and the muzzle blast acoustical signals. In real-life situations, the detection and direction-of-arrival estimation processes is usually performed under the influence of background noise sources, e.g., vehicles noise, and might result in non-negligible inaccuracies than can affect the system performance and reliability negatively, specially when detecting the muzzle sound under long range distance and absorbing terrains. This paper introduces a multi-band spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> based algorithm for real-time noise reduction, applied to gunshot acoustical signals. The ballistic shockwave and the muzzle blast signals exhibit distinct frequency contents that are affected differently by <span class="hlt">additive</span> noise. In most real situations, the noise component is colored and a multi-band spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> approach for noise reduction contributes to reducing the presence of artifacts in denoised signals. The proposed algorithm is tested using a dataset generated by combining signals from real gunshots and real vehicle noise. The noise component was generated using a steel tracked military tank running on asphalt and includes, therefore, the sound from the vehicle engine, which varies slightly in frequency over time according to the engine's rpm, and the sound from the steel tracks as the vehicle moves.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/875420','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/875420"><span>Potlining <span class="hlt">Additives</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Rudolf Keller</p> <p>2004-08-10</p> <p>In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining <span class="hlt">additives</span> was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1109092','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1109092"><span>Phosphazene <span class="hlt">additives</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W</p> <p>2013-11-26</p> <p>An <span class="hlt">additive</span> comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an <span class="hlt">additive</span>-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26407639','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26407639"><span>Identification of cold responsive genes in Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Peng, Jinxia; Wei, Pinyuan; Chen, Xiuli; Zeng, Digang; Chen, Xiaohan</p> <p>2016-01-10</p> <p>The Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei) is one of the most widely cultured shrimp species in the world. Despite L. vannamei having tropical origins, it is being reared subtropically, with low temperature stress being one of the most severe threats to its growth, survival and distribution. To unravel the molecular basis of cold tolerance in L. vannamei, the suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) platform was employed to identify cold responsive genes in the hepatopancreas of L. vannamei. Both forward and reverse cDNA libraries were constructed, followed by dot blot hybridization, cloning, sequence analysis and quantitative real-time PCR. These approaches identified 92 cold induced and 48 cold inhibited ESTs to give a total of 37 cold induced and 17 cold inhibited contigs. Some of the identified genes related to stress response or cell defense, such as tetraspanins (TSPANs), DEAD-box helicase, heat shock proteins (HSPs) and metallothionein (MT), which were more abundant in the forward SSH library than in the reverse SSH library. The most abundant Est was a tetraspanin-8 (TSPAN8) homolog dubbed LvTSPAN8. A <span class="hlt">multiple</span> sequence alignment and transmembrane domain prediction was also performed for LvTSPAN8. LvTSPAN8 expression was also examined in the gills, muscle, heart and hepatopancreas following cold exposure and showed the highest expression levels in the hepatopancreas. Overall, this study was able to identify several known genes and novel genes via SSH that appear to be associated with cold stress and will help to provide further insights into the molecular mechanisms regulating cold tolerance in L. vannamei.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810010904','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19810010904"><span>An investigation of self-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> holography in LiNbO3</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vahey, D. W.; Kenan, R. P.; Hartman, N. F.; Sherman, R. C.</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>A sample having self <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> characteristics that were very promising was tested in depth: hologram formation times were on the order of 150 sec, the null signal was less than 2.5% of the peak signal, and no fatigue nor instability was detected over the span of the experiments. Another sample, fabricated with, at most, slight modifications did not perform nearly as well. In all samples, attempts to improve self <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> characteristics by various thermal treatments had no effects or adverse effects, with one exception in which improvement was noted after a time delay of several days. A theory developed to describe self <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> showed the observed decrease in beam intensity with time, but the shape of the predicted decay curve was oscillatory in contrast to the exponential like decay observed. The theory was also inadequate to account for the experimental sensitivity of self <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> to the Bragg angle of the hologram. It is concluded that self <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> is a viable method for optical processing systems requiring background discrimination.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPIE.7963E..2RH','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011SPIE.7963E..2RH"><span>Automated contralateral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of dental panoramic radiographs for detecting abnormalities in paranasal sinus</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hara, Takeshi; Mori, Shintaro; Kaneda, Takashi; Hayashi, Tatsuro; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>Inflammation in the paranasal sinus is often observed in seasonal allergic rhinitis or with colds, but is also an indication for odontogenic tumors, carcinoma of the maxillary sinus or a maxillary cyst. The detection of those findings in dental panoramic radiographs is not difficult for radiologists, but general dentists may miss the findings since they focus on treatments of teeth. The purpose of this work is to develop a contralateral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> method for detecting the odontogenic sinusitis region on dental panoramic radiographs. We developed a contralateral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> technique in paranasal sinus region, consisting of 1) image filtering of the smoothing and sobel operation for noise reduction and edge extraction, 2) image registration of mirrored image by using mutual information, and 3) image display method of <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> pixel data. We employed 56 cases (24 normal and 32 abnormal). The abnormal regions and the normal cases were verified by a board-certified radiologist using CT scans. Observer studies with and without <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> images were performed for 9 readers. The true-positive rate at a 50% confidence level in 7 out of 9 readers was improved, but there was no statistical significance in the difference of area-under-curve (AUC) in each radiologist. In conclusion, the contralateral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> images of dental panoramic radiographs may improve the detection rate of abnormal regions in paranasal sinus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=two+AND+little+AND+words&pg=6&id=EJ1032727','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=two+AND+little+AND+words&pg=6&id=EJ1032727"><span><span class="hlt">Addition</span> and <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Word Problems in Greek Grade A and Grade B Mathematics Textbooks: Distribution and Children's Understanding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Despina, Desli; Harikleia, Loukidou</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Mathematics textbooks are a predominant resource in primary school in Greece, as well as in many other countries. The present study reports on both a content analysis of Greek mathematics textbooks with regard to the types of word problems represented in them and a quantitative analysis of children's achievement in these problems. For the purpose…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=S100&pg=2&id=ED571191','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=S100&pg=2&id=ED571191"><span>Teaching <span class="hlt">Addition</span> and <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Operations with Schematic Place-Value Learning Aids & the Impact on Arithmetic Competency</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kyriakidou-Christofidou, Athina</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The present mixed-methods quasi-experimental study (embedding a case study and a mixed factorial within-between ANOVA test), conducted in a private English school in Limassol, Cyprus, investigated how the use of the schematic learning aids (researcher-made color-coded flash-cards and grids) influence year-2 children's ability to read, write and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJTP...54.2952H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015IJTP...54.2952H"><span>M Times Photon <span class="hlt">Subtraction-Addition</span> Coherent Superposition Operated Odd-Schrődinger-cat State: Nonclassicality and Decoherence</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huang, Li; Guo, Qin; Jiang, Li-ying; Chen, Ge; Xu, Xue-xiang; Yuan, Wen</p> <p>2015-08-01</p> <p>We introduce a new non-Gaussian state (MCSO-OSCS), generated by m times coherent superposition operation acos θ + a †sin θ (MCSO) on odd-Schrődinger-cat state | α 0> - | - α 0>(OSCS), whose normalized constant is shown to be related to Hermite polynomials. We investigate the nonclassical properties of the MCSO-OSCS through Mandel's Q-parameter, quadrature squeezing, the photocount distribution and Wigner function (WF), which is turned out to be influenced by parameters m, θ and α 0. Especially the volume of negative region of WF could increase through controlling the parameters m, θ and α 0. We also investigate the decoherence of the MCSO-OSCS in terms of the fadeaway of the negativity of WF in a thermal environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25752073','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25752073"><span>[The backgroud sky <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> around [OIII] line in LAMOST QSO spectra].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shi, Zhi-Xin; Comte, Georges; Luo, A-Li; Tu, Liang-Ping; Zhao, Yong-Heng; Wu, Fu-Chao</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>At present, most sky-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> methods focus on the full spectrum, not the particular location, especially for the backgroud sky around [OIII] line which is very important to low redshift quasars. A new method to precisely <span class="hlt">subtract</span> sky lines in local region is proposed in the present paper, which sloves the problem that the width of Hβ-[OIII] line is effected by the backgroud sky <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>. The exprimental results show that, for different redshift quasars, the spectral quality has been significantly improved using our method relative to the original batch program by LAMOST. It provides a complementary solution for the small part of LAMOST spectra which are not well handled by LAMOST 2D pipeline. Meanwhile, This method has been used in searching for candidates of double-peaked Active Galactic Nuclei.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5119592','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5119592"><span><span class="hlt">Subtraction</span>-based approach for enhancing the depth sensitivity of time-resolved NIRS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Milej, Daniel; Abdalmalak, Androu; McLachlan, Peter; Diop, Mamadou; Liebert, Adam; St. Lawrence, Keith.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The aim of this study was to evaluate enhancing of the depth sensitivity of time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy with a <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>-based approach. Due to the complexity of light propagation in a heterogeneous media, and to prove the validity of the proposed method in a heterogeneous turbid media we conducted a broad analysis taking into account a number of parameters related to the method as well as various parameters of this media. The results of these experiments confirm that the depth sensitivity of the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>-based approach is better than classical approaches using continuous-wave or time-resolved methods. Furthermore, the results showed that the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>-based approach has a unique, selective sensitivity to a layer at a specific depth. In vivo application of the proposed method resulted in a greater magnitude of the hemodynamic changes during functional activation than with the standard approach. PMID:27895992</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9995E..0IB','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9995E..0IB"><span>The effects of camera jitter for background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> algorithms on fused infrared-visible video streams</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Becker, Stefan; Scherer-Negenborn, Norbert; Thakkar, Pooja; Hübner, Wolfgang; Arens, Michael</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>This paper is a continuation of the work of Becker et al.1 In their work, they analyzed the robustness of various background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> algorithms on fused video streams originating from visible and infrared cameras. In order to cover a broader range of background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> applications, we show the effects of fusing infrared-visible video streams from vibrating cameras on a large set of background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> algorithms. The effectiveness is quantitatively analyzed on recorded data of a typical outdoor sequence with a fine-grained and accurate annotation of the images. Thereby, we identify approaches which can benefit from fused sensor signals with camera jitter. Finally conclusions on what fusion strategies should be preferred under such conditions are given.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040141816&hterms=Myocardial+infarction&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DMyocardial%2Binfarction','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040141816&hterms=Myocardial+infarction&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DMyocardial%2Binfarction"><span>Effect of color coding and <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> on the accuracy of contrast echocardiography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pasquet, A.; Greenberg, N.; Brunken, R.; Thomas, J. D.; Marwick, T. H.</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>BACKGROUND: Contrast echocardiography may be used to assess myocardial perfusion. However, gray scale assessment of myocardial contrast echocardiography (MCE) is difficult because of variations in regional backscatter intensity, difficulties in distinguishing varying shades of gray, and artifacts or attenuation. We sought to determine whether the assessment of rest myocardial perfusion by MCE could be improved with <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> and color coding. METHODS AND RESULTS: MCE was performed in 31 patients with previous myocardial infarction with a 2nd generation agent (NC100100, Nycomed AS), using harmonic triggered or continuous imaging and gain settings were kept constant throughout the study. Digitized images were post processed by <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of baseline from contrast data and colorized to reflect the intensity of myocardial contrast. Gray scale MCE alone, MCE images combined with baseline and <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> colorized images were scored independently using a 16 segment model. The presence and severity of myocardial contrast abnormalities were compared with perfusion defined by rest MIBI-SPECT. Segments that were not visualized by continuous (17%) or triggered imaging (14%) after color processing were excluded from further analysis. The specificity of gray scale MCE alone (56%) or MCE combined with baseline 2D (47%) was significantly enhanced by <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> and color coding (76%, p<0.001) of triggered images. The accuracy of the gray scale approaches (respectively 52% and 47%) was increased to 70% (p<0.001). Similarly, for continuous images, the specificity of gray scale MCE with and without baseline comparison was 23% and 42% respectively, compared with 60% after post processing (p<0.001). The accuracy of colorized images (59%) was also significantly greater than gray scale MCE (43% and 29%, p<0.001). The sensitivity of MCE for both acquisitions was not altered by <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>. CONCLUSION: Post-processing with <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> and color coding significantly improves the accuracy</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22348360','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22348360"><span>Modeling self-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> in angular differential imaging: Application to the HD 32297 debris disk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Esposito, Thomas M.; Fitzgerald, Michael P.; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>We present a new technique for forward-modeling self-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of spatially extended emission in observations processed with angular differential imaging (ADI) algorithms. High-contrast direct imaging of circumstellar disks is limited by quasi-static speckle noise, and ADI is commonly used to suppress those speckles. However, the application of ADI can result in self-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of the disk signal due to the disk's finite spatial extent. This signal attenuation varies with radial separation and biases measurements of the disk's surface brightness, thereby compromising inferences regarding the physical processes responsible for the dust distribution. To compensate for this attenuation, we forward model the disk structure and compute the form of the self-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> function at each separation. As a proof of concept, we apply our method to 1.6 and 2.2 μm Keck adaptive optics NIRC2 scattered-light observations of the HD 32297 debris disk reduced using a variant of the 'locally optimized combination of images' algorithm. We are able to recover disk surface brightness that was otherwise lost to self-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> and produce simplified models of the brightness distribution as it appears with and without self-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span>. From the latter models, we extract radial profiles for the disk's brightness, width, midplane position, and color that are unbiased by self-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span>. Our analysis of these measurements indicates a break in the brightness profile power law at r ≈ 110 AU and a disk width that increases with separation from the star. We also verify disk curvature that displaces the midplane by up to 30 AU toward the northwest relative to a straight fiducial midplane.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4865876','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4865876"><span>Intensity Weighted <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Microscopy Approach for Image Contrast and Resolution Enhancement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Korobchevskaya, Kseniya; Peres, Chiara; Li, Zhibin; Antipov, Alexei; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We propose and demonstrate a novel <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> microscopy algorithm, exploiting fluorescence emission difference or switching laser mode and their derivatives for image enhancement. The key novelty of the proposed approach lies in the weighted <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> coefficient, adjusted pixel-by-pixel with respect to the intensity distributions of initial images. This method produces significant resolution enhancement and minimizes image distortions. Our theoretical and experimental studies demonstrate that this approach can be applied to any optical microscopy techniques, including label free and non-linear methods, where common super-resolution techniques cannot be used. PMID:27174367</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4568467','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4568467"><span>Resolution and contrast enhancement of <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> second harmonic generation microscopy with a circularly polarized vortex beam</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Tian, Nian; Fu, Ling; Gu, Min</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We extend the <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> imaging method to label-free second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy to enhance the spatial resolution and contrast. This method is based on the intensity difference between two images obtained with circularly polarized Gaussian and doughnut-shaped beams, respectively. By characterizing the intensity and polarization distributions of the two focused beams, we verify the feasibility of the <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> imaging method in polarization dependent SHG microscopy. The resolution and contrast enhancement in different biological samples is demonstrated. This work will open a new avenue for the applications of SHG microscopy in biomedical research. PMID:26364733</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=488318','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=488318"><span>Digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> cisternography: a new approach to fistula localisation in cerebrospinal fluid rhinorrhoea.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Byrne, J V; Ingram, C E; MacVicar, D; Sullivan, F M; Uttley, D</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Positive contrast cisternography with digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of fluoroscopy images before computed tomography (CT) was employed in the investigation of eight patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) rhinorrhoea. Fistulae were visualised by preliminary digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> cisternography (DSC) in six patients and in five patients the sites of leakage were confirmed at surgery. Fluoroscopy facilitated interpretation of CT in all the positive studies and in two patients provided information which could not be deduced from CT cisternography (CTC) alone. The combined technique is recommended for the investigation of patients with recurrent and post operative CSF rhinorrhoea and when CTC alone fails to identify the site of leakage. Images PMID:2292701</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...625816K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016NatSR...625816K"><span>Intensity Weighted <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Microscopy Approach for Image Contrast and Resolution Enhancement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Korobchevskaya, Kseniya; Peres, Chiara; Li, Zhibin; Antipov, Alexei; Sheppard, Colin J. R.; Diaspro, Alberto; Bianchini, Paolo</p> <p>2016-05-01</p> <p>We propose and demonstrate a novel <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> microscopy algorithm, exploiting fluorescence emission difference or switching laser mode and their derivatives for image enhancement. The key novelty of the proposed approach lies in the weighted <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> coefficient, adjusted pixel-by-pixel with respect to the intensity distributions of initial images. This method produces significant resolution enhancement and minimizes image distortions. Our theoretical and experimental studies demonstrate that this approach can be applied to any optical microscopy techniques, including label free and non-linear methods, where common super-resolution techniques cannot be used.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5682673','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5682673"><span>Using a digital signal processor as a data stream controller for digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Meng, J.D.; Katz, J.E.</p> <p>1991-10-01</p> <p>High speed, flexibility, and good arithmetic abilities make digital signal processors (DSP) a good choice as input/output controllers for real time applications. The DSP can be made to pre-process data in real time to reduce data volume, to open early windows on what is being acquired and to implement local servo loops. We present an example of a DSP as an input/output controller for a digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiographic imaging system. The DSP pre-processes the raw data, reducing data volume by a factor of two, and is potentially capable of producing real-time <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> images for immediate display.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005NIMPA.548...88R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005NIMPA.548...88R"><span>Absorption edge <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> imaging for volumetric measurement in an animal model of malignant brain tumor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Rigley, S.; Rigon, L.; Ataelmannan, K.; Chapman, D.; Doucette, R.; Griebel, R.; Juurlink, B.; Arfelli, F.; Menk, R.-H.; Tromba, G.; Barroso, R. C.; Beveridge, T.; Lewis, R.; Pavlov, K.; Siu, K.; Hall, C.; Schültke, E.</p> <p>2005-08-01</p> <p>The goal of this project is to determine the feasibility of utilizing colloidal gold as a marker for C6 glioblastoma cells implanted into rat brain as an appropriate model for volumetric measurements of tumors using absorption edge <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> (AES). Phase sensitive X-ray imaging is combined with KES to give good soft tissue contrast. Current methods for volumetric measurements of implanted C6 glioblastoma tumors in rat brains using MRI technology are inadequate due to the small size of the tumor (2.5-4 mm in diameter) and the thickness of the MRI slice (1-1.5 mm). Previously, our group has shown that AES detection of colloidal gold labeled C6 glioblastoma cells implanted into a rat brains may be feasible. The long-term goal for this project is to establish a method, which would allow the researcher to monitor the development of a tumor over time. Most importantly, this technique should allow researchers to accurately determine the potency of a treatment on the size and growth rate for a C6 implanted tumors. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, we plan to challenge the hypothesis that tumors of the glioma type do not metastasize outside of the brain. A sensitive technique for the detection of C6 cells, such as that using colloidal gold and AES/DEI, should enable researchers to detect C6 cells, which have metastasized and migrated to different areas of the body. The ability to detect implanted C6 cells followed by the development of the tumor, the possible migration of the cells and the ability to accurately measure the effects of treatments on the volume of the tumor would be of the utmost importance to brain tumor research.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22056698','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22056698"><span>Identification and characterization of low temperature stress responsive genes in Poncirus trifoliata by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Peng, T; Zhu, X F; Fan, Q J; Sun, P P; Liu, J H</p> <p>2012-01-15</p> <p>Trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata (L.) Raf.) is extremely cold hardy when fully acclimated, but knowledge relevant to the molecular events underlying the acclimation is still limited so far. In this study, forward (4 °C over 25 °C) and reverse (25 °C over 4 °C) suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) libraries were constructed in order to identify the genes involved in cold acclimation in trifoliate orange. After reverse northern blotting analysis and sequencing, a total of 105 and 117 non-redundant differentially expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained from the forward and reverse libraries, respectively. Blast2go analysis revealed that 91 ESTs, 31 from the forward library and 60 from the reverse library, displayed significant sequence homology to the genes with known or putative functions. They were categorized into various functional groups, including catalytic activity, binding protein, structural molecule, enzyme regulator, molecular transducer, electron carrier, and transport activity/transcription regulation. Expression analysis of the selected ESTs by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction was consistent with the results of differential screening. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, time-course expression patterns of the genes further confirmed that they were responsive to low temperature treatment. Among the genes of known functions, many are related to maintenance of cell wall integrity, adjustment of osmotic potential and maintenance of reactive oxygen species homeostasis, implying that these physiological processes might be of paramount significance in rendering protective mechanisms against the low temperature stress. The data presented here gain an insight into the molecular changes underlying the cold acclimation of trifoliate orange, and the results can be of reference for unraveling candidate genes that hold great potential for genetic engineering in an effort to create novel germplasms with enhanced cold stress tolerance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25632965','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25632965"><span>Suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization reveals differentially expressed genes in supraspinous ligaments of patients with ankylosing spondylitis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Ying; Hu, Xu; Zhang, Chao; Zhou, Yue; Chu, Tong-Wei</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a severe chronic inflammatory disease that may ultimately result in the development of a 'bamboo‑like' spine. Although the pathological changes that occur in AS have been extensively investigated, the mechanism underlying spinal fusion during AS remains elusive. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in paraspinal tissues from patients with AS compared with those from healthy controls were therefore investigated. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)‑based suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization was performed using total mRNA from the supraspinal ligaments of three patients with AS and three patients with spinal fractures as controls. From this, 27 genes were identified in all of the three independent forward libraries, which were defined as DEGs associated with AS. Reverse transcription‑quantitative PCR demonstrated that six DEGs were overexpressed in the tissues from patients with AS compared with those from individuals in the control group, including those encoding transforming growth factor β types I and III receptor, vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase‑3, core‑binding factor α1 and bone morphogenetic protein 2. Western blot analysis showed increased expression in all six of these proteins in the samples from patients with AS compared with those in the control groups. These findings suggested that changes in the expression of these genes and proteins are associated with the development of spinal fusion during the pathogenesis of AS. Furthermore, these genes may be novel markers of the risk of developing AS, in <span class="hlt">addition</span> to being targets for the treatment of this disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24583172','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24583172"><span>Construction and analysis of gonad suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization libraries for the rice field eel, Monopterus albus.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qu, Xiancheng; Jiang, Jiaoyun; Shang, Xiaoli; Cheng, Cui; Feng, Long; Liu, Qigen</p> <p>2014-04-25</p> <p>The objective of this study was to investigate gene transcription profiles of the stage IV ovary and the ovotestis of the rice field eel (Monopterus albus) in an attempt to uncover genes involved in sex reversal and gonad development. Suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) libraries were constructed using mRNA from the stage IV ovary and the ovotestis. In total 100 positive clones from the libraries were selected at random and sequenced, and then expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were used to search against sequences in the GenBank database using the BLASTn and BLASTx search algorithms. High quality SSH cDNA libraries and 90 ESTs were obtained. Of these ESTs, 43 showed high homology with genes of known function and these are associated with energy metabolism, signal transduction, transcription regulation and so on. The remaining 47 ESTs shared no homology with any genes in GenBank and are thus considered to be hypothetical genes. Furthermore, the four genes F11, F63, R11, and R47 from the forward and reverse libraries were analyzed in gonad, brain, heart, spleen, liver, kidney and muscle tissues. The results showed that the transcription of the F11 and F63 genes was significantly increased while the expression of the R11 and R47 genes was significantly decreased from IV or V ovary. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, the results also indicated that the four genes' expression was not gonad-tissue specific. This results strongly suggested that they may be involved in the rice field eel gonad development and/or sex reversal.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26271955','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26271955"><span>Suppression <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> Hybridization Versus Next-Generation Sequencing in Plant Genetic Engineering: Challenges and Perspectives.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Sahebi, Mahbod; Hanafi, Mohamed M; Azizi, Parisa; Hakim, Abdul; Ashkani, Sadegh; Abiri, Rambod</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) is an effective method to identify different genes with different expression levels involved in a variety of biological processes. This method has often been used to study molecular mechanisms of plants in complex relationships with different pathogens and a variety of biotic stresses. Compared to other techniques used in gene expression profiling, SSH needs relatively smaller amounts of the initial materials, with lower costs, and fewer false positives present within the results. Extraction of total RNA from plant species rich in phenolic compounds, carbohydrates, and polysaccharides that easily bind to nucleic acids through cellular mechanisms is difficult and needs to be considered. Remarkable advancement has been achieved in the next-generation sequencing (NGS) field. As a result of progress within fields related to molecular chemistry and biology as well as specialized engineering, parallelization in the sequencing reaction has exceptionally enhanced the overall read number of generated sequences per run. Currently available sequencing platforms support an earlier unparalleled view directly into complex mixes associated with RNA in <span class="hlt">addition</span> to DNA samples. NGS technology has demonstrated the ability to sequence DNA with remarkable swiftness, therefore allowing previously unthinkable scientific accomplishments along with novel biological purposes. However, the massive amounts of data generated by NGS impose a substantial challenge with regard to data safe-keeping and analysis. This review examines some simple but vital points involved in preparing the initial material for SSH and introduces this method as well as its associated applications to detect different novel genes from different plant species. This review evaluates general concepts, basic applications, plus the probable results of NGS technology in genomics, with unique mention of feasible potential tools as well as bioinformatics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21981634','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21981634"><span>Isotope labeling studies on the formation of <span class="hlt">multiple</span> <span class="hlt">addition</span> products of alanine in the pyrolysis residue of glucose/alanine mixtures by high-resolution ESI-TOF-MS.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chu, Fong Lam; Sleno, Lekha; Yaylayan, Varoujan A</p> <p>2011-11-09</p> <p>Pyrolysis was used as a microscale sample preparation tool to generate glucose/alanine reaction products to minimize the use of expensive labeled precursors in isotope labeling studies. The residue remaining after the pyrolysis at 250 °C was analyzed by electrospray time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ESI-TOF-MS). It was observed that a peak at m/z 199.1445 in the ESI-TOF-MS spectrum appeared only when the model system contained at least 2-fold excess alanine. The accurate mass determination indeed indicated the presence of two nitrogen atoms in the molecular formula (C(10)H(18)N(2)O(2)). To verify the origin of the carbon atoms in this unknown compound, model studies with [(13)U(6)]glucose, [(13)C-1]alanine, [(13)C-2]alanine, [(13)C-3]alanine, and [(15)N]alanine were also performed. Glucose furnished six carbon atoms, and alanine provides four carbon (2 × C-2 and 2 × C-3) and two nitrogen atoms. When commercially available fructosylalanine (N-attached to C-1) was reacted with only 1 mol of alanine, a peak at m/z 199.1445 was once again observed. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, when 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG) was reacted with a 2-fold excess of alanine, a peak at m/z 199.1433 was also generated, confirming the points of attachment of the two amino acids at C-1 and C-2 atoms of 3-DG. These studies have indicated that amino acids can undergo <span class="hlt">multiple</span> <span class="hlt">addition</span> reactions with 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds such as 3-deoxyglucosone and eventually form a tetrahydropyrazine moiety.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9202858','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9202858"><span><span class="hlt">Multiple</span> EDAS (encephalo-duro-arterio-synangiosis). <span class="hlt">Additional</span> EDAS using the frontal branch of the superficial temporal artery (STA) and the occipital artery for pediatric moyamoya patients in whom EDAS using the parietal branch of STA was insufficient.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tenjin, H; Ueda, S</p> <p>1997-04-01</p> <p>Although parietal EDAS or STA-MCA anastomosis are effective in pediatric moyamoya disease, they do not adequately prevent ischemia in the frontal and occipital lobes. Some <span class="hlt">additional</span> methods that can prevent ischemia in the frontal and occipital lobes are sometimes needed. We investigated whether EDAS using a frontal branch of the superficial temporal artery (frontal EDAS) or EDAS using the occipital artery (occipital EDAS) is preferable. Frontal or occipital EDAS was performed at 15 sites in seven patients with pediatric moyamoya disease. The outcome was estimated by angiography 3 months later, CT findings 3 months later, neurological findings during the follow up period and perioperative complications. The mean follow up period was 14 +/- 6 months after frontal or occipital EDAS. As results, good revascularization from frontal or occipital EDAS was shown in ten of fourteen surgical sites (71%) in angiography. None of the patients showed deterioration of symptoms after frontal or occipital EDAS during the follow up period. None of the patients developed surgical complications. In conclusion, <span class="hlt">multiple</span> EDAS using the frontal branch of STA and the occipital artery is an effective and safe method for preventing ischemia in the frontal and occipital lobe in pediatric moyamoya disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27662423','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27662423"><span><span class="hlt">Additive</span> Technology: Update on Current Materials and Applications in Dentistry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Barazanchi, Abdullah; Li, Kai Chun; Al-Amleh, Basil; Lyons, Karl; Waddell, J Neil</p> <p>2017-02-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Additive</span> manufacturing or 3D printing is becoming an alternative to <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> manufacturing or milling in the area of computer-aided manufacturing. Research on material for use in <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing is ongoing, and a wide variety of materials are being used or developed for use in dentistry. Some materials, however, such as cobalt chromium, still lack sufficient research to allow definite conclusions about the suitability of their use in clinical dental practice. Despite this, due to the wide variety of machines that use <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing, there is much more flexibility in the build material and geometry when building structures compared with <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> manufacturing. Overall <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing produces little material waste and is energy efficient when compared to <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> manufacturing, due to passivity and the <span class="hlt">additive</span> layering nature of the build process. Such features make the technique suitable to be used with fabricating structures out of hard to handle materials such as cobalt chromium. The main limitations of this technology include the appearance of steps due to layering of material and difficulty in fabricating certain material generally used in dentistry for use in 3D printing such as ceramics. The current pace of technological development, however, promises exciting possibilities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mathematical+AND+reasoning&pg=4&id=EJ965375','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mathematical+AND+reasoning&pg=4&id=EJ965375"><span>Helping Students to Connect <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Strategies Improves Mathematical Reasoning for Students and Teachers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sci, Eve</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>After administering an end of unit assessment written by the school's math program, teachers of three second grade classes in a New York City school noticed a majority of the students had not demonstrated mastery of <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> two, two-digit numbers. The teachers worked with the school's math coach to implement an instructional unit that required…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28000251','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28000251"><span>Considering ERP difference scores as individual difference measures: Issues with <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> and alternative approaches.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Meyer, Alexandria; Lerner, Matthew D; De Los Reyes, Andres; Laird, Robert D; Hajcak, Greg</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>There is growing interest in psychophysiological and neural correlates of psychopathology, personality, and other individual differences. Many studies correlate a criterion individual difference variable (e.g., anxiety) with a psychophysiological measurement derived by <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> scores taken from two within-subject conditions. These <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>-based difference scores are intended to increase specificity by isolating variability of interest. Using data on the error-related negativity (ERN) and correct response negativity (CRN) in relation to generalized anxiety disorder (GAD), we highlight several conceptual and practical issues with <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>-based difference scores and propose alternative approaches based on regression. We show that ERN and CRN are highly correlated, and that the ΔERN (i.e., ERN - CRN) is correlated in opposite directions both with ERN and CRN. Bivariate analyses indicate that GAD is related to ΔERN and ERN, but not CRN. We first show that, by using residualized scores, GAD relates both to a larger ERN and smaller CRN. Moreover, by probing the interaction of ERN and CRN, we show that the relationship between GAD and ERN varies by CRN. These latter findings are not evident when using traditional <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>-based difference scores. We then completed follow-up analyses that suggested that an increased P300 in anxious individuals gave rise to the apparent anxiety/CRN relationship observed. These findings have important conceptual implications for facilitating the interpretability of results from individual difference studies of psychophysiology.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20095470','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20095470"><span>[The improved design of table operating box of digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography device].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qi, Xianying; Zhang, Minghai; Han, Fengtan; Tang, Feng; He, Lemin</p> <p>2009-12-01</p> <p>In this paper are analyzed the disadvantages of CGO-3000 digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography table Operating Box. The authors put forward a communication control scheme between single-chip microcomputer(SCM) and programmable logic controller(PLC). The details of hardware and software of communication are given.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6527951','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6527951"><span>Videodensitometric ejection fraction from intravenous digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> right ventriculograms: correlation with first pass radionuclide ejection fraction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Detrano, R.; MacIntyre, W.; Salcedo, E.E.; O'Donnell, J.; Underwood, D.A.; Simpfendorfer, C.; Go, R.T.; Butters, K.; Withrow, S.</p> <p>1985-06-01</p> <p>Thirty-one consecutive patients undergoing intravenous blurred mask digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> right ventriculography were submitted to first pass radionuclide angiography. Second order mask resubtraction of end-diastolic and end-systolic right ventricular digital image frames was executed using preinjection end-diastolic and end-systolic frames to rid the digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> images of mis-registration artifact. End-diastolic and end-systolic perimeters were drawn manually by two independent observers with a light pen. Ejection fractions calculated from the integrated videodensitometric counts within these perimeters correlated well with those derived from the first pass radionuclide right ventriculogram (r = 0.84) and the interobserver correlation was acceptable (r = 0.91). Interobserver differences occurred more frequently in patients with atrial fibrillation and in those whose tricuspid valve planes were difficult to discern on the digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> right ventriculograms. These results suggest that videodensitometric analysis of digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> right ventriculograms is an accurate method of determining right ventricular ejection fraction and may find wide clinical applicability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24647055','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24647055"><span>[Development of a digital chest phantom for studies on energy <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> techniques].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hayashi, Norio; Taniguchi, Anna; Noto, Kimiya; Shimosegawa, Masayuki; Ogura, Toshihiro; Doi, Kunio</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Digital chest phantoms continue to play a significant role in optimizing imaging parameters for chest X-ray examinations. The purpose of this study was to develop a digital chest phantom for studies on energy <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> techniques under ideal conditions without image noise. Computed tomography (CT) images from the LIDC (Lung Image Database Consortium) were employed to develop a digital chest phantom. The method consisted of the following four steps: 1) segmentation of the lung and bone regions on CT images; 2) creation of simulated nodules; 3) transformation to attenuation coefficient maps from the segmented images; and 4) projection from attenuation coefficient maps. To evaluate the usefulness of digital chest phantoms, we determined the contrast of the simulated nodules in projection images of the digital chest phantom using high and low X-ray energies, soft tissue images obtained by energy <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>, and "gold standard" images of the soft tissues. Using our method, the lung and bone regions were segmented on the original CT images. The contrast of simulated nodules in soft tissue images obtained by energy <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> closely matched that obtained using the gold standard images. We thus conclude that it is possible to carry out simulation studies based on energy <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> techniques using the created digital chest phantoms. Our method is potentially useful for performing simulation studies for optimizing the imaging parameters in chest X-ray examinations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED500957.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED500957.pdf"><span>"It is Possible to Die Before Being Born". Negative Integers <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span>: A Case Study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Gallardo, Aurora</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>A Case Study is presented in this article, where there is a contradiction between pre-algebraic language semantic and syntax used to solve word problems through a negative integers <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>. Appendix includes answer key. (Contains 1 figure.) [For complete proceedings, see ED500859.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20070038216','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20070038216"><span>Spectral Dark <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span>: A MODTRAN-Based Algorithm for Estimating Ground Reflectance without Atmospheric Information</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Freedman, Ellis; Ryan, Robert; Pagnutti, Mary; Holekamp, Kara; Gasser, Gerald; Carver, David; Greer, Randy</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Spectral Dark <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> (SDS) provides good ground reflectance estimates across a variety of atmospheric conditions with no knowledge of those conditions. The algorithm may be sensitive to errors from stray light, calibration, and excessive haze/water vapor. SDS seems to provide better estimates than traditional algorithms using on-site atmospheric measurements much of the time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18839114','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18839114"><span>cDNA amplification by SMART-PCR and suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH)-PCR.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hillmann, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Kenny, Dermot</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The comparison of two RNA populations that differ from the effects of a single-independent variable, such as a drug treatment or a specific genetic defect, can identify differences in the abundance of specific transcripts that vary in a population-dependent manner. There are a variety of methods for identifying differentially expressed genes, including microarray, SAGE, qRT-PCR, and DDGE. This protocol describes a potentially less sensitive yet relatively easy and cost-effective alternative that does not require prior knowledge of the transcriptomes under investigation and is particularly applicable when minimal levels of starting material, RNA, are available. RNA input can often be a limiting factor when analyzing RNA from, for example, rigorously purified blood cells. This protocol describes the use of SMART-PCR to amplify cDNA from sub-microgram levels of RNA. The amplified cDNA populations under comparison are then subjected to suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH-PCR), a technique that couples <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization with suppression PCR to selectively amplify fragments of differentially expressed genes. The final products are cDNA populations enriched for significantly over-represented transcripts in either of the two input RNA preparations. These cDNA populations may then be cloned to make <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> cDNA libraries and/or used as probes to screen <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> cDNA, global cDNA, or genomic DNA libraries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999SPIE.3661...44H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999SPIE.3661...44H"><span>Detecting small anatomical change with 3D serial MR <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> images</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Holden, Mark; Denton, Erica R. E.; Jarosz, J. M.; Cox, T. C.; Studholme, Colin; Hawkes, David J.; Hill, Derek L.</p> <p>1999-05-01</p> <p>Spoiled gradient echo volume MR scans were obtained from 5 growth hormone (GH) patients and 6 normal controls. The patients were scanned before treatment and after 3 and 6 months of GH therapy. The controls were scanned at similar intervals. A calibration phantom was scanned on the same day as each subject. The phantom images were registered with a 9 degree of freedom algorithm to measure scaling errors due to changes in scanner calibration. The second and third images were each registered with a 6 degree of freedom algorithm to the first (baseline) image by maximizing normalized mutual information, and transformed, with and without scaling error correction, using sinc interpolation. Each registered and transformed image had the baseline image <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> to generate a difference image. Two neuro-radiologists were trained to detect structural change with difference images containing synthetic misregistration and scale changes. They carried out a blinded assessment of anatomical change for the unregistered; aligned and <span class="hlt">subtracted</span>; and scale corrected, aligned and <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> images. The results show a significant improvement in the detection of structural change and inter-observer agreement when aligned and <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> images were used instead of unregistered ones. The structural change corresponded to an increase in brain: CSF ratio.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22307284','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22307284"><span>Identification of a pheA gene associated with Streptococcus mitis by using suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Park, Hee Kuk; Dang, Hien Thanh; Myung, Soon Chul; Kim, Wonyong</p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>We performed suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization to identify genomic differences between Streptococcus mitis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. Based on the pheA gene, a primer set specific to S. mitis detection was found in 18 out of 103 S. mitis-specific clones. Our findings would be useful for discrimination of S. mitis from other closely related cocci in the oral environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=curing+AND+methods&pg=2&id=ED220297','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=curing+AND+methods&pg=2&id=ED220297"><span>The Effects of Mapping Instruction on Children's Procedural Bugs in <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Omanson, Susan F.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>This study was designed to follow up earlier work on mapping instruction. The two main goals were to: (1) test the effectiveness of mapping instruction as a general cure for "buggy" <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> algorithms, and (2) explore two alternative explanations of how this new form of instruction works. It was hypothesized that mapping cures bugs…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12031294','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12031294"><span>Issues relating to the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> phase in EOG artefact correction of the EEG.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Croft, Rodney J; Barry, Robert J</p> <p>2002-06-01</p> <p>An important method for removing the effect of ocular artefact from the EEG is 'EOG correction'. This method estimates the proportion of ocular artefact that is in the EEG, and removes it by <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>. To date, EOG correction research has focused on problems relating to the estimation of the correction coefficients. Using both mathematical rationale and empirical data, this paper addresses issues relating to the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> phase, such as the magnitude of error that can be expected due to EOG correction. Using ERP methodology, principal component and regression analyses, it is shown that the N1P2 complex propagates forward to the horizontal and radial (but not vertical) electrooculograms (EOG), and it is shown mathematically that this will result in EOG-correction error. Assuming an accurate estimate of ocular contamination of the EEG, maximal <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>-phase error of the N1P2 complex was found to be a prefrontal attenuation of 15-22%, decreasing to central and occipital enhancements of 3-4% and 13-14%, respectively. The magnitude of this <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>-phase error is compared to between-subject ERP variability and to error associated with EOG rejection (omitting data contaminated by ocular artefact). It is argued that such EOG correction error is small relative to both artefact rejection procedures and to normal variability found in ERP studies, and that it is less pernicious than artefact rejection procedures.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26782517','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26782517"><span>Screening of genes related to ovarian development in the swimming crab, Portunus trituberculatus, by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Yu, Z B; Mu, C K; Song, W W; Li, R H; Chen, Y E; Wang, C L</p> <p>2015-12-29</p> <p>The swimming crab, Portunus trituberculatus, is an important marine animal and is widely cultured in China. In the present study, suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization was applied to identify the differentially expressed genes in the ovaries of mature and immature P. trituberculatus. One hundred and seventy six expressed sequence tag (ESTs) were identified, of which 100 were down-regulated, and 76 up-regulated. BLAST analysis identified 51 unigenes, of which 27 were down-regulated, and 24 up-regulated. Quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction results indicated that the SSH technique is valuable in screening genes related to ovarian development. Genes identified in this study encoded proteins corresponding to a wide range of functions and included immune response protein, transcription initiation factor, metabolic proteins, chromosome, histone h3, ovarian development-related protein, and vitellogenin. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, 64 metabolic pathways were annotated in differentially expressed ESTs by using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway. Four annotated pathways (oxidative phosphorylation, carbon metabolism, fatty acid degradation, and protein digestion and absorption) appeared to be involved in ovarian development. In ontology analysis, 5.83% of the cellular process genes in reverse <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> cDNA library are involved in reproduction, and 5.88% involved in developmental process. In up-regulated genes, myosin II-expressed polehole-like protein; histone h3; ovigerous-hair stripping substance; peritrophin 48; and ovarian development-related protein appeared to be involved in ovarian development. Identification of differentially expressed genes in the mature and immature ovary of the swimming crab provides new insights for further studies on the mechanism underlying ovarian development in this species.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12072416','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12072416"><span>A novel TRH-PFTAIRE protein kinase 1 pathway in the cerebellum: <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization analysis of TRH-deficient mice.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hashida, Tetsu; Yamada, Masanobu; Hashimoto, Koshi; Shibusawa, Nobuyuki; Monden, Tsuyoushi; Satoh, Teturou; Mori, Masatomo</p> <p>2002-07-01</p> <p>TRH has been reported to possess several neurophysiological actions in the brain. To gain insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects, particularly in the cerebellum, we attempted to clone a cDNA that was regulated by TRH using TRH knockout mice and <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> cDNA analysis. Over 100 clones obtained by <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization analysis between the wild-type and TRH-1-cerebellum were analyzed. Four clones among them were identical and cdc2-related kinase (PFTAIRE protein kinase 1 (PFTK1)) cDNA, which was previously reported to be expressed only in the brain and testis. PFTK1 mRNA levels in the euthyroid TRH-1- cerebellum supplemented with thyroid hormone were significantly decreased compared with those in the wild-type. Induction of PFTK1 mRNA by TRH was also observed in a time- and dose-dependent manner in human medulloblastoma-derived HTB-185 cells that expressed TRH receptor subtype I mRNA. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, treatment of 8-Br-cGMP significantly increased PFTK1 mRNA levels, and a specific inhibitor of cGMP production, ODQ, completely blocked TRH-induced expression of PFTK1 mRNA. Furthermore, induction of PFrK1 mRNA by TRH was significantly inhibited by a NOS specific inhibitor, L-NAME, but not by a MEK inhibitor, PD98059 or a calcium channel inhibitor, nimodipine. These findings demonstrated, for the first time, a novel pathway between a neuropeptide and a cell cycle related peptide in the brain, and PFTK1 may be a key regulator for TRH action in t he cerebellum through t he NO-cGMP pathway.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvD..90d2003V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014PhRvD..90d2003V"><span>Data series <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> with unknown and unmodeled background noise</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vitale, Stefano; Congedo, Giuseppe; Dolesi, Rita; Ferroni, Valerio; Hueller, Mauro; Vetrugno, Daniele; Weber, William Joseph; Audley, Heather; Danzmann, Karsten; Diepholz, Ingo; Hewitson, Martin; Korsakova, Natalia; Ferraioli, Luigi; Gibert, Ferran; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Nofrarias, Miquel; Inchauspe, Henri; Plagnol, Eric; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul W.; Armano, Michele; Thorpe, James Ira; Wass, Peter</p> <p>2014-08-01</p> <p>LISA Pathfinder (LPF), the precursor mission to a gravitational wave observatory of the European Space Agency, will measure the degree to which two test masses can be put into free fall, aiming to demonstrate a suppression of disturbance forces corresponding to a residual relative acceleration with a power spectral density (PSD) below (30 fm/s2/√Hz )2 around 1 mHz. In LPF data analysis, the disturbance forces are obtained as the difference between the acceleration data and a linear combination of other measured data series. In many circumstances, the coefficients for this linear combination are obtained by fitting these data series to the acceleration, and the disturbance forces appear then as the data series of the residuals of the fit. Thus the background noise or, more precisely, its PSD, whose knowledge is needed to build up the likelihood function in ordinary maximum likelihood fitting, is here unknown, and its estimate constitutes instead one of the goals of the fit. In this paper we present a fitting method that does not require the knowledge of the PSD of the background noise. The method is based on the analytical marginalization of the posterior parameter probability density with respect to the background noise PSD, and returns an estimate both for the fitting parameters and for the PSD. We show that both these estimates are unbiased, and that, when using averaged Welch's periodograms for the residuals, the estimate of the PSD is consistent, as its error tends to zero with the inverse square root of the number of averaged periodograms. <span class="hlt">Additionally</span>, we find that the method is equivalent to some implementations of iteratively reweighted least-squares fitting. We have tested the method both on simulated data of known PSD and on data from several experiments performed with the LISA Pathfinder end-to-end mission simulator.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150022920','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150022920"><span>Data Series <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> with Unknown and Unmodeled Background Noise</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Vitale, Stefano; Congedo, Giuseppe; Dolesi, Rita; Ferroni, Valerio; Hueller, Mauro; Vetrugno, Daniele; Weber, William Joseph; Audley, Heather; Danzmann, Karsten; Diepholz, Ingo; Hewitson, Martin; Korsakova, Natalia; Ferraioli, Luigi; Gibert, Ferran; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Nofrarias, Miquel; Inchauspe, Henri; Plagnol, Eric; Jennrich, Oliver; McNamara, Paul W.; Armano, Michele; Thorpe, James Ira; Wass, Peter</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>LISA Pathfinder (LPF), the precursor mission to a gravitational wave observatory of the European Space Agency, will measure the degree to which two test masses can be put into free fall, aiming to demonstrate a suppression of disturbance forces corresponding to a residual relative acceleration with a power spectral density (PSD) below (30 fm/sq s/Hz)(sup 2) around 1 mHz. In LPF data analysis, the disturbance forces are obtained as the difference between the acceleration data and a linear combination of other measured data series. In many circumstances, the coefficients for this linear combination are obtained by fitting these data series to the acceleration, and the disturbance forces appear then as the data series of the residuals of the fit. Thus the background noise or, more precisely, its PSD, whose knowledge is needed to build up the likelihood function in ordinary maximum likelihood fitting, is here unknown, and its estimate constitutes instead one of the goals of the fit. In this paper we present a fitting method that does not require the knowledge of the PSD of the background noise. The method is based on the analytical marginalization of the posterior parameter probability density with respect to the background noise PSD, and returns an estimate both for the fitting parameters and for the PSD. We show that both these estimates are unbiased, and that, when using averaged Welchs periodograms for the residuals, the estimate of the PSD is consistent, as its error tends to zero with the inverse square root of the number of averaged periodograms. <span class="hlt">Additionally</span>, we find that the method is equivalent to some implementations of iteratively reweighted least-squares fitting. We have tested the method both on simulated data of known PSD and on data from several experiments performed with the LISA Pathfinder end-to-end mission simulator.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1344361-modeling-additive-manufacturing-processes-metals-challenges-opportunities','SCIGOV-DOEP'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/pages/biblio/1344361-modeling-additive-manufacturing-processes-metals-challenges-opportunities"><span>Modeling of <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing processes for metals: Challenges and opportunities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/pages">DOE PAGES</a></p> <p>Francois, Marianne M.; Sun, Amy; King, Wayne E.; ...</p> <p>2017-01-09</p> <p>Here, with the technology being developed to manufacture metallic parts using increasingly advanced <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing processes, a new era has opened up for designing novel structural materials, from designing shapes and complex geometries to controlling the microstructure (alloy composition and morphology). The material properties used within specific structural components are also designable in order to meet specific performance requirements that are not imaginable with traditional metal forming and machining (<span class="hlt">subtractive</span>) techniques.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4865503','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4865503"><span>Strategies for Human Tumor Virus Discoveries: From Microscopic Observation to Digital Transcriptome <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mirvish, Ezra D.; Shuda, Masahiro</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Over 20% of human cancers worldwide are associated with infectious agents, including viruses, bacteria, and parasites. Various methods have been used to identify human tumor viruses, including electron microscopic observations of viral particles, immunologic screening, cDNA library screening, nucleic acid hybridization, consensus PCR, viral DNA array chip, and representational difference analysis. With the Human Genome Project, a large amount of genetic information from humans and other organisms has accumulated over the last decade. Utilizing the available genetic databases, Feng et al. (2007) developed digital transcriptome <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> (DTS), an in silico method to sequentially <span class="hlt">subtract</span> human sequences from tissue or cellular transcriptome, and discovered Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV) from Merkel cell carcinoma. Here, we review the background and methods underlying the human tumor virus discoveries and explain how DTS was developed and used for the discovery of MCV. PMID:27242703</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986SPIE..626..301R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986SPIE..626..301R"><span>Use Of Image Similarity For The Selection Or Synthesis Of Projections For <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Radiography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ruttimann, Urs E.; van der Stelt, Paul F.; Webber, Richard L.</p> <p>1986-06-01</p> <p>The use of <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> radiography in dentistry is impeded by the necessity to couple physically the x-ray source, the patient and the film, in order to achieve a reproducible projection geometry. This need can he obviated by the ability to synthesize arbitrary projection images from a basis set of projections bearing a known geometric relationship to each other. Implementation of this method requires knowledge of the projection angle of the desired projection image relative to the basis set. This investigation explores the feasibility of using the gray-level standard deviations in corresponding <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> images as similarity measures, in order to determine retrospectively the projection angle of a radiograph of interest with respect to the set of basis projections. An iterative coordinate estimation procedure is developed incorporating this technique, and its accuracy is evaluated using radiographs obtained from dry skull specimens.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvC..92c4303G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvC..92c4303G"><span><span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> method in the second random-phase approximation: First applications with a Skyrme energy functional</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gambacurta, D.; Grasso, M.; Engel, J.</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>We make use of a <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> procedure, introduced to overcome double-counting problems in beyond-mean-field theories, in the second random-phase-approximation (SRPA) for the first time. This procedure guarantees the stability of the SRPA (so that all excitation energies are real). We show that the method fits perfectly into nuclear density-functional theory. We illustrate applications to the monopole and quadrupole response and to low-lying 0+ and 2+ states in the nucleus 16O . We show that the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> procedure leads to (i) results that are weakly cutoff dependent and (ii) a considerable reduction of the SRPA downwards shift with respect to the random-phase approximation (RPA) spectra (systematically found in all previous applications). This implementation of the SRPA model will allow a reliable analysis of the effects of two particle-two hole configurations (2p2h) on the excitation spectra of medium-mass and heavy nuclei.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24390235','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24390235"><span><span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> screen of potential limb regeneration related genes from Pachytriton brevipes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Jiang, Dan; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Zhao, Jun-Fang; Zhou, Yan-Kuan; Zhong, Chao; Zhang, Ji; Huang, Xiao</p> <p>2014-02-01</p> <p>Regeneration capacity varies greatly among different animal species. In vertebrate, amphibian especially the Urodela, has been used as a powerful model system to study the mechanism of tissue regeneration because of the strong ability to regenerate their damaged or lost appendages. Pachytriton brevipes, a species of newt, which is widely distributed in south of China, can completely restore their damaged limbs within several months. In this study, we use modified suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization assay and dot-blot screening to identify candidate genes involved in tissue regeneration in P. brevipes. We successfully isolated 81 ESTs from a forward regeneration <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> library. And we further verified the differential expression of four candidate genes, Rpl11, Cirbp, Ag2 and Trimx, between regenerating blastema and non-regeneration tissues by in situ hybridization. These genes were also be further characterized by phylogenetic and bioinformatic analysis. In general, we provided a comparative experimental approach to study the mechanisms of vertebrate regeneration.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApJ...773...38G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013ApJ...773...38G"><span>The Application of Continuous Wavelet Transform Based Foreground <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Method in 21 cm Sky Surveys</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gu, Junhua; Xu, Haiguang; Wang, Jingying; An, Tao; Chen, Wen</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>We propose a continuous wavelet transform based non-parametric foreground <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> method for the detection of redshifted 21 cm signal from the epoch of reionization. This method works based on the assumption that the foreground spectra are smooth in frequency domain, while the 21 cm signal spectrum is full of saw-tooth-like structures, thus their characteristic scales are significantly different. We can distinguish them in the wavelet coefficient space easily and perform the foreground <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>. Compared with the traditional spectral fitting based method, our method is more tolerant to complex foregrounds. Furthermore, we also find that when the instrument has uncorrected response error, our method can also work significantly better than the spectral fitting based method. Our method can obtain similar results with the Wp smoothing method, which is also a non-parametric method, but our method consumes much less computing time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17571159','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17571159"><span>Comments on "comparison between orthogonal subspace projection and background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> techniques applied to remote-sensing data".</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Johnson, Steven</p> <p>2007-07-01</p> <p>Ben-David and Ren [Appl. Opt. 44, 3846 (2005)] discussed methods of estimating the concentration of chemical vapor plumes in hyperspectral images. The authors of that paper concluded that a technique called orthogonal subspace projection (OSP) produces better concentration estimates than background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> when certain stochastic noise conditions are present in the data. While that conclusion is correct, it is worth noting that the data can be whitened to improve the performance of the background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> method. In particular, if the noise is multivariate Gaussian, then whitening will ensure that the background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> method is superior to OSP.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8670E..3FS','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8670E..3FS"><span>Temporal <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> system on torso FDG-PET scans based on statistical image analysis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shimizu, Yusuke; Hara, Takeshi; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Zhou, Xiangrong; Muramatsu, Chisako; Ito, Satoshi; Hakozaki, Kenta; Kumita, Shin-ichiro; Ishihara, Kei-ichi; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>Diagnostic imaging on FDG-PET scans was often used to evaluate chemotherapy results of cancer patients. Radiologists compare the changes of lesions' activities between previous and current examinations for the evaluation. The purpose of this study was to develop a new computer-aided detection (CAD) system with temporal <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> technique for FDGPET scans and to show the fundamental usefulness based on an observer performance study. Z-score mapping based on statistical image analysis was newly applied to the temporal <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> technique. The <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> images can be obtained based on the anatomical standardization results because all of the patients' scans were deformed into standard body shape. An observer study was performed without and with computer outputs to evaluate the usefulness of the scheme by ROC (receiver operating characteristics) analysis. Readers responded as confidence levels on a continuous scale from absolutely no change to definitely change between two examinations. The recognition performance of the computer outputs for the 43 pairs was 96% sensitivity with 31.1 false-positive marks per scan. The average of area-under-the-ROC-curve (AUC) from 4 readers in the observer performance study was increased from 0.85 without computer outputs to 0.90 with computer outputs (p=0.0389, DBM-MRMC). The average of interpretation time was slightly decreased from 42.11 to 40.04 seconds per case (p=0.625, Wilcoxon test). We concluded that the CAD system for torso FDG-PET scans with temporal <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> technique might improve the diagnostic accuracy of radiologist in cancer therapy evaluation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27586658','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27586658"><span><span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> transcriptome analysis of leaf and rhizome reveals differentially expressed transcripts in Panax sokpayensis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gurung, Bhusan; Bhardwaj, Pardeep K; Talukdar, Narayan C</p> <p>2016-11-01</p> <p>In the present study, suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) strategy was used to identify rare and differentially expressed transcripts in leaf and rhizome tissues of Panax sokpayensis. Out of 1102 randomly picked clones, 513 and 374 high quality expressed sequenced tags (ESTs) were generated from leaf and rhizome <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> libraries, respectively. Out of them, 64.92 % ESTs from leaf and 69.26 % ESTs from rhizome SSH libraries were assembled into different functional categories, while others were of unknown function. In particular, ESTs encoding galactinol synthase 2, ribosomal RNA processing Brix domain protein, and cell division cycle protein 20.1, which are involved in plant growth and development, were most abundant in the leaf SSH library. Other ESTs encoding protein KIAA0664 homologue, ubiquitin-activating enzyme e11, and major latex protein, which are involved in plant immunity and defense response, were most abundant in the rhizome SSH library. <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> ESTs also showed similarity with genes involved in ginsenoside biosynthetic pathway, namely farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase, squalene synthase, and dammarenediol synthase. Expression profiles of selected ESTs validated the quality of libraries and confirmed their differential expression in the leaf, stem, and rhizome tissues. In silico comparative analyses revealed that around 13.75 % of unigenes from the leaf SSH library were not represented in the available leaf transcriptome of Panax ginseng. Similarly, around 18.12, 23.75, 25, and 6.25 % of unigenes from the rhizome SSH library were not represented in available root/rhizome transcriptomes of P. ginseng, Panax notoginseng, Panax quinquefolius, and Panax vietnamensis, respectively, indicating a major fraction of novel ESTs. Therefore, these <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> transcriptomes provide valuable resources for gene discovery in P. sokpayensis and would complement the available transcriptomes from other Panax species.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..92l5001B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvD..92l5001B"><span>Maximal Abelian and Curci-Ferrari gauges in momentum <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> at three loops</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bell, J. M.; Gracey, J. A.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The vertex structure of QCD fixed in the maximal Abelian gauge (MAG) and Curci-Ferrari gauge is analyzed at two loops at the fully symmetric point for the 3-point functions corresponding to the three momentum <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> (MOM) renormalization schemes. Consequently, the three-loop renormalization group functions are determined for each of these three schemes in each gauge using properties of the renormalization group equation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20165090','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20165090"><span>Real-time optical <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of photographic imagery for difference detection.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ebersole, J F; Wyant, J C</p> <p>1976-04-01</p> <p>Interferometric techniques described in this paper permit real-time optical image <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of two input photograph transparencies without the necessity of intermediate processing steps (e.g., holograms or contact-print transparencies). These interferometric techniques allow the use of a white-light source as well as an extended light source, small input-collimator optics, and optical components with minimal requirements on wavefront quality. Experimental results with NASA LANDSAT (formerly ERTS) photographs are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006EJASP2007..351H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006EJASP2007..351H"><span>Power Spectral Density Error Analysis of Spectral <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Type of Speech Enhancement Methods</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Händel, Peter</p> <p>2006-12-01</p> <p>A theoretical framework for analysis of speech enhancement algorithms is introduced for performance assessment of spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> type of methods. The quality of the enhanced speech is related to physical quantities of the speech and noise (such as stationarity time and spectral flatness), as well as to design variables of the noise suppressor. The derived theoretical results are compared with the outcome of subjective listening tests as well as successful design strategies, performed by independent research groups.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/649400','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/649400"><span>A comparison of segmentation and emission <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> for singles transmission in PET</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Smith, R.J.; Karp, J.S.; Benard, F.; Alavi, A.; Gualtieri, E.; Muehllehner, G.; Geagan, M.</p> <p>1998-06-01</p> <p>Single photon transmission scans, using {sup 137}Cs (662 keV gamma rays), are performed post-injection for clinical whole body PET studies. Two methods of processing the transmission data are investigated. The first method segments the transmission image into lung and soft tissues volumes. Average attenuation coefficients for 511 keV are applied and this transmission image is forward projected for attenuation correction. In the second method short emission contamination (EC) scans are performed after the singles transmission scans. These are singles transmission scans without a {sup 137}Cs transmission source. These EC scans are then <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> from the transmission scans to remove contamination of the 662 keV energy window by 511 keV emission gamma rays. From ten patients studied by this method, the EC <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> transmission images have average soft tissue attenuation coefficients of 0.074/cm, compared to the expected value of 0.086/cm for 662 keV gamma rays. Simple scaling of these transmission images to 511 keV values (0.095/cm) results in quantitative attenuation correction. A comparison of the two methods is made for these ten patient studies. Both methods result in accurate attenuation correction. The segmentation method performs low noise attenuation correction but is more limited to torso studies with the limbs out of the FOV. The EC <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> method is more versatile and is applicable to the entire body but results in some more noise in the fully corrected images.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21414647','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21414647"><span>Nonlinear ultrasonic imaging method for closed cracks using <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of responses at different external loads.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ohara, Yoshikazu; Horinouchi, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Makoto; Shintaku, Yohei; Yamanaka, Kazushi</p> <p>2011-08-01</p> <p>To improve the selectivity of closed cracks for objects other than cracks in ultrasonic imaging, we propose an extension of a novel imaging method, namely, subharmonic phased array for crack evaluation (SPACE) as well as another approach using the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of responses at different external loads. By applying external static or dynamic loads to closed cracks, the contact state in the cracks varies, resulting in an intensity change of responses at cracks. In contrast, objects other than cracks are independent of external load. Therefore, only cracks can be extracted by <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> responses at different loads. In this study, we performed fundamental experiments on a closed fatigue crack formed in an aluminum alloy compact tension (CT) specimen using the proposed method. We examined the static load dependence of SPACE images and the dynamic load dependence of linear phased array (PA) images by simulating the external loads with a servohydraulic fatigue testing machine. By <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> the images at different external loads, we show that this method is useful in extracting only the intensity change of responses related to closed cracks, while canceling the responses of objects other than cracks.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14680275','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14680275"><span>Scatter-to-primary based scatter fractions for transmission-dependent convolution <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of SPECT images.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Larsson, Anne; Johansson, Lennart</p> <p>2003-11-21</p> <p>In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), transmission-dependent convolution <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> has been shown to be useful when correcting for scattered events. The method is based on convolution <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>, but includes a matrix of scatter fractions instead of a global scatter fraction. The method can be extended to iteratively improve the scatter estimate, but in this note we show that this requires a modification of the theory to use scatter-to-total scatter fractions for the first iteration only and scatter-to-primary fractions thereafter. To demonstrate this, scatter correction is performed on a Monte Carlo simulated image of a point source of activity in water. The modification of the theory is compared to corrections where the scatter fractions are based on the scatter-to-total ratio, using one and ten iterations. The resulting ratios of <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> to original counts are compared to the true scatter-to-total ratio of the simulation and the most accurate result is found for our modification of the theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23787148','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23787148"><span>Estimating background-<span class="hlt">subtracted</span> fluorescence transients in calcium imaging experiments: a quantitative approach.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Joucla, Sébastien; Franconville, Romain; Pippow, Andreas; Kloppenburg, Peter; Pouzat, Christophe</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>Calcium imaging has become a routine technique in neuroscience for subcellular to network level investigations. The fast progresses in the development of new indicators and imaging techniques call for dedicated reliable analysis methods. In particular, efficient and quantitative background fluorescence <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> routines would be beneficial to most of the calcium imaging research field. A background-<span class="hlt">subtracted</span> fluorescence transients estimation method that does not require any independent background measurement is therefore developed. This method is based on a fluorescence model fitted to single-trial data using a classical nonlinear regression approach. The model includes an appropriate probabilistic description of the acquisition system's noise leading to accurate confidence intervals on all quantities of interest (background fluorescence, normalized background-<span class="hlt">subtracted</span> fluorescence time course) when background fluorescence is homogeneous. An automatic procedure detecting background inhomogeneities inside the region of interest is also developed and is shown to be efficient on simulated data. The implementation and performances of the proposed method on experimental recordings from the mouse hypothalamus are presented in details. This method, which applies to both single-cell and bulk-stained tissues recordings, should help improving the statistical comparison of fluorescence calcium signals between experiments and studies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19931406','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19931406"><span>The identification of genes specific to Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens using genomic <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Masakiyo, Yoshiaki; Yoshida, Akihiro; Shintani, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Yusuke; Ansai, Toshihiro; Takehara, Tadamichi</p> <p>2010-06-01</p> <p>Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens, which are often isolated from periodontal sites, were once considered two different genotypes of P. intermedia. Although the genomic sequence of P. intermedia was determined recently, little is known about the genetic differences between P. intermedia and P. nigrescens. The <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization technique is a powerful method for generating a set of DNA fragments differing between two closely related bacterial strains or species. We used <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization to identify the DNA regions specific to P. intermedia ATCC 25611 and P. nigrescens ATCC 25261. Using this method, four P. intermedia ATCC 25611-specific and three P. nigrescens ATCC 25261-specific regions were determined. From the species-specific regions, insertion sequence (IS) elements were isolated for P. intermedia. IS elements play an important role in the pathogenicity of bacteria. For the P. intermedia-specific regions, the genes adenine-specific DNA-methyltransferase and 8-amino-7-oxononanoate synthase were isolated. The P. nigrescens-specific region contained a Flavobacterium psychrophilum SprA homologue, a cell-surface protein involved in gliding motility, Prevotella melaninogenica ATCC 25845 glutathione peroxide, and Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 leucyl-tRNA synthetase. The results demonstrate that the <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization technique was useful for distinguishing between the two closely related species. Furthermore, this technique will contribute to our understanding of the virulence of these species.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25117361','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25117361"><span>Identification of floral genes for sex determination in Calamus palustris Griff. by using suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ng, C Y; Wickneswari, R; Choong, C Y</p> <p>2014-08-07</p> <p>Calamus palustris Griff. is an economically important dioecious rattan species in Southeast Asia. However, dioecy and onset of flowering at 3-4 years old render uncertainties in desired female:male seedling ratios to establish a productive seed orchard for this rattan species. We constructed a <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> library for male floral tissue to understand the genetic mechanism for gender determination in C. palustris. The <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> library produced 1536 clones with 1419 clones of high quality. Reverse Northern screening showed 313 clones with differential expression, and sequence analyses clustered them into 205 unigenes, including 32 contigs and 173 singletons. The <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> library was further validated with reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis. Homology identification classified the unigenes into 12 putative functional proteins with 83% unigenes showing significant match to proteins in databases. Functional annotations of these unigenes revealed genes involved in male flower development, including MADS-box genes, pollen-related genes, phytohormones for flower development, and male flower organ development. Our results showed that the male floral genes may play a vital role in sex determination in C. palustris. The identified genes can be exploited to understand the molecular basis of sex determination in C. palustris.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PASP..129a4002M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PASP..129a4002M"><span>The IPAC Image <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> and Discovery Pipeline for the Intermediate Palomar Transient Factory</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Masci, Frank J.; Laher, Russ R.; Rebbapragada, Umaa D.; Doran, Gary B.; Miller, Adam A.; Bellm, Eric; Kasliwal, Mansi; Ofek, Eran O.; Surace, Jason; Shupe, David L.; Grillmair, Carl J.; Jackson, Ed; Barlow, Tom; Yan, Lin; Cao, Yi; Cenko, S. Bradley; Storrie-Lombardi, Lisa J.; Helou, George; Prince, Thomas A.; Kulkarni, Shrinivas R.</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>We describe the near real-time transient-source discovery engine for the intermediate Palomar Transient Factory (iPTF), currently in operations at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC), Caltech. We coin this system the IPAC/iPTF Discovery Engine (or IDE). We review the algorithms used for PSF-matching, image <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>, detection, photometry, and machine-learned (ML) vetting of extracted transient candidates. We also review the performance of our ML classifier. For a limiting signal-to-noise ratio of 4 in relatively unconfused regions, bogus candidates from processing artifacts and imperfect image <span class="hlt">subtractions</span> outnumber real transients by ≃10:1. This can be considerably higher for image data with inaccurate astrometric and/or PSF-matching solutions. Despite this occasionally high contamination rate, the ML classifier is able to identify real transients with an efficiency (or completeness) of ≃97% for a maximum tolerable false-positive rate of 1% when classifying raw candidates. All <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>-image metrics, source features, ML probability-based real-bogus scores, contextual metadata from other surveys, and possible associations with known Solar System objects are stored in a relational database for retrieval by the various science working groups. We review our efforts in mitigating false-positives and our experience in optimizing the overall system in response to the multitude of science projects underway with iPTF.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8446E..8DD','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012SPIE.8446E..8DD"><span>Laboratory test of a polarimetry imaging <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> system for the high-contrast imaging</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dou, Jiangpei; Ren, Deqing; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhang, Xi; Li, Rong</p> <p>2012-09-01</p> <p>We propose a polarimetry imaging <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> test system that can be used for the direct imaging of the reflected light from exoplanets. Such a system will be able to remove the speckle noise scattered by the wave-front error and thus can enhance the high-contrast imaging. In this system, we use a Wollaston Prism (WP) to divide the incoming light into two simultaneous images with perpendicular linear polarizations. One of the images is used as the reference image. Then both the phase and geometric distortion corrections have been performed on the other image. The corrected image is <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> with the reference image to remove the speckles. The whole procedure is based on an optimization algorithm and the target function is to minimize the residual speckles after <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>. For demonstration purpose, here we only use a circular pupil in the test without integrating of our apodized-pupil coronagraph. It is shown that best result can be gained by inducing both phase and distortion corrections. Finally, it has reached an extra contrast gain of 50-times improvement in average, which is promising to be used for the direct imaging of exoplanets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD1003814','DTIC-ST'); return false;" href="http://www.dtic.mil/docs/citations/AD1003814"><span><span class="hlt">Multiple</span> Frequency Parametric Sonar</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://publicaccess.dtic.mil/psm/api/service/search/search">DTIC Science & Technology</a></p> <p></p> <p>2015-09-28</p> <p>300003 1 <span class="hlt">MULTIPLE</span> FREQUENCY PARAMETRIC SONAR STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and...beams. However, the <span class="hlt">multiple</span> nonlinear interactions are not taken advantage of in order to generate <span class="hlt">additional</span> efficiencies, bandwidth, and SNR...array. [0050] It will be understood that many <span class="hlt">additional</span> changes in details, materials , steps, and arrangements of parts which have been described</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25979578','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25979578"><span><span class="hlt">Multiple</span> sclerosis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Files, Daniel Kane; Jausurawong, Tani; Katrajian, Ruba; Danoff, Robert</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Multiple</span> sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, debilitating disease that can have devastating effects. Presentation varies widely in symptoms, pace, and progression. In <span class="hlt">addition</span> to a thorough history and physical examination, diagnostic tools required to diagnose MS and exclude other diagnoses include MRI, evoked potential testing, and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Although the disease is not curable presently, quality of life can be improved by minimizing the frequency and severity of disease burden. Disease modification, symptom management, preservation of function, and treatment of psychosocial issues are paramount to enhance the quality of life for the patient affected with MS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6822E..0BJ','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008SPIE.6822E..0BJ"><span>Behavior <span class="hlt">subtraction</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jodoin, Pierre-Marc; Saligrama, Venkatesh; Konrad, Janusz</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Network video cameras, invented in the last decade or so, permit today pervasive, wide-area visual surveillance. However, due to the vast amounts of visual data that such cameras produce human-operator monitoring is not possible and automatic algorithms are needed. One monitoring task of particular interest is the detection of suspicious behavior, i.e., identification of individuals or objects whose behavior differs from behavior usually observed. Many methods based on object path analysis have been developed to date (motion detection followed by tracking and inferencing) but they are sensitive to motion detection and tracking errors and are also computationally complex. We propose a new surveillance method capable of abnormal behavior detection without explicit estimation of object paths. Our method is based on a simple model of video dynamics. We propose one practical implementation of this general model via temporal aggregation of motion detection labels. Our method requires little processing power and memory, is robust to motion segmentation errors, and general enough to monitor humans, cars or any other moving objects in uncluttered as well as highly-cluttered scenes. Furthermore, on account of its simplicity, our method can provide performance guarantees. It is also robust in harsh environments (jittery cameras, rain/snow/fog).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21448619','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21448619"><span>Generation of optical coherent-state superpositions by number-resolved photon <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> from the squeezed vacuum</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Gerrits, Thomas; Glancy, Scott; Clement, Tracy S.; Calkins, Brice; Lita, Adriana E.; Nam, Sae Woo; Mirin, Richard P.; Knill, Emanuel; Miller, Aaron J.; Migdall, Alan L.</p> <p>2010-09-15</p> <p>We have created heralded coherent-state superpositions (CSSs) by <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> up to three photons from a pulse of squeezed vacuum light. To produce such CSSs at a sufficient rate, we used our high-efficiency photon-number-resolving transition edge sensor to detect the <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> photons. This experiment is enabled by and utilizes the full photon-number-resolving capabilities of this detector. The CSS produced by three-photon <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> had a mean-photon number of 2.75{sub -0.24}{sup +0.06} and a fidelity of 0.59{sub -0.14}{sup +0.04} with an ideal CSS. This confirms that <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> more photons results in higher-amplitude CSSs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998nicm.rept...18S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998nicm.rept...18S"><span>TinyTim modeling of NICMOS PSF <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>: effects of focus breathing, cold mask wiggling, and color variations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Suchkov, A.; Krist, J.</p> <p>1998-11-01</p> <p>We conduct TinyTim modeling of NICMOS camera 2 PSFs to assess limits to the accuracy of PSF <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> imposed by color dependence, OTA focus breathing, and cold mask wiggling. The results suggest that effects of both cold mask wiggling and focus breathing can be described as a noise in a PSF-<span class="hlt">subtracted</span> image, well above 20% of the PSF signal in narrow band filters, with a spatial scale of a few pixels. The main effect of the PSF color dependence is adding a systemic component to the PSF <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> image. The effect is quite large if the color of the PSF used for <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> is very different from the image PSF color. It is pronounced in blue, wide filters, like F110W, while in filters like F187W or redder/ narrower it is essentially negligible.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1017485','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1017485"><span>Neutron <span class="hlt">multiplicity</span> analysis tool</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Stewart, Scott L</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>I describe the capabilities of the EXCOM (EXcel based COincidence and <span class="hlt">Multiplicity</span>) calculation tool which is used to analyze experimental data or simulated neutron <span class="hlt">multiplicity</span> data. The input to the program is the count-rate data (including the <span class="hlt">multiplicity</span> distribution) for a measurement, the isotopic composition of the sample and relevant dates. The program carries out deadtime correction and background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> and then performs a number of analyses. These are: passive calibration curve, known alpha and <span class="hlt">multiplicity</span> analysis. The latter is done with both the point model and with the weighted point model. In the current application EXCOM carries out the rapid analysis of Monte Carlo calculated quantities and allows the user to determine the magnitude of sample perturbations that lead to systematic errors. Neutron <span class="hlt">multiplicity</span> counting is an assay method used in the analysis of plutonium for safeguards applications. It is widely used in nuclear material accountancy by international (IAEA) and national inspectors. The method uses the measurement of the correlations in a pulse train to extract information on the spontaneous fission rate in the presence of neutrons from ({alpha},n) reactions and induced fission. The measurement is relatively simple to perform and gives results very quickly ({le} 1 hour). By contrast, destructive analysis techniques are extremely costly and time consuming (several days). By improving the achievable accuracy of neutron <span class="hlt">multiplicity</span> counting, a nondestructive analysis technique, it could be possible to reduce the use of destructive analysis measurements required in safeguards applications. The accuracy of a neutron <span class="hlt">multiplicity</span> measurement can be affected by a number of variables such as density, isotopic composition, chemical composition and moisture in the material. In order to determine the magnitude of these effects on the measured plutonium mass a calculational tool, EXCOM, has been produced using VBA within Excel. This</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25772851','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25772851"><span>Identification and comparison of gonadal transcripts of testis and ovary of adult common carp Cyprinus carpio using suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Jian-Jun; Xia, Xiao-Hua; Wang, Li-Fang; Jia, Yong-Fang; Nan, Ping; Li, Li; Chang, Zhong-Jie</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>The limited number of gonad-specific and gonad-related genes that have been identified in fish represents a major obstacle in the study of fish gonad development and sex differentiation. In common carp Cyprinus carpio from China's Yellow River, the ovary and testis differ in volume and weight in adult fish of the same age. Comparing sperm, egg, and somatic cell transcripts in this carp may provide insight into the mechanisms of its gonad development and sex differentiation. In the present work, gene expression patterns in the carp ovary and testis were compared using suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization. Two bidirectional <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> complementary DNA (cDNA) libraries were analyzed in parallel using testis or ovary as testers. Eighteen nonredundant clones were identified in the male library, including 15 known cDNAs. The expression patterns of selected genes in testis and ovary were analyzed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Tektin-1, GAPDS, FGFIBP, IGFBP-5, and an unknown gene from the Ccmg4 clone were observed to be expressed only in testis. GSDF, BMI1b, Wt1a, and an unknown gene from the Ccme2 clone were expressed at higher levels in testis than in ovary at sexual maturity. Thirty functional expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified in 43 sequenced clones in the female library, including 28 known cDNAs, one uncharacterized cDNA (EST clone), and one novel sequence. Eight identified ESTs showed significant differences in expression between the testis and the ovary. ZP3C and Psmb2 were expressed exclusively in ovary, whereas the expression levels of IFIPGL-1, Setd6, ATP-6, CDC45, AIF-1, and an unknown gene from the Ccfh2 clone were more strongly expressed in ovary than in testis. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, the expression of ZP3C, Wt1a, and Setd6 was analyzed in male and female gonads, heart, liver, kidney, and brain. ZP3C was expressed only in ovary. Setd6 expression was significantly stronger in female tissues than that in the male, except in the liver</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhRvE..76b6104B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007PhRvE..76b6104B"><span>Emergence of time-horizon invariant correlation structure in financial returns by <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of the market mode</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Borghesi, Christian; Marsili, Matteo; Miccichè, Salvatore</p> <p>2007-08-01</p> <p>We investigate the emergence of a structure in the correlation matrix of assets’ returns as the time horizon over which returns are computed increases from the minutes to the daily scale. We analyze data from different stock markets (New York, Paris, London, Milano) and with different methods. In <span class="hlt">addition</span> to the usual correlations, we also analyze those obtained by <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> the dynamics of the “center of mass” (i.e., the market mode). We find that when the center of mass is not removed the structure emerges, as the time horizon increases, from splitting a single large cluster into smaller ones. By contrast, when the market mode is removed the structure of correlations observed at the daily scale is already well defined at very high frequency ( 5min in the New York Stock Exchange). Moreover, this structure accounts for 80% of the classification of stocks in economic sectors. Similar results, though less sharp, are found for the other markets. We also find that the structure of correlations in the overnight returns is markedly different from that of intraday activity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24527027','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24527027"><span>Overexpression of FOXO3, MYD88, and GAPDH Identified by Suppression <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> Hybridization in Esophageal Cancer Is Associated with Autophagy.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Soltany-Rezaee-Rad, Mohammad; Mottaghi-Dastjerdi, Negar; Setayesh, Neda; Roshandel, Gholamreza; Ebrahimifard, Farzaneh; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>To find genes involved in tumorigenesis and the development of esophageal cancer, the suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) method was used to identify genes that are overexpressed in esophageal cancer tissues compared to normal esophageal tissues. In our SSH library, the forkhead box O3 (FOXO3), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes were the most highly upregulated genes, and they were selected for further studies because of their potential role in the induction of autophagy. Upregulation of these genes was also observed in clinical samples using qRT-PCR. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, coexpression analysis of the autophagy-related genes Beclin1, ATG12, Gabarapl, PIK3C3, and LC3 demonstrated a significant correlation between the differentially overexpressed genes and autophagy. Autophagy is an important mechanism in tumorigenesis and the development of chemoresistance in cancer cells. The upregulation of FOXO3, GAPDH, and MYD88 variants in esophageal cancer suggests a role for autophagy and provides new insight into the biology of esophageal cancer. We propose that FOXO3, GAPDH, and MYD88 are novel targets for combating autophagy in esophageal cancer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6510E..1VL','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007SPIE.6510E..1VL"><span>Evaluation of scatter mitigation strategies for x-ray cone-beam CT: impact of scatter <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> and anti-scatter grids on contrast-to-noise ratio</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lazos, Dimitrios; Lasio, Giovanni; Evans, Joshua; Williamson, Jeffrey F.</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>The large contribution of scatter to cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) x-ray projections significantly degrades image quality, both through streaking and cupping artifacts and by loss of low contrast boundary detectability. The goal of this investigation is to compare the efficacy of three widely used scatter mitigation methods: <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> scatter correction (SSC); anti-scatter grids (ASG); and beam modulating with bowtie filters; for improving signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and cupping artifacts. A simple analytic model was developed to predict scatter-to-primary ratio (SPR) and CNR as a function of cylindrical phantom thickness. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, CBCT x-ray projections of a CatPhan QA phantom were measured, using a Varian CBCT imaging system, and computed, using an inhouse Monte Carlo photon-transport code to more realistically evaluate the impact of scatter mitigation techniques. Images formed with uncorrected sinograms acquired without ASGs and bow-tie filter show pronounced cupping artifacts and loss of contrast. <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> of measured scatter profiles restores image uniformity and CT number accuracy, but does not improve CNR, since the improvement in contrast almost exactly offset by the increase in relative x-ray noise. ASGs were found to modestly improve CNR (up to 20%, depending ASG primary transmission and selectivity) only in body scans, while they can reduce CNR for head phantoms where SPR is low.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Absorption&id=EJ1046267','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Absorption&id=EJ1046267"><span>From a <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> to <span class="hlt">Multiplicative</span> Approach: A Concept-Driven Interactive Pathway on the Selective Absorption of Light</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Viennot, Laurence; de Hosson, Cécile</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>This research documents the aims and the impact of a teaching experiment on how the absorption of light depends on the thickness of the absorbing medium. This teaching experiment is more specifically characterized as bringing to bear a "concept-driven interactive pathway". It is designed to make students analyse the absorption of light…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=SIM&id=EJ1029990','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=SIM&id=EJ1029990"><span>Teaching <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> and <span class="hlt">Multiplication</span> with Regrouping Using the Concrete-Representational-Abstract Sequence and Strategic Instruction Model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Flores, Margaret M.; Hinton, Vanessa; Strozier, Shaunita D.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Based on Common Core Standards (2010), mathematics interventions should emphasize conceptual understanding of numbers and operations as well as fluency. For students at risk for failure, the concrete-representational-abstract (CRA) sequence and the Strategic Instruction Model (SIM) have been shown effective in teaching computation with an emphasis…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17228124','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17228124"><span>High accuracy <span class="hlt">multiple</span> scatter modelling for 3D whole body PET.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Markiewicz, P J; Tamal, M; Julyan, P J; Hastings, D L; Reader, A J</p> <p>2007-02-07</p> <p>A new technique for modelling <span class="hlt">multiple</span>-order Compton scatter which uses the absolute probabilities relating the image space to the projection space in 3D whole body PET is presented. The details considered in this work give a valuable insight into the scatter problem, particularly for <span class="hlt">multiple</span> scatter. Such modelling is advantageous for large attenuating media where scatter is a dominant component of the measured data, and where <span class="hlt">multiple</span> scatter may dominate the total scatter depending on the energy threshold and object size. The model offers distinct features setting it apart from previous research: (1) specification of the scatter distribution for each voxel based on the transmission data, the physics of Compton scattering and the specification of a given PET system; (2) independence from the true activity distribution; (3) in principle no scaling or iterative process is required to find the distribution; (4) explicit <span class="hlt">multiple</span> scatter modelling; (5) no scatter <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> or <span class="hlt">addition</span> to the forward model when included in the system matrix used with statistical image reconstruction methods; (6) adaptability to many different scatter compensation methods from simple and fast to more sophisticated and therefore slower methods; (7) accuracy equivalent to that of a Monte Carlo model. The scatter model has been validated using Monte Carlo simulation (SimSET).</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=primates&pg=7&id=EJ842226','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=primates&pg=7&id=EJ842226"><span>Children's <span class="hlt">Multiplicative</span> Transformations of Discrete and Continuous Quantities</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Barth, Hilary; Baron, Andrew; Spelke, Elizabeth; Carey, Susan</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Recent studies have documented an evolutionarily primitive, early emerging cognitive system for the mental representation of numerical quantity (the analog magnitude system). Studies with nonhuman primates, human infants, and preschoolers have shown this system to support computations of numerical ordering, <span class="hlt">addition</span>, and <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> involving…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2945742','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2945742"><span>Hybrid referenceless and multibaseline <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> MR thermometry for monitoring thermal therapies in moving organs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Grissom, William A.; Rieke, Viola; Holbrook, Andrew B.; Medan, Yoav; Lustig, Michael; Santos, Juan; McConnell, Michael V.; Pauly, Kim Butts</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: Magnetic resonance thermometry using the proton resonance frequency (PRF) shift is a promising technique for guiding thermal ablation. For temperature monitoring in moving organs, such as the liver and the heart, problems with motion must be addressed. Multi-baseline <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> techniques have been proposed, which use a library of baseline images covering the respiratory and cardiac cycle. However, main field shifts due to lung and diaphragm motion can cause large inaccuracies in multi-baseline <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>. Referenceless thermometry methods based on polynomial phase regression are immune to motion and susceptibility shifts. While referenceless methods can accurately estimate temperature within the organ, in general, the background phase at organ∕tissue interfaces requires large polynomial orders to fit, leading to increased danger that the heated region itself will be fitted by the polynomial and thermal dose will be underestimated. In this paper, a hybrid method for PRF thermometry in moving organs is presented that combines the strengths of referenceless and multi-baseline thermometry. Methods: The hybrid image model assumes that three sources contribute to image phase during thermal treatment: Background anatomical phase, spatially smooth phase deviations, and focal, heat-induced phase shifts. The new model and temperature estimation algorithm were tested in the heart and liver of normal volunteers, in a moving phantom HIFU heating experiment, and in numerical simulations of thermal ablation. The results were compared to multi-baseline and referenceless methods alone. Results: The hybrid method allows for in vivo temperature estimation in the liver and the heart with lower temperature uncertainty compared to multi-baseline and referenceless methods. The moving phantom HIFU experiment showed that the method accurately estimates temperature during motion in the presence of smooth main field shifts. Numerical simulations illustrated the method</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988SPIE..914..379F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1988SPIE..914..379F"><span>The Reduction Of Motion Artifacts In Digital <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Angiography By Geometrical Image Transformation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fitzpatrick, J. Michael; Pickens, David R.; Mandava, Venkateswara R.; Grefenstette, John J.</p> <p>1988-06-01</p> <p>In the diagnosis of arteriosclerosis, radio-opaque dye is injected into the interior of the arteries to make them visible. Because of its increased contrast sensitivity, digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography has the potential for providing diagnostic images of arteries with reduced dye volumes. In the conventional technique, a mask image, acquired before the introduction of the dye, is <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> from the contrast image, acquired after the dye is introduced, to produce a difference image in which only the dye in the arteries is visible. The usefulness of this technique has been severely limited by the image degradation caused by patient motion during image acquisition. This motion produces artifacts in the difference image that obscure the arteries. One technique for dealing with this problem is to reduce the degradation by means of image registration. The registration is carried out by means of a geometrical transformation of the mask image before <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> so that it is in registration with the contrast image. This paper describes our technique for determining an optimal transformation. We employ a one-to-one elastic mapping and the Jacobian of that mapping to produce a geometrical image transformation. We choose a parameterized class of such mappings and use a heuristic search algorithm to optimize the parameters to minimize the severity of the motion artifacts. To increase the speed of the optimization process we use a statistical image comparison technique that provides a quick approximate evaluation of each image transformation. We present the experimental results of the application of our registration system to mask-contrast pairs, for images acquired from a specially designed phantom (described in a companion paper), and for clinical images.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/555246','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/555246"><span>Dual-energy <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> imaging utilizing indium as a contrast agent</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Le Duc, G.; Zhong, Z.; Warkentien, L.; Laster, B.; Thomlinson, W.</p> <p>1997-10-01</p> <p>The purpose of our current work is to establish the minimum detection, of indium contrast agent using dual-energy <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> imaging above and below indium K-edge. Experiments were performed on the X12 and X17B2 beamlines at the National Synchrotron Light Source using the same method but with two different set-ups. Experiments were first carried out on InCl{sub 3} solutions, then on V79 Chinese hamster cells and on BALB/c mice excised tumors, labeled with indium. For each experiment, several layers of Lucite were placed in front of the phantom to ensure a 43 mm thickness, dose to that of a mammography examination. Results were the same on X12 and X17B2. As expected, indium-free materials disappeared on <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> images (water, steel reference and screw). Indium samples were easily distinguishable for the following concentrations: 10-5-2-1 mg/cm{sup 2}. Smaller concentrations were not clearly distinguishable and we were unable to see cell samples and tumors. To conclude, the lowest concentration we can image is around 1 mg/cm{sup 2}. These results agree with theoretical results. Such results also suggest that indium concentration in both cells and tumors is lower than 0.5 mg/cm{sup 2}. Since the current detection is dose to optimum, we conclude that dual energy <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> imaging using indium to label tumors cells and tumors is not possible unless the indium uptake is increased by more than an order of magnitude.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5288357','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5288357"><span>Phasic Firing and Coincidence Detection by Subthreshold Negative Feedback: Divisive or <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> or, Better, Both</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Huguet, Gemma; Meng, Xiangying; Rinzel, John</p> <p>2017-01-01</p> <p>Phasic neurons typically fire only for a fast-rising input, say at the onset of a step current, but not for steady or slow inputs, a property associated with type III excitability. Phasic neurons can show extraordinary temporal precision for phase locking and coincidence detection. Exemplars are found in the auditory brain stem where precise timing is used in sound localization. Phasicness at the cellular level arises from a dynamic, voltage-gated, negative feedback that can be recruited subthreshold, preventing the neuron from reaching spike threshold if the voltage does not rise fast enough. We consider two mechanisms for phasicness: a low threshold potassium current (<span class="hlt">subtractive</span> mechanism) and a sodium current with subthreshold inactivation (divisive mechanism). We develop and analyze three reduced models with either divisive or <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> mechanisms or both to gain insight into the dynamical mechanisms for the potentially high temporal precision of type III-excitable neurons. We compare their firing properties and performance for a range of stimuli. The models have characteristic non-monotonic input-output relations, firing rate vs. input intensity, for either stochastic current injection or Poisson-timed excitatory synaptic conductance trains. We assess performance according to precision of phase-locking and coincidence detection by the models' responses to repetitive packets of unitary excitatory synaptic inputs with more or less temporal coherence. We find that each mechanism contributes features but best performance is attained if both are present. The <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> mechanism confers extraordinary precision for phase locking and coincidence detection but only within a restricted parameter range when the divisive mechanism of sodium inactivation is inoperative. The divisive mechanism guarantees robustness of phasic properties, without compromising excitability, although with somewhat less precision. Finally, we demonstrate that brief transient inhibition if</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22652543','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22652543"><span><span class="hlt">Subtractive</span>-FTIR spectroscopy to characterize organic matter in lignite samples from different depths.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Gezici, Orhan; Demir, Ibrahim; Demircan, Aydin; Unlü, Nuri; Karaarslan, Muhsin</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>Organic matter present in lignite samples collected from different depths (i.e. top, mid and bottom) of lignite source, Ilgın, Konya province, was examined by using <span class="hlt">subtractive</span>-FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. FTIR spectra were recorded on (i) original samples, (ii) the samples dried at 105 °C and (iii) the samples acid-treated and dried. After a combustion process performed for each sample at 650 °C for 15 min, the spectra of samples were recorded and <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> from the spectra of untreated samples. Hence, a software-based <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> made it possible to acquire a representative spectra related with organic matter. As the contribution of the bands related with inorganic constituents in lignite samples were eliminated after spectrum-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> procedure, difference-spectra led analyzing the spectra related with organic matter in lignite samples, reasonably. Furthermore, the bands related with acidic functional groups, aromatic and aliphatic structures were analyzed on the basis of difference-spectra, easily. From the difference-spectra it was shown that an acid-treatment process under mild conditions caused shift in some specific bands related with carbonyl groups of carboxyls so that the band at around 1710 cm(-1) arisen, while the intensity of the band at around 1420 cm(-1) was diminished. Through the acid-treatment process, acidic groups in lignite samples from different depths were thought to be turned into similar forms by protonation and/or stripping of metal ions originally bonded. Difference-spectra acquired for acid-treated samples made it possible to evaluate the form of carboxylic acid groups present in the studied samples under specific environmental conditions. Hence, a facile and environmentally-friendly methodology was used to analyze organic matter in lignite by using FTIR spectra, and valuable information was acquired about the aliphatic, aromatic and acidic character of the studied lignite samples collected from different depths. The proposed</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5431009','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5431009"><span>Anatomic and functional imaging of congenital heart disease with digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Buonocore, E.; Pavlicek, W.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.; O'Donovan, P.B.; Grossman, L.B.; Moodie, D.S.; Yiannikas, J.</p> <p>1983-06-01</p> <p>Digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography (DSA) of the heart was performed in 54 patients for the evaluation of congenital heart diagnostic images and accurate physiologic shunt data that compared favorably with catheter angiography and nuclear medicine studies. Retrospective analysis of this series of patients indicated that DSA studies contributed sufficient informantion to shorten significantly or modify cardiac catheterization in 85% (79/93) of the defects that were identified. Interatrial septal defects were particularly well diagnosed, with identification occurring in 10 of 10 cases, wheseas intraventricular septal defects were identified in only 6 of 9 patients. Evaluation of postsurgical patients was accurate in 19 of 20 cases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AcSpA..96...63G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012AcSpA..96...63G"><span><span class="hlt">Subtractive</span>-FTIR spectroscopy to characterize organic matter in lignite samples from different depths</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gezici, Orhan; Demir, Ibrahim; Demircan, Aydin; Ünlü, Nuri; Karaarslan, Muhsin</p> <p>2012-10-01</p> <p>Organic matter present in lignite samples collected from different depths (i.e. top, mid and bottom) of lignite source, Ilgın, Konya province, was examined by using <span class="hlt">subtractive</span>-FTIR-ATR spectroscopy. FTIR spectra were recorded on (i) original samples, (ii) the samples dried at 105 °C and (iii) the samples acid-treated and dried. After a combustion process performed for each sample at 650 °C for 15 min, the spectra of samples were recorded and <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> from the spectra of untreated samples. Hence, a software-based <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> made it possible to acquire a representative spectra related with organic matter. As the contribution of the bands related with inorganic constituents in lignite samples were eliminated after spectrum-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> procedure, difference-spectra led analyzing the spectra related with organic matter in lignite samples, reasonably. Furthermore, the bands related with acidic functional groups, aromatic and aliphatic structures were analyzed on the basis of difference-spectra, easily. From the difference-spectra it was shown that an acid-treatment process under mild conditions caused shift in some specific bands related with carbonyl groups of carboxyls so that the band at around 1710 cm-1 arisen, while the intensity of the band at around 1420 cm-1 was diminished. Through the acid-treatment process, acidic groups in lignite samples from different depths were thought to be turned into similar forms by protonation and/or stripping of metal ions originally bonded. Difference-spectra acquired for acid-treated samples made it possible to evaluate the form of carboxylic acid groups present in the studied samples under specific environmental conditions. Hence, a facile and environmentally-friendly methodology was used to analyze organic matter in lignite by using FTIR spectra, and valuable information was acquired about the aliphatic, aromatic and acidic character of the studied lignite samples collected from different depths. The proposed methodology</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AcSpA.165....1X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AcSpA.165....1X"><span>A symmetrical <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> combined with interpolated values for eliminating scattering from fluorescence EEM data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xu, Jing; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Yutian</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Parallel factor analysis is a widely used method to extract qualitative and quantitative information of the analyte of interest from fluorescence emission-excitation matrix containing unknown components. Big amplitude of scattering will influence the results of parallel factor analysis. Many methods of eliminating scattering have been proposed. Each of these methods has its advantages and disadvantages. The combination of symmetrical <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> and interpolated values has been discussed. The combination refers to both the combination of results and the combination of methods. Nine methods were used for comparison. The results show the combination of results can make a better concentration prediction for all the components.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5442308','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5442308"><span>Digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography of the pulmonary arteries for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ludwig, J.W.; Verhoeven, L.A.J.; Kersbergen, J.J.; Overtoom, T.T.C.</p> <p>1983-06-01</p> <p>A comparative study of radionuclide scanning (perfusion studies in all 18 patients and ventilation studies in 9) and digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography (DSA) was performed in 18 patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism. In 17 patients good visualization of the arteries was obtained with DSA; 10 of these patients had no pre-existing lung disease, and 7 had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The information provided by DSA in this small group was equal to or better than that of scintigraphy, especially in patients with COPD, and the reliability of DSA was superior to that of the radionuclide scintigraphy. Methods for preventing motion artifacts with DSA are also described.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3532195','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3532195"><span>Cerebrovascular disease: evaluation with transbrachial intraarterial digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography using a 4-F catheter.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hicks, M E; Kreipke, D L; Becker, G J; Edwards, M K; Holden, R W; Jackson, V P; Bendick, P J; Kuehn, D S</p> <p>1986-11-01</p> <p>Three hundred sixty-one patients underwent intraarterial digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography for definite or probable occlusive vascular disease of the carotid arteries. Examinations were performed with 65-cm-long, 4-F aortic catheters. A transbrachial approach was used. Images were good or excellent in nearly all cases. No postprocedural neurologic deficits or hematomas occurred. Permanent pulse deficit occurred in two patients, and temporary deficit occurred in three patients, an improvement over the frequency found in previous transbrachial series using 6-8-F catheters. While these results establish the efficacy of this technique, they also indicate a possible greater relative safety in men than in women.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24477588','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24477588"><span>Comparative transcripts profiling of fruit mesocarp and endocarp relevant to secondary metabolism by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization in Azadirachta indica (neem).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Narnoliya, Lokesh K; Rajakani, Raja; Sangwan, Neelam S; Gupta, Vikrant; Sangwan, Rajender S</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Azadirachta indica (neem) is a medicinally important plant that is valued for its bioactive secondary metabolites. Higher levels of the bioactive phytochemicals are accumulated in fruits than in other tissues. In the present study, a total of 387 and 512 ESTs, respectively, from endocarp and mesocarp of neem fruits were isolated and analyzed. Out of them 318 ESTs (82.17%) clones from endocarp and 418 ESTs (81.64%) from mesocarp encoded putative proteins that could be classified into three major gene ontology categories: biological process, molecular function and cellular component. From the analyses of contigs, 73 unigenes from the forward <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> library and 35 unigenes from the reverse <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> library were obtained. The ESTs from mesocarp encoded cytochrome P450 enzymes, which indicated hydroxylation to be a major metabolic event and that biogeneration of hydroxylated neem fruit phytochemicals was differentially regulated with developmental stage-specificity of synthesis. Through this study, we present the first report of any gene expression data in neem tissues. Neem hydroxy-methyl glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (NHMGR) gene was used as expressing control vis-a-vis <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> tissues. NHMGR was present in fruit, endocarp and mesocarp tissues, but absent in <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> libraries, revealing that it was successfully eliminated during <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>. Eight genes of interest from <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> libraries were profiled for their expression in fruit, mesocarp and endocarp. Expression profiles validated the quality of the libraries and functional diversity of the tissues. The <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> cDNA library and EST database described in this study represent a valuable transcript sequence resource for future research aimed at improving the economically important medicinal plant.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1068744','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1068744"><span>Out of bounds <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Holshouser, Chris; Newell, Clint; Palas, Sid; Love, Lonnie J.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Lind, Randall F.; Lloyd, Peter D.; Rowe, John C.; Blue, Craig A.; Duty, Chad E.; Peter, William H.; Dehoff, Ryan R.</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>Lockheed Martin and Oak Ridge National Laboratory are working on an <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing system capable of manufacturing components measured not in terms of inches or feet, but <span class="hlt">multiple</span> yards in all dimensions with the potential to manufacture parts that are completely unbounded in size.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17521944','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17521944"><span>[<span class="hlt">Multiple</span> apheresis].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Coffe, C</p> <p>2007-05-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Multiple</span> apheresis makes it possible to obtain at least two labile blood components from a single donor using a cell separator. It can be either multicomponent apheresis leading to the preparation of at least two different blood component types or red blood cell apheresis providing two identical red blood cell concentrates. These techniques available in <span class="hlt">addition</span> to whole blood donation, are modifying collection strategies in many Etablissements Français du Sang and will contribute to improve stock logistics in the future. In areas with insufficient stock, these procedures will help achieve blood component self-sufficiency. The author first describes the principle underlying different--current or future--techniques as well as their advantages and drawbacks. He finally addresses the potential impact of these processes on the evolution of blood collection and the advantages to be gained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26038270','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26038270"><span>Isolation of differentially expressed sex genes in garden asparagus using suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Deng, Chuan-liang; Wang, Ning-na; Li, Shu-fen; Dong, Tian-yu; Zhao, Xin-peng; Wang, Shao-jing; Gao, Wu-jun; Lu, Long-dou</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>Garden asparagus (Asparagus officinalis L.) is a dioecious species whose male and female flowers are found in separate unisexual individuals. A region called the M-locus, located on a pair of homomorphic sex chromosomes, controls sexual dimorphism in asparagus. To date, no sex determining gene has been isolated from asparagus. To identify more genes involved in flower development in asparagus, <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization library of male flowers in asparagus was constructed by suppression <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> hybridization. A total of 107 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were identified. BLASTX analysis showed that the library contained several genes that could be related to flower development. The expression patterns of seven selected genes believed to be involved in the development of asparagus male flower were further analyzed by semi-quantitative or real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results showed that AOEST4-5, AOEST12-40, and AOEST13-38 were strongly expressed in the male flower stage, whereas no transcript level of AOEST13-38 was detected in the female flower stage. The expression levels of AOEST13-87, AOEST13-92, AOEST13-40, and AOEST18-87 in the male flower stage were also higher than those in the female flower stage, although these transcripts were also expressed in other tissues. The identified genes can provide a strong starting point for further studies on the underlying molecular differences between the male and female flowers of asparagus.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995ApOpt..34.8303Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1995ApOpt..34.8303Z"><span>Electronic <span class="hlt">subtracter</span> for trace-gas detection with InGaAsP diode lasers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhu, Xiang; Cassidy, Daniel T.</p> <p>1995-12-01</p> <p>An electronic noise-cancellation scheme has been developed and tested for second-harmonic (2f) detection with short-external-cavity and distributed-feedback InGaAsP diode lasers and wavelength modulation. The 2f background signal and noise from, e.g., optical feedback, optical fringes, and power-supply pickup are effectively reduced by <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of a measure of the signal-beam photocurrent from a measure of the reference-beam photocurrent. The dynamic range required for the lock-in amplifier is also reduced because the signal owing to modulation of the laser output at the first harmonic is canceled. Reduction of the 2f background and dynamic range are important for atmospheric-pressure detection where a large wavelength modulation is necessary. The detector noise was minimized by the use of zero-biased detectors in the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> circuit. A beam-noise level (defined as 2 \\times the rms value) equivalent to a line-center absorption of 1.6 \\times 10-6 was achieved with an equivalent-noise bandwidth of 1.25 Hz for 2f detection at 10 kHz. The electronic circuit is easy to construct and low cost.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ESASP.663E.141Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008ESASP.663E.141Z"><span>Cloning the Gravity and Shear Stress Related Genes from MG-63 Cells by <span class="hlt">Subtracting</span> Hybridization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Shu; Dai, Zhong-quan; Wang, Bing; Cao, Xin-sheng; Li, Ying-hui; Sun, Xi-qing</p> <p>2008-06-01</p> <p>Background The purpose of the present study was to clone the gravity and shear stress related genes from osteoblast-like human osteosarcoma MG-63 cells by <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization. Method MG-63 cells were divided into two groups (1G group and simulated microgravity group). After cultured for 60 h in two different gravitational environments, two groups of MG-63 cells were treated with 1.5Pa fluid shear stress (FSS) for 60 min, respectively. The total RNA in cells was isolated. The gravity and shear stress related genes were cloned by <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization. Result 200 clones were gained. 30 positive clones were selected using PCR method based on the primers of vector and sequenced. The obtained sequences were analyzed by blast. changes of 17 sequences were confirmed by RT-PCR and these genes are related to cell proliferation, cell differentiation, protein synthesis, signal transduction and apoptosis. 5 unknown genes related to gravity and shear stress were found. Conclusion In this part of our study, our result indicates that simulated microgravity may change the activities of MG-63 cells by inducing the functional alterations of specific genes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3934558','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3934558"><span><span class="hlt">Subtractive</span>, divisive and non-monotonic gain control in feedforward nets linearized by noise and delays</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Mejias, Jorge F.; Payeur, Alexandre; Selin, Erik; Maler, Leonard; Longtin, André</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The control of input-to-output mappings, or gain control, is one of the main strategies used by neural networks for the processing and gating of information. Using a spiking neural network model, we studied the gain control induced by a form of inhibitory feedforward circuitry—also known as “open-loop feedback”—, which has been experimentally observed in a cerebellum-like structure in weakly electric fish. We found, both analytically and numerically, that this network displays three different regimes of gain control: <span class="hlt">subtractive</span>, divisive, and non-monotonic. <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> gain control was obtained when noise is very low in the network. Also, it was possible to change from divisive to non-monotonic gain control by simply modulating the strength of the feedforward inhibition, which may be achieved via long-term synaptic plasticity. The particular case of divisive gain control has been previously observed in vivo in weakly electric fish. These gain control regimes were robust to the presence of temporal delays in the inhibitory feedforward pathway, which were found to linearize the input-to-output mappings (or f-I curves) via a novel variability-increasing mechanism. Our findings highlight the feedforward-induced gain control analyzed here as a highly versatile mechanism of information gating in the brain. PMID:24616694</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16382639','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16382639"><span>Doppler ultrasound spectral enhancement using the Gabor transform-based spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Hong</p> <p>2005-10-01</p> <p>Most of the important clinical indices of blood flow are estimated from the spectrograms of Doppler ultrasound (US) signals. Any noise may degrade the readability of the spectrogram and the precision of the clinical indiCes, so the spectral enhancement plays an important role in Doppler US signal processing. A new Doppler US spectral enhancement method is proposed in this paper and implemented in three main steps: the Gabor transform is used to compute the Gabor coefficients of a Doppler US signal, the spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> is performed on the magnitude of the Gabor coefficients, and the Gabor expansion with the spectral <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> Gabor coefficients is used to reconstruct the denoised Doppler US signal. The different analysis and synthesis windows are examined in the Gabor transform and expansion. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) improvement together with the overall enhancement of spectrograms are examined on the simulated Doppler US signals from a femoral artery. The results show the denoising method based on the orthogonal-like Gabor expansion achieves the best denoising performance. The experiments on some clinical Doppler US signals from umbilical arteries confirm the superior denoising performance of the new method.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/251106','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/251106"><span>Electrode configuration and signal <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> technique for single polarity charge carrier sensing in ionization detectors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Luke, P.</p> <p>1996-06-25</p> <p>An ionization detector electrode and signal <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> apparatus and method provide at least one first conductive trace formed onto the first surface of an ionization detector. The first surface opposes a second surface of the ionization detector. At least one second conductive trace is also formed on the first surface of the ionization detector in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern with the at least one first conductive trace. Both of the traces are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. By forming the traces in a substantially interlaced and symmetric pattern, signals generated by a charge carrier are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the traces. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carrier moves to within close proximity of the traces and is received at the collecting trace. The measured signals are then <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge and to determine the position at which the charge carrier originated within the ionization detector. 9 figs.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/870487','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/870487"><span>Electrode configuration and signal <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> technique for single polarity charge carrier sensing in ionization detectors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Luke, Paul</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>An ionization detector electrode and signal <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> apparatus and method provides at least one first conductive trace formed onto the first surface of an ionization detector. The first surface opposes a second surface of the ionization detector. At least one second conductive trace is also formed on the first surface of the ionization detector in a substantially interlaced and symmetrical pattern with the at least one first conductive trace. Both of the traces are held at a voltage potential of a first polarity type. By forming the traces in a substantially interlaced and symmetric pattern, signals generated by a charge carrier are substantially of equal strength with respect to both of the traces. The only significant difference in measured signal strength occurs when the charge carrier moves to within close proximity of the traces and is received at the collecting trace. The measured signals are then <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> and compared to quantitatively measure the magnitude of the charge and to determine the position at which the charge carrier originated within the ionization detector.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22742105A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22742105A"><span>Automated Transient Recovery Algorithm using Discrete Zernike Polynomials on Image-<span class="hlt">Subtracted</span> Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ackley, Kendall; Eikenberry, Stephen S.; Klimenko, Sergey</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We present an unsupervised algorithm for the automated identification of astrophysical transients recovered through image <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> techniques. We use a set of discrete Zernike polynomials to decompose and characterize residual energy discovered in the final <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> image, identifying candidate sources which appear point-like in nature. This work is motivated for use in collaboration with Advanced gravitational wave (GW) interferometers, such as Advanced LIGO and Virgo, where multiwavelength electromagnetic (EM) emission is expected in parallel with gravitational radiation from compact binary object mergers of neutron stars (NS-NS) and stellar-mass black holes (NS-BH). Imaging an EM counterpart coincident with a GW trigger will help to constrain the multi-dimensional GW parameter space as well as aid in the resolution of long-standing astrophysical mysteries, such as the true nature of the progenitor relationship between short-duration GRBs and massive compact binary mergers. We are working on making our method an open-source package optimized for low-latency response for community use during the upcoming era of GW astronomy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27108327','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27108327"><span>Construction of Hypericin Gland-Specific cDNA Library via Suppression <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> Hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Singh, Rupesh Kumar; Hou, Weina; Franklin, Gregory</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Hypericin, an important determinant of the pharmacological properties of the genus Hypericum, is considered as a major molecule for drug development. However, biosynthesis and accumulation of hypericin is not well understood. Identification of genes differentially expressed in tissues with and without hypericin accumulation is a useful strategy to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of the dark glands and hypericin biosynthesis. Suppression <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> Hybridization (SSH) is a unique method for PCR-based amplification of specific cDNA fragments that differ between a control (driver) and experimental (tester) transcriptome. This technique relies on the removal of dsDNA formed by hybridization between a control and test sample, thus eliminating cDNAs of similar abundance, and retaining differentially expressed or variable in sequence cDNAs. In our laboratory we applied this method to identify the genes involved in the development of dark glands and accumulation of hypericin in Hypericum perforatum. Here we describe the complete procedure for the construction of hypericin gland-specific <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> cDNA library.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26542948','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26542948"><span>Genetic differences between two Leishmania major-like strains revealed by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wu, Ângela C A; Freitas, Michelle A R; Silva, Soraia de O; Nogueira, Paula M; Soares, Rodrigo P; Pesquero, João Bosco; Gomes, Maria A; Pesquero, Jorge L; Melo, Maria N</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Leishmania major, the causative agent of zoonotic leishmaniasis, is restricted to Old World countries. Molecular and biochemical techniques have been used to identify some L. major-like isolated in South America including Brazil. Here, two L. major-like strains, one virulent (BH49) and one non-virulent (BH121), were subjected to suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) technique in order to identify differentially expressed genes. SSH technique identified nine cDNA fragments exhibiting high homology to previously sequenced L. major genes. Five cDNAs (four specific for BH49 and one for BH121) were confirmed by RT-PCR. Among those differentially expressed <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> genes, some were involved in physiological processes including metabolism, translation and destination of proteins, production of energy, virulence factors and unknown functions. Western-blot analysis confirmed a higher expression level of β-1,3-galactosyl residues in L. major-like lipophosphoglycan (LPG). This molecular analysis opens the possibility for identification of potential virulence factors not only in different strains, but also in others species of Leishmania.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25313356','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25313356"><span>Differentially expressed genes of virulent and nonvirulent Entamoeba histolytica strains identified by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Freitas, Michelle A R; Alvarenga, Ângela C; Fernandes, Helen C; Gil, Frederico F; Melo, Maria N; Pesquero, Jorge L; Gomes, Maria A</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Entamoeba histolytica is a parasite which presents capacity to degrade tissues and therefore has a pathogenic behavior. As this behavior is not shown by all strains, there have been several studies investigating molecular basis of the cytotoxicity process. Using the suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) technique, differential gene expressions of two E. histolytica strains, one virulent (EGG) and one nonvirulent (452), have been analyzed with the purpose of isolating genes which may be involved with amoebic virulence. Nine cDNA fragments presenting high homology with E. histolytica previously sequenced genes were <span class="hlt">subtracted</span>. Of these, four genes were confirmed by RT-PCR. Two coding for hypothetical proteins, one for a cysteine-rich protein, expressed only in the virulent strain, EGG and another one, coding for grainin 2 protein, exclusive from 452 strain. This study provided new insight into the proteins differences in the virulent and nonvirulent E. histolytica strains. We believe that further studies with these proteins may prove association of them with tissue damage, providing new perceptions to improve treatment or diagnosis of the invasive disease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26002218','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26002218"><span>Identification of cold tolerance genes from leaves of mangrove plant Kandelia obovata by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Fei, Jiao; Wang, You-Shao; Jiang, Zhao-Yu; Cheng, Hao; Zhang, Jian-Dong</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>Low temperature is a major abiotic stress that seriously limits mangrove productivity and distribution, the molecular mechanisms of cold tolerance involved in mangroves are still poorly understood at present. It was used to identify the potential cold-related genes in Kandelia obovata (K. obovata) by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization. 334 cold-related expressed sequence tags (ESTs) out of 670 clones were isolated and sequenced. Among these ESTs, 143 unique cDNAs were identified and classified into ten groups, such as metabolism, energy, cell rescue and defense, transcription and photosynthesis according to NCBI blast. Based on bioinformatics analysis, these ESTs were mainly related to response to stimulus and metabolic process, and were included to 72 KEGG pathways. Two selected genes (e.g., aquaporin gene and zinc family protein gene) from the library were further analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR analysis. Both the two genes were found to be transcriptionally up-regulated under cold stress, which partly approve the construction of the <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> cDNA library. The diversity of the putative functions of these genes indicated that cold stress resulted in a complex response in K. obovata. Further investigation on the functions and potential pathways of these genes will facilitate the understanding of the molecular adaptations to cold tolerance in mangrove plants.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24184195','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24184195"><span>Identification of cadmium-induced Agaricus blazei genes through suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wang, Liling; Li, Haibo; Wei, Hailong; Wu, Xueqian; Ke, Leqin</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Cadmium (Cd) is one of the most serious environmental pollutants. Filamentous fungi are very promising organisms for controlling and reducing the amount of heavy metals released by human and industrial activities. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in Cd accumulation and tolerance of filamentous fungi are not fully understood. Agaricus blazei Murrill, an edible mushroom with medicinal properties, demonstrates high tolerance for heavy metals, especially Cd. To investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the response of A. blazei after Cd exposure, we constructed a forward <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> library that represents cadmium-induced genes in A. blazei under 4 ppm Cd stress for 14 days using suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization combined with mirror orientation selection. Differential screening allowed us to identify 39 upregulated genes, 26 of which are involved in metabolism, protein fate, cellular transport, transport facilitation and transport routes, cell rescue, defense and virulence, transcription, and the action of proteins with a binding function, and 13 are encoding hypothetical proteins with unknown functions. Induction of six A. blazei genes after Cd exposure was further confirmed by RT-qPCR. The cDNAs isolated in this study contribute to our understanding of genes involved in the biochemical pathways that participate in the response of filamentous fungi to Cd exposure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3107995','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3107995"><span>Identification of differentially expressed genes in uveal melanoma using suppressive <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Landreville, Solange; Lupien, Caroline B.; Vigneault, Francois; Gaudreault, Manon; Mathieu, Mélissa; Rousseau, Alain P.; Guérin, Sylvain L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Purpose Uveal melanoma (UM) is the most common primary cancer of the eye, resulting not only in vision loss, but also in metastatic death. This study attempts to identify changes in the patterns of gene expression that lead to malignant transformation and proliferation of normal uveal melanocytes (UVM) using the Suppressive <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span> Hybridization (SSH) technique. Methods The SSH technique was used to isolate genes that are differentially expressed in the TP31 cell line derived from a primary UM compared to UVM. The expression level of selected genes was further validated by microarray, semi-quantitative RT–PCR and western blot analyses. Results Analysis of the <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> libraries revealed that 37 and 36 genes were, respectively, up- and downregulated in TP31 cells compared to UVM. Differential expression of the majority of these genes was confirmed by comparing UM cells with UVM by microarray. The expression pattern of selected genes was analyzed by semi-quantitative RT–PCR and western blot, and was found to be consistent with the SSH findings. Conclusions We demonstrated that the SSH technique is efficient to detect differentially expressed genes in UM. The genes identified in this study represent valuable candidates for further functional analysis in UM and should be informative in studying the biology of this tumor. PMID:21647268</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000Tectp.322..303H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2000Tectp.322..303H"><span>Limitations of tensor <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> in isolating diamagnetic fabrics by magnetic anisotropy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hrouda, František; Henry, Bernard; Borradaile, Graham</p> <p>2000-07-01</p> <p>The anisotropy of low field susceptibility (AMS) represents the orientation distribution of all minerals in a rock, whereas the anisotropy of magnetic remanence (AMR, preferably anhysteretic) isolates that of the accessory remanence-bearing minerals. The <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of normalized AMR from AMS, in theory and under limited practical circumstances, may isolate the paramagnetic+diamagnetic anisotropy contribution and thus the orientation distribution of the matrix minerals ( Borradaile et al., 1999. Geol. Soc. Lond., Sp. Publ. 151, 139-145). Limitations include the great sensitivity of the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> process to the precision of the definition of the respective (AMS, AMR) tensors, and a requirement that single-domain and superparamagnetic grains are absent. The latter is particularly important for superparamagnetic minerals because iron oxides may be part of the orientation distribution of the main group of remanence-bearing minerals, although they would be excluded from the AMR fabric. Low ratios of saturation isothermal remanence to induced susceptibility characterize those rare rocks in which superparamagnetic behavior is a significant contribution.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9514785','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9514785"><span>Differential <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> display: a unified approach for isolation of cDNAs from differentially expressed genes.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pardinas, J R; Combates, N J; Prouty, S M; Stenn, K S; Parimoo, S</p> <p>1998-03-15</p> <p>We have developed a novel efficient approach, termed differential <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> display, for the identification of differentially expressed genes. Several critical parameters for the reproducibility and enhanced sensitivity of display, as well as steps to reduce the number of false positive cDNA species, have been defined. These include- (a) use of standardized oligo(dT)-primed cDNA pools rather than total RNA as the starting material for differential display, (b) critical role of optimal cDNA input for each distinct class of primers, (c) phenomena of primer dominance and interference, and (d) design of a novel set of enhanced specificity anchor primers. Introduction of an efficient <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization step prior to cloning of cDNA species enriches the bona fide cDNA species that are either exclusively present in one sample (+/-) or show altered expression (up-/down-regulation) in RNA samples from two different tissues or cell types. This approach, in comparison to differential display, has several advantages in terms of reproducibility and enhanced sensitivity of display coupled to the cloning of enriched bona fide cDNA species corresponding to differentially expressed RNAs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21708167','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21708167"><span>Transcript profiling of the meiotic drive phenotype in testis of Aedes aegypti using suppressive <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Shin, Dongyoung; Jin, Lizhong; Lobo, Neil F; Severson, David W</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>The meiotic drive gene in Aedes aegypti is tightly linked with the sex determination locus on chromosome 1, and causes highly male-biased sex ratios. We prepared cDNA libraries from testes from the Ae. aegypti T37 strain (driving) and RED strain (non-driving), and used suppressive <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> hybridization techniques to enrich for T37 testes-specific transcripts. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained from a total of 2784 randomly selected clones from the <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> T37 (subT37) library as well as the primary libraries for each strain (pT37 and pRED). Sequence analysis identified a total of 171 unique genes in the subT37 library and 299 unique genes among the three libraries. The majority of genes enriched in the subT37 library were associated with signal transduction, development, reproduction, metabolic process and cell cycle functions. Further, as observed with meiotic drive systems in Drosophila and mouse, a number of these genes were associated with signaling cascades that involve the Ras superfamily of regulatory small GTPases. Differential expression of several of these genes was verified in Ae. aegypti pupal testes using qRT-PCR. This study increases our understanding of testes gene expression enriched in adult males from the meiotic drive strain as well as insights into the basic testes transcriptome in Ae. aegypti.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10157E..0CS','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE10157E..0CS"><span>Perception-inspired background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> in complex scenes based on spatiotemporal features</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Shi, Liu; Liu, Jiahang</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> (BGS) is a fundamental preprocessing step in most video-based applications. Most BGS methods fail to handle dynamic unconstrained scenarios accurately. This is because of overreliance on statistical model. In this paper, we develop a novel non-parametric sample-based background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> method. First, the background sample set is initialized by a clean sample frame rather than the first frame. This can avoid introducing a ghost when the first frame contains foreground objects. Here, we utilize the Gaussian mixture model to validate whether a pixel at the location is clean or not and construct the initialization of background model. Second, for an actual scenario with diversified environmental conditions (e.g., illumination changes, dynamic background), we employ normalized color space and a scale invariant local ternary pattern operator to handle these variations. In the meantime, in order to achieve high detection accuracy in the unconstrained scenarios without requiring any scenario-specific parameter tuning, we employ the perception-inspired confidence interval to modify the threshold in the color space. Third, the hole filling approach is used to reduce noise which comes from false segmentation, fill the blank area in the foreground region and maintain the integrity of foreground object. Our experimental results indicate that the proposed approach is superior to several state-of-the-art methods in terms of F-score and kappa index.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22317966','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22317966"><span>Real-time out-of-plane artifact <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> tomosynthesis imaging using prior CT for scanning beam digital x-ray system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Wu, Meng; Fahrig, Rebecca</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>Purpose: The scanning beam digital x-ray system (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopic system with high dose efficiency and the ability to perform continuous real-time tomosynthesis in <span class="hlt">multiple</span> planes. This system could be used for image guidance during lung nodule biopsy. However, the reconstructed images suffer from strong out-of-plane artifact due to the small tomographic angle of the system. Methods: The authors propose an out-of-plane artifact <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> tomosynthesis (OPAST) algorithm that utilizes a prior CT volume to augment the run-time image processing. A blur-and-add (BAA) analytical model, derived from the project-to-backproject physical model, permits the generation of tomosynthesis images that are a good approximation to the shift-and-add (SAA) reconstructed image. A computationally practical algorithm is proposed to simulate images and out-of-plane artifacts from patient-specific prior CT volumes using the BAA model. A 3D image registration algorithm to align the simulated and reconstructed images is described. The accuracy of the BAA analytical model and the OPAST algorithm was evaluated using three lung cancer patients’ CT data. The OPAST and image registration algorithms were also tested with added nonrigid respiratory motions. Results: Image similarity measurements, including the correlation coefficient, mean squared error, and structural similarity index, indicated that the BAA model is very accurate in simulating the SAA images from the prior CT for the SBDX system. The shift-variant effect of the BAA model can be ignored when the shifts between SBDX images and CT volumes are within ±10 mm in the x and y directions. The nodule visibility and depth resolution are improved by <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> simulated artifacts from the reconstructions. The image registration and OPAST are robust in the presence of added respiratory motions. The dominant artifacts in the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> images are caused by the mismatches between the real object and the prior CT</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvA..95c2304G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2017PhRvA..95c2304G"><span>Performance improvement of continuous-variable quantum key distribution with an entangled source in the middle via photon <span class="hlt">subtraction</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Guo, Ying; Liao, Qin; Wang, Yijun; Huang, Duan; Huang, Peng; Zeng, Guihua</p> <p>2017-03-01</p> <p>A suitable photon-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> operation can be exploited to improve the maximal transmission of continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CVQKD) in point-to-point quantum communication. Unfortunately, the photon-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> operation faces solving the improvement transmission problem of practical quantum networks, where the entangled source is located in the third part, which may be controlled by a malicious eavesdropper, instead of in one of the trusted parts, controlled by Alice or Bob. In this paper, we show that a solution can come from using a non-Gaussian operation, in particular, the photon-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> operation, which provides a method to enhance the performance of entanglement-based (EB) CVQKD. Photon <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> not only can lengthen the maximal transmission distance by increasing the signal-to-noise rate but also can be easily implemented with existing technologies. Security analysis shows that CVQKD with an entangled source in the middle (ESIM) from applying photon <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> can well increase the secure transmission distance in both direct and reverse reconciliations of the EB-CVQKD scheme, even if the entangled source originates from an untrusted part. Moreover, it can defend against the inner-source attack, which is a specific attack by an untrusted entangled source in the framework of ESIM.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Critical&pg=2&id=EJ1093241','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Critical&pg=2&id=EJ1093241"><span>The <span class="hlt">Multiplicative</span> Situation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hurst, Chris</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The relationships between three critical elements, and the associated mathematical language, to assist students to make the critical transition from <span class="hlt">additive</span> to <span class="hlt">multiplicative</span> thinking are examined in this article by Chris Hurst.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24387917','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24387917"><span>Study on a method to improve T1 image contrast by the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> technique for 3.0 T brain examination.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, Ham-Gyum; Heo, Yeong-Cheol; Cho, Jae-Hwan</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study is to describe the enhanced gray/white brain matter delineation achieved by a novel <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> technique. We <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> T2-weighted from T1-weighted images. The resulting images were analyzed for contrast-to-noise ratio and reader preference. Our results show superior outcomes for the <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> images. This improvement could be used to better identify tumor enhancement or cortical dysplasia.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12775420','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12775420"><span>Identification of gene products suppressed by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection or gp120 exposure of primary human astrocytes by rapid <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Su, Zao-Zhong; Kang, Dong-Chul; Chen, Yinming; Pekarskaya, Olga; Chao, Wei; Volsky, David J; Fisher, Paul B</p> <p>2003-06-01</p> <p>Neurodegeneration and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-associated dementia (HAD) are the major disease manifestations of HIV-1 colonization of the central nervous system (CNS). In the brain, HIV-1 replicates in microglial cells and infiltrating macrophages and it persists in a low-productive, noncytolytic state in astrocytes. Astrocytes play critical roles in the maintenance of the brain microenvironment, responses to injury, and in neuronal signal transmission, and disruption of these functions by HIV-1 could contribute to HAD. To better understand the potential effects of HIV-1 on astrocyte biology, the authors investigated changes in gene expression using an efficient and sensitive rapid <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> hybridization approach, RaSH. Primary human astrocytes were isolated from abortus brain tissue, low-passage cells were infected with HIV-1 or mock infected, and total cellular RNAs were isolated at <span class="hlt">multiple</span> time points over a period of 1 week. This approach is designed to identify gene products modulated early and late after HIV-1 infection and limits the cloning of genes displaying normal cell-cycle fluctuations in astrocytes. By <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> temporal cDNAs derived from HIV-1-infected astrocytes from temporal cDNAs made from uninfected cells, 10 genes displaying reduced expression in infected cells, termed astrocyte suppressed genes (ASGs), were identified and their suppression was confirmed by Northern blot hybridization. Both known and novel ASGs, not reported in current DNA databases, that are down-regulated by HIV-1 infection are described. Northern blotting confirms suppression of the same panel of ASGs by treatment of astrocytes with recombinant HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120. These results extend our previous analysis of astrocyte genes induced or enhanced by HIV-1 infection and together they suggest that HIV-1 and viral proteins have profound effects on astrocyte physiology, which may influence their function in the CNS.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25203592','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25203592"><span>Proteomic analysis of eucalyptus leaves unveils putative mechanisms involved in the plant response to a real condition of soil contamination by <span class="hlt">multiple</span> heavy metals in the presence or absence of mycorrhizal/rhizobacterial <span class="hlt">additives</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Guarino, Carmine; Conte, Barbara; Spada, Valentina; Arena, Simona; Sciarrillo, Rosaria; Scaloni, Andrea</p> <p>2014-10-07</p> <p>Here we report on the growth, accumulation performances of, and leaf proteomic changes in Eucalyptus camaldulensis plants harvested for different periods of time in an industrial, heavy metals (HMs)-contaminated site in the presence or absence of soil microorganism (AMs/PGPRs) <span class="hlt">additives</span>. Data were compared to those of control counterparts grown in a neighboring nonpolluted district. Plants harvested in the contaminated areas grew well and accumulated HMs in their leaves. The <span class="hlt">addition</span> of AMs/PGPRs to the polluted soil determined plant growth and metal accumulation performances that surpassed those observed in the control. Comparative proteomics suggested molecular mechanisms underlying plant adaptation to the HMs challenge. Similarly to what was observed in laboratory-scale investigations on other metal hyperaccumulators but not on HMs-sensitive plants, eucalyptus grown in the contaminated areas showed an over-representation of enzymes involved in photosynthesis and the Calvin cycle. AMs/PGPRs <span class="hlt">addition</span> to the soil increased the activation of these energetic pathways, suggesting the existence of signaling mechanisms that address the energy/reductive power requirement associated with augmented growth performances. HMs-exposed plants presented an over-representation of antioxidant enzymes, chaperones, and proteins involved in glutathione metabolism. While some antioxidant enzymes/chaperones returned to almost normal expression values in the presence of AMs/PGPRs or in plants exposed to HMs for prolonged periods, proteins guaranteeing elevated glutathione levels were constantly over-represented. These data suggest that glutathione (and related phytochelatins) could act as key molecules for ensuring the effective formation of HMs-chelating complexes that are possibly responsible for the observed plant tolerance to metal stresses. Overall, these results suggest potential genetic traits for further selection of phytoremediating plants based on dedicated cloning or breeding</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920000667&hterms=multiple+network&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dmultiple%2Bnetwork','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920000667&hterms=multiple+network&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dmultiple%2Bnetwork"><span><span class="hlt">Multiple-Ring</span> Digital Communication Network</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kirkham, Harold</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Optical-fiber digital communication network to support data-acquisition and control functions of electric-power-distribution networks. Optical-fiber links of communication network follow power-distribution routes. Since fiber crosses open power switches, communication network includes <span class="hlt">multiple</span> interconnected loops with occasional spurs. At each intersection node is needed. Nodes of communication network include power-distribution substations and power-controlling units. In <span class="hlt">addition</span> to serving data acquisition and control functions, each node acts as repeater, passing on messages to next node(s). <span class="hlt">Multiple-ring</span> communication network operates on new AbNET protocol and features fiber-optic communication.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4321097','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4321097"><span>Self-Adaptive Prediction of Cloud Resource Demands Using Ensemble Model and <span class="hlt">Subtractive</span>-Fuzzy Clustering Based Fuzzy Neural Network</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Chen, Zhijia; Zhu, Yuanchang; Di, Yanqiang; Feng, Shaochong</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In IaaS (infrastructure as a service) cloud environment, users are provisioned with virtual machines (VMs). To allocate resources for users dynamically and effectively, accurate resource demands predicting is essential. For this purpose, this paper proposes a self-adaptive prediction method using ensemble model and <span class="hlt">subtractive</span>-fuzzy clustering based fuzzy neural network (ESFCFNN). We analyze the characters of user preferences and demands. Then the architecture of the prediction model is constructed. We adopt some base predictors to compose the ensemble model. Then the structure and learning algorithm of fuzzy neural network is researched. To obtain the number of fuzzy rules and the initial value of the premise and consequent parameters, this paper proposes the fuzzy c-means combined with <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> clustering algorithm, that is, the <span class="hlt">subtractive</span>-fuzzy clustering. Finally, we adopt different criteria to evaluate the proposed method. The experiment results show that the method is accurate and effective in predicting the resource demands. PMID:25691896</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25691896','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25691896"><span>Self-adaptive prediction of cloud resource demands using ensemble model and <span class="hlt">subtractive</span>-fuzzy clustering based fuzzy neural network.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Zhijia; Zhu, Yuanchang; Di, Yanqiang; Feng, Shaochong</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>In IaaS (infrastructure as a service) cloud environment, users are provisioned with virtual machines (VMs). To allocate resources for users dynamically and effectively, accurate resource demands predicting is essential. For this purpose, this paper proposes a self-adaptive prediction method using ensemble model and <span class="hlt">subtractive</span>-fuzzy clustering based fuzzy neural network (ESFCFNN). We analyze the characters of user preferences and demands. Then the architecture of the prediction model is constructed. We adopt some base predictors to compose the ensemble model. Then the structure and learning algorithm of fuzzy neural network is researched. To obtain the number of fuzzy rules and the initial value of the premise and consequent parameters, this paper proposes the fuzzy c-means combined with <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> clustering algorithm, that is, the <span class="hlt">subtractive</span>-fuzzy clustering. Finally, we adopt different criteria to evaluate the proposed method. The experiment results show that the method is accurate and effective in predicting the resource demands.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJTP...55.4423W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016IJTP...55.4423W"><span>Nonclassicality and Entanglement of Photon-<span class="hlt">Subtracted</span> Two-Mode Squeezed Coherent States Studied via Entangled-States Representation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Zhen; Li, Heng-Mei; Yuan, Hong-Chun</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>We theoretically introduce a kind of non-Gaussian entangled states, i.e., photon-<span class="hlt">subtracted</span> two-mode squeezed coherent states (PSTMSCS), by successively <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> photons from each mode of the two-mode squeezed coherent states. The normalization factor which is related to bivariate Hermite polynomials is obtained by virtue of the two-mode squeezing operator in entangled-states representation. The sub-Poissonian photon statistics, antibunching effects, and partial negative Wigner function, respectively, are observed numerically, which fully reflect the nonclassicality of the resultant states. Finally, employing the SV criteria and the EPR correlation, respectively, the entangled property of PSTMSCS is analyzed. It is shown that the photon <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> operation can effectively enhance the inseparability between the two modes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGE....13..207X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JGE....13..207X"><span>Amplitude-preserving nonlinear adaptive <span class="hlt">multiple</span> attenuation using the high-order sparse Radon transform</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xue, Yaru; Yang, Jing; Ma, Jitao; Chen, Yangkang</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>The Radon transform is widely used for <span class="hlt">multiple</span> elimination. Since the Radon transform is not an orthogonal transform, it cannot preserve the amplitude of primary reflections well. The prediction and adaptive <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> method is another widely used approach for <span class="hlt">multiple</span> attenuation, which demands that the primaries are orthogonal with the <span class="hlt">multiples</span>. However, the orthogonality assumption is not true for non-stationary field seismic data. In this paper, the high-order sparse Radon transform (HOSRT) method is introduced to protect the amplitude variation with offset information during the <span class="hlt">multiple</span> <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> procedures. The HOSRT incorporates the high-resolution Radon transform with the orthogonal polynomial transform. Because the Radon transform contains the trajectory information of seismic events and the orthogonal polynomial transform contains the amplitude variation information of seismic events, their combination constructs an overcomplete transform and obtains the benefits of both the high-resolution property of the Radon transform and the amplitude preservation of the orthogonal polynomial transform. A fast nonlinear filter is adopted in the adaptive <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> step in order to avoid the orthogonality assumption that is used in traditional adaptive <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> methods. The application of the proposed approach to synthetic and field data examples shows that the proposed method can improve the separation performance by preserving more useful energy.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008NIMPA.588..442Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008NIMPA.588..442Z"><span>Field flatteners fabricated with a rapid prototyper for K-edge <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> imaging of small animals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Honglin; Bewer, Brian; Florin Gh. Popescu, Bogdan; Nichol, Helen; Chapman, Dean</p> <p>2008-04-01</p> <p>One of the difficulties in X-ray imaging is the need to record a wide dynamic range of intensities on the detector. For example, some rays may miss the object being imaged entirely while others may suffer many orders of magnitude attenuation in passing through. In K-edge <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> (KES) [E. Rubenstein, et al., Trans. Am. Clin. Climatol. Assoc. 97 (1985) 27.] imaging subtle differences in transmission through an object about the absorption edge of an element are used to create an image of the projected density of that element. This is done by a logarithmic <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of images acquired with energies above and below the absorption edge. For KES, the detector must register this transmitted intensity range in a linear manner for the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> method to be successful. The range of intensities which may strike the detector has inspired the concept of a field flattener. A field flattener is a device placed in the beam path that attenuates the input monochromatic beam to equalize X-ray absorption due to differences in the density of soft and hard tissues of an object before it passes through the object and thus achieves a flattened image. This removes the need for a wide dynamic range linear detector and allows detectors with modest performance to be used successfully in KES applications. The field flattener improves the S/ N ratio since X-ray exposures can be increased up to detector saturation. However, a field flattener removes anatomical information from each raw image (above or below K-edge) that may provide useful landmarks. Using rapid prototyping technology, two sets of field flatteners were fabricated and used in a KES experiment. This paper describes the procedure to design and fabricate field flatteners based on animal images from X-ray computed tomography (CT). Analysis of experimental data and KES images of a rat head with and without the field flattener are also presented. The results show a promising improvement of S/ N ratio using a field flattener</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100011235','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100011235"><span>Optoelectronic System Measures Distances to <span class="hlt">Multiple</span> Targets</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Liebe, Carl Christian; Abramovici, Alexander; Bartman, Randall; Chapsky, Jacob; Schmalz, John; Coste, Keith; Litty, Edward; Lam, Raymond; Jerebets, Sergei</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p> length inside the optical fiber is not ordinarily known and can change with temperature, it is also necessary to measure the phase difference associated with this portion and <span class="hlt">subtract</span> it from the aforementioned overall phase difference to obtain the phase difference proportional to only the free-space path length, which is the distance that one seeks to measure. Therefore, the apparatus includes a photodiode and a circulator that enable measurement of the phase difference associated with propagation from the LRU inside the fiber to the target, reflection from the fiber end, and propagation back inside the fiber to the LRU. Because this phase difference represents twice the optical path length of the fiber, this phase difference is divided in two before <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> from the aforementioned total-path-length phase difference. Radiation-induced changes in the photodetectors in this apparatus can affect the measurements. To enable calibration for the purpose of compensation for these changes, the apparatus includes an <span class="hlt">additional</span> target at a known short distance, located inside the camera. If the measured distance to this target changes, then the change is applied to the other targets.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24145117','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24145117"><span>Transcriptome responses in the rectal gland of fed and fasted spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias) determined by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Deck, Courtney A; McKay, Sheldon J; Fiedler, Tristan J; LeMoine, Christophe M R; Kajimura, Makiko; Nawata, C Michele; Wood, Chris M; Walsh, Patrick J</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>Prior studies of the elasmobranch rectal gland have demonstrated that feeding induces profound and rapid up regulation of the gland's ability to secrete concentrated NaCl solutions and the metabolic capacity to support this highly ATP consuming process. We undertook the current study to attempt to determine the degree to which up regulation of mRNA transcription was involved in the gland's activation. cDNA libraries were created from mRNA isolated from rectal glands of fasted (7days post-feeding) and fed (6h and 22h post-feeding) spiny dogfish sharks (Squalus acanthias), and the libraries were subjected to suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) analysis. Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) was also used to ascertain the mRNA expression of several genes revealed by the SSH analysis. In total the treatments changed the abundance of 170 transcripts, with 103 up regulated by feeding, and 67 up regulated by fasting. While many of the changes took place in 'expected' Gene Ontology (GO) categories (e.g., metabolism, transport, structural proteins, DNA and RNA turnover, etc.), KEGG analysis revealed a number of categories which identify oxidative stress as a topic of interest for the gland. GO analysis also revealed that branched chain essential amino acids (e.g., valine, leucine, isoleucine) are potential metabolic fuels for the rectal gland. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, up regulation of transcripts for many genes in the anticipated GO categories did not agree (i.e., fasting down regulated in feeding treatments) with previously observed increases in their respective proteins/enzyme activities. These results suggest an 'anticipatory' storage of selected mRNAs which presumably supports the rapid translation of proteins upon feeding activation of the gland.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9038E..0LI','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014SPIE.9038E..0LI"><span>Effect of injection technique on temporal parametric imaging derived from digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography in patient specific phantoms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ionita, Ciprian N.; Garcia, Victor L.; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Snyder, Kenneth V.; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Levy, Elad I.; Rudin, Stephen</p> <p>2014-03-01</p> <p>Parametric imaging maps (PIM's) derived from digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography (DSA) for the cerebral arterial flow assessment in clinical settings have been proposed, but experiments have yet to determine the reliability of such studies. For this study, we have observed the effects of different injection techniques on PIM's. A flow circuit set to physiologic conditions was created using an internal carotid artery phantom. PIM's were derived for two catheter positions, two different contrast bolus injection volumes (5ml and 10 ml), and four injection rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 ml/s). Using a gamma variate fitting approach, we derived PIM's for mean-transit-time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP) and bolus-arrivaltime (BAT). For the same injection rates, a larger bolus resulted in an increased MTT and TTP, while a faster injection rate resulted in a shorter MTT, TTP, and BAT. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, the position of the catheter tip within the vasculature directly affected the PIM. The experiment showed that the PIM is strongly correlated with the injection conditions, and, therefore, they have to be interpreted with caution. PIM images must be taken from the same patient to be able to be meaningfully compared. These comparisons can include pre- and post-treatment images taken immediately before and after an interventional procedure or simultaneous arterial flow comparisons through the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Due to the strong correlation between PIM and injection conditions, this study indicates that this assessment method should be used only to compare flow changes before and after treatment within the same patient using the same injection conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4187403','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4187403"><span>Effect of injection technique on temporal parametric imaging derived from digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography in patient specific phantoms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ionita, Ciprian N; Garcia, Victor L.; Bednarek, Daniel R; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Rudin, Stephen</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Parametric imaging maps (PIM’s) derived from digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography (DSA) for the cerebral arterial flow assessment in clinical settings have been proposed, but experiments have yet to determine the reliability of such studies. For this study, we have observed the effects of different injection techniques on PIM’s. A flow circuit set to physiologic conditions was created using an internal carotid artery phantom. PIM’s were derived for two catheter positions, two different contrast bolus injection volumes (5ml and 10 ml), and four injection rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 ml/s). Using a gamma variate fitting approach, we derived PIM’s for mean-transit-time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP) and bolus-arrivaltime (BAT). For the same injection rates, a larger bolus resulted in an increased MTT and TTP, while a faster injection rate resulted in a shorter MTT, TTP, and BAT. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, the position of the catheter tip within the vasculature directly affected the PIM. The experiment showed that the PIM is strongly correlated with the injection conditions, and, therefore, they have to be interpreted with caution. PIM images must be taken from the same patient to be able to be meaningfully compared. These comparisons can include pre- and post-treatment images taken immediately before and after an interventional procedure or simultaneous arterial flow comparisons through the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Due to the strong correlation between PIM and injection conditions, this study indicates that this assessment method should be used only to compare flow changes before and after treatment within the same patient using the same injection conditions. PMID:25302010</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25302010','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25302010"><span>Effect of injection technique on temporal parametric imaging derived from digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography in patient specific phantoms.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ionita, Ciprian N; Garcia, Victor L; Bednarek, Daniel R; Snyder, Kenneth V; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Levy, Elad I; Rudin, Stephen</p> <p>2014-03-13</p> <p>Parametric imaging maps (PIM's) derived from digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography (DSA) for the cerebral arterial flow assessment in clinical settings have been proposed, but experiments have yet to determine the reliability of such studies. For this study, we have observed the effects of different injection techniques on PIM's. A flow circuit set to physiologic conditions was created using an internal carotid artery phantom. PIM's were derived for two catheter positions, two different contrast bolus injection volumes (5ml and 10 ml), and four injection rates (5, 10, 15 and 20 ml/s). Using a gamma variate fitting approach, we derived PIM's for mean-transit-time (MTT), time-to-peak (TTP) and bolus-arrivaltime (BAT). For the same injection rates, a larger bolus resulted in an increased MTT and TTP, while a faster injection rate resulted in a shorter MTT, TTP, and BAT. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, the position of the catheter tip within the vasculature directly affected the PIM. The experiment showed that the PIM is strongly correlated with the injection conditions, and, therefore, they have to be interpreted with caution. PIM images must be taken from the same patient to be able to be meaningfully compared. These comparisons can include pre- and post-treatment images taken immediately before and after an interventional procedure or simultaneous arterial flow comparisons through the left and right cerebral hemispheres. Due to the strong correlation between PIM and injection conditions, this study indicates that this assessment method should be used only to compare flow changes before and after treatment within the same patient using the same injection conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27679822','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27679822"><span><span class="hlt">Additive</span> lattice kirigami.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require <span class="hlt">multiple</span> overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our <span class="hlt">additive</span> kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5035127','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=5035127"><span><span class="hlt">Additive</span> lattice kirigami</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require <span class="hlt">multiple</span> overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our <span class="hlt">additive</span> kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/multiple-sclerosis/home/ovc-20131882?p=1','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/multiple-sclerosis/home/ovc-20131882?p=1"><span><span class="hlt">Multiple</span> Sclerosis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Multiple</span> sclerosis Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff <span class="hlt">Multiple</span> sclerosis (MS) is a potentially disabling disease of the brain and spinal cord (central nervous system). In MS, the immune system attacks the protective ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/multiplesclerosis.html','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/multiplesclerosis.html"><span><span class="hlt">Multiple</span> Sclerosis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p><span class="hlt">Multiple</span> sclerosis (MS) is a nervous system disease that affects your brain and spinal cord. It damages the ... attacks healthy cells in your body by mistake. <span class="hlt">Multiple</span> sclerosis affects women more than men. It often begins ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000583.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000583.htm"><span><span class="hlt">Multiple</span> myeloma</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Plasma cell dyscrasia; Plasma cell myeloma; Malignant plasmacytoma; Plasmacytoma of bone; Myeloma - <span class="hlt">multiple</span> ... <span class="hlt">Multiple</span> myeloma most commonly causes: Low red blood cell count ( anemia ), which can lead to fatigue and ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23359022','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23359022"><span>Genes expressed in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) buds isolated with a <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> library.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Pinheiro, M P N; Batista, V G L; Martins, N F; Santos, R C; Melo Filho, P A; Silva, C R C; Lima, L M</p> <p>2013-01-16</p> <p>A <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> cDNA library from cotton buds was constructed to prospect for differentially expressed genes related to early bud development. A library was constructed and 768 cDNA sequences were obtained, comprising 168 clusters, with 126 contigs and 42 singlets. Both the Gossypium as well as Arabidopsis databases were utilized for the in silico analysis, since some genes identified in cotton have not yet been studied for functionality, although they have homology with genes from other species. The transcriptome revealed a large number of transcripts, some of them with unknown function, and others related to pollen development, pollen tubes, ovules, and fibers at different stages. The most populated contig was identified as fiber from 0-10 days after anthesis, with 12 reads. The success and novelty rates generated from the library were 67 and 51%, respectively. The information obtained here will provide a framework for research on functional cotton genomics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22308931','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22308931"><span>Resolving small signal measurements in experimental plasma environments using calibrated <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of noise signals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fimognari, P. J. Demers, D. R.; Chen, X.; Schoch, P. M.</p> <p>2014-11-15</p> <p>The performance of many diagnostic and control systems within fusion and other fields of research are often detrimentally affected by spurious noise signals. This is particularly true for those (such as radiation or particle detectors) working with very small signals. Common sources of radiated and conducted noise in experimental fusion environments include the plasma itself and instrumentation. The noise complicates data analysis, as illustrated by noise on signals measured with the heavy ion beam probe (HIBP) installed on the Madison Symmetric Torus. The noise is time-varying and often exceeds the secondary ion beam current (in contrast with previous applications). Analysis of the noise identifies the dominant source as photoelectric emission from the detectors induced by ultraviolet light from the plasma. This has led to the development of a calibrated <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> technique, which largely removes the undesired temporal noise signals from data. The advantages of the technique for small signal measurement applications are demonstrated through improvements realized on HIBP fluctuation measurements.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15715213','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15715213"><span>Analysis of transcripts expressed by Eimeria tenella oocysts using <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization methods.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Miska, K B; Fetterer, R H; Barfield, R C</p> <p>2004-12-01</p> <p>To characterize the genes expressed by Eimeria tenella oocysts, the sequence of 499 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was obtained from complementary DNA (cDNAs) enriched for transcripts expressed by unsporulated or sporulated oocysts. Of these, 225 clones were isolated from cDNA of sporulated oocysts and 274 from unsporulated oocysts. A total of 163 unique sequences were found, and the majority of these (64%) represent novel genes with no significant homology to the proteins in GenBank. Approximately half of the unique transcripts generated from sporulated oocysts are also expressed by sporozoites and merozoites, whereas the expression of most (79%) of the transcripts from unsporulated oocysts has not yet been detected at other stages of development. The expression of 4 transcripts obtained from the <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> cDNAs was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. The results confirmed that these transcripts are in fact differentially expressed between sporulated and unsporulated oocysts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22723703L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016AAS...22723703L"><span>Automated Artifact Rejection for Transient Identification in WFC3 IR Image <span class="hlt">Subtractions</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Luther, Kyle; Boone, Kyle; Hayden, Brian; Aldering, Greg Scott; Perlmutter, Saul; Supernova Cosmology Project</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>We describe a set of features for identifying z>1 supernovae in reference-<span class="hlt">subtracted</span> HST WFC3 IR images produced by the Supernova Cosmology Project's pipeline for the "See Change" project. These features, in combination with a random forest classifier, yield an effective system for automatically discriminating between supernovae and image artifacts produced by the instrumentation and the image processing procedure. When k-fold cross-validation is performed using a set of 30,000 artifacts and 10,000 synthetic supernovae, the classifier gives an efficiency comparable to that of a human scanner, correctly identifying 97 percent of the synthetic supernovae while rejecting 95 percent of the artifacts. This software will allow for less labor-intensive transient search procedures by automatically rejecting artifacts that would otherwise require human review.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4476701','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4476701"><span>Host <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span>, Filtering and Assembly Validations for Novel Viral Discovery Using Next Generation Sequencing Data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Rowe, William; Wilkinson, Maxim; Ramirez-Gonzalez, Ricardo H.; Caccamo, Mario; Bernal, William; Heeney, Jonathan L.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The use of next generation sequencing (NGS) to identify novel viral sequences from eukaryotic tissue samples is challenging. Issues can include the low proportion and copy number of viral reads and the high number of contigs (post-assembly), making subsequent viral analysis difficult. Comparison of assembly algorithms with pre-assembly host-mapping <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> using a short-read mapping tool, a k-mer frequency based filter and a low complexity filter, has been validated for viral discovery with Illumina data derived from naturally infected liver tissue and simulated data. Assembled contig numbers were significantly reduced (up to 99.97%) by the application of these pre-assembly filtering methods. This approach provides a validated method for maximizing viral contig size as well as reducing the total number of assembled contigs that require down-stream analysis as putative viral nucleic acids. PMID:26098299</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981SPIE..314..229G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981SPIE..314..229G"><span>Parametric Imaging Of Digital <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Angiography Studies For Renal Transplant Evaluation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gallagher, Joe H.; Meaney, Thomas F.; Flechner, Stuart M.; Novick, Andrew C.; Buonocore, Edward</p> <p>1981-11-01</p> <p>A noninvasive method for diagnosing acute tubular necrosis and rejection would be an important tool for the management of renal transplant patients. From a sequence of digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiographic images acquired after an intravenous injection of radiographic contrast material, the parametric images of the maximum contrast, the time when the maximum contrast is reached, and two times the time at which one half of the maximum contrast is reached are computed. The parametric images of the time when the maximum is reached clearly distinguish normal from abnormal renal function. However, it is the parametric image of two times the time when one half of the maximum is reached which provides some assistance in differentiating acute tubular necrosis from rejection.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17129576','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17129576"><span>Identification of differentially expressed genes in omental adipose tissues of obese patients by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qiu, Jie; Ni, Yu-hui; Gong, Hai-xia; Fei, Li; Pan, Xiao-qin; Guo, Mei; Chen, Rong-hua; Guo, Xi-rong</p> <p>2007-01-12</p> <p>To identify differentially expressed genes between obese individuals and normal control, we have undertaken suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH). Omental adipose tissues were obtained via abdominal surgery for appendicitis in both 13 obese subjects [BMI (body mass index) >30 kg/m2] and 13 normal subjects (BMI >18 and <25 kg/m2). Following SSH, about one thousand clones were sequenced and found to derive from 426 different genes. These predominately expressed genes included genes involved in lipid metabolism, cytokines, signal transduction, GLUT4 translocation, cell cycle and growth, cytoskeleton, and others. Although more detailed analyses are necessary, it is anticipated that further study of genes identified will provide insights into their specific roles in the etiology of obesity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21528845','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21528845"><span>Distillation of mixed-state continuous-variable entanglement by photon <span class="hlt">subtraction</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Zhang Shengli; Loock, Peter van</p> <p>2010-12-15</p> <p>We present a detailed theoretical analysis for the distillation of one copy of a mixed two-mode continuous-variable entangled state using beam splitters and coherent photon-detection techniques, including conventional on-off detectors and photon-number-resolving detectors. The initial Gaussian mixed-entangled states are generated by transmitting a two-mode squeezed state through a lossy bosonic channel, corresponding to the primary source of errors in current approaches to optical quantum communication. We provide explicit formulas to calculate the entanglement in terms of logarithmic negativity before and after distillation, including losses in the channel and the photon detection, and show that one-copy distillation is still possible even for losses near the typical fiber channel attenuation length. A lower bound for the transmission coefficient of the photon-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> beam splitter is derived, representing the minimal value that still allows to enhance the entanglement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22217991','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22217991"><span>Unconventional minimal <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> and Bogoliubov-Parasyuk-Hepp-Zimmermann method: Massive scalar theory and critical exponents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Carvalho, Paulo R. S.; Leite, Marcelo M.</p> <p>2013-09-15</p> <p>We introduce a simpler although unconventional minimal <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> renormalization procedure in the case of a massive scalar λφ{sup 4} theory in Euclidean space using dimensional regularization. We show that this method is very similar to its counterpart in massless field theory. In particular, the choice of using the bare mass at higher perturbative order instead of employing its tree-level counterpart eliminates all tadpole insertions at that order. As an application, we compute diagrammatically the critical exponents η and ν at least up to two loops. We perform an explicit comparison with the Bogoliubov-Parasyuk-Hepp-Zimmermann (BPHZ) method at the same loop order, show that the proposed method requires fewer diagrams and establish a connection between the two approaches.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JASTP.105..293B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JASTP.105..293B"><span>Effective <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> technique at the Irkutsk Incoherent Scatter Radar: Theory and experiment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Berngardt, Oleg I.; Kushnarev, Dmitrii S.</p> <p>2013-12-01</p> <p>We describe a sounding technique that allows us to improve spatial resolution at the Irkutsk Incoherent Scatter Radar (IISR) without losing spectral resolution. The technique also allows us to decrease temperature estimation errors caused by the Faraday effect. The technique is based on transmitting various duration pulses without any modulation and on <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> correlation matrices of the received signal grouped by sounding pulse duration. We show theoretically and experimentally that the technique allows us to solve the problem of improving spatial resolution. Accumulation time for the technique is approximately four times longer than that for the alternating codes technique with the same spatial resolution. The number of lags in the correlation function with high spatial resolution does not depend on necessary spatial resolution. In the proposed technique, all the lags are obtained with the same spatial resolution and with the same signal-to-noise ratio. The technique is valid within the quasi-static ionospheric parameter approximation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-002491&hterms=dmr&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Ddmr','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-002491&hterms=dmr&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Ddmr"><span>Following <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of the dipole anisotropy and components of the detected emission arising from</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Following <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of the dipole anisotropy and components of the detected emission arising from dust (thermal emission), hot gas (free-free emission), and charged particles interacting with magnetic fields (synchrotron emission) in the Milky Way Galaxy, the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy can be seen. CMB anisotropy - tiny fluctuations in the sky brightness at a level of a part in one hundred thousand - was first detected by the COBE DMR instrument. The CMB radiation is a remnant of the Big Bang, and the fluctuations are the imprint of density contrast in the early Universe (see slide 24 caption). This image represents the anisotropy detected in data collected during the first two years of DMR operation. Ultimately the DMR was operated for four years. See slide 19 caption for information about map smoothing and projection.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770021527','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770021527"><span>Feasibility investigation of integrated optics Fourier transform devices. [holographic <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> for multichannel data preprocessing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Verber, C. M.; Vahey, D. W.; Wood, V. E.; Kenan, R. P.; Hartman, N. F.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>The possibility of producing an integrated optics data processing device based upon Fourier transformations or other parallel processing techniques, and the ways in which such techniques may be used to upgrade the performance of present and projected NASA systems were investigated. Activities toward this goal include; (1) production of near-diffraction-limited geodesic lenses in glass waveguides; (2) development of grinding and polishing techniques for the production of geodesic lenses in LiNbO3 waveguides; (3) development of a characterization technique for waveguide lenses; and (4) development of a theory for corrected aspheric geodesic lenses. A holographic <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> system was devised which should be capable of rapid on-board preprocessing of a large number of parallel data channels. The principle involved is validated in three demonstrations.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10193623','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/10193623"><span>Conceptual design of an 8 Tesla superconducting wiggler for a dedicated digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography source</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Blum, E.B.</p> <p>1993-09-01</p> <p>One of the most important techniques used to diagnose heart disease is coronary angiography. Coronary angiography is only used when it is absolutely essential because of the risk of fatalities and other serious complications arising from the insertion of the catheter. The technique also exposes the patients to large amounts of x-rays. Research, begun at SSRL and continued on the X17 beam line at NSLS, demonstrated the feasibility of imaging human coronary arteries following venous injection of the contrast agent. The technique, caged digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography (DSA), uses two monochromatic beams of x-rays, one slightly above and one slightly below the iodine K absorption edge (33.169 KeV) to collect simultaneous images. When the two images are <span class="hlt">subtracted</span>, the contrast agent, contained primarily in the blood vessels, is revealed and the background that is common to both images is suppressed. The images must be collected during a single heartbeat to avoid blurring from motion of the blood vessels. Conventional x-ray sources are too weak to provide the intense flux that is required in the narrow energy bandwidth of the beams. Only the most powerful synchrotron radiation beams from wiggler magnet sources can provide the intensity required in the short exposure time. Although DSA experiments have shown promise, they have been conducted at large, research synchrotron radiation facilities. A small, dedicated source will be needed before DSA can be used as a standard medical procedure. Such x-ray sources as laser backscattering, Cherenkov radiation, parametric x-radiation, and channeling radiation have been suggested for hospital based DSA sources but none of them appear to produce enough flux to be useful. Barring the discovery of a new source of intense x-rays, only synchrotron radiation seems to meet the requirements for DSA. This report briefly describes the preliminary design of a high field, superconducting wiggler magnet that can be used as a DSA source.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-002488&hterms=illustration&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dillustration','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="https://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=GL-2002-002488&hterms=illustration&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dillustration"><span>An illustration of the foreground emission <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> process resulting in the DIRBE detection of t</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>An illustration of the foreground emission <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> process resulting in the DIRBE detection of the Cosmic Infrared Background at 240 Aum. The map at the top is a false-color image showing the observed infrared sky brightness at wavelengths of 60 (blue), 100 (green) and 240 Aum (red). The bright white-yellow horizontal band across the middle of the image corresponds to emission from interstellar dust in the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy (the center of the Galaxy lies at the center of the map). The red regions above and below this bright band are 'infrared cirrus' clouds, wispy clouds of relatively cool Galactic dust. The blue S-shaped figure follows the ecliptic plane and represents emission from interplanetary dust in the solar system. The map in the middle is a 60-100-240 Aum false-color image depicting the sky after the foreground glow of the interplanetary dust has been modeled and <span class="hlt">subtracted</span>; this image is dominated by emission from interstellar dust in the Milky Way. After the infrared light from our solar system and Galaxy has been removed, what remains is a uniform Cosmic Infrared Background. This is illustrated in the bottom image, which shows just the residual 240 Aum brightness. The line across the center is an artifact from removal of the Galactic light. The DIRBE team reports detection of this cosmic background light also at 140 Aum, and has set limits to its brightness at eight other infrared wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 Aum (see Slide 22). Credit: STScI OPO - PRC98-01; M. Hauser and NASA.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23876734','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23876734"><span>Automated quantitative spectroscopic analysis combining background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>, cosmic ray removal, and peak fitting.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>James, Timothy M; Schlösser, Magnus; Lewis, Richard J; Fischer, Sebastian; Bornschein, Beate; Telle, Helmut H</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>An integrated concept for post-acquisition spectrum analysis was developed for in-line (real-time) and off-line applications that preserves absolute spectral quantification; after the initializing parameter setup, only minimal user intervention is required. This spectral evaluation suite is composed of a sequence of tasks specifically addressing cosmic ray removal, background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>, and peak analysis and fitting, together with the treatment of two-dimensional charge-coupled device array data. One may use any of the individual steps on their own, or may exclude steps from the chain if so desired. For the background treatment, the canonical rolling-circle filter (RCF) algorithm was adopted, but it was coupled with a Savitzky-Golay filtering step on the locus-array generated from a single RCF pass. This novel only-two-parameter procedure vastly improves on the RCF's deficiency to overestimate the baseline level in spectra with broad peak features. The peak analysis routine developed here is an only-two-parameter (amplitude and position) fitting algorithm that relies on numerical line shape profiles rather than on analytical functions. The overall analysis chain was programmed in National Instrument's LabVIEW; this software allows for easy incorporation of this spectrum analysis suite into any LabVIEW-managed instrument control, data-acquisition environment, or both. The strength of the individual tasks and the integrated program sequence are demonstrated for the analysis of a wide range of (although not necessarily limited to) Raman spectra of varying complexity and exhibiting nonanalytical line profiles. In comparison to other analysis algorithms and functions, our new approach for background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>, peak analysis, and fitting returned vastly improved quantitative results, even for "hidden" details in the spectra, in particular, for nonanalytical line profiles. All software is available for download.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MeScT..27b5001Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016MeScT..27b5001Z"><span>An adaptive demodulation approach for bearing fault detection based on adaptive wavelet filtering and spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Yan; Tang, Baoping; Liu, Ziran; Chen, Rengxiang</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings is important for improving mechanical system reliability and performance. Vibration signals contain a wealth of complex information useful for state monitoring and fault diagnosis. However, any fault-related impulses in the original signal are often severely tainted by various noises and the interfering vibrations caused by other machine elements. Narrow-band amplitude demodulation has been an effective technique to detect bearing faults by identifying bearing fault characteristic frequencies. To achieve this, the key step is to remove the corrupting noise and interference, and to enhance the weak signatures of the bearing fault. In this paper, a new method based on adaptive wavelet filtering and spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> is proposed for fault diagnosis in bearings. First, to eliminate the frequency associated with interfering vibrations, the vibration signal is bandpass filtered with a Morlet wavelet filter whose parameters (i.e. center frequency and bandwidth) are selected in separate steps. An alternative and efficient method of determining the center frequency is proposed that utilizes the statistical information contained in the production functions (PFs). The bandwidth parameter is optimized using a local ‘greedy’ scheme along with Shannon wavelet entropy criterion. Then, to further reduce the residual in-band noise in the filtered signal, a spectral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> procedure is elaborated after wavelet filtering. Instead of resorting to a reference signal as in the majority of papers in the literature, the new method estimates the power spectral density of the in-band noise from the associated PF. The effectiveness of the proposed method is validated using simulated data, test rig data, and vibration data recorded from the transmission system of a helicopter. The experimental results and comparisons with other methods indicate that the proposed method is an effective approach to detecting the fault-related impulses</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9784E..42M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9784E..42M"><span>Lung iodine mapping by <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> with image registration allowing for tissue sliding</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mohr, Brian; Brink, Monique; Oostveen, Luuk J.; Schuijf, Joanne D.; Prokop, Mathias</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Pulmonary embolism is a fairly common and serious entity, so rapid diagnosis and treatment has a significant impact on morbidity and mortality rates. Iodine maps representing tissue perfusion enhancement are commonly generated by dual-energy CT acquisitions to provide information about the effect of the embolism on pulmonary perfusion. Alternatively, the iodine map can be generated by <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> pre- from post-contrast CT scans as previously reported. Although accurate image registration is essential, <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> has the advantage of a higher signal-to-noise ratio and suppression of bone. This paper presents an improvement over the previously reported registration algorithm. Significantly, allowance for sliding motion at tissue boundaries is included in the regularization. Pre- and post-contrast helical CT scans were acquired for thirty subjects using a Toshiba Aquilion ONE scanner. Ten of these subjects were designated for algorithm development, while the remaining twenty were reserved for qualitative clinical evaluation. Quantitative evaluation was performed against the previously reported method and using publicly available data for comparison against other methods. Comparison of 100 landmarks in seven datasets shows no change in the mean Euclidean error of 0.48 mm, compared to the previous method. Evaluation in the publicly available DIR-Lab data with 300 annotations results in a mean Euclidean error of 1.17 mm in the ten 4DCT cases and 3.37 mm in the ten COPDGene cases. Clinical evaluation on a sliding scale from 1 (excellent) to 5 (non-diagnostic) indicates a slight, but non-significant, improvement in registration adequacy from 3.1 to 2.9.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhPro..83..549M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhPro..83..549M"><span>Hybrid <span class="hlt">Additive</span> Manufacturing Technologies - An Analysis Regarding Potentials and Applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Merklein, Marion; Junker, Daniel; Schaub, Adam; Neubauer, Franziska</p> <p></p> <p>Imposing the trend of mass customization of lightweight construction in industry, conventional manufacturing processes like forming technology and chipping production are pushed to their limits for economical manufacturing. More flexible processes are needed which were developed by the <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing technology. This toolless production principle offers a high geometrical freedom and an optimized utilization of the used material. Thus load adjusted lightweight components can be produced in small lot sizes in an economical way. To compensate disadvantages like inadequate accuracy and surface roughness hybrid machines combining <span class="hlt">additive</span> and <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> manufacturing are developed. Within this paper the principles of mainly used <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing processes of metals and their possibility to be integrated into a hybrid production machine are summarized. It is pointed out that in particular the integration of deposition processes into a CNC milling center supposes high potential for manufacturing larger parts with high accuracy. Furthermore the combination of <span class="hlt">additive</span> and <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> manufacturing allows the production of ready to use products within one single machine. <span class="hlt">Additionally</span> actual research for the integration of <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing processes into the production chain will be analyzed. For the long manufacturing time of <span class="hlt">additive</span> production processes the combination with conventional manufacturing processes like sheet or bulk metal forming seems an effective solution. Especially large volumes can be produced by conventional processes. In an <span class="hlt">additional</span> production step active elements can be applied by <span class="hlt">additive</span> manufacturing. This principle is also investigated for tool production to reduce chipping of the high strength material used for forming tools. The aim is the <span class="hlt">addition</span> of active elements onto a geometrical simple basis by using Laser Metal Deposition. That process allows the utilization of several powder materials during one process what</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1227250','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1227250"><span><span class="hlt">Multiplicity</span> Counting</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Geist, William H.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>This set of slides begins by giving background and a review of neutron counting; three attributes of a verification item are discussed: <sup>240</sup>Pu<sub>eff</sub> mass; α, the ratio of (α,n) neutrons to spontaneous fission neutrons; and leakage <span class="hlt">multiplication</span>. It then takes up neutron detector systems – theory & concepts (coincidence counting, moderation, die-away time); detector systems – some important details (deadtime, corrections); introduction to <span class="hlt">multiplicity</span> counting; <span class="hlt">multiplicity</span> electronics and example distributions; singles, doubles, and triples from measured <span class="hlt">multiplicity</span> distributions; and the point model: <span class="hlt">multiplicity</span> mathematics.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=211259','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=211259"><span>Diapause-specific gene expression in the northern house mosquito, Culex pipiens L., identified by suppressive <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>In this study we probe the molecular events underpinning diapause observed in overwintering females of Culex pipiens. Using suppressive <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) we have identified 40 genes that are either upregulated or downregulated during this seasonal period of dormancy. Northern blot hybr...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9813E..02K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9813E..02K"><span>Modeling optical pattern recognition algorithms for object tracking based on nonlinear equivalent models and <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of frames</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krasilenko, Vladimir G.; Nikolskyy, Aleksandr I.; Lazarev, Alexander A.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>We have proposed and discussed optical pattern recognition algorithms for object tracking based on nonlinear equivalent models and <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of frames. Experimental results of suggested algorithms in Mathcad and LabVIEW are shown. Application of equivalent functions and difference of frames gives good results for recognition and tracking moving objects.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981SPIE..314..372R','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1981SPIE..314..372R"><span>Exposure Geometry And Film Contrast Differences As Bases For Incomplete Cancellation Of Irrelevant Structures In Dental <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Radiography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ruttimann, Urs E.; Okano, Tomohiro; Grondahl, Hans-Goran; Grondahl, Kerstin; Webber, Richard L.</p> <p>1981-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> radiography for longitudinal studies requires both reproducible imaging geometry and film contrast characteristics to permit perfect alignment of the radiographs, and achieve good cancellation of diagnostically irrelevant background structures. The standard deviation (SD) of gray levels about the mean in a <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> image was used as a relative measure of the residual structured noise. In order to estimate the effects of improperly standardized radiographs on SD in the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> image, both the imaging angle and film exposure time were systematically varied. The results showed that SD changed linear for small misalignment angles of the central beam, the variance attributable to this error source reaching about the same magnitude as the variance due to anatomical differences for angulation errors within ±20. The SD increase due to large film contrast disparity could be partly reverted for angulation errors within this bound by using a quadratic transformation which matched the first two moments of the gray level distributions in the two parent radiographs. Therefore, in order to use some of the retrospective data obtained under less stringent standardizations for <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> imagery, it appears possible to adjust for differences in film contrast, and, perhaps, correct for geometric misalignment by a separate algorithm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012IEITF..95..586M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2012IEITF..95..586M"><span>Theoretical Analysis of Amounts of Musical Noise and Speech Distortion in Structure-Generalized Parametric Blind Spatial <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Array</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Miyazaki, Ryoichi; Saruwatari, Hiroshi; Shikano, Kiyohiro</p> <p></p> <p>We propose a structure-generalized blind spatial <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> array (BSSA), and the theoretical analysis of the amounts of musical noise and speech distortion. The structure of BSSA should be selected according to the application, i.e., a channelwise BSSA is recommended for listening but a conventional BSSA is suitable for speech recognition.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21718658','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21718658"><span>Construction and analysis of liver suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization library of silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) intraperitoneally injected with microcystin-LR.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Qu, Xiancheng; Zhang, Kaiyue; Cui, Zhihui; Zhang, Yong; Jiang, Jiaoyun; Feng, Long; Liu, Qigen</p> <p>2011-09-01</p> <p>Microcystin-LR (MC-LR) is the most frequently studied cyclic heptapeptide hepatotoxin produced by cyanobacteria. The toxin accumulates rapidly in the liver where it exerts most of its damage, but the molecular mechanisms behind its toxicity remain unclear. Here, suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) was used to identify alterations in gene transcription of the silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) after exposure to MC-LR. After hybridization and cloning, the forward and reverse <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> cDNA libraries were obtained. At random, 150 positive clones (70 forward and 80 reverse) were selected and sequenced from the <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> libraries, which gave a total of 88 gene fragment sequences (48 forward and 40 reverse). Sequencing analysis and homology searches showed that these ESTs represented 75 unique genes and 13 duplicates. Of the 75 unique genes, 38 shared high homology with fish genes of known functions, including immune-related genes, transporters and some involved in cell metabolism. Four sequenced genes (Fs59, Fs70, Rs2 and Rs15) were analyzed further using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. The genes from the forward library (Fs59 and Fs70) were found to be transcriptionally upregulated, while the genes from the reverse library (Rs2 and Rs15) were found to be transcriptionally downregulated. These results confirmed the successful construction of the <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> cDNA library that was enriched for genes that were differentially transcribed in the silver carp liver challenged with MC-LR.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24158398','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24158398"><span>Toxic effects of octylphenol on the expression of genes in liver identified by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization of Rana chensinensis.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Xin-Yi; Xiao, Ning; Zhang, Yu-Hui</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Octylphenol (OP) is the degradative product of alkylphenol ethoxylates that are widely used to produce rubber, pesticides, and paints. It is chemically stable substance and demonstrates estrogenic effects, toxicity and carcinogenic effects in the environment. The toxin accumulates rapidly in the liver where it exerts most of its damage, but the molecular mechanisms behind its toxicity remain unclear. Due to limited information concerning the effect of OP on liver, this study investigates how OP causes hepatotoxicity in liver. Here, suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization was used to identify the alterations in gene transcription of the frog (Rana chensinensis) after exposure to OP. After hybridization and cloning, the <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> cDNA libraries were obtained. At random, 207 positive clones were selected and sequenced from the <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> libraries, which gave a total of 75 gene fragment sequences. The screening identified numerous genes involved in apoptosis, signal transduction, cytoskeletal remodeling, innate immunity, material and energy metabolism, translation and transcription which were extensively discussed. Two sequenced genes were analyzed further using real time quantitative PCR. The two genes from the library were found to be transcriptionally up-regulated. These results confirmed the successful construction of the <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> cDNA library that was enriched for the genes that were differentially transcribed in the amphibian liver challenged with OP, and for the first time present the basic data on toxicity effect of OP on liver.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17368347','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17368347"><span>Evaluation of chronic periapical lesions by digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> radiography by using Adobe Photoshop CS: a technical report.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Carvalho, Fabiola B; Gonçalves, Marcelo; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário</p> <p>2007-04-01</p> <p>The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique by using Adobe Photoshop CS (San Jose, CA) image-analysis software to evaluate the radiographic changes of chronic periapical lesions after root canal treatment by digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> radiography. Thirteen upper anterior human teeth with pulp necrosis and radiographic image of chronic periapical lesion were endodontically treated and radiographed 0, 2, 4, and 6 months after root canal treatment by using a film holder. The radiographic films were automatically developed and digitized. The radiographic images taken 0, 2, 4, and 6 months after root canal therapy were submitted to digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> in pairs (0 and 2 months, 2 and 4 months, and 4 and 6 months) choosing "image," "calculation," "<span class="hlt">subtract</span>," and "new document" tools from Adobe Photoshop CS image-analysis software toolbar. The resulting images showed areas of periapical healing in all cases. According to this methodology, the healing or expansion of periapical lesions can be evaluated by means of digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> radiography by using Adobe Photoshop CS software.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2570656','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2570656"><span>Gene expression <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> of non-cancerous lung from smokers and non-smokers with adenocarcinoma, as a predictor for smokers developing lung cancer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Stav, David; Bar, Ilan; Sandbank, Judith</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>Background Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer death in developed countries. Adenocarcinoma is becoming the most common form of lung cancer. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor for lung cancer. Long-term cigarettes smoking may be characterized by genetic alteration and diffuse injury of the airways surface, named field cancerization, while cancer in non-smokers is usually clonally derived. Detecting specific genes expression changes in non-cancerous lung in smokers with adenocarcinoma may give us instrument for predicting smokers who are going to develop this malignancy. Objectives We described the gene expression in non-cancerous lungs from 21 smoker patients with lung adenocarcinoma and compare it to gene expression in non-cancerous lung tissue from 10 non-smokers with primary lung adenocarcinoma. Methods Total RNA was isolated from peripheral non-cancerous lung tissue. The cDNA was hybridized to the U133A GeneChip array. Hierarchical clustering analysis on genes obtained from smokers and non-smokers, after <span class="hlt">subtracting</span> were exported to the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software for further analysis. Results The genes <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> resulted in disclosure of 36 genes with high score. They were subsequently mapped and sorted based on location, cellular components, and biochemical activity. The gene functional analysis disclosed 20 genes, which are involved in cancer process (P = 7.05E-5 to 2.92E-2). Conclusion Detected genes may serve as a predictor for smokers who may be at high risk of developing lung cancer. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, since these genes originating from non-cancerous lung, which is the major area of the lungs, a sample from an induced sputum may represent it. PMID:18811983</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PASA...33...58Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PASA...33...58Z"><span>A Novel Sky-<span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Method Based on Non-negative Matrix Factorisation with Sparsity for Multi-object Fibre Spectroscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Long; Ye, Zhongfu</p> <p>2016-12-01</p> <p>A novel sky-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> method based on non-negative matrix factorisation with sparsity is proposed in this paper. The proposed non-negative matrix factorisation with sparsity method is redesigned for sky-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> considering the characteristics of the skylights. It has two constraint terms, one for sparsity and the other for homogeneity. Different from the standard sky-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> techniques, such as the B-spline curve fitting methods and the Principal Components Analysis approaches, sky-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> based on non-negative matrix factorisation with sparsity method has higher accuracy and flexibility. The non-negative matrix factorisation with sparsity method has research value for the sky-<span class="hlt">subtraction</span> on multi-object fibre spectroscopic telescope surveys. To demonstrate the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed algorithm, experiments are performed on Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope data, as the mechanisms of the multi-object fibre spectroscopic telescopes are similar.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4372211','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4372211"><span>Improved Visualization of Intracranial Vessels with Intraoperative Coregistration of Rotational Digital <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Angiography and Intraoperative 3D Ultrasound</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Podlesek, Dino; Meyer, Tobias; Morgenstern, Ute; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Introduction Ultrasound can visualize and update the vessel status in real time during cerebral vascular surgery. We studied the depiction of parent vessels and aneurysms with a high-resolution 3D intraoperative ultrasound imaging system during aneurysm clipping using rotational digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography as a reference. Methods We analyzed 3D intraoperative ultrasound in 39 patients with cerebral aneurysms to visualize the aneurysm intraoperatively and the nearby vascular tree before and after clipping. Simultaneous coregistration of preoperative <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography data with 3D intraoperative ultrasound was performed to verify the anatomical assignment. Results Intraoperative ultrasound detected 35 of 43 aneurysms (81%) in 39 patients. Thirty-nine intraoperative ultrasound measurements were matched with rotational digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography and were successfully reconstructed during the procedure. In 7 patients, the aneurysm was partially visualized by 3D-ioUS or was not in field of view. Post-clipping intraoperative ultrasound was obtained in 26 and successfully reconstructed in 18 patients (69%) despite clip related artefacts. The overlap between 3D-ioUS aneurysm volume and preoperative rDSA aneurysm volume resulted in a mean accuracy of 0.71 (Dice coefficient). Conclusions Intraoperative coregistration of 3D intraoperative ultrasound data with preoperative rotational digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography is possible with high accuracy. It allows the immediate visualization of vessels beyond the microscopic field, as well as parallel assessment of blood velocity, aneurysm and vascular tree configuration. Although spatial resolution is lower than for standard angiography, the method provides an excellent vascular overview, advantageous interpretation of 3D-ioUS and immediate intraoperative feedback of the vascular status. A prerequisite for understanding vascular intraoperative ultrasound is image quality and a successful match with preoperative</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8670E..2RM','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013SPIE.8670E..2RM"><span>Automated detection of abnormalities in paranasal sinus on dental panoramic radiographs by using contralateral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> technique based on mandible contour</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Mori, Shintaro; Hara, Takeshi; Tagami, Motoki; Muramatsu, Chicako; Kaneda, Takashi; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Fujita, Hiroshi</p> <p>2013-02-01</p> <p>Inflammation in paranasal sinus sometimes becomes chronic to take long terms for the treatment. The finding is important for the early treatment, but general dentists may not recognize the findings because they focus on teeth treatments. The purpose of this study was to develop a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for the inflammation in paranasal sinus on dental panoramic radiographs (DPRs) by using the mandible contour and to demonstrate the potential usefulness of the CAD system by means of receiver operating characteristic analysis. The detection scheme consists of 3 steps: 1) Contour extraction of mandible, 2) Contralateral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>, and 3) Automated detection. The Canny operator and active contour model were applied to extract the edge at the first step. At the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> step, the right region of the extracted contour image was flipped to compare with the left region. Mutual information between two selected regions was obtained to estimate the shift parameters of image registration. The <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> images were generated based on the shift parameter. Rectangle regions of left and right paranasal sinus on the <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> image were determined based on the size of mandible. The abnormal side of the regions was determined by taking the difference between the averages of each region. Thirteen readers were responded to all cases without and with the automated results. The averaged AUC of all readers was increased from 0.69 to 0.73 with statistical significance (p=0.032) when the automated detection results were provided. In conclusion, the automated detection method based on contralateral <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> technique improves readers' interpretation performance of inflammation in paranasal sinus on DPRs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=61242&keyword=SANDIA+AND+REPORT&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=76087536&CFTOKEN=46229844','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=61242&keyword=SANDIA+AND+REPORT&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=76087536&CFTOKEN=46229844"><span>ECOTOXICOGENOMICS: EXPOSURE INDICATORS USING ESTS AND <span class="hlt">SUBTRACTIVE</span> LIBRARIES FOR MULTI-LIFE STAGES OF PIMEPHALES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Ecotoxicogenomics is research that identifies patterns of gene expression in wildlife and predicts effects of environmental stressors. We are developing a <span class="hlt">multiple</span> stressor, <span class="hlt">multiple</span> life stage exposure model using the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), initially studying fou...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15359472','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15359472"><span>CO2 demonstration of <span class="hlt">multiple</span> extravasations into a subcapsular hematoma of the liver.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Terayama, Noboru; Matsui, Osamu; Ueda, Fumiaki; Hattori, Yuki; Nishijima, Hiroshi; Sanada, Junichiro</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>In a case of esophageal cancer with liver metastases, rupture of a liver metastasis resulted in subcapsular hematoma of the liver. Digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography with carbon dioxide showed <span class="hlt">multiple</span> extravasations at the surface of the liver suggesting <span class="hlt">multiple</span> ruptures of the penetrating hepatic capsular arteries. It was suggested that these findings are not rare in cases of subcapsular hematoma; however, they have received little attention.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21088273','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="https://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21088273"><span>CO{sub 2} Demonstration of <span class="hlt">Multiple</span> Extravasations into a Subcapsular Hematoma of the Liver</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Terayama, Noboru Matsui, Osamu; Ueda, Fumiaki; Hattori, Yuki; Nishijima, Hiroshi; Sanada, Junichiro</p> <p>2004-09-15</p> <p>In a case of esophageal cancer with liver metastases, rupture of a liver metastasis resulted in subcapsular hematoma of the liver. Digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography with carbon dioxide showed <span class="hlt">multiple</span> extravasations at the surface of the liver suggesting <span class="hlt">multiple</span> ruptures of the penetrating hepatic capsular arteries. It was suggested that these findings are not rare in cases of subcapsular hematoma; however, they have received little attention.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Planar&pg=7&id=EJ106435','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Planar&pg=7&id=EJ106435"><span>On the <span class="hlt">Addition</span> of Planar Rotations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Maor, Eli</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>An interpretation of the transformation formulas for rotations in a plane in terms of the exponential function is given. <span class="hlt">Addition</span> of two rotations is shown to correspond to the <span class="hlt">multiplication</span> of the two corresponding matrices. (Author/LS)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2949867','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2949867"><span>Suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization analysis reveals expression of conserved and novel genes in male accessory glands of the ant Leptothorax gredleri</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Background During mating, insect males eject accessory gland proteins (Acps) into the female genital tract. These substances are known to affect female post-mating behavior and physiology. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, they may harm the female, e.g., in reducing its lifespan. This is interpreted as a consequence of sexual antagonistic co-evolution. Whereas sexual conflict abounds in non-social species, the peculiar life history of social insects (ants, bees, wasps) with lifelong pair-bonding and no re-mating aligns the reproductive interests of the sexes. Harming the female during mating would negatively affect male fitness and sexual antagonism is therefore not expected. Indeed, mating appears to increase female longevity in at least one ant species. Acps are presumed to play a role in this phenomenon, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. In this study, we investigated genes, which are preferentially expressed in male accessory glands of the ant Leptothorax gredleri, to determine which proteins might be transferred in the seminal fluid. Results By a suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization protocol we obtained 20 unique sequences (USs). Twelve had mutual best matches with genes predicted for Apis mellifera and Nasonia vitripennis. Functional information (Gene Ontology) was available only for seven of these, including intracellular signaling, energy-dependent transport and metabolic enzyme activities. The remaining eight USs did not match sequences from other species. Six genes were further analyzed by quantitative RT-PCR in three life cycle stages of male ants. A gene with carboxy-lyase activity and one of unpredicted function were significantly overexpressed in accessory glands of sexually mature males. Conclusions Our study is the first one to investigate differential gene expression in ants in a context related to mating. Our findings indicate that male accessory glands of L. gredleri express a series of genes that are unique to this species, possibly representing novel</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21468647','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21468647"><span>Thoracic pedicle <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> osteotomy in the treatment of severe pediatric deformities.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bakaloudis, Georgios; Lolli, Francesco; Di Silvestre, Mario; Greggi, Tiziana; Astolfi, Stefano; Martikos, Konstantinos; Vommaro, Francesco; Barbanti-Brodano, Giovanni; Cioni, Alfredo; Giacomini, Stefano</p> <p>2011-05-01</p> <p>The traditional surgical treatment of severe spinal deformities, both in adult and pediatric patients, consisted of a 360° approach. Posterior-based spinal osteotomy has recently been reported as a useful and safe technique in maximizing kyphosis and/or kyphoscoliosis correction. It obviates the deleterious effects of an anterior approach and can increase the magnitude of correction both in the coronal and sagittal plane. There are few reports in the literature focusing on the surgical treatment of severe spinal deformities in large pediatric-only series (age <16 years old) by means of a posterior-based spinal osteotomy, with no consistent results on the use of a single posterior-based thoracic pedicle <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> osteotomy in the treatment of such challenging group of patients. The purpose of the present study was to review our operative experience with pediatric patients undergoing a single level PSO for the correction of thoracic kyphosis/kyphoscoliosis in the region of the spinal cord (T12 and cephalad), and determine the safety and efficacy of posterior thoracic pedicle <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> osteotomy (PSO) in the treatment of severe pediatric deformities. A retrospective review was performed on 12 consecutive pediatric patients (6 F, 6 M) treated by means of a posterior thoracic PSO between 2002 and 2006 in a single Institution. Average age at surgery was 12.6 years (range, 9-16), whereas the deformity was due to a severe juvenile idiopathic scoliosis in seven cases (average preoperative main thoracic 113°; 90-135); an infantile idiopathic scoliosis in two cases (preoperative main thoracic of 95° and 105°, respectively); a post-laminectomy kypho-scoliosis of 95° (for a intra-medullar ependimoma); an angular kypho-scoliosis due to a spondylo-epiphisary dysplasia (already operated on four times); and a sharp congenital kypho-scoliosis (already operated on by means of a anterior-posterior in situ fusion). In all patients a pedicle screws instrumentation was used</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040037784','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040037784"><span><span class="hlt">Multiplicative</span> Versus <span class="hlt">Additive</span> Filtering for Spacecraft Attitude Determination</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Markley, F. Landis</p> <p>2003-01-01</p> <p>The absence of a globally nonsingular three-parameter representation of rotations forces attitude Kalman filters to estimate either a singular or a redundant attitude representation. We compare two filtering strategies using simplified kinematics and measurement models. Our favored strategy estimates a three-parameter representation of attitude deviations from a reference attitude specified by a higher- dimensional nonsingular parameterization. The deviations from the reference are assumed to be small enough to avoid any singularity or discontinuity of the three-dimensional parameterization. We point out some disadvantages of the other strategy, which directly estimates the four-parameter quaternion representation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=325363','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/publication/?seqNo115=325363"><span><span class="hlt">Addition</span> of <span class="hlt">multiple</span> limiting resources reduces grassland diversity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Niche dimensionality is the most general theoretical explanation for biodiversity: more niches allow for more ecological tradeoffs between species and thus greater opportunities for coexistence. Resource competition theory predicts that removing resource limitations, by increasing resource availabil...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780003325','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780003325"><span>Mobile <span class="hlt">multiple</span> access study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Multiple</span> access techniques (FDMA, CDMA, TDMA) for the mobile user and attempts to identify the current best technique are discussed. Traffic loading is considered as well as voice and data modulation and spacecraft and system design. Emphasis is placed on developing mobile terminal cost estimates for the selected design. In <span class="hlt">addition</span>, design examples are presented for the alternative techniques of <span class="hlt">multiple</span> access in order to compare with the selected technique.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25829088','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25829088"><span><span class="hlt">Multiple</span> myeloma.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Peller, Patrick J</p> <p>2015-04-01</p> <p>This article presents a review of <span class="hlt">multiple</span> myeloma, precursor states, and related plasma cell disorders. The clinical roles of fluorodeoxyglucose PET/computed tomography (CT) and the potential to improve the management of patients with <span class="hlt">multiple</span> myeloma are discussed. The clinical and research data supporting the utility of PET/CT use in evaluating myeloma and other plasma cell dyscrasias continues to grow.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ITIP...25.4842X','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ITIP...25.4842X"><span>Weighted Schatten p -Norm Minimization for Image Denoising and Background <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Xie, Yuan; Gu, Shuhang; Liu, Yan; Zuo, Wangmeng; Zhang, Wensheng; Zhang, Lei</p> <p>2016-10-01</p> <p>Low rank matrix approximation (LRMA), which aims to recover the underlying low rank matrix from its degraded observation, has a wide range of applications in computer vision. The latest LRMA methods resort to using the nuclear norm minimization (NNM) as a convex relaxation of the nonconvex rank minimization. However, NNM tends to over-shrink the rank components and treats the different rank components equally, limiting its flexibility in practical applications. We propose a more flexible model, namely the Weighted Schatten $p$-Norm Minimization (WSNM), to generalize the NNM to the Schatten $p$-norm minimization with weights assigned to different singular values. The proposed WSNM not only gives better approximation to the original low-rank assumption, but also considers the importance of different rank components. We analyze the solution of WSNM and prove that, under certain weights permutation, WSNM can be equivalently transformed into independent non-convex $l_p$-norm subproblems, whose global optimum can be efficiently solved by generalized iterated shrinkage algorithm. We apply WSNM to typical low-level vision problems, e.g., image denoising and background <span class="hlt">subtraction</span>. Extensive experimental results show, both qualitatively and quantitatively, that the proposed WSNM can more effectively remove noise, and model complex and dynamic scenes compared with state-of-the-art methods.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26611410','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26611410"><span>Image Pretreatment Tools I: Algorithms for Map Denoising and Background <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Methods.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Cannistraci, Carlo Vittorio; Alessio, Massimo</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>One of the critical steps in two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) image pre-processing is the denoising, that might aggressively affect either spot detection or pixel-based methods. The Median Modified Wiener Filter (MMWF), a new nonlinear adaptive spatial filter, resulted to be a good denoising approach to use in practice with 2-DE. MMWF is suitable for global denoising, and contemporary for the removal of spikes and Gaussian noise, being its best setting invariant on the type of noise. The second critical step rises because of the fact that 2-DE gel images may contain high levels of background, generated by the laboratory experimental procedures, that must be <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> for accurate measurements of the proteomic optical density signals. Here we discuss an efficient mathematical method for background estimation, that is suitable to work even before the 2-DE image spot detection, and it is based on the 3D mathematical morphology (3DMM) theory.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23212334','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23212334"><span>Differentially expressed genes implicated in embryo abortion of mango identified by suppression <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>He, J H; Ma, F W; Chen, Y Y; Shu, H R</p> <p>2012-11-14</p> <p>Embryo abortion in mango severely damages mango production worldwide. The mechanisms by which the mango embryos abort have long been an intriguing question. We used <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> suppression hybridization to investigate the differentially expressed genes involved in this process. We generated 2 cDNA libraries from normal seed and aborted seed embryos of mango cultivar 'Jinhuang'. One thousand five hundred and seventy-two high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were obtained, with 1092 from the normal seed tester library and 480 from the aborted seed tester library. These ESTs were assembled into 783 unigenes, including 147 contigs and 636 singletons in contigs; 297 singletons in gene ontology (GO) indicated coverage of a broad range of GO categories. Seven candidate genes from different categories were selected for semi-quantitative PCR analysis, and their possible functions in embryo abortion are discussed. These data provide new insight into the genetic regulation of embryo abortion in mango and may aid in further identification of novel genes and their functions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27006920','PUBMED'); return false;" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27006920"><span>A LabVIEW Platform for Preclinical Imaging Using Digital <span class="hlt">Subtraction</span> Angiography and Micro-CT.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Badea, Cristian T; Hedlund, Laurence W; Johnson, G Allan</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>CT and digital <span class="hlt">subtraction</span> angiography (DSA) are ubiquitous in the clinic. Their preclinical equivalents are valuable imaging methods for studying disease models and treatment. We have developed a dual source/detector X-ray imaging system that we have used for both micro-CT and DSA studies in rodents. The control of such a complex imaging system requires substantial software development for which we use the graphical language LabVIEW (National Instruments, Austin, TX, USA). This paper focuses on a LabVIEW platform that we have developed to enable anatomical and functional imaging with micro-CT and DSA. Our LabVIEW applications integrate and control all the elements of our system including a dual source/detector X-ray system, a mechanical ventilator, a physiological monitor, and a power microinjector for the vascular delivery of X-ray contrast agents. Various applications allow cardiac- and respiratory-gated acquisitions for both DSA and micro-CT studies. Our results illustrate the application of DSA for cardiopulmonary studies and vascular imaging of the liver and coronary arteries. We also show how DSA can be used for functional imaging of the kidney. Finally, the power of 4D micro-CT imaging using both prospective and retrospective gating is shown for cardiac imaging.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=368432','PMC'); return false;" href="https://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=368432"><span>Identification of Bacillus anthracis specific chromosomal sequences by suppressive <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Dwyer, Kathleen G; Lamonica, Janine M; Schumacher, Jennifer A; Williams, Leanne E; Bishara, Joanne; Lewandowski, Anna; Redkar, Rajendra; Patra, Guy; DelVecchio, Vito G</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>Background Bacillus anthracis, Bacillus thuringiensis and Bacillus cereus are closely related members of the B. cereus-group of bacilli. Suppressive <span class="hlt">subtractive</span> hybridization (SSH) was used to identify specific chromosomal sequences unique to B. anthracis. Results Two SSH libraries were generated. Genomic DNA from plasmid-cured B. anthracis was used as the tester DNA in both libraries, while genomic DNA from either B. cereus or B. thuringiensis served as the driver DNA. Progressive screening of the libraries by colony filter and Southern blot analyses identified 29 different clones that were specific for the B. anthracis chromosome relative not only to the respective driver DNAs, but also to seven other different strains of B. cereus and B. thuringiensis included in the process. The nucleotide sequences of the clones were compared with those found in genomic databases, revealing that over half of the clones were located into 2 regions on the B. anthracis chromosome. Conclusions Genes encoding potential cell wall synthesis proteins dominated one region, while bacteriophage-related sequences dominated the other region. The latter supports the hypothesis that acquisition of these bacteriophage sequences occurred during or after speciation of B. anthracis relative to B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. This study provides insight into the chromosomal differences between B. anthracis and its closest phylogenetic relatives. PMID:15028116</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JBO....21g1105K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JBO....21g1105K"><span>Averaged <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> polarization imaging for endoscopic diagnostics of surface microstructures on translucent mucosae</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kanamori, Katsuhiro</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>An endoscopic image processing technique for enhancing the appearance of microstructures on translucent mucosae is described. This technique employs two pairs of co- and cross-polarization images under two different linearly polarized lights, from which the averaged <span class="hlt">subtracted</span> polarization image (AVSPI) is calculated. Experiments were then conducted using an acrylic phantom and excised porcine stomach tissue using a manual experimental setup with ring-type lighting, two rotating polarizers, and a color camera; better results were achieved with the proposed method than with conventional color intensity image processing. An objective evaluation method that uses texture analysis was developed and used to evaluate the enhanced microstructure images. This paper introduces two types of online, rigid-type, polarimetric endoscopic implementations using a polarized ring-shaped LED and a polarimetric camera. The first type uses a beam-splitter-type color polarimetric camera, and the second uses a single-chip monochrome polarimetric camera. Microstructures on the mucosa surface were enhanced robustly with these online endoscopes regardless of the difference in the extinction ratio of each device. These results show that polarimetric endoscopy using AVSPI is both effective and practical for hardware implementation.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. 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