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Sample records for addition transcript levels

  1. Untangling the Effect of Fatty Acid Addition at Species Level Revealed Different Transcriptional Responses of the Biogas Microbial Community Members.

    PubMed

    Treu, Laura; Campanaro, Stefano; Kougias, Panagiotis G; Zhu, Xinyu; Angelidaki, Irini

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, RNA-sequencing was used to elucidate the change of anaerobic digestion metatranscriptome after long chain fatty acids (oleate) exposure. To explore the general transcriptional behavior of the microbiome, the analysis was first performed on shotgun reads without considering a reference metagenome. As a second step, RNA reads were aligned on the genes encoded by the microbial community, revealing the expression of more than 51 000 different transcripts. The present study is the first research which was able to dissect the transcriptional behavior at a single species level by considering the 106 microbial genomes previously identified. The exploration of the metabolic pathways confirmed the importance of Syntrophomonas species in fatty acids degradation, and also highlighted the presence of protective mechanisms toward the long chain fatty acid effects in bacteria belonging to Clostridiales, Rykenellaceae, and in species of the genera Halothermothrix and Anaerobaculum. Additionally, an interesting transcriptional activation of the chemotaxis genes was evidenced in seven species belonging to Clostridia, Halothermothrix, and Tepidanaerobacter. Surprisingly, methanogens revealed a very versatile behavior different from each other, even among similar species of the Methanoculleus genus, while a strong increase of the expression level in Methanosarcina sp. was evidenced after oleate addition.

  2. Reducing nontemplated 3' nucleotide addition to polynucleotide transcripts

    DOEpatents

    Kao, C. Cheng

    2000-01-01

    Non-template 3' nucleotide addition to a transcript is reduced by transcribing a transcript from a template comprising an ultimate and/or penultimate 5' ribose having a C'2 substituent such as methoxy, which reduces non-template 3' nucleotide addition to the transcript. The methods are shown to be applicable to a wide variety of polymerases, including Taq, T7 RNA polymerase, etc.

  3. 47. MAIN WAREHOUSE SECOND LEVEL ADDITION Second level was ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    47. MAIN WAREHOUSE - SECOND LEVEL ADDITION Second level was added in 1941. Note the variety of building materials used in the wall: cement, bricks and finally cement blocks, with wood topping the entire wall. - Hovden Cannery, 886 Cannery Row, Monterey, Monterey County, CA

  4. Three WRKY transcription factors additively repress abscisic acid and gibberellin signaling in aleurone cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gu, Lingkun; Ringler, Patricia; Smith, Stanley; Rushton, Paul J; Shen, Qingxi J

    2015-07-01

    Members of the WRKY transcription factor superfamily are essential for the regulation of many plant pathways. Functional redundancy due to duplications of WRKY transcription factors, however, complicates genetic analysis by allowing single-mutant plants to maintain wild-type phenotypes. Our analyses indicate that three group I WRKY genes, OsWRKY24, -53, and -70, act in a partially redundant manner. All three showed characteristics of typical WRKY transcription factors: each localized to nuclei and yeast one-hybrid assays indicated that they all bind to W-boxes, including those present in their own promoters. Quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicated that the expression levels of the three WRKY genes varied in the different tissues tested. Particle bombardment-mediated transient expression analyses indicated that all three genes repress the GA and ABA signaling in a dosage-dependent manner. Combination of all three WRKY genes showed additive antagonism of ABA and GA signaling. These results suggest that these WRKY proteins function as negative transcriptional regulators of GA and ABA signaling. However, different combinations of these WRKY genes can lead to varied strengths in suppression of their targets.

  5. YjjQ Represses Transcription of flhDC and Additional Loci in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wiebe, Helene; Gürlebeck, Doreen; Groß, Jana; Dreck, Katrin; Pannen, Derk; Ewers, Christa; Wieler, Lothar H.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The presumptive transcriptional regulator YjjQ has been identified as being virulence associated in avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). In this work, we characterize YjjQ as transcriptional repressor of the flhDC operon, encoding the master regulator of flagellar synthesis, and of additional loci. The latter include gfc (capsule 4 synthesis), ompC (outer membrane porin C), yfiRNB (regulated c-di-GMP synthesis), and loci of poorly defined function (ybhL and ymiA-yciX). We identify the YjjQ DNA-binding sites at the flhDC and gfc promoters and characterize a DNA-binding sequence motif present at all promoters found to be repressed by YjjQ. At the flhDC promoter, the YjjQ DNA-binding site overlaps the RcsA-RcsB DNA-binding site. RcsA-RcsB likewise represses the flhDC promoter, but the repression by YjjQ and that by RcsA-RcsB are independent of each other. These data suggest that YjjQ is an additional regulator involved in the complex control of flhDC at the level of transcription initiation. Furthermore, we show that YjjQ represses motility of the E. coli K-12 laboratory strain and of uropathogenic E. coli (UPEC) strains CFT073 and 536. Regulation of flhDC, yfiRNB, and additional loci by YjjQ may be features relevant for pathogenicity. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli is a commensal and pathogenic bacterium causing intra- and extraintestinal infections in humans and farm animals. The pathogenicity of E. coli strains is determined by their particular genome content, which includes essential and associated virulence factors that control the cellular physiology in the host environment. However, the gene pools of commensal and pathogenic E. coli are not clearly differentiated, and the function of virulence-associated loci needs to be characterized. In this study, we characterize the function of yjjQ, encoding a transcription regulator that was identified as being virulence associated in avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC). We characterize YjjQ as transcriptional

  6. Pairwise comparisons of ten porcine tissues identify differential transcriptional regulation at the gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level

    SciTech Connect

    Farajzadeh, Leila; Hornshøj, Henrik; Momeni, Jamal; Thomsen, Bo; Larsen, Knud; Hedegaard, Jakob; Bendixen, Christian; Madsen, Lone Bruhn

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Transcriptome sequencing yielded 223 mill porcine RNA-seq reads, and 59,000 transcribed locations. •Establishment of unique transcription profiles for ten porcine tissues including four brain tissues. •Comparison of transcription profiles at gene, isoform, promoter and transcription start site level. •Highlights a high level of regulation of neuro-related genes at both gene, isoform, and TSS level. •Our results emphasize the pig as a valuable animal model with respect to human biological issues. -- Abstract: The transcriptome is the absolute set of transcripts in a tissue or cell at the time of sampling. In this study RNA-Seq is employed to enable the differential analysis of the transcriptome profile for ten porcine tissues in order to evaluate differences between the tissues at the gene and isoform expression level, together with an analysis of variation in transcription start sites, promoter usage, and splicing. Totally, 223 million RNA fragments were sequenced leading to the identification of 59,930 transcribed gene locations and 290,936 transcript variants using Cufflinks with similarity to approximately 13,899 annotated human genes. Pairwise analysis of tissues for differential expression at the gene level showed that the smallest differences were between tissues originating from the porcine brain. Interestingly, the relative level of differential expression at the isoform level did generally not vary between tissue contrasts. Furthermore, analysis of differential promoter usage between tissues, revealed a proportionally higher variation between cerebellum (CBE) versus frontal cortex and cerebellum versus hypothalamus (HYP) than in the remaining comparisons. In addition, the comparison of differential transcription start sites showed that the number of these sites is generally increased in comparisons including hypothalamus in contrast to other pairwise assessments. A comprehensive analysis of one of the tissue contrasts, i

  7. Addition of uridines to edited RNAs in trypanosome mitochondria occurs independently of transcription

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, M.E.; Moore, D.R.; Hajduk, S.L. )

    1990-07-05

    RNA editing is a novel RNA processing event of unknown mechanism that results in the introduction of nucleotides not encoded in the DNA into specific RNA molecules. We have examined the post-transcriptional addition of nucleotides into the mitochondrial RNA of Trypanosoma brucei. Utilizing an isolated organelle system we have determined that addition of uridines to edited RNAs does not require ongoing transcription. Trypanosome mitochondria incorporate CTP, ATP, and UTP into RNA in the absence of transcription. GTP is incorporated into RNA only as a result of the transcription process. Post-transcriptional CTP and ATP incorporation can be ascribed to known enzymatic activities. CTP is incorporated into tRNAs as a result of synthesis or turnover of their 3{prime} CCA sequences. ATP is incorporated into the 3{prime} CCA of tRNAs and into mitochondrial messenger RNAs due to polyadenylation. In the absence of transcription, UTP is incorporated into transcripts known to undergo editing, and the degree of UTP incorporation is consistent with the degree of editing occurring in these transcripts. Cytochrome b mRNAs, which contain a single editing site near their 5{prime} ends, are initially transcribed unedited at that site. Post-transcriptional labeling of cytochrome b mRNAs in the organelle with (alpha-32P)UTP results in the addition of uridines near the 5{prime} end of the RNA but not in a 3{prime} region which lacks an editing site. These results indicate that RNA editing is a post-transcriptional process in the mitochondria of trypanosomes.

  8. Effect of multiplicative and additive noise on genetic transcriptional regulatory mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue-Mei; Xie, Hui-Zhang; Liu, Liang-Gang; Li, Zhi-Bing

    2009-02-01

    A multiplicative noise and an additive noise are introduced in the kinetic model of Smolen-Baxter-Byrne [P. Smolen, D.A. Baxter, J.H. Byrne, Amer. J. Physiol. Cell. Physiol. 274 (1998) 531], in which the expression of gene is controlled by protein concentration of transcriptional activator. The Fokker-Planck equation is solved and the steady-state probability distribution is obtained numerically. It is found that the multiplicative noise converts the bistability to monostability that can be regarded as a noise-induced transition. The additive noise reduces the transcription efficiency. The correlation between the multiplicative noise and the additive noise works as a genetic switch and regulates the gene transcription effectively.

  9. eQTL Regulating Transcript Levels Associated with Diverse Biological Processes in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Ranjan, Aashish; Budke, Jessica M; Rowland, Steven D; Chitwood, Daniel H; Kumar, Ravi; Carriedo, Leonela; Ichihashi, Yasunori; Zumstein, Kristina; Maloof, Julin N; Sinha, Neelima R

    2016-09-01

    Variation in gene expression, in addition to sequence polymorphisms, is known to influence developmental, physiological, and metabolic traits in plants. Genetic mapping populations have facilitated identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), the genetic determinants of variation in gene expression patterns. We used an introgression population developed from the wild desert-adapted Solanum pennellii and domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to identify the genetic basis of transcript level variation. We established the effect of each introgression on the transcriptome and identified approximately 7,200 eQTL regulating the steady-state transcript levels of 5,300 genes. Barnes-Hut t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding clustering identified 42 modules revealing novel associations between transcript level patterns and biological processes. The results showed a complex genetic architecture of global transcript abundance pattern in tomato. Several genetic hot spots regulating a large number of transcript level patterns relating to diverse biological processes such as plant defense and photosynthesis were identified. Important eQTL regulating transcript level patterns were related to leaf number and complexity as well as hypocotyl length. Genes associated with leaf development showed an inverse correlation with photosynthetic gene expression, but eQTL regulating genes associated with leaf development and photosynthesis were dispersed across the genome. This comprehensive eQTL analysis details the influence of these loci on plant phenotypes and will be a valuable community resource for investigations on the genetic effects of eQTL on phenotypic traits in tomato. PMID:27418589

  10. eQTL Regulating Transcript Levels Associated with Diverse Biological Processes in Tomato1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Budke, Jessica M.; Rowland, Steven D.; Kumar, Ravi; Ichihashi, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    Variation in gene expression, in addition to sequence polymorphisms, is known to influence developmental, physiological, and metabolic traits in plants. Genetic mapping populations have facilitated identification of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL), the genetic determinants of variation in gene expression patterns. We used an introgression population developed from the wild desert-adapted Solanum pennellii and domesticated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) to identify the genetic basis of transcript level variation. We established the effect of each introgression on the transcriptome and identified approximately 7,200 eQTL regulating the steady-state transcript levels of 5,300 genes. Barnes-Hut t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding clustering identified 42 modules revealing novel associations between transcript level patterns and biological processes. The results showed a complex genetic architecture of global transcript abundance pattern in tomato. Several genetic hot spots regulating a large number of transcript level patterns relating to diverse biological processes such as plant defense and photosynthesis were identified. Important eQTL regulating transcript level patterns were related to leaf number and complexity as well as hypocotyl length. Genes associated with leaf development showed an inverse correlation with photosynthetic gene expression, but eQTL regulating genes associated with leaf development and photosynthesis were dispersed across the genome. This comprehensive eQTL analysis details the influence of these loci on plant phenotypes and will be a valuable community resource for investigations on the genetic effects of eQTL on phenotypic traits in tomato. PMID:27418589

  11. Array-Based Transcript Profiling and Limiting-Dilution Reverse Transcription-PCR Analysis Identify Additional Latent Genes in Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Chandriani, Sanjay; Ganem, Don

    2010-01-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) is a B-lymphotropic herpesvirus strongly linked to both lymphoproliferative diseases and Kaposi's sarcoma. The viral latency program of KSHV is central to persistent infection and plays important roles in the pathogenesis of KSHV-related tumors. Up to six polypeptides and 18 microRNAs are known to be expressed in latency, but it is unclear if all major latency genes have been identified. Here, we have employed array-based transcript profiling and limiting-dilution reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) methodologies to explore this issue in several KSHV-infected cell lines. Our results show that RNAs encoding the K1 protein are found at low levels in most latently infected cell lines. The gene encoding v-IL-6 is also expressed as a latent transcript in some contexts. Both genes encode powerful signaling molecules with particular relevance to B cell biology: K1 mimics signaling through the B cell receptor, and v-IL-6 promotes B cell survival. These data resolve earlier controversies about K1 and v-IL-6 expression and indicate that, in addition to core latency genes, some transcripts can be expressed in KSHV latency in a context-dependent manner. PMID:20219929

  12. Differential analyses for RNA-seq: transcript-level estimates improve gene-level inferences

    PubMed Central

    Soneson, Charlotte; Love, Michael I.; Robinson, Mark D.

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing of cDNA (RNA-seq) is used extensively to characterize the transcriptome of cells. Many transcriptomic studies aim at comparing either abundance levels or the transcriptome composition between given conditions, and as a first step, the sequencing reads must be used as the basis for abundance quantification of transcriptomic features of interest, such as genes or transcripts. Various quantification approaches have been proposed, ranging from simple counting of reads that overlap given genomic regions to more complex estimation of underlying transcript abundances. In this paper, we show that gene-level abundance estimates and statistical inference offer advantages over transcript-level analyses, in terms of performance and interpretability. We also illustrate that the presence of differential isoform usage can lead to inflated false discovery rates in differential gene expression analyses on simple count matrices but that this can be addressed by incorporating offsets derived from transcript-level abundance estimates. We also show that the problem is relatively minor in several real data sets. Finally, we provide an R package ( tximport) to help users integrate transcript-level abundance estimates from common quantification pipelines into count-based statistical inference engines. PMID:26925227

  13. Cell cycle regulation of RPA1 transcript levels in the trypanosomatid Crithidia fasciculata.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, L M; Ray, D S

    1997-01-01

    Transcripts of both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA replication genes accumulate periodically during the cell cycle in Crithidia fasciculata. An octameric consensus sequence with a conserved hexameric core was found previously to be required for cycling of the TOP2 transcript, encoding the mitochondrial DNA topoisomerase. We show here that the rate of synthesis of the p51 protein, the large subunit of nuclear replication protein-A encoded by the RPA1 gene, varies during the cell cycle in parallel with RPA1 mRNA level. Plasmids expressing a truncated form of RPA1 (Delta RPA1 ) were used to identify cis elements required for cycling of the Delta RPA1 transcript. Sequences within the RPA1 5'-untranslated region (UTR) were found to be necessary for cycling of the Delta RPA1 transcript. These sequences also function when transposed 3'of the Delta RPA1 coding sequence. A 121 bp fragment of this sequence can confer cycling on a heterologous transcript, but is inactivated when two consensus octamers within the sequence are mutated. Mutation of these two octamers in the full-length 5'-UTR ofDelta RPA1 is insufficient to abolish cycling of the mRNA unless three additional octamers having single base changes within the hexameric core are also mutated. Thus, common octameric sequence elements are involved in periodic accumulation of both the TOP2 and RPA1 transcripts. PMID:9241242

  14. Calcium regulates caveolin-1 expression at the transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Cheng-Cheng; Kan, Qi-Ming; Li, Yan; Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Sato, Toshinori; Yamagata, Sadako; Yamagata, Tatsuya

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 expression is regulated by calcium signaling at the transcriptional level. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer An inhibitor of or siRNA to L-type calcium channel suppressed caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cyclosporine A or an NFAT inhibitor markedly reduced caveolin-1 expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caveolin-1 regulation by calcium signaling is observed in several mouse cell lines. -- Abstract: Caveolin-1, an indispensable component of caveolae serving as a transformation suppressor protein, is highly expressed in poorly metastatic mouse osteosarcoma FBJ-S1 cells while highly metastatic FBJ-LL cells express low levels of caveolin-1. Calcium concentration is higher in FBJ-S1 cells than in FBJ-LL cells; therefore, we investigated the possibility that calcium signaling positively regulates caveolin-1 in mouse FBJ-S1 cells. When cells were treated with the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, cyclosporin A (a calcineurin inhibitor), or INCA-6 (a nuclear factor of activated T-cells [NFAT] inhibitor), caveolin-1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels decreased. RNA silencing of voltage-dependent L-type calcium channel subunit alpha-1C resulted in suppression of caveolin-1 expression. This novel caveolin-1 regulation pathway was also identified in mouse NIH 3T3 cells and Lewis lung carcinoma cells. These results indicate that caveolin-1 is positively regulated at the transcriptional level through a novel calcium signaling pathway mediated by L-type calcium channel/Ca{sup 2+}/calcineurin/NFAT.

  15. 38. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF STREET LEVEL IN SHOWROOM ADDITION (NOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. VIEW SOUTHWEST OF STREET LEVEL IN SHOWROOM ADDITION (NOW USED AS FINISHING ROOM) WITH FRESHLY PAINTED DORY BOATS ON DISPLAY. 2X4 STUD WALL AND ROOF FRAMING CAN BE SEEN. - Lowell's Boat Shop, 459 Main Street, Amesbury, Essex County, MA

  16. Transcriptional enhancement of Smn levels in motoneurons is crucial for proper axon morphology in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Spiró, Zoltán; Koh, Angela; Tay, Shermaine; See, Kelvin; Winkler, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    An unresolved mystery in the field of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is why a reduction of the ubiquitously expressed Smn protein causes defects mostly in motoneurons. We addressed the possibility that this restricted vulnerability stems from elevated Smn expression in motoneurons. To explore this, we established an ex vivo zebrafish culture system of GFP-marked motoneurons to quantitatively measure Smn protein and smn mRNA levels as well as promoter activity in motoneurons versus other cell types. Importantly, we uncovered that Smn levels are elevated in motoneurons by means of transcriptional activation. In addition, we identified the ETS family transcription factor Etv5b to be responsible for increased smn transcription in motoneurons. Moreover, we established that the additional supply of Smn protein in motoneurons is necessary for proper axonogenesis in a cell-autonomous manner. These findings demonstrate the reliance of motoneurons on more Smn, thereby adding a novel piece of evidence for their increased vulnerability under SMA conditions. PMID:27273160

  17. 113. Stage level floor structure. In addition to the movable ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. Stage level floor structure. In addition to the movable sections, there were hinged slots that could be opened in the stage floor (see sheet 4 of 9, note 4; sheet 5 of 9, note 2; and sheet 7 of 9, note 1). A remaining cast iron bracket is visible in the left foreground of the photograph. The actual structure for a hinged section is visible in the background, to the right of center. The hydraulic ram (type D) visible below the floor level is the south ram in the middle row; the view is facing north. - Auditorium Building, 430 South Michigan Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  18. 45. VIEW OF UPPER LEVEL CRUSHER ADDITION FROM CRUSHED OXIDIZED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. VIEW OF UPPER LEVEL CRUSHER ADDITION FROM CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN. 18 INCH BELT CONVEYOR BIN FEED, LOWER CENTER, WITH STEPHENS-ADAMSON 25 TON/HR ELEVATOR SPLIT DISCHARGE (OXIDIZED/UNOXIDIZED) IN CENTER. CRUDE ORE BINS AND MACHINE SHOP BEYOND. NOTE TOP OF CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN IS BELOW TOP OF CRUDE ORE BINS. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  19. The transcription factor titration effect dictates level of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Brewster, Robert C; Weinert, Franz M; Garcia, Hernan G; Song, Dan; Rydenfelt, Mattias; Phillips, Rob

    2014-03-13

    Models of transcription are often built around a picture of RNA polymerase and transcription factors (TFs) acting on a single copy of a promoter. However, most TFs are shared between multiple genes with varying binding affinities. Beyond that, genes often exist at high copy number-in multiple identical copies on the chromosome or on plasmids or viral vectors with copy numbers in the hundreds. Using a thermodynamic model, we characterize the interplay between TF copy number and the demand for that TF. We demonstrate the parameter-free predictive power of this model as a function of the copy number of the TF and the number and affinities of the available specific binding sites; such predictive control is important for the understanding of transcription and the desire to quantitatively design the output of genetic circuits. Finally, we use these experiments to dynamically measure plasmid copy number through the cell cycle.

  20. The Transcription Factor Titration Effect Dictates Level of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Brewster, Robert C.; Weinert, Franz M.; Garcia, Hernan G.; Song, Dan; Rydenfelt, Mattias; Phillips, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Models of transcription are often built around a picture of RNA polymerase and transcription factors (TFs) acting on a single copy of a promoter. However, most TFs are shared between multiple genes with varying binding affinities. Beyond that, genes often exist at high copy number; in multiple, identical copies on the chromosome or on plasmids or viral vectors with copy numbers in the hundreds. Using a thermodynamic model, we characterize the interplay between TF copy number and the demand for that TF. We demonstrate the parameter-free predictive power of this model as a function of the copy number of the TF and the number and affinities of the available specific binding sites; such predictive control is important for the understanding of transcription and the desire to quantitatively design the output of genetic circuits. Finally we use these experiments to dynamically measure plasmid copy number through the cell cycle. PMID:24612990

  1. Fission yeast Cactin restricts telomere transcription and elongation by controlling Rap1 levels.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, Luca E; Bah, Amadou; Wischnewski, Harry; Shchepachev, Vadim; Soneson, Charlotte; Santagostino, Marco; Azzalin, Claus M

    2015-01-01

    The telomeric transcriptome comprises multiple long non-coding RNAs generated by transcription of linear chromosome ends. In a screening performed in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we identified factors modulating the cellular levels of the telomeric transcriptome. Among these factors, Cay1 is the fission yeast member of the conserved family of Cactins, uncharacterized proteins crucial for cell growth and survival. In cay1∆ mutants, the cellular levels of the telomeric factor Rap1 are drastically diminished due to defects in rap1+ pre-mRNA splicing and Rap1 protein stability. cay1∆ cells accumulate histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 at telomeres, which become transcriptionally desilenced, are over-elongated by telomerase and cause chromosomal aberrations in the cold. Overexpressing Rap1 in cay1+ deleted cells significantly reverts all telomeric defects. Additionally, cay1∆ mutants accumulate unprocessed Tf2 retrotransposon RNA through Rap1-independent mechanisms. Thus, Cay1 plays crucial roles in cells by ultimately harmonizing expression of transcripts originating from seemingly unrelated genomic loci.

  2. Fission yeast Cactin restricts telomere transcription and elongation by controlling Rap1 levels

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzi, Luca E; Bah, Amadou; Wischnewski, Harry; Shchepachev, Vadim; Soneson, Charlotte; Santagostino, Marco; Azzalin, Claus M

    2015-01-01

    The telomeric transcriptome comprises multiple long non-coding RNAs generated by transcription of linear chromosome ends. In a screening performed in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we identified factors modulating the cellular levels of the telomeric transcriptome. Among these factors, Cay1 is the fission yeast member of the conserved family of Cactins, uncharacterized proteins crucial for cell growth and survival. In cay1Δ mutants, the cellular levels of the telomeric factor Rap1 are drastically diminished due to defects in rap1+ pre-mRNA splicing and Rap1 protein stability. cay1Δ cells accumulate histone H3 acetylated at lysine 9 at telomeres, which become transcriptionally desilenced, are over-elongated by telomerase and cause chromosomal aberrations in the cold. Overexpressing Rap1 in cay1+ deleted cells significantly reverts all telomeric defects. Additionally, cay1Δ mutants accumulate unprocessed Tf2 retrotransposon RNA through Rap1-independent mechanisms. Thus, Cay1 plays crucial roles in cells by ultimately harmonizing expression of transcripts originating from seemingly unrelated genomic loci. PMID:25398909

  3. 41. VIEW NORTH OF UPPER LEVEL OF CRUSHER ADDITION. DINGS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. VIEW NORTH OF UPPER LEVEL OF CRUSHER ADDITION. DINGS MAGNETIC PULLEY AT CENTER. ALSO SHOWS 100-TON CRUSHED UNOXIDIZED ORE BIN (RIGHT), PULLEY FORM 18 INCH BELT CONVEYOR CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN FEED AND STEPHENSADAMSON 25 TON/HR BUCKET ELEVATOR (UPPER CENTER). THE UPPER PORTION OF THE SAMPLING ELEVATOR IS ABOVE THE MAGNETIC PULLEY (CENTER LEFT) WITH THE ROUTE OF THE 16 INCH BELT CONVEYOR FINES FEED TO CRUSHED OXIDIZED ORE BIN TO ITS LEFT. - Bald Mountain Gold Mill, Nevada Gulch at head of False Bottom Creek, Lead, Lawrence County, SD

  4. Deciphering Mineral Homeostasis in Barley Seed Transfer Cells at Transcriptional Level

    PubMed Central

    Borg, Søren

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the micronutrient inadequacy of staple crops for optimal human nutrition, a global downtrend in crop-quality has emerged from intensive breeding for yield. This trend will be aggravated by elevated levels of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide. Therefore, crop biofortification is inevitable to ensure a sustainable supply of minerals to the large part of human population who is dietary dependent on staple crops. This requires a thorough understanding of plant-mineral interactions due to the complexity of mineral homeostasis. Employing RNA sequencing, we here communicate transfer cell specific effects of excess iron and zinc during grain filling in our model crop plant barley. Responding to alterations in mineral contents, we found a long range of different genes and transcripts. Among them, it is worth to highlight the auxin and ethylene signaling factors Arfs, Abcbs, Cand1, Hps4, Hac1, Ecr1, and Ctr1, diurnal fluctuation components Sdg2, Imb1, Lip1, and PhyC, retroelements, sulfur homeostasis components Amp1, Hmt3, Eil3, and Vip1, mineral trafficking components Med16, Cnnm4, Aha2, Clpc1, and Pcbps, and vacuole organization factors Ymr155W, RabG3F, Vps4, and Cbl3. Our analysis introduces new interactors and signifies a broad spectrum of regulatory levels from chromatin remodeling to intracellular protein sorting mechanisms active in the plant mineral homeostasis. The results highlight the importance of storage proteins in metal ion toxicity-resistance and chelation. Interestingly, the protein sorting and recycling factors Exoc7, Cdc1, Sec23A, and Rab11A contributed to the response as well as the polar distributors of metal-transporters ensuring the directional flow of minerals. Alternative isoform switching was found important for plant adaptation and occurred among transcripts coding for identical proteins as well as transcripts coding for protein isoforms. We also identified differences in the alternative-isoform preference between the treatments

  5. Varying levels of complexity in transcription factor binding motifs

    PubMed Central

    Keilwagen, Jens; Grau, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Binding of transcription factors to DNA is one of the keystones of gene regulation. The existence of statistical dependencies between binding site positions is widely accepted, while their relevance for computational predictions has been debated. Building probabilistic models of binding sites that may capture dependencies is still challenging, since the most successful motif discovery approaches require numerical optimization techniques, which are not suited for selecting dependency structures. To overcome this issue, we propose sparse local inhomogeneous mixture (Slim) models that combine putative dependency structures in a weighted manner allowing for numerical optimization of dependency structure and model parameters simultaneously. We find that Slim models yield a substantially better prediction performance than previous models on genomic context protein binding microarray data sets and on ChIP-seq data sets. To elucidate the reasons for the improved performance, we develop dependency logos, which allow for visual inspection of dependency structures within binding sites. We find that the dependency structures discovered by Slim models are highly diverse and highly transcription factor-specific, which emphasizes the need for flexible dependency models. The observed dependency structures range from broad heterogeneities to sparse dependencies between neighboring and non-neighboring binding site positions. PMID:26116565

  6. Triple-layer dissection of the lung adenocarcinoma transcriptome: regulation at the gene, transcript, and exon levels.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Min-Kung; Wu, I-Ching; Cheng, Ching-Chia; Su, Jen-Liang; Hsieh, Chang-Huain; Lin, Yeong-Shin; Chen, Feng-Chi

    2015-10-01

    Lung adenocarcinoma is one of the most deadly human diseases. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this disease, particularly RNA splicing, have remained underexplored. Here, we report a triple-level (gene-, transcript-, and exon-level) analysis of lung adenocarcinoma transcriptomes from 77 paired tumor and normal tissues, as well as an analysis pipeline to overcome genetic variability for accurate differentiation between tumor and normal tissues. We report three major results. First, more than 5,000 differentially expressed transcripts/exonic regions occur repeatedly in lung adenocarcinoma patients. These transcripts/exonic regions are enriched in nicotine metabolism and ribosomal functions in addition to the pathways enriched for differentially expressed genes (cell cycle, extracellular matrix receptor interaction, and axon guidance). Second, classification models based on rationally selected transcripts or exonic regions can reach accuracies of 0.93 to 1.00 in differentiating tumor from normal tissues. Of the 28 selected exonic regions, 26 regions correspond to alternative exons located in such regulators as tumor suppressor (GDF10), signal receptor (LYVE1), vascular-specific regulator (RASIP1), ubiquitination mediator (RNF5), and transcriptional repressor (TRIM27). Third, classification systems based on 13 to 14 differentially expressed genes yield accuracies near 100%. Genes selected by both detection methods include C16orf59, DAP3, ETV4, GABARAPL1, PPAR, RADIL, RSPO1, SERTM1, SRPK1, ST6GALNAC6, and TNXB. Our findings imply a multilayered lung adenocarcinoma regulome in which transcript-/exon-level regulation may be dissociated from gene-level regulation. Our described method may be used to identify potentially important genes/transcripts/exonic regions for the tumorigenesis of lung adenocarcinoma and to construct accurate tumor vs. normal classification systems for this disease.

  7. Effect of biotin on transcription levels of key enzymes and glutamate efflux in glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yan; Duan, Zuoying; Shi, Zhongping

    2014-02-01

    Biotin is an important factor affecting the performance of glutamate fermentation by biotin auxotrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum and glutamate is over-produced only when initial biotin content is controlled at suitable levels or initial biotin is excessive but with Tween 40 addition during fermentation. The transcription levels of key enzymes at pyruvate, isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate metabolic nodes, as well as transport protein (TP) of glutamate were investigated under the conditions of varied biotin contents and Tween 40 supplementation. When biotin was insufficient, the genes encoding key enzymes and TP were down-regulated in the early production phase, in particular, the transcription level of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) which was only 2% of that of control. Although the cells' morphology transformation and TP level were not affected, low transcription level of ICDH led to lower final glutamate concentration (64 g/L). When biotin was excessive, the transcription levels of key enzymes were at comparable levels as those of control with ICDH as an exception, which was only 3-22% of control level throughout production phase. In this case, little intracellular glutamate accumulation (1.5 mg/g DCW) and impermeable membrane resulted in non glutamate secretion into broth, even though the quantity of TP was more than 10-folds of control level. Addition of Tween 40 when biotin was excessive stimulated the expression of all key enzymes and TP, intracellular glutamate content was much higher (10-12 mg/g DCW), and final glutamate concentration reached control level (75-80 g/L). Hence, the membrane alteration and TP were indispensable in glutamate secretion. Biotin and Tween 40 influenced the expression level of ICDH and glutamate efflux, thereby influencing glutamate production.

  8. The effect of myotonic dystrophy transcript levels and location on muscle differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mastroyiannopoulos, Nikolaos P.; Chrysanthou, Elina; Kyriakides, Tassos C.; Uney, James B.; Mahadevan, Mani S.; Phylactou, Leonidas A.

    2008-12-12

    In myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), nuclear retention of mutant DMPK transcripts compromises muscle cell differentiation. Although several reports have identified molecular defects in myogenesis, it remains still unclear how exactly the retention of the mutant transcripts induces this defect. We have recently created a novel cellular model in which the mutant DMPK 3' UTR transcripts were released to the cytoplasm of myoblasts by using the WPRE genetic element. As a result, muscle cell differentiation was repaired. In this paper, this cellular model was further exploited to investigate the effect of the levels and location of the mutant transcripts on muscle differentiation. Results show that the levels of these transcripts were proportional to the inhibition of both the initial fusion of myoblasts and the maturity of myotubes. Moreover, the cytoplasmic export of the mutant RNAs to the cytoplasm caused less inhibition only in the initial fusion of myoblasts.

  9. Global O-GlcNAc Levels Modulate Transcription of the Adipocyte Secretome during Chronic Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wollaston-Hayden, Edith E.; Harris, Ruth B. S.; Liu, Bingqiang; Bridger, Robert; Xu, Ying; Wells, Lance

    2015-01-01

    Increased flux through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway and the corresponding increase in intracellular glycosylation of proteins via O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) is sufficient to induce insulin resistance (IR) in multiple systems. Previously, our group used shotgun proteomics to identify multiple rodent adipocytokines and secreted proteins whose levels are modulated upon the induction of IR by indirectly and directly modulating O-GlcNAc levels. We have validated the relative levels of several of these factors using immunoblotting. Since adipocytokines levels are regulated primarily at the level of transcription and O-GlcNAc alters the function of many transcription factors, we hypothesized that elevated O-GlcNAc levels on key transcription factors are modulating secreted protein expression. Here, we show that upon the elevation of O-GlcNAc levels and the induction of IR in mature 3T3-F442a adipocytes, the transcript levels of multiple secreted proteins reflect the modulation observed at the protein level. We validate the transcript levels in male mouse models of diabetes. Using inguinal fat pads from the severely IR db/db mouse model and the mildly IR diet-induced mouse model, we have confirmed that the secreted proteins regulated by O-GlcNAc modulation in cell culture are likewise modulated in the whole animal upon a shift to IR. By comparing the promoters of similarly regulated genes, we determine that Sp1 is a common cis-acting element. Furthermore, we show that the LPL and SPARC promoters are enriched for Sp1 and O-GlcNAc modified proteins during insulin resistance in adipocytes. Thus, the O-GlcNAc modification of proteins bound to promoters, including Sp1, is linked to adipocytokine transcription during insulin resistance. PMID:25657638

  10. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  11. SlNAC1, a stress-related transcription factor, is fine-tuned on both the transcriptional and the post-translational level.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weizao; Miao, Min; Kud, Joanna; Niu, Xiangli; Ouyang, Bo; Zhang, Junhong; Ye, Zhibiao; Kuhl, Joseph C; Liu, Yongsheng; Xiao, Fangming

    2013-03-01

    The plant-specific NAC (NAM, ATAF1,2, CUC2) transcription factors play significant roles in diverse physiological processes. In this study, we determined the regulation of a stress-related tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) NAC1 (SlNAC1) transcription factor at both the transcriptional and the post-translational level. The SlNAC1 protein was found to be stable in the presence of proteasome-specific inhibitor MG132 or MG115 and ubiquitinated in plant cells, suggesting that the SlNAC1 is subject to the ubiquitin-proteasome system-mediated degradation. Deletion analysis identified a short segment of 10 amino acids (aa261-270) that was required for ubiquitin-proteasome system-mediated degradation, among which two leucine residues (L268 and L269) were critical for the protein instability of SlNAC1. Fusion of the degron (SlNAC1(191-270) ) containing these 10 amino acids to green fluorescent protein was found to be sufficient to trigger the degradation of the fusion protein. In addition, the SlNAC1 gene is strongly upregulated during Pseudomonas infection, while repression of the NAC1 ortholog in Nicotiana benthamiana resulted in enhanced susceptibility to Pseudomonas bacteria. These results suggest that rapid upregulation of the NAC1 gene resulting in more protein production is likely one of the strategies plants use to defend themselves against pathogen infection.

  12. DYRK1A Controls HIV-1 Replication at a Transcriptional Level in an NFAT Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Booiman, Thijs; Loukachov, Vladimir V.; van Dort, Karel A.; van ’t Wout, Angélique B.; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Transcription of the HIV-1 provirus is regulated by both viral and host proteins and is very important in the context of viral latency. In latently infected cells, viral gene expression is inhibited as a result of the sequestration of host transcription factors and epigenetic modifications. Results In our present study we analyzed the effect of host factor dual specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation-regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A) on HIV-1 replication. We show that DYRK1A controls HIV-1 replication by regulating provirus transcription. Downregulation or inhibition of DYRK1A increased LTR-driven transcription and viral replication in cell lines and primary PBMC. Furthermore, inhibition of DYRK1A resulted in reactivation of latent HIV-1 provirus to a similar extent as two commonly used broad-spectrum HDAC inhibitors. We observed that DYRK1A regulates HIV-1 transcription via the Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT) by promoting its translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Therefore, inhibition of DYRK1A results in increased nuclear levels of NFAT and increased NFAT binding to the viral LTR and thus increasing viral transcription. Conclusions Our data indicate that host factor DYRK1A plays a role in the regulation of viral transcription and latency. Therefore, DYRK1A might be an attractive candidate for therapeutic strategies targeting the viral reservoir. PMID:26641855

  13. High Levels of Transcription Stimulate Transversions at GC Base Pairs in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Matthew P.; Begins, Kaitlyn J.; Crall, William C.; Holmes, Margaret P.; Lippert, Malcolm J.

    2016-01-01

    High-levels of transcription through a gene stimulate spontaneous mutation rate, a phenomenon termed transcription-associated mutation (TAM). While transcriptional effects on specific mutation classes have been identified using forward mutation and frameshift-reversion assays, little is yet known about transcription-associated base substitutions in yeast. To address this issue, we developed a new base substitution reversion assay (the lys2-TAG allele). We report a 22-fold increase in overall reversion rate in the high- relative to the low-transcription strain (from 2.1- to 47- × 10−9). While all detectable base substitution types increased in the high-transcription strain, G→T and G→C transversions increased disproportionately by 58- and 52-fold, respectively. To assess a potential role of DNA damage in the TAM events, we measured mutation rates and spectra in individual strains defective in the repair of specific DNA lesions or null for the error-prone translesion DNA polymerase zeta (Pol zeta). Results exclude a role of 8-oxoGuanine, general oxidative damage, or apurinic/apyrimidinic sites in the generation of TAM G→T and G→C transversions. In contrast, the TAM transversions at GC base pairs depend on Pol zeta for occurrence implicating DNA damage, other than oxidative lesions or AP sites, in the TAM mechanism. Results further indicate that transcription-dependent G→T transversions in yeast differ mechanistically from equivalent events in E. coli reported by others. Given their occurrences in repair-proficient cells, transcription-associated G→T and G→C events represent a novel type of transcription-associated mutagenesis in normal cells with potentially important implications for evolution and genetic disease. PMID:23055242

  14. Top-level dynamics and the regulated gene response of feed-forward loop transcriptional motifs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayo, Michael; Abdelzaher, Ahmed; Perkins, Edward J.; Ghosh, Preetam

    2014-09-01

    Feed-forward loops are hierarchical three-node transcriptional subnetworks, wherein a top-level protein regulates the activity of a target gene via two paths: a direct-regulatory path, and an indirect route, whereby the top-level proteins act implicitly through an intermediate transcription factor. Using a transcriptional network of the model bacterium Escherichia coli, we confirmed that nearly all types of feed-forward loop were significantly overrepresented in the bacterial network. We then used mathematical modeling to study their dynamics by manipulating the rise times of the top-level protein concentration, termed the induction time, through alteration of the protein destruction rates. Rise times of the regulated proteins exhibited two qualitatively different regimes, depending on whether top-level inductions were "fast" or "slow." In the fast regime, rise times were nearly independent of rapid top-level inductions, indicative of biological robustness, and occurred when RNA production rate-limits the protein yield. Alternatively, the protein rise times were dependent upon slower top-level inductions, greater than approximately one bacterial cell cycle. An equation is given for this crossover, which depends upon three parameters of the direct-regulatory path: transcriptional cooperation at the DNA-binding site, a protein-DNA dissociation constant, and the relative magnitude of the top-level protien concentration.

  15. Top-level dynamics and the regulated gene response of feed-forward loop transcriptional motifs.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Michael; Abdelzaher, Ahmed; Perkins, Edward J; Ghosh, Preetam

    2014-09-01

    Feed-forward loops are hierarchical three-node transcriptional subnetworks, wherein a top-level protein regulates the activity of a target gene via two paths: a direct-regulatory path, and an indirect route, whereby the top-level proteins act implicitly through an intermediate transcription factor. Using a transcriptional network of the model bacterium Escherichia coli, we confirmed that nearly all types of feed-forward loop were significantly overrepresented in the bacterial network. We then used mathematical modeling to study their dynamics by manipulating the rise times of the top-level protein concentration, termed the induction time, through alteration of the protein destruction rates. Rise times of the regulated proteins exhibited two qualitatively different regimes, depending on whether top-level inductions were "fast" or "slow." In the fast regime, rise times were nearly independent of rapid top-level inductions, indicative of biological robustness, and occurred when RNA production rate-limits the protein yield. Alternatively, the protein rise times were dependent upon slower top-level inductions, greater than approximately one bacterial cell cycle. An equation is given for this crossover, which depends upon three parameters of the direct-regulatory path: transcriptional cooperation at the DNA-binding site, a protein-DNA dissociation constant, and the relative magnitude of the top-level protien concentration.

  16. Additive estrogenic effects of mixtures of frequently used UV filters on pS2-gene transcription in MCF-7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Heneweer, Marjoke . E-mail: M.Heneweer@iras.uu.nl; Muusse, Martine; Berg, Martin van den; Sanderson, J. Thomas

    2005-10-15

    In order to protect consumers from ultraviolet (UV) radiation and enhance light stability of the product, three to eight UV filters are usually added to consumer sunscreen products. High lipophilicity of the UV filters has been shown to cause bioaccumulation in fish and humans, leading to environmental levels of UV filters that are similar to those of PCBs and DDT. In this paper, estrogen-regulated pS2 gene transcription in the human mammary tumor cell line MCF-7 was used as a measure of estrogenicity of four individual UV filters. Since humans are exposed to more than one UV filter at a time, an equipotent binary mixture of 2-hydroxy-4-methoxy-benzophenone (BP-3) and its metabolite 2,4-dihydroxy benzophenone (BP-1), as well as an equipotent multi-component mixture of BP-1, BP-3, octyl methoxy cinnamate (OMC) and 3-(4-methylbenzylidene) camphor (4-MBC), were also evaluated for their ability to induce pS2 gene transcription in order to examine additivity. An estrogen receptor-mediated mechanism of action was expected for all UV filters. Therefore, our null-hypothesis was that combined estrogenic responses, measured as increased pS2 gene transcription in MCF-7 cells after exposure to mixtures of UV filters, are additive, according to a concentration-addition model. Not all UV filters produced a full concentration-response curve within the concentration range tested (100 nM-1 {mu}M). Therefore, instead of using EC{sub 50} values for comparison, the concentration at which each compound caused a 50% increase of basal pS2 gene transcription was defined as the C50 value for that compound and used to calculate relative potencies. For comparison, the EC{sub 50} value of a compound is the concentration at which the compound elicits an effect that is 50% of its maximal effect. Individual UV filters increased pS2 gene transcription concentration-dependently with C50 values of 0.12 {mu}M, 0.5 {mu}M, 1.9 {mu}M, and 1.0 {mu}M for BP-1, BP-3, 4-MBC and OMC, respectively. Estradiol

  17. Decreased Integrity, Content, and Increased Transcript Level of Mitochondrial DNA Are Associated with Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Xiao-Dan; Chen, Zhao-Li; Qu, Ming-Li; Zhao, Xiao-Wen; Li, Su-Xia; Chen, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathogenesis of keratoconus (KC). Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is involved in mitochondrial function, and the mtDNA content, integrity, and transcript level may affect the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and be involved in the pathogenesis of KC. We designed a case-control study to research the relationship between KC and mtDNA integrity, content and transcription. One-hundred ninety-eight KC corneas and 106 normal corneas from Chinese patients were studied. Quantitative real-time PCR was used to measure the relative mtDNA content, transcript levels of mtDNA and related genes. Long-extension PCR was used to detect mtDNA damage. ROS, mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP were measured by respective assay kit, and Mito-Tracker Green was used to label the mitochondria. The relative mtDNA content of KC corneas was significantly lower than that of normal corneas (P = 9.19×10−24), possibly due to decreased expression of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) gene (P = 3.26×10−3). In contrast, the transcript levels of mtDNA genes were significantly increased in KC corneas compared with normal corneas (NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 [ND1]: P = 1.79×10−3; cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 [COX1]: P = 1.54×10−3; NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1, [ND6]: P = 4.62×10−3). The latter may be the result of increased expression levels of mtDNA transcription-related genes mitochondrial RNA polymerase (POLRMT) (P = 2.55×10−4) and transcription factor B2 mitochondrial (TFB2M) (P = 7.88×10−5). KC corneas also had increased mtDNA damage (P = 3.63×10−10), higher ROS levels, and lower mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP levels compared with normal corneas. Decreased integrity, content and increased transcript level of mtDNA are associated with KC. These changes may affect the generation of ROS and play a role in the pathogenesis of KC. PMID:27783701

  18. A systems-level approach to understanding transcriptional regulation by p53 during mammalian hibernation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Peipei; Treat, Michael D; van Breukelen, Frank

    2014-07-15

    Presumably to conserve energy, many mammals enter into hibernation during the winter. Homeostatic processes such as transcription and translation are virtually arrested. To further elucidate transcriptional regulation during hibernation, we studied the transcription factor p53. Here, we demonstrate that changes in liver mRNA and protein concentrations of known regulators of p53 are consistent with activation. p53 mRNA and protein concentrations are unrelated. Importantly, p53 protein concentration is increased ~2-fold during the interbout arousal that punctuates bouts of torpor. As a result, both the interbout arousal and the torpid state are characterized by high levels of nuclear-localized p53. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicate that p53 binds DNA during the winter. Furthermore, p53 recruits RNA polymerase II, as indicated by nuclear run-on data. However, and consistent with previous data indicating an arrest of transcriptional elongation during torpor, p53 'activity' does not result in expected changes in target gene transcripts. These data demonstrate the importance of using a systems level-approach in understanding a complex phenotype such as mammalian hibernation. Relying on interpretations of data that are based on steady-state regulation in other systems may be misleading in the context of non-steady-state conditions such as torpor.

  19. Genetic effects of an air discharge plasma on Staphylococcus aureus at the gene transcription level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zimu; Wei, Jun; Shen, Jie; Liu, Yuan; Ma, Ronghua; Zhang, Zelong; Qian, Shulou; Ma, Jie; Lan, Yan; Zhang, Hao; Zhao, Ying; Xia, Weidong; Sun, Qiang; Cheng, Cheng; Chu, Paul K.

    2015-05-01

    The dynamics of gene expression regulation (at transcription level) in Staphylococcus aureus after different doses of atmospheric-pressure room-temperature air plasma treatments are investigated by monitoring the quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The plasma treatment influences the transcription of genes which are associated with several important bio-molecular processes related to the environmental stress resistance of the bacteria, including oxidative stress response, biofilm formation, antibiotics resistance, and DNA damage protection/repair. The reactive species generated by the plasma discharge in the gas phase and/or induced in the liquid phase may account for these gene expression changes.

  20. Post-Transcriptional Regulation of RNA Polymerase II Levels in Caenorhabditis Elegans

    PubMed Central

    Dalley, B. K.; Rogalski, T. M.; Tullis, G. E.; Riddle, D. L.; Golomb, M.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate the regulation of RNA polymerase II levels in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have constructed nematode strains having one, two, or three copies of ama-1, the gene for the largest subunit of RNA polymerase II. Steady-state levels of RNA polymerase II polypeptides and solubilized enzyme activity are invariant with gene dosage, indicating regulatory compensation. However, steady-state levels of ama-1 mRNA are directly proportional to gene dosage. These results imply that RNA polymerase II levels in C. elegans are regulated post-transcriptionally. PMID:8436272

  1. Life without post-transcriptional addition of G−1: two alternatives for tRNAHis identity in Eukarya

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Bhalchandra S.

    2015-01-01

    The identity of tRNAHis is strongly associated with the presence of an additional 5′-guanosine residue (G−1) in all three domains of life. The critical nature of the G−1 residue is underscored by the fact that two entirely distinct mechanisms for its acquisition are observed, with cotranscriptional incorporation observed in Bacteria, while post-transcriptional addition of G−1 occurs in Eukarya. Here, through our investigation of eukaryotes that lack obvious homologs of the post-transcriptional G−1-addition enzyme Thg1, we identify alternative pathways to tRNAHis identity that controvert these well-established rules. We demonstrate that Trypanosoma brucei, like Acanthamoeba castellanii, lacks the G−1 identity element on tRNAHis and utilizes a noncanonical G−1-independent histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS). Purified HisRS enzymes from A. castellanii and T. brucei exhibit a mechanism of tRNAHis recognition that is distinct from canonical G−1-dependent synthetases. Moreover, noncanonical HisRS enzymes genetically complement the loss of THG1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, demonstrating the biological relevance of the G−1-independent aminoacylation activity. In contrast, in Caenorhabditis elegans, which is another Thg1-independent eukaryote, the G−1 residue is maintained, but here its acquisition is noncanonical. In this case, the G−1 is encoded and apparently retained after 5′ end processing, which has so far only been observed in Bacteria and organelles. Collectively, these observations unearth a widespread and previously unappreciated diversity in eukaryotic tRNAHis identity mechanisms. PMID:25505023

  2. Decreased Transcription Factor Binding Levels Nearby Primate Pseudogenes Suggest Regulatory Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Gavin M.; Wilson, Michael D.; Moses, Alan M.

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of pseudogene degeneration at the coding level are well-known, such as a shift toward neutral rates of nonsynonymous substitutions and gain of frameshift mutations. In contrast, degeneration of pseudogene transcriptional regulation is not well understood. Here, we test two predictions of regulatory degeneration along a pseudogenized lineage: 1) Decreased transcription factor (TF) binding and 2) accelerated evolution in putative cis-regulatory regions. We find evidence for decreased TF binding levels nearby two primate pseudogenes compared with functional liver genes. However, the majority of TF-bound sequences nearby pseudogenes do not show evidence for lineage-specific accelerated rates of evolution. We conclude that decreases in TF binding level could be a marker for regulatory degeneration, while sequence degeneration in primate cis-regulatory modules may be obscured by background rates of TF binding site turnover. PMID:26882985

  3. Dietary carbohydrates enhance lactase/phlorizin hydrolase gene expression at a transcription level in rat jejunum.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, T; Kishi, K; Igawa, M; Takase, S; Goda, T

    1998-04-01

    We have previously shown that dietary sucrose stimulates the lactase/phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) mRNA accumulation along with a rise in lactase activity in rat jejunum [Goda, Yasutake, Suzuki, Takase and Koldovský (1995) Am. J. Physiol. 268, G1066-G1073]. To elucidate the mechanisms whereby dietary carbohydrates enhance the LPH mRNA expression, 7-week-old rats that had been fed a low-carbohydrate diet (5.5% of energy as starch) were given diets containing various monosaccharides or sucrose for 12h. Among carbohydrates examined, fructose, sucrose, galactose and glycerol elicited an increase in LPH mRNA accumulation along with a rise in lactase activity in the jejunum. By contrast, glucose and alpha-methylglucoside were unable to elicit a significant increase in LPH mRNA levels. To explore a transcriptional mechanism for the carbohydrate-induced increases in LPH mRNA levels, we employed two techniques currently available to estimate transcriptional rate, i.e. RNA protection assays of pre-mRNA using an intron probe, and nuclear run-on assays. Both assays revealed that fructose elicited an increase in transcription of the LPH gene, and that the transcription of LPH was influenced only slightly, if at all, by glucose intake. These results suggest that certain monosaccharides such as fructose or their metabolite(s) are capable of enhancing LPH mRNA levels in the small intestine, and that transcriptional control might play a major role in the carbohydrate-induced increase of LPH mRNA expression.

  4. Plants on constant alert: elevated levels of jasmonic acid and jasmonate-induced transcripts in caterpillar-resistant maize.

    PubMed

    Shivaji, Renuka; Camas, Alberto; Ankala, Arunkanth; Engelberth, Jurgen; Tumlinson, James H; Williams, W Paul; Wilkinson, Jeff R; Luthe, Dawn Sywassink

    2010-02-01

    This study was conducted to determine if constitutive levels of jasmonic acid (JA) and other octadecanoid compounds were elevated prior to herbivory in a maize genotype with documented resistance to fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) and other lepidopteran pests. The resistant inbred Mp708 had approximately 3-fold higher levels of jasmonic acid (JA) prior to herbivore feeding than the susceptible inbred Tx601. Constitutive levels of cis-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) also were higher in Mp708 than Tx601. In addition, the constitutive expression of JA-inducible genes, including those in the JA biosynthetic pathway, was higher in Mp708 than Tx601. In response to herbivory, Mp708 generated comparatively higher levels of hydrogen peroxide, and had a greater abundance of NADPH oxidase transcripts before and after caterpillar feeding. Before herbivore feeding, low levels of transcripts encoding the maize insect resistance cysteine protease (Mir1-CP) and the Mir1-CP protein were detected consistently. Thus, Mp708 appears to have a portion of its defense pathway primed, which results in constitutive defenses and the ability to mount a stronger defense when caterpillars attack. Although the molecular mechanisms that regulate the constitutive accumulation of JA in Mp708 are unknown, it might account for its enhanced resistance to lepidopteran pests. This genotype could be valuable in studying the signaling pathways that maize uses to response to insect herbivores.

  5. ABI4 mediates antagonistic effects of abscisic acid and gibberellins at transcript and protein levels.

    PubMed

    Shu, Kai; Chen, Qian; Wu, Yaorong; Liu, Ruijun; Zhang, Huawei; Wang, Pengfei; Li, Yanli; Wang, Shengfu; Tang, Sanyuan; Liu, Chunyan; Yang, Wenyu; Cao, Xiaofeng; Serino, Giovanna; Xie, Qi

    2016-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs) are plant hormones which antagonistically mediate numerous physiological processes, and their optimal balance is essential for normal plant development. However, the molecular mechanism underlying ABA and GA antagonism still needs to be determined. Here, we report that ABA-INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4) is a central factor in GA/ABA homeostasis and antagonism in post-germination stages. ABI4 overexpression in Arabidopsis (OE-ABI4) leads to developmental defects including a decrease in plant height and poor seed production. The transcription of a key ABA biosynthetic gene, NCED6, and of a key GA catabolic gene, GA2ox7, is significantly enhanced by ABI4 overexpression. ABI4 activates NCED6 and GA2ox7 transcription by directly binding to the promoters, and genetic analysis revealed that mutation in these two genes partially rescues the dwarf phenotype of ABI4 overexpressing plants. Consistently, ABI4 overexpressing seedlings have a lower GA/ABA ratio than the wild type. We further show that ABA induces GA2ox7 transcription while GA represses NCED6 expression in an ABI4-dependent manner; and that ABA stabilizes the ABI4 protein whereas GA promotes its degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that ABA and GA antagonize each other by oppositely acting on ABI4 transcript and protein levels.

  6. Selenoprotein Transcript Level and Enzyme Activity as Biomarkers for Selenium Status and Selenium Requirements in the Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rachel M; Sunde, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    The current National Research Council (NRC) selenium (Se) requirement for the turkey is 0.2 μg Se/g diet. The sequencing of the turkey selenoproteome offers additional molecular biomarkers for assessment of Se status. To determine dietary Se requirements using selenoprotein transcript levels and enzyme activities, day-old male turkey poults were fed a Se-deficient diet supplemented with graded levels of Se (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 μg Se/g diet) as selenite, and 12.5X the vitamin E requirement. Poults fed less than 0.05 μg Se/g diet had a significantly reduced rate of growth, indicating the Se requirement for growth in young male poults is 0.05 μg Se/g diet. Se deficiency decreased plasma GPX3 (glutathione peroxidase), liver GPX1, and liver GPX4 activities to 2, 3, and 7%, respectively, of Se-adequate levels. Increasing Se supplementation resulted in well-defined plateaus for all blood, liver and gizzard enzyme activities and mRNA levels, showing that these selenoprotein biomarkers could not be used as biomarkers for supernutritional-Se status. Using selenoenzyme activity, minimum Se requirements based on red blood cell GPX1, plasma GPX3, and pancreas and liver GPX1 activities were 0.29-0.33 μg Se/g diet. qPCR analyses using all 10 dietary Se treatments for all 24 selenoprotein transcripts (plus SEPHS1) in liver, gizzard, and pancreas found that only 4, 4, and 3 transcripts, respectively, were significantly down-regulated by Se deficiency and could be used as Se biomarkers. Only GPX3 and SELH mRNA were down regulated in all 3 tissues. For these transcripts, minimum Se requirements were 0.07-0.09 μg Se/g for liver, 0.06-0.15 μg Se/g for gizzard, and 0.13-0.18 μg Se/g for pancreas, all less than enzyme-based requirements. Panels based on multiple Se-regulated transcripts were effective in identifying Se deficiency. These results show that the NRC turkey dietary Se requirement should be raised to 0.3 μg Se/g diet. PMID:27008545

  7. Selenoprotein Transcript Level and Enzyme Activity as Biomarkers for Selenium Status and Selenium Requirements in the Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rachel M; Sunde, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    The current National Research Council (NRC) selenium (Se) requirement for the turkey is 0.2 μg Se/g diet. The sequencing of the turkey selenoproteome offers additional molecular biomarkers for assessment of Se status. To determine dietary Se requirements using selenoprotein transcript levels and enzyme activities, day-old male turkey poults were fed a Se-deficient diet supplemented with graded levels of Se (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 μg Se/g diet) as selenite, and 12.5X the vitamin E requirement. Poults fed less than 0.05 μg Se/g diet had a significantly reduced rate of growth, indicating the Se requirement for growth in young male poults is 0.05 μg Se/g diet. Se deficiency decreased plasma GPX3 (glutathione peroxidase), liver GPX1, and liver GPX4 activities to 2, 3, and 7%, respectively, of Se-adequate levels. Increasing Se supplementation resulted in well-defined plateaus for all blood, liver and gizzard enzyme activities and mRNA levels, showing that these selenoprotein biomarkers could not be used as biomarkers for supernutritional-Se status. Using selenoenzyme activity, minimum Se requirements based on red blood cell GPX1, plasma GPX3, and pancreas and liver GPX1 activities were 0.29-0.33 μg Se/g diet. qPCR analyses using all 10 dietary Se treatments for all 24 selenoprotein transcripts (plus SEPHS1) in liver, gizzard, and pancreas found that only 4, 4, and 3 transcripts, respectively, were significantly down-regulated by Se deficiency and could be used as Se biomarkers. Only GPX3 and SELH mRNA were down regulated in all 3 tissues. For these transcripts, minimum Se requirements were 0.07-0.09 μg Se/g for liver, 0.06-0.15 μg Se/g for gizzard, and 0.13-0.18 μg Se/g for pancreas, all less than enzyme-based requirements. Panels based on multiple Se-regulated transcripts were effective in identifying Se deficiency. These results show that the NRC turkey dietary Se requirement should be raised to 0.3 μg Se/g diet.

  8. Selenoprotein Transcript Level and Enzyme Activity as Biomarkers for Selenium Status and Selenium Requirements in the Turkey (Meleagris gallopavo)

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Rachel M.; Sunde, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    The current National Research Council (NRC) selenium (Se) requirement for the turkey is 0.2 μg Se/g diet. The sequencing of the turkey selenoproteome offers additional molecular biomarkers for assessment of Se status. To determine dietary Se requirements using selenoprotein transcript levels and enzyme activities, day-old male turkey poults were fed a Se-deficient diet supplemented with graded levels of Se (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.75, 1.0 μg Se/g diet) as selenite, and 12.5X the vitamin E requirement. Poults fed less than 0.05 μg Se/g diet had a significantly reduced rate of growth, indicating the Se requirement for growth in young male poults is 0.05 μg Se/g diet. Se deficiency decreased plasma GPX3 (glutathione peroxidase), liver GPX1, and liver GPX4 activities to 2, 3, and 7%, respectively, of Se-adequate levels. Increasing Se supplementation resulted in well-defined plateaus for all blood, liver and gizzard enzyme activities and mRNA levels, showing that these selenoprotein biomarkers could not be used as biomarkers for supernutritional-Se status. Using selenoenzyme activity, minimum Se requirements based on red blood cell GPX1, plasma GPX3, and pancreas and liver GPX1 activities were 0.29–0.33 μg Se/g diet. qPCR analyses using all 10 dietary Se treatments for all 24 selenoprotein transcripts (plus SEPHS1) in liver, gizzard, and pancreas found that only 4, 4, and 3 transcripts, respectively, were significantly down-regulated by Se deficiency and could be used as Se biomarkers. Only GPX3 and SELH mRNA were down regulated in all 3 tissues. For these transcripts, minimum Se requirements were 0.07–0.09 μg Se/g for liver, 0.06–0.15 μg Se/g for gizzard, and 0.13–0.18 μg Se/g for pancreas, all less than enzyme-based requirements. Panels based on multiple Se-regulated transcripts were effective in identifying Se deficiency. These results show that the NRC turkey dietary Se requirement should be raised to 0.3 μg Se/g diet. PMID

  9. Topographical regulation of cone and rod opsin genes: parallel, position dependent levels of transcription.

    PubMed

    van Ginkel, P R; Timmers, A M; Szél, A; Hauswirth, W W

    1995-10-27

    RNase protection assays were used to follow rhodopsin and red cone opsin mRNA levels during bovine fetal development as a function of retinal position. Following induction, an equivalent radial gradient of rod and cone opsin mRNA is present in the fetal retina. This gradient is maintained in the adult retina even though no corresponding gradient in rod or cone cell density is present. Since the mRNA expression gradient does not progress radially, position dependent levels of photoreceptor-specific transcription is suggested.

  10. Distinct regulatory mechanisms of the human ferritin gene by hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bo-Wen; Miyazawa, Masaki; Tsuji, Yoshiaki

    2014-12-01

    Cobalt chloride has been used as a hypoxia mimetic because it stabilizes hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF1-α) and activates gene transcription through a hypoxia responsive element (HRE). However, differences between hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride in gene regulation remain elusive. Expression of ferritin, the major iron storage protein, is regulated at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels through DNA and RNA regulatory elements. Here we demonstrate that hypoxia and cobalt chloride regulate ferritin heavy chain (ferritin H) expression by two distinct mechanisms. Both hypoxia and cobalt chloride increased HIF1-α but a putative HRE in the human ferritin H gene was not activated. Instead, cobalt chloride but not hypoxia activated ferritin H transcription through an antioxidant responsive element (ARE), to which Nrf2 was recruited. Intriguingly, cobalt chloride downregulated ferritin H protein expression while it upregulated other ARE-regulated antioxidant genes in K562 cells. Further characterization demonstrated that cobalt chloride increased interaction between iron regulatory proteins (IRP1 and IRP2) and iron responsive element (IRE) in the 5'UTR of ferritin H mRNA, resulting in translational block of the accumulated ferritin H mRNA. In contrast, hypoxia had marginal effect on ferritin H transcription but increased its translation through decreased IRP1-IRE interaction. These results suggest that hypoxia and hypoxia mimetic cobalt chloride employ distinct regulatory mechanisms through the interplay between DNA and mRNA elements at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  11. Transcriptional bursting explains the noise–versus–mean relationship in mRNA and protein levels

    DOE PAGES

    Dar, Roy; Shaffer, Sydney M.; Singh, Abhyudai; Razooky, Brandon S.; Simpson, Michael L.; Raj, Arjun; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-07-28

    Recent analysis demonstrates that the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (HIV LTR) promoter exhibits a range of possible transcriptional burst sizes and frequencies for any mean-expression level. However, these results have also been interpreted as demonstrating that cell-tocell expression variability (noise) and mean are uncorrelated, a significant deviation from previous results. Here, we re-examine the available mRNA and protein abundance data for the HIV LTR and find that noise in mRNA and protein expression scales inversely with the mean along analytically predicted transcriptional burst-size manifolds. We then experimentally perturb transcriptional activity to test a prediction of the multiple burst-size model: thatmore » increasing burst frequency will cause mRNA noise to decrease along given burst-size lines as mRNA levels increase. In conclusion, the data show that mRNA and protein noise decrease as mean expression increases, supporting the canonical inverse correlation between noise and mean.« less

  12. High transcript levels of heat-shock genes are associated with shorter lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Manière, X; Krisko, A; Pellay, F X; Di Meglio, J-M; Hersen, P; Matic, I

    2014-12-01

    Individual lifespans of isogenic organisms, such as Caenorhabditis elegans nematodes, fruit flies, and mice, vary greatly even under identical environmental conditions. To study the molecular mechanisms responsible for such variability, we used an assay based on the measurement of post-reproductive nematode movements stimulated by a moderate electric field. This assay allows for the separation of individual nematodes based on their speed. We show that this phenotype could be used as a biomarker for aging because it is a better predictor of lifespan than chronological age. Fast nematodes have longer lifespans, fewer protein carbonyls, higher heat-shock resistance, and higher transcript levels of the daf-16 and hsf-1 genes, which code for the stress response transcription factors, than slow nematodes. High transcript levels of the genes coding for heat-shock proteins observed in slow nematodes correlate with lower heat-shock resistance, more protein carbonyls, and shorter lifespan. Taken together, our data suggests that shorter lifespan results from early-life damage accumulation that causes subsequent faster age-related deterioration.

  13. Transcriptional Bursting Explains the Noise–Versus–Mean Relationship in mRNA and Protein Levels

    PubMed Central

    Dar, Roy D.; Shaffer, Sydney M.; Singh, Abhyudai; Razooky, Brandon S.; Simpson, Michael L.; Raj, Arjun; Weinberger, Leor S.

    2016-01-01

    Recent analysis demonstrates that the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (HIV LTR) promoter exhibits a range of possible transcriptional burst sizes and frequencies for any mean-expression level. However, these results have also been interpreted as demonstrating that cell-to-cell expression variability (noise) and mean are uncorrelated, a significant deviation from previous results. Here, we re-examine the available mRNA and protein abundance data for the HIV LTR and find that noise in mRNA and protein expression scales inversely with the mean along analytically predicted transcriptional burst-size manifolds. We then experimentally perturb transcriptional activity to test a prediction of the multiple burst-size model: that increasing burst frequency will cause mRNA noise to decrease along given burst-size lines as mRNA levels increase. The data show that mRNA and protein noise decrease as mean expression increases, supporting the canonical inverse correlation between noise and mean. PMID:27467384

  14. Atlantic halibut experimentally infected with nodavirus shows increased levels of T-cell marker and IFNγ transcripts.

    PubMed

    Overgård, Aina-Cathrine; Nerland, Audun Helge; Fiksdal, Ingrid Uglenes; Patel, Sonal

    2012-05-01

    The transcript levels of viral RNAs, selected T-cell marker and cytokine genes, toll like receptor (TLR) 7, and two interferon stimulated genes (ISG) were analysed in sexually immature adult Atlantic halibut (Hippoglossus hippoglossus L.) experimentally infected with nodavirus. The expression of the T-cell markers, TLR7 and the cytokine genes was further explored in in vitro stimulated anterior kidney leucocytes (AK leucocytes) isolated from the experiment fish and from additional untreated non-injected fish. The levels of viral RNA1 and RNA2 were increasing in brain and eye at around 4 and 8weeks post injection (wpi), respectively, and still increasing at the end of the experiment, especially in eye. Immuno-positive cells and signs of vacuolisation in both brain and eye were seen at 14wpi. Increased transcript levels of TCRβ, CD4-2, CD4, CD8α, and Lck in brain and eye of the experimentally infected halibut suggested an involvement of halibut T-cells in the immune response against nodavirus. Interestingly, a similar expression pattern of TCRβ, CD4 and Lck was seen in both brain and eye. However, compared to brain that showed elevated transcript levels of TCRβ, CD4 and Lck mainly at 10 and 14wpi, the increase appeared earlier between 3 and 4wpi in the eye. Yet, an increase in the transcript level of IFNγ was seen at 10 and 14wpi in both organs. Moreover, elevated levels of TLR7, IL-1β, IL-6, ISG15 and Mx were detected in vivo. The in vitro experiments, stimulating AK leucocytes with ConA-PMA, imiquimod or nodavirus, further supported an involvement of IL-6 and IFNγ in the immune response against nodavirus and the involvement of CD8β(+) cells. Results from the present study thus indicate an importance of T-cells, IFNγ and the analysed ISGs in the immune response against nodavirus in Atlantic halibut, and would be of great help in future vaccination trials giving the possibility to monitor the immune response rather than mortality during post

  15. A Small RNA-Catalytic Argonaute Pathway Tunes Germline Transcript Levels to Ensure Embryonic Divisions.

    PubMed

    Gerson-Gurwitz, Adina; Wang, Shaohe; Sathe, Shashank; Green, Rebecca; Yeo, Gene W; Oegema, Karen; Desai, Arshad

    2016-04-01

    Multiple division cycles without growth are a characteristic feature of early embryogenesis. The female germline loads proteins and RNAs into oocytes to support these divisions, which lack many quality control mechanisms operating in somatic cells undergoing growth. Here, we describe a small RNA-Argonaute pathway that ensures early embryonic divisions in C. elegans by employing catalytic slicing activity to broadly tune, instead of silence, germline gene expression. Misregulation of one target, a kinesin-13 microtubule depolymerase, underlies a major phenotype associated with pathway loss. Tuning of target transcript levels is guided by the density of homologous small RNAs, whose generation must ultimately be related to target sequence. Thus, the tuning action of a small RNA-catalytic Argonaute pathway generates oocytes capable of supporting embryogenesis. We speculate that the specialized nature of germline chromatin led to the emergence of small RNA-catalytic Argonaute pathways in the female germline as a post-transcriptional control layer to optimize oocyte composition. PMID:27020753

  16. Nucleolin is regulated both at the level of transcription and translation

    SciTech Connect

    Bicknell, Katrina; Brooks, Gavin; Kaiser, Pete; Chen Hongying; Dove, Brian K.; Hiscox, Julian A.; E-mail: j.a.hiscox@leeds.ac.uk

    2005-07-08

    Nucleolin is a multi-functional protein that is located to the nucleolus. In tissue culture cells, the stability of nucleolin is related to the proliferation status of the cell. During development, rat cardiomyocytes proliferate actively with increases in the mass of the heart being due to both hyperplasia and hypertrophy. The timing of this shift in the phenotype of the myocyte from one capable of undergoing hyperplasia to one that can grow only by hypertrophy occurs within 4 days of post-natal development. Thus, cardiomyocytes are an ideal model system in which to study the regulation of nucleolin during growth in vivo. Using Western blot and quantitative RT-PCR (TaqMan) we found that the amount of nucleolin is regulated both at the level of transcription and translation during the development of the cardiomyocyte. However, in cells which had exited the cell cycle and were subsequently given a hypertrophic stimulus, nucleolin was regulated post-transcriptionally.

  17. Genetic variants in ABCA1 promoter affect transcription activity and plasma HDL level in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiao-yong; Chu, Wei-wei; Shi, Heng-chuan; Yu, Shi-gang; Han, Hai-yin; Gu, Shu-Hua; Chen, Jie

    2015-01-25

    Excess accumulation of cholesterol in plasma may result in coronary artery disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated that ATP-binding cassette protein A1 (ABCA1) mediates the efflux of cholesterol and phospholipids to apolipoproteins, a process necessary for plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) formation. Higher plasma levels of HDL are associated with lower risk for cardiovascular disease. Studies of human disease and animal models had shown that an increased hepatic ABCA1 activity relates to an enhanced plasma HDL level. In this study, we hypothesized that functional mutations in the ABCA1 promoter in pigs may affect gene transcription activity, and consequently the HDL level in plasma. The promoter region of ABCA1 was comparatively scanned by direct sequencing with pool DNA of high- and low-HDL groups (n=30 for each group). Two polymorphisms, c. - 608A>G and c. - 418T>A, were revealed with reverse allele distribution in the two groups. The two polymorphisms were completely linked and formed only G-A or A-T haplotypes when genotyped in a larger population (n=526). Furthermore, we found that the G-A/G-A genotype was associated with higher HDL and ABCA1 mRNA level than A-T/A-T genotype. Luciferase assay also revealed that G-A haplotype promoter had higher activity than A-T haplotype. Single-nucleotide mutant assay showed that c.-418T>A was the causal mutation for ABCA1 transcription activity alteration. Conclusively, we identified two completely linked SNPs in porcine ABCA1 promoter region which have influence on the plasma HDL level by altering ABCA1 gene transcriptional activity.

  18. The Transcriptional Cascade in the Heat Stress Response of Arabidopsis Is Strictly Regulated at the Level of Transcription Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Ohama, Naohiko; Kusakabe, Kazuya; Mizoi, Junya; Zhao, Huimei; Kidokoro, Satoshi; Koizumi, Shinya; Takahashi, Fuminori; Ishida, Tetsuya; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Group A1 heat shock transcription factors (HsfA1s) are the master regulators of the heat stress response (HSR) in plants. Upon heat shock, HsfA1s trigger a transcriptional cascade that is composed of many transcription factors. Despite the importance of HsfA1s and their downstream transcriptional cascade in the acquisition of thermotolerance in plants, the molecular basis of their activation remains poorly understood. Here, domain analysis of HsfA1d, one of several HsfA1s in Arabidopsis thaliana, demonstrated that the central region of HsfA1d is a key regulatory domain that represses HsfA1d transactivation activity through interaction with HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN70 (HSP70) and HSP90. We designated this region as the temperature-dependent repression (TDR) domain. We found that HSP70 dissociates from HsfA1d in response to heat shock and that the dissociation is likely regulated by an as yet unknown activation mechanism, such as HsfA1d phosphorylation. Overexpression of constitutively active HsfA1d that lacked the TDR domain induced expression of heat shock proteins in the absence of heat stress, thereby conferring potent thermotolerance on the overexpressors. However, transcriptome analysis of the overexpressors demonstrated that the constitutively active HsfA1d could not trigger the complete transcriptional cascade under normal conditions, thereby indicating that other factors are necessary to fully induce the HSR. These complex regulatory mechanisms related to the transcriptional cascade may enable plants to respond resiliently to various heat stress conditions. PMID:26715648

  19. Regulation of Transcript Levels of the Arabidopsis Cytochrome P450 Genes Involved in Brassinosteroid Biosynthesis1

    PubMed Central

    Bancoş, Simona; Nomura, Takahito; Sato, Tatsuro; Molnár, Gergely; Bishop, Gerard J.; Koncz, Csaba; Yokota, Takao; Nagy, Ferenc; Szekeres, Miklós

    2002-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the closely related CYP90 and CYP85 families catalyze essential oxidative reactions in the biosynthesis of brassinosteroid (BR) hormones. Arabidopsis CYP90B1/DWF4 and CYP90A1/CPD are responsible for respective C-22 and C-23 hydroxylation of the steroid side chain and CYP85A1 catalyzes C-6 oxidation of 6-deoxo intermediates, whereas the functions of CYP90C1/ROT3, CYP90D1, and CYP85A2 are still unknown. Semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analyses show that transcript levels of CYP85 and CYP90 genes are down-regulated by brassinolide, the end product of the BR biosynthesis pathway. Feedback control of the CYP90C1, CYP90D1, and CYP85A2 genes by brassinolide suggests that the corresponding enzymes might also participate in BR synthesis. CYP85 and CYP90 mRNAs show strong and transient accumulation during the 1st week of seedling development, as well as characteristic organ-specific distribution. Transcripts of CYP90A1 and CYP85A2 are preferentially represented in shoots and CYP90C1, CYP90D1, and CYP85A1 mRNAs are more abundant in roots, whereas CYP90B1 is ubiquitously expressed. Remarkably, the spatial pattern of CYP90A1 expression is maintained in the BR-insensitive cbb2 mutant, indicating the independence of organ-specific and BR-dependent regulation. Quantitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of endogenous BRs in shoots and roots of Arabidopsis, pea (Pisum sativum), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) reveal similar partitioning patterns of BR intermediates in these species. Inverse correlation between CYP90A1/CPD transcript levels and the amounts of the CYP90A1 substrate 6-deoxocathasterone in shoots and roots suggests that transcriptional regulation plays an important role in controlling BR biosynthesis. PMID:12226529

  20. Regulation of transcript levels of the Arabidopsis cytochrome p450 genes involved in brassinosteroid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bancoş, Simona; Nomura, Takahito; Sato, Tatsuro; Molnár, Gergely; Bishop, Gerard J; Koncz, Csaba; Yokota, Takao; Nagy, Ferenc; Szekeres, Miklós

    2002-09-01

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes of the closely related CYP90 and CYP85 families catalyze essential oxidative reactions in the biosynthesis of brassinosteroid (BR) hormones. Arabidopsis CYP90B1/DWF4 and CYP90A1/CPD are responsible for respective C-22 and C-23 hydroxylation of the steroid side chain and CYP85A1 catalyzes C-6 oxidation of 6-deoxo intermediates, whereas the functions of CYP90C1/ROT3, CYP90D1, and CYP85A2 are still unknown. Semiquantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analyses show that transcript levels of CYP85 and CYP90 genes are down-regulated by brassinolide, the end product of the BR biosynthesis pathway. Feedback control of the CYP90C1, CYP90D1, and CYP85A2 genes by brassinolide suggests that the corresponding enzymes might also participate in BR synthesis. CYP85 and CYP90 mRNAs show strong and transient accumulation during the 1st week of seedling development, as well as characteristic organ-specific distribution. Transcripts of CYP90A1 and CYP85A2 are preferentially represented in shoots and CYP90C1, CYP90D1, and CYP85A1 mRNAs are more abundant in roots, whereas CYP90B1 is ubiquitously expressed. Remarkably, the spatial pattern of CYP90A1 expression is maintained in the BR-insensitive cbb2 mutant, indicating the independence of organ-specific and BR-dependent regulation. Quantitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of endogenous BRs in shoots and roots of Arabidopsis, pea (Pisum sativum), and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) reveal similar partitioning patterns of BR intermediates in these species. Inverse correlation between CYP90A1/CPD transcript levels and the amounts of the CYP90A1 substrate 6-deoxocathasterone in shoots and roots suggests that transcriptional regulation plays an important role in controlling BR biosynthesis.

  1. Transcriptional Regulation of Zein Gene Expression in Maize through the Additive and Synergistic Action of opaque2, Prolamine-Box Binding Factor, and O2 Heterodimerizing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Yang, Jun; Wu, Yongrui

    2015-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) zeins are some of the most abundant cereal seed storage proteins (SSPs). Their abundance influences kernel hardness but compromises its nutritional quality. Transcription factors regulating the expression of zein and other SSP genes in cereals are endosperm-specific and homologs of maize opaque2 (O2) and prolamine-box binding factor (PBF). This study demonstrates that the ubiquitously expressed transcription factors, O2 heterodimerizing proteins (OHPs), specifically regulate 27-kD γ-zein gene expression (through binding to an O2-like box in its promoter) and interact with PBF. The zein content of double mutants OhpRNAi;o2 and PbfRNAi;o2 and the triple mutant PbfRNAi;OhpRNAi;o2 is reduced by 83, 89, and 90%, respectively, compared with the wild type. The triple mutant developed the smallest zein protein bodies, which were merely one-tenth the wild type’s size. Total protein levels in these mutants were maintained in a relatively constant range through proteome rebalancing. These data show that OHPs, O2, and PBF are master regulators of zein storage protein synthesis, acting in an additive and synergistic mode. The differential expression patterns of OHP and O2 genes may cause the slight differences in the timing of 27-kD γ-zein and 22-kD α-zein accumulation during protein body formation. PMID:25901087

  2. Forkhead transcription factor FOXO3a levels are increased in Huntington disease because of overactivated positive autofeedback loop.

    PubMed

    Kannike, Kaja; Sepp, Mari; Zuccato, Chiara; Cattaneo, Elena; Timmusk, Tõnis

    2014-11-21

    Huntington disease (HD) is a fatal autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an increased number of CAG repeats in the HTT gene coding for huntingtin. Decreased neurotrophic support and increased mitochondrial and excitotoxic stress have been reported in HD striatal and cortical neurons. The members of the class O forkhead (FOXO) transcription factor family, including FOXO3a, act as sensor proteins that are activated upon decreased survival signals and/or increased cellular stress. Using immunocytochemical screening in mouse striatal Hdh(7/7) (wild type), Hdh(7/109) (heterozygous for HD mutation), and Hdh(109/109) (homozygous for HD mutation) cells, we identified FOXO3a as a differentially regulated transcription factor in HD. We report increased nuclear FOXO3a levels in mutant Hdh cells. Additionally, we show that treatment with mitochondrial toxin 3-nitropropionic acid results in enhanced nuclear localization of FOXO3a in wild type Hdh(7/7) cells and in rat primary cortical neurons. Furthermore, mRNA levels of Foxo3a are increased in mutant Hdh cells compared with wild type cells and in 3-nitropropionic acid-treated primary neurons compared with untreated neurons. A similar increase was observed in the cortex of R6/2 mice and HD patient post-mortem caudate tissue compared with controls. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays, we demonstrate that FOXO3a regulates its own transcription by binding to the conserved response element in Foxo3a promoter. Altogether, the findings of this study suggest that FOXO3a levels are increased in HD cells as a result of overactive positive feedback loop.

  3. Regulation by gravity of the transcript levels of MAP65 in azuki bean epicotyls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soga, Kouichi; Hoson, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki; Kotake, Toshihisa

    2012-07-01

    Development of a short and thick body by reorientation of cortical microtubules is required for the resistance of plants to the gravitational force. The 65 kDa microtubule-associated protein (MAP65) has microtubule bundling activity and is involved in the reorientation of cortical microtubules. Here, we investigated the relation between the orientation of cortical microtubules and the transcript levels of VaMAP65-1 under centrifugal hypergravity conditions in azuki bean epicotyls. The percentage of cells with transverse microtubules was decreased, while that with longitudinal microtubules was increased, in proportion to the logarithm of the magnitude of gravity. The orientation of microtubules was restored to the original direction after removal of the hypergravity stimulus. The transcript level of VaMAP65-1 was down-regulated in proportion to the logarithm of the magnitude of gravity (R=-0.99). By removal of hypergravity stimulus, expression of VaMAP65-1 was increased to control levels. Strong correlations were observed between the percentage of cells with longitudinal or transverse microtubules and the transcript levels of VaMAP65-1 (R=-0.93, 0.91). These results suggest that down-regulation of VaMAP65-1 expression is involved in the regulation by gravity of the orientation of cortical microtubules in azuki bean epicotyls. Lanthanum and gadolinium ions, potential blockers of mechanosensitive calcium ion-permeable channels (mechanoreceptors), nullified the down-regulation of expression of VaMAP65-1 gene, suggesting that mechanoreceptors are responsible for regulation by gravity of VaMAP65-1 expression.

  4. Weapons of the Spirit, Transcript of the Feature Documentary. Bill Moyers Interviews Filmmaker Pierre Sauvage, Transcript of the P. B. S. Broadcast, and Additional Background Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sauvage, Pierre

    This documentary tells the wartime story of Le Chambon, a tiny Protestant village in France that defied the Nazi occupation and provided a safe haven for thousands of Jews. Using interviews, old photographs and footage, and specially declassified documents, the film [and transcript] examine the difference between being a bystander and a…

  5. Reinitiation enhances reliable transcriptional responses in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Yuan, Zhanjiang; Aihara, Kazuyuki; Chen, Luonan

    2014-08-01

    Gene transcription is a noisy process carried out by the transcription machinery recruited to the promoter. Noise reduction is a fundamental requirement for reliable transcriptional responses which in turn are crucial for signal transduction. Compared with the relatively simple transcription initiation in prokaryotes, eukaryotic transcription is more complex partially owing to its additional reinitiation mechanism. By theoretical analysis, we showed that reinitiation reduces noise in eukaryotic transcription independent of the transcription level. Besides, a higher reinitiation rate enables a stable scaffold complex an advantage in noise reduction. Finally, we showed that the coupling between scaffold formation and transcription can further reduce transcription noise independent of the transcription level. Furthermore, compared with the reinitiation mechanism, the noise reduction effect of the coupling can be of more significance in the case that the transcription level is low and the intrinsic noise dominates. Our results uncover a mechanistic route which eukaryotes may use to facilitate a more reliable response in the noisy transcription process. PMID:24850905

  6. GLUT2 proteins and PPARγ transcripts levels are increased in liver of ovariectomized rats: reversal effects of resistance training

    PubMed Central

    Tomaz, Luciane M.; Barbosa, Marina R.; Farahnak, Zahra; Lagoeiro, Cristiani G.; Magosso, Natalia S.S; Lavoie, Jean-Marc; Perez, Sérgio E. A.

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of ovariectomy (Ovx) and 12 weeks of resistance training (RT) on gene expression of GLUT2, the main glucose transporter in the liver, and on PPARγ, a transcription factor known to target GLUT2 expression. [Methods] Forty Holtzman rats were divided into 5 groups: Sham-sedentary (Sed), Sham- RT, Ovx-Sed, Ovx-RT, and Ovx-Sed with hormone replacement (E2). The RT protocol consisted of sessions held every 72 h for 12 weeks, during which the animals performed 4 to 9 vertical climbs (1.1 m) at 2 min intervals with progressively heavier weights (30 g after the fourth climb) tied to the tail. The E2 silastic capsule was inserted into the rats’ backs 48 hours before the first RT session. [Results] In addition to liver fat, GLUT2 protein levels and PPARγ transcripts were increased (P < 0.05) in Ovx compared to Sham-Sed animals, suggesting increased hepatic glucose uptake under estrogen deficient conditions. RT and E2 in Ovx rats decreased liver fat accumulation as well as GLUT2 and PPARγ gene expression to the level of Sham- Sed animals. [Conclusion] The results of this study suggest that liver GLUT2 as well as PPARγ expression in Ovx rats are accompanied by increased fat accumulation and glucose uptake, thus providing a substrate for increased de novo lipogenesis. RT appears to be an appropriate exercise model to circumvent these effects. PMID:27508154

  7. Chloroplasts of salt-grown Arabidopsis seedlings are impaired in structure, genome copy number and transcript levels.

    PubMed

    Peharec Štefanić, Petra; Koffler, Tal; Adler, Guy; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2013-01-01

    The chloroplast is the most prominent and metabolically active plastid in photosynthetic plants. Chloroplasts differentiate from proplastids in the plant meristem. Plant plastids contain multiple copies of a small circular genome. The numbers of chloroplasts per mesophyll cell and of plastid genome copies are affected by developmental stage and environmental signals. We compared chloroplast structure, gene expression and genome copy number in Arabidopsis seedlings germinated and grown under optimal conditions to those in seedlings germinated and grown in the presence of NaCl. Chloroplasts of the NaCl-grown seedlings were impaired, with less developed thylakoid and granum membranes than control seedlings. In addition, chloroplasts of salt-grown Arabidopsis seedlings accumulated more starch grains than those in the respective control plants. Steady-state transcript levels of chloroplast-encoded genes and of nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins were reduced in salt-grown seedlings. This reduction did not result from a global decrease in gene expression, since the expression of other nuclear genes was induced or not affected. Average cellular chloroplast genome copy number was reduced in salt-grown seedlings, suggesting that the reduction in steady-state transcript levels of chloroplast-encoded genes might result from a decrease in template DNA.

  8. Chloroplasts of Salt-Grown Arabidopsis Seedlings Are Impaired in Structure, Genome Copy Number and Transcript Levels

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Guy; Bar-Zvi, Dudy

    2013-01-01

    The chloroplast is the most prominent and metabolically active plastid in photosynthetic plants. Chloroplasts differentiate from proplastids in the plant meristem. Plant plastids contain multiple copies of a small circular genome. The numbers of chloroplasts per mesophyll cell and of plastid genome copies are affected by developmental stage and environmental signals. We compared chloroplast structure, gene expression and genome copy number in Arabidopsis seedlings germinated and grown under optimal conditions to those in seedlings germinated and grown in the presence of NaCl. Chloroplasts of the NaCl-grown seedlings were impaired, with less developed thylakoid and granum membranes than control seedlings. In addition, chloroplasts of salt-grown Arabidopsis seedlings accumulated more starch grains than those in the respective control plants. Steady-state transcript levels of chloroplast-encoded genes and of nuclear genes encoding chloroplast proteins were reduced in salt-grown seedlings. This reduction did not result from a global decrease in gene expression, since the expression of other nuclear genes was induced or not affected. Average cellular chloroplast genome copy number was reduced in salt-grown seedlings, suggesting that the reduction in steady-state transcript levels of chloroplast-encoded genes might result from a decrease in template DNA. PMID:24340039

  9. Dual transcriptional-translational cascade permits cellular level tuneable expression control

    PubMed Central

    Morra, Rosa; Shankar, Jayendra; Robinson, Christopher J.; Halliwell, Samantha; Butler, Lisa; Upton, Mathew; Hay, Sam; Micklefield, Jason; Dixon, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The ability to induce gene expression in a small molecule dependent manner has led to many applications in target discovery, functional elucidation and bio-production. To date these applications have relied on a limited set of protein-based control mechanisms operating at the level of transcription initiation. The discovery, design and reengineering of riboswitches offer an alternative means by which to control gene expression. Here we report the development and characterization of a novel tunable recombinant expression system, termed RiboTite, which operates at both the transcriptional and translational level. Using standard inducible promoters and orthogonal riboswitches, a multi-layered modular genetic control circuit was developed to control the expression of both bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and recombinant gene(s) of interest. The system was benchmarked against a number of commonly used E. coli expression systems, and shows tight basal control, precise analogue tunability of gene expression at the cellular level, dose-dependent regulation of protein production rates over extended growth periods and enhanced cell viability. This novel system expands the number of E. coli expression systems for use in recombinant protein production and represents a major performance enhancement over and above the most widely used expression systems. PMID:26405200

  10. Dual transcriptional-translational cascade permits cellular level tuneable expression control.

    PubMed

    Morra, Rosa; Shankar, Jayendra; Robinson, Christopher J; Halliwell, Samantha; Butler, Lisa; Upton, Mathew; Hay, Sam; Micklefield, Jason; Dixon, Neil

    2016-02-18

    The ability to induce gene expression in a small molecule dependent manner has led to many applications in target discovery, functional elucidation and bio-production. To date these applications have relied on a limited set of protein-based control mechanisms operating at the level of transcription initiation. The discovery, design and reengineering of riboswitches offer an alternative means by which to control gene expression. Here we report the development and characterization of a novel tunable recombinant expression system, termed RiboTite, which operates at both the transcriptional and translational level. Using standard inducible promoters and orthogonal riboswitches, a multi-layered modular genetic control circuit was developed to control the expression of both bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase and recombinant gene(s) of interest. The system was benchmarked against a number of commonly used E. coli expression systems, and shows tight basal control, precise analogue tunability of gene expression at the cellular level, dose-dependent regulation of protein production rates over extended growth periods and enhanced cell viability. This novel system expands the number of E. coli expression systems for use in recombinant protein production and represents a major performance enhancement over and above the most widely used expression systems. PMID:26405200

  11. Hepcidin expression in liver cells: evaluation of mRNA levels and transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Yohei; Murakami, Masaru; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2014-08-01

    Hepcidin produced in the liver negatively regulates intestinal iron absorption, and the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway is well-known to stimulate hepcidin expression. However, the regulation of hepcidin expression has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we evaluate different systems that can be used to determine how hepcidin expression is regulated. The basal expression of hepcidin in liver cell lines, such as HepG2 cells and Hepa1-6 cells, was lower than that in the liver and primary hepatocytes; the expression levels of hepcidin in the cell lines were near the limit of detection for RT-PCR and RT-qPCR analyses. Treatment with trichostatin A, RNAlater, or MG-132 enhanced the expression of hepcidin in HepG2 cells, suggesting that histone deacetylation, instability of mRNA, or proteosomal degradation of the protein(s) that positively regulate hepcidin expression may be responsible for the decreased expression of hepcidin in HepG2 cells. In luciferase-based reporter assays, BMP induced the transcription of a reporter, hepcidin(-2018)-luc, that contains nt -2018 through nt -35 of the hepcidin promoter in HepG2 cells and Hepa1-6 cells. However, BRE-luc, a representative reporter used to evaluate BMP signaling, was unresponsive to BMP in HepG2 cells. These results suggest that hepcidin transcription can be best evaluated in liver cell lines and that the hepcidin promoter senses BMP signaling with high sensitivity. The present study demonstrates that studies regarding the regulation of hepcidin expression at the mRNA level should be evaluated in primary hepatocytes, and liver cell lines are well-suited for studies examining the transcriptional regulation of hepcidin.

  12. Chronic venlafaxine treatment fails to alter the levels of galanin system transcripts in normal rats.

    PubMed

    Petschner, Peter; Juhasz, Gabriella; Tamasi, Viola; Adori, Csaba; Tothfalusi, Laszlo; Hökfelt, Tomas; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2016-06-01

    It is widely accepted that efficacy and speed of current antidepressants' therapeutic effect are far from optimal. Thus, there is a need for the development of antidepressants with new mechanisms of action. The neuropeptide galanin and its receptors (GalR1, GalR2 and GalR3) are among the promising targets. However, it is not clear whether or not the galanin system is involved in the antidepressant effect exerted by the currently much used inhibitors of the reuptake of serotonin and/or noradrenaline. To answer this question we administered the selective serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) venlafaxine (40mg/kg/day via osmotic minipumps) to normal rats and examined the levels of the transcripts for galanin and GalR1-3 after a 3-week venlafaxine treatment in the dorsal raphe, hippocampus and frontal cortex. These areas are known to be involved in the effects of antidepressants and in depression itself. Venlafaxine failed to alter the expression of any of the galanin system genes in these areas. Our results show that one of the most efficient, currently used SNRIs does not alter transcript levels of galanin or its three receptors in normal rats. These findings suggest that the pro- and antidepressive-like effects of galanin reported in animal experiments may employ a novel mechanism(s).

  13. Regulation of Budding Yeast CENP-A levels Prevents Misincorporation at Promoter Nucleosomes and Transcriptional Defects

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrand, Erica M.; Biggins, Sue

    2016-01-01

    The exclusive localization of the histone H3 variant CENP-A to centromeres is essential for accurate chromosome segregation. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis helps to ensure that CENP-A does not mislocalize to euchromatin, which can lead to genomic instability. Consistent with this, overexpression of the budding yeast CENP-ACse4 is lethal in cells lacking Psh1, the E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets CENP-ACse4 for degradation. To identify additional mechanisms that prevent CENP-ACse4 misincorporation and lethality, we analyzed the genome-wide mislocalization pattern of overexpressed CENP-ACse4 in the presence and absence of Psh1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by high throughput sequencing. We found that ectopic CENP-ACse4 is enriched at promoters that contain histone H2A.ZHtz1 nucleosomes, but that H2A.ZHtz1 is not required for CENP-ACse4 mislocalization. Instead, the INO80 complex, which removes H2A.ZHtz1 from nucleosomes, promotes the ectopic deposition of CENP-ACse4. Transcriptional profiling revealed gene expression changes in the psh1Δ cells overexpressing CENP-ACse4. The down-regulated genes are enriched for CENP-ACse4 mislocalization to promoters, while the up-regulated genes correlate with those that are also transcriptionally up-regulated in an htz1Δ strain. Together, these data show that regulating centromeric nucleosome localization is not only critical for maintaining centromere function, but also for ensuring accurate promoter function and transcriptional regulation. PMID:26982580

  14. The ribB FMN riboswitch from Escherichia coli operates at the transcriptional and translational level and regulates riboflavin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Pedrolli, Danielle; Langer, Simone; Hobl, Birgit; Schwarz, Julia; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Mack, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    FMN riboswitches are genetic elements that, in many bacteria, control genes responsible for biosynthesis and/or transport of riboflavin (vitamin B2 ). We report that the Escherichia coli ribB FMN riboswitch controls expression of the essential gene ribB coding for the riboflavin biosynthetic enzyme 3,4-dihydroxy-2-butanone-4-phosphate synthase (RibB; EC 4.1.99.12). Our data show that the E. coli ribB FMN riboswitch is unusual because it operates at the transcriptional and also at the translational level. Expression of ribB is negatively affected by FMN and by the FMN analog roseoflavin mononucleotide, which is synthesized enzymatically from roseoflavin and ATP. Consequently, in addition to flavoenzymes, the E. coli ribB FMN riboswitch constitutes a target for the antibiotic roseoflavin produced by Streptomyces davawensis.

  15. Transcript levels, alternative splicing and proteolytic cleavage of TFIIIA control 5S rRNA accumulation during Arabidopsis thaliana development.

    PubMed

    Layat, Elodie; Cotterell, Sylviane; Vaillant, Isabelle; Yukawa, Yasushi; Tutois, Sylvie; Tourmente, Sylvette

    2012-07-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is critical for eukaryotic cells and requires coordinated synthesis of the protein and rRNA moieties of the ribosome, which are therefore highly regulated. 5S ribosomal RNA, an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit, is transcribed by RNA polymerase III and specifically requires transcription factor IIIA (TFIIIA). To obtain insight into the regulation of 5S rRNA transcription, we have investigated the expression of 5S rRNA and the exon-skipped (ES) and exon-including (EI) TFIIIA transcripts, two transcript isoforms that result from alternative splicing of the TFIIIA gene, and TFIIIA protein amounts with respect to requirements for 5S rRNA during development. We show that 5S rRNA quantities are regulated through distinct but complementary mechanisms operating through transcriptional and post-transcriptional control of TFIIIA transcripts as well as at the post-translational level through proteolytic cleavage of the TFIIIA protein. During the reproductive phase, high expression of the TFIIIA gene together with low proteolytic cleavage contributes to accumulation of functional, full-length TFIIIA protein, and results in 5S rRNA accumulation in the seed. In contrast, just after germination, the levels of TFIIIA-encoding transcripts are low and stable. Full-length TFIIIA protein is undetectable, and the level of 5S rRNA stored in the embryo progressively decreases. After day 4, in correlation with the reorganization of 5S rDNA chromatin to a mature state, full-length TFIIIA protein with transcriptional activity accumulates and permits de novo transcription of 5S rRNA.

  16. Elevated level of renal xanthine oxidase mRNA transcription after nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis virus infection in growing layers

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huayuan; Huang, Qiqi; Liu, Weilian; Zou, Yuelong; Zhu, Shuliang; Deng, Guangfu; Kuang, Jun; Zhang, Caiying; Cao, Huabin; Hu, Guoliang

    2015-01-01

    To assess relationships between xanthine oxidase (XOD) and nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis virus (NIBV) infection, 240 growing layers (35 days old) were randomly divided into two groups (infected and control) of 120 chickens each. Each chicken in the control and infected group was intranasally inoculated with 0.2 mL sterile physiological saline and virus, respectively, after which serum antioxidant parameters and renal XOD mRNA expression in growing layers were evaluated at 8, 15 and 22 days post-inoculation (dpi). The results showed that serum glutathione peroxidase and superoxide dismutase activities in the infected group were significantly lower than in the control group at 8 and 15 dpi (p < 0.01), while serum malondialdehyde concentrations were significantly higher (p < 0.01). The serum uric acid was significantly higher than that of the control group at 15 dpi (p < 0.01). In addition, the kidney mRNA transcript level and serum activity of XOD in the infected group was significantly higher than that of the control group at 8, 15 and 22 dpi (p < 0.05). The results indicated that NIBV infection could cause the increases of renal XOD gene transcription and serum XOD activity, leading to hyperuricemia and reduction of antioxidants in the body. PMID:26119168

  17. Post-transcriptional regulation of neurofibromin level in cultured human melanocytes in response to growth factors.

    PubMed

    Griesser, J; Kaufmann, D; Maier, B; Mailhammer, R; Kuehl, P; Krone, W

    1997-03-01

    Among the symptoms that characterize neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) are pigmentation anomalies such as cafe au lait spots. It has been suggested that the reduction of the neurofibromin level in the epidermis of NF1 patients is responsible for the observed signs such as altered melanogenesis and altered density of melanocytes. Our studies show that in cultured normal human melanocytes, the neurofibromin level can be varied in vitro over a wide range by using different culture conditions. The influence of factors that control differentiation and proliferation of melanocytes on neurofibromin levels was studied. Immunoprecipitation followed by western blotting showed a 3- to 4-fold increase of neurofibromin after stimulation by PMA or bFGF, respectively, and a 1.5-fold increase in cells stimulated with steel factor. The increase of neurofibromin was not paralleled by a higher NF1 mRNA level as proved by northern blotting. Pulse-chase experiments with 35S-labeled melanocytes revealed an approximately 3-fold increase in the half-life of neurofibromin in bFGF- or PMA-stimulated cells compared to controls. These results indicate that the neurofibromin level of cultured melanocytes can be regulated by a mechanism independent of NF1 gene transcription and translation, which might influence the degradation rate of the protein.

  18. Intratumoral heterogeneity identified at the epigenetic, genetic and transcriptional level in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Nicole R.; Hudson, Amanda L.; Khong, Peter; Parkinson, Jonathon F.; Dwight, Trisha; Ikin, Rowan J.; Zhu, Ying; Cheng, Zhangkai Jason; Vafaee, Fatemeh; Chen, Jason; Wheeler, Helen R.; Howell, Viive M.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of glioblastoma with intratumoral heterogeneity contributing to variability in responses and resistance to standard treatments. Promoter methylation status of the DNA repair enzyme O6-methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) is the most important clinical biomarker in glioblastoma, predicting for therapeutic response. However, it does not always correlate with response. This may be due to intratumoral heterogeneity, with a single biopsy unlikely to represent the entire lesion. Aberrations in other DNA repair mechanisms may also contribute. This study investigated intratumoral heterogeneity in multiple glioblastoma tumors with a particular focus on the DNA repair pathways. Transcriptional intratumoral heterogeneity was identified in 40% of cases with variability in MGMT methylation status found in 14% of cases. As well as identifying intratumoral heterogeneity at the transcriptional and epigenetic levels, targeted next generation sequencing identified between 1 and 37 unique sequence variants per specimen. In-silico tools were then able to identify deleterious variants in both the base excision repair and the mismatch repair pathways that may contribute to therapeutic response. As these pathways have roles in temozolomide response, these findings may confound patient management and highlight the importance of assessing multiple tumor biopsies. PMID:26940435

  19. Plasmodium falciparum spermidine synthase inhibition results in unique perturbation-specific effects observed on transcript, protein and metabolite levels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    also observed. Most notably, uridine phosphorylase, adenosine deaminase, lysine decarboxylase (LDC) and S-adenosylmethionine synthetase were differentially expressed at the transcript and/or protein level. Several genes in associated metabolic pathways (purine metabolism and various methyltransferases) were also affected. The specific nature of the perturbation was additionally reflected by changes in polyamine metabolite levels. Conclusions This study details the malaria parasite's response to PfSpdSyn inhibition on the transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic levels. The results corroborate and significantly expand previous functional genomics studies relating to polyamine depletion in this parasite. Moreover, they confirm the role of transcriptional regulation in P. falciparum, particularly in this pathway. The findings promote this essential pathway as a target for antimalarial chemotherapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:20385001

  20. Identification and validation of genetic variants that influence transcription factor and cell signaling protein levels.

    PubMed

    Hause, Ronald J; Stark, Amy L; Antao, Nirav N; Gorsic, Lidija K; Chung, Sophie H; Brown, Christopher D; Wong, Shan S; Gill, Daniel F; Myers, Jamie L; To, Lida Anita; White, Kevin P; Dolan, M Eileen; Jones, Richard Baker

    2014-08-01

    Many genetic variants associated with human disease have been found to be associated with alterations in mRNA expression. Although it is commonly assumed that mRNA expression changes will lead to consequent changes in protein levels, methodological challenges have limited our ability to test the degree to which this assumption holds true. Here, we further developed the micro-western array approach and globally examined relationships between human genetic variation and cellular protein levels. We collected more than 250,000 protein level measurements comprising 441 transcription factor and signaling protein isoforms across 68 Yoruba (YRI) HapMap lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) and identified 12 cis and 160 trans protein level QTLs (pQTLs) at a false discovery rate (FDR) of 20%. Whereas up to two thirds of cis mRNA expression QTLs (eQTLs) were also pQTLs, many pQTLs were not associated with mRNA expression. Notably, we replicated and functionally validated a trans pQTL relationship between the KARS lysyl-tRNA synthetase locus and levels of the DIDO1 protein. This study demonstrates proof of concept in applying an antibody-based microarray approach to iteratively measure the levels of human proteins and relate these levels to human genome variation and other genomic data sets. Our results suggest that protein-based mechanisms might functionally buffer genetic alterations that influence mRNA expression levels and that pQTLs might contribute phenotypic diversity to a human population independently of influences on mRNA expression.

  1. The sae locus of Staphylococcus aureus controls exoprotein synthesis at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Giraudo, A T; Cheung, A L; Nagel, R

    1997-07-01

    Agr and sar are known regulatory loci of Staphylococcus aureus that control the production of several extracellular and cell-wall-associated proteins. A pleiotropic insertional mutation in S. aureus, designated sae, that leads to the production of drastically diminished levels of alpha- and beta-hemolysins and coagulase and slightly reduced levels of protein A has been described. The study of the expression of the genes coding for these exoproteins in the sae::Tn551 mutant (carried out in this work by Northern blot analyses) revealed that the genes for alpha- and beta-hemolysins (hla and hlb) and coagulase (coa) are not transcribed and that the gene for protein A (spa) is transcribed at a somewhat reduced level. These results indicate that the sae locus regulates these exoprotein genes at the transcriptional level. Northern blot analyses also show that the sae mutation does not affect the expression of agr or sar regulatory loci. An sae::Tn551 agr::tetM double mutant has been phenotypically characterized as producing reduced or null levels of alpha-, beta-, and delta-hemolysins, coagulase, and high levels of protein A. Northern blot analyses carried out in this work with the double mutant revealed that hla, hlb, hld, and coa genes are not transcribed, while spa is transcribed at high levels. The fact that coa is not expressed in the sae agr mutant, as in the sae parental strain, while spa is expressed at the high levels characteristic of the agr parental strain, suggests that sae and agr interact in a complex way in the control of the expression of the genes of several exoproteins.

  2. Accounting for experimental noise reveals that mRNA levels, amplified by post-transcriptional processes, largely determine steady-state protein levels in yeast.

    PubMed

    Csárdi, Gábor; Franks, Alexander; Choi, David S; Airoldi, Edoardo M; Drummond, D Allan

    2015-05-01

    Cells respond to their environment by modulating protein levels through mRNA transcription and post-transcriptional control. Modest observed correlations between global steady-state mRNA and protein measurements have been interpreted as evidence that mRNA levels determine roughly 40% of the variation in protein levels, indicating dominant post-transcriptional effects. However, the techniques underlying these conclusions, such as correlation and regression, yield biased results when data are noisy, missing systematically, and collinear---properties of mRNA and protein measurements---which motivated us to revisit this subject. Noise-robust analyses of 24 studies of budding yeast reveal that mRNA levels explain more than 85% of the variation in steady-state protein levels. Protein levels are not proportional to mRNA levels, but rise much more rapidly. Regulation of translation suffices to explain this nonlinear effect, revealing post-transcriptional amplification of, rather than competition with, transcriptional signals. These results substantially revise widely credited models of protein-level regulation, and introduce multiple noise-aware approaches essential for proper analysis of many biological phenomena.

  3. Accounting for Experimental Noise Reveals That mRNA Levels, Amplified by Post-Transcriptional Processes, Largely Determine Steady-State Protein Levels in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Csárdi, Gábor; Franks, Alexander; Choi, David S.; Airoldi, Edoardo M.; Drummond, D. Allan

    2015-01-01

    Cells respond to their environment by modulating protein levels through mRNA transcription and post-transcriptional control. Modest observed correlations between global steady-state mRNA and protein measurements have been interpreted as evidence that mRNA levels determine roughly 40% of the variation in protein levels, indicating dominant post-transcriptional effects. However, the techniques underlying these conclusions, such as correlation and regression, yield biased results when data are noisy, missing systematically, and collinear---properties of mRNA and protein measurements---which motivated us to revisit this subject. Noise-robust analyses of 24 studies of budding yeast reveal that mRNA levels explain more than 85% of the variation in steady-state protein levels. Protein levels are not proportional to mRNA levels, but rise much more rapidly. Regulation of translation suffices to explain this nonlinear effect, revealing post-transcriptional amplification of, rather than competition with, transcriptional signals. These results substantially revise widely credited models of protein-level regulation, and introduce multiple noise-aware approaches essential for proper analysis of many biological phenomena. PMID:25950722

  4. Screening for impact of popular herbs improving mental abilities on the transcriptional level of brain transporters.

    PubMed

    Mrozikiewicz, Przemyslaw M; Bogacz, Anna; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Kujawski, Radoslaw; Mikolajczak, Przemyslaw L; Ozarowski, Marcin; Czerny, Boguslaw; Mrozikiewicz-Rakowska, Beata; Grzeskowiak, Edmund

    2014-06-01

    There are a number of compounds that can modify the activity of ABC (ATP-binding cassette) and SLC (solute carrier) transporters in the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of natural and synthetic substances on the expression level of genes encoding transporters present in the BBB (mdr1a, mdr1b, mrp1, mrp2, oatp1a4, oatp1a5 and oatp1c1). Our results showed that verapamil caused the greatest reduction in the mRNA level while other synthetic (piracetam, phenobarbital) and natural (codeine, cyclosporine A, quercetin) substances showed a selective inhibitory effect. Further, the extract from the roots of Panax ginseng C. A. Meyer exhibited a decrease of transcription against selected transporters whereas the extract from Ginkgo biloba L. leaves resulted in an increase of the expression level of tested genes, except for mrp2. Extract from the aerial parts of Hypericum perforatum L. was the only one to cause an increased mRNA level for mdr1 and oatp1c1. These findings suggest that herbs can play an important role in overcoming the BBB and multidrug resistance to pharmacotherapy of brain cancer and mental disorders, based on the activity of selected drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters located in the BBB. PMID:24914722

  5. Minor Contribution of Chimeric Host-HIV Readthrough Transcripts to the Level of HIV Cell-Associated gag RNA.

    PubMed

    Pasternak, Alexander O; DeMaster, Laura K; Kootstra, Neeltje A; Reiss, Peter; O'Doherty, Una; Berkhout, Ben

    2015-11-11

    Cell-associated HIV unspliced RNA is an important marker of the viral reservoir. HIV gag RNA-specific assays are frequently used to monitor reservoir activation. Because HIV preferentially integrates into actively transcribed genes, some of the transcripts detected by these assays may not represent genuine HIV RNA but rather chimeric host-HIV readthrough transcripts. Here, we demonstrate that in HIV-infected patients on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy, such host-derived transcripts do not significantly contribute to the HIV gag RNA level.

  6. Surprisal Analysis of Transcripts Expression Levels in the Presence of Noise: A Reliable Determination of the Onset of a Tumor Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Ayelet; Levine, Raphael D.

    2013-01-01

    Towards a reliable identification of the onset in time of a cancer phenotype, changes in transcription levels in cell models were tested. Surprisal analysis, an information-theoretic approach grounded in thermodynamics, was used to characterize the expression level of mRNAs as time changed. Surprisal Analysis provides a very compact representation for the measured expression levels of many thousands of mRNAs in terms of very few - three, four - transcription patterns. The patterns, that are a collection of transcripts that respond together, can be assigned definite biological phenotypic role. We identify a transcription pattern that is a clear marker of eventual malignancy. The weight of each transcription pattern is determined by surprisal analysis. The weight of this pattern changes with time; it is never strictly zero but it is very low at early times and then rises rather suddenly. We suggest that the low weights at early time points are primarily due to experimental noise. We develop the necessary formalism to determine at what point in time the value of that pattern becomes reliable. Beyond the point in time when a pattern is deemed reliable the data shows that the pattern remain reliable. We suggest that this allows a determination of the presence of a cancer forewarning. We apply the same formalism to the weight of the transcription patterns that account for healthy cell pathways, such as apoptosis, that need to be switched off in cancer cells. We show that their weight eventually falls below the threshold. Lastly we discuss patient heterogeneity as an additional source of fluctuation and show how to incorporate it within the developed formalism. PMID:23626699

  7. Salt Stress Reveals a New Role for ARGONAUTE1 in miRNA Biogenesis at the Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Levels1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Niedojadlo, Katarzyna; Niedojadlo, Janusz; Walczak, Weronika; Szweykowska-Kulinska, Zofia; Jarmolowski, Artur

    2016-01-01

    Plants as sessile organisms have developed prompt response mechanisms to react to rapid environmental changes. In addition to the transcriptional regulation of gene expression, microRNAs (miRNAs) are key posttranscriptional regulators of the plant stress response. We show here that the expression levels of many miRNAs were regulated under salt stress conditions. This regulation occurred at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. During salinity stress, the levels of miRNA161 and miRNA173 increased, while the expression of pri-miRNA161 and pri-miRNA173 was down-regulated. Under salt stress conditions, miRNA161 and miRNA173 were stabilized in the cytoplasm, and the expressions of MIR161 and MIR173 were negatively regulated in the nucleus. ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) participated in both processes. We demonstrated that AGO1 cotranscriptionally controlled the expression of MIR161 and MIR173 in the nucleus. Our results suggests that AGO1 interacts with chromatin at MIR161 and MIR173 loci and causes the disassembly of the transcriptional complex, releasing short and unpolyadenylated transcripts. PMID:27385819

  8. Open complex scrunching before nucleotide addition accounts for the unusual transcription start site of E. coli ribosomal RNA promoters.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, Jared T; Chandrangsu, Pete; Ross, Wilma; Gourse, Richard L

    2016-03-29

    Most Escherichia coli promoters initiate transcription with a purine 7 or 8 nt downstream from the -10 hexamer, but some promoters, including the ribosomal RNA promoter rrnB P1, start 9 nt from the -10 element. We identified promoter and RNA polymerase determinants of this noncanonical rrnB P1 start site using biochemical and genetic approaches including mutational analysis of the promoter, Fe(2+) cleavage assays to monitor template strand positions near the active-site, and Bpa cross-linking to map the path of open complex DNA at amino acid and nucleotide resolution. We find that mutations in several promoter regions affect transcription start site (TSS) selection. In particular, we show that the absence of strong interactions between the discriminator region and σ region 1.2 and between the extended -10 element and σ region 3.0, identified previously as a determinant of proper regulation of rRNA promoters, is also required for the unusual TSS. We find that the DNA in the single-stranded transcription bubble of the rrnB P1 promoter complex expands and is "scrunched" into the active site channel of RNA polymerase, similar to the situation in initial transcribing complexes. However, in the rrnB P1 open complex, scrunching occurs before RNA synthesis begins. We find that the scrunched open complex exhibits reduced abortive product synthesis, suggesting that scrunching and unusual TSS selection contribute to the extraordinary transcriptional activity of rRNA promoters by increasing promoter escape, helping to offset the reduction in promoter activity that would result from the weak interactions with σ.

  9. Open complex scrunching before nucleotide addition accounts for the unusual transcription start site of E. coli ribosomal RNA promoters.

    PubMed

    Winkelman, Jared T; Chandrangsu, Pete; Ross, Wilma; Gourse, Richard L

    2016-03-29

    Most Escherichia coli promoters initiate transcription with a purine 7 or 8 nt downstream from the -10 hexamer, but some promoters, including the ribosomal RNA promoter rrnB P1, start 9 nt from the -10 element. We identified promoter and RNA polymerase determinants of this noncanonical rrnB P1 start site using biochemical and genetic approaches including mutational analysis of the promoter, Fe(2+) cleavage assays to monitor template strand positions near the active-site, and Bpa cross-linking to map the path of open complex DNA at amino acid and nucleotide resolution. We find that mutations in several promoter regions affect transcription start site (TSS) selection. In particular, we show that the absence of strong interactions between the discriminator region and σ region 1.2 and between the extended -10 element and σ region 3.0, identified previously as a determinant of proper regulation of rRNA promoters, is also required for the unusual TSS. We find that the DNA in the single-stranded transcription bubble of the rrnB P1 promoter complex expands and is "scrunched" into the active site channel of RNA polymerase, similar to the situation in initial transcribing complexes. However, in the rrnB P1 open complex, scrunching occurs before RNA synthesis begins. We find that the scrunched open complex exhibits reduced abortive product synthesis, suggesting that scrunching and unusual TSS selection contribute to the extraordinary transcriptional activity of rRNA promoters by increasing promoter escape, helping to offset the reduction in promoter activity that would result from the weak interactions with σ. PMID:26976590

  10. Genome wide analysis of transcript levels after perturbation of the EGFR pathway in the Drosophila ovary.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Katherine C; Hatfield, Steven D; Tworoger, Michael; Ward, Ellen J; Fischer, Karin A; Bowers, Stuart; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2005-03-01

    Defects in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway can lead to aggressive tumor formation. Activation of this pathway during normal development produces multiple outcomes at the cellular level, leading to cellular differentiation and cell cycle activation. To elucidate the downstream events induced by this pathway, we used genome-wide cDNA microarray technology to identify potential EGFR targets in Drosophila oogenesis. We focused on genes for which the transcriptional responses due to EGFR pathway activation and inactivation were in opposite directions, as this is expected for genes that are directly regulated by the pathway in this tissue type. We perturbed the EGFR pathway in epithelial follicle cells using seven different genetic backgrounds. To activate the pathway, we overexpressed an activated form of the EGFR (UAS-caEGFR), and an activated form of the signal transducer Raf (UAS-caRaf); we also over- or ectopically expressed the downstream homeobox transcription factor Mirror (UAS-mirr) and the ligand-activating serine protease Rhomboid (UAS-rho). To reduce pathway activity we used loss-of-function mutations in the ligand (gurken) and receptor (torpedo). From microarrays containing 6,255 genes, we found 454 genes that responded in an opposite manner in gain-of-function and loss-of-function conditions among which are many Wingless signaling pathway components. Further analysis of two such components, sugarless and pangolin, revealed a function for these genes in late follicle cell patterning. Of interest, components of other signaling pathways were also enriched in the EGFR target group, suggesting that one reason for the pleiotropic effects seen with EGFR activity in cancer progression and development may be its ability to regulate many other signaling pathways. PMID:15704171

  11. Concordance of transcriptional and apical benchmark dose levels for conazole-induced liver effects in mice.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Virunya S; Hester, Susan D; Nesnow, Stephen; Eastmond, David A

    2013-11-01

    The ability to anchor chemical class-based gene expression changes to phenotypic lesions and to describe these changes as a function of dose and time informs mode-of-action determinations and improves quantitative risk assessments. Previous global expression profiling identified a 330-probe cluster differentially expressed and commonly responsive to 3 hepatotumorigenic conazoles (cyproconazole, epoxiconazole, and propiconazole) at 30 days. Extended to 2 more conazoles (triadimefon and myclobutanil), the present assessment encompasses 4 tumorigenic and 1 nontumorigenic conazole. Transcriptional benchmark dose levels (BMDL(T)) were estimated for a subset of the cluster with dose-responsive behavior and a ≥ 5-fold increase or decrease in signal intensity at the highest dose. These genes primarily encompassed CAR/RXR activation, P450 metabolism, liver hypertrophy- glutathione depletion, LPS/IL-1-mediated inhibition of RXR, and NRF2-mediated oxidative stress pathways. Median BMDL(T) estimates from the subset were concordant (within a factor of 2.4) with apical benchmark doses (BMDL(A)) for increased liver weight at 30 days for the 5 conazoles. The 30-day median BMDL(T) estimates were within one-half order of magnitude of the chronic BMDLA for hepatocellular tumors. Potency differences seen in the dose-responsive transcription of certain phase II metabolism, bile acid detoxification, and lipid oxidation genes mirrored each conazole's tumorigenic potency. The 30-day BMDL(T) corresponded to tumorigenic potency on a milligram per kilogram day basis with cyproconazole > epoxiconazole > propiconazole > triadimefon > myclobutanil (nontumorigenic). These results support the utility of measuring short-term gene expression changes to inform quantitative risk assessments from long-term exposures.

  12. Modification of expansin transcript levels in the maize primary root at low water potentials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Y; Thorne, E T; Sharp, R E; Cosgrove, D J

    2001-08-01

    We previously demonstrated that maintenance of cell elongation in the apical region of maize primary roots at low water potentials (psi(w)) was associated with an increase in expansin activity and extractable expansin protein. Here, we characterized the spatial pattern of expansin gene expression along the growing maize root and studied the effect of low psi(w) on expansin gene expression. Roots were divided into three segments: apical 0 to 5 mm, subapical 5 to 10 mm, and non-growing 10 to 20 mm. Of the five expansin genes expressed in control roots, two alpha-expansins (Exp1 and Exp5) and two beta-expansins (ExpB2 and ExpB8) are expressed specifically in the growing region, whereas expression of beta-expansin ExpB6 is shifted basipetally. After seedlings were transplanted to vermiculite with a psi(w) of -1.6 MPa, transcripts for Exp1, Exp5, and ExpB8 rapidly accumulated in the apical region of the root. These mRNA changes correlated with the maintenance of root elongation and increases in wall extensibility found previously. The beta-expansins ExpB2 and ExpB6 showed distinctive patterns of expression and responses to low psi(w,) indicative of distinctive functions. Inhibition of abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation at low psi(w) (by fluridone treatment) had no effect on expansin expression, except that ExpB2 transcript level showed a minor dependence on ABA. Gene-specific regulation of alpha- and beta-expansin mRNA pools likely contributes to growth alterations of the maize (Zea mays) root as it adapts to a low psi(w), but these changes do not appear to be mediated by changes in ABA content.

  13. Genome wide analysis of transcript levels after perturbation of the EGFR pathway in the Drosophila ovary.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Katherine C; Hatfield, Steven D; Tworoger, Michael; Ward, Ellen J; Fischer, Karin A; Bowers, Stuart; Ruohola-Baker, Hannele

    2005-03-01

    Defects in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway can lead to aggressive tumor formation. Activation of this pathway during normal development produces multiple outcomes at the cellular level, leading to cellular differentiation and cell cycle activation. To elucidate the downstream events induced by this pathway, we used genome-wide cDNA microarray technology to identify potential EGFR targets in Drosophila oogenesis. We focused on genes for which the transcriptional responses due to EGFR pathway activation and inactivation were in opposite directions, as this is expected for genes that are directly regulated by the pathway in this tissue type. We perturbed the EGFR pathway in epithelial follicle cells using seven different genetic backgrounds. To activate the pathway, we overexpressed an activated form of the EGFR (UAS-caEGFR), and an activated form of the signal transducer Raf (UAS-caRaf); we also over- or ectopically expressed the downstream homeobox transcription factor Mirror (UAS-mirr) and the ligand-activating serine protease Rhomboid (UAS-rho). To reduce pathway activity we used loss-of-function mutations in the ligand (gurken) and receptor (torpedo). From microarrays containing 6,255 genes, we found 454 genes that responded in an opposite manner in gain-of-function and loss-of-function conditions among which are many Wingless signaling pathway components. Further analysis of two such components, sugarless and pangolin, revealed a function for these genes in late follicle cell patterning. Of interest, components of other signaling pathways were also enriched in the EGFR target group, suggesting that one reason for the pleiotropic effects seen with EGFR activity in cancer progression and development may be its ability to regulate many other signaling pathways.

  14. Transcript-level expression analysis of RNA-seq experiments with HISAT, StringTie and Ballgown.

    PubMed

    Pertea, Mihaela; Kim, Daehwan; Pertea, Geo M; Leek, Jeffrey T; Salzberg, Steven L

    2016-09-01

    High-throughput sequencing of mRNA (RNA-seq) has become the standard method for measuring and comparing the levels of gene expression in a wide variety of species and conditions. RNA-seq experiments generate very large, complex data sets that demand fast, accurate and flexible software to reduce the raw read data to comprehensible results. HISAT (hierarchical indexing for spliced alignment of transcripts), StringTie and Ballgown are free, open-source software tools for comprehensive analysis of RNA-seq experiments. Together, they allow scientists to align reads to a genome, assemble transcripts including novel splice variants, compute the abundance of these transcripts in each sample and compare experiments to identify differentially expressed genes and transcripts. This protocol describes all the steps necessary to process a large set of raw sequencing reads and create lists of gene transcripts, expression levels, and differentially expressed genes and transcripts. The protocol's execution time depends on the computing resources, but it typically takes under 45 min of computer time. HISAT, StringTie and Ballgown are available from http://ccb.jhu.edu/software.shtml. PMID:27560171

  15. GlpR Represses Fructose and Glucose Metabolic Enzymes at the Level of Transcription in the Haloarchaeon Haloferax volcanii▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Rawls, Katherine S.; Yacovone, Shalane K.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a DeoR/GlpR-type transcription factor was investigated for its potential role as a global regulator of sugar metabolism in haloarchaea, using Haloferax volcanii as a model organism. Common to a number of haloarchaea and Gram-positive bacterial species, the encoding glpR gene was chromosomally linked with genes of sugar metabolism. In H. volcanii, glpR was cotranscribed with the downstream phosphofructokinase (PFK; pfkB) gene, and the transcript levels of this glpR-pfkB operon were 10- to 20-fold higher when cells were grown on fructose or glucose than when they were grown on glycerol alone. GlpR was required for repression on glycerol based on significant increases in the levels of PFK (pfkB) transcript and enzyme activity detected upon deletion of glpR from the genome. Deletion of glpR also resulted in significant increases in both the activity and the transcript (kdgK1) levels of 2-keto-3-deoxy-d-gluconate kinase (KDGK), a key enzyme of haloarchaeal glucose metabolism, when cells were grown on glycerol, compared to the levels obtained for media with glucose. Promoter fusions to a β-galactosidase bgaH reporter revealed that transcription of glpR-pfkB and kdgK1 was modulated by carbon source and GlpR, consistent with quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) and enzyme activity assays. The results presented here provide genetic and biochemical evidence that GlpR controls both fructose and glucose metabolic enzymes through transcriptional repression of the glpR-pfkB operon and kdgK1 during growth on glycerol. PMID:20935102

  16. c-Fos: an AP-1 transcription factor with an additional cytoplasmic, non-genomic lipid synthesis activation capacity.

    PubMed

    Caputto, Beatriz L; Cardozo Gizzi, Andrés M; Gil, Germán A

    2014-09-01

    The mechanisms that co-ordinately activate lipid synthesis when high rates of membrane biogenesis are needed to support cell growth are largely unknown. c-Fos, a well known AP-1 transcription factor, has emerged as a unique protein with the capacity to associate to specific enzymes of the pathway of synthesis of phospholipids at the endoplasmic reticulum and activate their synthesis to accompany genomic decisions of growth. Herein, we discuss this cytoplasmic, non-genomic effect of c-Fos in the context of other mechanisms that have been proposed to regulate lipid synthesis.

  17. High atomic weight, high-energy radiation (HZE) induces transcriptional responses shared with conventional stresses in addition to a core "DSB" response specific to clastogenic treatments.

    PubMed

    Missirian, Victor; Conklin, Phillip A; Culligan, Kevin M; Huefner, Neil D; Britt, Anne B

    2014-01-01

    Plants exhibit a robust transcriptional response to gamma radiation which includes the induction of transcripts required for homologous recombination and the suppression of transcripts that promote cell cycle progression. Various DNA damaging agents induce different spectra of DNA damage as well as "collateral" damage to other cellular components and therefore are not expected to provoke identical responses by the cell. Here we study the effects of two different types of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment, HZE (1 GeV Fe(26+) high mass, high charge, and high energy relativistic particles) and gamma photons, on the transcriptome of Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. Both types of IR induce small clusters of radicals that can result in the formation of double strand breaks (DSBs), but HZE also produces linear arrays of extremely clustered damage. We performed these experiments across a range of time points (1.5-24 h after irradiation) in both wild-type plants and in mutants defective in the DSB-sensing protein kinase ATM. The two types of IR exhibit a shared double strand break-repair-related damage response, although they differ slightly in the timing, degree, and ATM-dependence of the response. The ATM-dependent, DNA metabolism-related transcripts of the "DSB response" were also induced by other DNA damaging agents, but were not induced by conventional stresses. Both Gamma and HZE irradiation induced, at 24 h post-irradiation, ATM-dependent transcripts associated with a variety of conventional stresses; these were overrepresented for pathogen response, rather than DNA metabolism. In contrast, only HZE-irradiated plants, at 1.5 h after irradiation, exhibited an additional and very extensive transcriptional response, shared with plants experiencing "extended night." This response was not apparent in gamma-irradiated plants.

  18. The Effectiveness of an Additional Stretching Exercise Program in Improving Flexibility Level among Preschool Boys

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Wee Akina Sia Seng; Rengasamy, Shabeshan A/L; Raju, Subramaniam A/L

    2014-01-01

    This study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of a two minutes' additional stretching exercise program in a 30 minutes games teaching lesson in improving the flexibility level of 6 year old preschool boys (M = 5.92, SD = 0.27) in a preschool in Malaysia. Fifty (50) preschool boys were selected for the study based on the intact sampling…

  19. The CYP51F1 Gene of Leptographium qinlingensis: Sequence Characteristic, Phylogeny and Transcript Levels.

    PubMed

    Dai, Lulu; Li, Zhumei; Yu, Jiamin; Ma, Mingyuan; Zhang, Ranran; Chen, Hui; Pham, Thanh

    2015-05-26

    Leptographium qinlingensis is a fungal associate of the Chinese white pine beetle (Dendroctonus armandi) and a pathogen of the Chinese white pine (Pinus armandi) that must overcome the terpenoid oleoresin defenses of host trees. L. qinlingensis responds to monoterpene flow with abundant mechanisms that include export and the use of these compounds as a carbon source. As one of the fungal cytochrome P450 proteins (CYPs), which play important roles in general metabolism, CYP51 (lanosterol 14-α demethylase) can catalyze the biosynthesis of ergosterol and is a target for antifungal drug. We have identified an L. qinlingensis CYP51F1 gene, and the phylogenetic analysis shows the highest homology with the 14-α-demethylase sequence from Grosmannia clavigera (a fungal associate of Dendroctonus ponderosae). The transcription level of CYP51F1 following treatment with terpenes and pine phloem extracts was upregulated, while using monoterpenes as the only carbon source led to the downregulation of CYP5F1 expression. The homology modeling structure of CYP51F1 is similar to the structure of the lanosterol 14-α demethylase protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae YJM789, which has an N-terminal membrane helix 1 (MH1) and transmembrane helix 1 (TMH1). The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of terpenoid and azole fungicides (itraconazole (ITC)) and the docking of terpenoid molecules, lanosterol and ITC in the protein structure suggested that CYP51F1 may be inhibited by terpenoid molecules by competitive binding with azole fungicides.

  20. Influence of Host Gene Transcription Level and Orientation on HIV-1 Latency in a Primary-Cell Model▿

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Liang; Yang, Hung-Chih; Rabi, S. Alireza; Bravo, Hector C.; Shroff, Neeta S.; Irizarry, Rafael A.; Zhang, Hao; Margolick, Joseph B.; Siliciano, Janet D.; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2011-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) establishes a latent reservoir in resting memory CD4+ T cells. This latent reservoir is a major barrier to the eradication of HIV-1 in infected individuals and is not affected by highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Reactivation of latent HIV-1 is a possible strategy for elimination of this reservoir. The mechanisms with which latency is maintained are unclear. In the analysis of the regulation of HIV-1 gene expression, it is important to consider the nature of HIV-1 integration sites. In this study, we analyzed the integration and transcription of latent HIV-1 in a primary CD4+ T cell model of latency. The majority of integration sites in latently infected cells were in introns of transcription units. Serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) demonstrated that more than 90% of those host genes harboring a latent integrated provirus were transcriptionally active, mostly at high levels. For latently infected cells, we observed a modest preference for integration in the same transcriptional orientation as the host gene (63.8% versus 36.2%). In contrast, this orientation preference was not observed in acutely infected or persistently infected cells. These results suggest that transcriptional interference may be one of the important factors in the establishment and maintenance of HIV-1 latency. Our findings suggest that disrupting the negative control of HIV-1 transcription by upstream host promoters could facilitate the reactivation of latent HIV-1 in some resting CD4+ T cells. PMID:21430059

  1. Transcript levels of antioxidative genes and oxygen radical scavenging enzyme activities in chilled zucchini squash in response to superatmospheric oxygen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transcript levels of antioxidative genes including Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), Cu/Zn SOD, ascorbate peroxidise (APX), and catalase (CAT) do not vary significantly during storage at 5 °C with high oxygen treatment in freshly harvested zucchini squash (Cucurbita pepo L. cv. Elite). However, ...

  2. Neuropeptide Receptor Transcript Expression Levels and Magnitude of Ionic Current Responses Show Cell Type-Specific Differences in a Small Motor Circuit

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Veronica J.; Daur, Nelly; Temporal, Simone; Schulz, David J.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the relationship between neuropeptide receptor transcript expression and current responses in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the crab, Cancer borealis. We identified a transcript with high sequence similarity to crustacean cardioactive peptide (CCAP) receptors in insects and mammalian neuropeptide S receptors. This transcript was expressed throughout the nervous system, consistent with the role of CCAP in a range of different behaviors. In the STG, single-cell qPCR showed expression in only a subset of neurons. This subset had previously been shown to respond to CCAP with the activation of a modulator-activated inward current (IMI), with one exception. In the one cell type that showed expression but no IMI responses, we found CCAP modulation of synaptic currents. Expression levels within STG neuron types were fairly variable, but significantly different between some neuron types. We tested the magnitude and concentration dependence of IMI responses to CCAP application in two identified neurons, the lateral pyloric (LP) and the inferior cardiac (IC) neurons. LP had several-fold higher expression and showed larger current responses. It also was more sensitive to low CCAP concentrations and showed saturation at lower concentrations, as sigmoid fits showed smaller EC50 values and steeper slopes. In addition, occlusion experiments with proctolin, a different neuropeptide converging onto IMI, showed that saturating concentrations of CCAP activated all available IMI in LP, but only approximately two-thirds in IC, the neuron with lower receptor transcript expression. The implications of these findings for comodulation are discussed. PMID:25926455

  3. Low-temperature affected LC-PUFA conversion and associated gene transcript level in Nannochloropsis oculata CS-179

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiaolei; Zhang, Lin; Zhu, Baohua; Pan, Kehou; Li, Si; Yang, Guanpin

    2011-09-01

    Nannochloropsis oculata CS-179, a marine eukaryotic unicellular microalga, is rich in long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs). Culture temperature affected cell growth and the composition of LC-PUFAs. At an initial cell density of 1.5 × 106 cell mL-1, the highest growth was observed at 25°C and the cell density reached 3 × 107 cell mL-1 at the beginning of logarithmic phase. The content of LC-PUFAs varied with culture temperature. The highest content of LC-PUFAs (43.96%) and EPA (36.6%) was gained at 20°C. Real-time PCR showed that the abundance of Δ6-desaturase gene transcripts was significantly different among 5 culture temperatures and the highest transcript level (15°C) of Nanoc-D6D took off at cycle 21.45. The gene transcript of C20-elongase gene was higher at lower temperatures (10, 15, and 20°C), and the highest transcript level (20°C) of Nanoc-E took off at cycle 21.18. The highest conversion rate (39.3%) of Δ6-desaturase was also gained at 20°C. But the conversion rate of Nanoc-E was not detected. The higher content of LC-PUFAs was a result of higher gene transcript level and higher enzyme activity. Compared with C20-elongase gene, Δ6-desaturase gene transcript and enzyme activity varied significantly with temperature. It will be useful to study the mechanism of how the content of LC-PUFAs is affected by temperature.

  4. Energy level formula for the Morse oscillator with an additional kinetic coupling potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Hong-yi; Chen, Bo-zhan; Fan, Yue

    1996-02-01

    Based on the <η| representation which is the common eigenstate of the relative position x1 - x2 and the total momentum P1 + P2 of two particles we derive the energy level formula for a Morse oscillator with an additional kinetic coupling potential. The <η| representation seems to provide a direct and convenient approach for solving certain dynamical problems for two-body systems.

  5. Evidence that the regulation of diphtheria toxin production is directed at the level of transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J R; Michel, J L; Teng, M

    1978-01-01

    It has been known for several decades that iron inhibits the production of diphtheria toxin by Corynebacterium diphtheriae by preventing expression at maximal levels. We examined the inhibition kinetics of toxin production after the addition of either iron or rifampin to iron-limited cultures of C7 (betatox+). Iron-mediated inhibition of toxin production was found to be linear within the range of 16 nM to 16 micron. The inhibition kinetics following the addition of iron or rifampin was almost identical. [3H]RNA extracted from iron-limited toxigenic C. diphtheriae was found to hybridize to a greater extent to corynephage beta DNA than either [3H]RNA extracted from toxigenic C. diphtheriae before the onset of toxin production or [3H]RNA extracted from nonlysogenic, nontoxigenic C. diphtheriae. PMID:98519

  6. Altered transcription levels of endocrine associated genes in two fisheries species collected from the Great Barrier Reef catchment and lagoon.

    PubMed

    Kroon, Frederieke J; Hook, Sharon E; Jones, Dean; Metcalfe, Suzanne; Henderson, Brent; Smith, Rachael; Warne, Michael St J; Turner, Ryan D; McKeown, Adam; Westcott, David A

    2015-03-01

    The Great Barrier Reef (GBR) is chronically exposed to agricultural run-off containing pesticides, many of which are known endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Here, we measure mRNA transcript abundance of two EDC biomarkers in wild populations of barramundi (Lates calcarifer) and coral trout (Plectropomus leopardus and Plectropomus maculatus). Transcription levels of liver vitellogenin (vtg) differed significantly in both species amongst sites with different exposures to agricultural run-off; brain aromatase (cyp19a1b) revealed some differences for barramundi only. Exposure to run-off from sugarcane that contains pesticides is a likely pathway given (i) significant associations between barramundi vtg transcription levels, catchment sugarcane land use, and river pesticide concentrations, and (ii) consistency between patterns of coral trout vtg transcription levels and pesticide distribution in the GBR lagoon. Given the potential consequences of such exposure for reproductive fitness and population dynamics, these results are cause for concern for the sustainability of fisheries resources downstream from agricultural land uses.

  7. A global transcriptional regulator in Thermococcus kodakaraensis controls the expression levels of both glycolytic and gluconeogenic enzyme-encoding genes.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Tamotsu; Akerboom, Jasper; Takedomi, Shogo; van de Werken, Harmen J G; Blombach, Fabian; van der Oost, John; Murakami, Taira; Atomi, Haruyuki; Imanaka, Tadayuki

    2007-11-16

    We identified a novel regulator, Thermococcales glycolytic regulator (Tgr), functioning as both an activator and a repressor of transcription in the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis KOD1. Tgr (TK1769) displays similarity (28% identical) to Pyrococcus furiosus TrmB (PF1743), a transcriptional repressor regulating the trehalose/maltose ATP-binding cassette transporter genes, but is more closely related (67%) to a TrmB paralog in P. furiosus (PF0124). Growth of a tgr disruption strain (Deltatgr) displayed a significant decrease in growth rate under gluconeogenic conditions compared with the wild-type strain, whereas comparable growth rates were observed under glycolytic conditions. A whole genome microarray analysis revealed that transcript levels of almost all genes related to glycolysis and maltodextrin metabolism were at relatively high levels in the Deltatgr mutant even under gluconeogenic conditions. The Deltatgr mutant also displayed defects in the transcriptional activation of gluconeogenic genes under these conditions, indicating that Tgr functions as both an activator and a repressor. Genes regulated by Tgr contain a previously identified sequence motif, the Thermococcales glycolytic motif (TGM). The TGM was positioned upstream of the Transcription factor B-responsive element (BRE)/TATA sequence in gluconeogenic promoters and downstream of it in glycolytic promoters. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay indicated that recombinant Tgr protein specifically binds to promoter regions containing a TGM. Tgr was released from the DNA when maltotriose was added, suggesting that this sugar is most likely the physiological effector. Our results strongly suggest that Tgr is a global transcriptional regulator that simultaneously controls, in response to sugar availability, both glycolytic and gluconeogenic metabolism in T. kodakaraensis via its direct binding to the TGM.

  8. Metabolic syndrome influences cardiac gene expression pattern at the transcript level in male ZDF rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Metabolic syndrome (coexisting visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, and hypertension) is a prominent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, however, its effect on cardiac gene expression pattern is unclear. Therefore, we examined the possible alterations in cardiac gene expression pattern in male Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) rats, a model of metabolic syndrome. Methods Fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol and triglyceride levels were measured at 6, 16, and 25 wk of age in male ZDF and lean control rats. Oral glucose tolerance test was performed at 16 and 25 wk of age. At week 25, total RNA was isolated from the myocardium and assayed by rat oligonucleotide microarray for 14921 genes. Expression of selected genes was confirmed by qRT-PCR. Results Fasting blood glucose, serum insulin, cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly increased, glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were impaired in ZDF rats compared to leans. In hearts of ZDF rats, 36 genes showed significant up-regulation and 49 genes showed down-regulation as compared to lean controls. Genes with significantly altered expression in the heart due to metabolic syndrome includes functional clusters of metabolism (e.g. 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-Coenzyme A synthase 2; argininosuccinate synthetase; 2-amino-3-ketobutyrate-coenzyme A ligase), structural proteins (e.g. myosin IXA; aggrecan1), signal transduction (e.g. activating transcription factor 3; phospholipase A2; insulin responsive sequence DNA binding protein-1) stress response (e.g. heat shock 70kD protein 1A; heat shock protein 60; glutathione S-transferase Yc2 subunit), ion channels and receptors (e.g. ATPase, (Na+)/K+ transporting, beta 4 polypeptide; ATPase, H+/K+ transporting, nongastric, alpha polypeptide). Moreover some other genes with no definite functional clusters were also changed such as e.g. S100 calcium binding protein A3; ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1; interleukin

  9. The Wheat NAC Transcription Factor TaNAC2L Is Regulated at the Transcriptional and Post-Translational Levels and Promotes Heat Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weiwei; Zhang, Jinxia; Zhang, Ning; Xin, Mingming; Peng, Huiru; Hu, Zhaorong; Ni, Zhongfu; Du, Jinkun

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress poses a serious threat to global crop production. In efforts that aim to mitigate the adverse effects of heat stress on crops, a variety of genetic tools are being used to develop plants with improved thermotolerance. The characterization of important regulators of heat stress tolerance provides essential information for this aim. In this study, we examine the wheat (Triticum aestivum) NAC transcription factor gene TaNAC2L. High temperature induced TaNAC2L expression in wheat and overexpression of TaNAC2L in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced acquired heat tolerance without causing obvious alterations in phenotype compared with wild type under normal conditions. TaNAC2L overexpression also activated the expression of heat-related genes in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, suggesting that TaNAC2L may improve heat tolerance by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes. Notably, TaNAC2L is also regulated at the post-translational level and might be degraded via a proteasome-mediated pathway. Thus, this wheat transcription factor may have potential uses in enhancing thermotolerance in crops.

  10. The Wheat NAC Transcription Factor TaNAC2L Is Regulated at the Transcriptional and Post-Translational Levels and Promotes Heat Stress Tolerance in Transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Weiwei; Zhang, Jinxia; Zhang, Ning; Xin, Mingming; Peng, Huiru; Hu, Zhaorong; Ni, Zhongfu; Du, Jinkun

    2015-01-01

    Heat stress poses a serious threat to global crop production. In efforts that aim to mitigate the adverse effects of heat stress on crops, a variety of genetic tools are being used to develop plants with improved thermotolerance. The characterization of important regulators of heat stress tolerance provides essential information for this aim. In this study, we examine the wheat (Triticum aestivum) NAC transcription factor gene TaNAC2L. High temperature induced TaNAC2L expression in wheat and overexpression of TaNAC2L in Arabidopsis thaliana enhanced acquired heat tolerance without causing obvious alterations in phenotype compared with wild type under normal conditions. TaNAC2L overexpression also activated the expression of heat-related genes in the transgenic Arabidopsis plants, suggesting that TaNAC2L may improve heat tolerance by regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes. Notably, TaNAC2L is also regulated at the post-translational level and might be degraded via a proteasome-mediated pathway. Thus, this wheat transcription factor may have potential uses in enhancing thermotolerance in crops. PMID:26305210

  11. Effect of Refiner Addition Level on Zirconium-Containing Aluminium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaradeh, M. M. R.; Carlberg, T.

    2012-01-01

    It is well known that in aluminium alloys containing Zr, grain refiner additions do not function as desired, producing an effect often referred to as nuclei poisoning. This paper investigates the structure of direct chill-cast ingots of commercial AA3003 aluminium alloys, with and without Zr, at various addition levels of Al5Ti1B master alloy. In Bridgman experiments simulating ingot solidification, Zr-containing alloys were studied after the addition of various amounts of Ti. It could be demonstrated, in both ingot casting and simulation experiments, that Zr poisoning can be compensated for by adding more Ti and/or Al5Ti1B. The results confirm better refinement behaviour with the addition of Ti + B than of only Ti. The various combinations of Zr and Ti also influenced the formation of AlFeMn phases, and the precipitation of large Al6(Mn,Fe) particles was revealed. AlZrTiSi intermetallic compounds were also detected.

  12. Heat shock-mediated regulation of IκB-α at the post-transcriptional level by HuR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuxin; Yu, Wenyan

    2014-02-01

    Heat shock treatment induces tolerance to subsequent thermal stress and abrogates the response to alternative stimuli, including LPS and cytokines in vitro and in vivo. One of the mechanisms responsible for this phenomenon is inhibition of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway via NF-κB inhibitor proteins (IκB-α). However, the underlying mechanisms involved in the effect of heat shock treatment on IκB-α expression remain unclear. In the present study, the effect of heat shock treatment on the production of IκB-α and the possible mechanisms involved were investigated. The results revealed a significant increase in the half-lives of IκB-α mRNA and proteins in RAW264.7 macrophages following heat shock treatment and IκB-α transcription levels also increased. In addition, RNA pull-down and RNA immunoprecipitation studies showed that the RNA-binding protein, HuR, may specifically bind to the IκB-α mRNA 3'UTR upon heat shock treatment. Overexpression of HuR in 3T3 cells caused an alteration in IκB-α protein expression leading to a change in NF-κB expression, however, IκB‑α mRNA expression levels were unchanged. The relocalization of HuR from the nucleus to the cytoplasm was observed following 1 h heat shock treatment and HuR was colocalized with the G3BP1 protein, the main content of stress granules. The results indicate that following heat shock treatment, HuR translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, forming stress granules and regulating the translation of IκB‑α mRNA without affecting the half-life.

  13. Regulation of transcript level and synthesis of nitrate reductase by phytochrome and nitrate in turions of Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schleiden.

    PubMed

    Appenroth, K J; Oelmüller, R; Schuster, C; Mohr, H

    1992-11-01

    Control by light and nitrate of the appearance of nitrate reductase (NR; EC 1.6.6.1) in the turions of Spirodela polyrhiza (L.) Schieiden was investigated during the pre-germination phase, i.e. up to 120 h after the transfer from after-ripening to germination conditions. Turions are particularily suited for this type of coaction study since control of nitrate uptake by light and long-distance transport of nitrate do not play a role. Control of NR gene expression was mainly studied between 72 and 120 h after transfer to germination conditions (phase II of the pre-germination process). It was found that the effect of light on NR appearance is exerted via phytochrome. The light effect on enzyme synthesis was only observed in the presence of nitrate. On the other hand, in darkness, the NR level decreased to almost zero even in the presence of an optimum supply of nitrate. It is concluded that in phase II a coaction of light (phytochrome) and nitrate is required to bring about NR synthesis. However, when nitrate was applied to turions - following a dark incubation without nitrate - the turions responded to nitrate even in darkness with strong NR synthesis. This response was augmented by light. The highest transcript levels were observed in the presence of both factors, light and nitrate. As a single factor, light was more effective in stimulating the transcript level than nitrate. However, no correlation between the transcript level and the rate of enzyme synthesis was observed. This is consistent with the previous conclusion (Schuster et al. 1988, Planta 174, 426-432) that in higher plants control at the transcript level is only coarse and does not determine quantitatively the output at the level of enzyme protein. PMID:24178393

  14. Dual-level regulation of ACC synthase activity by MPK3/MPK6 cascade and its downstream WRKY transcription factor during ethylene induction in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Guojing; Meng, Xiangzong; Wang, Ruigang; Mao, Guohong; Han, Ling; Liu, Yidong; Zhang, Shuqun

    2012-06-01

    Plants under pathogen attack produce high levels of ethylene, which plays important roles in plant immunity. Previously, we reported the involvement of ACS2 and ACS6, two Type I ACS isoforms, in Botrytis cinerea-induced ethylene biosynthesis and their regulation at the protein stability level by MPK3 and MPK6, two Arabidopsis pathogen-responsive mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). The residual ethylene induction in the acs2/acs6 double mutant suggests the involvement of additional ACS isoforms. It is also known that a subset of ACS genes, including ACS6, is transcriptionally induced in plants under stress or pathogen attack. However, the importance of ACS gene activation and the regulatory mechanism(s) are not clear. In this report, we demonstrate using genetic analysis that ACS7 and ACS11, two Type III ACS isoforms, and ACS8, a Type II ACS isoform, also contribute to the B. cinerea-induced ethylene production. In addition to post-translational regulation, transcriptional activation of the ACS genes also plays a critical role in sustaining high levels of ethylene induction. Interestingly, MPK3 and MPK6 not only control the stability of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins via direct protein phosphorylation but also regulate the expression of ACS2 and ACS6 genes. WRKY33, another MPK3/MPK6 substrate, is involved in the MPK3/MPK6-induced ACS2/ACS6 gene expression based on genetic analyses. Furthermore, chromatin-immunoprecipitation assay reveals the direct binding of WRKY33 to the W-boxes in the promoters of ACS2 and ACS6 genes in vivo, suggesting that WRKY33 is directly involved in the activation of ACS2 and ACS6 expression downstream of MPK3/MPK6 cascade in response to pathogen invasion. Regulation of ACS activity by MPK3/MPK6 at both transcriptional and protein stability levels plays a key role in determining the kinetics and magnitude of ethylene induction.

  15. Concordance of Transcriptional and Apical Benchmark Dose Levels for Conazole-Induced Liver Effects in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT The ability to anchor chemical class-based gene expression changes to phenotypic lesions and to describe these changes as a function of dose and time informs mode of action determinations and improves quantitative risk assessments. Previous transcription-based microarra...

  16. Characterization of the Tomato ARF Gene Family Uncovers a Multi-Levels Post-Transcriptional Regulation Including Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Chateigner-Boutin, Anne-Laure; Mila, Isabelle; Frasse, Pierre; Wang, Hua; Audran, Corinne; Roustan, Jean-Paul; Bouzayen, Mondher

    2014-01-01

    Background The phytohormone auxin is involved in a wide range of developmental processes and auxin signaling is known to modulate the expression of target genes via two types of transcriptional regulators, namely, Aux/IAA and Auxin Response Factors (ARF). ARFs play a major role in transcriptional activation or repression through direct binding to the promoter of auxin-responsive genes. The present study aims at gaining better insight on distinctive structural and functional features among ARF proteins. Results Building on the most updated tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) reference genome sequence, a comprehensive set of ARF genes was identified, extending the total number of family members to 22. Upon correction of structural annotation inconsistencies, renaming the tomato ARF family members provided a consensus nomenclature for all ARF genes across plant species. In silico search predicted the presence of putative target site for small interfering RNAs within twelve Sl-ARFs while sequence analysis of the 5′-leader sequences revealed the presence of potential small uORF regulatory elements. Functional characterization carried out by transactivation assay partitioned tomato ARFs into repressors and activators of auxin-dependent gene transcription. Expression studies identified tomato ARFs potentially involved in the fruit set process. Genome-wide expression profiling using RNA-seq revealed that at least one third of the gene family members display alternative splicing mode of regulation during the flower to fruit transition. Moreover, the regulation of several tomato ARF genes by both ethylene and auxin, suggests their potential contribution to the convergence mechanism between the signaling pathways of these two hormones. Conclusion All together, the data bring new insight on the complexity of the expression control of Sl-ARF genes at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels supporting the hypothesis that these transcriptional mediators might represent

  17. Cold-induced changes in stress hormone and steroidogenic transcript levels in cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus), a fish capable of metabolic depression.

    PubMed

    Alzaid, Abdullah; Hori, Tiago S; Hall, Jennifer R; Rise, Matthew L; Gamperl, A Kurt

    2015-12-01

    The cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) is a fish with a wide latitudinal distribution that is capable of going into metabolic depression during the winter months, and thus, represents a unique model to investigate the impacts of cold temperatures on the stress response. In this study, we measured resting (pre-stress) plasma cortisol levels in 10 °C and 0 °C acclimated cunner from Newfoundland, and both catecholamine and cortisol levels after they were given a standardized handling stress (i.e. 1 min air exposure). In addition, we cloned and characterized cDNAs for several key genes of the cortisol-axis [cytochrome P450scc, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) most likely to be an ortholog of the teleost GR2], determined the tissue distribution of their transcripts, and measured their constitutive (i.e. pre-stress) transcript levels in individuals acclimated to both temperatures. In cunner acclimated to 0 °C, post-stress epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were much lower (by approximately 9- and 5-fold, respectively) compared to 10 °C acclimated fish, and these fish had relatively low resting cortisol levels (~15 ngml(-1)) and showed a typical post-stress response. In contrast, those acclimated to 10 °C had quite high resting cortisol levels (~75 ngml(-1)) that actually decreased (to ~20 ngml(-1)) post-stress before returning to pre-stress levels. Finally, fish acclimated to 10 °C had higher P450scc transcript levels in the head kidney and lower levels of GR transcript in both the head kidney and liver. Taken together, these results suggest that: (1) temperature has a profound effect on the stress response of this species; and (2) although the ancestors of this species inhabited warm waters (i.e. they are members of the family Labridae), populations of cunner from colder regions may show signs of stress at temperatures as low as 10 °C.

  18. Cold-induced changes in stress hormone and steroidogenic transcript levels in cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus), a fish capable of metabolic depression.

    PubMed

    Alzaid, Abdullah; Hori, Tiago S; Hall, Jennifer R; Rise, Matthew L; Gamperl, A Kurt

    2015-12-01

    The cunner (Tautogolabrus adspersus) is a fish with a wide latitudinal distribution that is capable of going into metabolic depression during the winter months, and thus, represents a unique model to investigate the impacts of cold temperatures on the stress response. In this study, we measured resting (pre-stress) plasma cortisol levels in 10 °C and 0 °C acclimated cunner from Newfoundland, and both catecholamine and cortisol levels after they were given a standardized handling stress (i.e. 1 min air exposure). In addition, we cloned and characterized cDNAs for several key genes of the cortisol-axis [cytochrome P450scc, steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) most likely to be an ortholog of the teleost GR2], determined the tissue distribution of their transcripts, and measured their constitutive (i.e. pre-stress) transcript levels in individuals acclimated to both temperatures. In cunner acclimated to 0 °C, post-stress epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were much lower (by approximately 9- and 5-fold, respectively) compared to 10 °C acclimated fish, and these fish had relatively low resting cortisol levels (~15 ngml(-1)) and showed a typical post-stress response. In contrast, those acclimated to 10 °C had quite high resting cortisol levels (~75 ngml(-1)) that actually decreased (to ~20 ngml(-1)) post-stress before returning to pre-stress levels. Finally, fish acclimated to 10 °C had higher P450scc transcript levels in the head kidney and lower levels of GR transcript in both the head kidney and liver. Taken together, these results suggest that: (1) temperature has a profound effect on the stress response of this species; and (2) although the ancestors of this species inhabited warm waters (i.e. they are members of the family Labridae), populations of cunner from colder regions may show signs of stress at temperatures as low as 10 °C. PMID:26188716

  19. Ciliary transcription factors and miRNAs precisely regulate Cp110 levels required for ciliary adhesions and ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Walentek, Peter; Quigley, Ian K; Sun, Dingyuan I; Sajjan, Umeet K; Kintner, Christopher; Harland, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Upon cell cycle exit, centriole-to-basal body transition facilitates cilia formation. The centriolar protein Cp110 is a regulator of this process and cilia inhibitor, but its positive roles in ciliogenesis remain poorly understood. Using Xenopus we show that Cp110 inhibits cilia formation at high levels, while optimal levels promote ciliogenesis. Cp110 localizes to cilia-forming basal bodies and rootlets, and is required for ciliary adhesion complexes that facilitate Actin interactions. The opposing roles of Cp110 in ciliation are generated in part by coiled-coil domains that mediate preferential binding to centrioles over rootlets. Because of its dual role in ciliogenesis, Cp110 levels must be precisely controlled. In multiciliated cells, this is achieved by both transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation through ciliary transcription factors and microRNAs, which activate and repress cp110 to produce optimal Cp110 levels during ciliogenesis. Our data provide novel insights into how Cp110 and its regulation contribute to development and cell function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17557.001 PMID:27623009

  20. The alpaca melanocortin 1 receptor: gene mutations, transcripts, and relative levels of expression in ventral skin biopsies.

    PubMed

    Chandramohan, Bathrachalam; Renieri, Carlo; La Manna, Vincenzo; La Terza, Antonietta

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were to characterize the MC1R gene, its transcripts and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with coat color in alpaca. Full length cDNA amplification revealed the presence of two transcripts, named as F1 and F2, differing only in the length of their 5'-terminal untranslated region (UTR) sequences and presenting a color specific expression. Whereas the F1 transcript was common to white and colored (black and brown) alpaca phenotypes, the shorter F2 transcript was specific to white alpaca. Further sequencing of the MC1R gene in white and colored alpaca identified a total of twelve SNPs; among those nine (four silent mutations (c.126C>A, c.354T>C, c.618G>A, and c.933G>A); five missense mutations (c.82A>G, c.92C>T, c.259A>G, c.376A>G, and c.901C>T)) were observed in coding region and three in the 3'UTR. A 4 bp deletion (c.224 227del) was also identified in the coding region. Molecular segregation analysis uncovered that the combinatory mutations in the MC1R locus could cause eumelanin and pheomelanin synthesis in alpaca. Overall, our data refine what is known about the MC1R gene and provides additional information on its role in alpaca pigmentation.

  1. Comparison of additive image fusion vs. feature-level image fusion techniques for enhanced night driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Edward J.; Reese, Colin E.; Van Der Wal, Gooitzen S.

    2003-02-01

    The Night Vision & Electronic Sensors Directorate (NVESD) has conducted a series of image fusion evaluations under the Head-Tracked Vision System (HTVS) program. The HTVS is a driving system for both wheeled and tracked military vehicles, wherein dual-waveband sensors are directed in a more natural head-slewed imaging mode. The HTVS consists of thermal and image-intensified TV sensors, a high-speed gimbal, a head-mounted display, and a head tracker. A series of NVESD field tests over the past two years has investigated the degree to which additive (A+B) image fusion of these sensors enhances overall driving performance. Additive fusion employs a single (but user adjustable) fractional weighting for all the features of each sensor's image. More recently, NVESD and Sarnoff Corporation have begun a cooperative effort to evaluate and refine Sarnoff's "feature-level" multi-resolution (pyramid) algorithms for image fusion. This approach employs digital processing techniques to select at each image point only the sensor with the strongest features, and to utilize only those features to reconstruct the fused video image. This selection process is performed simultaneously at multiple scales of the image, which are combined to form the reconstructed fused image. All image fusion techniques attempt to combine the "best of both sensors" in a single image. Typically, thermal sensors are better for detecting military threats and targets, while image-intensified sensors provide more natural scene cues and detect cultural lighting. This investigation will address the differences between additive fusion and feature-level image fusion techniques for enhancing the driver's overall situational awareness.

  2. Dexamethasone inhibits human interleukin 2 but not interleukin 2 receptor gene expression in vitro at the level of nuclear transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Boumpas, D T; Anastassiou, E D; Older, S A; Tsokos, G C; Nelson, D L; Balow, J E

    1991-01-01

    Glucocorticosteroids have an inhibitory effect on the expression of interleukin 2 (IL-2) and interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) genes. To determine the mechanisms of this inhibition, human T lymphocytes were stimulated with mitogens in the presence of dexamethasone. Nuclear transcription run-off assays showed that high doses of dexamethasone inhibited the transcription of the IL-2 gene but not that of the IL-2R gene. Post-transcriptionally, high doses of dexamethasone (10(-4) M) were required to inhibit IL-2R mRNA levels by 50%, whereas lower doses (10(-6) M) inhibited by greater than 70% the accumulation of IL-2 mRNA. IL-2 mRNA half-life decreased in the presence of dexamethasone (10(-6) M) by approximately 50%. At the protein product level, dexamethasone inhibited both IL-2 production, as well as cell surface and soluble forms of IL-2R. IL-2R gene expression was inhibited for at least 72 h after exposure of cells to dexamethasone. In the presence of exogenous IL-2, dexamethasone failed to exert a significant effect on the production of IL-2R protein. These data indicate that dexamethasone has a greater effect on the expression of the IL-2 gene than on the IL-2R gene. Dexamethasone both inhibits transcription of the IL-2 gene and decreases the stability of IL-2 mRNA. The effect of dexamethasone on the IL-2R gene is post-transcriptional and may result indirectly from decreased IL-2 production. Images PMID:2022743

  3. Foot-and-mouth disease virus leader proteinase inhibits dsRNA-induced type I interferon transcription by decreasing interferon regulatory factor 3/7 in protein levels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Dang; Fang, Liurong; Luo, Rui; Ye, Rui; Fang, Ying; Xie, Lilan; Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo

    2010-08-13

    Research highlights: {yields} FMDV L{sup pro} inhibits poly(I:C)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} mRNA expression. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits MDA5-mediated activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter. {yields} L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes. {yields} L{sup pro} inhibits IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter activation by decreasing IRF-3/7 in protein levels. {yields} The ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not necessary to inhibit IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} activation. -- Abstract: The leader proteinase (L{sup pro}) of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) has been identified as an interferon-{beta} (IFN-{beta}) antagonist that disrupts the integrity of transcription factor nuclear factor {kappa}B (NF-{kappa}B). In this study, we showed that the reduction of double stranded RNA (dsRNA)-induced IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} expression caused by L{sup pro} was also associated with a decrease of interferon regulatory factor 3/7 (IRF-3/7) in protein levels, two critical transcription factors for activation of IFN-{alpha}/{beta}. Furthermore, overexpression of L{sup pro} significantly reduced the transcription of multiple IRF-responsive genes including 2',5'-OAS, ISG54, IP-10, and RANTES. Screening L{sup pro} mutants indicated that the ability to process eIF-4G of L{sup pro} is not required for suppressing dsRNA-induced activation of the IFN-{alpha}1/{beta} promoter and decreasing IRF-3/7 expression. Taken together, our results demonstrate that, in addition to disrupting NF-{kappa}B, L{sup pro} also decreases IRF-3/7 expression to suppress dsRNA-induced type I IFN production, suggesting multiple strategies used by FMDV to counteract the immune response to viral infection.

  4. c-MYC targets the central oscillator gene Per1 and is regulated by the circadian clock at the post-transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Repouskou, Anastasia; Prombona, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    Cell proliferation in mammals follows a circadian rhythm while disruption of clock gene expression has been linked to tumorigenesis. Expression of the c-Myc oncogene is frequently deregulated in tumors, facilitating aberrant cell proliferation. c-MYC protein levels display circadian rhythmicity, which is compatible with an in vitro repressive role of the clock-activating complex BMAL1/CLOCK on its promoter. In this report, we provide evidence for the in vivo binding of the core circadian factor BMAL1 on the human c-Myc promoter. In addition, analysis of protein synthesis and degradation rates, as well as post-translational acetylation, demonstrate that the clock tightly controls cellular MYC levels. The oncoprotein itself is a transcription factor that by responding to mitogenic signals regulates the expression of several hundred genes. c-MYC-driven transcription is generally exerted upon dimerization with MAX and binding to E-box elements, a sequence that is also recognized by the circadian heterodimer. Our reporter assays reveal that the MYC/MAX dimer cannot affect transcription of the circadian gene Per1. However, when overexpressed, c-MYC is able to repress Per1 transactivation by BMAL1/CLOCK via targeting selective E-box sequences. Importantly, upon serum stimulation, MYC was detected in BMAL1 protein complexes. Together, these data demonstrate a novel interaction between MYC and circadian transactivators resulting in reduced clock-driven transcription. Perturbation of Per1 expression by MYC constitutes a plausible alternative explanation for the deregulated expression of clock genes observed in many types of cancer.

  5. Identification of a new subclass of ALK-negative ALCL expressing aberrant levels of ERBB4 transcripts.

    PubMed

    Scarfò, Irene; Pellegrino, Elisa; Mereu, Elisabetta; Kwee, Ivo; Agnelli, Luca; Bergaggio, Elisa; Garaffo, Giulia; Vitale, Nicoletta; Caputo, Manuel; Machiorlatti, Rodolfo; Circosta, Paola; Abate, Francesco; Barreca, Antonella; Novero, Domenico; Mathew, Susan; Rinaldi, Andrea; Tiacci, Enrico; Serra, Sara; Deaglio, Silvia; Neri, Antonino; Falini, Brunangelo; Rabadan, Raul; Bertoni, Francesco; Inghirami, Giorgio; Piva, Roberto

    2016-01-14

    Anaplastic large-cell lymphoma (ALCL) is a clinical and biological heterogeneous disease that includes systemic anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-positive and ALK-negative entities. To discover biomarkers and/or genes involved in ALK-negative ALCL pathogenesis, we applied the cancer outlier profile analysis algorithm to a gene expression profiling data set including 249 cases of T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma and normal T cells. Ectopic coexpression of ERBB4 and COL29A1 genes was detected in 24% of ALK-negative ALCL patients. RNA sequencing and 5' RNA ligase-mediated rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends identified 2 novel ERBB4-truncated transcripts displaying intronic transcription start sites. By luciferase assays, we defined that the expression of ERBB4-aberrant transcripts is promoted by endogenous intronic long terminal repeats. ERBB4 expression was confirmed at the protein level by western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry. Lastly, we demonstrated that ERBB4-truncated forms show oncogenic potentials and that ERBB4 pharmacologic inhibition partially controls ALCL cell growth and disease progression in an ERBB4-positive patient-derived tumorgraft model. In conclusion, we identified a new subclass of ALK-negative ALCL characterized by aberrant expression of ERBB4-truncated transcripts carrying intronic 5' untranslated regions. PMID:26463425

  6. Decreasing Global Transcript Levels over Time Suggest that Phytoplasma Cells Enter Stationary Phase during Plant and Insect Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Pacifico, D.; Galetto, L.; Rashidi, M.; Abbà, S.; Palmano, S.; Firrao, G.; Bosco, D.

    2015-01-01

    To highlight different transcriptional behaviors of the phytoplasma in the plant and animal host, expression of 14 genes of “Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris,” chrysanthemum yellows strain, was investigated at different times following the infection of a plant host (Arabidopsis thaliana) and two insect vector species (Macrosteles quadripunctulatus and Euscelidius variegatus). Target genes were selected among those encoding antigenic membrane proteins, membrane transporters, secreted proteins, and general enzymes. Transcripts were detected for all analyzed genes in the three hosts; in particular, those encoding the antigenic membrane protein Amp, elements of the mechanosensitive channel, and two of the four secreted proteins (SAP54 and TENGU) were highly accumulated, suggesting that they play important roles in phytoplasma physiology during the infection cycle. Most transcripts were present at higher abundance in the plant host than in the insect hosts. Generally, transcript levels of the selected genes decreased significantly during infection of A. thaliana and M. quadripunctulatus but were more constant in E. variegatus. Such decreases may be explained by the fact that only a fraction of the phytoplasma population was transcribing, while the remaining part was aging to a stationary phase. This strategy might improve long-term survival, thereby increasing the likelihood that the pathogen may be acquired by a vector and/or inoculated to a healthy plant. PMID:25636844

  7. A new approach to map transcription sites at the ultrastructural level.

    PubMed

    Testillano, P S; Gorab, E; Risueño, M C

    1994-01-01

    We describe a new ultrastructural method for locating transcription on ultra-thin sections. The use of anti-DNA/RNA hybrid antibodies provides specific labeling on precise structures of the nuclear compartments of several cell types. All mammalian and plant material studied (HeLa cells, lymphocytes, onion root meristematic cells) showed the same pattern of labeling: fibrillar structures in the interchromatin region and discrete regions of the dense fibrillar component at the periphery of the fibrillar centers in the nucleolus. The specificity of the immunogold labeling was tested by RNAse H digestion and by pre-blocking the antibody with synthetic DNA/RNA hybrids; in both cases no gold particles were observed. This method has considerable advantages compared with current techniques, constituting a very useful tool to map transcriptionally active loci in a variety of cells. PMID:7505298

  8. Sucrose regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase subunit genes transcript levels in leaves and fruits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiangyang; Xing, Jinpeng; Gianfagna, Thomas J.; Janes, Harry W.

    2002-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase, EC2.7.7.27) is a key regulatory enzyme in starch biosynthesis. The enzyme is a heterotetramer with two S and two B subunits. In tomato, there are three multiple forms of the S subunit gene. Agp S1, S2 and B are highly expressed in fruit from 10 to 25 days after anthesis. Agp S3 is only weakly expressed in fruit. Sucrose significantly elevates expression of Agp S1, S2 and B in both leaves and fruits. Agp S1 exhibits the highest degree of regulation by sucrose. In fact, sucrose may be required for Agp S1 expression. For excised leaves incubated in water, no transcripts for Agp S1 could be detected in the absence of sucrose, whereas it took up to 16 h in water before transcripts were no longer detectable for Agp S2 and B. Neither Agp S3 nor the tubulin gene is affected by sucrose, demonstrating that this response is specifically regulated by a carbohydrate metabolic signal, and is not due to a general increase in metabolism caused by sucrose treatment. Truncated versions of the promoter for Agp S1 indicate that a specific region 1.3-3.0 kb upstream from the transcription site is responsible for sucrose sensitivity. This region of the S1 promoter contains several cis-acting elements present in the promoters of other genes that are also regulated by sucrose. c2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcription factor levels enable metabolic diversification of single cells of environmental bacteria.

    PubMed

    Guantes, Raúl; Benedetti, Ilaria; Silva-Rocha, Rafael; de Lorenzo, Víctor

    2016-05-01

    Transcriptional noise is a necessary consequence of the molecular events that drive gene expression in prokaryotes. However, some environmental microorganisms that inhabit polluted sites, for example, the m-xylene degrading soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida mt-2 seem to have co-opted evolutionarily such a noise for deploying a metabolic diversification strategy that allows a cautious exploration of new chemical landscapes. We have examined this phenomenon under the light of deterministic and stochastic models for activation of the main promoter of the master m-xylene responsive promoter of the system (Pu) by its cognate transcriptional factor (XylR). These analyses consider the role of co-factors for Pu activation and determinants of xylR mRNA translation. The model traces the onset and eventual disappearance of the bimodal distribution of Pu activity along time to the growth-phase dependent abundance of XylR itself, that is, very low in exponentially growing cells and high in stationary. This tenet was validated by examining the behaviour of a Pu-GFP fusion in a P. putida strain in which xylR expression was engineered under the control of an IPTG-inducible system. This work shows how a relatively simple regulatory scenario (for example, growth-phase dependent expression of a limiting transcription factor) originates a regime of phenotypic diversity likely to be advantageous in competitive environmental settings.

  10. Interacting Electrons in Parabolic Quantum Dots:. Energy Levels, Addition Energies, and Charge Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Michael; Siewert, Jens; Vojta, Thomas

    We investigate the properties of interacting electrons in a parabolic confinement. To this end we numerically diagonalize the Hamiltonian using the Hartree-Fock based diagonalization method which is related to the configuration interaction approach. We study different types of interactions, Coulomb as well as short range. In addition to the ground state energy we calculate the spatial charge distribution and compare the results to those of the classical calculation. We find that a sufficiently strong screened Coulomb interaction produces energy level bunching for classical as well as for quantum-mechanical dots. Bunching in the quantum-mechanical system occurs due to an interplay of kinetic and interaction energy, moreover, it is observed well before reaching the limit of a Wigner crystal. It also turns out that the shell structure of classical and quantum mechanical spatial charge distributions is quite similar.

  11. Interacting Electrons in Parabolic Quantum Dots:. Energy Levels, Addition Energies, and Charge Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber, Michael; Siewert, Jens; Vojta, Thomas

    2001-08-01

    We investigate the properties of interacting electrons in a parabolic confinement. To this end we numerically diagonalize the Hamiltonian using the Hartree-Fock based diagonalization method which is related to the configuration interaction approach. We study different types of interactions, Coulomb as well as short range. In addition to the ground state energy we calculate the spatial charge distribution and compare the results to those of the classical calculation. We find that a sufficiently strong screened Coulomb interaction produces energy level bunching for classical as well as for quantum-mechanical dots. Bunching in the quantum-mechanical system occurs due to an interplay of kinetic and interaction energy, moreover, it is observed well before reaching the limit of a Wigner crystal. It also turns out that the shell structure of classical and quantum mechanical spatial charge distributions is quite similar.

  12. Ground-Level Ozone Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events: An Additional Biological Hazard?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Goracke, Byron D

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling, we examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and found that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supernovae and extreme solar proton events.

  13. Ground-Level Ozone Following Astrophysical Ionizing Radiation Events: An Additional Biological Hazard?

    PubMed

    Thomas, Brian C; Goracke, Byron D

    2016-01-01

    Astrophysical ionizing radiation events such as supernovae, gamma-ray bursts, and solar proton events have been recognized as a potential threat to life on Earth, primarily through depletion of stratospheric ozone and subsequent increase in solar UV radiation at Earth's surface and in the upper levels of the ocean. Other work has also considered the potential impact of nitric acid rainout, concluding that no significant threat is likely. Not yet studied to date is the potential impact of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere following an ionizing radiation event. Ozone is a known irritant to organisms on land and in water and therefore may be a significant additional hazard. Using previously completed atmospheric chemistry modeling, we examined the amount of ozone produced in the lower atmosphere for the case of a gamma-ray burst and found that the values are too small to pose a significant additional threat to the biosphere. These results may be extended to other ionizing radiation events, including supernovae and extreme solar proton events. PMID:26745353

  14. Additional Routes to Staphylococcus aureus Daptomycin Resistance as Revealed by Comparative Genome Sequencing, Transcriptional Profiling, and Phenotypic Studies

    PubMed Central

    Song, Yang; Rubio, Aileen; Jayaswal, Radheshyam K.; Silverman, Jared A.; Wilkinson, Brian J.

    2013-01-01

    Daptomycin is an extensively used anti-staphylococcal agent due to the rise in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, but the mechanism(s) of resistance is poorly understood. Comparative genome sequencing, transcriptomics, ultrastructure, and cell envelope studies were carried out on two relatively higher level (4 and 8 µg/ml−1) laboratory-derived daptomycin-resistant strains (strains CB1541 and CB1540 respectively) compared to their parent strain (CB1118; MW2). Several mutations were found in the strains. Both strains had the same mutations in the two-component system genes walK and agrA. In strain CB1540 mutations were also detected in the ribose phosphate pyrophosphokinase (prs) and polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase genes (pnpA), a hypothetical protein gene, and in an intergenic region. In strain CB1541 there were mutations in clpP, an ATP-dependent protease, and two different hypothetical protein genes. The strain CB1540 transcriptome was characterized by upregulation of cap (capsule) operon genes, genes involved in the accumulation of the compatible solute glycine betaine, ure genes of the urease operon, and mscL encoding a mechanosensitive chanel. Downregulated genes included smpB, femAB and femH involved in the formation of the pentaglycine interpeptide bridge, genes involved in protein synthesis and fermentation, and spa encoding protein A. Genes altered in their expression common to both transcriptomes included some involved in glycine betaine accumulation, mscL, ure genes, femH, spa and smpB. However, the CB1541 transcriptome was further characterized by upregulation of various heat shock chaperone and protease genes, consistent with a mutation in clpP, and lytM and sceD. Both strains showed slow growth, and strongly decreased autolytic activity that appeared to be mainly due to decreased autolysin production. In contrast to previous common findings, we did not find any mutations in phospholipid biosynthesis genes, and it appears there

  15. Carbonic anhydrase induction in euryhaline crustaceans is rate-limited at the post-transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Reed T; Henry, Raymond P

    2014-03-01

    The transfer of euryhaline crustaceans from full-strength seawater to low salinity results in both a rapid up-regulation of carbonic anhydrase (CA; EC 4.2.1.1) mRNA and a slow induction of CA activity. There is a delay of several days between the two processes, which is attributed to the time required to synthesize new enzyme. These delays may also be due to limitations in the cellular uptake of Zn, which is a required post-translational active site modification to CA. To investigate these processes, the euryhaline crabs, Callinectes sapidus and Carcinus maenas, were acclimated to salinities below their isosmotic points (22.5 and 25 ppt, respectively) for 7 days to activate the physiological and molecular mechanisms of osmoregulation. CA mRNA increased 90-fold in C. sapidus and 2-fold in C. maenas within 6h; whereas it took 48 h for the initial increases in CA activity (120% and 31%), and 4 to 7 days for new acclimated levels (300% and 100%, respectively). Crabs were then transferred to lower salinities (10 and 15 ppt) to induce further CA activity and to determine if previous increases in CA mRNA reduced the time required for subsequent CA induction. Additionally, the expression of the Zn transporter ZIP1 was examined in C. sapidus at 35 and 22.5 ppt. In both species, prior CA mRNA elevation failed to accelerate the rate of CA induction. Levels of CA mRNA did not change in either crab following transfer from intermediate to low salinity. Taken together, these results show that the timecourse of CA induction at low salinity is not limited by the expression of CA mRNA, but by the synthesis of new enzyme from an existing pool of mRNA. No increases in ZIP1 expression occurred at low salinity, therefore these delays may be due to the limits of cellular Zn uptake. PMID:24333600

  16. Elite sport is not an additional source of distress for adolescents with high stress levels.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Markus; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith; Pühse, Uwe; Brand, Serge

    2011-04-01

    This study examined whether participation in elite sport interacts with stress in decreasing or increasing symptoms of depression and anxiety among adolescents, and further, whether the interplay between participation in high-performance sport and stress is related to the perceived quality of sleep. 434 adolescents (278 girls, 156 boys; age: M = 17.2 yr.) from 15 "Swiss Olympic Sport Classes" and 9 conventional classes answered a questionnaire and completed a 7-day sleep log. Analyses of covariance showed that heightened stress was related to more depressive symptoms and higher scores for trait-anxiety. Moreover, those classified as having poor sleep by a median split cutoff reported higher levels of depressive symptoms. No significant (multivariate) main effects were found for high-performance sport athletes. Similarly, no significant two- or three-way interaction effects were found. These results caution against exaggerated expectations concerning sport participation as a stress buffer. Nevertheless, participation in high-performance sport was not found to be an additional source of distress for adolescents who reported high stress levels despite prior research that has pointed toward such a relationship.

  17. Bisphenol A alters transcript levels of biomarker genes for Major Depressive Disorder in vascular endothelial cells and colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-Varandas, Edna; Pereira, H Sofia; Viegas, Wanda; Delgado, Margarida

    2016-06-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is capable of mimicking endogenous hormones with potential consequences for human health and BPA exposure has been associated with several human diseases including neuropsychiatric disorders. Here, quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR) results show that BPA at low concentrations (10 ng/mL and 1 μg/mL) induces differential transcript levels of four biomarker genes for Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in HT29 human colon adenocarcinona cell line and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC). These results substantiate increasing concerns of BPA exposure in levels currently detected in humans. PMID:27010169

  18. Transcript level coordination of carbon pathways during silicon starvation-induced lipid accumulation in the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sarah R; Glé, Corine; Abbriano, Raffaela M; Traller, Jesse C; Davis, Aubrey; Trentacoste, Emily; Vernet, Maria; Allen, Andrew E; Hildebrand, Mark

    2016-05-01

    Diatoms are one of the most productive and successful photosynthetic taxa on Earth and possess attributes such as rapid growth rates and production of lipids, making them candidate sources of renewable fuels. Despite their significance, few details of the mechanisms used to regulate growth and carbon metabolism are currently known, hindering metabolic engineering approaches to enhance productivity. To characterize the transcript level component of metabolic regulation, genome-wide changes in transcript abundance were documented in the model diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana on a time-course of silicon starvation. Growth, cell cycle progression, chloroplast replication, fatty acid composition, pigmentation, and photosynthetic parameters were characterized alongside lipid accumulation. Extensive coordination of large suites of genes was observed, highlighting the existence of clusters of coregulated genes as a key feature of global gene regulation in T. pseudonana. The identity of key enzymes for carbon metabolic pathway inputs (photosynthesis) and outputs (growth and storage) reveals these clusters are organized to synchronize these processes. Coordinated transcript level responses to silicon starvation are probably driven by signals linked to cell cycle progression and shifts in photophysiology. A mechanistic understanding of how this is accomplished will aid efforts to engineer metabolism for development of algal-derived biofuels. PMID:26844818

  19. Potato Tuber Blight Resistance Phenotypes Correlate with RB Transgene Transcript Levels in an Age-Dependent Manner.

    PubMed

    Millett, Benjamin P; Gao, Liangliang; Iorizzo, Massimo; Carputo, Domenico; Bradeen, James M

    2015-08-01

    Plants have evolved strategies and mechanisms to detect and respond to pathogen attack. Different organs of the same plant may be subjected to different environments (e.g., aboveground versus belowground) and pathogens with different lifestyles. Accordingly, plants commonly need to tailor defense strategies in an organ-specific manner. Phytophthora infestans, causal agent of potato late blight disease, infects both aboveground foliage and belowground tubers. We examined the efficacy of transgene RB (known for conferring foliar late blight resistance) in defending against tuber late blight disease. Our results indicate that the presence of the transgene has a positive yet only marginally significant effect on tuber disease resistance on average. However, a significant association between transgene transcript levels and tuber resistance was established for specific transformed lines in an age-dependent manner, with higher transcript levels indicating enhanced tuber resistance. Thus, RB has potential to function in both foliage and tuber to impart late blight resistance. Our data suggest that organ-specific resistance might result directly from transcriptional regulation of the resistance gene itself.

  20. Expression of the rat protamine 2 gene is suppressed at the level of transcription and translation

    SciTech Connect

    Bunick, D.; Hecht, N.B. ); Balhorn, R.; Stanker, L.H. )

    1990-05-01

    The authors have compared the rat protamine 2 gene sequence (rP2) to that of the mouse protamine 2 (mP2) gene. The sequence encompasses 435 nucleotides of the coding region which includes an intron of 120 nucleotides, 461 nucleotides 5{prime} to the coding sequence and 181 bases 3{prime} to it. In the mouse the protamine 2 gene is abundantly transcribed and translated. The mP2 protein is initially synthesized as a precursor and then proteolytically processed to yield the mature protein. In contrast, in the rat, protamine 2 transcripts are present at 2-5% that found in the mouse and the mature protein has never been detected in spermatozoa. Analyses of total sperm basic nuclear proteins extracted from epididymal sperm using a monoclonal antibody specific for protamine 2 suggest that the rat P2 mRNA is translated in vivo but is not properly processed. These results suggest that the lowered transcription rate and altered processing sites of the rat protamine 2 gene are likely to contribute to the lack of protamine 2 in rat spermatozoa.

  1. Transcriptional profiling at whole population and single cell levels reveals somatosensory neuron molecular diversity

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Isaac M; Barrett, Lee B; Williams, Erika K; Strochlic, David E; Lee, Seungkyu; Weyer, Andy D; Lou, Shan; Bryman, Gregory S; Roberson, David P; Ghasemlou, Nader; Piccoli, Cara; Ahat, Ezgi; Wang, Victor; Cobos, Enrique J; Stucky, Cheryl L; Ma, Qiufu; Liberles, Stephen D; Woolf, Clifford J

    2014-01-01

    The somatosensory nervous system is critical for the organism's ability to respond to mechanical, thermal, and nociceptive stimuli. Somatosensory neurons are functionally and anatomically diverse but their molecular profiles are not well-defined. Here, we used transcriptional profiling to analyze the detailed molecular signatures of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) sensory neurons. We used two mouse reporter lines and surface IB4 labeling to purify three major non-overlapping classes of neurons: 1) IB4+SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, 2) IB4−SNS-Cre/TdTomato+, and 3) Parv-Cre/TdTomato+ cells, encompassing the majority of nociceptive, pruriceptive, and proprioceptive neurons. These neurons displayed distinct expression patterns of ion channels, transcription factors, and GPCRs. Highly parallel qRT-PCR analysis of 334 single neurons selected by membership of the three populations demonstrated further diversity, with unbiased clustering analysis identifying six distinct subgroups. These data significantly increase our knowledge of the molecular identities of known DRG populations and uncover potentially novel subsets, revealing the complexity and diversity of those neurons underlying somatosensation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04660.001 PMID:25525749

  2. ESTs from brain and testis of White Leghorn and red junglefowl: annotation, bioinformatic classification of unknown transcripts and analysis of expression levels.

    PubMed

    Savolainen, P; Fitzsimmons, C; Arvestad, L; Andersson, L; Lundeberg, J

    2005-01-01

    We report the generation, assembly and annotation of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from four chicken cDNA libraries, constructed from brain and testis tissue dissected from red junglefowl and White Leghorn. 21,285 5'-end ESTs were generated and assembled into 2,813 contigs and 9,737 singletons, giving 12,549 tentative unique transcripts. The transcripts were annotated using BLAST by matching to known chicken genes or to putative homologues in other species using the major gene/protein databases. The results for these similarity searches are available on www.sbc.su.se/~arve/chicken. 4,129 (32.9%) of the transcripts remained without a significant match to gene/protein databases, a proportion of unmatched transcripts similar to earlier non-mammalian EST studies. To estimate how many of these transcripts may represent novel genes, they were studied for the presence of coding sequence. It was shown that most of the unique chicken transcripts do not contain coding parts of genes, but it was estimated that at least 400 of the transcripts contain coding sequence, indicating that 3.2% of avian genes belong to previously unknown gene families. Further BLAST search against dbEST left 1,649 (13.1%) of the transcripts unmatched to any library. The number of completely unmatched transcripts containing coding sequence was estimated at 180, giving a measure of the number of putative novel chicken genes identified in this study. 84.3% of the identified transcripts were found only in testis tissue, which has been poorly studied in earlier chicken EST studies. Large differences in expression levels were found between the brain and testis libraries for a large number of transcripts, and among the 525 most frequently represented transcripts, there were at least 20 transcripts with significant difference in expression levels between red junglefowl and White Leghorn. PMID:16093725

  3. Chronic low-level domoic acid exposure alters gene transcription and impairs mitochondrial function in the CNS

    PubMed Central

    Hiolski, Emma M; Kendrick, Preston S; Frame, Elizabeth R; Myers, Mark S; Bammler, Theo K; Beyer, Richard P; Farin, Federico M; Wilkerson, Hui-wen; Smith, Donald R; Marcinek, David J; Lefebvre, Kathi A

    2014-01-01

    Domoic acid is an algal-derived seafood toxin that functions as a glutamate agonist and exerts excitotoxicity via overstimulation of glutamate receptors (AMPA, NMDA) in the central nervous system (CNS). At high (symptomatic) doses, domoic acid is well-known to cause seizures, brain lesions and memory loss; however, a significant knowledge gap exists regarding the health impacts of repeated low-level (asymptomatic) exposure. Here, we investigated the impacts of low-level repetitive domoic acid exposure on gene transcription and mitochondrial function in the vertebrate CNS using a zebrafish model in order to: 1) identify transcriptional biomarkers of exposure; and 2) examine potential pathophysiology that may occur in the absence of overt excitotoxic symptoms. We found that transcription of genes related to neurological function and development were significantly altered, and that asymptomatic exposure impaired mitochondrial function. Interestingly, the transcriptome response was highly-variable across the exposure duration (36 weeks), with little to no overlap of specific genes across the six exposure time points (2, 6, 12, 18, 24, and 36 weeks). Moreover, there were no apparent similarities at any time point with the gene transcriptome profile exhibited by the glud1 mouse model of chronic moderate excess glutamate release. These results suggest that although the fundamental mechanisms of toxicity may be similar, gene transcriptome responses to domoic acid exposure do not extrapolate well between different exposure durations. However, the observed impairment of mitochondrial function based on respiration rates and mitochondrial protein content suggests that repetitive low-level exposure does have fundamental cellular level impacts that could contribute to chronic health consequences. PMID:25033243

  4. The Impact of Promoting Transcription on Early Text Production: Effects on Bursts and Pauses, Levels of Written Language, and Writing Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alves, Rui A.; Limpo, Teresa; Fidalgo, Raquel; Carvalhais, Lénia; Pereira, Luísa Álvares; Castro, São Luís

    2016-01-01

    Writing development seems heavily dependent upon the automatization of transcription. This study aimed to further investigate the link between transcription and writing by examining the effects of promoting handwriting and spelling skills on a comprehensive set of writing measures (viz., bursts and pauses, levels of written language, and writing…

  5. Selenoprotein Transcript Level and Enzyme Activity as Biomarkers for Selenium Status and Selenium Requirements of Chickens (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Long; Sunde, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    The NRC selenium (Se) requirement for broiler chicks is 0.15 μg Se/g diet, based primarily on weight gain and feed intake studies reported in 1986. To determine Se requirements in today's rapidly growing broiler chick, day-old male chicks were fed Se-deficient basal diets supplemented with graded levels of Se (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 μg Se/g) as Na2SeO3 (5/treatment). Diets contained 15X the vitamin E requirement, and there were no gross signs of Se-deficiency. At 29 d, Se-deficient chicks weighed 62% of Se-supplemented chicks; 0.025 μg Se/g reversed this effect, indicating a minimum Se requirement of 0.025 μg Se/g diet for growth for male broiler chicks. Enzyme activities in Se-deficient chicks for plasma GPX3, liver and gizzard GPX1, and liver and gizzard GPX4 decreased dramatically to 3, 2, 5, 10 and 5%, respectively, of Se-adequate levels, with minimum Se requirements of 0.10-0.13 μg Se/g, and with defined plateaus above these levels. Pancreas GPX1 and GPX4 activities, however, lacked defined plateaus, with breakpoints at 0.3 μg Se/g. qPCR measurement of all 24 chicken selenoprotein transcripts, plus SEPHS1, found that SEPP1 in liver, GPX3 in gizzard, and SEPP1, GPX3 and SELK in pancreas were expressed at levels comparable to housekeeping transcripts. Only 33%, 25% and 50% of selenoprotein transcripts were down-regulated significantly by Se deficiency in liver, gizzard and pancreas, respectively. No transcripts could be used as biomarkers for supernutritional Se status. For export selenoproteins SEPP1 and GPX3, tissue distribution, high expression and Se-regulation clearly indicate unique Se metabolism, which may underlie tissues targeted by Se deficiency. Based on enzyme activities in liver, gizzard, and plasma, the minimum Se requirement in today's broiler chick is 0.15 μg Se/g diet; pancreas data indicate that the Se requirement should be raised to 0.2 μg Se/g diet to provide a margin of safety. PMID:27045754

  6. Selenoprotein Transcript Level and Enzyme Activity as Biomarkers for Selenium Status and Selenium Requirements of Chickens (Gallus gallus)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Long; Sunde, Roger A.

    2016-01-01

    The NRC selenium (Se) requirement for broiler chicks is 0.15 μg Se/g diet, based primarily on weight gain and feed intake studies reported in 1986. To determine Se requirements in today’s rapidly growing broiler chick, day-old male chicks were fed Se-deficient basal diets supplemented with graded levels of Se (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 μg Se/g) as Na2SeO3 (5/treatment). Diets contained 15X the vitamin E requirement, and there were no gross signs of Se-deficiency. At 29 d, Se-deficient chicks weighed 62% of Se-supplemented chicks; 0.025 μg Se/g reversed this effect, indicating a minimum Se requirement of 0.025 μg Se/g diet for growth for male broiler chicks. Enzyme activities in Se-deficient chicks for plasma GPX3, liver and gizzard GPX1, and liver and gizzard GPX4 decreased dramatically to 3, 2, 5, 10 and 5%, respectively, of Se-adequate levels, with minimum Se requirements of 0.10–0.13 μg Se/g, and with defined plateaus above these levels. Pancreas GPX1 and GPX4 activities, however, lacked defined plateaus, with breakpoints at 0.3 μg Se/g. qPCR measurement of all 24 chicken selenoprotein transcripts, plus SEPHS1, found that SEPP1 in liver, GPX3 in gizzard, and SEPP1, GPX3 and SELK in pancreas were expressed at levels comparable to housekeeping transcripts. Only 33%, 25% and 50% of selenoprotein transcripts were down-regulated significantly by Se deficiency in liver, gizzard and pancreas, respectively. No transcripts could be used as biomarkers for supernutritional Se status. For export selenoproteins SEPP1 and GPX3, tissue distribution, high expression and Se-regulation clearly indicate unique Se metabolism, which may underlie tissues targeted by Se deficiency. Based on enzyme activities in liver, gizzard, and plasma, the minimum Se requirement in today’s broiler chick is 0.15 μg Se/g diet; pancreas data indicate that the Se requirement should be raised to 0.2 μg Se/g diet to provide a margin of safety. PMID:27045754

  7. Selenoprotein Transcript Level and Enzyme Activity as Biomarkers for Selenium Status and Selenium Requirements of Chickens (Gallus gallus).

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-Long; Sunde, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    The NRC selenium (Se) requirement for broiler chicks is 0.15 μg Se/g diet, based primarily on weight gain and feed intake studies reported in 1986. To determine Se requirements in today's rapidly growing broiler chick, day-old male chicks were fed Se-deficient basal diets supplemented with graded levels of Se (0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 0.75, and 1.0 μg Se/g) as Na2SeO3 (5/treatment). Diets contained 15X the vitamin E requirement, and there were no gross signs of Se-deficiency. At 29 d, Se-deficient chicks weighed 62% of Se-supplemented chicks; 0.025 μg Se/g reversed this effect, indicating a minimum Se requirement of 0.025 μg Se/g diet for growth for male broiler chicks. Enzyme activities in Se-deficient chicks for plasma GPX3, liver and gizzard GPX1, and liver and gizzard GPX4 decreased dramatically to 3, 2, 5, 10 and 5%, respectively, of Se-adequate levels, with minimum Se requirements of 0.10-0.13 μg Se/g, and with defined plateaus above these levels. Pancreas GPX1 and GPX4 activities, however, lacked defined plateaus, with breakpoints at 0.3 μg Se/g. qPCR measurement of all 24 chicken selenoprotein transcripts, plus SEPHS1, found that SEPP1 in liver, GPX3 in gizzard, and SEPP1, GPX3 and SELK in pancreas were expressed at levels comparable to housekeeping transcripts. Only 33%, 25% and 50% of selenoprotein transcripts were down-regulated significantly by Se deficiency in liver, gizzard and pancreas, respectively. No transcripts could be used as biomarkers for supernutritional Se status. For export selenoproteins SEPP1 and GPX3, tissue distribution, high expression and Se-regulation clearly indicate unique Se metabolism, which may underlie tissues targeted by Se deficiency. Based on enzyme activities in liver, gizzard, and plasma, the minimum Se requirement in today's broiler chick is 0.15 μg Se/g diet; pancreas data indicate that the Se requirement should be raised to 0.2 μg Se/g diet to provide a margin of safety.

  8. Effects of coupled dose and rhythm manipulation of plasma cortisol levels on leukocyte transcriptional response to endotoxin challenge in humans.

    PubMed

    Kamisoglu, Kubra; Sleight, Kirsten; Nguyen, Tung T; Calvano, Steve E; Coyle, Susette M; Corbett, Siobhan A; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2014-10-01

    Severe traumas are associated with hypercortisolemia due to both disruption of cortisol secretion rhythm and increase in its total concentration. Understanding the effects of altered cortisol levels and rhythms on immune function is of great clinical interest, to prevent conditions such as sepsis from complicating the recovery. This in vivo study assesses the responses of circulating leukocytes to coupled dose and rhythm manipulation of cortisol, preceding an immune challenge induced by endotoxin administration. Through continuous infusion, plasma cortisol concentration was increased to and kept constant at a level associated with major physiologic stress. In response, transcriptional programming of leukocytes was altered to display a priming response before endotoxin exposure. Enhanced expression of a number of receptors and signaling proteins, as well as lowered protein translation and mitochondrial function indicated a sensitization against potential infectious threats. Despite these changes, response to endotoxin followed very similar patterns in both cortisol and saline pre-treated groups except one cluster including probe sets associated with major players regulating inflammatory response. In sum, altered dose and rhythm of plasma cortisol levels engendered priming of circulating leukocytes when preceded an immune challenge. This transcriptional program change associated with stimulated surveillance function and suppressed energy-intensive processes, emphasized permissive actions of cortisol on immune function.

  9. Simulation of uphill/downhill running on a level treadmill using additional horizontal force.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Philippe; Arnal, Pierrick J; Samozino, Pierre; Millet, Guillaume Y; Morin, Jean-Benoit

    2014-07-18

    Tilting treadmills allow a convenient study of biomechanics during uphill/downhill running, but they are not commonly available and there is even fewer tilting force-measuring treadmill. The aim of the present study was to compare uphill/downhill running on a treadmill (inclination of ± 8%) with running on a level treadmill using additional backward or forward pulling forces to simulate the effect of gravity. This comparison specifically focused on the energy cost of running, stride frequency (SF), electromyographic activity (EMG), leg and foot angles at foot strike, and ground impact shock. The main results are that SF, impact shock, and leg and foot angle parameters determined were very similar and significantly correlated between the two methods, the intercept and slope of the linear regression not differing significantly from zero and unity, respectively. The correlation of oxygen uptake (V̇O2) data between both methods was not significant during uphill running (r=0.42; P>0.05). V̇O2 data were correlated during downhill running (r=0.74; P<0.01) but there was a significant difference between the methods (bias=-2.51 ± 1.94 ml min(-1) kg(-1)). Linear regressions for EMG of vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, soleus and tibialis anterior were not different from the identity line but the systematic bias was elevated for this parameter. In conclusion, this method seems appropriate for the study of SF, leg and foot angle, impact shock parameters but is less applicable for physiological variables (EMG and energy cost) during uphill/downhill running when using a tilting force-measuring treadmill is not possible.

  10. Changes in neuropeptide Y immunoreactivity and transcript levels in circadian system structures of the diurnal rodent, the thirteen-lined ground squirrel.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Luis; Lugo, Nidza

    2006-12-13

    The intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) and its neuropeptide Y (NPY) projection to the main circadian clock, the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), have been the focus of extensive research conducted, for the most part, on nocturnal rodent species. However, a variety of anatomical and physiological differences between the circadian system of diurnal and nocturnal species have been reported. These differences led us to question whether the role of NPY in the circadian system of the diurnal ground squirrel differs from that in nocturnal rodents. We used semi-quantitative immunohistochemistry to analyze NPY content in SCN terminals of squirrels sacrificed at specific times of the day and compared the data to previous published results from the rat. Additionally, IGL NPY mRNA was quantified using real-time PCR to determine if varying NPY immunoreactivity (-ir) levels could be the result of changes in peptide transcription. Our results demonstrate that NPY-ir levels in the ground squirrel SCN peak during the middle of the night unlike what is observed in the rat. Cell counts of NPY-ir neurons in the IGL revealed a pattern of variation 6 h out of phase compared to what was observed in the SCN. NPY mRNA levels showed only one sharp increase in the middle of the night, coinciding with increases in NPY-ir levels observed in the SCN. Differences in the pattern of fluctuation of NPY in the SCN between the rat and squirrel suggest that this peptide may serve distinct roles in the circadian system of diurnal and nocturnal species. Our data provide the first evidence of the relationship between transcript and peptide levels in the circadian system of a diurnal species.

  11. A hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR functions in regulation at post-transcription level

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yuen; Wang, Yuan; Feng, Jinyan; Feng, Guoxing; Zheng, Minying; Yang, Zhe; Xiao, Zelin; Lu, Zhanping; Ye, Lihong; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2015-04-03

    The central dogma of gene expression is that DNA is transcribed into messenger RNAs, which in turn serve as the template for protein synthesis. Recently, it has been reported that mRNAs display regulatory roles that rely on their ability to compete for microRNA binding, independent of their protein-coding function. However, the regulatory mechanism of mRNAs remains poorly understood. Here, we report that a hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) functions in regulation at post-transcription level through generating endogenous siRNAs (esiRNAs). Bioinformatics analysis for secondary structure showed that YAP mRNA displayed a hairpin structure (termed standard hairpin, S-hairpin) within its 3′UTR. Surprisingly, we observed that the overexpression of S-hairpin derived from YAP 3′UTR (YAP-sh) increased the luciferase reporter activities of transcriptional factor NF-κB and AP-1 in 293T cells. Moreover, we identified that a fragment from YAP-sh, an esiRNA, was able to target mRNA 3′UTR of NF2 (a member of Hippo-signaling pathway) and YAP mRNA 3′UTR itself in hepatoma cells. Thus, we conclude that the YAP-sh within YAP mRNA 3′UTR may serve as a novel regulatory element, which functions in regulation at post-transcription level. Our finding provides new insights into the mechanism of mRNAs in regulatory function. - Highlights: • An S-hairpin within YAP mRNA 3′UTR possesses regulatory function. • YAP-sh acts as a regulatory element for YAP at post-transcription level. • YAP-sh-3p20, an esiRNA derived from YAP-sh, targets mRNAs of YAP and NF2. • YAP-sh-3p20 depresses the proliferation of HepG2 cells in vitro.

  12. Biomarkers and transcription levels of cancer-related genes in cockles Cerastoderma edule from Galicia (NW Spain) with disseminated neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pamela; Díaz, Seila; Orbea, Amaia; Carballal, Maria J; Villalba, Antonio; Cajaraville, Miren P

    2013-07-15

    Disseminated neoplasia (DN) is a pathological condition reported for several species of marine bivalves throughout the world, but its aetiology has not yet been satisfactorily explained. It has been suggested that chemical contamination could be a factor contributing to neoplasia. The aim of the present study was to compare cell and tissue biomarkers and the transcription level of cancer-related genes in cockles (Cerastoderma edule) affected by DN with those of healthy cockles in relation to chemical contaminant burdens. For this, cockles were collected from a natural bed in Cambados (Ria de Arousa, Galicia) in May 2009. The prevalence of DN was 12.36% and 3 degrees of DN severity were distinguished. No significant differences in metal accumulation, non-specific inflammatory responses and parasites were observed between healthy and DN-affected cockles. Lysosomal membrane stability was significantly reduced in cockles affected by DN, which indicates a poorer health condition. Very low frequencies of micronuclei were recorded and no significant differences were detected between DN severity groups. Haemolymph analyses showed a higher frequency of mitotic figures and binucleated cells in cockles affected by moderate and heavy DN than in healthy ones. Neoplastic animals showed significantly higher transcription levels of p53 and ras than healthy cockles and mutational alterations in ras gene sequence were detected. Low concentrations of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and phthalate esters were measured in cockles from Cambados. In conclusion, cockles affected by DN suffer a general stress situation and have altered patterns of cancer-related gene transcription. Further studies are in progress to elucidate mechanisms of carcinogenesis in this species.

  13. Biomarkers and transcription levels of cancer-related genes in cockles Cerastoderma edule from Galicia (NW Spain) with disseminated neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Pamela; Díaz, Seila; Orbea, Amaia; Carballal, Maria J; Villalba, Antonio; Cajaraville, Miren P

    2013-07-15

    Disseminated neoplasia (DN) is a pathological condition reported for several species of marine bivalves throughout the world, but its aetiology has not yet been satisfactorily explained. It has been suggested that chemical contamination could be a factor contributing to neoplasia. The aim of the present study was to compare cell and tissue biomarkers and the transcription level of cancer-related genes in cockles (Cerastoderma edule) affected by DN with those of healthy cockles in relation to chemical contaminant burdens. For this, cockles were collected from a natural bed in Cambados (Ria de Arousa, Galicia) in May 2009. The prevalence of DN was 12.36% and 3 degrees of DN severity were distinguished. No significant differences in metal accumulation, non-specific inflammatory responses and parasites were observed between healthy and DN-affected cockles. Lysosomal membrane stability was significantly reduced in cockles affected by DN, which indicates a poorer health condition. Very low frequencies of micronuclei were recorded and no significant differences were detected between DN severity groups. Haemolymph analyses showed a higher frequency of mitotic figures and binucleated cells in cockles affected by moderate and heavy DN than in healthy ones. Neoplastic animals showed significantly higher transcription levels of p53 and ras than healthy cockles and mutational alterations in ras gene sequence were detected. Low concentrations of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and phthalate esters were measured in cockles from Cambados. In conclusion, cockles affected by DN suffer a general stress situation and have altered patterns of cancer-related gene transcription. Further studies are in progress to elucidate mechanisms of carcinogenesis in this species. PMID:23665240

  14. A major peroxiredoxin-induced activation of Yap1 transcription factor is mediated by reduction-sensitive disulfide bonds and reveals a low level of transcriptional activation.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Tsuyoshi; Okazaki, Shoko; Murayama, Asako; Naganuma, Akira; Nomoto, Akio; Kuge, Shusuke

    2009-02-13

    Redox reactions involving cysteine thiol-disulfide exchange are crucial for the intracellular monitoring of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Yap1, the master transcription factor for the oxidative stress response in budding yeast, is activated by the formation of disulfide bonds in response to H(2)O(2). Gpx3 (glutathione peroxidase-like protein 3) acts as a receptor for H(2)O(2), and Ybp1 (Yap1-binding protein 1) is crucial for Gpx3-dependent disulfide bond formation in Yap1. We previously reported that Tsa1, a major peroxiredoxin in yeast cells, is required for activation of Yap1 in a widely used yeast strain, W303-1b, carrying the ybp1-1 mutant allele encoding a truncated Ybp1 protein. In the present study, we show that Tsa1 can interact with Yap1 via disulfide linkages and induce the formation of intramolecular disulfide bonds in Yap1 in ybp1-1 cells. The results provide evidence that Prx can have intrinsic activity as an H(2)O(2) receptor and can relay H(2)O(2) as a signal to the Prx target proteins in terms of formation of disulfide linkage. Furthermore, our data reveal that there is more of the reduction-resistant active form of Yap1 (i.e. Yap1 (oxII)) when it is partnered with Gpx3 than with Tsa1. These data support our hypothesis that changes in the redox status of Yap1 to reduction-resistant forms by multiple disulfide bond formation are important for determining the level and duration of Yap1 activity in the dynamic equilibrium of redox reactions in cells exposed to H(2)O(2). PMID:19106090

  15. Transcription factor Sp4 regulates expression of nervous wreck 2 to control NMDAR1 levels and dendrite patterning.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xinxin; Pinacho, Raquel; Saia, Gregory; Punko, Diana; Meana, J Javier; Ramos, Belén; Gill, Grace

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic signaling through N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) is important for neuronal development and plasticity and is often dysregulated in psychiatric disorders. Mice mutant for the transcription factor Sp4 have reduced levels of NMDAR subunit 1 (NR1) protein, but not mRNA, and exhibit behavioral and memory deficits (Zhou et al., [2010] Human Molecular Genetics 19: 3797-3805). In developing cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs), Sp4 controls dendrite patterning (Ramos et al., [2007] Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 104: 9882-9887). Sp4 target genes that regulate dendrite pruning or NR1 levels are not known. Here we report that Sp4 activates transcription of Nervous Wreck 2 (Nwk2; also known as Fchsd1) and, further, that Nwk2, an F-BAR domain-containing protein, mediates Sp4-dependent regulation of dendrite patterning and cell surface expression of NR1. Knockdown of Nwk2 in CGNs increased primary dendrite number, phenocopying Sp4 knockdown, and exogenous expression of Nwk2 in Sp4-depleted neurons rescued dendrite number. We observed that acute Sp4 depletion reduced levels of surface, but not total, NR1, and this was rescued by Nwk2 expression. Furthermore, expression of Nr1 suppressed the increase in dendrite number in Sp4- or Nwk2- depleted neurons. We previously reported that Sp4 protein levels were reduced in cerebellum of subjects with bipolar disorder (BD) (Pinacho et al., [2011] Bipolar Disorders 13: 474-485). Here we report that Nwk2 mRNA and NR1 protein levels were also reduced in postmortem cerebellum of BD subjects. Our data suggest a role for Sp4-regulated Nwk2 in NMDAR trafficking and identify a Sp4-Nwk2-NMDAR1 pathway that regulates neuronal morphogenesis during development and may be disrupted in bipolar disorder.

  16. The CFTR frameshift mutation 3905insT and its effect at transcript and protein level.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Javier; von Känel, Thomas; Schneider, Mircea; Steiner, Bernhard; Schaller, André; Gallati, Sabina

    2010-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common genetic diseases in the Caucasian population and is characterized by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, exocrine pancreatic insufficiency, and elevation of sodium and chloride concentrations in the sweat and infertility in men. The disease is caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene, which encodes a protein that functions as chloride channel at the apical membrane of different epithelia. Owing to the high genotypic and phenotypic disease heterogeneity, effects and consequences of the majority of the CFTR mutations have not yet been studied. Recently, the frameshift mutation 3905insT was identified as the second most frequent mutation in the Swiss population and found to be associated with a severe phenotype. The frameshift mutation produces a premature termination codon (PTC) in exon 20, and transcripts bearing this PTC are potential targets for degradation through nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) and/or for exon skipping through nonsense-associated alternative splicing (NAS). Using RT-PCR analysis in lymphocytes and different tissue types from patients carrying the mutation, we showed that the PTC introduced by the mutation does neither elicit a degradation of the mRNA through NMD nor an alternative splicing through NAS. Moreover, immunocytochemical analysis in nasal epithelial cells revealed a significantly reduced amount of CFTR at the apical membrane providing a possible molecular explanation for the more severe phenotype observed in F508del/3905insT compound heterozygotes compared with F508del homozygotes. However, further experiments are needed to elucidate the fate of the 3905insT CFTR in the cell after its biosynthesis.

  17. Bone-remodeling transcript levels are independent of perching in end-of-lay white leghorn chickens.

    PubMed

    Dale, Maurice D; Mortimer, Erin M; Kolli, Santharam; Achramowicz, Erik; Borchert, Glenn; Juliano, Steven A; Halkyard, Scott; Sietz, Nick; Gatto, Craig; Hester, Patricia Y; Rubin, David A

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a bone disease that commonly results in a 30% incidence of fracture in hens used to produce eggs for human consumption. One of the causes of osteoporosis is the lack of mechanical strain placed on weight-bearing bones. In conventionally-caged hens, there is inadequate space for chickens to exercise and induce mechanical strain on their bones. One approach is to encourage mechanical stress on bones by the addition of perches to conventional cages. Our study focuses on the molecular mechanism of bone remodeling in end-of-lay hens (71 weeks) with access to perches. We examined bone-specific transcripts that are actively involved during development and remodeling. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we examined seven transcripts (COL2A1 (collagen, type II, alpha 1), RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand), OPG (osteoprotegerin), PTHLH (PTH-like hormone), PTH1R (PTH/PTHLH type-1 receptor), PTH3R (PTH/PTHLH type-3 receptor), and SOX9 (Sry-related high mobility group box)) in phalange, tibia and femur. Our results indicate that the only significant effect was a difference among bones for COL2A1 (femur > phalange). Therefore, we conclude that access to a perch did not alter transcript expression. Furthermore, because hens have been used as a model for human bone metabolism and osteoporosis, the results indicate that bone remodeling due to mechanical loading in chickens may be a product of different pathways than those involved in the mammalian model. PMID:25625518

  18. Bone-Remodeling Transcript Levels Are Independent of Perching in End-of-Lay White Leghorn Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Maurice D.; Mortimer, Erin M.; Kolli, Santharam; Achramowicz, Erik; Borchert, Glenn; Juliano, Steven A.; Halkyard, Scott; Sietz, Nick; Gatto, Craig; Hester, Patricia Y.; Rubin, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a bone disease that commonly results in a 30% incidence of fracture in hens used to produce eggs for human consumption. One of the causes of osteoporosis is the lack of mechanical strain placed on weight-bearing bones. In conventionally-caged hens, there is inadequate space for chickens to exercise and induce mechanical strain on their bones. One approach is to encourage mechanical stress on bones by the addition of perches to conventional cages. Our study focuses on the molecular mechanism of bone remodeling in end-of-lay hens (71 weeks) with access to perches. We examined bone-specific transcripts that are actively involved during development and remodeling. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we examined seven transcripts (COL2A1 (collagen, type II, alpha 1), RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand), OPG (osteoprotegerin), PTHLH (PTH-like hormone), PTH1R (PTH/PTHLH type-1 receptor), PTH3R (PTH/PTHLH type-3 receptor), and SOX9 (Sry-related high mobility group box)) in phalange, tibia and femur. Our results indicate that the only significant effect was a difference among bones for COL2A1 (femur > phalange). Therefore, we conclude that access to a perch did not alter transcript expression. Furthermore, because hens have been used as a model for human bone metabolism and osteoporosis, the results indicate that bone remodeling due to mechanical loading in chickens may be a product of different pathways than those involved in the mammalian model. PMID:25625518

  19. LRE2, an active human L1 element, has low level transcriptional activity and extremely low reverse transcriptase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, S.E.; Dombroski, B.A.; Sassaman, D.M.

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we found a 2 kb insertion containing a rearranged L1 element plus a unique sequence component (USC) within exon 48 of the dystrophin gene of a patient with muscular dystrophy. We used the USC to clone the precursor of this insertion, the second known {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} human L1 element. The locus LRE2 (L1 Retrotransposable Element 2) has an allele derived from the patient which matches the insertion sequence exactly. LRE2 has a perfect 13-15 bp target site duplication, 2 open reading frames (ORFs), and an unusual 21 bp truncation of the 5{prime} end in a region known to be important for L1 transcription. The truncated LRE2 promoter has about 20% of the transcriptional activity of a previously studied L1 promoter after transfection into NTera2D1 cells of a construct in which the L1 promoter drives the expression of a lacZ gene. In addition, the reverse transcriptase (RT) encoded by LRE2 is active in an in vivo pseudogene assay in yeast and an in vitro assay. However, in both assays the RT of LRE2 is 1-5% as active as that of LRE1. These data demonstrate that multiple {open_quotes}active{close_quotes} L1 elements exist in the human genome, and that active elements can have highly variable rates of transcription and reverse transcriptase activity. That the RT of LRE2 has extremely low activity suggests the possibility that retrotransposition of an L1 element may in some cases involve an RT encoded by another L1 element.

  20. Abiotic stress-induced oscillations in steady-state transcript levels of Group 3 LEA protein genes in the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Suhas; Shinde, Rupali; Downey, Frances; Ng, Carl K-Y

    2013-01-01

    The moss, Physcomitrella patens is a non-seed land plant belonging to early diverging lineages of land plants following colonization of land in the Ordovician period in Earth's history. Evidence suggests that mosses can be highly tolerant of abiotic stress. We showed previously that dehydration stress and abscisic acid treatments induced oscillations in steady-state levels of LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) protein transcripts, and that removal of ABA resulted in rapid attenuation of oscillatory increases in transcript levels. Here, we show that other abiotic stresses like salt and osmotic stresses also induced oscillations in steady-state transcript levels and that the amplitudes of the oscillatory increases in steady-state transcript levels are reflective of the severity of the abiotic stress treatment. Together, our results suggest that oscillatory increases in transcript levels in response to abiotic stresses may be a general phenomenon in P. patens and that temporally dynamic increases in steady-state transcript levels may be important for adaptation to life in constantly fluctuating environmental conditions. PMID:23221763

  1. Mitochondrial DNA transcription levels during spermatogenesis and early development in doubly uniparental inheritance of the mitochondrial DNA system of the blue mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Sano, Natsumi; Obata, Mayu; Komaru, Akira

    2013-08-01

    In some species of bivalve, there are two highly diverged mitochondrial genomes, one found in all individuals (F type) and the other normally in males only (M type). In Mytilus, a maternally-dependent sex ratio of the progeny has been reported. Some females almost exclusively produce daughters, while others produce a high proportion of sons. We previously reported that in M. galloprovincialis, M type mtDNA copy number may be maintained during spermatogenesis and the development of larvae of male-biased mothers to sustain the doubly uniparental inheritance system. In this study, we investigated transcription levels of M type mtDNA before and after fertilization to understand its function in the germ line. First, we quantified transcription levels of M type mtDNA in testicular cells dissected using laser-capture micro-dissection. The transcription levels of M type mtDNA were not significantly different between spermatogonia and spermatocytes versus spermatids and spermatozoa. Next, we examined differences in transcription levels of M type mtDNA between larvae from male-biased and female-biased mothers. The transcription levels of M type mtDNA significantly increased 24 and 48 h after fertilization in male-biased crosses. By contrast, transcription levels significantly decreased in female-biased crosses. These results suggest M type mtDNA may play a role in early germ line formation.

  2. Abiotic stress-induced oscillations in steady-state transcript levels of Group 3 LEA protein genes in the moss, Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Suhas; Shinde, Rupali; Downey, Frances; Ng, Carl K-Y

    2013-01-01

    The moss, Physcomitrella patens is a non-seed land plant belonging to early diverging lineages of land plants following colonization of land in the Ordovician period in Earth's history. Evidence suggests that mosses can be highly tolerant of abiotic stress. We showed previously that dehydration stress and abscisic acid treatments induced oscillations in steady-state levels of LEA (Late Embryogenesis Abundant) protein transcripts, and that removal of ABA resulted in rapid attenuation of oscillatory increases in transcript levels. Here, we show that other abiotic stresses like salt and osmotic stresses also induced oscillations in steady-state transcript levels and that the amplitudes of the oscillatory increases in steady-state transcript levels are reflective of the severity of the abiotic stress treatment. Together, our results suggest that oscillatory increases in transcript levels in response to abiotic stresses may be a general phenomenon in P. patens and that temporally dynamic increases in steady-state transcript levels may be important for adaptation to life in constantly fluctuating environmental conditions.

  3. Profiling of histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation levels predicts transcription factor activity and survival in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Hascher, Antje; Isken, Fabienne; Tickenbrock, Lara; Thoennissen, Nils; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi; Tschanter, Petra; Disselhoff, Christine; Wang, Yipeng; Becker, Anke; Thiede, Christian; Ehninger, Gerhard; zur Stadt, Udo; Koschmieder, Steffen; Seidl, Matthias; Müller, Frank U.; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Schlenke, Peter; McClelland, Michael; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Dugas, Martin; Serve, Hubert

    2010-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is commonly associated with alterations in transcription factors because of altered expression or gene mutations. These changes might induce leukemia-specific patterns of histone modifications. We used chromatin-immunoprecipitation on microarray to analyze histone 3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) patterns in primary AML (n = 108), acute lymphoid leukemia (n = 28), CD34+ cells (n = 21) and white blood cells (n = 15) specimens. Hundreds of promoter regions in AML showed significant alterations in H3K9me3 levels. H3K9me3 deregulation in AML occurred preferentially as a decrease in H3K9me3 levels at core promoter regions. The altered genomic regions showed an overrepresentation of cis-binding sites for ETS and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response elements (CREs) for transcription factors of the CREB/CREM/ATF1 family. The decrease in H3K9me3 levels at CREs was associated with increased CRE-driven promoter activity in AML blasts in vivo. AML-specific H3K9me3 patterns were not associated with known cytogenetic abnormalities. But a signature derived from H3K9me3 patterns predicted event-free survival in AML patients. When the H3K9me3 signature was combined with established clinical prognostic markers, it outperformed prognosis prediction based on clinical parameters alone. These findings demonstrate widespread changes of H3K9me3 levels at gene promoters in AML. Signatures of histone modification patterns are associated with patient prognosis in AML. PMID:20498303

  4. Transcription levels of endothelin-1 and endothelin receptors are associated with age and leaflet location in porcine mitral valves.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, L G; Offenberg, H; Moesgaard, S G; Thomsen, P D; Pedersen, H D; Olsen, L H

    2007-04-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the expression levels of endothelin-1 (ET-1) and ET(A) and ET(B) receptors (ET(A)-R and ET(B)-R) in porcine mitral valves and associate the transcription levels to age, leaflet location and deposition of mucopolysaccharides (MPS). Tissue samples from the chordal and inter-chordal insertion area of the anterior mitral valve leaflet from 11 sows (> or = 2 years of age) and 10 slaughter pigs (approximately 6 months old) were obtained and the relative gene expression levels of ET-1, ET(A)-R and ET(B)-R measured by semi-quantitative real-time PCR. A separate tissue sample was taken for histopathological grading of MPS deposition. The transcription levels of ET-1 (P < 0.0001) and ET(A)-R (P < 0.0004) were significantly higher in leaflets from the sows compared with slaughter pigs. The gene expression of ET(B)-R was not associated to age (P = 0.38), but increased in chordal insertion areas compared with inter-chordal areas (P = 0.01). The expression of ET-1 and ET(A)-R mRNA did not differ significantly between the two leaflet locations. The valve leaflets from sows had a significantly increased degree of MPS deposition compared with slaughter pigs upon histological examination (P = 0.04). In conclusion, an age-related valvular degeneration is observed in porcine mitral valve leaflets and ET-1 is suggested to be involved through action of both ET(A) and ET(B) receptors.

  5. Cold acclimation induces distinctive changes in the chromatin state and transcript levels of COR genes in Cannabis sativa varieties with contrasting cold acclimation capacities.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Boris F; Ali-Benali, Mohamed Ali; Demone, Jordan; Bertrand, Annick; Charron, Jean-Benoit

    2015-11-01

    Little is known about the capacity of Cannabis sativa to cold-acclimate and develop freezing tolerance. This study investigates the cold acclimation (CA) capacity of nine C. sativa varieties and the underlying genetic and epigenetic responses. The varieties were divided into three groups based on their contrasting CA capacities by comparing the survival of non-acclimated and cold-acclimated plants in whole-plant freeze tests. In response to the CA treatment, all varieties accumulated soluble sugars but only the varieties with superior capacity for CA could maintain higher levels throughout the treatment. In addition, the varieties that acclimated most efficiently accumulated higher transcript levels of cold-regulated (COR) genes and genes involved in de novo DNA methylation while displaying locus- and variety-specific changes in the levels of H3K9ac, H3K27me3 and methylcytosine (MeC) during CA. Furthermore, these hardy C. sativa varieties displayed significant increases in MeC levels at COR gene loci when deacclimated, suggesting a role for locus-specific DNA methylation in deacclimation. This study uncovers the molecular mechanisms underlying CA in C. sativa and reveals higher levels of complexity regarding how genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors intertwine.

  6. Effect of Greens and Soil Type, Sulfur Addition and Lithium Level on Leaf Constituents

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between Dec. 2006 and Feb 2007 to evaluate the effect of soil type, added sulfur and lithium level on the growth and leaf nutrients, particularly biofortified levels of Li and S, in spinach and mustard gree...

  7. Spinach and mustard greens response to soil type, sulfur addition and lithium level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted near Weslaco, Texas (Lat. 26o 8' N, Long. 97o 57' W) between Dec. 2006 and Feb 2007 to evaluate the effect of soil type, added sulfur and lithium level on the growth and leaf nutrients, particularly biofortified levels of Li and S, in spinach and mustard gree...

  8. Studies of levels of biogenic amines in meat samples in relation to the content of additives.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska, Aneta; Kowalska, Sylwia; Szłyk, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The impact of meat additives on the concentration of biogenic amines and the quality of meat was studied. Fresh white and red meat samples were fortified with the following food additives: citric and lactic acids, disodium diphosphate, sodium nitrite, sodium metabisulphite, potassium sorbate, sodium chloride, ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, propyl 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoate (propyl gallate) and butylated hydroxyanisole. The content of spermine, spermidine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, tryptamine and 2-phenylethylamine was determined by capillary isotachophoretic methods in meat samples (fresh and fortified) during four days of storage at 4°C. The results were applied to estimate the impact of the tested additives on the formation of biogenic amines in white and red meat. For all tested meats, sodium nitrite, sodium chloride and disodium diphosphate showed the best inhibition. However, cadaverine and putrescine were characterised by the biggest changes in concentration during the storage time of all the additives. Based on the presented data for the content of biogenic amines in meat samples analysed as a function of storage time and additives, we suggest that cadaverine and putrescine have a significant impact on meat quality. PMID:26515667

  9. Studies of levels of biogenic amines in meat samples in relation to the content of additives.

    PubMed

    Jastrzębska, Aneta; Kowalska, Sylwia; Szłyk, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The impact of meat additives on the concentration of biogenic amines and the quality of meat was studied. Fresh white and red meat samples were fortified with the following food additives: citric and lactic acids, disodium diphosphate, sodium nitrite, sodium metabisulphite, potassium sorbate, sodium chloride, ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol, propyl 3,4,5-trihydroxybenzoate (propyl gallate) and butylated hydroxyanisole. The content of spermine, spermidine, putrescine, cadaverine, histamine, tyramine, tryptamine and 2-phenylethylamine was determined by capillary isotachophoretic methods in meat samples (fresh and fortified) during four days of storage at 4°C. The results were applied to estimate the impact of the tested additives on the formation of biogenic amines in white and red meat. For all tested meats, sodium nitrite, sodium chloride and disodium diphosphate showed the best inhibition. However, cadaverine and putrescine were characterised by the biggest changes in concentration during the storage time of all the additives. Based on the presented data for the content of biogenic amines in meat samples analysed as a function of storage time and additives, we suggest that cadaverine and putrescine have a significant impact on meat quality.

  10. Hoxb-2 transcriptional activation in rhombomeres 3 and 5 requires an evolutionarily conserved cis-acting element in addition to the Krox-20 binding site.

    PubMed Central

    Vesque, C; Maconochie, M; Nonchev, S; Ariza-McNaughton, L; Kuroiwa, A; Charnay, P; Krumlauf, R

    1996-01-01

    Segmentation is a key feature of the development of the vertebrate hindbrain where it involves the generation of repetitive morphological units termed rhombomeres (r). Hox genes are likely to play an essential role in the specification of segmental identity and we have been investigating their regulation. We show here that the mouse and chicken Hoxb-2 genes are dependent for their expression in r3 and r5 on homologous enhancer elements and on binding to this enhancer of the r3/r5-specific transcriptional activator Krox-20. Among the three Krox-20 binding sites of the mouse Hoxb-2 enhancer, only the high-affinity site is absolutely necessary for activity. In contrast, we have identified an additional cis-acting element, Box1, essential for r3/r5 enhancer activity. It is conserved both in sequence and in position respective to the high-affinity Krox-20 binding site within the mouse and chicken enhancers. Furthermore, a short 44 bp sequence spanning the Box1 and Krox-20 sites can act as an r3/r5 enhancer when oligomerized. Box1 may therefore constitute a recognition sequence for another factor cooperating with Krox-20. Taken together, these data demonstrate the conservation of Hox gene regulation and of Krox-20 function during vertebrate evolution. Images PMID:8895582

  11. High ACSL5 Transcript Levels Associate with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Apoptosis in Jurkat T Lymphocytes and Peripheral Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a prototypical autoimmune disease in which increased apoptosis and decreased apoptotic cells removal has been described as most relevant in the pathogenesis. Long-chain acyl-coenzyme A synthetases (ACSLs) have been involved in the immunological dysfunction of mouse models of lupus-like autoimmunity and apoptosis in different in vitro cell systems. The aim of this work was to assess among the ACSL isoforms the involvement of ACSL2, ACSL4 and ACSL5 in SLE pathogenesis. Findings With this end, we determined the ACSL2, ACSL4 and ACSL5 transcript levels in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of 45 SLE patients and 49 healthy controls by quantitative real time-PCR (q-PCR). We found that patients with SLE had higher ACSL5 transcript levels than healthy controls [median (range), healthy controls = 16.5 (12.3–18.0) vs. SLE = 26.5 (17.8–41.7), P = 3.9×10 E-5] but no differences were found for ACSL2 and ACSL4. In in vitro experiments, ACSL5 mRNA expression was greatly increased when inducing apoptosis in Jurkat T cells and PBMCs by Phorbol-Myristate-Acetate plus Ionomycin (PMA+Io). On the other hand, short interference RNA (siRNA)-mediated silencing of ACSL5 decreased induced apoptosis in Jurkat T cells up to the control levels as well as decreased mRNA expression of FAS, FASLG and TNF. Conclusions These findings indicate that ACSL5 may play a role in the apoptosis that takes place in SLE. Our results point to ACSL5 as a potential novel functional marker of pathogenesis and a possible therapeutic target in SLE. PMID:22163040

  12. Construction of pancreatic cancer double-factor regulatory network based on chip data on the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Li; Zhang, Tong; Liu, Bing-Rong; Liu, Tie-Fu; Tao, Na; Zhuang, Li-Wei

    2014-05-01

    Transcription factor (TF) and microRNA (miRNA) have been discovered playing crucial roles in cancer development. However, the effect of TFs and miRNAs in pancreatic cancer pathogenesis remains vague. We attempted to reveal the possible mechanism of pancreatic cancer based on transcription level. Using GSE16515 datasets downloaded from gene expression omnibus database, we first identified the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in pancreatic cancer by the limma package in R. Then the DEGs were mapped into DAVID to conduct the kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. TFs and miRNAs that DEGs significantly enriched were identified by Fisher's test, and then the pancreatic cancer double-factor regulatory network was constructed. In our study, total 1117 DEGs were identified and they significantly enriched in 4 KEGG pathways. A double-factor regulatory network was established, including 29 DEGs, 24 TFs, 25 miRNAs. In the network, LAMC2, BRIP1 and miR155 were identified which may be involved in pancreatic cancer development. In conclusion, the double-factor regulatory network was found to play an important role in pancreatic cancer progression and our results shed new light on the molecular mechanism of pancreatic cancer.

  13. Amino acid limitation induces down-regulation of WNT5a at transcriptional level

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zuguang; Chen Hong

    2009-01-23

    An aberrant WNT signaling contributes to the development and progression of multiple cancers. WNT5a is one of the WNT signaling molecules. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that amino acid deprivation induces changes in the WNT signaling pathway in colon cancer cells. Results showed that targets of the amino acid response pathway, ATF3 and p21, were induced in the human colon cancer cell line SW480 during amino acid limitation. There was a significant decrease in the WNT5a mRNA level following amino acid deprivation. The down-regulation of WNT5a mRNA by amino acid deprivation is not due to mRNA destabilization. There is a reduction of nuclear {beta}-catenin protein level by amino acid limitation. Under amino acid limitation, phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was increased and the blockage of ERK1/2 by the inhibitor U0126 partially restored WNT5a mRNA level. In conclusion, amino acid limitation in colon cancer cells induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which then down-regulates WNT5a expression.

  14. Transcriptional activation by the acidic domain of Vmw65 requires the integrity of the domain and involves additional determinants distinct from those necessary for TFIIB binding.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S; Greaves, R; O'Hare, P

    1993-01-01

    In this work we have examined the requirements for activity of the acidic domain of Vmw65 (VP16) by deletion and site-directed mutagenesis of the region in the context of GAL4 fusion proteins. The results indicate that the present interpretation of what actually constitutes the activation domain is not correct. We demonstrate, using a promoter with one target site which is efficiently activated by the wild-type (wt) fusion protein, that amino acids distal to residue 453 are critical for activity. Truncation of the domain or substitution of residues in the distal region almost completely abrogate activity. However, inactivating mutations within the distal region are complemented by using a promoter containing multiple target sites. Moreover, duplication of the proximal region, but not the distal region, restores the ability to activate a promoter with a single target site. These results indicate some distinct qualitative difference between the proximal and distal regions. We have also examined the binding of nuclear proteins to the wt domain and to a variant with the distal region inactivated by mutation. The lack of activity of this variant is not explained by a lack of binding of TFIIB, a protein previously reported to be the likely target of the acidic domain. Therefore some additional function is involved in transcriptional activation by the acid domain, and determinants distinct from those involved in TFIIB binding are required for this function. Analysis of the total protein profiles binding to the wt and mutant domains has demonstrated the selective binding to the wt domain of a 135-kDa polypeptide, which is therefore a candidate component involved in this additional function. This is the first report to provide evidence for the proposal of a multiplicity of interactions within the acidic domain, by uncoupling requirements for one function from those for another. Images PMID:8395001

  15. Solving Additive Problems at Pre-Elementary School Level with the Support of Graphical Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selva, Ana Coelho Vieira; Falcao, Jorge Tarcisio da Rocha; Nunes, Terezinha

    2005-01-01

    This research offers empirical evidence of the importance of supplying diverse symbolic representations in order to support concept development in mathematics. Graphical representation can be a helpful symbolic tool for concept development in the conceptual field of additive structures. Nevertheless, this symbolic tool has specific difficulties…

  16. Fine-mapping at three loci known to affect fetal hemoglobin levels explains additional genetic variation.

    PubMed

    Galarneau, Geneviève; Palmer, Cameron D; Sankaran, Vijay G; Orkin, Stuart H; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Lettre, Guillaume

    2010-12-01

    We used resequencing and genotyping in African Americans with sickle cell anemia (SCA) to characterize associations with fetal hemoglobin (HbF) levels at the BCL11A, HBS1L-MYB and β-globin loci. Fine-mapping of HbF association signals at these loci confirmed seven SNPs with independent effects and increased the explained heritable variation in HbF levels from 38.6% to 49.5%. We also identified rare missense variants that causally implicate MYB in HbF production.

  17. A Pilot Study to Examine the Effect of Additional Structured Outdoor Playtime on Preschoolers' Physical Activity Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alhassan, Sofiya; Nwaokelemeh, Ogechi; Lyden, Kate; Goldsby, TaShauna; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The impact of additional structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; physical activity (PA) level is unclear. The purpose of this pilot study was to explore the effects of increasing structured outdoor playtime on preschoolers'; PA levels. Eight full-day classrooms (n = 134 children) from two preschool programmes were randomised into a treatment…

  18. Sulfate-Driven Elemental Sparing Is Regulated at the Transcriptional and Posttranscriptional Levels in a Filamentous Cyanobacterium▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gutu, Andrian; Alvey, Richard M.; Bashour, Sami; Zingg, Daniel; Kehoe, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Sulfur is an essential nutrient that can exist at growth-limiting concentrations in freshwater environments. The freshwater cyanobacterium Fremyella diplosiphon (also known as Tolypothrix sp. PCC 7601) is capable of remodeling the composition of its light-harvesting antennae, or phycobilisomes, in response to changes in the sulfur levels in its environment. Depletion of sulfur causes these cells to cease the accumulation of two forms of a major phycobilisome protein called phycocyanin and initiate the production of a third form of phycocyanin, which possesses a minimal number of sulfur-containing amino acids. Since phycobilisomes make up approximately 50% of the total protein in these cells, this elemental sparing response has the potential to significantly influence the fitness of this species under low-sulfur conditions. This response is specific for sulfate and occurs over the physiological range of sulfate concentrations likely to be encountered by this organism in its natural environment. F. diplosiphon has two separate sulfur deprivation responses, with low sulfate levels activating the phycobilisome remodeling response and low sulfur levels activating the chlorosis or bleaching response. The phycobilisome remodeling response results from changes in RNA abundance that are regulated at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. The potential of this response, and the more general bleaching response of cyanobacteria, to provide sulfur-containing amino acids during periods of sulfur deprivation is examined. PMID:21239582

  19. Addition by Subtraction: The Relation between Dropout Rates and School-Level Academic Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennie, Elizabeth; Bonneau, Kara; vanDellen, Michelle; Dodge, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Background/Context: Efforts to improve student achievement should increase graduation rates. However, work investigating the effects of student-level accountability has consistently demonstrated that increases in the standards for high school graduation are correlated with increases in dropout rates. The most favored explanation for this finding…

  20. Nonlinear responses of coastal salt marshes to nutrient additions and sea level rise

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increasing nutrients and accelerated sea level rise (SLR) can cause marsh loss in some coastal systems. Responses to nutrients and SLR are complex and vary with soil matrix, marsh elevation, sediment inputs, and hydroperiod. We describe field and greenhouse studies examining sing...

  1. Addition by Subtraction: The Relation Between Dropout Rates and School-Level Academic Achievement

    PubMed Central

    GLENNIE, ELIZABETH; BONNEAU, KARA; VANDELLEN, MICHELLE; DODGE, KENNETH A.

    2013-01-01

    Background/Context Efforts to improve student achievement should increase graduation rates. However, work investigating the effects of student-level accountability has consistently demonstrated that increases in the standards for high school graduation are correlated with increases in dropout rates. The most favored explanation for this finding is that high-stakes testing policies that mandate grade repetition and high school exit exams may be the tipping point for students who are already struggling academically. These extra demands may, in fact, push students out of school. Purpose/Objective/Focus This article examines two hypotheses regarding the relation between school-level accountability and dropout rates. The first posits that improvements in school performance lead to improved success for everyone. If school-level accountability systems improve a school for all students, then the proportion of students performing at grade level increases, and the dropout rate decreases. The second hypothesis posits that schools facing pressure to improve their overall accountability score may pursue this increase at the cost of other student outcomes, including dropout rate. Research Design Our approach focuses on the dynamic relation between school-level academic achievement and dropout rates over time—that is, between one year’s achievement and the subsequent year’s dropout rate, and vice versa. This article employs longitudinal data of records on all students in North Carolina public schools over an 8-year period. Analyses employ fixed-effects models clustering schools and districts within years and controls each year for school size, percentage of students who were free/reduced-price lunch eligible, percentage of students who are ethnic minorities, and locale. Findings/Results This study finds partial evidence that improvements in school-level academic performance will lead to improvements (i.e., decreases) in school-level dropout rates. Schools with improved

  2. Interleukin-2 transcription is regulated in vivo at the level of coordinated binding of both constitutive and regulated factors.

    PubMed Central

    Garrity, P A; Chen, D; Rothenberg, E V; Wold, B J

    1994-01-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) transcription is developmentally restricted to T cells and physiologically dependent on specific stimuli such as antigen recognition. Prior studies have shown that this stringent two-tiered regulation is mediated through a transcriptional promoter/enhancer DNA segment which is composed of diverse recognition elements. Factors binding to some of these elements are present constitutively in many cell types, while others are signal dependent, T cell specific, or both. This raises several questions about the molecular mechanism by which IL-2 expression is regulated. Is the developmental commitment of T cells reflected molecularly by stable interaction between available factors and the IL-2 enhancer prior to signal-dependent induction? At which level, factor binding to DNA or factor activity once bound, are individual regulatory elements within the native enhancer regulated? By what mechanism is developmental and physiological specificity enforced, given the participation of many relatively nonspecific elements? To answer these questions, we have used in vivo footprinting to determine and compare patterns of protein-DNA interactions at the native IL-2 locus in cell environments, including EL4 T-lymphoma cells and 32D clone 5 premast cells, which express differing subsets of IL-2 DNA-binding factors. We also used the immunosuppressant cyclosporin A as a pharmacological agent to further dissect the roles played by cyclosporin A-sensitive factors in the assembly and maintenance of protein-DNA complexes. Occupancy of all site types was observed exclusively in T cells and then only upon excitation of signal transduction pathways. This was true even though partially overlapping subsets of IL-2-binding activities were shown to be present in 32D clone 5 premast cells. This observation was especially striking in 32D cells because, upon signal stimulation, they mobilized a substantial set of IL-2 DNA-binding activities, as measured by in vitro assays using

  3. Priming effect in agricultural and forest soils depending on glucose level and N addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splettstoesser, Thomas; Kumar, Amit; Sun, Yue

    2015-04-01

    Growing plants continuously release easily available organic compounds into the rhizosphere. By their interactions with soil microbial biomass (MB) these compounds result in changes of organic matter turnover rates. The understanding of this priming effect (PE) is important for the estimation of climate change impacts on different land use systems. In order to investigate the PE, we conducted a soil incubation experiment under laboratory conditions with two loamy soils: one under cropland and the second under a deciduous forest near Göttingen. 13C and 14C Glucose were added in four levels reaching from 10% to 300% of MB-C. Furthermore two nitrogen levels were established in order to investigate the effects of fertilization on PE. During the whole experiment CO2 release was monitored by trapping in a NaOH solution. Nitrogen mineralization rate, activity of enzymes, and composition of MB were analyzed at the start, after one day, after one week and at the end of the experiment. The results on priming effects induced in agricultural and forest soils depending on N and glucose levels will be presented.

  4. Pheomelanin coat colour dilution in French cattle breeds is not correlated with the TYR, TYRP1 and DCT transcription levels.

    PubMed

    Guibert, Sylvain; Girardot, Michael; Leveziel, Hubert; Julien, Raymond; Oulmouden, Ahmad

    2004-08-01

    In this study we report the isolation of full-length cDNAs and the expression patterns of TYR, TYRP1 and DCT in four e/e cattle breeds exhibiting different pheomelanic coat colours ranging from reddish brown to creamy white phenotypes. Predicted proteins encoded by bovine TYR, TYRP1 and DCT display high levels of homology and contain all characteristic domains shared between their mouse and human counterparts. The full expression of these three genes is observed in melanocytes of black areas of E(D)/E(D) Prim'Holstein's animals. On the other hand, e/e melanocytes of animals belonging to the Blonde d'Aquitaine (blond), Limousine (red) and Salers (reddish brown) breeds present different levels of down-regulated TYR and DCT expression and a complete repression of TYRP1. Surprisingly, e/e melanocytes of animals belonging to the Charolais breed (creamy white) present an inverse relationship between TYR, TYRP1 and DCT expression and its lower melanogenic activity. The sum of these results shows that the dilution of the coat colour in French cattle breeds is not correlated with a transcription level of TYR family genes. Other possible modifier loci are suggested.

  5. [The role of transcription factors in the response of mouse lymphocytes to low-level electromagnetic and laser radiations].

    PubMed

    Khrenov, M O; Cherenkov, D A; Glushkova, O V; Novoselova, T V; Lunin, S M; Parfeniuk, S B; Lysenko, E A; Novoselova, E G; Fesenko, E E

    2007-01-01

    The effects of low-intensity laser radiation (LILR, 632.8 nm, 0.2 mW/cm2) and low-intensity electromagnetic waves (LIEW, 8.15 - 18 GHz, 1 MW/cm2) on the production of transcription factors in lymphocytes from NMRI male mice were examined. The total level of NF-KB and its phosphorylated metabolite Phospho-NF-kappaB, as well as the regulatory protein IkappaB-alpha were determined in spleen lymphocytes subjected to laser or microwave radiations. The proteins were determined by immunoblotting. Laser light induced a lowering in the level of NF-kappaB and IkappaB-alpha. By contrast, irradiation with electromagnetic waves resulted in a significant increase in the amount of NF-kappaB and IkappaB-alpha. The phosphorylated form of NF-kappaB did not noticeably change under either of the two kinds of radiation. The results showed that electromagnetic waves activate the production of both NF-kappaB and the regulatory protein IkappaB-alpha and these data confirm the stress character of the response of spleen lymphocytes to low-level microwaves of the centimeter range. PMID:17969924

  6. Additions to the spectrum and energy levels and critical compilation of doubly ionized boron, B III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, A. E.; Ryabtsev, A. N.; Ekberg, J. O.; Kink, I.; Mannervik, S.; Martinson, I.

    2008-08-01

    We have undertaken the study of the Li-like spectrum of doubly ionized boron, B III. The spectroscopic data have been obtained with beam-foil spectroscopy and high-resolution spark spectroscopy. The experimental work was combined with theoretical calculations using ab initio and semi-empirical techniques. About 50 new transitions have been observed, and most of the previously known lines have been measured with improved accuracy. We have also critically evaluated all previous and recent data for this spectrum. Complete data on wavelengths and energy levels based on this analysis are tabulated.

  7. Transcript profiling of Zea mays roots reveals gene responses to phosphate deficiency at the plant- and species-specific levels.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Vazquez, Carlos; Ibarra-Laclette, Enrique; Caballero-Perez, Juan; Herrera-Estrella, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Maize (Zea mays) is the most widely cultivated crop around the world; however, it is commonly affected by phosphate (Pi) deficiency in many regions, particularly in acid and alkaline soils of developing countries. To cope with Pi deficiency, plants have evolved a large number of developmental and biochemical adaptations; however, for maize, the underlying molecular basis of these responses is still unknown. In this work, the transcriptional response of maize roots to Pi starvation at 1, 3, 6, and 10 d after the onset of Pi deprivation was assessed. The investigation revealed a total of 1179 Pi-responsive genes, of which 820 and 363 genes were found to be either up- or down-regulated, respectively, by 2-fold or more. Pi-responsive genes were found to be involved in various metabolic, signal transduction, and developmental gene networks. A large set of transcription factors, which may be potential targets for crop breeding, was identified. In addition, gene expression profiles and changes in specific metabolites were also correlated. The results show that several dicotyledonous plant responses to Pi starvation are conserved in maize, but that some genetic responses appear to be more specific and that Pi deficiency leads to a shift in the recycling of internal Pi in maize roots. Ultimately, this work provides a more comprehensive view of Pi-responses in a model for economically important cereals and also sets a framework to produce Pi-specific maize microarrays to study the changes in global gene expression between Pi-efficient and Pi-inefficient maize genotypes. PMID:18503042

  8. Evaluation of alternative chemical additives for high-level waste vitrification feed preparation processing

    SciTech Connect

    Seymour, R.G.

    1995-06-07

    During the development of the feed processing flowsheet for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), research had shown that use of formic acid (HCOOH) could accomplish several processing objectives with one chemical addition. These objectives included the decomposition of tetraphenylborate, chemical reduction of mercury, production of acceptable rheological properties in the feed slurry, and controlling the oxidation state of the glass melt pool. However, the DEPF research had not shown that some vitrification slurry feeds had a tendency to evolve hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) as the result of catalytic decomposition of CHOOH with noble metals (rhodium, ruthenium, palladium) in the feed. Testing conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory and later at the Savannah River Technical Center showed that the H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} could evolve at appreciable rates and quantities. The explosive nature of H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} (as ammonium nitrate) warranted significant mitigation control and redesign of both facilities. At the time the explosive gas evolution was discovered, the DWPF was already under construction and an immediate hardware fix in tandem with flowsheet changes was necessary. However, the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) was in the design phase and could afford to take time to investigate flowsheet manipulations that could solve the problem, rather than a hardware fix. Thus, the HWVP began to investigate alternatives to using HCOOH in the vitrification process. This document describes the selection, evaluation criteria, and strategy used to evaluate the performance of the alternative chemical additives to CHOOH. The status of the evaluation is also discussed.

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lsr2 Is a Global Transcriptional Regulator Required for Adaptation to Changing Oxygen Levels and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Bartek, I. L.; Woolhiser, L. K.; Baughn, A. D.; Basaraba, R. J.; Jacobs, W. R.; Lenaerts, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT To survive a dynamic host environment, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must endure a series of challenges, from reactive oxygen and nitrogen stress to drastic shifts in oxygen availability. The mycobacterial Lsr2 protein has been implicated in reactive oxygen defense via direct protection of DNA. To examine the role of Lsr2 in pathogenesis and physiology of M. tuberculosis, we generated a strain deleted for lsr2. Analysis of the M. tuberculosis Δlsr2 strain demonstrated that Lsr2 is not required for DNA protection, as this strain was equally susceptible as the wild type to DNA-damaging agents. The lsr2 mutant did display severe growth defects under normoxic and hyperoxic conditions, but it was not required for growth under low-oxygen conditions. However, it was also required for adaptation to anaerobiosis. The defect in anaerobic adaptation led to a marked decrease in viability during anaerobiosis, as well as a lag in recovery from it. Gene expression profiling of the Δlsr2 mutant under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in conjunction with published DNA binding-site data indicates that Lsr2 is a global transcriptional regulator controlling adaptation to changing oxygen levels. The Δlsr2 strain was capable of establishing an early infection in the BALB/c mouse model; however, it was severely defective in persisting in the lungs and caused no discernible lung pathology. These findings demonstrate M. tuberculosis Lsr2 is a global transcriptional regulator required for control of genes involved in adaptation to extremes in oxygen availability and is required for persistent infection. PMID:24895305

  10. Enhanced critical currents in (Gd,Y)Ba2Cu3Ox superconducting tapes with high levels of Zr addition

    SciTech Connect

    Selvamanickam, V; Chen, Y; Shi, T; Liu, Y; Khatri, ND; Liu, J; Yao, Y; Xiong, X; Lei, C; Soloveichik, S; Galstyan, E; Majkic, G

    2013-01-21

    The critical current and structural properties of (Gd,Y)BaCuO tapes made by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with Zr addition levels up to 30 at.% have been investigated. The reduction in critical current beyond the previously optimized Zr addition level of 7.5 at.% was found to be due to structural deterioration of the (Gd,Y)Ba2Cu3Ox film. By a modified MOCVD process,enhanced critical current densities have been achieved with high levels of Zr addition,including 3.83 MA cm(-2) in 15 at.% Zr- added 1.1 mu m thick film at 77 K in zero magnetic field. Critical currents as high as 1072 A/ 12 mm have been reached in (Gd,Y) BaCuO tapes with 15 at.% Zr addition at 30 K in a field of 3 T applied perpendicular to the tape,corresponding to a pinning force value of 268 GN m(-3). The enhanced critical currents achievable with a high density of nanoscale defects by employing high levels of second- phase additions enable the performance targets needed for the use of HTS tapes in coil applications involving high magnetic fields at temperatures below 50 K to be met.

  11. Enhanced critical currents in (Gd,Y)Ba2Cu3Ox superconducting tapes with high levels of Zr addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvamanickam, V.; Chen, Y.; Shi, T.; Liu, Y.; Khatri, N. D.; Liu, J.; Yao, Y.; Xiong, X.; Lei, C.; Soloveichik, S.; Galstyan, E.; Majkic, G.

    2013-03-01

    The critical current and structural properties of (Gd,Y)BaCuO tapes made by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with Zr addition levels up to 30 at.% have been investigated. The reduction in critical current beyond the previously optimized Zr addition level of 7.5 at.% was found to be due to structural deterioration of the (Gd,Y)Ba2Cu3Ox film. By a modified MOCVD process, enhanced critical current densities have been achieved with high levels of Zr addition, including 3.83 MA cm-2 in 15 at.% Zr-added 1.1 μm thick film at 77 K in zero magnetic field. Critical currents as high as 1072 A/12 mm have been reached in (Gd,Y)BaCuO tapes with 15 at.% Zr addition at 30 K in a field of 3 T applied perpendicular to the tape, corresponding to a pinning force value of 268 GN m-3. The enhanced critical currents achievable with a high density of nanoscale defects by employing high levels of second-phase additions enable the performance targets needed for the use of HTS tapes in coil applications involving high magnetic fields at temperatures below 50 K to be met.

  12. Total Glutamine Synthetase Activity during Soybean Nodule Development Is Controlled at the Level of Transcription and Holoprotein Turnover.

    PubMed Central

    Temple, S. J.; Kunjibettu, S.; Roche, D.; Sengupta-Gopalan, C.

    1996-01-01

    Gln synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia with glutamate to yield Gln. In higher plants GS is an octameric enzyme and the subunits are encoded by members of a small multigene family. In soybeans (Glycine max), following the onset of N2 fixation there is a dramatic increase in GS activity in the root nodules. GS activity staining of native polyacrylamide gels containing nodule and root extracts showed a common band of activity (GSrs). The nodules also contained a slower-migrating, broad band of enzyme activity (GSns). The GSns activity band is a complex of many isozymes made up of different proportions of two kinds of GS subunits: GSr and GSn. Root nodules formed following inoculation with an Nif- strain of Bradyrhizobium japonicum showed the presence of GS isoenzymes (GSns1) with low enzyme activity, which migrated more slowly than GSns. Gsns1 is most likely made up predominantly of GSn subunits. Our data suggest that, whereas the class I GS genes encoding the GSr subunits are regulated by the availability of NH3, the class II GS genes coding for the GSn subunits are developmentally regulated. Furthermore, we have demonstrated that the GSns1 isozymes in the Nif- nodules are relatively more labile. Our overall conclusion is that GSns activity in soybean nodules is regulated by N2 fixation both at the level of transcription and at the level of holoprotein stability. PMID:12226474

  13. Toll signal transduction pathway in bivalves: complete cds of intermediate elements and related gene transcription levels in hemocytes of immune stimulated Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Toubiana, Mylène; Rosani, Umberto; Giambelluca, Sonia; Cammarata, Matteo; Gerdol, Marco; Pallavicini, Alberto; Venier, Paola; Roch, Philippe

    2014-08-01

    Based on protein domain structure and organization deduced from mRNA contigs, 15 transcripts of the Toll signaling pathway have been identified in the bivalve, Mytilus galloprovincialis. Identical searches performed on publicly available Mytilus edulis ESTs revealed 11 transcripts, whereas searches performed in genomic and new transcriptome sequences of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, identified 21 Toll-related transcripts. The remarkable molecular diversity of TRAF and IKK coding sequences of C. gigas, suggests that the sequence data inferred from Mytilus cDNAs may not be exhaustive. Most of the Toll pathway genes were constitutively and ubiquitously expressed in M. galloprovincialis, although at different levels, and clearly induced after in vivo injection with bacteria. Such over-transcription was more rapid and intense with Gram-negative than with Gram-positive bacteria. Injection of a fungus modulated the transcription of few Toll pathway genes, with the induction levels of TLR/MyD88 complex being always less intense. Purified LPS and β-glucans had marginal effect whereas peptidoglycans were ineffective. At the moment, we found no evidence of an IMD transcript in bivalves. In conclusion, mussels possess a complete Toll pathway which can be triggered either by Gram-positive or Gram-negative bacteria.

  14. Premature termination of GAT1 transcription explains paradoxical negative correlation between nitrogen-responsive mRNA, but constitutive low-level protein production

    PubMed Central

    Isabelle, Georis; Tate, Jennifer J; Vierendeels, Fabienne; Cooper, Terrance G; Dubois, Evelyne

    2015-01-01

    The first step in executing the genetic program of a cell is production of mRNA. In yeast, almost every gene is transcribed as multiple distinct isoforms, differing at their 5′ and/or 3′ termini. However, the implications and functional significance of the transcriptome-wide diversity of mRNA termini remains largely unexplored. In this paper, we show that the GAT1 gene, encoding a transcriptional activator of nitrogen-responsive catabolic genes, produces a variety of mRNAs differing in their 5′ and 3′ termini. Alternative transcription initiation leads to the constitutive, low level production of 2 full length proteins differing in their N-termini, whereas premature transcriptional termination generates a short, highly nitrogen catabolite repression- (NCR-) sensitive transcript that, as far as we can determine, is not translated under the growth conditions we used, but rather likely protects the cell from excess Gat1. PMID:26259534

  15. Nitrogen and Carbon Status Are Integrated at the Transcriptional Level by the Nitrogen Regulator NtrC In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schumacher, Jörg; Behrends, Volker; Pan, Zhensheng; Brown, Dan R.; Heydenreich, Franziska; Lewis, Matthew R.; Bennett, Mark H.; Razzaghi, Banafsheh; Komorowski, Michal; Barahona, Mauricio; Stumpf, Michael P. H.; Wigneshweraraj, Sivaramesh; Bundy, Jacob G.; Buck, Martin

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nitrogen regulation in Escherichia coli is a model system for gene regulation in bacteria. Growth on glutamine as a sole nitrogen source is assumed to be nitrogen limiting, inferred from slow growth and strong NtrB/NtrC-dependent gene activation. However, we show that under these conditions, the intracellular glutamine concentration is not limiting but 5.6-fold higher than in ammonium-replete conditions; in addition, α-ketoglutarate concentrations are elevated. We address this glutamine paradox from a systems perspective. We show that the dominant role of NtrC is to regulate glnA transcription and its own expression, indicating that the glutamine paradox is not due to NtrC-independent gene regulation. The absolute intracellular NtrC and GS concentrations reveal molecular control parameters, where NtrC-specific activities were highest in nitrogen-starved cells, while under glutamine growth, NtrC showed intermediate specific activity. We propose an in vivo model in which α-ketoglutarate can derepress nitrogen regulation despite nitrogen sufficiency. PMID:24255125

  16. Retinoic acid regulates CD1d gene expression at the transcriptional level in human and rodent monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiuyan; Ross, A Catharine

    2007-04-01

    CD1d belongs to a group of nonclassical antigen-presenting molecules that present glycolipid antigens and thereby activate natural killer T (NKT) cells, a subset of bifunctional T cells. Little is known so far regarding the expression and physiologic regulation of CD1d. Here we show that all-trans-retinoic acid (RA), the active metabolite of vitamin A, rapidly (1 hr after treatment) increases CD1d mRNA in human and rodent monocytic cells at a physiologic dose (10 nM). The induction is RA specific and RA receptor (RAR) dependent-RA and an RARalpha agonist, Am580, both had a pronounced positive effect, whereas the addition of RARalpha antagonist partially blocked the increase in CD1d mRNA induced by RA and Am580. The induction was also completely blocked by the presence of actinomycin D. A putative RA-response element was identified in the distal 5' flanking region of the CD1d gene, which binds nuclear retinoid receptors and was responsive to RA in both gel mobility shift assay and transient transfection assay in THP-1 cells. These results further confirmed the transcriptional regulation of RA in CD1d gene expression. Moreover, RA significantly increased alpha-galactosylceramide-induced spleen cell proliferation. These studies together provide evidence for a previously unknown mechanism of CD1d gene expression regulation by RA and suggest that RA is a significant modulator of NKT cell activation.

  17. C(m)CGG methylation-independent parent-of-origin effects on genome-wide transcript levels in isogenic reciprocal F1 triploid plants.

    PubMed

    Donoghue, Mark T A; Fort, Antoine; Clifton, Rachel; Zhang, Xu; McKeown, Peter C; Voigt-Zielinksi, M L; Borevitz, Justin O; Spillane, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Triploid F1 hybrids generated via reciprocal interploidy crosses between genetically distinct parental plants can display parent-of-origin effects on gene expression or phenotypes. Reciprocal triploid F1 isogenic plants generated from interploidy crosses in the same genetic background allow investigation on parent-of-origin-specific (parental) genome-dosage effects without confounding effects of hybridity involving heterozygous mutations. Whole-genome transcriptome profiling was conducted on reciprocal F1 isogenic triploid (3x) seedlings of A. thaliana. The genetically identical reciprocal 3x genotypes had either an excess of maternally inherited 3x(m) or paternally inherited 3x(p) genomes. We identify a major parent-of-origin-dependent genome-dosage effect on transcript levels, whereby 602 genes exhibit differential expression between the reciprocal F1 triploids. In addition, using methylation-sensitive DNA tiling arrays, constitutive and polymorphic CG DNA methylation patterns at CCGG sites were analysed, which revealed that paternal-excess F1 triploid seedling C(m)CGG sites are overall hypermethylated. However, no correlation exists between C(m)CGG methylation polymorphisms and transcriptome dysregulation between the isogenic reciprocal F1 triploids. Overall, our study indicates that parental genome-dosage effects on the transcriptome levels occur in paternal-excess triploids, which are independent of C(m)CGG methylation polymorphisms. Such findings have implications for understanding parental effects and genome-dosage effects on gene expression and phenotypes in polyploid plants. PMID:24212467

  18. Grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) ATF6 (activating transcription factor 6) modulates the transcriptional level of GRP78 and GRP94 in CIK cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiangqin; Zhang, Tao; Mao, Huiling; Mi, Yichuan; Zhong, Bin; Wei, Lili; Liu, Xiancheng; Hu, Chengyu

    2016-05-01

    ATF transcription factors are stress proteins containing alkaline area-leucine zipper and play an important role in endoplasmic reticulum stress. ATF6 is a protective protein which regulates the adaptation of cells to ER stress by modulating the transcription of UPR (Unfolded Protein Response) target genes, including GRP78 and GRP94. In the present study, a grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) ATF6 full-length cDNA (named CiATF6, KT279356) has been cloned and identified. CiATF6 is 4176 bp in length, comprising 159 nucleotides of 5'-untranslated sequence, a 1947 nucleotides open reading frame and 2170 nucleotides of 3'-untranslated sequences. The largest open reading frame of CiATF6 translates into 648 aa with a typical DNA binding domain (BRLZ domain) and shares significant homology to the known ATF6 counterparts. Phylogenetic reconstruction confirmed its closer evolutionary relationship with other fish counterparts, especially with Zebrafish ATF6. RT-PCR showed that CiATF6 was ubiquitously expressed and significantly up-regulated after stimulation with thermal stress in all tested grass carp tissues. In order to know more about the role of CiATF6 in ER stress, recombinant CiATF6N with His-tag was over-expressed in Rosetta Escherichia coli, and the expressed protein was purified by affinity chromatography with Ni-NTA His-Bind Resin. In vitro, gel mobility shift assays were employed to analyze the interaction of CiATF6 protein with the promoters of grass carp GRP78 and GRP94, respectively. The result has shown that CiATF6 could bind to these promoters with high affinity by means of its BRLZ mainly. To further study the transcriptional regulatory mechanism of CiATF6, Dual-luciferase reporter assays were applied. Recombinant plasmids of pGL3-GRP78P and pGL3-CiGRP94P were constructed and transiently co-transfected with pcDNA3.1-CiATF6 (pcDN3.1-CiATF6-nBRLZ, respectively) into C. idella kidney (CIK) cells. The result has shown that CiATF6 could activate CiGRP78 and Ci

  19. Three-dimensional arrangement of genes involved in lipid metabolism in nuclei of porcine adipocytes and fibroblasts in relation to their transcription level.

    PubMed

    Kociucka, B; Cieslak, J; Szczerbal, I

    2012-01-01

    The 3-dimensional arrangement of chromosomes and genes within a nuclear space is considered to represent the level of transcriptional regulation. Understanding how the nuclear architecture of adipocyte cells contributes to gene expression has become the subject of great interest in the context of obesity research. In this study we investigated nuclear positioning of 3 gene loci involved in lipid metabolism in the pig (Sus scrofa, SSC) which is considered as an important animal model for obesity in humans. We found that the position of the SCD gene in the 3-dimensional space of the cell nucleus is not correlated with transcriptional activity. The gene locus as well as chromosome territory SSC14 occupied the same peripheral location in adipocyte and fibroblast cells, in spite of the fact that their transcription level differs significantly between both cell types. For the 2 other investigated genes, i.e. ACACA and SREBF1 and their chromosome territory (SSC12), slightly different nuclear locations were found. They occupied intermediate nuclear positions in fibroblast nuclei, while in adipocytes they were positioned in the nuclear interior. The more internal location of these genes corresponds to increased transcription levels in fat cells. Our results confirm the non-random position of genes and chromosome territories in nuclei of adult porcine cells and indicate that relationship between transcription activity and gene positioning exists only for some but not all genes.

  20. Elevated in vivo levels of a single transcription factor directly convert satellite glia into oligodendrocyte-like cells.

    PubMed

    Weider, Matthias; Wegener, Amélie; Schmitt, Christian; Küspert, Melanie; Hillgärtner, Simone; Bösl, Michael R; Hermans-Borgmeyer, Irm; Nait-Oumesmar, Brahim; Wegner, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the myelinating glia of the central nervous system and ensure rapid saltatory conduction. Shortage or loss of these cells leads to severe malfunctions as observed in human leukodystrophies and multiple sclerosis, and their replenishment by reprogramming or cell conversion strategies is an important research aim. Using a transgenic approach we increased levels of the transcription factor Sox10 throughout the mouse embryo and thereby prompted Fabp7-positive glial cells in dorsal root ganglia of the peripheral nervous system to convert into cells with oligodendrocyte characteristics including myelin gene expression. These rarely studied and poorly characterized satellite glia did not go through a classic oligodendrocyte precursor cell stage. Instead, Sox10 directly induced key elements of the regulatory network of differentiating oligodendrocytes, including Olig2, Olig1, Nkx2.2 and Myrf. An upstream enhancer mediated the direct induction of the Olig2 gene. Unlike Sox10, Olig2 was not capable of generating oligodendrocyte-like cells in dorsal root ganglia. Our findings provide proof-of-concept that Sox10 can convert conducive cells into oligodendrocyte-like cells in vivo and delineates options for future therapeutic strategies.

  1. Digital inventory of Arabidopsis transcripts revealed by 61 RNA sequencing samples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoyong; Yang, Qiuying; Deng, Zhiping; Ye, Xinfu

    2014-10-01

    Alternative splicing is an essential biological process to generate proteome diversity and phenotypic complexity. Recent improvements in RNA sequencing accuracy and computational algorithms have provided unprecedented opportunities to examine the expression levels of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transcripts. In this article, we analyzed 61 RNA sequencing samples from 10 totally independent studies of Arabidopsis and calculated the transcript expression levels in different tissues, treatments, developmental stages, and varieties. These data provide a comprehensive profile of Arabidopsis transcripts with single-base resolution. We quantified the expression levels of 40,745 transcripts annotated in The Arabidopsis Information Resource 10, comprising 73% common transcripts, 15% rare transcripts, and 12% nondetectable transcripts. In addition, we investigated diverse common transcripts in detail, including ubiquitous transcripts, dominant/subordinate transcripts, and switch transcripts, in terms of their expression and transcript ratio. Interestingly, alternative splicing was the highly enriched function for the genes related to dominant/subordinate transcripts and switch transcripts. In addition, motif analysis revealed that TC motifs were enriched in dominant transcripts but not in subordinate transcripts. These motifs were found to have a strong relationship with transcription factor activity. Our results shed light on the complexity of alternative splicing and the diversity of the contributing factors. PMID:25118256

  2. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-05-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation-selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. "Animal model" analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population.

  3. Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population

    PubMed Central

    McFarlane, S Eryn; Gorrell, Jamieson C; Coltman, David W; Humphries, Murray M; Boutin, Stan; McAdam, Andrew G

    2014-01-01

    A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components than would be expected from mutation–selection balance. Here, we used a long-term study of an individually marked population of North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) to look for evidence of (1) additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success and (2) fitness trade-offs between fitness components, such as male and female fitness or fitness in high- and low-resource environments. “Animal model” analyses of a multigenerational pedigree revealed modest maternal effects on fitness, but very low levels of additive genetic variance in lifetime reproductive success overall as well as fitness measures within each sex and environment. It therefore appears that there are very low levels of direct genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in red squirrels to facilitate contemporary adaptation in this population. PMID:24963372

  4. Murine retroviruses control class I major histocompatibility antigen gene expression via a trans effect at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Wilson, L D; Flyer, D C; Faller, D V

    1987-07-01

    Moloney murine leukemia virus (M-MuLV) and Moloney murine sarcoma virus (M-MSV) exert a regulatory effect on the class I genes of the murine major histocompatibility complex (MHC). We have previously shown that M-MuLV infection of mouse fibroblasts results in a substantial increase in cell surface expression of H-2K, H-2D, and H-2L proteins, whereas M-MSV, upon coinfection of the same cells, is apparently able to override the MuLV-induced increase in H-2 expression. As a result of this modulation, immune recognition of the infected cells is profoundly altered. Our efforts have been directed toward elucidating the molecular basis for this phenomenon. We report here that stimulation of interferon production as a result of infection with MuLV does not occur and, therefore, is not the cause of MuLV-induced enhancement of MHC expression. Control of H-2 class I and beta 2-microglobulin gene expression by M-MuLV, and probably by M-MSV, takes place at the transcriptional level as indicated by nuclear runoff studies and analysis of steady-state mRNA levels. Our demonstration that M-MuLV controls expression of widely separated endogenous cellular genes (those coding for H-2D, H-2K, H-2L, and beta 2-microglobulin), transfected class I MHC genes, and unintegrated chimeric genes consisting of fragments of class I MHC genes linked to sequences encoding a procaryotic enzyme, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase, suggests that M-MuLV exerts its effect in trans and not by proviral integration in the vicinity of the H-2 gene complex. Finally, we show that the sequences of at least one MHC gene, which are responsive to trans regulation by M-MuLV, lie within 1.2 kilobases upstream of the initiation codon for that gene.

  5. High REDOX RESPONSIVE TRANSCRIPTION FACTOR1 Levels Result in Accumulation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Arabidopsis thaliana Shoots and Roots.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Mitsuhiro; Johnson, Joy Michal; Hieno, Ayaka; Tokizawa, Mutsutomo; Nomoto, Mika; Tada, Yasuomi; Godfrey, Rinesh; Obokata, Junichi; Sherameti, Irena; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu Y; Böhmer, Frank-D; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Redox Responsive Transcription Factor1 (RRTF1) in Arabidopsis is rapidly and transiently upregulated by H2O2, as well as biotic- and abiotic-induced redox signals. RRTF1 is highly conserved in angiosperms, but its physiological role remains elusive. Here we show that inactivation of RRTF1 restricts and overexpression promotes reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation in response to stress. Transgenic lines overexpressing RRTF1 are impaired in root and shoot development, light sensitive, and susceptible to Alternaria brassicae infection. These symptoms are diminished by the beneficial root endophyte Piriformospora indica, which reduces ROS accumulation locally in roots and systemically in shoots, and by antioxidants and ROS inhibitors that scavenge ROS. More than 800 genes were detected in mature leaves and seedlings of transgenic lines overexpressing RRTF1; ∼ 40% of them have stress-, redox-, ROS-regulated-, ROS-scavenging-, defense-, cell death- and senescence-related functions. Bioinformatic analyses and in vitro DNA binding assays demonstrate that RRTF1 binds to GCC-box-like sequences in the promoter of RRTF1-responsive genes. Upregulation of RRTF1 by stress stimuli and H2O2 requires WRKY18/40/60. RRTF1 is co-regulated with the phylogenetically related RAP2.6, which contains a GCC-box-like sequence in its promoter, but transgenic lines overexpressing RAP2.6 do not accumulate higher ROS levels. RRTF1 also stimulates systemic ROS accumulation in distal non-stressed leaves. We conclude that the elevated levels of the highly conserved RRTF1 induce ROS accumulation in response to ROS and ROS-producing abiotic and biotic stress signals.

  6. Transcript levels of the Saccharomyes cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD23 increase in response to UV light and in meiosis but remain constant in the mitotic cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Madura, K; Prakash, S

    1990-08-25

    The RAD23 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for excision-repair of UV damaged DNA. In this paper, we determine the location of the RAD23 gene in a cloned DNA fragment, identify the 1.6 kb RAD23 transcript, and examine RAD23 transcript levels in UV damaged cells, during the mitotic cell cycle, and in meiosis. The RAD23 mRNA levels are elevated 5-fold between 30 to 60 min after 37 J/m2 of UV light. RAD23 mRNA levels rise over 6-fold during meiosis at a stage coincident with high levels of genetic recombination. This response is specific to sporulation competent MATa/MAT alpha diploid cells, and is not observed in asporogenous MATa/MATa diploids. RAD23 mRNA levels, however, remain constant during the mitotic cell cycle.

  7. Activity of the upstream TATA-less promoter of the p21(Waf1/Cip1) gene depends on transcription factor IIA (TFIIA) in addition to TFIIA-reactive TBP-like protein.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hidefumi; Maeda, Ryo; Nakadai, Tomoyoshi; Tamura, Taka-aki

    2014-07-01

    TATA-binding protein-like protein (TLP) binds to transcription factor IIA (TFIIA) with high affinity, although the significance of this binding is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the role of TFIIA in transcriptional regulation of the p21(Waf1/Cip1) (p21) gene. It has been shown that TLP is indispensable for p53-activated transcription from an upstream TATA-less promoter of the p21 gene. We found that mutant TLPs having decreased TFIIA-binding ability exhibited weakened transcriptional activation function for the upstream promoter. Activity of the upstream promoter was enhanced considerably by an increased amount of TFIIA in a p53-dependent manner, whereas activity of the TATA-containing downstream promoter was enhanced only slightly. TFIIA potentiated the upstream promoter additively with TLP. Although TFIIA is recruited to both promoters, activity of the upstream promoter was much more dependent on TFIIA. Recruitment of TFIIA and TLP to the upstream promoter was augmented in etoposide-treated cells, in which the amount of TFIIA-TLP complex is increased, and TFIIA-reactive TLP was required for the recruitment of both factors. It was confirmed that etoposide-stimulated transcription depends on TLP. We also found that TFIIA-reactive TLP acts to decrease cell growth rate, which can be explained by interaction of the p21 promoter with the transcription factors that we examined. The results of the present study suggest that the upstream TATA-less promoter of p21 needs TFIIA and TFIIA-reactive TLP for p53-dependent transcriptional enhancement.

  8. Studying σ 54-dependent transcription at the single-molecule level using alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilemann, M.; Lymperopoulos, K.; Wigneshweraraj, S. R.; Buck, M.; Kapanidis, A. N.

    2007-07-01

    We present single-molecule fluorescence studies of σ 54-dependent gene-transcription complexes using singlemolecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer (smFRET) and alternating-laser excitation (ALEX) spectroscopy. The ability to study one biomolecule at the time allowed us to resolve and analyze sample heterogeneities and extract structural information on subpopulations and transient intermediates of transcription; such information is hidden in bulk experiments. Using site-specifically labeled σ 54 derivatives and site-specifically labeled promoter-DNA fragments, we demonstrate that we can observe single diffusing σ 54-DNA and transcription-initiation RNA polymerase-σ 54- DNA complexes, and that we can measure distances within such complexes; the identity of the complexes has been confirmed using electrophoretic-mobility-shift assays. Our studies pave the way for understanding the mechanism of abortive initiation and promoter escape in σ 54-dependent transcription.

  9. Transcript levels of CHL P gene, antioxidants and chlorophylls contents in olive (Olea europaea L.) pericarps: a comparative study on eleven olive cultivars harvested in two ripening stages.

    PubMed

    Muzzalupo, Innocenzo; Stefanizzi, Francesca; Perri, Enzo; Chiappetta, Adriana Ada

    2011-03-01

    The effects of ripening stage on the antioxidant content in olive pericarps were evaluated in eleven olive genotypes grown in the same bioagronomic conditions in Southern Italy. We examined the transcript levels of geranylgeranyl reductase (CHL P) gene and the content of tocopherols, phenolic compounds and chlorophylls in the pericarps. The examined genotypes showed an increase of CHL P transcripts during pericarps ripening. Significant differences were reported in the antioxidant proportions in the same cultivars at different pericarp ripening stage. We show an inverse correlation between phenols and tocopherols content. In particular, during the ripening phase, tocopherols increased rapidly in olive pericarps while phenolic compounds and chlorophyll levels declined significantly. The significant amounts of these antioxidants confirm the nutritional and medicinal value of olive drupes and its products (table olives and olive oil). We suggest, for the first time, a link between CHL P transcript levels and tocopherols content during the ripening of olive pericarps. Besides, we revealed that this trend of CHL P transcript levels during pericarps ripening is independent from the olive genotypes.

  10. Genome-wide mapping of human DNA-replication origins: levels of transcription at ORC1 sites regulate origin selection and replication timing.

    PubMed

    Dellino, Gaetano Ivan; Cittaro, Davide; Piccioni, Rossana; Luzi, Lucilla; Banfi, Stefania; Segalla, Simona; Cesaroni, Matteo; Mendoza-Maldonado, Ramiro; Giacca, Mauro; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We report the genome-wide mapping of ORC1 binding sites in mammals, by chromatin immunoprecipitation and parallel sequencing (ChIP-seq). ORC1 binding sites in HeLa cells were validated as active DNA replication origins (ORIs) using Repli-seq, a method that allows identification of ORI-containing regions by parallel sequencing of temporally ordered replicating DNA. ORC1 sites were universally associated with transcription start sites (TSSs) of coding or noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). Transcription levels at the ORC1 sites directly correlated with replication timing, suggesting the existence of two classes of ORIs: those associated with moderate/high transcription levels (≥1 RNA copy/cell), firing in early S and mapping to the TSSs of coding RNAs; and those associated with low transcription levels (<1 RNA copy/cell), firing throughout the entire S and mapping to TSSs of ncRNAs. These findings are compatible with a scenario whereby TSS expression levels influence the efficiency of ORC1 recruitment at G(1) and the probability of firing during S.

  11. Transcript levels of CHL P gene, antioxidants and chlorophylls contents in olive (Olea europaea L.) pericarps: a comparative study on eleven olive cultivars harvested in two ripening stages.

    PubMed

    Muzzalupo, Innocenzo; Stefanizzi, Francesca; Perri, Enzo; Chiappetta, Adriana Ada

    2011-03-01

    The effects of ripening stage on the antioxidant content in olive pericarps were evaluated in eleven olive genotypes grown in the same bioagronomic conditions in Southern Italy. We examined the transcript levels of geranylgeranyl reductase (CHL P) gene and the content of tocopherols, phenolic compounds and chlorophylls in the pericarps. The examined genotypes showed an increase of CHL P transcripts during pericarps ripening. Significant differences were reported in the antioxidant proportions in the same cultivars at different pericarp ripening stage. We show an inverse correlation between phenols and tocopherols content. In particular, during the ripening phase, tocopherols increased rapidly in olive pericarps while phenolic compounds and chlorophyll levels declined significantly. The significant amounts of these antioxidants confirm the nutritional and medicinal value of olive drupes and its products (table olives and olive oil). We suggest, for the first time, a link between CHL P transcript levels and tocopherols content during the ripening of olive pericarps. Besides, we revealed that this trend of CHL P transcript levels during pericarps ripening is independent from the olive genotypes. PMID:21253861

  12. Increased accumulation of carbohydrates and decreased photosynthetic gene transcript levels in wheat grown at an elevated CO{sub 2} concentration in the field

    SciTech Connect

    Nie, G.; Hendrix, D.L.; Webber, A.N.

    1995-07-01

    Repression of photosynthetic genes by increased soluble carbohydrate concentrations may explain acclimation of photosynthesis to elevated CO{sub 2} concentration. This hypothesis was examined in a field crop of spring wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown at both ambient (approximately 360 {mu}mol{sup -1}) and elevated (550 {mu}mol mol{sup -1}) atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations using free-air CO{sub 2} enrichment at Maricopa, Arizona. The correspondence of steady-state levels of mRNA transcripts (coding for the 83-kD photosystem 1 apoprotein, sedoheptulose-1,7-bisphosphatase, phosphoribulokinase, phosphoglcerodkinase, and the large and small subunits of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) with leaf carbohydrate concentrations (glucose-6-phosphate, glucose, fructose, sucrose, fructans, and starch) was examined at different stages of crop and leaf development and through the diurnal cycle. Overall only a weak correspondence between increased soluble carbohydrate concentrations and decreased levels for nuclear gene transcripts was found. The difference in soluble carbohydrate concentration between leaves grown at elevated and current ambient CO{sub 2} concentrations diminished with crop development, whereas the difference in transcript levels increased. In the flag leaf, soluble carbohydrate concentrations declined markedly with the onset of grain filling; yet transcript levels also declined. The results suggest that, many other factors modified its significance in this field wheat crop. 52 refs., 8 figs.

  13. Association of Neuropeptide Y (NPY), Interleukin-1B (IL1B) Genetic Variants and Correlation of IL1B Transcript Levels with Vitiligo Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Laddha, Naresh C.; Dwivedi, Mitesh; Mansuri, Mohmmad Shoab; Singh, Mala; Patel, Hetanshi H.; Agarwal, Nishtha; Shah, Anish M.; Begum, Rasheedunnisa

    2014-01-01

    Background Vitiligo is a depigmenting disorder resulting from loss of functional melanocytes in the skin. NPY plays an important role in induction of immune response by acting on a variety of immune cells. NPY synthesis and release is governed by IL1B. Moreover, genetic variability in IL1B is reported to be associated with elevated NPY levels. Objectives Aim of the present study was to explore NPY promoter −399T/C (rs16147) and exon2 +1128T/C (rs16139) polymorphisms as well as IL1B promoter −511C/T (rs16944) polymorphism and to correlate IL1B transcript levels with vitiligo. Methods PCR-RFLP method was used to genotype NPY -399T/C SNP in 454 patients and 1226 controls; +1128T/C SNP in 575 patients and 1279 controls and IL1B −511C/T SNP in 448 patients and 785 controls from Gujarat. IL1B transcript levels in blood were also assessed in 105 controls and 95 patients using real-time PCR. Results Genotype and allele frequencies for NPY −399T/C, +1128T/C and IL1B −511C/T SNPs differed significantly (p<0.0001, p<0.0001; p = 0.0161, p = 0.0035 and p<0.0001, p<0.0001) between patients and controls. ‘TC’ haplotype containing minor alleles of NPY polymorphisms was significantly higher in patients and increased the risk of vitiligo by 2.3 fold (p<0.0001). Transcript levels of IL1B were significantly higher, in patients compared to controls (p = 0.0029), in patients with active than stable vitiligo (p = 0.015), also in female patients than male patients (p = 0.026). Genotype-phenotype correlation showed moderate association of IL1B -511C/T polymorphism with higher IL1B transcript levels. Trend analysis revealed significant difference between patients and controls for IL1B transcript levels with respect to different genotypes. Conclusion Our results suggest that NPY −399T/C, +1128T/C and IL1B −511C/T polymorphisms are associated with vitiligo and IL1B −511C/T SNP influences its transcript levels leading to increased risk for vitiligo in

  14. Morris Water Maze Training in Mice Elevates Hippocampal Levels of Transcription Factors Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 and Nuclear Factor Kappa B p65

    PubMed Central

    Snow, Wanda M.; Pahlavan, Payam S.; Djordjevic, Jelena; McAllister, Danielle; Platt, Eric E.; Alashmali, Shoug; Bernstein, Michael J.; Suh, Miyoung; Albensi, Benedict C.

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified several transcription factors that regulate activity-dependent plasticity and memory, with cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) being the most well-studied. In neurons, CREB activation is influenced by the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), considered central to immunity but more recently implicated in memory. The transcription factor early growth response-2 (Egr-2), an NF-κB gene target, is also associated with learning and memory. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), an antioxidant transcription factor linked to NF-κB in pathological conditions, has not been studied in normal memory. Given that numerous transcription factors implicated in activity-dependent plasticity demonstrate connections to NF-κB, this study simultaneously evaluated protein levels of NF-κB, CREB, Egr-2, Nrf2, and actin in hippocampi from young (1 month-old) weanling CD1 mice after training in the Morris water maze, a hippocampal-dependent spatial memory task. After a 6-day acquisition period, time to locate the hidden platform decreased in the Morris water maze. Mice spent more time in the target vs. non-target quadrants of the maze, suggestive of recall of the platform location. Western blot data revealed a decrease in NF-κB p50 protein after training relative to controls, whereas NF-κB p65, Nrf2 and actin increased. Nrf2 levels were correlated with platform crosses in nearly all tested animals. These data demonstrate that training in a spatial memory task results in alterations in and associations with particular transcription factors in the hippocampus, including upregulation of NF-κB p65 and Nrf2. Training-induced increases in actin protein levels caution against its use as a loading control in immunoblot studies examining activity-dependent plasticity, learning, and memory. PMID:26635523

  15. Morris Water Maze Training in Mice Elevates Hippocampal Levels of Transcription Factors Nuclear Factor (Erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 and Nuclear Factor Kappa B p65.

    PubMed

    Snow, Wanda M; Pahlavan, Payam S; Djordjevic, Jelena; McAllister, Danielle; Platt, Eric E; Alashmali, Shoug; Bernstein, Michael J; Suh, Miyoung; Albensi, Benedict C

    2015-01-01

    Research has identified several transcription factors that regulate activity-dependent plasticity and memory, with cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) being the most well-studied. In neurons, CREB activation is influenced by the transcription factor nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB), considered central to immunity but more recently implicated in memory. The transcription factor early growth response-2 (Egr-2), an NF-κB gene target, is also associated with learning and memory. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), an antioxidant transcription factor linked to NF-κB in pathological conditions, has not been studied in normal memory. Given that numerous transcription factors implicated in activity-dependent plasticity demonstrate connections to NF-κB, this study simultaneously evaluated protein levels of NF-κB, CREB, Egr-2, Nrf2, and actin in hippocampi from young (1 month-old) weanling CD1 mice after training in the Morris water maze, a hippocampal-dependent spatial memory task. After a 6-day acquisition period, time to locate the hidden platform decreased in the Morris water maze. Mice spent more time in the target vs. non-target quadrants of the maze, suggestive of recall of the platform location. Western blot data revealed a decrease in NF-κB p50 protein after training relative to controls, whereas NF-κB p65, Nrf2 and actin increased. Nrf2 levels were correlated with platform crosses in nearly all tested animals. These data demonstrate that training in a spatial memory task results in alterations in and associations with particular transcription factors in the hippocampus, including upregulation of NF-κB p65 and Nrf2. Training-induced increases in actin protein levels caution against its use as a loading control in immunoblot studies examining activity-dependent plasticity, learning, and memory.

  16. Effect of Various Food Additives on the Levels of 4(5)-Methylimidazole in a Soy Sauce Model System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sumin; Lee, Jung-Bin; Hwang, Junho; Lee, Kwang-Geun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of food additives such as iron sulfate, magnesium sulfate, zinc sulfate, citric acid, gallic acid, and ascorbic acid on the reduction of 4(5)-methylimidazole (4(5)-MI) was investigated using a soy sauce model system. The concentration of 4(5)-MI in the soy sauce model system with 5% (v/v) caramel colorant III was 1404.13 μg/L. The reduction rate of 4(5)-MI level with the addition of 0.1M additives followed in order: iron sulfate (81%) > zinc sulfate (61%) > citric acid (40%) > gallic acid (38%) > ascorbic acid (24%) > magnesium sulfate (13%). Correlations between 4(5)-MI levels and the physicochemical properties of soy sauce, including the amount of caramel colorant, pH value, and color differences, were determined. The highest correlations were found between 4(5)-MI levels and the amount of caramel colorant and pH values (r(2) = 0.9712, r(2) = 0.9378). The concentration of caramel colorants in 8 commercial soy sauces were estimated, and ranged from 0.01 to 1.34% (v/v). PMID:26661512

  17. Effect of Various Food Additives on the Levels of 4(5)-Methylimidazole in a Soy Sauce Model System.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sumin; Lee, Jung-Bin; Hwang, Junho; Lee, Kwang-Geun

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the effect of food additives such as iron sulfate, magnesium sulfate, zinc sulfate, citric acid, gallic acid, and ascorbic acid on the reduction of 4(5)-methylimidazole (4(5)-MI) was investigated using a soy sauce model system. The concentration of 4(5)-MI in the soy sauce model system with 5% (v/v) caramel colorant III was 1404.13 μg/L. The reduction rate of 4(5)-MI level with the addition of 0.1M additives followed in order: iron sulfate (81%) > zinc sulfate (61%) > citric acid (40%) > gallic acid (38%) > ascorbic acid (24%) > magnesium sulfate (13%). Correlations between 4(5)-MI levels and the physicochemical properties of soy sauce, including the amount of caramel colorant, pH value, and color differences, were determined. The highest correlations were found between 4(5)-MI levels and the amount of caramel colorant and pH values (r(2) = 0.9712, r(2) = 0.9378). The concentration of caramel colorants in 8 commercial soy sauces were estimated, and ranged from 0.01 to 1.34% (v/v).

  18. Developmental coexposure to polychlorinated biphenyls and polybrominated diphenyl ethers has additive effects on circulating thyroxine levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Miller, Veronica M; Sanchez-Morrissey, Susana; Brosch, Karl O; Seegal, Richard F

    2012-05-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are widespread environmental contaminants found in seafood and dairy products. PCBs and PBDEs are structurally similar chemicals and affect thyroid hormone function and behavior in children and laboratory rodents. Although coexposure frequently exists, the in vivo developmental effects of combined exposure to PCBs and PBDEs on thyroxine (T4) levels are unknown. We examined the effects of PCB and PBDE coexposure from gestational day 6 through postnatal day (p) 21, alone and in combination, on T4 levels in rat offspring. In males, exposure to PCBs and PBDEs at 1.7, 5, 10, 20, 40, and 60 μmol/kg/day induced equivalent and dose-dependent reductions in T4 from p 7 to p 21. Exposure to equimolar mixtures of PCBs and PBDEs at 3.4, 10, 20, 40, and 80 μmol/kg/day additively reduced T4 from p 7 to p 21 in males. In a second series of experiments, we determined sex effects on the mixture exposures and found that coexposure to PCBs and PBDEs had similar additive effects on T4 levels in male and female offspring. This study demonstrates that equimolar exposure to PCBs and PBDEs induces similar reductions in T4 levels and that coexposure to a mixture of PCBs and PBDEs has additive effects on T4 levels. These thyroid hormone effects of coexposure to PCBs and PBDEs are important when considering the cumulative effects of coexposure to multiple environmental thyroid hormone-disrupting agents in risk assessment for developmental disorders. PMID:22345314

  19. Low folate levels are associated with methylation-mediated transcriptional repression of miR-203 and miR-375 during cervical carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    HAO, MIN; ZHAO, WEIHONG; ZHANG, LILI; WANG, HONGHONG; YANG, XIN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between a lack of folic acid and the abnormal expression of microRNA (miR)-203 and miR-375 in cervical cancer. In total, 60 tissue samples of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) or stage IA-IIA cervical cancer (study group), and 30 samples without soluble interleukin or malignancy (control group) were examined. The expression of miR-203 and miR-375 was detected using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), and the difference in expression levels was quantified using the 2−ΔΔCq method. In addition, CaSki cervical cancer cells were cultured in vitro and treated with various concentrations of folic acid. The DNA methylation states of miR-203 and miR-375 were subsequently detected by methylation-specific PCR, and the expression levels were evaluated using RT-PCR. miR-203 and miR-375 were significantly downregulated in CIN and cervical cancer tissues, compared with the control group. There was a marked difference in terms of the expression levels of miR-375 between the two groups (P<0.05). In CaSki cells, as the concentration of folic acid increased, the positive rate of DNA methylation of miR-203 and miR-375 decreased, while the expression levels of miR-203 and miR-375 demonstrated a gradual increase, which indicated that the latter two parameters were negatively correlated (P<0.05). Compared with normal cervical tissue, the expression levels of miR-203 and miR-375 were downregulated in CIN and cervical cancer. Methylation of these two miRs was apparent in CaSki cells, and was associated with a lack of folic acid. Therefore, reduced levels of folic acid, leading to increased methylation of miR-203 and miR-375, may be significant events during cervical carcinogenesis. PMID:27313708

  20. HMGI(Y) and Sp1 in addition to NF-kappa B regulate transcription of the MGSA/GRO alpha gene.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, L D; Farmer, A A; Richmond, A

    1995-01-01

    Expression of the chemokine MGSA/GRO is upregulated as melanocytes progress to melanoma cells. We demonstrate that constitutive and cytokine induced MGSA/GRO alpha expression requires multiple DNA regulatory regions between positions -143 to -62. We have previously shown that the NF-kappa B element at -83 to -65 is essential for basal and cytokine induced MGSA/GRO alpha promoter activity in the Hs294T melanoma and normal retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, respectively. Here, we have determined that the Sp1 binding element located approximately 42 base pairs upstream from the NF-kappa B element binds Sp1 and Sp3 constitutively and this element is necessary for basal MGSA/GRO alpha promoter activity. We demonstrate that the high mobility group proteins HMGI(Y) recognize the AT-rich motif nested within the NF-kappa B element in the MGSA/GRO alpha promoter. Loss of either NF-kappa B or HMGI(Y) complex binding by selected point mutations in the NF-kappa B element results in decreased basal and cytokine induced MGSA/GRO alpha promoter activity. Thus, these results indicate that transcriptional regulation of the chemokine MGSA/GRO alpha requires at least three transcription factors: Sp1, NF-kappa B and HMGI(Y). Images PMID:7479086

  1. The relationship between transcript expression levels of nuclear encoded (TFAM, NRF1) and mitochondrial encoded (MT-CO1) genes in single human oocytes during oocyte maturation

    PubMed Central

    Novin, M Ghaffari; Allahveisi, A; Noruzinia, M; Farhadifar, F; Yousefian, E; Fard, A Dehghani; Salimi, M

    2015-01-01

    In some cases of infertility in women, human oocytes fail to mature when they reach the metaphase II (MII) stage. Mitochondria plays an important role in oocyte maturation. A large number of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), copied in oocytes, is essential for providing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) during oocyte maturation. The purpose of this study was to identify the relationship between transcript expression levels of the mitochondrial encoded gene (MT-CO1) and two nuclear encoded genes, nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1) and mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) in various stages of human oocyte maturation. Nine consenting patients, age 21–35 years old, with male factors were selected for ovarian stimulation and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) procedures. mRNA levels of mitochondrial-related genes were performed by singlecell TaqMan® quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). There was no significant relationship between the relative expression levels in germinal vesicle (GV) stage oocytes (p = 0.62). On the contrary, a significant relationship was seen between the relative expression levels of TFAM and NRF1 and the MT-CO1 genes at the stages of metaphase I (MI) and MII (p = 0.03 and p = 0.002). A relationship exists between the transcript expression levels of TFAM and NRF1, and MT-CO1 genes in various stages of human oocyte maturation. PMID:26929904

  2. Line differences in Cor/Lea and fructan biosynthesis-related gene transcript accumulation are related to distinct freezing tolerance levels in synthetic wheat hexaploids.

    PubMed

    Yokota, Hirokazu; Iehisa, Julio C M; Shimosaka, Etsuo; Takumi, Shigeo

    2015-03-15

    In common wheat, cultivar differences in freezing tolerance are considered to be mainly due to allelic differences at two major loci controlling freezing tolerance. One of the two loci, Fr-2, is coincident with a cluster of genes encoding C-repeat binding factors (CBFs), which induce downstream Cor/Lea genes during cold acclimation. Here, we conducted microarray analysis to study comprehensive changes in gene expression profile under long-term low-temperature (LT) treatment and to identify other LT-responsive genes related to cold acclimation in leaves of seedlings and crown tissues of a synthetic hexaploid wheat line. The microarray analysis revealed marked up-regulation of a number of Cor/Lea genes and fructan biosynthesis-related genes under the long-term LT treatment. For validation of the microarray data, we selected four synthetic wheat lines that contain the A and B genomes from the tetraploid wheat cultivar Langdon and the diverse D genomes originating from different Aegilops tauschii accessions with distinct levels of freezing tolerance after cold acclimation. Quantitative RT-PCR showed increased transcript levels of the Cor/Lea, CBF, and fructan biosynthesis-related genes in more freezing-tolerant lines than in sensitive lines. After a 14-day LT treatment, a significant difference in fructan accumulation was observed among the four lines. Therefore, the fructan biosynthetic pathway is associated with cold acclimation in development of wheat freezing tolerance and is another pathway related to diversity in freezing tolerance, in addition to the CBF-mediated Cor/Lea expression pathway.

  3. Antidepressant Effect of Crocus sativus Aqueous Extract and its Effect on CREB, BDNF, and VGF Transcript and Protein Levels in Rat Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, T; Abnous, K; Vahdati, F; Mehri, S; Razavi, B M; Hosseinzadeh, H

    2015-07-01

    Crocus sativus L., commonly known as saffron, is a perennial stemless herb in Iridaceae family. It has been used in traditional medicine as well as in modern pharmacological studies for variety of conditions including depression. Recent studies have suggested brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), VGF Neuropeptide, Cyclic-AMP Response Element Binding Protein (CREB) and phospho-CREB (p-CREB) may play roles in depression. In this research the molecular mechanism of antidepressant effect of aqueous extract of saffron and its effect on the levels of BDNF, VGF, CREB and p-CREB in rat hippocampus, were investigated. The aqueous extract of saffron (40, 80 and 160 mg/kg/day) and imipramine 10 mg/kg/day were injected intraperitoneally (i.p.) for 21 days to rats. The FST (forced swimming test) was performed on the days 1(st) and 21(st). The protein expression and transcript levels of BDNF, VGF CREB and phospho-CREB in rat hippocampus, were evaluated using western blot and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). The results of FST showed that saffron reduced the immobility time. The protein levels of BDNF, CREB and p-CREB were significantly increased in saffron treated rats. VGF protein expression was also increased, but not significantly. The transcript levels of BDNF significantly increased. No significant changes in CREB and VGF transcript levels were observed. It was concluded that aqueous extract of saffron has antidepressant effects and the mechanism of its antidepressant effect may be due to increasing the levels of BDNF, VGF, CREB and P-CREB in rat hippocampus.

  4. The Arabidopsis bHLH Transcription Factors MYC3 and MYC4 Are Targets of JAZ Repressors and Act Additively with MYC2 in the Activation of Jasmonate Responses[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Calvo, Patricia; Chini, Andrea; Fernández-Barbero, Gemma; Chico, José-Manuel; Gimenez-Ibanez, Selena; Geerinck, Jan; Eeckhout, Dominique; Schweizer, Fabian; Godoy, Marta; Franco-Zorrilla, José Manuel; Pauwels, Laurens; Witters, Erwin; Puga, María Isabel; Paz-Ares, Javier; Goossens, Alain; Reymond, Philippe; De Jaeger, Geert; Solano, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Jasmonates (JAs) trigger an important transcriptional reprogramming of plant cells to modulate both basal development and stress responses. In spite of the importance of transcriptional regulation, only one transcription factor (TF), the Arabidopsis thaliana basic helix-loop-helix MYC2, has been described so far as a direct target of JAZ repressors. By means of yeast two-hybrid screening and tandem affinity purification strategies, we identified two previously unknown targets of JAZ repressors, the TFs MYC3 and MYC4, phylogenetically closely related to MYC2. We show that MYC3 and MYC4 interact in vitro and in vivo with JAZ repressors and also form homo- and heterodimers with MYC2 and among themselves. They both are nuclear proteins that bind DNA with sequence specificity similar to that of MYC2. Loss-of-function mutations in any of these two TFs impair full responsiveness to JA and enhance the JA insensitivity of myc2 mutants. Moreover, the triple mutant myc2 myc3 myc4 is as impaired as coi1-1 in the activation of several, but not all, JA-mediated responses such as the defense against bacterial pathogens and insect herbivory. Our results show that MYC3 and MYC4 are activators of JA-regulated programs that act additively with MYC2 to regulate specifically different subsets of the JA-dependent transcriptional response. PMID:21335373

  5. Association of Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) Messenger RNA Level, Food Intake, and Growth in Channel Catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cocaine-and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript (CART) is a potent hypothalamic anorectic peptide in mammals and fish. We hypothesized that increased food intake is associated with changes in expression of CART mRNA within the brain of channel catfish. Objectives were to clone the CART gene, examine ...

  6. ICE1 of Pyrus ussuriensis functions in cold tolerance by enhancing PuDREBa transcriptional levels through interacting with PuHHP1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaosan; Li, Kongqing; Jin, Cong; Zhang, Shaoling

    2015-12-01

    ICE1 transcription factor plays an important role in plant cold stress via regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes. In this study, a PuICE1 gene isolated from Pyrus ussuriensis was characterized for its function in cold tolerance. The expression levels of the PuICE1 were induced by cold, dehydration and salt, with the greatest induction under cold conditions. PuICE1 was localized in the nucleus and could bind specifically to the MYC element in the PuDREBa promoter. The PuICE1 fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain to have transcriptional activation activity. Ectopic expression of the PuICE1 in tomato conferred enhanced tolerance to cold stress at cold temperatures, less electrolyte leakage, less MDA content, higher chlorophyll content, higher survival rate, higher proline content, higher activities of enzymes. In additon, steady-state mRNA levels of six stress-responsive genes coding for either functional or regulatory genes were induced to higher levels in the transgenic lines by cold stress. Yeast two-hybrid, transient assay, split luciferase complementation and BiFC assays all revealed that PuHHP1 protein can physically interact with PuICE1. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PuICE1 plays a positive role in cold tolerance, which may be due to enhancement of PuDREBa transcriptional levels through interacting with the PuHHP1.

  7. ICE1 of Pyrus ussuriensis functions in cold tolerance by enhancing PuDREBa transcriptional levels through interacting with PuHHP1

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaosan; Li, Kongqing; Jin, Cong; Zhang, Shaoling

    2015-01-01

    ICE1 transcription factor plays an important role in plant cold stress via regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes. In this study, a PuICE1 gene isolated from Pyrus ussuriensis was characterized for its function in cold tolerance. The expression levels of the PuICE1 were induced by cold, dehydration and salt, with the greatest induction under cold conditions. PuICE1 was localized in the nucleus and could bind specifically to the MYC element in the PuDREBa promoter. The PuICE1 fused to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain to have transcriptional activation activity. Ectopic expression of the PuICE1 in tomato conferred enhanced tolerance to cold stress at cold temperatures, less electrolyte leakage, less MDA content, higher chlorophyll content, higher survival rate, higher proline content, higher activities of enzymes. In additon, steady-state mRNA levels of six stress-responsive genes coding for either functional or regulatory genes were induced to higher levels in the transgenic lines by cold stress. Yeast two-hybrid, transient assay, split luciferase complementation and BiFC assays all revealed that PuHHP1 protein can physically interact with PuICE1. Taken together, these results demonstrated that PuICE1 plays a positive role in cold tolerance, which may be due to enhancement of PuDREBa transcriptional levels through interacting with the PuHHP1. PMID:26626798

  8. Annual Variation in the Levels of Transcripts of Sex-Specific Genes in the Mantle of the Common Mussel, Mytilus edulis

    PubMed Central

    Anantharaman, Sandhya; Craft, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Mytilus species are used as sentinels for the assessment of environmental health but sex or stage in the reproduction cycle is rarely considered even though both parameters are likely to influence responses to pollution. We have validated the use of a qPCR assay for sex identification and related the levels of transcripts to the reproductive cycle. A temporal study of mantle of Mytilus edulis found transcripts of male-specific vitelline coat lysin (VCL) and female-specific vitelline envelope receptor for lysin (VERL) could identify sex over a complete year. The levels of VCL/VERL were proportional to the numbers of sperm/ova and are indicative of the stage of the reproductive cycle. Maximal levels of VCL and VERL were found in February 2009 declining to minima between July – August before increasing and re-attaining a peak in February 2010. Water temperature may influence these transitions since they coincide with minimal water temperature in February and maximal temperature in August. An identical pattern of variation was found for a cryptic female-specific transcript (H5) but a very different pattern was observed for oestrogen receptor 2 (ER2). ER2 varied in a sex-specific way with male > female for most of the cycle, with a female maxima in July and a male maxima in December. Using artificially spawned animals, the transcripts for VCL, VERL and H5 were shown to be present in gametes and thus their disappearance from mantle is indicative of spawning. VCL and VERL are present at equivalent levels in February and July–August but during gametogenesis (August to January) and spawning (March to June) VCL is present at lower relative amounts than VERL. This may indicate sex-specific control mechanisms for these processes and highlight a potential pressure point leading to reduced reproductive output if environmental factors cause asynchrony to gamete maturation or release. PMID:23226407

  9. Active Center Control of Termination by RNA Polymerase III and tRNA Gene Transcription Levels In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rijal, Keshab; Maraia, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of RNA polymerase (RNAP) III to efficiently recycle from termination to reinitiation is critical for abundant tRNA production during cellular proliferation, development and cancer. Yet understanding of the unique termination mechanisms used by RNAP III is incomplete, as is its link to high transcription output. We used two tRNA-mediated suppression systems to screen for Rpc1 mutants with gain- and loss- of termination phenotypes in S. pombe. 122 point mutation mutants were mapped to a recently solved 3.9 Å structure of yeast RNAP III elongation complex (EC); they cluster in the active center bridge helix and trigger loop, as well as the pore and funnel, the latter of which indicate involvement of the RNA cleavage domain of the C11 subunit in termination. Purified RNAP III from a readthrough (RT) mutant exhibits increased elongation rate. The data strongly support a kinetic coupling model in which elongation rate is inversely related to termination efficiency. The mutants exhibit good correlations of terminator RT in vitro and in vivo, and surprisingly, amounts of transcription in vivo. Because assessing in vivo transcription can be confounded by various parameters, we used a tRNA reporter with a processing defect and a strong terminator. By ruling out differences in RNA decay rates, the data indicate that mutants with the RT phenotype synthesize more RNA than wild type cells, and than can be accounted for by their increased elongation rate. Finally, increased activity by the mutants appears unrelated to the RNAP III repressor, Maf1. The results show that the mobile elements of the RNAP III active center, including C11, are key determinants of termination, and that some of the mutations activate RNAP III for overall transcription. Similar mutations in spontaneous cancer suggest this as an unforeseen mechanism of RNAP III activation in disease. PMID:27518095

  10. Quantifying Temporal Autocorrelations for the Expression of Geobacter species mRNA Gene Transcripts at Variable Ammonium Levels during in situ U(VI) Bioremediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouser, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    In order to develop decision-making tools for the prediction and optimization of subsurface bioremediation strategies, we must be able to link the molecular-scale activity of microorganisms involved in remediation processes with biogeochemical processes observed at the field-scale. This requires the ability to quantify changes in the in situ metabolic condition of dominant microbes and associate these changes to fluctuations in nutrient levels throughout the bioremediation process. It also necessitates a need to understand the spatiotemporal variability of the molecular-scale information to develop meaningful parameters and constraint ranges in complex bio-physio-chemical models. The expression of three Geobacter species genes (ammonium transporter (amtB), nitrogen fixation (nifD), and a housekeeping gene (recA)) were tracked at two monitoring locations that differed significantly in ammonium (NH4+) concentrations during a field-scale experiment where acetate was injected into the subsurface to simulate Geobacteraceae in a uranium-contaminated aquifer. Analysis of amtB and nifD mRNA transcript levels indicated that NH4+ was the primary form of fixed nitrogen during bioremediation. Overall expression levels of amtB were on average 8-fold higher at NH4+ concentrations of 300 μM or more than at lower NH4+ levels (average 60 μM). The degree of temporal correlation in Geobacter species mRNA expression levels was calculated at both locations using autocorrelation methods that describe the relationship between sample semi-variance and time lag. At the monitoring location with lower NH4+, a temporal correlation lag of 8 days was observed for both amtB and nifD transcript patterns. At the location where higher NH4+ levels were observed, no discernable temporal correlation lag above the sampling frequency (approximately every 2 days) was observed for amtB or nifD transcript fluctuations. Autocorrelation trends in recA expression levels at both locations indicated that

  11. O- and H-induced surface core level shifts on Ru(0001): prevalence of the additivity rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizzit, S.; Zhang, Y.; Kostov, K. L.; Petaccia, L.; Baraldi, A.; Menzel, D.; Reuter, K.

    2009-04-01

    In previous work on adsorbate-induced surface core level shifts (SCLSs), the effects caused by O atom adsorption on Rh(111) and Ru(0001) were found to be additive: the measured shifts for first-layer Ru atoms depended linearly on the number of directly coordinated O atoms. Density-functional theory calculations quantitatively reproduced this effect, allowed separation of initial- and final-state contributions, and provided an explanation in terms of a roughly constant charge transfer per O atom. We have now conducted similar measurements and calculations for three well-defined adsorbate and coadsorbate layers containing O and H atoms: (1 × 1)-H, (2 × 2)-(O+H) and (2 × 2)-(O+3H) on Ru(0001). As H is stabilized in fcc sites in the prior two structures and in hcp sites in the latter, this enables us to not only study coverage and coadsorption effects on the adsorbate-induced SCLSs, but also the sensitivity to similar adsorption sites. Remarkably good agreement is obtained between experiment and calculations for the energies and geometries of the layers, as well as for all aspects of the SCLS values. The additivity of the next-neighbor adsorbate-induced SCLSs is found to prevail even for the coadsorbate structures. While this confirms the suggested use of SCLSs as fingerprints of the adsorbate configuration, their sensitivity is further demonstrated by the slightly different shifts unambiguously determined for H adsorption in either fcc or hcp hollow sites.

  12. Fertilizer addition lessens the flux of microbial carbon to higher trophic levels in soil food webs of grassland.

    PubMed

    Lemanski, Kathleen; Scheu, Stefan

    2014-10-01

    Roots and root-derived C compounds are increasingly recognised as important resources for soil animal food webs. We used (13)C-labelled glucose as a model C compound representing root exudates to follow the incorporation of root-derived C into the soil animal food web of a temperate grassland over a period of 52 weeks. We investigated variations in glucose C incorporation with fertilizer addition and sward composition, i.e. variations in plant functional groups. The approach allowed the differentiation of trophic chains based on primary decomposers feeding on litter and phytophagous species feeding on roots (i.e. not incorporating glucose C) from those based on secondary decomposers feeding on microorganisms (thereby assimilating glucose C). Each of the studied soil animal species incorporated glucose C, indicating that the majority of grassland soil animal species rely on microorganisms as food resources with microorganisms being fuelled by root exudates. However, incorporation of glucose C into soil animal species varied markedly with species identity, suggesting that detritivorous microarthropods complement each other in channelling microbial C through soil food webs. Fertilizer addition markedly reduced the concentration of glucose C in most soil animal species as well as the absolute transfer of glucose C into oribatid mites as major secondary decomposers. The results suggest that fertilizer addition shifts the basis of the decomposer food web towards the use of unlabelled resources, presumably roots, i.e. towards a herbivore system, thereby lessening the link between microorganisms and microbial grazers and hampering the propagation of microbial C to higher trophic levels.

  13. Application of a Nonlinear Model to Transcript Levels of Upregulated Stress Response Gene ibpA in Stationary-Phase Salmonella enterica Subjected to Sublethal Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Laura M; Bergholz, Teresa M; Hildebrandt, Ian M; Marks, Bradley P

    2016-07-01

    Sublethal heating, which can occur during slow cooking of meat products, is known to induce increased thermal resistance in Salmonella. However, very few studies have addressed the kinetics of this response. Although several recent studies have reported improved thermal inactivation models that include the effect of prior sublethal history on subsequent thermal resistance, none of these models were based on cellular-level responses to sublethal thermal stress. The goal of this study was to determine whether a nonlinear model could accurately portray the response of Salmonella to heat stress induced by prolonged exposure to sublethal temperatures. To accomplish this, stationary-phase Salmonella Montevideo cultures were subjected to various heating profiles (held at either 40 or 45°C for 0, 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 90, 180, or 240 min) using a PCR thermal cycler. Differential plating on selective and nonselective media was used to confirm the presence of cellular injury. Reverse transcription quantitative PCR was used to screen the transcript levels of six heat stress-related genes to find candidate genes for nonlinear modeling. Injury was detected in populations of Salmonella held at 45°C for 30, 60, and 90 min and at 40°C for 0, 5, and 90 min (P < 0.05), whereas no significant injury was found at 180 and 240 min (P > 0.05). The transcript levels of ibpA, which codes for a small heat shock protein associated with the ClpB and DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE chaperone systems, showed the greatest increase relative to the transcript levels at 0 min, which was significant at 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 180 min at 45°C and at 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, and 90 min at 40°C (P < 0.05). Using ibpA transcript levels as an indicator of adaptation to thermal stress, a nonlinear model for sublethal injury is proposed. The use of variables indicating the physiological state of the pathogen during stress has the potential to increase the accuracy of thermal inactivation models that must account for

  14. Application of a Nonlinear Model to Transcript Levels of Upregulated Stress Response Gene ibpA in Stationary-Phase Salmonella enterica Subjected to Sublethal Heat Stress.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Laura M; Bergholz, Teresa M; Hildebrandt, Ian M; Marks, Bradley P

    2016-07-01

    Sublethal heating, which can occur during slow cooking of meat products, is known to induce increased thermal resistance in Salmonella. However, very few studies have addressed the kinetics of this response. Although several recent studies have reported improved thermal inactivation models that include the effect of prior sublethal history on subsequent thermal resistance, none of these models were based on cellular-level responses to sublethal thermal stress. The goal of this study was to determine whether a nonlinear model could accurately portray the response of Salmonella to heat stress induced by prolonged exposure to sublethal temperatures. To accomplish this, stationary-phase Salmonella Montevideo cultures were subjected to various heating profiles (held at either 40 or 45°C for 0, 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 90, 180, or 240 min) using a PCR thermal cycler. Differential plating on selective and nonselective media was used to confirm the presence of cellular injury. Reverse transcription quantitative PCR was used to screen the transcript levels of six heat stress-related genes to find candidate genes for nonlinear modeling. Injury was detected in populations of Salmonella held at 45°C for 30, 60, and 90 min and at 40°C for 0, 5, and 90 min (P < 0.05), whereas no significant injury was found at 180 and 240 min (P > 0.05). The transcript levels of ibpA, which codes for a small heat shock protein associated with the ClpB and DnaK-DnaJ-GrpE chaperone systems, showed the greatest increase relative to the transcript levels at 0 min, which was significant at 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, 90, and 180 min at 45°C and at 5, 10, 15, 30, 60, and 90 min at 40°C (P < 0.05). Using ibpA transcript levels as an indicator of adaptation to thermal stress, a nonlinear model for sublethal injury is proposed. The use of variables indicating the physiological state of the pathogen during stress has the potential to increase the accuracy of thermal inactivation models that must account for

  15. Correlation of Antagonistic Regulation of leuO Transcription with the Cellular Levels of BglJ-RcsB and LeuO in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Breddermann, Hannes; Schnetz, Karin

    2016-01-01

    LeuO is a conserved and pleiotropic transcription regulator, antagonist of the nucleoid-associated silencer protein H-NS, and important for pathogenicity and multidrug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. Regulation of transcription of the leuO gene is complex. It is silenced by H-NS and its paralog StpA, and it is autoregulated. In addition, in Escherichia coli leuO is antagonistically regulated by the heterodimeric transcription regulator BglJ-RcsB and by LeuO. BglJ-RcsB activates leuO, while LeuO inhibits activation by BglJ-RcsB. Furthermore, LeuO activates expression of bglJ, which is likewise H-NS repressed. Mutual activation of leuO and bglJ resembles a double-positive feedback network, which theoretically can result in bi-stability and heterogeneity, or be maintained in a stable OFF or ON states by an additional signal. Here we performed quantitative and single-cell expression analyses to address the antagonistic regulation and feedback control of leuO transcription by BglJ-RcsB and LeuO using a leuO promoter mVenus reporter fusion and finely tunable bglJ and leuO expression plasmids. The data revealed uniform regulation of leuO expression in the population that correlates with the relative cellular concentration of BglJ and LeuO. The data are in agreement with a straightforward model of antagonistic regulation of leuO expression by the two regulators, LeuO and BglJ-RcsB, by independent mechanisms. Further, the data suggest that at standard laboratory growth conditions feedback regulation of leuO is of minor relevance and that silencing of leuO and bglJ by H-NS (and StpA) keeps these loci in the OFF state.

  16. Correlation of Antagonistic Regulation of leuO Transcription with the Cellular Levels of BglJ-RcsB and LeuO in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Breddermann, Hannes; Schnetz, Karin

    2016-01-01

    LeuO is a conserved and pleiotropic transcription regulator, antagonist of the nucleoid-associated silencer protein H-NS, and important for pathogenicity and multidrug resistance in Enterobacteriaceae. Regulation of transcription of the leuO gene is complex. It is silenced by H-NS and its paralog StpA, and it is autoregulated. In addition, in Escherichia coli leuO is antagonistically regulated by the heterodimeric transcription regulator BglJ-RcsB and by LeuO. BglJ-RcsB activates leuO, while LeuO inhibits activation by BglJ-RcsB. Furthermore, LeuO activates expression of bglJ, which is likewise H-NS repressed. Mutual activation of leuO and bglJ resembles a double-positive feedback network, which theoretically can result in bi-stability and heterogeneity, or be maintained in a stable OFF or ON states by an additional signal. Here we performed quantitative and single-cell expression analyses to address the antagonistic regulation and feedback control of leuO transcription by BglJ-RcsB and LeuO using a leuO promoter mVenus reporter fusion and finely tunable bglJ and leuO expression plasmids. The data revealed uniform regulation of leuO expression in the population that correlates with the relative cellular concentration of BglJ and LeuO. The data are in agreement with a straightforward model of antagonistic regulation of leuO expression by the two regulators, LeuO and BglJ-RcsB, by independent mechanisms. Further, the data suggest that at standard laboratory growth conditions feedback regulation of leuO is of minor relevance and that silencing of leuO and bglJ by H-NS (and StpA) keeps these loci in the OFF state. PMID:27695690

  17. Additive enhancement of wound healing in diabetic mice by low level light and topical CoQ10

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Zhigang; Wu, Jeffrey H.; Dong, Tingting; Wu, Mei X.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes, a highly prevalent disease that affects 9.3% of Americans, often leads to severe complications and slow wound healing. Preclinical studies have suggested that low level light therapy (LLLT) can accelerate wound healing in diabetic subjects, but significant improvements must be made to overcome the absence of persuasive evidence for its clinical use. We demonstrate here that LLLT can be combined with topical Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) to heal wounds in diabetic mice significantly faster than LLLT alone, CoQ10 alone, or controls. LLLT followed by topical CoQ10 enhanced wound healing by 68~103% in diabetic mice in the first week and more than 24% in the second week compared with untreated controls. All wounds were fully healed in two weeks following the dual treatment, in contrast to only 50% wounds or a fewer being fully healed for single or sham treatment. The accelerated healing was corroborated by at least 50% higher hydroxyproline levels, and tripling cell proliferation rates in LLLT and CoQ10 treated wounds over controls. The beneficial effects on wound healing were probably attributed to additive enhancement of ATP production by LLLT and CoQ10 treatment. The combination of LLLT and topical CoQ10 is safe and convenient, and merits further clinical study. PMID:26830658

  18. LV wall segmentation using the variational level set method (LSM) with additional shape constraint for oedema quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadir, K.; Gao, H.; Payne, A.; Soraghan, J.; Berry, C.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper an automatic algorithm for the left ventricle (LV) wall segmentation and oedema quantification from T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images is presented. The extent of myocardial oedema delineates the ischaemic area-at-risk (AAR) after myocardial infarction (MI). Since AAR can be used to estimate the amount of salvageable myocardial post-MI, oedema imaging has potential clinical utility in the management of acute MI patients. This paper presents a new scheme based on the variational level set method (LSM) with additional shape constraint for the segmentation of T2-weighted CMR image. In our approach, shape information of the myocardial wall is utilized to introduce a shape feature of the myocardial wall into the variational level set formulation. The performance of the method is tested using real CMR images (12 patients) and the results of the automatic system are compared to manual segmentation. The mean perpendicular distances between the automatic and manual LV wall boundaries are in the range of 1-2 mm. Bland-Altman analysis on LV wall area indicates there is no consistent bias as a function of LV wall area, with a mean bias of -121 mm2 between individual investigator one (IV1) and LSM, and -122 mm2 between individual investigator two (IV2) and LSM when compared to two investigators. Furthermore, the oedema quantification demonstrates good correlation when compared to an expert with an average error of 9.3% for 69 slices of short axis CMR image from 12 patients.

  19. Circadian regulation of chloroplast transcription in Chlamydomonas is accompanied by little or no fluctuation in RPOD levels or core RNAP activity.

    PubMed

    Kawazoe, Ryo; Mahan, Kristina M; Venghaus, Brad E; Carter, Matthew L; Herrin, David L

    2012-12-01

    In Chlamydomonas growing under 24 h light-dark cycles, chloroplast transcription is under circadian clock control, and peaks early in the morning. The peak (but not trough) requires ongoing cytoplasmic translation, as it is sensitive to cycloheximide (CH). The chloroplast transcriptional apparatus in Chlamydomonas is simpler than in land plants, with only one type of RNA polymerase (RNAP, bacterial) and apparently only one sigma factor (RPOD). Core RNAP can be assayed in vitro with a non-sigma factor dependent template, and is sensitive to rifampicin. We developed a membrane-based assay for RNAP activity, and used it to determine that core activity is only weakly affected by pre-treating cells with CH. Moreover, core chloroplast RNAP activity was steady during a 24 h light-dark cycle. Levels of the sigma factor (RPOD) were examined using western blots, and found to fluctuate less than 25 % during light-dark cycles. These data indicate that circadian regulation of chloroplast transcription is distinct from regulation by sulfur availability, which involves significant changes in RPOD levels. The implications of this data for hypotheses that purport to explain the circadian control mechanism are discussed.

  20. Promoter-level expression clustering identifies time development of transcriptional regulatory cascades initiated by ErbB receptors in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Mina, Marco; Magi, Shigeyuki; Jurman, Giuseppe; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Arner, Erik; Forrest, Alistair R R; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Daub, Carsten O; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Furlanello, Cesare

    2015-07-16

    The analysis of CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) time-course has been proposed by the FANTOM5 Consortium to extend the understanding of the sequence of events facilitating cell state transition at the level of promoter regulation. To identify the most prominent transcriptional regulations induced by growth factors in human breast cancer, we apply here the Complexity Invariant Dynamic Time Warping motif EnRichment (CIDER) analysis approach to the CAGE time-course datasets of MCF-7 cells stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) or heregulin (HRG). We identify a multi-level cascade of regulations rooted by the Serum Response Factor (SRF) transcription factor, connecting the MAPK-mediated transduction of the HRG stimulus to the negative regulation of the MAPK pathway by the members of the DUSP family phosphatases. The finding confirms the known primary role of FOS and FOSL1, members of AP-1 family, in shaping gene expression in response to HRG induction. Moreover, we identify a new potential regulation of DUSP5 and RARA (known to antagonize the transcriptional regulation induced by the estrogen receptors) by the activity of the AP-1 complex, specific to HRG response. The results indicate that a divergence in AP-1 regulation determines cellular changes of breast cancer cells stimulated by ErbB receptors.

  1. Promoter-level expression clustering identifies time development of transcriptional regulatory cascades initiated by ErbB receptors in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mina, Marco; Magi, Shigeyuki; Jurman, Giuseppe; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Arner, Erik; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Daub, Carsten O.; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Furlanello, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) time-course has been proposed by the FANTOM5 Consortium to extend the understanding of the sequence of events facilitating cell state transition at the level of promoter regulation. To identify the most prominent transcriptional regulations induced by growth factors in human breast cancer, we apply here the Complexity Invariant Dynamic Time Warping motif EnRichment (CIDER) analysis approach to the CAGE time-course datasets of MCF-7 cells stimulated by epidermal growth factor (EGF) or heregulin (HRG). We identify a multi-level cascade of regulations rooted by the Serum Response Factor (SRF) transcription factor, connecting the MAPK-mediated transduction of the HRG stimulus to the negative regulation of the MAPK pathway by the members of the DUSP family phosphatases. The finding confirms the known primary role of FOS and FOSL1, members of AP-1 family, in shaping gene expression in response to HRG induction. Moreover, we identify a new potential regulation of DUSP5 and RARA (known to antagonize the transcriptional regulation induced by the estrogen receptors) by the activity of the AP-1 complex, specific to HRG response. The results indicate that a divergence in AP-1 regulation determines cellular changes of breast cancer cells stimulated by ErbB receptors. PMID:26179713

  2. Increase in proto-oncogene mRNA transcript levels in bovine lymphoid cells infected with a cytopathic type 2 bovine viral diarrhea virus.

    PubMed

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F

    2008-08-01

    Infection of susceptible animals with bovine viral diarrhea viruses (BVDV) can result in an array of disease symptoms that are dependent in part on the strain of infecting virus and the physiological status of the host. BVDV are lymphotrophic and exist as two biotypes. Cytopathic BVDV kill cells outright while noncytopathic strains can readily establish persistent infections. The molecular mechanisms behind these different affects are unknown. To gain a better understanding of the mechanisms of disease, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), a powerful method for global gene expression analysis, was employed to examine gene expression changes in BVDV-infected BL3 cells, a bovine B-cell lymphosarcoma cell line. SAGE libraries were constructed from mRNA derived from BL3 cells that were noninfected or infected with the cytopathic BVDV2 strain 296c. Annotation of the SAGE data showed the expression of many genes that are characteristic of B cells and integral to their function. Comparison of the SAGE databases also revealed a number of genes that were differentially expressed. Of particular interest was the increased numbers of transcripts encoding proto-oncogenes (c-fos, c-jun, junB, junD) in 296c-infected cells, all of which are constituents of the AP-1 transcriptional activation complex. Real-time RT-PCR confirmed these results and indicated that the actual increases were larger than that predicted by SAGE. In contrast, there was no corresponding increase in protein levels, but instead a significant decrease of c-jun and junB protein levels in the infected BL3 cells was observed. Rather than an increase in transcription of these genes, it appeared that these proto-oncogenes transcripts accumulated in the BVDV2-infected cells.

  3. REPRESSION OF SHOOT GROWTH, a bZIP Transcriptional Activator, Regulates Cell Elongation by Controlling the Level of Gibberellins

    PubMed Central

    Fukazawa, Jutarou; Sakai, Tatsuya; Ishida, Sarahmi; Yamaguchi, Isomaro; Kamiya, Yuji; Takahashi, Yohsuke

    2000-01-01

    Cell expansion, a developmental process regulated by both endogenous programs and environmental stimuli, is critically important for plant growth. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of RSG (for repression of shoot growth), a transcriptional activator with a basic leucine zipper (bZIP) domain. To examine the role of RSG in plant development, we generated transgenic tobacco plants expressing a dominant-negative form of RSG, which repressed the activity of full-length RSG. In transgenic plants, this expression severely inhibited stem internode growth, specifically cell elongation. These plants also had less endogenous amounts of the major active gibberellin (GA) in tobacco, GA1. Applying GAs restored the dwarf phenotypes of transgenic tobacco plants that expressed the dominant-negative form of RSG. To investigate the function of RSG in the regulation of the endogenous amounts of GAs, we identified a target for RSG. RSG bound and activated the promoter of Arabidopsis GA3, one of the genes encoding enzymes involved in GA biosynthesis. Moreover, the dominant-negative form of RSG decreased expression of the GA3 homolog in transgenic tobacco plants. Our results show that RSG, a bZIP transcriptional activator, regulates the morphology of plants by controlling the endogenous amounts of GAs. PMID:10852936

  4. Direct and efficient xylitol production from xylan by Saccharomyces cerevisiae through transcriptional level and fermentation processing optimizations.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhe; Qu, Hongnan; Li, Chun; Zhou, Xiaohong

    2013-12-01

    In this study, four engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae carrying xylanase, β-xylosidase and xylose reductase genes by different transcriptional regulations were constructed to directly convert xylan to xylitol. According to the results, the high-copy number plasmid required a rigid selection for promoter characteristics, on the contrast, the selection of promoters could be more flexible for low-copy number plasmid. For cell growth and xylitol production, glucose and galactose were found more efficient than other sugars. The semi-aerobic condition and feeding of co-substrates were taken to improve the yield of xylitol. It was found that the strain containing high-copy number plasmid had the highest xylitol yield, but it was sensitive to the change of fermentation. However, the strain carrying low-copy number plasmid was more adaptable to different processes. By optimization of the transcriptional regulation and fermentation processes, the xylitol concentration could be increased of 1.7 folds and the yield was 0.71 g xylitol/g xylan.

  5. Response of Functional Structure of Soil Microbial Community to Multi-level Nitrogen Additions on the Central Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, G.; Yuan, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The use of fossil fuels and fertilizers has increased the amount of biologically reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere over the past century. Tibet is the one of the most threatened regions by nitrogen deposition, thus understanding how its microbial communities function maybe of high importance to predicting microbial responses to nitrogen deposition. Here we describe a short-time nitrogen addition conducted in an alpine steppe ecosystem to investigate the response of functional structure of soil microbial community to multi-level nitrogen addition. Using a GeoChip 4.0, we showed that functional diversities and richness of functional genes were unchanged at low level of nitrogen fertilizer inputs (<20 kg N ha-1 yr-1), but significantly decreased at higher nitrogen fertilizer inputs (>=40 kg N ha-1 yr-1). Detrended correspondence analysis indicated that the functional structure of microbial communities was markedly different across the nitrogen gradients. Most C degradation genes whose abundances significantly increased under elevated N fertilizer were those involved in the degradation of relatively labile C (starch, hemicellulose, cellulose), whereas the abundance of certain genes involved in the degradation of recalcitrant C (i.e. lignin) was largely decreased (such as manganese peroxidase, mnp). The results suggest that the elevated N fertilization rates might significantly accelerate the labile C degradation, but might not spur recalcitrant C degradation. The combined effect of gdh and ureC genes involved in N cycling appeared to shift the balance between ammonia and organic N toward organic N ammonification and hence increased the N mineralization potential. Moreover, Urease directly involved in urea mineralization significantly increased. Lastly, Canonical correspondence analysis showed that soil (TOC+NH4++NO3-+NO2-+pH) and plant (Aboveground plant productivity + Shannon Diversity) variables could explain 38.9% of the variation of soil microbial community

  6. LV wall segmentation using the variational level set method (LSM) with additional shape constraint for oedema quantification.

    PubMed

    Kadir, K; Gao, H; Payne, A; Soraghan, J; Berry, C

    2012-10-01

    In this paper an automatic algorithm for the left ventricle (LV) wall segmentation and oedema quantification from T2-weighted cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) images is presented. The extent of myocardial oedema delineates the ischaemic area-at-risk (AAR) after myocardial infarction (MI). Since AAR can be used to estimate the amount of salvageable myocardial post-MI, oedema imaging has potential clinical utility in the management of acute MI patients. This paper presents a new scheme based on the variational level set method (LSM) with additional shape constraint for the segmentation of T2-weighted CMR image. In our approach, shape information of the myocardial wall is utilized to introduce a shape feature of the myocardial wall into the variational level set formulation. The performance of the method is tested using real CMR images (12 patients) and the results of the automatic system are compared to manual segmentation. The mean perpendicular distances between the automatic and manual LV wall boundaries are in the range of 1-2 mm. Bland-Altman analysis on LV wall area indicates there is no consistent bias as a function of LV wall area, with a mean bias of -121 mm(2) between individual investigator one (IV1) and LSM, and -122 mm(2) between individual investigator two (IV2) and LSM when compared to two investigators. Furthermore, the oedema quantification demonstrates good correlation when compared to an expert with an average error of 9.3% for 69 slices of short axis CMR image from 12 patients.

  7. Insulin-sensitive glucose transporter transcript levels in calf muscles assessed with a bovine GLUT4 cDNA fragment.

    PubMed

    Hocquette, J F; Graulet, B; Castiglia-Delavaud, C; Bornes, F; Lepetit, N; Ferre, P

    1996-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the expression of the insulin-sensitive glucose transporter (GLUT4) is lower in oxidative muscles than in glycolytic muscles in bovines and goats in contrast to observations in rats. Additional experiments in this work provide very strong arguments that the immunoreactive band detected does represent GLUT4 protein, which further validates our previous results. Therefore, to determine the level of regulation, the main objective of the present study was to measure GLUT4 mRNA amounts in various bovine muscles. A 241-bp fragment of the bovine GLUT4 cDNA was cloned by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). It shares 80-90% sequence identity with related sequences in other species. This PCR-amplified bovine GLUT4 probe was used to determine the distribution of GLUT4 mRNA in bovine tissues in comparison with that of GLUT1 mRNA. Moreover, GLUT4 mRNA amounts were quantified by Northern-blot analysis in heart and seven skeletal muscles with various oxidative and glycolytic activities from seven ruminant calves. GLUT4 mRNA was detected by Northern-blot analysis only in calf insulin-sensitive tissues. In contrast, GLUT1 mRNA was detected in all tissues studied except liver. GLUT4 mRNA amount was the highest in masseter and heart, which are oxidative muscles (1.67 +/- 0.16 and 1.53 +/- 0.19 units/g wet tissue weight, respectively) and the lowest in glycolytic or oxido-glycolytic muscles (0.31 +/- 0.04 to 1.00 +/- 0.09 units/g wet tissue weight; SEM, n = 7). These data and our previous results provide evidence for translational and/or post-translational control mechanisms of bovine GLUT4 protein expression in a muscle type-specific manner.

  8. MRD assessed by WT1 and NPM1 transcript levels identifies distinct outcomes in AML patients and is influenced by gemtuzumab ozogamicin

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Juliette; Lambert, Jérôme; Nibourel, Olivier; Pautas, Cécile; Hayette, Sandrine; Cayuela, Jean-Michel; Terré, Christine; Rousselot, Philippe; Dombret, Hervé; Chevret, Sylvie; Preudhomme, Claude; Castaigne, Sylvie; Renneville, Aline

    2014-01-01

    We analysed the prognostic significance of minimal residual disease (MRD) level in adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) treated in the randomized gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO) ALFA-0701 trial. Levels of WT1 and NPM1 gene transcripts were assessed using cDNA-based real-time quantitative PCR in 183 patients with WT1 overexpression and in 77 patients with NMP1 mutation (NPM1mut) at diagnosis. Positive WT1 MRD (defined as > 0.5% in the peripheral blood) after induction and at the end of treatment were both significantly associated with a higher risk of relapse and a shorter overall survival (OS). Positive NPM1mut MRD (defined as > 0.1% in the bone marrow) after induction and at the end of treatment also predicted a higher risk of relapse, but did not influence OS. Interestingly, the achievement of a negative NPM1mut MRD was significantly more frequent in patients treated in the GO arm compared to those treated in control arm (39% versus 7% (p=0.006) after induction and 91% versus 61% (p=0.028) at the end of treatment). However, GO did not influence WT1 MRD levels. Our study supports the prognostic significance of MRD assessed by WT1 and NPM1mut transcript levels and show that NPM1 MRD is decreased by GO treatment. PMID:25026287

  9. (S)-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, a product of the mva operon of Pseudomonas mevalonii, is regulated at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y L; Beach, M J; Rodwell, V W

    1989-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a 505-base-pair (bp) segment of DNA situated upstream of mvaA, the structural gene for (S)-3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (EC 1.1.1.88) of Pseudomonas mevalonii. The DNA segment that we characterized includes the promoter region for the mva operon. Nuclease S1 mapping and primer extension analysis showed that mvaA is the promoter-proximal gene of the mva operon. Transcription initiates at -56 bp relative to the first A (+1) of the translation start site. Transcription in vivo was induced by mevalonate. Structural features of the mva promoter region include an 80-bp A + T-rich region, and -12, -24 consensus sequences that resemble sequences of sigma 54 promoters in enteric organisms. The relative amplitudes of catalytic activity, enzyme protein, and mvaA mRNA are consistent with a model of regulation of this operon at the transcriptional level. Images PMID:2477360

  10. Molecular Mechanisms of Transcription Initiation at gal Promoters and their Multi-Level Regulation by GalR, CRP and DNA Loop

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Dale E.A.; Adhya, Sankar

    2015-01-01

    Studying the regulation of transcription of the gal operon that encodes the amphibolic pathway of d-galactose metabolism in Escherichia coli discerned a plethora of principles that operate in prokaryotic gene regulatory processes. In this chapter, we have reviewed some of the more recent findings in gal that continues to reveal unexpected but important mechanistic details. Since the operon is transcribed from two overlapping promoters, P1 and P2, regulated by common regulatory factors, each genetic or biochemical experiment allowed simultaneous discernment of two promoters. Recent studies range from genetic, biochemical through biophysical experiments providing explanations at physiological, mechanistic and single molecule levels. The salient observations highlighted here are: the axiom of determining transcription start points, discovery of a new promoter element different from the known ones that influences promoter strength, occurrence of an intrinsic DNA sequence element that overrides the transcription elongation pause created by a DNA-bound protein roadblock, first observation of a DNA loop and determination its trajectory, and piggybacking proteins and delivering to their DNA target. PMID:26501343

  11. Single-target high-throughput transcription analyses reveal high levels of alternative splicing present in the FPPS/GGPPS from Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Gabriel, Heloisa B.; de Azevedo, Mauro F.; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Kimura, Emília A.; Katzin, Alejandro M.; Alves, João M. P.

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a tropical disease with significant morbidity and mortality. A better understanding of the metabolism of its most important etiological agent, Plasmodium falciparum, is paramount to the development of better treatment and other mitigation measures. Farnesyldiphosphate synthase/geranylgeranyldiphosphate synthase (FPPS/GGPPS) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of isoprenic chains present in many essential structures. In P. falciparum, as well as a handful of other organisms, FPPS/GGPPS has been shown to be a bifunctional enzyme. By genetic tagging and microscopy, we observed a changing localization of FPPS/GGPPS in blood stage parasites. Given the great importance of alternative splicing and other transcriptional phenomena in gene regulation and the generation of protein diversity, we have investigated the processing of the FPPS/GGPPS transcript in P. falciparum by high-throughput sequencing methods in four time-points along the intraerythrocytic cycle of P. falciparum. We have identified levels of transcript diversity an order of magnitude higher than previously observed in this organism, as well as a few stage-specific splicing events. Our data suggest that alternative splicing in P. falciparum is an important feature for gene regulation and the generation of protein diversity. PMID:26688062

  12. Single-target high-throughput transcription analyses reveal high levels of alternative splicing present in the FPPS/GGPPS from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Heloisa B; de Azevedo, Mauro F; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Wunderlich, Gerhard; Kimura, Emília A; Katzin, Alejandro M; Alves, João M P

    2015-01-01

    Malaria is a tropical disease with significant morbidity and mortality. A better understanding of the metabolism of its most important etiological agent, Plasmodium falciparum, is paramount to the development of better treatment and other mitigation measures. Farnesyldiphosphate synthase/geranylgeranyldiphosphate synthase (FPPS/GGPPS) is a key enzyme in the synthesis of isoprenic chains present in many essential structures. In P. falciparum, as well as a handful of other organisms, FPPS/GGPPS has been shown to be a bifunctional enzyme. By genetic tagging and microscopy, we observed a changing localization of FPPS/GGPPS in blood stage parasites. Given the great importance of alternative splicing and other transcriptional phenomena in gene regulation and the generation of protein diversity, we have investigated the processing of the FPPS/GGPPS transcript in P. falciparum by high-throughput sequencing methods in four time-points along the intraerythrocytic cycle of P. falciparum. We have identified levels of transcript diversity an order of magnitude higher than previously observed in this organism, as well as a few stage-specific splicing events. Our data suggest that alternative splicing in P. falciparum is an important feature for gene regulation and the generation of protein diversity. PMID:26688062

  13. Comparison of cyanobacterial microcystin synthetase (mcy) E gene transcript levels, mcy E gene copies, and biomass as indicators of microcystin risk under laboratory and field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ngwa, Felexce F; Madramootoo, Chandra A; Jabaji, Suha

    2014-01-01

    Increased incidences of mixed assemblages of microcystin-producing and nonproducing cyanobacterial strains in freshwater bodies necessitate development of reliable proxies for cyanotoxin risk assessment. Detection of microcystin biosynthetic genes in water blooms of cyanobacteria is generally indicative of the presence of potentially toxic cyanobacterial strains. Although much effort has been devoted toward elucidating the microcystin biosynthesis mechanisms in many cyanobacteria genera, little is known about the impacts of co-occurring cyanobacteria on cellular growth, mcy gene expression, or mcy gene copy distribution. The present study utilized conventional microscopy, qPCR assays, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to study how competition between microcystin-producing Microcystis aeruginosa CPCC 299 and Planktothrix agardhii NIVA-CYA 126 impacts mcyE gene expression, mcyE gene copies, and microcystin concentration under controlled laboratory conditions. Furthermore, analyses of environmental water samples from the Missisquoi Bay, Quebec, enabled us to determine how the various potential toxigenic cyanobacterial biomass proxies correlated with cellular microcystin concentrations in a freshwater lake. Results from our laboratory study indicated significant downregulation of mcyE gene expression in mixed cultures of M. aeruginosa plus P. agardhii on most sampling days in agreement with depressed growth recorded in the mixed cultures, suggesting that interaction between the two species probably resulted in suppressed growth and mcyE gene expression in the mixed cultures. Furthermore, although mcyE gene copies and McyE transcripts were detected in all laboratory and field samples with measureable microcystin levels, only mcyE gene copies showed significant positive correlations (R2 > 0.7) with microcystin concentrations, while McyE transcript levels did not. These results suggest that mcyE gene copies are better indicators of potential risks from microcystins

  14. The specific expression patterns of lactase, sucrase and calbindin-D9k in weaning rats are regulated at the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Akiko; Goda, Toshinao; Motohashi, Yasuko; Sakuma, Keiko

    2004-08-01

    During weaning, rat lactase-phlorizin hydrolase (LPH) expression decreased to the low levels found in adults, while sucrase-isomaltase (SI) sharply increased. Calbindin-D9k (CaBP) is specific to the intestine and expression peaked within a few days of weaning. The present study investigates whether these molecules are regulated at transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels and examines the effects of diet on regulation. At normal weaning on day 21, litters were separated from their dams and one group was fed with a standard laboratory diet (weaned (W) group). The other group received a diet containing lactose as the sole source of carbohydrate (lactose-fed (L) group). Mucosal cells were obtained from the proximal part of the rat small intestine and then the activity and concentration of LPH, SI and CaBP proteins and mRNAs were determined. Three parameters revealed the same changing patterns in LPH, SI and CaBP during development and there was significant (p<0.001) correlation between three parameters: LPH, r=0.97 for activity vs. protein, r=0.99 for activity vs. mRNA, r=0.96 for protein vs. mRNA, SI, r=0.99 for activity vs. protein, r=0.98 for activity vs. mRNA, r=0.96 for protein vs. mRNA, CaBP, r=0.94 for activity vs. protein, r=0.97 for activity vs. mRNA, r=0.95 for protein vs. mRNA. Expression of the three proteins did not differ between the L and W groups. Accordingly, it has been suggested that the expression of LPH, SI and CaBP during development is defined at the transcriptional level and dietary changes do not exert a primary effect on it.

  15. Multisite light-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor PIF3 is necessary for both its rapid degradation and concomitant negative feedback modulation of photoreceptor phyB levels in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ni, Weimin; Xu, Shou-Ling; Chalkley, Robert J; Pham, Thao Nguyen D; Guan, Shenheng; Maltby, Dave A; Burlingame, Alma L; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Quail, Peter H

    2013-07-01

    Plants constantly monitor informational light signals using sensory photoreceptors, which include the phytochrome (phy) family (phyA to phyE), and adjust their growth and development accordingly. Following light-induced nuclear translocation, photoactivated phy molecules bind to and induce rapid phosphorylation and degradation of phy-interacting basic Helix Loop Helix (bHLH) transcription factors (PIFs), such as PIF3, thereby regulating the expression of target genes. However, the mechanisms underlying the signal-relay process are still not fully understood. Here, using mass spectrometry, we identify multiple, in vivo, light-induced Ser/Thr phosphorylation sites in PIF3. Using transgenic expression of site-directed mutants of PIF3, we provide evidence that a set of these phosphorylation events acts collectively to trigger rapid degradation of the PIF3 protein in response to initial exposure of dark-grown seedlings to light. In addition, we show that phyB-induced PIF3 phosphorylation is also required for the known negative feedback modulation of phyB levels in prolonged light, potentially through codegradation of phyB and PIF3. This mutually regulatory intermolecular transaction thus provides a mechanism with the dual capacity to promote early, graded, or threshold regulation of the primary, PIF3-controlled transcriptional network in response to initial light exposure, and later, to attenuate global sensitivity to the light signal through reductions in photoreceptor levels upon prolonged exposure. PMID:23903316

  16. Formation Of Transparent Exopolymeric Particles (TEP) In Mesocosms Under Increasing Turbulence Levels With And Without Additional Nutrients.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauvais, S.; Pedrotti, Ml.

    Transparent Exopolymeric Particles (TEP) are formed abiotically by spontaneous co- agulation of the colloidal fraction of dissolved organic polysaccharides released via phytoplankton and bacteria exudation. Their importance in the vertical fluxes of or- ganic matter in coastal and pelagic ecosystems is now well recognised. However, their production as a function of the environment features has yet to be investigated. Evolu- tion of TEP formation was followed during a two week mesocosm experiment under 4 several turbulence levels and with or without added nutrients. This study was per- formed in the framework of EC-ELOISE-NATP project. The results showed a rapid formation of TEP 24h after the phytoplankton bloom occurred. This suggests that TEP consist of fresh organic material, derived from biological process, such as phyto- plankton blooms. Their abundance increased with time in mesocosms with additional nutrients indicating that phytoplankton cells were actively exuding the precursors. The C/N ratio of particualte organic matter (POM) in mesocosms enriched with nutrients was highly correlated with TEP abundance, it confirms that TEP can have a strong impact on the biogeochemical fluxes in oceans, in particular on the carbon cycle. TEP were more abundant in the mesocosms with the highest turbulence intensity. It sug- gests that the effect of turbulence could promote encounter rates between particles increasing coagulation processes. Even if biological processes are of primary impor- tance in TEP production, this study also highlights the role of physical processes in their formation dynamics. The role of TEP in the microbial food web will be also discussed.

  17. Distinct Transcript Isoforms of the Atypical Chemokine Receptor 1 (ACKR1)/Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) Gene Are Expressed in Lymphoblasts and Altered Isoform Levels Are Associated with Genetic Ancestry and the Duffy-Null Allele.

    PubMed

    Davis, Melissa B; Walens, Andrea; Hire, Rupali; Mumin, Kauthar; Brown, Andrea M; Ford, DeJuana; Howerth, Elizabeth W; Monteil, Michele

    2015-01-01

    The Atypical ChemoKine Receptor 1 (ACKR1) gene, better known as Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC or Duffy), is responsible for the Duffy Blood Group and plays a major role in regulating the circulating homeostatic levels of pro-inflammatory chemokines. Previous studies have shown that one common variant, the Duffy Null (Fy-) allele that is specific to African Ancestry groups, completely removes expression of the gene on erythrocytes; however, these individuals retain endothelial expression. Additional alleles are associated with a myriad of clinical outcomes related to immune responses and inflammation. In addition to allele variants, there are two distinct transcript isoforms of DARC which are expressed from separate promoters, and very little is known about the distinct transcriptional regulation or the distinct functionality of these protein isoforms. Our objective was to determine if the African specific Fy- allele alters the expression pattern of DARC isoforms and therefore could potentially result in a unique signature of the gene products, commonly referred to as antigens. Our work is the first to establish that there is expression of DARC on lymphoblasts. Our data indicates that people of African ancestry have distinct relative levels of DARC isoforms expressed in these cells. We conclude that the expression of both isoforms in combination with alternate alleles yields multiple Duffy antigens in ancestry groups, depending upon the haplotypes across the gene. Importantly, we hypothesize that DARC isoform expression patterns will translate into ancestry-specific inflammatory responses that are correlated with the axis of pro-inflammatory chemokine levels and distinct isoform-specific interactions with these chemokines. Ultimately, this work will increase knowledge of biological mechanisms underlying disparate clinical outcomes of inflammatory-related diseases among ethnic and geographic ancestry groups. PMID:26473357

  18. Abundance, transcription levels and phylogeny of bacteria capable of nitrous oxide reduction in a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Song, Kang; Suenaga, Toshikazu; Hamamoto, Aki; Satou, Kouichi; Riya, Shohei; Hosomi, Masaaki; Terada, Akihiko

    2014-09-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production and expression of genes capable of its reduction were investigated in two full-scale parallel plug-flow activated sludge systems. These two systems continuously received wastewater with the same constituents, but operated under distinct nitrification efficiencies due to mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS) concentration and the different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). A shorter HRT in system 2 resulted in a lower nitrification efficiency (40-60%) in conjunction with a high N2O emission (50.6 mg-N/L/day), whereas there was a higher nitrification efficiency (>99%) in system 1 with low N2O emission (22.6 mg-N/L/day). The DNA abundance of functional genes responsible for nitrification and denitrification were comparable in both systems, but transcription of nosZ mRNA in the lower N2O emission system (system 1) was one order of magnitude higher than that in the higher N2O emission system (system 2). The diversity and evenness of the nosZ gene were nearly identical; however, the predominant N2O reducing bacteria were phylogenetically distinct. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that N2O-reducing strains only retrieved in system 1 were close to the genera Rhodobacter, Oligotropha and Shinella, whereas they were close to the genera Mesorhizobium only in system 2. The distinct predominant N2O reducers may directly or indirectly influence N2O emissions.

  19. Analysis of transcript and metabolite levels in Italian rice (Oryza sativa L.) cultivars subjected to osmotic stress or benzothiadiazole treatment.

    PubMed

    Baldoni, Elena; Mattana, Monica; Locatelli, Franca; Consonni, Roberto; Cagliani, Laura R; Picchi, Valentina; Abbruscato, Pamela; Genga, Annamaria

    2013-09-01

    One of the major objectives of rice (Oryza sativa L.) breeding programs is the development of new varieties with higher tolerance/resistance to both abiotic and biotic stresses. In this study, Italian rice cultivars were subjected to osmotic stress or benzothiadiazole (BTH) treatments. An analysis of the expression of selected genes known to be involved in the stress response and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) metabolic profiling were combined with multivariate statistical analyses to elucidate potential correlations between gene expression or metabolite content and observed tolerant/resistant phenotypes. We observed that the expression of three chosen genes (two WRKY genes and one peroxidase encoding gene) differed between susceptible and resistant cultivars in response to BTH treatments. Moreover, the analysis of metabolite content, in particular in the osmotic stress experiment, enabled discrimination between selected cultivars based on differences in the accumulation of some primary metabolites, primarily sugars. This research highlights the potential usefulness of this approach to characterise rice varieties based on transcriptional or metabolic changes due to adverse environmental conditions.

  20. Abundance, transcription levels and phylogeny of bacteria capable of nitrous oxide reduction in a municipal wastewater treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Song, Kang; Suenaga, Toshikazu; Hamamoto, Aki; Satou, Kouichi; Riya, Shohei; Hosomi, Masaaki; Terada, Akihiko

    2014-09-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) production and expression of genes capable of its reduction were investigated in two full-scale parallel plug-flow activated sludge systems. These two systems continuously received wastewater with the same constituents, but operated under distinct nitrification efficiencies due to mixed liquor suspended solid (MLSS) concentration and the different hydraulic retention times (HRTs). A shorter HRT in system 2 resulted in a lower nitrification efficiency (40-60%) in conjunction with a high N2O emission (50.6 mg-N/L/day), whereas there was a higher nitrification efficiency (>99%) in system 1 with low N2O emission (22.6 mg-N/L/day). The DNA abundance of functional genes responsible for nitrification and denitrification were comparable in both systems, but transcription of nosZ mRNA in the lower N2O emission system (system 1) was one order of magnitude higher than that in the higher N2O emission system (system 2). The diversity and evenness of the nosZ gene were nearly identical; however, the predominant N2O reducing bacteria were phylogenetically distinct. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that N2O-reducing strains only retrieved in system 1 were close to the genera Rhodobacter, Oligotropha and Shinella, whereas they were close to the genera Mesorhizobium only in system 2. The distinct predominant N2O reducers may directly or indirectly influence N2O emissions. PMID:24725963

  1. Cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenases in the mesocarp of ripening fruit of Prunus persica genotypes with different flesh characteristics: changes in activity and protein and transcript levels.

    PubMed

    Gabotti, Damiano; Negrini, Noemi; Morgutti, Silvia; Nocito, Fabio F; Cocucci, Maurizio

    2015-07-01

    Development of fruit flesh texture quality traits may involve the metabolism of phenolic compounds. This study presents molecular and biochemical results on the possible role played by cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD; EC 1.1.1.195) during ripening [S3, S4 I (pre-climacteric) and S4 III (climacteric) stages] of peach [Prunus persica (L.) Batsch] fruit with different flesh firmness [non-melting flesh (NMF) 'Oro A'/melting flesh (MF) 'Springcrest' and 'Sanguinella'] and color (blood-flesh Sanguinella). A total of 24 putative full-length PRUPE_CAD genes were identified (in silico analysis) in the peach genome. The most abundant CAD isoforms, encoded by genes located on scaffolds 8 and 6, were probed by specifically developed anti-PRUPE_CAD sc8 and by anti-FaCAD (PRUPE_CAD sc6) polyclonal antibodies, respectively. PRUPE_CAD sc8 proteins (SDS-PAGE and native-PAGE/western blot) appeared responsible for the CAD activity (in vitro/in-gel assays) that increased with ripening (parallel to PRUPE_ACO1 transcripts accumulation and ethylene evolution) only in the mesocarp of Oro A and blood-flesh Sanguinella. Accumulation of PRUPE_CAD sc8 transcripts (semi-quantitative RT-PCR) occurred in all three cultivars, but in Oro A and Springcrest it was not always accompanied by that of the related proteins, suggesting possible post-transcriptional regulation. Flesh firmness, as well as levels of lignin, total phenolics and, where present (Sanguinella), anthocyanins, declined with ripening, suggesting that, at least in the studied peach cultivars, CAD activity is related to neither lignification nor differences in flesh firmness (NMF/MF). Further studies are necessary to clarify whether the high levels of CAD activity/expression in Sanguinella play a role in determining the characteristics of this blood-flesh fruit.

  2. Full-Length Isoform Sequencing Reveals Novel Transcripts and Substantial Transcriptional Overlaps in a Herpesvirus

    PubMed Central

    Tombácz, Dóra; Csabai, Zsolt; Oláh, Péter; Balázs, Zsolt; Likó, István; Zsigmond, Laura; Sharon, Donald; Snyder, Michael; Boldogkői, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Whole transcriptome studies have become essential for understanding the complexity of genetic regulation. However, the conventionally applied short-read sequencing platforms cannot be used to reliably distinguish between many transcript isoforms. The Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) RS II platform is capable of reading long nucleic acid stretches in a single sequencing run. The pseudorabies virus (PRV) is an excellent system to study herpesvirus gene expression and potential interactions between the transcriptional units. In this work, non-amplified and amplified isoform sequencing protocols were used to characterize the poly(A+) fraction of the lytic transcriptome of PRV, with the aim of a complete transcriptional annotation of the viral genes. The analyses revealed a previously unrecognized complexity of the PRV transcriptome including the discovery of novel protein-coding and non-coding genes, novel mono- and polycistronic transcription units, as well as extensive transcriptional overlaps between neighboring and distal genes. This study identified non-coding transcripts overlapping all three replication origins of the PRV, which might play a role in the control of DNA synthesis. We additionally established the relative expression levels of gene products. Our investigations revealed that the whole PRV genome is utilized for transcription, including both DNA strands in all coding and intergenic regions. The genome-wide occurrence of transcript overlaps suggests a crosstalk between genes through a network formed by interacting transcriptional machineries with a potential function in the control of gene expression. PMID:27685795

  3. Short-term UV-B and UV-C radiations preferentially decrease spermidine contents and arginine decarboxylase transcript levels of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Jantaro, Saowarath; Pothipongsa, Apiradee; Khanthasuwan, Suparaporn; Incharoensakdi, Aran

    2011-02-01

    To investigate the short term effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiations on changes in pigments and polyamine contents, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells after exposure to UV-radiation were extracted by dimethylformamide and perchloric acid for pigments and polyamines determination, respectively. Cell growth was slightly decreased after 1 h exposure to UV-A and UV-B radiations. UV-C had little effect on cell growth despite the decrease of photosynthetic rate by about 18%. UV-A and UV-B decreased the contents of chlorophyll a and carotenoids whereas UV-C decreased chlorophyll a but had no effect on carotenoids. Spermidine contents were unaffected by UV-A, in contrast to the reduction of 25 and 50% by UV-B and UV-C, respectively. All three types of UV-radiation particularly reduced perchloric acid-insoluble spermidine. Importantly, putrescine and spermine which accounted for less than 1% of intracellular polyamines were increased by about three- to eight-fold by UV-B and UV-C, respectively. The changes in polyamines contents by UV-B and UV-C were consistent with the changes in transcript levels of arginine decarboxylase mRNA, but not with the protein levels. The decrease in the transcripts of adc2 but not adc1 was observed with UV-B and UV-C treatments.

  4. Differential regulation of the cellulase transcription factors XYR1, ACE2, and ACE1 in Trichoderma reesei strains producing high and low levels of cellulase.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, Thomas; Margeot, Antoine; Seidl-Seiboth, Verena; Le Crom, Stéphane; Ben Chaabane, Fadhel; Linke, Rita; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2011-02-01

    Due to its capacity to produce large amounts of cellulases, Trichoderma reesei is increasingly being investigated for second-generation biofuel production from lignocellulosic biomass. The induction mechanisms of T. reesei cellulases have been described recently, but the regulation of the genes involved in their transcription has not been studied thoroughly. Here we report the regulation of expression of the two activator genes xyr1 and ace2, and the corepressor gene ace1, during the induction of cellulase biosynthesis by the inducer lactose in T. reesei QM 9414, a strain producing low levels of cellulase (low producer). We show that all three genes are induced by lactose. xyr1 was also induced by d-galactose, but this induction was independent of d-galactose metabolism. Moreover, ace1 was carbon catabolite repressed, whereas full induction of xyr1 and ace2 in fact required CRE1. Significant differences in these regulatory patterns were observed in the high-producer strain RUT C30 and the hyperproducer strain T. reesei CL847. These observations suggest that a strongly elevated basal transcription level of xyr1 and reduced upregulation of ace1 by lactose may have been important for generating the hyperproducer strain and that thus, these genes are major control elements of cellulase production.

  5. Transcript levels of ten caste-related genes in adult diploid males of Melipona quadrifasciata (Hymenoptera, Apidae) - A comparison with haploid males, queens and workers

    PubMed Central

    Borges, Andreia A.; Humann, Fernanda C.; Oliveira Campos, Lucio A.; Tavares, Mara G.; Hartfelder, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    In Hymenoptera, homozygosity at the sex locus results in the production of diploid males. In social species, these pose a double burden by having low fitness and drawing resources normally spent for increasing the work force of a colony. Yet, diploid males are of academic interest as they can elucidate effects of ploidy (normal males are haploid, whereas the female castes, the queens and workers, are diploid) on morphology and life history. Herein we investigated expression levels of ten caste-related genes in the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata, comparing newly emerged and 5-day-old diploid males with haploid males, queens and workers. In diploid males, transcript levels for dunce and paramyosin were increased during the first five days of adult life, while those for diacylglycerol kinase and the transcriptional co-repressor groucho diminished. Two general trends were apparent, (i) gene expression patterns in diploid males were overall more similar to haploid ones and workers than to queens, and (ii) in queens and workers, more genes were up-regulated after emergence until day five, whereas in diploid and especially so in haploid males more genes were down-regulated. This difference between the sexes may be related to longevity, which is much longer in females than in males. PMID:22215977

  6. Viable adenovirus vaccine prototypes: high-level production of a papillomavirus capsid antigen from the major late transcriptional unit.

    PubMed

    Berg, Michael; Difatta, Julie; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Schlegel, Richard; Ketner, Gary

    2005-03-22

    Safe, effective, orally delivered, live adenovirus vaccines have been in use for three decades. Recombinant derivatives of the live adenovirus vaccines may prove an economical alternative to current vaccines for a variety of diseases. To explore that possibility, we constructed a series of recombinants that express the major capsid protein (L1) of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV), a model for mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of recombinant HPV L1 completely prevents persistent HPV infection [Koutsky, L. A., Ault, K. A., Wheeler, C. M., Brown, D. R., Barr, E., Alvarez, F. B., Chiacchierini, L. M. & Jansen, K. U. (2002) N. Engl. J. Med. 347, 1645-1651], suggesting that L1 expressed from recombinant adenoviruses might provide protective immunity. In our recombinants, COPV L1 is incorporated into adenovirus late region 5 (Ad L5) and is expressed as a member of the adenoviral major late transcriptional unit (MLTU). COPV L1 production by the most prolific recombinant is comparable to that of the most abundant adenoviral protein, hexon. COPV L1 production by recombinants is influenced by Ad L5 gene order, the specific mRNA processing signals associated with COPV L1, and the state of a putative splicing inhibitor in the COPV L1 gene. Recombinant COPV L1 protein assembles into VLPs that react with an antibody specific for conformational epitopes on native COPV L1 protein that correlate with protection in vivo. The designs of these recombinants can be applied directly to the production of recombinants appropriate for assessing immunogenicity and protective efficacy in animal models and in human trials. PMID:15767581

  7. Viable adenovirus vaccine prototypes: High-level production of a papillomavirus capsid antigen from the major late transcriptional unit

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Michael; DiFatta, Julie; Hoiczyk, Egbert; Schlegel, Richard; Ketner, Gary

    2005-01-01

    Safe, effective, orally delivered, live adenovirus vaccines have been in use for three decades. Recombinant derivatives of the live adenovirus vaccines may prove an economical alternative to current vaccines for a variety of diseases. To explore that possibility, we constructed a series of recombinants that express the major capsid protein (L1) of canine oral papillomavirus (COPV), a model for mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Vaccination with virus-like particles (VLPs) composed of recombinant HPV L1 completely prevents persistent HPV infection [Koutsky, L. A., Ault, K. A., Wheeler, C. M., Brown, D. R., Barr, E., Alvarez, F. B., Chiacchierini, L. M. & Jansen, K. U. (2002) N. Engl. J. Med. 347, 1645–1651], suggesting that L1 expressed from recombinant adenoviruses might provide protective immunity. In our recombinants, COPV L1 is incorporated into adenovirus late region 5 (Ad L5) and is expressed as a member of the adenoviral major late transcriptional unit (MLTU). COPV L1 production by the most prolific recombinant is comparable to that of the most abundant adenoviral protein, hexon. COPV L1 production by recombinants is influenced by Ad L5 gene order, the specific mRNA processing signals associated with COPV L1, and the state of a putative splicing inhibitor in the COPV L1 gene. Recombinant COPV L1 protein assembles into VLPs that react with an antibody specific for conformational epitopes on native COPV L1 protein that correlate with protection in vivo. The designs of these recombinants can be applied directly to the production of recombinants appropriate for assessing immunogenicity and protective efficacy in animal models and in human trials. PMID:15767581

  8. Integrated analysis of transcript-level regulation of metabolism reveals disease-relevant nodes of the human metabolic network.

    PubMed

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Berninger, Philipp; Lin, Jake; Sauter, Thomas; Heinäniemi, Merja

    2014-02-01

    Metabolic diseases and comorbidities represent an ever-growing epidemic where multiple cell types impact tissue homeostasis. Here, the link between the metabolic and gene regulatory networks was studied through experimental and computational analysis. Integrating gene regulation data with a human metabolic network prompted the establishment of an open-sourced web portal, IDARE (Integrated Data Nodes of Regulation), for visualizing various gene-related data in context of metabolic pathways. Motivated by increasing availability of deep sequencing studies, we obtained ChIP-seq data from widely studied human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Interestingly, we found that association of metabolic genes with multiple transcription factors (TFs) enriched disease-associated genes. To demonstrate further extensions enabled by examining these networks together, constraint-based modeling was applied to data from human preadipocyte differentiation. In parallel, data on gene expression, genome-wide ChIP-seq profiles for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (CEBP) α, liver X receptor (LXR) and H3K4me3 and microRNA target identification for miR-27a, miR-29a and miR-222 were collected. Disease-relevant key nodes, including mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAM), were exposed from metabolic pathways predicted to change activity by focusing on association with multiple regulators. In both cell types, our analysis reveals the convergence of microRNAs and TFs within the branched chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolic pathway, possibly providing an explanation for its downregulation in obese and diabetic conditions.

  9. Parent-of-origin genetic background affects the transcriptional levels of circadian and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep loss

    PubMed Central

    Tinarelli, Federico; Garcia-Garcia, Celina; Nicassio, Francesco; Tucci, Valter

    2014-01-01

    Sleep homoeostasis refers to a process in which the propensity to sleep increases as wakefulness progresses and decreases as sleep progresses. Sleep is tightly organized around the circadian clock and is regulated by genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The homoeostatic response of sleep, which is classically triggered by sleep deprivation, is generally measured as a rebound effect of electrophysiological measures, for example delta sleep. However, more recently, gene expression changes following sleep loss have been investigated as biomarkers of sleep homoeostasis. The genetic background of an individual may affect this sleep-dependent gene expression phenotype. In this study, we investigated whether parental genetic background differentially modulates the expression of genes following sleep loss. We tested the progeny of reciprocal crosses of AKR/J and DBA/2J mouse strains and we show a parent-of-origin effect on the expression of circadian, sleep and neuronal plasticity genes following sleep deprivation. Thus, we further explored, by in silico, specific functions or upstream mechanisms of regulation and we observed that several upstream mechanisms involving signalling pathways (i.e. DICER1, PKA), growth factors (CSF3 and BDNF) and transcriptional regulators (EGR2 and ELK4) may be differentially modulated by parental effects. This is the first report showing that a behavioural manipulation (e.g. sleep deprivation) in adult animals triggers specific gene expression responses according to parent-of-origin genomic mechanisms. Our study suggests that the same mechanism may be extended to other behavioural domains and that the investigation of gene expression following experimental manipulations should take seriously into account parent-of-origin effects. PMID:24446504

  10. Integrated analysis of transcript-level regulation of metabolism reveals disease-relevant nodes of the human metabolic network

    PubMed Central

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Sinkkonen, Lasse; Berninger, Philipp; Lin, Jake; Sauter, Thomas; Heinäniemi, Merja

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic diseases and comorbidities represent an ever-growing epidemic where multiple cell types impact tissue homeostasis. Here, the link between the metabolic and gene regulatory networks was studied through experimental and computational analysis. Integrating gene regulation data with a human metabolic network prompted the establishment of an open-sourced web portal, IDARE (Integrated Data Nodes of Regulation), for visualizing various gene-related data in context of metabolic pathways. Motivated by increasing availability of deep sequencing studies, we obtained ChIP-seq data from widely studied human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Interestingly, we found that association of metabolic genes with multiple transcription factors (TFs) enriched disease-associated genes. To demonstrate further extensions enabled by examining these networks together, constraint-based modeling was applied to data from human preadipocyte differentiation. In parallel, data on gene expression, genome-wide ChIP-seq profiles for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (CEBP) α, liver X receptor (LXR) and H3K4me3 and microRNA target identification for miR-27a, miR-29a and miR-222 were collected. Disease-relevant key nodes, including mitochondrial glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase (GPAM), were exposed from metabolic pathways predicted to change activity by focusing on association with multiple regulators. In both cell types, our analysis reveals the convergence of microRNAs and TFs within the branched chain amino acid (BCAA) metabolic pathway, possibly providing an explanation for its downregulation in obese and diabetic conditions. PMID:24198249

  11. Regulation of the cyanobacterial CO2-concentrating mechanism involves internal sensing of NADP+ and α-ketogutarate levels by transcription factor CcmR.

    PubMed

    Daley, Shawn M E; Kappell, Anthony D; Carrick, Marla J; Burnap, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic carbon is the major macronutrient required by organisms utilizing oxygenic photosynthesis for autotrophic growth. Aquatic photoautotrophic organisms are dependent upon a CO(2) concentrating mechanism (CCM) to overcome the poor CO(2)-affinity of the major carbon-fixing enzyme, ribulose-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco). The CCM involves the active transport of inorganic forms of carbon (C(i)) into the cell to increase the CO(2) concentration around the active site of Rubisco. It employs both bicarbonate transporters and redox-powered CO(2)-hydration enzymes coupled to membranous NDH-type electron transport complexes that collectively produce C(i) concentrations up to a 1000-fold greater in the cytoplasm compared to the external environment. The CCM is regulated: a high affinity CCM comprised of multiple components is induced under limiting external Ci concentrations. The LysR-type transcriptional regulator CcmR has been shown to repress its own expression along with structural genes encoding high affinity C(i) transporters distributed throughout the genome of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. While much has been learned about the structural genes of the CCM and the identity of the transcriptional regulators controlling their expression, little is known about the physiological signals that elicit the induction of the high affinity CCM. Here CcmR is studied to identify metabolites that modulate its transcriptional repressor activity. Using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) and the oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+)) have been identified as the co-repressors of CcmR. Additionally, ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) and 2-phosphoglycolate (2-PG) have been confirmed as co-activators of CmpR which controls the expression of the ABC-type bicarbonate transporter. PMID:22911771

  12. Fish IRF3 up-regulates the transcriptional level of IRF1, IRF2, IRF3 and IRF7 in CIK cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaowen; Lai, Qinan; Gu, Meihui; Liu, Dan; Hou, Qunhao; Liu, Xiancheng; Mi, Yichuan; Sun, Zhicheng; Wang, Haizhou; Lin, Gang; Hu, Chengyu

    2015-12-01

    Interferon Regulatory Factors (IRFs) belong to a family of transcription factor involved in transcriptional regulation of type I IFN and IFN-stimulated genes (ISG) in cells. In the present study, an IRF3 full-length cDNA (termed CiIRF3, JX999055) and its promoter sequence were cloned by homology cloning strategy and genome walking from grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella). The full-length cDNA sequence of CiIRF3 is comprised of a 5'UTR (195 bp), a 3'UTR (269 bp) and a largest open reading frame (ORF) of 1377 bp encoding a polypeptide of 458 amino acids. CiIRF3 has a conservative DNA-binding domain (DBD) at N-terminal and a relatively conserved interferon regulatory factors association domain (IAD). Phylogenetic tree analysis indicated that CiIRF3 gathers together with other IRF-3 from higher vertebrates in the same branch. The promoter sequence of CiIRF3 (596 bp) consists of three IRF-E, a C/EBP beta, a NF-kappa B and a TATA-BOX. CiIRF3 was constitutively expressed at low level in different grass carp tissues but was rapidly up-regulated with Poly I:C stimulation. To study the molecular mechanism of CiIRF3 regulating the transcription of IRFs, CiIRF3 was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 and purified by affinity chromatography with the Ni-NTA His-Bind Resin. Gel mobility shift assays revealed the affinity of CiIRF3 protein with promoters of CiIRF1, CiIRF2, CiIRF3 and CiIRF7 respectively. Then, CIK cells were co-transfected with pcDNA3.1-CiIRF3, pGL3-promotor (pGL3-CiIRF1, pGL3-CiIRF2, pGL3-CiIRF3, pGL3-CiIRF7) and luciferase reporter vector respectively. The cotransfection experiment showed that CiIRF3 increased the promoter activity of CiIRF1, CiIRF2, CiIRF3 and CiIRF7. Furthermore, overexpression of CiIRF3 in CIK cells also up-regulated the expressions of CiIRF1, CiIRF2, CiIRF3 and CiIRF7. So, CiIRF3 can improve the transcriptional level of CiIRF1, CiIRF2, CiIRF3 and CiIRF7. PMID:26545324

  13. Nutrient-dependent control of short neuropeptide F transcript levels via components of the insulin/IGF signaling pathway in the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria.

    PubMed

    Dillen, Senne; Chen, Ziwei; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Peptides of the short neuropeptide F (sNPF) family modulate feeding behavior in a wide variety of insect species, including the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. Likewise, the nutritional state of the animal can strongly affect sNPF expression. Although several studies have been published describing these nutrient-dependent effects, it remains largely unclear how they are achieved. In this study, we describe a series of in vivo experiments which indicate that it is not the act of feeding in se, but rather the consequent availability of nutrients in the insect's hemolymph that gives rise to the postprandial modulation of sNPF expression. Furthermore, by performing a series of RNAi-mediated knockdown experiments, we were able to show that components of the evolutionarily conserved insulin/insulin-related growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway form a functional link between nutrient levels and sNPF transcript levels. PMID:26631598

  14. Standard addition flow method for potentiometric measurements at low concentration levels: application to the determination of fluoride in food samples.

    PubMed

    Galvis-Sánchez, Andrea C; Santos, João Rodrigo; Rangel, António O S S

    2015-02-01

    A standard addition method was implemented by using a flow manifold able to perform automatically multiple standard additions and in-line sample treatment. This analytical strategy was based on the in-line mixing of sample and standard addition solutions, using a merging zone approach. The flow system aimed to exploit the standard addition method to quantify the target analyte particularly in cases where the analyte concentration in the matrix is below the lower limit of linear response of the detector. The feasibility of the proposed flow configuration was assessed through the potentiometric determination of fluoride in sea salts of different origins and different types of coffee infusions. The limit of quantification of the proposed manifold was 5×10(-6) mol L(-1), 10-fold lower than the lower limit of linear response of the potentiometric detector used. A determination rate of 8 samples h(-1) was achieved considering an experimental procedure based on three standard additions per sample. The main advantage of the proposed strategy is the simple approach to perform multiple standard additions, which can be implemented with other ion selective electrodes, especially in cases when the primary ion is below the lower limit of linear response of the detector.

  15. The Proportion of Chromatin Graded between Closed and Open States Determines the Level of Transcripts Derived from Distinct Promoters in the CYP19 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kotomura, Naoe; Harada, Nobuhiro; Ishihara, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    The human CYP19 gene encodes aromatase, which converts androgens to estrogens. CYP19 mRNA variants are transcribed mainly from three promoters. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure the relative amounts of each of the three transcripts and determine the on/off state of the promoters. While some of the promoters were silent, CYP19 mRNA production differed among the other promoters, whose estimated transcription levels were 0.001% to 0.1% of that of the TUBB control gene. To investigate the structural aspects of chromatin that were responsible for this wide range of activity of the CYP19 promoters, we used a fractionation protocol, designated SEVENS, which sequentially separates densely packed nucleosomes from dispersed nucleosomes. The fractional distribution of each inactive promoter showed a similar pattern to that of the repressed reference loci; the inactive regions were distributed toward lower fractions, in which closed chromatin comprising packed nucleosomes was enriched. In contrast, active CYP19 promoters were raised toward upper fractions, including dispersed nucleosomes in open chromatin. Importantly, these active promoters were moderately enriched in the upper fractions as compared to active reference loci, such as the TUBB promoter; the proportion of open chromatin appeared to be positively correlated to the promoter strength. These results, together with ectopic transcription accompanied by an increase in the proportion of open chromatin in cells treated with an H3K27me inhibitor, indicate that CYP19 mRNA could be transcribed from a promoter in which chromatin is shifted toward an open state in the equilibrium between closed and open chromatin. PMID:26020632

  16. The Proportion of Chromatin Graded between Closed and Open States Determines the Level of Transcripts Derived from Distinct Promoters in the CYP19 Gene.

    PubMed

    Kotomura, Naoe; Harada, Nobuhiro; Ishihara, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    The human CYP19 gene encodes aromatase, which converts androgens to estrogens. CYP19 mRNA variants are transcribed mainly from three promoters. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to measure the relative amounts of each of the three transcripts and determine the on/off state of the promoters. While some of the promoters were silent, CYP19 mRNA production differed among the other promoters, whose estimated transcription levels were 0.001% to 0.1% of that of the TUBB control gene. To investigate the structural aspects of chromatin that were responsible for this wide range of activity of the CYP19 promoters, we used a fractionation protocol, designated SEVENS, which sequentially separates densely packed nucleosomes from dispersed nucleosomes. The fractional distribution of each inactive promoter showed a similar pattern to that of the repressed reference loci; the inactive regions were distributed toward lower fractions, in which closed chromatin comprising packed nucleosomes was enriched. In contrast, active CYP19 promoters were raised toward upper fractions, including dispersed nucleosomes in open chromatin. Importantly, these active promoters were moderately enriched in the upper fractions as compared to active reference loci, such as the TUBB promoter; the proportion of open chromatin appeared to be positively correlated to the promoter strength. These results, together with ectopic transcription accompanied by an increase in the proportion of open chromatin in cells treated with an H3K27me inhibitor, indicate that CYP19 mRNA could be transcribed from a promoter in which chromatin is shifted toward an open state in the equilibrium between closed and open chromatin. PMID:26020632

  17. Express yourself: Transcriptional regulation of plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Garner, Christopher M; Kim, Sang Hee; Spears, Benjamin J; Gassmann, Walter

    2016-08-01

    The plant immune system is a complex network of components that function together to sense the presence and activity of potential biotic threats, and integrate these signals into an appropriate output, namely the transcription of genes that activate an immune response that is commensurate with the perceived threat. Given the variety of biotic threats a plant must face the immune response must be plastic, but because an immune response is costly to the plant in terms of energy expenditure and development it must also be under tight control. To meet these needs transcriptional control is exercised at multiple levels. In this article we will review some of the latest developments in understanding how the plant immune response is regulated at the level of transcription. New roles are being discovered for the long-studied WRKY and TGA transcription factor families, while additional critical defense functions are being attributed to TCPs and other transcription factors. Dynamically controlling access to DNA through post-translational modification of histones is emerging as an essential component of priming, maintaining, attenuating, and repressing transcription in response to biotic stress. Unsurprisingly, the plant's transcriptional response is targeted by pathogen effectors, and in turn resistance proteins stand guard over and participate in transcriptional regulation. Together, these multiple layers lead to the observed complexity of the plant transcriptional immune response, with different transcription factors or chromatin components playing a prominent role depending on the plant-pathogen interaction being studied. PMID:27174437

  18. Express yourself: Transcriptional regulation of plant innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Garner, Christopher M; Kim, Sang Hee; Spears, Benjamin J; Gassmann, Walter

    2016-08-01

    The plant immune system is a complex network of components that function together to sense the presence and activity of potential biotic threats, and integrate these signals into an appropriate output, namely the transcription of genes that activate an immune response that is commensurate with the perceived threat. Given the variety of biotic threats a plant must face the immune response must be plastic, but because an immune response is costly to the plant in terms of energy expenditure and development it must also be under tight control. To meet these needs transcriptional control is exercised at multiple levels. In this article we will review some of the latest developments in understanding how the plant immune response is regulated at the level of transcription. New roles are being discovered for the long-studied WRKY and TGA transcription factor families, while additional critical defense functions are being attributed to TCPs and other transcription factors. Dynamically controlling access to DNA through post-translational modification of histones is emerging as an essential component of priming, maintaining, attenuating, and repressing transcription in response to biotic stress. Unsurprisingly, the plant's transcriptional response is targeted by pathogen effectors, and in turn resistance proteins stand guard over and participate in transcriptional regulation. Together, these multiple layers lead to the observed complexity of the plant transcriptional immune response, with different transcription factors or chromatin components playing a prominent role depending on the plant-pathogen interaction being studied.

  19. Transcript levels of several epigenome regulatory genes in bovine somatic donor cells are not correlated with their cloning efficiency.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenli; Sadeghieh, Sanaz; Abruzzese, Ronald; Uppada, Subhadra; Meredith, Justin; Ohlrichs, Charletta; Broek, Diane; Polejaeva, Irina

    2009-09-01

    Among many factors that potentially affect somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryo development is the donor cell itself. Cloning potentials of somatic donor cells vary greatly, possibly because the cells have different capacities to be reprogrammed by ooplasma. It is therefore intriguing to identify factors that regulate the reprogrammability of somatic donor cells. Gene expression analysis is a widely used tool to investigate underlying mechanisms of various phenotypes. In this study, we conducted a retrospective analysis investigating whether donor cell lines with distinct cloning efficiencies express different levels of genes involved in epigenetic reprogramming including histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC1), -2 (HDAC2); DNA methyltransferase-1 (DNMT1), -3a (DNMT3a),-3b (DNMT3b), and the bovine homolog of yeast sucrose nonfermenting-2 (SNF2L), a SWI/SNF family of ATPases. Cell samples from 12 bovine donor cell lines were collected at the time of nuclear transfer experiments and expression levels of the genes were measured using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Our results show that there are no significant differences in expression levels of these genes between donor cell lines of high and low cloning efficiency defined as live calving rates, although inverse correlations are observed between in vitro embryo developmental rates and expression levels of HDAC2 and SNF2L. We also show that selection of stable reference genes is important for relative quantification, and different batches of cells can have different gene expression patterns. In summary, we demonstrate that expression levels of these epigenome regulatory genes in bovine donor cells are not correlated with cloning potential. The experimental design and data analysis method reported here can be applied to study any genes expressed in donor cells.

  20. Treatment with PPARα Agonist Clofibrate Inhibits the Transcription and Activation of SREBPs and Reduces Triglyceride and Cholesterol Levels in Liver of Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lijun; Li, Chunyan; Wang, Fang; Zhou, Shenghua; Shangguan, Mingjun; Xue, Lina; Zhang, Bianying; Ding, Fuxiang; Hui, Dequan; Liang, Aihua; He, Dongchang

    2015-01-01

    PPARα agonist clofibrate reduces cholesterol and fatty acid concentrations in rodent liver by an inhibition of SREBP-dependent gene expression. In present study we investigated the regulation mechanisms of the triglyceride- and cholesterol-lowering effect of the PPARα agonist clofibrate in broiler chickens. We observed that PPARα agonist clofibrate decreases the mRNA and protein levels of LXRα and the mRNA and both precursor and nuclear protein levels of SREBP1 and SREBP2 as well as the mRNA levels of the SREBP1 (FASN and GPAM) and SREBP2 (HMGCR and LDLR) target genes in the liver of treated broiler chickens compared to control group, whereas the mRNA level of INSIG2, which inhibits SREBP activation, was increased in the liver of treated broiler chickens compared to control group. Taken together, the effects of PPARα agonist clofibrate on lipid metabolism in liver of broiler chickens involve inhibiting transcription and activation of SREBPs and SREBP-dependent lipogenic and cholesterologenic gene expression, thereby resulting in a reduction of the triglyceride and cholesterol levels in liver of broiler chickens. PMID:26693219

  1. Propanil inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by reducing nuclear levels of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappab in the macrophage cell line ic-21.

    PubMed

    Frost, L L; Neeley, Y X; Schafer, R; Gibson, L F; Barnett, J B

    2001-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an essential proinflammatory cytokine whose production is normally stimulated by bacterial cell wall components, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), during an infection. Macrophages stimulated with LPS in vitro produce several cytokines, including TNF-alpha. LPS-stimulated primary mouse macrophages produced less TNF-alpha protein and message after treatment with the herbicide propanil (Xie et al., Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 145, 184-191, 1997). Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) tightly regulates TNF-alpha transcription. Therefore, as a step toward understanding the mechanism of the effect of propanil on TNF-alpha transcription, IC-21 cells were transfected with a TNF-alpha promoter-luciferase construct, and the effect of propanil on luciferase activity was measured. Cells transfected with promoter constructs containing a kappaB site showed decreased luciferase activity relative to controls after propanil treatment. These observations implicated NF-kappaB binding as an intracellular target of propanil. Further studies demonstrated a marked reduction in the nuclear levels of the stimulatory p65 subunit of NF-kappaB after propanil treatment, as measured by fluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. The p50 subunit of NF-kappaB was not found to be reduced after propanil exposure by Western blot. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays showed decreased DNA binding of both p65/p50 heterodimers and p50/p50 homodimers to the kappaB3 site of the TNF-alpha promoter of propanil-treated cells. The marked reduction in nuclear p65/p50 NF-kappaB levels and diminished binding to the TNF-alpha promoter in propanil-treated cells are consistent with reduced TNF-alpha levels induced by LPS. PMID:11312646

  2. Higher transcription levels in ascorbic acid biosynthetic and recycling genes were associated with higher ascorbic acid accumulation in blueberry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fenghong; Wang, Lei; Gu, Liang; Zhao, Wei; Su, Hongyan; Cheng, Xianhao

    2015-12-01

    In our preliminary study, the ripe fruits of two highbush blueberry (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) cultivars, cv 'Berkeley' and cv 'Bluecrop', were found to contain different levels of ascorbic acid. However, factors responsible for these differences are still unknown. In the present study, ascorbic acid content in fruits was compared with expression profiles of ascorbic acid biosynthetic and recycling genes between 'Bluecrop' and 'Berkeley' cultivars. The results indicated that the l-galactose pathway was the predominant route of ascorbic acid biosynthesis in blueberry fruits. Moreover, higher expression levels of the ascorbic acid biosynthetic genes GME, GGP, and GLDH, as well as the recycling genes MDHAR and DHAR, were associated with higher ascorbic acid content in 'Bluecrop' compared with 'Berkeley', which indicated that a higher efficiency ascorbic acid biosynthesis and regeneration was likely to be responsible for the higher ascorbic acid accumulation in 'Bluecrop'.

  3. Effects of a phytogenic feed additive on susceptibility of channel catfish to Edwardsiella ictaluri and levels of mannose binding lectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of a phytogenic feed additive (Digestarom® P.E.P. MGE) on growth performance and disease susceptibility to Edwardsiella ictaluri. Two hundred and fifty juvenile channel catfish (7.2 ± 0.1 g) were allotted into the following treatments: Control (float...

  4. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction on Student Achievement in Addition and Subtraction at First Grade Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spivey, Patsy M.

    This study was conducted to determine whether the traditional classroom approach to instruction involving the addition and subtraction of number facts (digits 0-6) is more or less effective than the traditional classroom approach plus a commercially-prepared computer game. A pretest-posttest control group design was used with two groups of first…

  5. Hypoxia drives apoptosis independently of p53 and metallothionein transcript levels in hemocytes of the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Felix-Portillo, Monserrath; Martínez-Quintana, José A; Arenas-Padilla, Marina; Mata-Haro, Verónica; Gómez-Jiménez, Silvia; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2016-10-01

    The cellular mechanisms used by the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei to respond to hypoxia have been studied from the energetic metabolism and antioxidant angles. We herein investigated the participation of p53 and metallothionein (MT) in the apoptotic process in response to hypoxia in shrimp hemocytes. The Lvp53 or LvMT genes were efficiently silenced by injection of double stranded RNA for p53 or MT. The effects of silencing on apoptosis were measured as caspase-3 activity and flow cytometry in hemocytes after 24 and 48 h of hypoxia (1.5 mg DO L(-1)). Hemocytes from unsilenced animals had significantly higher apoptosis levels upon both times of hypoxia. The apoptotic levels were diminished but not suppressed in dsp53-silenced but not dsMT-silenced hemocytes after 24 h of hypoxia, indicating a contribution of Lvp53 to apoptosis. Apoptosis in normoxia was significantly higher in dsp53-and dsMT-silenced animals compared to the unsilenced controls, pointing to a possible cytoprotective role of LvMT and Lvp53 during the basal apoptotic program in normoxia. Overall, these results indicate that hypoxia augments apoptosis in shrimp hemocytes and high mRNA levels of Lvp53 and LvMT are not necessary for this response.

  6. Hypoxia drives apoptosis independently of p53 and metallothionein transcript levels in hemocytes of the whiteleg shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei.

    PubMed

    Felix-Portillo, Monserrath; Martínez-Quintana, José A; Arenas-Padilla, Marina; Mata-Haro, Verónica; Gómez-Jiménez, Silvia; Yepiz-Plascencia, Gloria

    2016-10-01

    The cellular mechanisms used by the shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei to respond to hypoxia have been studied from the energetic metabolism and antioxidant angles. We herein investigated the participation of p53 and metallothionein (MT) in the apoptotic process in response to hypoxia in shrimp hemocytes. The Lvp53 or LvMT genes were efficiently silenced by injection of double stranded RNA for p53 or MT. The effects of silencing on apoptosis were measured as caspase-3 activity and flow cytometry in hemocytes after 24 and 48 h of hypoxia (1.5 mg DO L(-1)). Hemocytes from unsilenced animals had significantly higher apoptosis levels upon both times of hypoxia. The apoptotic levels were diminished but not suppressed in dsp53-silenced but not dsMT-silenced hemocytes after 24 h of hypoxia, indicating a contribution of Lvp53 to apoptosis. Apoptosis in normoxia was significantly higher in dsp53-and dsMT-silenced animals compared to the unsilenced controls, pointing to a possible cytoprotective role of LvMT and Lvp53 during the basal apoptotic program in normoxia. Overall, these results indicate that hypoxia augments apoptosis in shrimp hemocytes and high mRNA levels of Lvp53 and LvMT are not necessary for this response. PMID:27459156

  7. Increased transcript level of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) in human tricuspid compared with bicuspid aortic valves correlates with the stenosis severity

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Edit; Caidahl, Kenneth; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Baeck, Magnus

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathomechanism of calcific aortic valve stenosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed the transcript levels for PARP-1 (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase), acts as a DNA damage nick sensor in stenotic valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early stage of diseased tricuspid valves exhibited higher mRNA levels for PARP-1 compared to bicuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mRNA levels for PARP-1 inversely correlated with the clinical stenosis severity in tricuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data demonstrated that DNA damage pathways might be associated with stenosis severity only in tricuspid valves. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress may contribute to the hemodynamic progression of aortic valve stenosis, and is associated with activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1. The aim of the present study was to assess the transcriptional profile and the topological distribution of PARP-1 in human aortic valves, and its relation to the stenosis severity. Human stenotic aortic valves were obtained from 46 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery and used for mRNA extraction followed by quantitative real-time PCR to correlate the PARP-1 expression levels with the non invasive hemodynamic parameters quantifying the stenosis severity. Primary isolated valvular interstitial cells (VICs) were used to explore the effects of cytokines and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) on valvular PARP-1 expression. The thickened areas of stenotic valves with tricuspid morphology expressed significantly higher levels of PARP-1 mRNA compared with the corresponding part of bicuspid valves (0.501 vs 0.243, P = 0.01). Furthermore, the quantitative gene expression levels of PARP-1 were inversely correlated with the aortic valve area (AVA) (r = -0.46, P = 0.0469) and AVA indexed for body surface area (BSA) (r = -0.498; P = 0.0298) only in tricuspid aortic valves

  8. Additions to the Spectrum and Energy Levels and a Critical Compilation of Singly-Ionized Boron, B II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryabtsev, A. N.; Kink, I.; Awaya, Y.; Ekberg, J. O.; Mannervik, S.; Ölme, A.; Martinson, I.

    2005-01-01

    We have undertaken a number of experimental studies of the structure of singly ionized boron, B II. Much of this work was initially motivated by a search for the "missing" 2s3s 1S term. There was a surprising disagreement between theory and experiment for this level. In this context lots of data for B II were collected over the years, from beam-foil experiments, high-resolution spark spectroscopy and theoretical calculations. The new material, which includes more than 80 newly classified (or revised) spectral lines, has now been thoroughly analyzed. This was followed by a critical compilation of all known levels and lines of B II, along with the theoretical interpretation of the levels, classifications of the lines and calculated transition probabilities for most lines.

  9. Predicting phonetic transcription agreement: Insights from research in infant vocalizations

    PubMed Central

    RAMSDELL, HEATHER L.; OLLER, D. KIMBROUGH; ETHINGTON, CORINNA A.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide new perspectives on correlates of phonetic transcription agreement. Our research focuses on phonetic transcription and coding of infant vocalizations. The findings are presumed to be broadly applicable to other difficult cases of transcription, such as found in severe disorders of speech, which similarly result in low reliability for a variety of reasons. We evaluated the predictiveness of two factors not previously documented in the literature as influencing transcription agreement: canonicity and coder confidence. Transcribers coded samples of infant vocalizations, judging both canonicity and confidence. Correlation results showed that canonicity and confidence were strongly related to agreement levels, and regression results showed that canonicity and confidence both contributed significantly to explanation of variance. Specifically, the results suggest that canonicity plays a major role in transcription agreement when utterances involve supraglottal articulation, with coder confidence offering additional power in predicting transcription agreement. PMID:17882695

  10. Moonlight affects nocturnal Period2 transcript levels in the pineal gland of the reef fish Siganus guttatus.

    PubMed

    Sugama, Nozomi; Park, Ji-Gweon; Park, Yong-Ju; Takeuchi, Yuki; Kim, Se-Jae; Takemura, Akihiro

    2008-09-01

    The golden rabbitfish Siganus guttatus is a reef fish with a restricted lunar-synchronized spawning cycle. It is not known how the fish recognizes cues from the moon and exerts moon-related activities. In order to evaluate the perception and utilization of moonlight by the fish, the present study aimed to clone and characterize Period2 (Per2), a light-inducible clock gene in lower vertebrates, and to examine daily variations in rabbitfish Per2 (rfPer2) expression as well as the effect of light and moonlight on its expression in the pineal gland. The partially-cloned rfPer2 cDNA (2933 bp) was highly homologous (72%) to zebrafish Per2. The rfPer2 levels increased at ZT6 and decreased at ZT18 in the whole brain and several peripheral organs. The rfPer2 expression in the pineal gland exhibited a daily variation with an increase during daytime. Exposing the fish to light during nighttime resulted in a rapid increase of its expression in the pineal gland, while the level was decreased by intercepting light during daytime. Two hours after exposing the fish to moonlight at the full moon period, the rfPer2 expression was upregulated. These results suggest that rfPer2 is a light-inducible clock gene and that its expression is affected not only by daylight but also by moonlight. Since the rfPer2 expression level during the full moon period was higher than that during the new moon period, the monthly variation in the rfPer2 expression is likely to occur with the change in amplitude between the full and new moon periods.

  11. Comprehensive data base of high-level nuclear waste glasses: September 1987 status report: Volume 2, Additional appendices

    SciTech Connect

    Kindle, C.H.; Kreiter, M.R.

    1987-12-01

    The Materials Characterization Center (MCC) is assembling a comprehensive data base (CDB) of experimental data collected for high-level nuclear waste package components. The status of the CDB is summarized in Volume I of this report. Volume II contains appendices that present data from the data base and an evaluation of glass durability models applied to the data base.

  12. Additions to the spectra and energy levels of the zinc-like ions Y X-Cd XIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litzén, Ulf; Hansson, Anna

    1989-10-01

    Transitions from 4p4d 1F and 3F have been identified in the spectra Y X-Cd XIX emitted from laserproduced plasmas. Energy levels have been derived, and the term structure has been studied with special emphasis on the 4s4f-4p4d configuration interaction.

  13. Infant Formula: The Addition of Minimum and Maximum Levels of Selenium to Infant Formula and Related Labeling Requirements. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-06-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is amending the regulations on nutrient specifications and labeling for infant formula to add the mineral selenium to the list of required nutrients and to establish minimum and maximum levels of selenium in infant formula.

  14. Proximity of H2A.Z containing nucleosome to the transcription start site influences gene expression levels in the mammalian liver and brain

    PubMed Central

    Bargaje, Rhishikesh; Alam, Mohammad Parwez; Patowary, Ashok; Sarkar, Maharnob; Ali, Tamer; Gupta, Shivani; Garg, Manali; Singh, Meghna; Purkanti, Ramya; Scaria, Vinod; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Brahmachari, Vani; Pillai, Beena

    2012-01-01

    Nucleosome positioning maps of several organisms have shown that Transcription Start Sites (TSSs) are marked by nucleosome depleted regions flanked by strongly positioned nucleosomes. Using genome-wide nucleosome maps and histone variant occupancy in the mouse liver, we show that the majority of genes were associated with a single prominent H2A.Z containing nucleosome in their promoter region. We classified genes into clusters depending on the proximity of H2A.Z to the TSS. The genes with no detectable H2A.Z showed lowest expression level, whereas H2A.Z was positioned closer to the TSS of genes with higher expression levels. We confirmed this relation between the proximity of H2A.Z and expression level in the brain. The proximity of histone variant H2A.Z, but not H3.3 to the TSS, over seven consecutive nucleosomes, was correlated with expression. Further, a nucleosome was positioned over the TSS of silenced genes while it was displaced to expose the TSS in highly expressed genes. Our results suggest that gene expression levels in vivo are determined by accessibility of the TSS and proximity of H2A.Z. PMID:22821566

  15. Genome-level transcription data of Yersinia pestis analyzed with a New metabolic constraint-based approach

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Constraint-based computational approaches, such as flux balance analysis (FBA), have proven successful in modeling genome-level metabolic behavior for conditions where a set of simple cellular objectives can be clearly articulated. Recently, the necessity to expand the current range of constraint-based methods to incorporate high-throughput experimental data has been acknowledged by the proposal of several methods. However, these methods have rarely been used to address cellular metabolic responses to some relevant perturbations such as antimicrobial or temperature-induced stress. Here, we present a new method for combining gene-expression data with FBA (GX-FBA) that allows modeling of genome-level metabolic response to a broad range of environmental perturbations within a constraint-based framework. The method uses mRNA expression data to guide hierarchical regulation of cellular metabolism subject to the interconnectivity of the metabolic network. Results We applied GX-FBA to a genome-scale model of metabolism in the gram negative bacterium Yersinia pestis and analyzed its metabolic response to (i) variations in temperature known to induce virulence, and (ii) antibiotic stress. Without imposition of any a priori behavioral constraints, our results show strong agreement with reported phenotypes. Our analyses also lead to novel insights into how Y. pestis uses metabolic adjustments to counter different forms of stress. Conclusions Comparisons of GX-FBA predicted metabolic states with fluxomic measurements and different reported post-stress phenotypes suggest that mass conservation constraints and network connectivity can be an effective representative of metabolic flux regulation in constraint-based models. We believe that our approach will be of aid in the in silico evaluation of cellular goals under different conditions and can be used for a variety of analyses such as identification of potential drug targets and their action. PMID:23216785

  16. Effects of salinity and prolactin on gene transcript levels of ion transporters, ion pumps and prolactin receptors in Mozambique tilapia intestine.

    PubMed

    Seale, Andre P; Stagg, Jacob J; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Breves, Jason P; Soma, Satoshi; Watanabe, Soichi; Kaneko, Toyoji; Cnaani, Avner; Harpaz, Sheenan; Lerner, Darren T; Grau, E Gordon

    2014-09-15

    Euryhaline teleosts are faced with significant challenges during changes in salinity. Osmoregulatory responses to salinity changes are mediated through the neuroendocrine system which directs osmoregulatory tissues to modulate ion transport. Prolactin (PRL) plays a major role in freshwater (FW) osmoregulation by promoting ion uptake in osmoregulatory tissues, including intestine. We measured mRNA expression of ion pumps, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase α3-subunit (NKAα3) and vacuolar type H(+)-ATPase A-subunit (V-ATPase A-subunit); ion transporters/channels, Na(+)/K(+)/2Cl(-) co-transporter (NKCC2) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR); and the two PRL receptors, PRLR1 and PRLR2 in eleven intestinal segments of Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus) acclimated to FW or seawater (SW). Gene expression levels of NKAα3, V-ATPase A-subunit, and NKCC2 were generally lower in middle segments of the intestine, whereas CFTR mRNA was most highly expressed in anterior intestine of FW-fish. In both FW- and SW-acclimated fish, PRLR1 was most highly expressed in the terminal segment of the intestine, whereas PRLR2 was generally most highly expressed in anterior intestinal segments. While NKCC2, NKAα3 and PRLR2 mRNA expression was higher in the intestinal segments of SW-acclimated fish, CFTR mRNA expression was higher in FW-fish; PRLR1 and V-ATPase A-subunit mRNA expression was similar between FW- and SW-acclimated fish. Next, we characterized the effects of hypophysectomy (Hx) and PRL replacement on the expression of intestinal transcripts. Hypophysectomy reduced both NKCC2 and CFTR expression in particular intestinal segments; however, only NKCC2 expression was restored by PRL replacement. Together, these findings describe how both acclimation salinity and PRL impact transcript levels of effectors of ion transport in tilapia intestine.

  17. Dietary Oil Source and Selenium Supplementation Modulate Fads2 and Elovl5 Transcriptional Levels in Liver and Brain of Meagre (Argyrosomus regius).

    PubMed

    Silva-Brito, Francisca; Magnoni, Leonardo J; Fonseca, Sthelio Braga; Peixoto, Maria João; Castro, L Filipe C; Cunha, Isabel; de Almeida Ozório, Rodrigo Otávio; Magalhães, Fernando Antunes; Gonçalves, José Fernando Magalhães

    2016-06-01

    The meagre (Argyrosomus regius) is taking on increasing importance in the aquaculture industry. In view of the limited supply of fish oil (FO) as a feed ingredient, the study of the capacity to biosynthesize long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) from alternative dietary oil sources is important. We analyzed changes in fatty acid (FA) desaturase 2 (fads2) and FA elongase 5 (elovl5) mRNA levels in livers and brains in response to FO replacement with a blend of vegetable oils (VO) and selenium (Se) supplementation. Fish were fed for 60 days with either a diet containing FO or a diet including VO, each supplemented or not with organic Se. Results showed that fads2 and elovl5 transcription was higher in liver when fish were fed VO diets. The brain mRNA levels of both genes were not affected by the dietary replacement of FO by VO. FA composition in the liver and skeletal muscle was altered by FO replacement, particularly by decreasing eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid contents. The α-linolenic, linoleic, and arachidonic acid contents increased in both liver and brain of fish fed VO diets. The effect of Se supplementation on lipid metabolism was evident only in fish fed FO, showing a decrease in the transcription of hepatic fads2. Results indicate that the total replacement of FO by VO in diets modulates the expression of genes involved in LC-PUFA biosynthesis in meagre, affecting the FA profile of the fish flesh. PMID:27169705

  18. An evolutionarily conserved Myostatin proximal promoter/enhancer confers basal levels of transcription and spatial specificity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Grade, Carla Vermeulen Carvalho; Salerno, Mônica Senna; Schubert, Frank R; Dietrich, Susanne; Alvares, Lúcia Elvira

    2009-10-01

    Myostatin (Mstn) is a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass, and Mstn mutations are responsible for the double muscling phenotype observed in many animal species. Moreover, Mstn is a positive regulator of adult muscle stem cell (satellite cell) quiescence, and hence, Mstn is being targeted in therapeutic approaches to muscle diseases. In order to better understand the mechanisms underlying Mstn regulation, we searched for the gene's proximal enhancer and promoter elements, using an evolutionary approach. We identified a 260-bp-long, evolutionary conserved region upstream of tetrapod Mstn and teleost mstn b genes. This region contains binding sites for TATA binding protein, Meis1, NF-Y, and for CREB family members, suggesting the involvement of cAMP in Myostatin regulation. The conserved fragment was able to drive reporter gene expression in C2C12 cells in vitro and in chicken somites in vivo; both normally express Mstn. In contrast, the reporter construct remained silent in the avian neural tube that normally does not express Mstn. This suggests that the identified element serves as a minimal promoter, harboring some spatial specificity. Finally, using bioinformatic approaches, we identified additional genes in the human genome associated with sequences similar to the Mstn proximal promoter/enhancer. Among them are genes important for myogenesis. This suggests that Mstn and these genes may form a synexpression group, regulated by a common signaling pathway.

  19. Structure of a microbial community in soil after prolonged addition of low levels of simulated acid rain

    PubMed

    Pennanen; Fritze; Vanhala; Kiikkila; Neuvonen; Baath

    1998-06-01

    Humus samples were collected 12 growing seasons after the start of a simulated acid rain experiment situated in the subarctic environment. The acid rain was simulated with H2SO4, a combination of H2SO4 and HNO3, and HNO3 at two levels of moderate acidic loads close to the natural anthropogenic pollution levels of southern Scandinavia. The higher levels of acid applications resulted in acidification, as defined by humus chemistry. The concentrations of base cations decreased, while the concentrations of exchangeable H+, Al, and Fe increased. Humus pH decreased from 3.83 to 3.65. Basal respiration decreased with decreasing humus pH, and total microbial biomass, measured by substrate-induced respiration and total amount of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA), decreased slightly. An altered PLFA pattern indicated a change in the microbial community structure at the higher levels of acid applications. In general, branched fatty acids, typical of gram-positive bacteria, increased in the acid plots. PLFA analysis performed on the bacterial community growing on agar plates also showed that the relative amount of PLFA specific for gram-positive bacteria increased due to the acidification. The changed bacterial community was adapted to the more acidic environment in the acid-treated plots, even though bacterial growth rates, estimated by thymidine and leucine incorporation, decreased with pH. Fungal activity (measured as acetate incorporation into ergosterol) was not affected. This result indicates that bacteria were more affected than fungi by the acidification. The capacity of the bacterial community to utilize 95 different carbon sources was variable and only showed weak correlations to pH. Differences in the toxicities of H2SO4 and HNO3 for the microbial community were not found.

  20. Optimal choice: assessing the probability of additional damage to buildings caused by water level changes of larger areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijnagte, J. L.; Luger, D.

    2012-12-01

    In the Northern parts of the Netherlands exploration of natural gas reservoirs causes subsidence over large areas. As a consequence, the water levels in canals and polders have to be adjusted over time in order to keep the groundwater levels at a constant depth relative to the surface level. In the middle of the subsidence area it is relatively easy to follow the settlements by a uniform lowering of the water level. This would however result in a relative lowering of the groundwater table at the edges of the subsidence area. Given the presence of soft compressible soils, this would result in induced settlements. For buildings in these areas this will increase the chance of damage. A major design challenge lies therefore in the optimisation of the use of compartments. The more compartments the higher the cost therefore the aim is to make compartments in the water management system that are as large as possible without causing inadmissible damage to buildings. In order to asses expected damage from different use of compartments three tools are needed. The first is a generally accepted method of damage determination, the second a method to determine the contribution to damage of a new influence, e.g. a groundwater table change. Third, and perhaps most importantly, a method is needed to evaluate effects not for single buildings but for larger areas. The first need is covered by established damage criteria like those of Burland & Wroth or Boscardin & Cording. Up until now the second and the third have been problematic. This paper presents a method which enables to assign a contribution to the probability of damage of various recognised mechanisms such as soil and foundation inhomogeneity, uneven loading, ground water level changes. Shallow subsidence due to peat oxidation and deep subsidence due to reservoir depletion can be combined. In order to address the third issue: evaluation of effects for larger areas, the method uses a probabilistic approach. Apart from a

  1. Plasma level of metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 is associated with liver damage and predicts development of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Konishi, Hirotaka; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Arita, Tomohiro; Shoda, Katsutoshi; Hiramoto, Hidekazu; Hamada, Junichi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Fujita, Yuji; Komatsu, Shuhei; Shiozaki, Atsushi; Ikoma, Hisashi; Ochiai, Toshiya; Otsuji, Eigo

    2016-02-01

    Recent studies have shown that metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) was overexpressed in many human solid cancers, however, its roles in plasma of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients were unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of plasma MALAT1 levels in HCC patients. Plasma samples were collected from pre-operative HCC, hepatic disease patients, and healthy controls, and tissue samples from HCC patients and colorectal cancer patients with liver metastasis. Plasma and tissue MALAT1 levels were measured. Plasma MALAT1 levels were progressively and significantly higher in HCC patients than hepatic disease patients, and higher in hepatic disease patients than healthy controls. The expression of MALAT1 in HCC tissue was slightly higher than that in paired non-cancerous liver tissue, but not significant. The expression of MALAT1 in the non-cancerous liver tissue of 20 HCC patients was significantly higher than that in normal liver tissue of 13 colorectal cancer patients. In contrast, plasma MALAT1 levels were significantly low in HCC patients with hepatitis B infection, and significantly high in patients with liver damage B or liver cirrhosis. In a receiver-operator curve analysis of HCC and hepatic disease patients, the cut-off value of plasma MALAT1 was 1.60 and the area under the curve was 0.66. Plasma MALAT1 levels were not correlated with α-fetoprotein or protein induced by vitamin K absence II, whereas sensitivity and specificity for the detection of HCC with the combination of MALAT1, α-fetoprotein, and protein induced by vitamin K absence II were 88.6% and 75%, respectively. In conclusion, the plasma MALAT1 level is associated with liver damage, and has clinical utility for predicting development of HCC.

  2. EFFECTS OF QUARTZ PARTICLE SIZE AND SUCROSE ADDITION ON MELTING BEHAVIOR OF A MELTER FEED FOR HIGH-LEVEL GLASS

    SciTech Connect

    MARCIAL J; KRUGER AA; HRMA PR; SCHWEIGER MJ; SWEARINGEN KJ; TEGROTENHUIS WE; HENAGER SH

    2010-07-28

    The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5 C/min up to 1200 C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 {micro}m. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-{micro}m quartz particles; particles {ge}150 {micro}m formed clusters. Particles of 5 {micro}m completely dissolved by 900 C whereas particles {ge}150 {micro}m did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200 C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles. Over 100 sites in the United States are currently tasked with the storage of nuclear waste. The largest is the Hanford Site located in southeastern Washington State with 177 subterranean tanks containing over fifty-million gallons of nuclear waste from plutonium production from 1944 through 1987. This waste will be vitrified at the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. In the vitrification process, feed is charged into a melter and converted into glass to be ultimately stored in a permanent repository. The duration of waste-site cleanups by the vitrification process depends on the rate of melting, i.e., on the rate of the feed-to-glass conversion. Foaming associated with the melting process and the rate of dissolution of quartz particles (silica being the major glass-forming additive) are assumed to be important factors that influence the rate of melting. Previous studies on foaming of high-alumina feed demonstrated that varying the makeup of a melter feed has a significant impact on foaming. The volume of feeds that contained 5-{micro

  3. Down-Regulation of the Expression of the FIH-1 and ARD-1 Genes at the Transcriptional Level by Nickel and Cobalt in the Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Qingdong; Kluz, Thomas; Costa, Max

    2005-01-01

    Although nickel and cobalt compounds have been known to cause induction of the transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) and activation of a battery of hypoxia-inducible genes in the cell, the molecular mechanisms of this induction remain unclear. The post-translational modification of HIF-1a, the oxygen-sensitive subunit of HIF-1, regulates stabilization, nuclear translocation, DNA binding activity, and transcriptional activity of the protein. Among the enzymes regulating the post-translational modification of HIF-1a, the factor inhibiting HIF-1 (FIH-1) hydroxylates the protein at asparagine 803, suppressing the interaction of HIF-1a with transcription coactivators p300/CBP and reducing the transcriptional activity of the protein. ARD-1, the acetyltransferase, acetylates HIF-1a at lysine 532, which enhances the interaction of HIF-1a with pVHL. Therefore, FIH-1 and ARD-1 negatively regulate the transcriptional activity and the stability of HIF-1a. We examined the mRNA levels of FIH-1 and ARD-1 genes after exposure nickel (II) or cobalt (II) to the cell and found that both genes were down-regulated by the chemical treatment, which may lead to reduced levels of both proteins and result in increased level of HIF-1a and its transcriptional activity. PMID:16705796

  4. Association of elevated transcript levels of interferon-inducible chemokines with disease activity and organ damage in systemic lupus erythematosus patients

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qiong; Chen, Xiaoqing; Cui, Huijuan; Guo, Yanzhi; Chen, Jing; Shen, Nan; Bao, Chunde

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multi-system autoimmune disease with a heterogeneous course and varying degrees of severity and organ damage; thus, there is increasing interest in identifying biomarkers for SLE. In this study we correlated the combined expression level of multiple interferon-inducible chemokines with disease activity, degree of organ damage and clinical features in SLE, and we investigated their roles as biomarkers. Methods Peripheral blood cells obtained from 67 patients with SLE patients, 20 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and 23 healthy donors were subjected to real-time PCR in order to measure the transcriptional levels of seven interferon-inducible chemokines (RANTES, MCP-1, CCL19, MIG, IP-10, CXCL11, and IL-8). The data were used to calculate a chemokine score for each participant, after which comparisons were performed between various groups of SLE patients and control individuals. Results Chemokine scores were significantly elevated in SLE patients versus RA patients and healthy donors (P = 0.012 and P = 0.002, respectively). Chemokine scores were correlated positively with SLE Disease Activity Index 2000 scores (P = 0.005) and negatively with C3 levels (P < 0.001). Compared with patients without lupus nephritis and those with inactive lupus nephritis, chemokine scores were elevated in patients with active lupus nephritis, especially when their daily prednisone dosage was under 30 mg (P = 0.002 and P = 0.014, respectively). Elevated chemokine scores were also associated with the presence of cumulative organ damage (Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American Society of Rheumatology Damage Index ≥ 1; P = 0.010) and the occurrence of anti-Sm or anti-RNP autoantibodies (both P = 0.021). Conclusions The combined transcription level of interferon-inducible chemokines in peripheral blood leucocytes is closely associated with disease activity, degree of organ damage, and specific autoantibody patterns

  5. Interleukin-10 neutralizing antibody for detection of intestinal luminal levels and as a dietary additive in Eimeria challenged broiler chicks.

    PubMed

    Arendt, Maria K; Sand, Jordan M; Marcone, Taylor M; Cook, Mark E

    2016-02-01

    Interleukin-10 (IL-10) mRNA levels are increased within intestinal mucosa after Eimeria infection. IL-10 apical receptor presence on enterocytes suggests IL-10 is secreted into the intestinal lumen. Increased IL-10 has been shown to be central to the pathogenesis of numerous intracellular pathogens; we hypothesize luminal secretion of IL-10 enables Eimeria spp. infection in chickens. This study examines intestine luminal IL-10 levels and performance in broilers challenged with Eimeria when fed an anti-IL-10 antibody. Chicks were fed a diet (1 to 21 d) with control or anti-IL-10 antibody (0.34 g egg yolk antibody powder/Kg diet) with a saline or 10× dose of Advent coccidiosis vaccine on d 3. One chick per pen was euthanized on days 2, 4, 7, 10, 13, 16, and 19 post-challenge, bled, and intestines were collected for luminal fluid IL-10 concentrations. Body weight and feed intake were measured on d 21, and oocyst shedding was assessed on d 7 post-challenge. A significant Eimeria × antibody interaction on d 21 body weight (P < 0.05) showed chicks fed control antibody, but not anti-IL-10, had significant reductions in body weight when challenged with Eimeria spp. Oocyst shedding was increased with Eimeria challenge, but dietary antibody had no effect. Plasma carotenoid levels were reduced in Eimeria challenged chicks 4, 7, 10, and 16 days post-challenge compared to unchallenged chicks. Lack of an Eimeria × antibody interaction showed anti-IL-10 was not protective against Eimeria-induced decreases in plasma carotenoids. Eimeria challenge increased intestine luminal IL-10 on days 4 and 7 post-challenge in the cecum and jejunum, respectively, compared to unchallenged. Dietary anti-IL-10 decreased luminal IL-10 in the ileum on day 2 post-challenge when compared to control antibody fed chicks. No interaction between Eimeria challenge and antibody was observed on intestine luminal contents of IL-10, suggesting anti-IL-10 was ineffective at preventing increased Eimeria

  6. Theta-Burst Stimulation of Hippocampal Slices Induces Network-Level Calcium Oscillations and Activates Analogous Gene Transcription to Spatial Learning

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, John J.; Murphy, Keith J.

    2014-01-01

    Over four decades ago, it was discovered that high-frequency stimulation of the dentate gyrus induces long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission. LTP is believed to underlie how we process and code external stimuli before converting it to salient information that we store as 'memories'. It has been shown that rats performing spatial learning tasks display theta-frequency (3–12 Hz) hippocampal neural activity. Moreover, administering theta-burst stimulation (TBS) to hippocampal slices can induce LTP. TBS triggers a sustained rise in intracellular calcium [Ca2+]i in neurons leading to new protein synthesis important for LTP maintenance. In this study, we measured TBS-induced [Ca2+]i oscillations in thousands of cells at increasing distances from the source of stimulation. Following TBS, a calcium wave propagates radially with an average speed of 5.2 µm/s and triggers multiple and regular [Ca2+]i oscillations in the hippocampus. Interestingly, the number and frequency of [Ca2+]i fluctuations post-TBS increased with respect to distance from the electrode. During the post-tetanic phase, 18% of cells exhibited 3 peaks in [Ca2+]i with a frequency of 17 mHz, whereas 2.3% of cells distributed further from the electrode displayed 8 [Ca2+]i oscillations at 33 mHz. We suggest that these observed [Ca2+]i oscillations could lead to activation of transcription factors involved in synaptic plasticity. In particular, the transcription factor, NF-κB, has been implicated in memory formation and is up-regulated after LTP induction. We measured increased activation of NF-κB 30 min post-TBS in CA1 pyramidal cells and also observed similar temporal up-regulation of NF-κB levels in CA1 neurons following water maze training in rats. Therefore, TBS of hippocampal slice cultures in vitro can mimic the cell type-specific up-regulations in activated NF-κB following spatial learning in vivo. This indicates that TBS may induce similar transcriptional changes to spatial learning

  7. Role of two different glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases in controlling the reversible Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway in Thermoproteus tenax: regulation on protein and transcript level.

    PubMed

    Brunner, N A; Siebers, B; Hensel, R

    2001-04-01

    The hyperthermophilic archaeum Thermoproteus tenax uses a variant of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway as the main route for carbohydrate metabolism. This variant is characterized by a reversible nonallosteric PPi-dependent phosphofructokinase and two glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases differing in cosubstrate specificity, phosphate dependence, and allosteric behavior. Although the nonphosphorylating NAD+-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPN; E.C. 1.2.1.8) fulfills exclusively catabolic purposes, the phosphorylating NADP+-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (NADP+-GAPDH; E.C. 1.2.1.13) exhibits anabolic features. The gene encoding the NADP+-GAPDH was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The deduced protein sequence displayed 47%-53% sequence identity to archaeal phosphorylating GAPDHs. The kinetic parameters of the NADP+-GAPDH showed a clear preference for the reductive reaction with a 5-fold-higher specific activity in the reductive reaction as compared to the oxidative reaction and a 20-fold-lower Km for 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate as compared to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate. Contrary to GAPN, the enzyme is not allosterically regulated. The coding gene overlaps by 1 bp with a preceding open reading frame coding for 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK; E.C. 2.7.2.3). Northern analyses identified mono- and bicistronic messages of both genes in an equimolar ratio. Transcript levels and specific activity of NADP+-GAPDH and PGK were 3- to 4-fold higher under autotrophic conditions as compared to heterotrophic conditions, whereas transcript abundance and specific activity of GAPN remained constant in autotrophically and heterotrophically grown cells. The different regulation of the two counteracting glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases is discussed with respect to the flux control of the T. tenax-specific EMP variant.

  8. The effect of different levels of sunflower head pith addition on the properties of model system emulsions prepared from fresh and frozen beef.

    PubMed

    Sariçoban, Cemalettin; Yilmaz, Mustafa Tahsin; Karakaya, Mustafa; Tiske, Sümeyra Sultan

    2010-01-01

    The effect of sunflower head pith on the functional properties of emulsions was studied by using a model system. Oil/water (O/W) model emulsion systems were prepared from fresh and frozen beef by the addition of the pith at five concentrations. Emulsion capacity (EC), stability (ES), viscosity (EV), colour and flow properties of the prepared model system emulsions were analyzed. The pith addition increased the EC and ES and the highest EC and ES values were reached when 5% of pith added; however, further increase in the pith concentration caused an inverse trend in these values. Fresh beef emulsions had higher EC and ES values than did frozen beef emulsions. One percent pith concentration was the critic level for the EV values of fresh beef emulsions. EV values of the emulsions reached a maximum level at 5% pith level, followed by a decrease at 7% pit level.

  9. Effect of Feed Melting, Temperature History and Minor Component Addition on Spinel Crystallization in High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Izak, Pavel; Hrma, Pavel R.; Arey, Bruce W.; Plaisted, Trevor J.

    2001-08-01

    This study was undertaken to help design mathematical models for high-level waste (HLW) glass melter that simulate spinel behavior in molten glass. Spinel, (Fe,Ni,Mn) (Fe,Cr)2O4, is the primary solid phase that precipitates from HLW glasses containing Fe and Ni in sufficient concentrations. Spinel crystallization affects the anticipated cost and risk of HLW vitrification. To study melting reactions, we used simulated HLW feed, prepared with co-precipitated Fe, Ni, Cr, and Mn hydroxides. Feed samples were heated up at a temperature-increase rate (4C/min) close to that which the feed experiences in the HLW glass melter. The decomposition, melting, and dissolution of feed components (such as nitrates, carbonates, and silica) and the formation of intermediate crystalline phases (spinel, sodalite [Na8(AlSiO4)6(NO2)2], and Zr-containing minerals) were characterized using evolved gas analysis, volume-expansion measurement, optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, thermogravimetric analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, and X-ray diffraction. Nitrates and quartz, the major feed components, converted to a glass-forming melt by 880C. A chromium-free spinel formed in the nitrate melt starting from 520C and Sodalite, a transient product of corundum dissolution, appeared above 600C and eventually dissolved in glass. To investigate the effects of temperature history and minor components (Ru,Ag, and Cu) on the dissolution and growth of spinel crystals, samples were heated up to temperatures above liquidus temperature (TL), then subjected to different temperature histories, and analyzed. The results show that spinel mass fraction, crystals composition, and crystal size depend on the chemical and physical makeup of the feed and temperature history.

  10. Transcriptional expression levels and biochemical markers of oxidative stress in the earthworm Eisenia andrei after exposure to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D).

    PubMed

    Hattab, Sabrine; Boughattas, Iteb; Boussetta, Hamadi; Viarengo, Aldo; Banni, Mohamed; Sforzini, Susanna

    2015-12-01

    This study investigated the stress response of earthworms (Eisenia andrei) to exposure to a commonly used herbicide, 2,4 dichloro-phenoxy-acetic acid (2,4-D). We evaluated both stress biomarkers and the transcriptional expression levels and activity of three enzymes involved in oxidative stress responses. Earthworms were exposed to three sublethal concentration of 2,4-D (3.5, 7, and 14 mg kg(-1)) for 7 and 14 days. Exposure to 7 and 14 mg kg(-1) 2,4-D significantly reduced both worm body weight and lysosomal membrane stability (LMS); the latter is a sensitive stress biomarker in coelomocytes. Exposure to 2,4-D caused a pronounced increase in the accumulation of malonedialdehyde (MDA), a marker of oxidative stress, and significantly increased the activity of the antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD),and glutathione-S-transferase (GST). Compared to expression in controls, the expression levels of the sod, cat, and gst genes increased in worms exposed to all three 2,4-D doses for 7 days. However, after 14 days of exposure, only the expression of the gst gene remained higher than controls. These data provide new insights into the cytotoxicity of 2,4-D in the earthworm E. andrei and should be carefully considered in view of the biological effects of herbicides in soils organisms.

  11. Genetic Inactivation of ATRX Leads to a Decrease in the Amount of Telomeric Cohesin and Level of Telomere Transcription in Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eid, Rita; Demattei, Marie-Véronique; Episkopou, Harikleia; Augé-Gouillou, Corinne; Decottignies, Anabelle; Grandin, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in ATRX (alpha thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome X-linked), a chromatin-remodeling protein, are associated with the telomerase-independent ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres) pathway of telomere maintenance in several types of cancer, including human gliomas. In telomerase-positive glioma cells, we found by immunofluorescence that ATRX localized not far from the chromosome ends but not exactly at the telomere termini. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments confirmed a subtelomeric localization for ATRX, yet short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated genetic inactivation of ATRX failed to trigger the ALT pathway. Cohesin has been recently shown to be part of telomeric chromatin. Here, using ChIP, we showed that genetic inactivation of ATRX provoked diminution in the amount of cohesin in subtelomeric regions of telomerase-positive glioma cells. Inactivation of ATRX also led to diminution in the amount of TERRAs, noncoding RNAs resulting from transcription of telomeric DNA, as well as to a decrease in RNA polymerase II (RNAP II) levels at the telomeres. Our data suggest that ATRX might establish functional interactions with cohesin on telomeric chromatin in order to control TERRA levels and that one or the other or both of these events might be relevant to the triggering of the ALT pathway in cancer cells that exhibit genetic inactivation of ATRX. PMID:26055325

  12. TMEM45A, SERPINB5 and p16INK4A transcript levels are predictive for development of high-grade cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Manawapat-Klopfer, Anna; Thomsen, Louise T; Martus, Peter; Munk, Christian; Russ, Rainer; Gmuender, Hans; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Haedicke-Jarboui, Juliane; Stubenrauch, Frank; Kjaer, Susanne K; Iftner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Women persistently infected with human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 are at high risk for development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or cervical cancer (CIN3+). We aimed to identify biomarkers for progression to CIN3+ in women with persistent HPV16 infection. In this prospective study, 11,088 women aged 20-29 years were enrolled during 1991-1993, and re-invited for a second visit two years later. Cervical cytology samples obtained at both visits were tested for HPV DNA by Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), and HC2-positive samples were genotyped by INNO-LiPA. The cohort was followed for up to 19 years via a national pathology register. To identify markers for progression to CIN3+, we performed microarray analysis on RNA extracted from cervical swabs of 30 women with persistent HPV16-infection and 11 HPV-negative women. Six genes were selected and validated by quantitative PCR. Three genes were subsequently validated within a different and large group of women from the same cohort. Secondly, Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analyses were used to investigate whether expression levels of those three genes predict progression to CIN3+. We found that high transcript levels of TMEM45A, SERPINB5 and p16INK4a at baseline were associated with increased risk of CIN3+ during follow-up. The hazard ratios of CIN3+ per 10-fold increase in baseline expression level were 1.6 (95% CI: 1.1-2.3) for TMEM45A, 1.6 (95% CI: 1.1-2.5) for p16INK4a, and 1.8 (95% CI: 1.2-2.7) for SERPINB5. In conclusion, high mRNA expression levels of TMEM45A, SERPINB5 and p16INK4a were associated with increased risk of CIN3+ in persistently HPV16-infected women. PMID:27508094

  13. TMEM45A, SERPINB5 and p16INK4A transcript levels are predictive for development of high-grade cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Manawapat-Klopfer, Anna; Thomsen, Louise T; Martus, Peter; Munk, Christian; Russ, Rainer; Gmuender, Hans; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Haedicke-Jarboui, Juliane; Stubenrauch, Frank; Kjaer, Susanne K; Iftner, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Women persistently infected with human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 are at high risk for development of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or cervical cancer (CIN3+). We aimed to identify biomarkers for progression to CIN3+ in women with persistent HPV16 infection. In this prospective study, 11,088 women aged 20-29 years were enrolled during 1991-1993, and re-invited for a second visit two years later. Cervical cytology samples obtained at both visits were tested for HPV DNA by Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), and HC2-positive samples were genotyped by INNO-LiPA. The cohort was followed for up to 19 years via a national pathology register. To identify markers for progression to CIN3+, we performed microarray analysis on RNA extracted from cervical swabs of 30 women with persistent HPV16-infection and 11 HPV-negative women. Six genes were selected and validated by quantitative PCR. Three genes were subsequently validated within a different and large group of women from the same cohort. Secondly, Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression analyses were used to investigate whether expression levels of those three genes predict progression to CIN3+. We found that high transcript levels of TMEM45A, SERPINB5 and p16INK4a at baseline were associated with increased risk of CIN3+ during follow-up. The hazard ratios of CIN3+ per 10-fold increase in baseline expression level were 1.6 (95% CI: 1.1-2.3) for TMEM45A, 1.6 (95% CI: 1.1-2.5) for p16INK4a, and 1.8 (95% CI: 1.2-2.7) for SERPINB5. In conclusion, high mRNA expression levels of TMEM45A, SERPINB5 and p16INK4a were associated with increased risk of CIN3+ in persistently HPV16-infected women.

  14. Influence of type and level of water-soluble additives on drug release and surface and mechanical properties of Surelease films.

    PubMed

    Rohera, Bhagwan D; Parikh, Nilesh H

    2002-11-01

    Ethylcellulose in combination with water-soluble additives has been used in the development of microporous membrane-coated dosage forms. In the present study, application of three types of water-soluble additives, namely polyethylene glycols (PEG 400, 3350, and 8000), maltodextrins (Maltrin M150, M100, and M040 in the order of lower to higher average polymer size and molecular weight; dextrose equivalence 16.9, 11.1, and 4.8, respectively), and xylitol, as porosity modifiers in the films of a commercially available aqueous ethylcellulose dispersion (Surelease/E-7-7060 plasticized with glyceryl tricaprylate/caprate) was investigated. The effect of type and level of these additives on drug release characteristics and surface and mechanical properties of the polymeric films was studied. Each additive was incorporated at 20 and 30% levels in the polymeric dispersion based on its solids content. Ibuprofen tablets were coated using the polymeric dispersion with and without additive at 3% w/w coat level in a fluid-bed equipment. The coated tablets were evaluated for their drug release rate, coat reflectivity (gloss), Brinell hardness, and elastic modulus. Differential scanning calorimetric analysis of the films was performed to determine the physico-chemical changes in the applied film-coats. The rate of drug release, hence film porosity, was observed to be dependent on the type and level of the additive added. The molecular weight of the additive and its concentration in the polymeric dispersion had significant influence on the rate of drug release, hardness, and elasticity of the film-coats.

  15. The effect of aluminium-stress and exogenous spermidine on chlorophyll degradation, glutathione reductase activity and the photosystem II D1 protein gene (psbA) transcript level in lichen Xanthoria parietina.

    PubMed

    Sen, Gulseren; Eryilmaz, Isil Ezgi; Ozakca, Dilek

    2014-02-01

    In this study, the effects of short-term aluminium toxicity and the application of spermidine on the lichen Xanthoria parietina were investigated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. Our results suggest that aluminium stress leads to physiological processes in a dose-dependent manner through differences in lipid peroxidation rate, chlorophyll content and glutathione reductase (EC 1.6.4.2) activity in aluminium and spermidine treated samples. The expression of the photosystem II D1 protein (psbA) gene was quantified using semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Increased glutathione reductase activity and psbA mRNA transcript levels were observed in the X. parietina thalli that were treated with spermidine before aluminium-stress. The results showed that the application of spermidine could mitigate aluminium-induced lipid peroxidation and chlorophyll degradation on lichen X. parietina thalli through an increase in psbA transcript levels and activity of glutathione reductase (GR) enzymes.

  16. MiRNA-20 and MiRNA-106a Regulate Spermatogonial Stem Cell Renewal at the Post-transcriptional Level via Targeting STAT3 and Ccnd1

    PubMed Central

    He, Zuping; Jiang, Jiji; Kokkinaki, Maria; Tang, Lin; Zeng, Wenxian; Gallicano, Ian; Dobrinski, Ina; Dym, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Studies onspermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are of unusual significance because they are the unique stem cells that transmit genetic information to subsequent generations and they can acquire pluripotency to become embryonic stem-like cells that have therapeutic applications in human diseases. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have recently emerged as critical endogenous regulators in mammalian cells. However, the function and mechanisms of individual miRNAs in regulating SSC fate remain unknown. Here we report for the first time that miRNA-20 and miRNA-106a are preferentially expressed in mouse SSCs. Functional assays in vitro and in vivo using miRNA mimics and inhibitors reveal that miRNA-20 and miRNA-106a are essential for renewal of SSCs. We further demonstrate that these two miRNAs promote renewal at the post-transcriptional level via targeting STAT3 and Ccnd1 and that knockdown of STAT3, Fos, and Ccnd1 results in renewal of SSCs. This study thus provides novel insights into molecular mechanisms regulating renewal and differentiation of SSCs and may have important implications for regulating male reproduction. PMID:23836497

  17. Role of Burkholderia pseudomallei Sigma N2 in Amino Acids Utilization and in Regulation of Catalase E Expression at the Transcriptional Level

    PubMed Central

    Diep, Duong Thi Hong; Phuong, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Hlaing, Mya Myintzu; Srimanote, Potjanee; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis. The complete genome sequences of this pathogen have been revealed, which explain some pathogenic mechanisms. In various hostile conditions, for example, during nitrogen and amino acid starvation, bacteria can utilize alternative sigma factors such as RpoS and RpoN to modulate genes expression for their adaptation and survival. In this study, we demonstrate that mutagenesis of rpoN2, which lies on chromosome 2 of B. pseudomallei and encodes a homologue of the sigma factor RpoN, did not alter nitrogen and amino acid utilization of the bacterium. However, introduction of B. pseudomallei rpoN2 into E. coli strain deficient for rpoN restored the ability to utilize amino acids. Moreover, comparative partial proteomic analysis of the B. pseudomallei wild type and its rpoN2 isogenic mutant was performed to elucidate its amino acids utilization property which was comparable to its function found in the complementation assay. By contrast, the rpoN2 mutant exhibited decreased katE expression at the transcriptional and translational levels. Our finding indicates that B. pseudomallei RpoN2 is involved in a specific function in the regulation of catalase E expression. PMID:26904748

  18. Rapid N2O fluxes at high level of nitrate nitrogen addition during freeze-thaw events in boreal peatlands of Northeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Qian; Song, Changchun; Wang, Xianwei; Shi, Fuxi; Wang, Lili; Guo, Yuedong

    2016-06-01

    Freeze-thaw (FT) events and increasing nitrogen (N) availability may alter N turnover and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in permafrost peatlands. However, the responses of N2O emissions to different N levels and additions during FT events are far from clear. We conducted an incubation study to investigate the impacts of different N addition levels (LN: 0.07 mg N g-1, HN: 0.14 mg N g-1) and N addition forms (AC: ammonium chloride, NS: sodium nitrate) on the emissions of N2O under FT and non-freeze-thaw (NFT) conditions in boreal peatlands of Northeast China. Results indicated that the FT condition significantly increased N2O emissions compared with the NFT condition and peaks occurred during thawing. Compared with AC treatments, NS treatments significantly elevated the accumulation of N2O emissions under the FT condition, exhibiting significant differences in different NS levels. N2O emissions were also positively dependent on soil NO3- concentrations to supply nitrate for denitrification. Nitrate-N addition was mainly responsible for the burst of N2O with denitrification as the main process during FT events. Therefore, these results suggest that N2O emissions potentially increase during FT events with increasing nitrate-N deposition in permafrost peatlands, which would contribute to global climate warming.

  19. Addition of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels to electrocardiography criteria for detection of left ventricular hypertrophy: the ARIRANG study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Min-Soo; Yoo, Byung-Su; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jun-Won; Youn, Young Jin; Ahn, Sung Gyun; Kim, Jang-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Junghan; Park, Jong-Ku; Ahn, Song Vogue; Choi, Eunhee

    2015-04-01

    The utility of electrocardiography (ECG) in screening for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in general populations is limited mainly because its low sensitivity. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is released due to the remodeling processes of LVH and could improve the diagnostic accuracy for the ECG criteria for LVH. We hypothesized that addition of BNP levels to ECG criteria could aid LVH detection compared with ECG alone in a general population. We enrolled consecutive 343 subjects from a community-based cohort. LVH was defined as LV mass index > 95 g/m(2) for females and > 115 g/m(2) for males according to echocardiography. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve to detect LVH was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.61) in Sokolow-Lyon criteria and 0.53 (0.47-0.59) in the Cornell voltage criteria. After addition of N-terminal-proBNP levels to the model, the corresponding areas under the ROC were 0.63 (0.58-0.69) and 0.64 (0.59-0.69), respectively. P values for the comparison in areas under the ROC for models with and without N-terminal-proBNP levels were < 0.001. These data suggest that addition of N-terminal-proBNP levels to ECG criteria could significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy of LVH in general populations.

  20. Differential oxidant tolerance determined by the key transcription factor Yap1 is controlled by levels of the Yap1-binding protein, Ybp1.

    PubMed

    Gulshan, Kailash; Lee, Stella S; Moye-Rowley, W Scott

    2011-09-30

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcription factor Yap1 is a central determinant of oxidative stress tolerance. This protein is found primarily in the cytoplasm in the absence of oxidative stress but, upon exposure to oxidants, rapidly translocates to the nucleus and activates expression of target genes. Although both diamide and H(2)O(2) have been used to impose oxidative stress on cells, these different oxidants trigger Yap1 nuclear localization in distinctly different ways. Diamide appears to oxidize particular cysteine residues on Yap1, leading to inhibition of association of Yap1 with the nuclear exportin Crm1. Crm1 would normally transport Yap1 out of the nucleus. H(2)O(2) activation of Yap1 nuclear localization requires the participation of the glutathione peroxidase Gpx3 and the Yap1-binding protein Ybp1. H(2)O(2) exposure triggers formation of a dual disulfide bonded Yap1 that is catalyzed by the presence of Gpx3 and Ybp1. In the current study, we have determined that two distinct pools of Yap1 exist in the cell. These pools are designated by the level of Ybp1. Ybp1 interacts directly with Yap1 and these proteins form a stable complex in vivo. Genetic and biochemical experiments indicate that Ybp1 is rate-limiting for Yap1 oxidative folding during H(2)O(2) stress. The fungal pathogen Candida glabrata expresses a protein homologous to Ybp1 called CgYbp1. Overproduction of CgYbp1 elevated H(2)O(2) tolerance in this pathogen indicating that the determinative role of Ybp1 in setting the level of H(2)O(2) resistance has been evolutionarily conserved. PMID:21844193

  1. Transcriptional feedback oscillators: maybe, maybe not...

    PubMed

    Lakin-Thomas, Patricia L

    2006-04-01

    The molecular mechanism of circadian rhythmicity is usually modeled by a transcription/translation feedback oscillator in which clock proteins negatively feed back on their own transcription to produce rhythmic levels of clock protein mRNAs, which in turn cause the production of rhythmic levels of clock proteins. This mechanism has been applied to all model organisms for which molecular data are available. This review summarizes the increasing number of anomalous observations that do not fit the standard molecular mechanism for the model organisms Acetabularia, Synechococcus, Drosophila, Neurospora, and mouse. The anomalies fall into 2 classes: observations of rhythmicity in the organism when transcription of clock genes is held constant, and rhythmicity in the organism when clock gene function is missing in knockout mutants. It is concluded that the weight of anomalies is now so large that the standard transcription/translation mechanism is no longer an adequate model for circadian oscillators. Rhythmic transcription may have other functions in the circadian system, such as participating in input and output pathways and providing robustness to the oscillations. It may be most useful to think in terms of a circadian system that uses a noncircadian oscillator consisting of metabolic feedback loops, which acquires its circadian properties from additional regulatory molecules such as the products of canonical clock genes.

  2. Transcription factors Sox10 and Sox2 functionally interact with positive transcription elongation factor b in Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Arter, Juliane; Wegner, Michael

    2015-02-01

    Sox proteins are mechanistically versatile regulators with established relevance to different developmental processes and crucial impact on chromatin structure, DNA conformation, and transcriptional initiation. Here, we show that Sox2 and Sox10, two Sox proteins important for Schwann cell development, also have the capability to activate transcriptional elongation in a Schwann cell line by recruiting the positive transcription elongation factor b. Recruitment is mediated by physical interaction between the carboxyterminal transactivation domains of the two Sox proteins and the Cyclin T1 subunit of positive transcription elongation factor b, with interaction interfaces for the two Sox proteins being mapped to adjacent regions of the central part of Cyclin T1. Supporting the relevance of this interaction to Schwann cell development, transcription of myelin genes appears regulated at the level of elongation. Our results thus add a new facet to the activity of Sox proteins and expand the functional repertoire of this important group of developmental regulators. Sox transcription factors are important regulators of nervous system development. While they are known to regulate transcription by recruiting and stabilizing the RNA polymerase II preinitiation complex directly or with help of the Mediator complex, this study provides evidence that Sox10 and Sox2 additionally influence transcription in glial cells at the elongation stage by recruiting P-TEFb. Cdk9, cyclin-dependent kinase 9; P-TEFb, positive transcription elongation factor b; Pol II, RNA polymerase II; Sox, Sox2 or Sox10 protein.

  3. Evaluating the prognostic significance of FBXW7 expression level in human breast cancer by a meta-analysis of transcriptional profiles

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guangwei; Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Pengju; Lu, Jing; Mao, Jian-Hua

    2012-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene FBXW7 is mutated in numerous types of human cancers leading to loss of its function and/or expression. However the clinic significance of FBXW7 alterations remains largely unknown. Here, we carried out a meta-analysis of 10 gene expression microarray studies for a total 1900 patients of breast cancer with clinic information to evaluate the prognostic impact of FBXW7 mRNA expression. The FBXW7 mRNA levels significantly reduced in breast cancer compared to normal tissues. In addition, significant difference in the FBXW7 mRNA levels was found among molecular subtypes (normal-like, luminal A, luminal B, ERBB2 and basal). ERBB2 and basal tumors had significantly lower average FBXW7 mRNA level than normal-like tumors, whereas luminal A and B tumors have the lowest average FBXW7 mRNA level. The patients with higher FBXW7 mRNA level significantly increased disease-free survival, particularly in the group of patients with ER negative and basal subtype tumors. Moreover, higher FBXW7 mRNA level also significantly increased overall survival in the patients with ER negative tumors. But we strikingly found opposite effect of FBXW7 expression on overall survival in different subtypes. The patients with higher FBXW7 mRNA level significantly decreased overall survival in normal-like subtype while the patients with higher FBXW7 mRNA level significantly increased overall survival in ERBB2 and Basal subtype. Taken together, our results suggest that FBXW7 mRNA levels were a prognostic factor for disease-free and overall survival according to ER status and molecular subtypes. PMID:23105958

  4. Alteration at translational but not transcriptional level of transferrin receptor expression following manganese exposure at the blood-CSF barrier in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Li, G. Jane; Zhao Qiuqu; Zheng Wei . E-mail: wzheng@purdue.edu

    2005-06-01

    Manganese exposure alters iron homeostasis in blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), possibly by acting on iron transport mechanisms localized at the blood-brain barrier and/or blood-CSF barrier. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that manganese exposure may change the binding affinity of iron regulatory proteins (IRPs) to mRNAs encoding transferrin receptor (TfR), thereby influencing iron transport at the blood-CSF barrier. A primary culture of choroidal epithelial cells was adapted to grow on a permeable membrane sandwiched between two culture chambers to mimic blood-CSF barrier. Trace {sup 59}Fe was used to determine the transepithelial transport of iron. Following manganese treatment (100 {mu}M for 24 h), the initial flux rate constant (K {sub i}) of iron was increased by 34%, whereas the storage of iron in cells was reduced by 58%, as compared to controls. A gel shift assay demonstrated that manganese exposure increased the binding of IRP1 and IRP2 to the stem loop-containing mRNAs. Consequently, the cellular concentrations of TfR proteins were increased by 84% in comparison to controls. Assays utilizing RT-PCR, quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR, and nuclear run off techniques showed that manganese treatment did not affect the level of heterogeneous nuclear RNA (hnRNA) encoding TfR, nor did it affect the level of nascent TfR mRNA. However, manganese exposure resulted in a significantly increased level of TfR mRNA and reduced levels of ferritin mRNA. Taken together, these results suggest that manganese exposure increases iron transport at the blood-CSF barrier; the effect is likely due to manganese action on translational events relevant to the production of TfR, but not due to its action on transcriptional, gene expression of TfR. The disrupted protein-TfR mRNA interaction in the choroidal epithelial cells may explain the toxicity of manganese at the blood-CSF barrier.

  5. Cooperative activation of Xenopus rhodopsin transcription by paired-like transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vertebrates, rod photoreceptor-specific gene expression is regulated by the large Maf and Pax-like transcription factors, Nrl/LNrl and Crx/Otx5. The ubiquitous occurrence of their target DNA binding sites throughout rod-specific gene promoters suggests that multiple transcription factor interactions within the promoter are functionally important. Cooperative action by these transcription factors activates rod-specific genes such as rhodopsin. However, a quantitative mechanistic explanation of transcriptional rate determinants is lacking. Results We investigated the contributions of various paired-like transcription factors and their cognate cis-elements to rhodopsin gene activation using cultured cells to quantify activity. The Xenopus rhodopsin promoter (XOP) has a bipartite structure, with ~200 bp proximal to the start site (RPP) coordinating cooperative activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 and the adjacent 5300 bp upstream sequence increasing the overall expression level. The synergistic activation by Nrl/LNrl-Crx/Otx5 also occurred when XOP was stably integrated into the genome. We determined that Crx/Otx5 synergistically activated transcription independently and additively through the two Pax-like cis-elements, BAT1 and Ret4, but not through Ret1. Other Pax-like family members, Rax1 and Rax2, do not synergistically activate XOP transcription with Nrl/LNrl and/or Crx/Otx5; rather they act as co-activators via the Ret1 cis-element. Conclusions We have provided a quantitative model of cooperative transcriptional activation of the rhodopsin promoter through interaction of Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl at two paired-like cis-elements proximal to the NRE and TATA binding site. Further, we have shown that Rax genes act in cooperation with Crx/Otx5 with Nrl/LNrl as co-activators of rhodopsin transcription. PMID:24499263

  6. Does addition of low-level laser therapy (LLLT) in conservative care of knee arthritis successfully postpone the need for joint replacement?

    PubMed

    Ip, David

    2015-12-01

    The current study evaluates whether the addition of low-level laser therapy into standard conventional physical therapy in elderly with bilateral symptomatic tri-compartmental knee arthritis can successfully postpone the need for joint replacement surgery. A prospective randomized cohort study of 100 consecutive unselected elderly patients with bilateral symptomatic knee arthritis with each knee randomized to receive either treatment protocol A consisting of conventional physical therapy or protocol B which is the same as protocol A with added low-level laser therapy. The mean follow-up was 6 years. Treatment failure was defined as breakthrough pain which necessitated joint replacement surgery. After a follow-up of 6 years, patients clearly benefited from treatment with protocol B as only one knee needed joint replacement surgery, while nine patients treated with protocol A needed surgery (p < 0.05). We conclude low-level laser therapy should be incorporated into standard conservative treatment protocol for symptomatic knee arthritis.

  7. Exposure to2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) alters thyroid hormone levels and thyroid hormone-regulated gene transcription in manila clam Ruditapes philippinarum.

    PubMed

    Song, Ying; Miao, Jingjing; Pan, Luqing; Wang, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have the potential to disturb the thyroid endocrine system in vertebrates, but little is known about the disruptive effects of PBDEs on marine bivalves. In this study, we first examined the effects of BDE-47 exposure on growth of juvenile manila clams Ruditapes philippinarum. The result showed that 1.0 and 10 μg L(-1) BDE-47 had adverse effects on 14-d shell-length growth of juvenile clams. Then, one-year-old adult clams were exposed to 0, 0.1 and 1 μg L(-1) BDE-47 for 15 d. BDE-47 (1 μg L(-1)) exposure caused significant decreases of total T4 (thyroxine) by 40% and T3 (3,5,3'-triiodothyronine) by 75% concentrations in haemolymph of the clams. Transcription of genes involved in thyroid hormone synthesis and metabolism were also studied by quantitative RT-PCR. Gene expression levels of sodium iodide symporter (rp-NIS), iodothyronine deiodinase (rp-Deio) and thyroid peroxidase (rp-TPO) were increased in a dose-dependent manner at day 5 and day 10, while monocarboxylate transporter 8 (rp-Mct8) was downregulated at day 5, day 10 and day 15. The effect and preliminary mechanism observed in the present study were consistent with the results from previous studies on rodent and fish, implying that exposure to BDE-47 may pose threat to thyroid hormone homeostasis in bivalves through thyroid synthesis and metabolism pathways. This study may provide a first step towards understanding of the thyroid function disruptive effects of PBDEs on marine bivalves and the underlying mechanism across taxonomic groups and phyla. PMID:26943874

  8. Changes in Air CO₂ Concentration Differentially Alter Transcript Levels of NtAQP1 and NtPIP2;1 Aquaporin Genes in Tobacco Leaves.

    PubMed

    Secchi, Francesca; Schubert, Andrea; Lovisolo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The aquaporin specific control on water versus carbon pathways in leaves is pivotal in controlling gas exchange and leaf hydraulics. We investigated whether Nicotiana tabacum aquaporin 1 (NtAQP1) and Nicotiana tabacum plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2;1 (NtPIP2;1) gene expression varies in tobacco leaves subjected to treatments with different CO₂ concentrations (ranging from 0 to 800 ppm), inducing changes in photosynthesis, stomatal regulation and water evaporation from the leaf. Changes in air CO₂ concentration ([CO₂]) affected net photosynthesis (Pn) and leaf substomatal [CO₂] (Ci). Pn was slightly negative at 0 ppm air CO₂; it was one-third that of ambient controls at 200 ppm, and not different from controls at 800 ppm. Leaves fed with 800 ppm [CO₂] showed one-third reduced stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration (E), and their gs was in turn slightly lower than in 200 ppm- and in 0 ppm-treated leaves. The 800 ppm air [CO₂] strongly impaired both NtAQP1 and NtPIP2;1 gene expression, whereas 0 ppm air [CO₂], a concentration below any in vivo possible conditions and specifically chosen to maximize the gene expression alteration, increased only the NtAQP1 transcript level. We propose that NtAQP1 expression, an aquaporin devoted to CO₂ transport, positively responds to CO₂ scarcity in the air in the whole range 0-800 ppm. On the contrary, expression of NtPIP2;1, an aquaporin not devoted to CO₂ transport, is related to water balance in the leaf, and changes in parallel with gs. These observations fit in a model where upregulation of leaf aquaporins is activated at low Ci, while downregulation occurs when high Ci saturates photosynthesis and causes stomatal closure. PMID:27089333

  9. Runaway transcription

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A newly demonstrated defect in RNA polymerase II termination caused by 7SK snRNA knockdown may have revealed a novel mechanism uncoupling RNA processing from transcription. Please see related Research article, http://genomebiology.com/2013/14/9/R98 PMID:24079702

  10. Association between the transcriptional levels of Htr-1a and tryptophan hydroxylase-1 in the hippocampus and the antifatigue effects of leucine on rats with postoperative fatigue

    PubMed Central

    WU, TIANTIAN; CHEN, JING; ZHU, JIANG; YU, ZHEN

    2014-01-01

    Leucine (Leu), a branched-chain amino acid (BCAA), is widely used in clinical practice following severe burns, gastrointestinal surgery, trauma and sepsis. In the present study, the antifatigue effects of BCAAs on a postoperative fatigue (POF) rat model, induced by 70% intestinal resection, were investigated. Leu (16.5 g/l) was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 18 ml/kg/day. The fatigue level and antifatigue effects of Leu were evaluated by open-field testing on day 1, 3, 5 and 7 after surgery. In addition, mRNA specimens were extracted and measured using a quantitative polymerase chain reaction method. The open-field test results indicated that Leu exhibited a significant antifatigue effect. The total distance travelled and the number of times the rats passed from the outermost grids of an open-top case were greatly improved in the Leu treatment group when compared with the POF model group. With the exception of the normal group, the mRNA expression levels of Htr-1a exhibited a similar trend in all other groups, reaching a climax on day 3 and 5, while being restored to a normal level on day 7. With regard to the Leu intervention group, the mRNA expression level of Htr-1a decreased significantly on day 3 and 5 following surgery. The mRNA expression levels of tryptophan hydroxylase-1 were unchanged in this short time period; however, the levels were increased gradually in the Leu treatment group. Therefore, Leu exhibited an apparent antifatigue effect on various 5-hydroxytryptamine-associated genes. PMID:25289072

  11. LOX-1 transcription.

    PubMed

    Hermonat, Paul L; Zhu, Hongqing; Cao, Maohua; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2011-10-01

    The importance of the lectin-like oxidized LDL receptor (LOX-1) gene in cardiovascular and other diseases is slowly being revealed. LOX-1 gene expression appears to be a "canary in a coal mine" for atherogenesis, being strongly up-regulated early on in a number of cell types when they are activated, and predicting the sites of future disease. From this early time point the LOX-1 protein often participates in the disease process itself. While gene/protein expression can be regulated on a multiplicity of levels, the most basic and important mode of regulation is usually transcriptional. There are very few studies on the transcriptional regulation of the human LOX-1 promoter; fewer still on definitive mapping of the transcription factors involved. It is known that a wide variety of stimuli up-regulate LOX-1, usually/probably on the transcriptional level. Angiotensin II (Ang II) is one important regulator of renin-angiotensin system and stimulator LOX-1. Ang II is known to up-regulate LOX-1 transcription through an NF-kB motif located at nt -2158. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) is another important cardiovascular regulator, particularly of atherosclerotic disease, and a strong stimulator of LOX-1. Ox-LDL is known to up-regulate LOX-1 transcription through an Oct-1 motif located at nt -1556. The subsequent enhanced LOX-1 receptor numbers and their binding by ox-LDL ligand triggers a positive feedback loop, increasing further LOX-1 expression, with a presently unknown regulatory governor. The Oct-1 gene also has its own Oct-1-driven positive feedback loop, which likely also contributes to LOX-1 up-regulation. There is also data which suggests the involvement of the transcription factor AP-1 during stimulation with Phorbol 12-myristate acetate. While the importance of NF-κB as a transcriptional regulator of cardiovascular-relevant genes is well known, the importance of Oct-1 is not. Data suggests that Oct-1-mediated up-regulation of transcription is an early

  12. Identifying Novel Transcriptional Regulators with Circadian Expression

    PubMed Central

    Schick, Sandra; Thakurela, Sudhir; Fournier, David; Hampel, Mareike Hildegard

    2015-01-01

    Organisms adapt their physiology and behavior to the 24-h day-night cycle to which they are exposed. On a cellular level, this is regulated by intrinsic transcriptional-translational feedback loops that are important for maintaining the circadian rhythm. These loops are organized by members of the core clock network, which further regulate transcription of downstream genes, resulting in their circadian expression. Despite progress in understanding circadian gene expression, only a few players involved in circadian transcriptional regulation, including transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long noncoding RNAs, are known. Aiming to discover such genes, we performed a high-coverage transcriptome analysis of a circadian time course in murine fibroblast cells. In combination with a newly developed algorithm, we identified many transcription factors, epigenetic regulators, and long intergenic noncoding RNAs that are cyclically expressed. In addition, a number of these genes also showed circadian expression in mouse tissues. Furthermore, the knockdown of one such factor, Zfp28, influenced the core clock network. Mathematical modeling was able to predict putative regulator-effector interactions between the identified circadian genes and may help for investigations into the gene regulatory networks underlying circadian rhythms. PMID:26644408

  13. Functional coupling of transcription and splicing.

    PubMed

    Montes, Marta; Becerra, Soraya; Sánchez-Álvarez, Miguel; Suñé, Carlos

    2012-06-15

    The tightly regulated process of precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) alternative splicing is a key mechanism to increase the number and complexity of proteins encoded by the genome. Evidence gathered in recent years has established that transcription and splicing are physically and functionally coupled and that this coupling may be an essential aspect of the regulation of splicing and alternative splicing. Recent advances in our understanding of transcription and of splicing regulation have uncovered the multiple interactions between components from both types of machinery. These interactions help to explain the functional coupling of RNAPII transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing for efficient and regulated gene expression at the molecular level. Recent technological advances, in addition to novel cell and molecular biology approaches, have led to the development of new tools for addressing mechanistic questions to achieve an integrated and global understanding of the functional coupling of RNAPII transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing. Here, we review major milestones and insights into RNA polymerase II transcription and pre-mRNA alternative splicing as well as new concepts and challenges that have arisen from multiple genome-wide approaches and analyses at the single-cell resolution.

  14. A R2R3-MYB transcription factor, GmMYB12B2, affects the expression levels of flavonoid biosynthesis genes encoding key enzymes in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Li, Jing-Wen; Zhai, Ying; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Xu; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Su, Lian-Tai; Wang, Ying; Wang, Qing-Yu

    2013-12-10

    Isoflavones play diverse roles in plant-microbe interactions and are potentially important for human nutrition and health. To study the regulation of isoflavonoid synthesis in soybean, the R2R3-MYB transcription factor GmMYB12B2 was isolated and characterized. Yeast expression experiments demonstrated that GmMYB12B2 showed transcriptional activity. GmMYB12B2 was localized in the nucleus when it was transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that GmMYB12B2 transcription was increased in roots and mature seeds compared with other organs. The gene expression level in immature embryos was consistent with the accumulation of isoflavones. CHS8 is a key enzyme in plant flavonoid biosynthesis. Transient expression experiments in soybean calli demonstrated that CHS8 was regulated by GmMYB12B2 and produced more fluorescence. The expression levels of some key enzymes in flavonoid biosynthesis were examined in transgenic Arabidopsis lines. The results showed that the expression levels of PAL1, CHS and FLS in transgenic plants were significantly higher than those in wild type plants. However, the expression level of DFR was lower, and the expression levels of CHI, F3H and F3'H were the same in all lines. GmMYB12B2 expression caused a constitutive increase in the accumulation of flavonoids in transgenic Arabidopsis lines compared with wild type plants. PMID:24060295

  15. A R2R3-MYB transcription factor, GmMYB12B2, affects the expression levels of flavonoid biosynthesis genes encoding key enzymes in transgenic Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiao-Wei; Li, Jing-Wen; Zhai, Ying; Zhao, Yan; Zhao, Xu; Zhang, Hai-Jun; Su, Lian-Tai; Wang, Ying; Wang, Qing-Yu

    2013-12-10

    Isoflavones play diverse roles in plant-microbe interactions and are potentially important for human nutrition and health. To study the regulation of isoflavonoid synthesis in soybean, the R2R3-MYB transcription factor GmMYB12B2 was isolated and characterized. Yeast expression experiments demonstrated that GmMYB12B2 showed transcriptional activity. GmMYB12B2 was localized in the nucleus when it was transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that GmMYB12B2 transcription was increased in roots and mature seeds compared with other organs. The gene expression level in immature embryos was consistent with the accumulation of isoflavones. CHS8 is a key enzyme in plant flavonoid biosynthesis. Transient expression experiments in soybean calli demonstrated that CHS8 was regulated by GmMYB12B2 and produced more fluorescence. The expression levels of some key enzymes in flavonoid biosynthesis were examined in transgenic Arabidopsis lines. The results showed that the expression levels of PAL1, CHS and FLS in transgenic plants were significantly higher than those in wild type plants. However, the expression level of DFR was lower, and the expression levels of CHI, F3H and F3'H were the same in all lines. GmMYB12B2 expression caused a constitutive increase in the accumulation of flavonoids in transgenic Arabidopsis lines compared with wild type plants.

  16. The Global Nitrogen Regulator NtcA Regulates Transcription of the Signal Transducer PII (GlnB) and Influences Its Phosphorylation Level in Response to Nitrogen and Carbon Supplies in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7942

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Mi; Vázquez-Bermúdez, María Félix; de Marsac, Nicole Tandeau

    1999-01-01

    The PII protein is encoded by a unique glnB gene in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942. Its expression has been analyzed in the wild type and in NtcA-null mutant cells grown under different conditions of nitrogen and carbon supply. RNA-DNA hybridization experiments revealed the presence of one transcript species 680 nucleotides long, whatever the nutrient conditions tested. A second transcript species, 620 nucleotides long, absent in the NtcA null mutant, was observed in wild-type cells that were nitrogen starved for 2 h under both high and low CO2 and in the presence of nitrate under a high CO2 concentration. Primer extension analysis indicated that the two transcript species are generated from two tandem promoters, a ς70 Escherichia coli-type promoter and an NtcA-dependent promoter, located 120 and 53 nucleotides, respectively, from the glnB initiation codon. The NtcA-dependent promoter is up-regulated under the conditions mentioned above, while the ς70 E. coli-type promoter displays constitutive levels of transcripts in the NtcA null mutant and slightly different levels in the wild-type cells, depending on the nitrogen and carbon supplies. In general, a good correlation between the amounts of the two transcript species and that of the PII protein was observed, as revealed by immunodetection with specific antibodies. The phosphorylation level of PII in the wild type is inversely correlated with nitrogen availability and directly correlated with higher CO2 concentration. This regulation is correspondingly less stringent in the NtcA null mutant cells. In contrast, the dephosphorylation of PII is NtcA independent. PMID:10217756

  17. Correlation between CYP1A1 transcript, protein level, enzyme activity and DNA adduct formation in normal human mammary epithelial cell strains exposed to benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Divi, Rao L.; Einem Lindeman, Tracey L.; Shockley, Marie E.; Keshava, Channa; Weston, Ainsley; Poirier, Miriam C.

    2014-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) benzo(a)pyrene (BP) is thought to bind covalently to DNA, through metabolism by cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) and CYP1B1, and other enzymes, to form r7, t8, t9-trihydroxy-c-10-(N 2-deoxyguanosyl)-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro-benzo[a]-pyrene (BPdG). Evaluation of RNA expression data, to understand the contribution of different metabolic enzymes to BPdG formation, is typically presented as fold-change observed upon BP exposure, leaving the actual number of RNA transcripts unknown. Here, we have quantified RNA copies/ng cDNA (RNA cpn) for CYP1A1 and CYP1B1, as well as NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), which may reduce formation of BPdG adducts, using primary normal human mammary epithelial cell (NHMEC) strains, and the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. In unexposed NHMECs, basal RNA cpn values were 58–836 for CYP1A1, 336–5587 for CYP1B1 and 5943–40112 for NQO1. In cells exposed to 4.0 µM BP for 12h, RNA cpn values were 251–13234 for CYP1A1, 4133–57078 for CYP1B1 and 4456–55887 for NQO1. There were 3.5 (mean, range 0.2–15.8) BPdG adducts/108 nucleotides in the NHMECs (n = 16), and 790 in the MCF-7s. In the NHMECs, BP-induced CYP1A1 RNA cpn was highly associated with BPdG (P = 0.002), but CYP1B1 and NQO1 were not. Western blots of four NHMEC strains, chosen for different levels of BPdG adducts, showed a linear correlation between BPdG and CYP1A1, but not CYP1B1 or NQO1. Ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) activity, which measures CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 together, correlated with BPdG, but NQO1 activity did not. Despite more numerous levels of CYP1B1 and NQO1 RNA cpn in unexposed and BP-exposed NHMECs and MCF-7cells, BPdG formation was only correlated with induction of CYP1A1 RNA cpn. The higher level of BPdG in MCF-7 cells, compared to NHMECs, may have been due to a much increased induction of CYP1A1 and EROD. Overall, BPdG correlation was observed with CYP1A1 protein and CYP1A1/1B1 enzyme activity, but not with CYP1B1 or NQO

  18. Correlation of the level of full-length CFTR transcript with pulmonary phenotype in patients carrying R117H and 1342-1,-2delAG mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Hamosh, A.; Cutting, G.R.; Oates, R.; Amos, J.

    1994-09-01

    The R117H mutation occurs on two chromosome backgrounds, one associated with a 7 thymidine tract (7T-R11H) in the splice-acceptor site of intron 8, the other with a 5 thymidine tract (5T-R117H). We examined exon 9 splicing efficiency in 5 patients of genotype R117H/{delta}F508 and one carrying 1342-1,-2delAG{delta}F508, an obligate exon 9 slice site mutation. Four patients carried R117H on a 7T background -- three adult men with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens and one adolescent female with pancreatitis and borderline sweat chloride concentration. The patient with R117H on a 5T background had pancreatic sufficient CF (PS-CF). The 1342-1,-2delAG patient has classic pancreatic insufficient CF (PI-CF). cDNA was synthesized from total RNA extracted from nasal epithlial cells and analyzed for CFTR splicing by 35 cycle PCR using primers in exon 7 and 11. The quantity of full length transcript derived from the R117H or {delta}F508 alleles was assessed by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization. While 91.4% of transcript from the 5T-R117H allele was full-length, only 42.2% of CFTR transcript from the 5T-R117H allele was full length. Since CBAVD patients have no lung disease and PS-CF patients do, this indicates that the threshold of developing CF lung disease is crossed when the amount of CFTR transcript bearing R117H is reduced by half. Interestingly, 17.1% of transcript derived from the 1342-1,-2delAG allele (or 8.6% of total CFTR transcript) was normal and full length. This suggests that up to 9% of full length wild-type CFTR transcript may be inadequate to escape the lung disease of CF and that a 9 thymidine tract followed by AAC (the result of the AG deletion) can be used as a splice donor with 2-9% efficiency.

  19. Investigation of the extent of surface coating via mechanofusion with varying additive levels and the influences on bulk powder flow properties.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qi Tony; Qu, Li; Gengenbach, Thomas; Denman, John A; Larson, Ian; Stewart, Peter J; Morton, David A V

    2011-07-15

    The objective of this study was to investigate if the coating extent created by a mechanofusion process corresponded with observed changes in bulk powder properties. A fine lactose powder (approximate median diameter 20 μm) was dry coated with magnesium stearate using from 0.1 to 5% (w/w) content. An ultra-thin coating layer of magnesium stearate was anticipated, but previous attempts to determine such thin layers on these fine particles have had limited success, with poor resolution. In this study, the surface coating was examined using the state-of-the-art XPS and ToF-SIMS systems. The powder flow was characterized by Carr index and shear cell testing. XPS was successfully applied to demonstrate variations in surface coverage, as a function of additive levels, and indicated near complete coating coverage at additive levels of 1% (w/w) and above. ToF-SIMS results supported such coating coverage assessment, and indicated coating uniformly across the fine particle surfaces. The flow metrics employed could then be related to the coating coverage metrics. The mechanofusion process also modified the apparent surface roughness observed by SEM and BET. It was suggested that the changes in the surface chemical composition exerted a more evident and direct impact on the powder cohesion and flow characteristics than the changes in the surface morphological properties after the mechanofusion in this study.

  20. Dual-energy precursor and nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 activator treatment additively improve redox glutathione levels and neuron survival in aging and Alzheimer mouse neurons upstream of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debolina; LeVault, Kelsey R; Brewer, Gregory J

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether glutathione (GSH) loss or increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) are more important to neuron loss, aging, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we stressed or boosted GSH levels in neurons isolated from aging 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those from age-matched nontransgenic (non-Tg) neurons. Here, using titrating with buthionine sulfoximine, an inhibitor of γ-glutamyl cysteine synthetase (GCL), we observed that GSH depletion increased neuronal death of 3xTg-AD cultured neurons at increasing rates across the age span, whereas non-Tg neurons were resistant to GSH depletion until old age. Remarkably, the rate of neuron loss with ROS did not increase in old age and was the same for both genotypes, which indicates that cognitive deficits in the AD model were not caused by ROS. Therefore, we targeted for neuroprotection activation of the redox sensitive transcription factor, nuclear erythroid-related factor 2 (Nrf2) by 18 alpha glycyrrhetinic acid to stimulate GSH synthesis through GCL. This balanced stimulation of a number of redox enzymes restored the lower levels of Nrf2 and GCL seen in 3xTg-AD neurons compared with those of non-Tg neurons and promoted translocation of Nrf2 to the nucleus. By combining the Nrf2 activator together with the NADH precursor, nicotinamide, we increased neuron survival against amyloid beta stress in an additive manner. These stress tests and neuroprotective treatments suggest that the redox environment is more important for neuron survival than ROS. The dual neuroprotective treatment with nicotinamide and an Nrf2 inducer indicates that these age-related and AD-related changes are reversible.

  1. Genomewide Identification of Genes Under Directional Selection: Gene Transcription QST Scan in Diverging Atlantic Salmon Subpopulations

    PubMed Central

    Roberge, C.; Guderley, H.; Bernatchez, L.

    2007-01-01

    Evolutionary genomics has benefited from methods that allow identifying evolutionarily important genomic regions on a genomewide scale, including genome scans and QTL mapping. Recently, genomewide scanning by means of microarrays has permitted assessing gene transcription differences among species or populations. However, the identification of differentially transcribed genes does not in itself suffice to measure the role of selection in driving evolutionary changes in gene transcription. Here, we propose and apply a “transcriptome scan” approach to investigating the role of selection in shaping differential profiles of gene transcription among populations. We compared the genomewide transcription levels between two Atlantic salmon subpopulations that have been diverging for only six generations. Following assessment of normality and unimodality on a gene-per-gene basis, the additive genetic basis of gene transcription was estimated using the animal model. Gene transcription h2 estimates were significant for 1044 (16%) of all detected cDNA clones. In an approach analogous to that of genome scans, we used the distribution of the QST values estimated from intra- and intersubpopulation additive genetic components of the transcription profiles to identify 16 outlier genes (average QST estimate = 0.11) whose transcription levels are likely to have evolved under the influence of directional selection within six generations only. Overall, this study contributes both empirically and methodologically to the quantitative genetic exploration of gene transcription data. PMID:17720934

  2. Effects of feeding different levels of dietary fiber through the addition of corn stover on nutrient utilization of dairy heifers precision-fed high and low concentrate diets.

    PubMed

    Lascano, G J; Heinrichs, A J

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this experiment was to assess the effects of manipulating dietary fiber by replacing corn silage (CS) with lower quality forage as corn stover (CST) when used in high concentrate (HC) and low concentrate (LC) diets for precision-fed dairy heifers. Eight Holstein heifers (335.6 ± 7.41 kg of body weight) were randomly assigned to 2 levels of concentrate: HC (20% forage) and LC (80% forage), and to a forage type sequence [0% of forage as corn stover (CST), 100% corn silage (CS); 20% CST, 80% CS; 40% CST, 60% CS; and 60% CST, 40% CS] within concentrate level administered according to a split-plot, 4 × 4 Latin square design (21-d periods). Heifers fed HC had higher apparent total-tract dry matter digestibility (DMD). Increasing the fiber level by increasing the amount of CST in the diet resulted in a linear decrease of DMD and organic matter digestibility. Heifers fed LC diets had higher neutral detergent fiber (NDF) digestibility and tended to have lower acid detergent fiber (ADF) digestibility than those fed HC diets. Substituting CS with 20% CST resulted in the highest NDF and ADF digestibilities. Digestibility of N was not different, but N retention increased for HC and decreased quadratically for LC diets. Heifers fed HC diets decreased fecal output, and CST linearly increased these parameters. Urine volume tended to be higher for HC-fed heifers, and increasing dietary fiber through CST inclusion tended to decrease urine output. This shift in water excretion resulted in similar total manure output. Total purine derivative excretion did not differ between treatments, but interacted with CST addition, resulting in a linear increase in microbial protein flow to the duodenum in HC-fed heifers and in a linear decrease in LC diets as CST increased. In conclusion, increasing dietary fiber through CST decreased DMD and organic matter digestibility linearly, whereas NDF and ADF digestibility were maximized when 20% CST was added to HC and LC diets

  3. No Additional Benefit of Repeat-Sprint Training in Hypoxia than in Normoxia on Sea-Level Repeat-Sprint Ability

    PubMed Central

    Goods, Paul S.R.; Dawson, Brian; Landers, Grant J.; Gore, Christopher J.; Peeling, Peter

    2015-01-01

    To assess the impact of ‘top-up’ normoxic or hypoxic repeat-sprint training on sea-level repeat-sprint ability, thirty team sport athletes were randomly split into three groups, which were matched in running repeat-sprint ability (RSA), cycling RSA and 20 m shuttle run performance. Two groups then performed 15 maximal cycling repeat-sprint training sessions over 5 weeks, in either normoxia (NORM) or hypoxia (HYP), while a third group acted as a control (CON). In the post-training cycling RSA test, both NORM (13.6%; p = 0.0001, and 8.6%; p = 0.001) and HYP (10.3%; p = 0.007, and 4.7%; p = 0.046) significantly improved overall mean and peak power output, respectively, whereas CON did not change (1.4%; p = 0.528, and -1.1%; p = 0.571, respectively); with only NORM demonstrating a moderate effect for improved mean and peak power output compared to CON. Running RSA demonstrated no significant between group differences; however, the mean sprint times improved significantly from pre- to post-training for CON (1.1%), NORM (1.8%), and HYP (2.3%). Finally, there were no group differences in 20 m shuttle run performance. In conclusion, ‘top-up’ training improved performance in a task-specific activity (i.e. cycling); however, there was no additional benefit of conducting this ‘top-up’ training in hypoxia, since cycle RSA improved similarly in both HYP and NORM conditions. Regardless, the ‘top-up’ training had no significant impact on running RSA, therefore the use of cycle repeat-sprint training should be discouraged for team sport athletes due to limitations in specificity. Key points ‘Top-up’ repeat-sprint training performed on a cycle ergometer enhances cycle repeat-sprint ability compared to team sport training only in football players. The addition of moderate hypoxia to repeat-sprint training provides no additional performance benefits to sea-level repeat-sprint ability or endurance performance than normoxic repeat-sprint training.

  4. No Additional Benefit of Repeat-Sprint Training in Hypoxia than in Normoxia on Sea-Level Repeat-Sprint Ability.

    PubMed

    Goods, Paul S R; Dawson, Brian; Landers, Grant J; Gore, Christopher J; Peeling, Peter

    2015-09-01

    To assess the impact of 'top-up' normoxic or hypoxic repeat-sprint training on sea-level repeat-sprint ability, thirty team sport athletes were randomly split into three groups, which were matched in running repeat-sprint ability (RSA), cycling RSA and 20 m shuttle run performance. Two groups then performed 15 maximal cycling repeat-sprint training sessions over 5 weeks, in either normoxia (NORM) or hypoxia (HYP), while a third group acted as a control (CON). In the post-training cycling RSA test, both NORM (13.6%; p = 0.0001, and 8.6%; p = 0.001) and HYP (10.3%; p = 0.007, and 4.7%; p = 0.046) significantly improved overall mean and peak power output, respectively, whereas CON did not change (1.4%; p = 0.528, and -1.1%; p = 0.571, respectively); with only NORM demonstrating a moderate effect for improved mean and peak power output compared to CON. Running RSA demonstrated no significant between group differences; however, the mean sprint times improved significantly from pre- to post-training for CON (1.1%), NORM (1.8%), and HYP (2.3%). Finally, there were no group differences in 20 m shuttle run performance. In conclusion, 'top-up' training improved performance in a task-specific activity (i.e. cycling); however, there was no additional benefit of conducting this 'top-up' training in hypoxia, since cycle RSA improved similarly in both HYP and NORM conditions. Regardless, the 'top-up' training had no significant impact on running RSA, therefore the use of cycle repeat-sprint training should be discouraged for team sport athletes due to limitations in specificity. Key points'Top-up' repeat-sprint training performed on a cycle ergometer enhances cycle repeat-sprint ability compared to team sport training only in football players.The addition of moderate hypoxia to repeat-sprint training provides no additional performance benefits to sea-level repeat-sprint ability or endurance performance than normoxic repeat-sprint training.'Top-up' cycling repeat-sprint training

  5. Additive effects of LPL, APOA5 and APOE variant combinations on triglyceride levels and hypertriglyceridemia: results of the ICARIA genetic sub-study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hypertriglyceridemia (HTG) is a well-established independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and the influence of several genetic variants in genes related with triglyceride (TG) metabolism has been described, including LPL, APOA5 and APOE. The combined analysis of these polymorphisms could produce clinically meaningful complementary information. Methods A subgroup of the ICARIA study comprising 1825 Spanish subjects (80% men, mean age 36 years) was genotyped for the LPL-HindIII (rs320), S447X (rs328), D9N (rs1801177) and N291S (rs268) polymorphisms, the APOA5-S19W (rs3135506) and -1131T/C (rs662799) variants, and the APOE polymorphism (rs429358; rs7412) using PCR and restriction analysis and TaqMan assays. We used regression analyses to examine their combined effects on TG levels (with the log-transformed variable) and the association of variant combinations with TG levels and hypertriglyceridemia (TG ≥ 1.69 mmol/L), including the covariates: gender, age, waist circumference, blood glucose, blood pressure, smoking and alcohol consumption. Results We found a significant lowering effect of the LPL-HindIII and S447X polymorphisms (p < 0.0001). In addition, the D9N, N291S, S19W and -1131T/C variants and the APOE-ε4 allele were significantly associated with an independent additive TG-raising effect (p < 0.05, p < 0.01, p < 0.001, p < 0.0001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Grouping individuals according to the presence of TG-lowering or TG-raising polymorphisms showed significant differences in TG levels (p < 0.0001), with the lowest levels exhibited by carriers of two lowering variants (10.2% reduction in TG geometric mean with respect to individuals who were homozygous for the frequent alleles of all the variants), and the highest levels in carriers of raising combinations (25.1% mean TG increase). Thus, carrying two lowering variants was protective against HTG (OR = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.39-0.98; p = 0.042) and having one single raising polymorphism (OR

  6. Investigating transcription reinitiation through in vitro approaches.

    PubMed

    Dieci, Giorgio; Fermi, Beatrice; Bosio, Maria Cristina

    2014-01-01

    By influencing the number of RNA molecules repeatedly synthesized from the same gene, the control of transcription reinitiation has the potential to shape the transcriptome. Transcription reinitiation mechanisms have been mainly addressed in vitro, through approaches based on both crude and reconstituted systems. These studies support the notion that transcription reinitiation and its regulation rely on dedicated networks of molecular interactions within transcription machineries. At the same time, comparison with in vivo transcription rates suggests that additional mechanisms, factors and conditions must exist in the nucleus, whose biochemical elucidation is a fascinating challenge for future in vitro transcription studies.

  7. Transcriptional Timers Regulating Mitosis in Early Drosophila Embryos.

    PubMed

    Momen-Roknabadi, Amir; Di Talia, Stefano; Wieschaus, Eric

    2016-09-13

    The development of an embryo requires precise spatiotemporal regulation of cellular processes. During Drosophila gastrulation, a precise temporal pattern of cell division is encoded through transcriptional regulation of cdc25(string) in 25 distinct mitotic domains. Using a genetic screen, we demonstrate that the same transcription factors that regulate the spatial pattern of cdc25(string) transcription encode its temporal activation. We identify buttonhead and empty spiracles as the major activators of cdc25(string) expression in mitotic domain 2. The effect of these activators is balanced through repression by hairy, sloppy paired 1, and huckebein. Within the mitotic domain, temporal precision of mitosis is robust and unaffected by changing dosage of rate-limiting transcriptional factors. However, precision can be disrupted by altering the levels of the two activators or two repressors. We propose that the additive and balanced action of activators and repressors is a general strategy for precise temporal regulation of cellular transitions during development. PMID:27626650

  8. Early and late trisporoids differentially regulate β-carotene production and gene transcript Levels in the mucoralean fungi Blakeslea trispora and Mucor mucedo.

    PubMed

    Sahadevan, Yamuna; Richter-Fecken, Mareike; Kaerger, Kerstin; Voigt, Kerstin; Boland, Wilhelm

    2013-12-01

    The multistep cleavage of carotenoids in Mucorales during the sexual phase results in a cocktail of trisporic acid (C18) sex pheromones. We hypothesized that the C18 trisporoid intermediates have a specific regulatory function for sex pheromone production and carotenogenesis that varies with genus/species and vegetative and sexual phases of their life cycles. Real-time quantitative PCR kinetics determined for Blakeslea trispora displayed a very high transcript turnover in the gene for carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase, tsp3, during the sexual phase. An in vivo enzyme assay and chromatographic analysis led to the identification of β-apo-12'-carotenal as the first apocarotenoid involved in trisporic acid biosynthesis in B. trispora. Supplementation of C18 trisporoids, namely D'orenone, methyl trisporate C, and trisporin C, increased tsp3 transcripts in the plus compared to minus partners. Interestingly, the tsp1 gene, which is involved in trisporic acid biosynthesis, was downregulated compared to tsp3 irrespective of asexual or sexual phase. Only the minus partners of both B. trispora and Mucor mucedo had enhanced β-carotene production after treatment with C20 apocarotenoids, 15 different trisporoids, and their analogues. We conclude that the apocarotenoids and trisporoids influence gene transcription and metabolite production, depending upon the fungal strain, corresponding genus, and developmental phase, representing a "chemical dialect" during sexual communication.

  9. Early and Late Trisporoids Differentially Regulate β-Carotene Production and Gene Transcript Levels in the Mucoralean Fungi Blakeslea trispora and Mucor mucedo

    PubMed Central

    Sahadevan, Yamuna; Richter-Fecken, Mareike; Kaerger, Kerstin; Voigt, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    The multistep cleavage of carotenoids in Mucorales during the sexual phase results in a cocktail of trisporic acid (C18) sex pheromones. We hypothesized that the C18 trisporoid intermediates have a specific regulatory function for sex pheromone production and carotenogenesis that varies with genus/species and vegetative and sexual phases of their life cycles. Real-time quantitative PCR kinetics determined for Blakeslea trispora displayed a very high transcript turnover in the gene for carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase, tsp3, during the sexual phase. An in vivo enzyme assay and chromatographic analysis led to the identification of β-apo-12′-carotenal as the first apocarotenoid involved in trisporic acid biosynthesis in B. trispora. Supplementation of C18 trisporoids, namely D'orenone, methyl trisporate C, and trisporin C, increased tsp3 transcripts in the plus compared to minus partners. Interestingly, the tsp1 gene, which is involved in trisporic acid biosynthesis, was downregulated compared to tsp3 irrespective of asexual or sexual phase. Only the minus partners of both B. trispora and Mucor mucedo had enhanced β-carotene production after treatment with C20 apocarotenoids, 15 different trisporoids, and their analogues. We conclude that the apocarotenoids and trisporoids influence gene transcription and metabolite production, depending upon the fungal strain, corresponding genus, and developmental phase, representing a “chemical dialect” during sexual communication. PMID:24056470

  10. Early and late trisporoids differentially regulate β-carotene production and gene transcript Levels in the mucoralean fungi Blakeslea trispora and Mucor mucedo.

    PubMed

    Sahadevan, Yamuna; Richter-Fecken, Mareike; Kaerger, Kerstin; Voigt, Kerstin; Boland, Wilhelm

    2013-12-01

    The multistep cleavage of carotenoids in Mucorales during the sexual phase results in a cocktail of trisporic acid (C18) sex pheromones. We hypothesized that the C18 trisporoid intermediates have a specific regulatory function for sex pheromone production and carotenogenesis that varies with genus/species and vegetative and sexual phases of their life cycles. Real-time quantitative PCR kinetics determined for Blakeslea trispora displayed a very high transcript turnover in the gene for carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase, tsp3, during the sexual phase. An in vivo enzyme assay and chromatographic analysis led to the identification of β-apo-12'-carotenal as the first apocarotenoid involved in trisporic acid biosynthesis in B. trispora. Supplementation of C18 trisporoids, namely D'orenone, methyl trisporate C, and trisporin C, increased tsp3 transcripts in the plus compared to minus partners. Interestingly, the tsp1 gene, which is involved in trisporic acid biosynthesis, was downregulated compared to tsp3 irrespective of asexual or sexual phase. Only the minus partners of both B. trispora and Mucor mucedo had enhanced β-carotene production after treatment with C20 apocarotenoids, 15 different trisporoids, and their analogues. We conclude that the apocarotenoids and trisporoids influence gene transcription and metabolite production, depending upon the fungal strain, corresponding genus, and developmental phase, representing a "chemical dialect" during sexual communication. PMID:24056470

  11. Radiological, physical, and chemical characterization of additional alpha contaminated and mixed low-level waste for treatment at the advanced mixed waste treatment project

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, D.P.

    1995-07-01

    This document provides physical, chemical, and radiological descriptive information for a portion of mixed waste that is potentially available for private sector treatment. The format and contents are designed to provide treatment vendors with preliminary information on the characteristics and properties for additional candidate portions of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and offsite mixed wastes not covered in the two previous characterization reports for the INEL-stored low-level alpha-contaminated and transuranic wastes. This report defines the waste, provides background information, briefly reviews the requirements of the Federal Facility Compliance Act (P.L. 102-386), and relates the Site Treatment Plans developed under the Federal Facility Compliance Act to the waste streams described herein. Each waste is summarized in a Waste Profile Sheet with text, charts, and tables of waste descriptive information for a particular waste stream. A discussion of the availability and uncertainty of data for these waste streams precedes the characterization descriptions.

  12. The influence of fish age, salt level, and Mtgase addition on the quality of gels prepared from unwashed mince of farmed meagre (Argyrosomus regius).

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Carlos; Ribeiro, Bernardo; Mendes, Rogério

    2014-06-01

    The potential of using the unwashed mince of farmed meagre as raw material for the preparation of heat-induced gel products was assessed taking into account the effect of age (small size <1 kg meagre vs commercial size > 2kg meagre), lower salt levels (1.0%, w/w, vs 2.5%, w/w), and microbial transglutaminase (MTGase) incorporation (0.0%, w/w, vs 0.5%, w/w). Heat-induced gel products from > 2 kg fish were of superior quality. Salt reduction from 2.5% to 1.0% (w/w) was detrimental for textural quality, particularly, of gels prepared from >2 kg meagre mince. MTGase addition improved texture. Moreover, MTGase incorporation led to a greater importance of non-covalent hydrophobic bonding. PMID:23751542

  13. Reduction of saltiness and acrylamide levels in palm sugar-like flavouring through buffer modification and the addition of calcium chloride.

    PubMed

    Tan, Phui Yee; Tan, Chin Ping; Abas, Faridah; Ho, Chun Wai; Mustapha, Wan Aida Wan

    2013-06-10

    Palm sugar-like flavouring (PSLF) is a type of flavour product that is formed by heating amino acids and sugar under specific heating conditions. Unfortunately, PSLF has a salty taste and contains high amounts of acrylamide. Hence, the objective of this research was to reduce saltiness and acrylamide without negatively affecting the aroma properties of PSLF. A decrease in the sodium phosphate (NaHPO₄) buffer concentration from 0.20 to 0.02 M was found to reduce sodium to approximately 15% of the level found in original PSLF. A further decrease (~25%) in the sodium content was achieved by removing monobasic sodium phosphate (NaH₂PO₄) from the buffer system. Meanwhile, the addition of CaCl₂ at 20-40 mg/L reduced the acrylamide content in PSLF by as much as 58%. A CaCl₂ concentration of 20 mg/mL was most favourable as it most efficiently suppressed acrylamide formation while providing an acceptably high flavour yield in PSLF. In view of the high acrylamide content in PSLF, additional work is necessary to further reduce the amount of acrylamide by controlling the asparagine concentration in the precursor mixture.

  14. Transcriptional Regulation: a Genomic Overview

    PubMed Central

    Riechmann, José Luis

    2002-01-01

    The availability of the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence allows a comprehensive analysis of transcriptional regulation in plants using novel genomic approaches and methodologies. Such a genomic view of transcription first necessitates the compilation of lists of elements. Transcription factors are the most numerous of the different types of proteins involved in transcription in eukaryotes, and the Arabidopsis genome codes for more than 1,500 of them, or approximately 6% of its total number of genes. A genome-wide comparison of transcription factors across the three eukaryotic kingdoms reveals the evolutionary generation of diversity in the components of the regulatory machinery of transcription. However, as illustrated by Arabidopsis, transcription in plants follows similar basic principles and logic to those in animals and fungi. A global view and understanding of transcription at a cellular and organismal level requires the characterization of the Arabidopsis transcriptome and promoterome, as well as of the interactome, the localizome, and the phenome of the proteins involved in transcription. PMID:22303220

  15. Additive Effect of Qidan Dihuang Grain, a Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers on Albuminuria Levels in Patients with Diabetic Nephropathy: A Randomized, Parallel-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Lei; Jiang, Pingping; Zhou, Lin; Sun, Xiaomin; Bi, Jianlu; Cui, Lijuan; Nie, Xiaoli; Luo, Ren; Liu, Yanyan

    2016-01-01

    Albuminuria is characteristic of early-stage diabetic nephropathy (DN). The conventional treatments with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) are unable to prevent the development of albuminuria in normotensive individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Purpose. The present study aimed to evaluate the effect of ARB combined with a Chinese formula Qidan Dihuang grain (QDDHG) in improving albuminuria and Traditional Chinese Medicine Symptom (TCMS) scores in normotensive individuals with T2DM. Methods. Eligible patients were randomized to the treatment group and the control group. Results. Compared with baseline (week 0), both treatment and control groups markedly improved the 24-hour albuminuria, total proteinuria (TPU), and urinary albumin to creatinine ratio (A/C) at 4, 8, and 12 weeks. Between treatment and the control group, the levels of albuminuria in the treatment group were significantly lower than in the control group at 8 and 12 weeks (p < 0.05). In addition, treatment group markedly decreased the scores of TCMS after treatment. Conclusion. This trial suggests that QDDHG combined with ARB administration decreases the levels of albuminuria and the scores for TCMS in normotensive individuals with T2DM. PMID:27375762

  16. Abduction and asylum in the lives of transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Burger, Anat; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Wolynes, Peter G

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that there are many nonfunctional transcription factor binding sites along a genome. Although these "decoy" sites compete with the promoter region for binding of transcription factors, they may also protect these proteins from degradation. We show that in the limit of perfect protection, where bound transcription factors are never degraded, the competitive effect of nonfunctional binding sites is completely canceled out by the stability gained from reduced degradation. We examine the response of an autoregulated gene to the total number of transcription factors to quantify the consequences of competition for transcription factors. We show that intuition about this system can be gained by mathematically constructing a single gene with effective parameters that reproduce the behavior of a gene with added decoy sites. In analogy to dressed particles in many-body systems we term this description a "quasi gene." We find that protective decoys buffer against noise by reducing correlations between transcription factors, specifically in the case of production of transcription factors in bursts. We show that the addition of protective decoy sites causes the level of gene expression to approach that predicted from deterministic mass action models. Finally, we show that protective decoy sites decrease the size of the region of parameter space that exhibits bistability. PMID:20160109

  17. Genetic analysis of transcription-associated mutation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Morey, N J; Greene, C N; Jinks-Robertson, S

    2000-01-01

    High levels of transcription are associated with elevated mutation rates in yeast, a phenomenon referred to as transcription-associated mutation (TAM). The transcription-associated increase in mutation rates was previously shown to be partially dependent on the Rev3p translesion bypass pathway, thus implicating DNA damage in TAM. In this study, we use reversion of a pGAL-driven lys2DeltaBgl allele to further examine the genetic requirements of TAM. We find that TAM is increased by disruption of the nucleotide excision repair or recombination pathways. In contrast, elimination of base excision repair components has only modest effects on TAM. In addition to the genetic studies, the lys2DeltaBgl reversion spectra of repair-proficient low and high transcription strains were obtained. In the low transcription spectrum, most of the frameshift events correspond to deletions of AT base pairs whereas in the high transcription strain, deletions of GC base pairs predominate. These results are discussed in terms of transcription and its role in DNA damage and repair. PMID:10628973

  18. Transcription induces gyration of the DNA template in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, N; Bossi, L

    1988-01-01

    We show that transcription modulation of a plasmid sequence in exponentially growing Escherichia coli cells leads to a rapid change in the linking number of plasmid DNA. Activation of transcription is accompanied by an increase in the plasmid's level of negative supercoiling. The added superhelical turns, whose number is proportional to the strength of the promoter and to the length of the transcript, are promptly removed when transcription is turned off. The transcription-induced increase of template supercoiling can still be detected in the presence of an inhibitor of ATP-dependent DNA gyrase [DNA topoisomerase (ATP-hydrolyzing), EC 5.99.1.3]. Altogether, our results indicate that, in addition to being under a general control, DNA superhelicity can be modulated locally in response to the topological perturbations associated with DNA tracking processes. We discuss a model in which supercoiling changes are produced by differential swiveling activities on the opposite sides of a transcriptional flow during transcriptional modulation. Images PMID:2849103

  19. High levels of acute phase proteins and soluble 70 kDa heat shock proteins are independent and additive risk factors for mortality in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kocsis, Judit; Mészáros, Tamás; Madaras, Balázs; Tóth, Éva Katalin; Kamondi, Szilárd; Gál, Péter; Varga, Lilian; Prohászka, Zoltán

    2010-01-01

    Recently, we reported that high soluble Hsp70 (sHsp70) level was a significant predictor of mortality during an almost 3-year-long follow-up period in patients with colorectal cancer. This association was the strongest in the group of <70-year-old female patients as well as in those who were in a less advanced stage of the disease at baseline. According to these observations, measurement of the serum level of sHsp70 is a useful, stage-independent prognostic marker in colorectal cancer, especially in patients without distant metastasis. Since many literature data indicated that measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other acute phase proteins (APPs) may also be suitable for predicting the mortality of patients with colorectal cancer, it seemed reasonable to study whether the effect of sHsp70 and other APPs are related or independent. In order to answer this question, we measured the concentrations of CRP as well as of other complement-related APPs (C1 inhibitor, C3, and C9) along with that of the MASP-2 complement component in the sera of 175 patients with colorectal cancer and known levels of sHsp70, which have been used in our previous study. High (above median) levels of CRP, C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), and sHsp70 were found to be independently associated with poor patient survival, whereas no such association was observed with the other proteins tested. According to the adjusted Cox proportional hazards analysis, the additive effect of high sHsp70, CRP, and C1-INH levels on the survival of patients exceeded that of high sHsp70 alone, with a hazard ratio (HR) of 2.83 (1.13–70.9). In some subgroups of patients, such as in females [HR 4.80 (1.07–21.60)] or in ≤70-year-old patients [HR 11.53 (2.78–47.70)], even greater differences were obtained. These findings indicate that the clinical mortality–prediction value of combined measurements of sHsp70, CRP, and C1-INH with inexpensive methods can be very high, especially in specific subgroups of

  20. Effect of the addition of β-mannanase on the performance, metabolizable energy, amino acid digestibility coefficients, and immune functions of broilers fed different nutritional levels

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, H. C.; Hannas, M. I.; Albino, L. F. T.; Rostagno, H. S.; Neme, R.; Faria, B. D.; Xavier, M. L.; Rennó, L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Three experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of β-mannanase (BM) supplementation on the performance, metabolizable energy, amino acid digestibility, and immune function of broilers. A total of 1,600 broilers were randomly distributed in a 4 × 2 factorial arrangement (4 nutritional levels × 0 or 500 g/ton BM), with 10 replicates and 20 broilers per pen. The same design was used in the energy and digestibility experiments with 8 and 6 replicates, respectively, and 6 broilers per pen. The nutritional levels (NL) were formulated to meet the nutritional requirements of broilers (NL1); reductions of 100 kcal metabolizable energy (NL2); 3% of the total amino acids (NL3); and 100 kcal metabolizable energy and 3% total amino acids (NL4) from NL1. The serum immunoglobulin (Ig) concentration was determined in two broilers per pen, and these broilers were slaughtered to determine the relative weight of spleen, thymus, and bursa of Fabricius. Throughout the experiment, the lower nutritional levels reduced (P < 0.05) body weight gain (BWG) and increased (P < 0.05) feed conversion (FCR) for the NL4 treatment. The BM increased (P < 0.05) the BWG values and improved (P < 0.05) the FCR of the broilers. The apparent metabolizable energy corrected for nitrogen balance (AMEn) values were reduced (P < 0.05) for NL2 and NL3. The BM increased (P < 0.05) the AMEn values and reduced (P < 0.05) the excreted nitrogen. NL3 and NL4 reduced (P < 0.05) the true ileal digestibility coefficients (TIDc) of the amino acids cystine and glycine, and BM increased (P < 0.05) the TIDc for all amino acids. The addition of BM reduced (P < 0.05) the relative weights of the spleen and bursa. NL2 increased (P < 0.05) the Ig values, whereas BM reduced (P < 0.05) the serum IgA, IgG, and IgM values of the broilers. This study indicates that using suboptimal nutrient levels leads to losses in production parameters, whereas BM-supplemented diets were effective in improving performance, energy

  1. Aboveground Whitefly Infestation Modulates Transcriptional Levels of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis and Jasmonic Acid Signaling-Related Genes and Augments the Cope with Drought Stress of Maize

    PubMed Central

    Park, Yong-Soon; Bae, Dong-Won; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, the potential underlying molecular mechanisms by which maize (Zea mays L.) plants elicit defense responses by infestation with a phloem feeding insect whitefly [Bemisia tabaci (Genn.)] have been barely elucidated against (a)biotic stresses. To fill this gap of current knowledge maize plants were infested with whitefly and these plants were subsequently assessed the levels of water loss. To understand the mode of action, plant hormone contents and the stress-related mRNA expression were evaluated. Whitefly-infested maize plants did not display any significant phenotypic differences in above-ground tissues (infested site) compared with controls. By contrast, root (systemic tissue) biomass was increased by 2-fold by whitefly infestation. The levels of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), jasmonic acid (JA), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were significantly higher in whitefly-infested plants. The biosynthetic or signaling-related genes for JA and anthocyanins were highly up-regulated. Additionally, we found that healthier plants were obtained in whitefly-infested plants under drought conditions. The weight of whitefly-infested plants was approximately 20% higher than that of control plants at 14 d of drought treatment. The drought tolerance-related genes, ZmbZIP72, ZmSNAC1, and ZmABA1, were highly expressed in the whitefly-infected plants. Collectively, our results suggest that IAA/JA-derived maize physiological changes and correlation of H2O2 production and water loss are modulated by above-ground whitefly infestation in maize plants. PMID:26630288

  2. Extensive RNA editing of U to C in addition to C to U substitution in the rbcL transcripts of hornwort chloroplasts and the origin of RNA editing in green plants.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshinaga, K; Iinuma, H; Masuzawa, T; Uedal, K

    1996-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a portion of chloroplast DNA from the hornwort Anthoceros formosae. A nucleotide sequence of 7556 bp contained structures similar to those of ndhK, ndhC, trnV, trnM, atpE, atpB, rbcL, trnR and accD. The arrangement of these was the same as that of other chloroplast DNA. However, two nonsense codons were located within the putative coding region of rbcL, although they were used as putative termination codons of the genes. RNA was extensively edited in the transcripts of rbcL when cDNA sequences were analyzed. The unusual nonsense codons of TGA and TAA became CGA and CAA respectively. These are examples of U to C type RNA editing, which was never been found before in chloroplast mRNA. In general, 13 Cs of genomic DNA were found as Ts in the cDNA sequence and seven Ts were found as Cs. This is the first finding of RNA editing on the transcripts of rbcL and also in bryophytes. This event had been thought to arise in land plants after the split of bryophytes. The origin of RNA editing is discussed in relation to the landing of green plants. PMID:8604330

  3. Antioxidant-induced changes of the AP-1 transcription complex are paralleled by a selective suppression of human papillomavirus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Rösl, F; Das, B C; Lengert, M; Geletneky, K; zur Hausen, H

    1997-01-01

    Considering the involvement of a redox-regulatory pathway in the expression of human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV type 16 (HPV-16)-immortalized human keratinocytes were treated with the antioxidant pyrrolidine-dithiocarbamate (PDTC). PDTC induces elevated binding of the transcription factor AP-1 to its cognate recognition site within the viral regulatory region. Despite of increased AP-1 binding, normally indispensable for efficient HPV-16 transcription, viral gene expression was selectively suppressed at the level of initiation of transcription. Electrophoretic mobility supershift assays showed that the composition of the AP-1 complex, predominantly consisting of Jun homodimers in untreated cells, was altered. Irrespective of enhanced c-fos expression, c-jun was phosphorylated and became primarily heterodimerized with fra-1, which was also induced after PDTC incubation. Additionally, there was also an increased complex formation between c-jun and junB. Because both fra-1 and junB overexpression negatively interferes with c-jun/c-fos trans-activation of AP-1-responsive genes, our results suggest that the observed block in viral transcription is mainly the consequence of an antioxidant-induced reconstitution of the AP-1 transcription complex. Since expression of the c-jun/c-fos gene family is tightly regulated during cellular differentiation, defined reorganization of a central viral transcription factor may represent a novel mechanism controlling the transcription of pathogenic HPVs during keratinocyte differentiation and in the progression to cervical cancer. PMID:8985358

  4. Inhibitors of Eicosanoid Biosynthesis Influencing the Transcripts Level of sHSP21.4 Gene Induced by Pathogen Infections, in Antheraea pernyi

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Congfen; Dai, Lishang; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Wei, Guoqing; Li, Jun; Zhu, Baojian; Liu, Chaoliang

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) can regulate protein folding and protect cells from stress. To investigate the role of sHSPs in the silk-producing insect Antheraea pernyi response to microorganisms, a sHsp gene termed as Ap-sHSP21.4, was identified. This gene encoded a 21.4 kDa protein which shares the conserved structure of insect sHsps and belongs to sHSP21.4 family. Ap-sHSP21.4 was highly expressed in fat body and up-regulated in midgut and fat body of A. pernyi challenged with Escherichia coli, Beauveria bassiana and nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV), which was determined by quantitative real-time PCR. Meanwhile, knock down of Ap-sHSP21.4 with dsRNA result in the decrease at the expression levels of several immune response-related genes (defensin, Dopa decarboxylase, Toll1, lysozyme and Kazal-type serine protease inhibitor). Additionally, the impact of eicosanoid biosynthesis on the expression of Ap-sHSP21.4 response to NPV was determined using qPCR, inhibitors of eicosanoid biosynthesis significantly suppress Ap-HSP21.4 expression upon NPV challenge. All together, Ap-sHSP21.4 was involved in the immunity of A. pernyi against microorganism and possibly mediated by eicosanoids pathway. These results will shed light in the understanding of the pathogen-host interaction in A. pernyi. PMID:25844646

  5. Integrated Analysis of Metabolite and Transcript Levels Reveals the Metabolic Shifts That Underlie Tomato Fruit Development and Highlight Regulatory Aspects of Metabolic Network Behavior1[W

    PubMed Central

    Carrari, Fernando; Baxter, Charles; Usadel, Björn; Urbanczyk-Wochniak, Ewa; Zanor, Maria-Ines; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Nikiforova, Victoria; Centero, Danilo; Ratzka, Antje; Pauly, Markus; Sweetlove, Lee J.; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2006-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is a well-studied model of fleshy fruit development and ripening. Tomato fruit development is well understood from a hormonal-regulatory perspective, and developmental changes in pigment and cell wall metabolism are also well characterized. However, more general aspects of metabolic change during fruit development have not been studied despite the importance of metabolism in the context of final composition of the ripe fruit. In this study, we quantified the abundance of a broad range of metabolites by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, analyzed a number of the principal metabolic fluxes, and in parallel analyzed transcriptomic changes during tomato fruit development. Metabolic profiling revealed pronounced shifts in the abundance of metabolites of both primary and secondary metabolism during development. The metabolite changes were reflected in the flux analysis that revealed a general decrease in metabolic activity during ripening. However, there were several distinct patterns of metabolite profile, and statistical analysis demonstrated that metabolites in the same (or closely related) pathways changed in abundance in a coordinated manner, indicating a tight regulation of metabolic activity. The metabolite data alone allowed investigations of likely routes through the metabolic network, and, as an example, we analyze the operational feasibility of different pathways of ascorbate synthesis. When combined with the transcriptomic data, several aspects of the regulation of metabolism during fruit ripening were revealed. First, it was apparent that transcript abundance was less strictly coordinated by functional group than metabolite abundance, suggesting that posttranslational mechanisms dominate metabolic regulation. Nevertheless, there were some correlations between specific transcripts and metabolites, and several novel associations were identified that could provide potential targets for manipulation of fruit compositional traits

  6. Effects of Elevated CO2 on Levels of Primary Metabolites and Transcripts of Genes Encoding Respiratory Enzymes and Their Diurnal Patterns in Arabidopsis thaliana: Possible Relationships with Respiratory Rates

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Chihiro K.; Sato, Shigeru; Yanagisawa, Shuichi; Uesono, Yukifumi; Terashima, Ichiro; Noguchi, Ko

    2014-01-01

    Elevated CO2 affects plant growth and photosynthesis, which results in changes in plant respiration. However, the mechanisms underlying the responses of plant respiration to elevated CO2 are poorly understood. In this study, we measured diurnal changes in the transcript levels of genes encoding respiratory enzymes, the maximal activities of the enzymes and primary metabolite levels in shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana grown under moderate or elevated CO2 conditions (390 or 780 parts per million by volume CO2, respectively). We examined the relationships between these changes and respiratory rates. Under elevated CO2, the transcript levels of several genes encoding respiratory enzymes increased at the end of the light period, but these increases did not result in changes in the maximal activities of the corresponding enzymes. The levels of some primary metabolites such as starch and sugar phosphates increased under elevated CO2, particularly at the end of the light period. The O2 uptake rate at the end of the dark period was higher under elevated CO2 than under moderate CO2, but higher under moderate CO2 than under elevated CO2 at the end of the light period. These results indicate that the changes in O2 uptake rates are not directly related to changes in maximal enzyme activities and primary metabolite levels. Instead, elevated CO2 may affect anabolic processes that consume respiratory ATP, thereby affecting O2 uptake rates. PMID:24319073

  7. DNA damage mediated transcription arrest: Step back to go forward.

    PubMed

    Mullenders, Leon

    2015-12-01

    The disturbance of DNA helix conformation by bulky DNA damage poses hindrance to transcription elongating due to stalling of RNA polymerase at transcription blocking lesions. Stalling of RNA polymerase provokes the formation of R-loops, i.e. the formation of a DNA-RNA hybrid and a displaced single stranded DNA strand as well as displacement of spliceosomes. R-loops are processed into DNA single and double strand breaks by NER factors depending on TC-NER factors leading to genome instability. Moreover, stalling of RNA polymerase induces a strong signal for cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. These toxic and mutagenic effects are counteracted by a rapid recruitment of DNA repair proteins to perform transcription coupled nucleotide excision repair (TC-NER) to remove the blocking DNA lesions and to restore transcription. Recent studies have highlighted the role of backtracking of RNA polymerase to facilitate TC-NER and identified novel factors that play key roles in TC-NER and in restoration of transcription. On the molecular level these factors facilitate stability of the repair complex by promotion and regulation of various post-translational modifications of NER factors and chromatin substrate. In addition, the continuous flow of new factors that emerge from screening assays hints to several regulatory levels to safeguard the integrity of transcription elongation after disturbance by DNA damage that have yet to be explored.

  8. Identification and Classification of New Transcripts in Dorper and Small-Tailed Han Sheep Skeletal Muscle Transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Chao, Tianle; Wang, Guizhi; Wang, Jianmin; Liu, Zhaohua; Ji, Zhibin; Hou, Lei; Zhang, Chunlan

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput mRNA sequencing enables the discovery of new transcripts and additional parts of incompletely annotated transcripts. Compared with the human and cow genomes, the reference annotation level of the sheep genome is still low. An investigation of new transcripts in sheep skeletal muscle will improve our understanding of muscle development. Therefore, applying high-throughput sequencing, two cDNA libraries from the biceps brachii of small-tailed Han sheep and Dorper sheep were constructed, and whole-transcriptome analysis was performed to determine the unknown transcript catalogue of this tissue. In this study, 40,129 transcripts were finally mapped to the sheep genome. Among them, 3,467 transcripts were determined to be unannotated in the current reference sheep genome and were defined as new transcripts. Based on protein-coding capacity prediction and comparative analysis of sequence similarity, 246 transcripts were classified as portions of unannotated genes or incompletely annotated genes. Another 1,520 transcripts were predicted with high confidence to be long non-coding RNAs. Our analysis also revealed 334 new transcripts that displayed specific expression in ruminants and uncovered a number of new transcripts without intergenus homology but with specific expression in sheep skeletal muscle. The results confirmed a complex transcript pattern of coding and non-coding RNA in sheep skeletal muscle. This study provided important information concerning the sheep genome and transcriptome annotation, which could provide a basis for further study. PMID:27434270

  9. Identification and Classification of New Transcripts in Dorper and Small-Tailed Han Sheep Skeletal Muscle Transcriptomes

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Tianle; Wang, Guizhi; Wang, Jianmin; Liu, Zhaohua; Ji, Zhibin; Hou, Lei; Zhang, Chunlan

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput mRNA sequencing enables the discovery of new transcripts and additional parts of incompletely annotated transcripts. Compared with the human and cow genomes, the reference annotation level of the sheep genome is still low. An investigation of new transcripts in sheep skeletal muscle will improve our understanding of muscle development. Therefore, applying high-throughput sequencing, two cDNA libraries from the biceps brachii of small-tailed Han sheep and Dorper sheep were constructed, and whole-transcriptome analysis was performed to determine the unknown transcript catalogue of this tissue. In this study, 40,129 transcripts were finally mapped to the sheep genome. Among them, 3,467 transcripts were determined to be unannotated in the current reference sheep genome and were defined as new transcripts. Based on protein-coding capacity prediction and comparative analysis of sequence similarity, 246 transcripts were classified as portions of unannotated genes or incompletely annotated genes. Another 1,520 transcripts were predicted with high confidence to be long non-coding RNAs. Our analysis also revealed 334 new transcripts that displayed specific expression in ruminants and uncovered a number of new transcripts without intergenus homology but with specific expression in sheep skeletal muscle. The results confirmed a complex transcript pattern of coding and non-coding RNA in sheep skeletal muscle. This study provided important information concerning the sheep genome and transcriptome annotation, which could provide a basis for further study. PMID:27434270

  10. Transcript copy number of genes for DNA repair and translesion synthesis in yeast: contribution of transcription rate and mRNA stability to the steady-state level of each mRNA along with growth in glucose-fermentative medium.

    PubMed

    Michán, Carmen; Monje-Casas, Fernando; Pueyo, Carmen

    2005-04-01

    We quantitated the copy number of mRNAs (NTG1, NTG2, OGG1, APN1, APN2, MSH2, MSH6, REV3, RAD30) encoding different DNA repair enzymes and translesion-synthesis polymerases in yeast. Quantitations reported examine how the steady-state number of each transcript is modulated in association with the growth in glucose-fermentative medium, and evaluate the respective contribution of the rate of mRNA degradation and transcription initiation to the specific mRNA level profile of each gene. Each transcript displayed a unique growth-related profile, therefore altering the relative abundance of mRNAs coding for proteins with similar functions, as cells proceed from exponential to stationary phase. Nonetheless, as general trend, they exhibited maximal levels when cells proliferate rapidly and minimal values when cells cease proliferation. We found that previous calculations on the stability of the investigated mRNAs might be biased, in particular regarding those that respond to heat shock stress. Overall, the mRNAs experienced drastic increments in their stabilities in response to gradual depletion of essential nutrients in the culture. However, differences among the mRNA stability profiles suggest a dynamic modulation rather than a passive process. As general rule, the investigated genes were much more frequently transcribed during the fermentative growth than later during the diauxic arrest and the stationary phase, this finding conciliating low steady-state levels with increased mRNA stabilities. Interestingly, while the rate at which each gene is transcribed appeared as the only determinant of the number of mRNA copies at the exponential growth, later, when cell growth is arrested, the rate of mRNA degradation becomes also a key factor for gene expression. In short, our results raise the question of how important the respective contribution of transcription and mRNA stability mechanisms is for the steady-state profile of a given transcript, and how this contribution may

  11. Transcriptional coregulators: fine-tuning metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mouchiroud, Laurent; Eichner, Lillian J.; Shaw, Reuben; Auwerx, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires that cellular energy levels are adapted to environmental cues. This adaptation is largely regulated at the transcriptional level, through the interaction between transcription factors, coregulators, and the basal transcriptional machinery. Coregulators, which function both as metabolic sensors and transcriptional effectors, are ideally positioned to synchronize metabolic pathways to environmental stimuli. The balance between inhibitory actions of corepressors and stimulatory effects of coactivators enables the fine-tuning of metabolic processes. The tight regulation opens therapeutic opportunities to manage metabolic dysfunction, by directing the activity of cofactors towards specific transcription factors, pathways, or cells/tissues, thereby restoring whole body metabolic homeostasis. PMID:24794975

  12. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  13. Sequences upstream of the homologous cis-elements of the Adh adult enhancer of Drosophila are required for maximal levels of Adh gene transcription in adults of Scaptodrosophila lebanonensis.

    PubMed Central

    Papaceit, Montserrat; Orengo, Dorcas; Juan, Elvira

    2004-01-01

    The evolution of cis-regulatory elements is of particular interest for our understanding of the evolution of gene regulation. The Adh gene of Drosophilidae shows interspecific differences in tissue-specific expression and transcript levels during development. In Scaptodrosophila lebanonensis adults, the level of distal transcripts is maximal between the fourth and eighth day after eclosion and is around five times higher than that in D. melanogaster Adh(S). To examine whether these quantitative differences are regulated by sequences lying upstream of the distal promoter, we performed in vitro deletion mutagenesis of the Adh gene of S. lebanonensis, followed by P-element-mediated germ-line transformation. All constructs included, as a cotransgene, a modified Adh gene of D. melanogaster (dAdh) in a fixed position and orientation that acted as a chromosomal position control. Using this approach, we have identified a fragment of 1.5 kb in the 5' region, 830 bp upstream of the distal start site, which is required to achieve maximal levels of distal transcript in S. lebanonensis. The presence of this fragment produces a 3.5-fold higher level of distal mRNA (as determined by real time quantitative PCR) compared with the D. melanogaster dAdh cotransgene. This region contains the degenerated end of a minisatellite sequence expanding farther upstream and does not correspond to the Adh adult enhancer (AAE) of D. melanogaster. Indeed, the cis-regulatory elements of the AAE have been identified by phylogenetic footprinting within the region 830 bp upstream of the distal start site of S. lebanonensis. Furthermore, the deletions Delta-830 and Delta-2358 yield the same pattern of tissue-specific expression, indicating that all tissue-specific elements are contained within the region 830 bp upstream of the distal start site. PMID:15166155

  14. An Interface-Enriched eXtended Finite Element-Level Set Simulation of Solutal Melting of Additive Powder Particles during Transient Liquid Phase Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, A.; Hunedy, J.; Ojo, O. A.

    2013-02-01

    A new numerical simulation model is developed by using an interface-enriched eXtended Finite Element-Level Set (XFE-LS) method to study the solute-induced melting of additive powder particles (APPs) during transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding. The robust model captures rapidly occurring concurrent interfacial events at multiple propagating liquid-solid interfaces to simulate the melting behavior. In contrast to the critical assumption in analytical models, numerical calculations show that solute-transport into the APPs during the equilibration of the liquid composition is a significant factor that affects the APPs melting behavior. Also, the study shows that the solute-transport dependence of extent of APPs melting is influenced by the kinetics of solid-state solute diffusion within the particles. The understanding generated by the numerical analysis has resulted in the use of interlayer powder mixture that contains base-alloy APPs to produce single crystal TLP joint that has matching crystallographic orientations with single crystal substrate material, at a substantially reduced processing time, which has been previously considered unfeasible.

  15. Vitamin A and arachidonic acid altered the skeletal mineralization in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) larvae without any interactions on the transcriptional level.

    PubMed

    Lie, Kai Kristoffer; Kvalheim, Karen; Rasinger, Josef Daniel; Harboe, Torstein; Nordgreen, Andreas; Moren, Mari

    2016-01-01

    The main object of this study was to evaluate the impact of different levels of vitamin A (VA) and arachidonic acid (ARA) in relation to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) on mineralization and gene expression in Atlantic cod larvae (Gadus morhua). First-feeding larvae were fed enriched rotifers from start-feeding until 29 days post hatch (dph). Larvae in four tanks were fed one of the following diets: control (EPA/ARA ratio: 15.8, 0.9μg VA g(-1)), control+VA (EPA/ARA ratio: 15.8, 7.8μg VA g(-1)), High ARA (EPA/ARA ratio: 0.9, 1.5μg VA g(-1)) or High ARA+VA (EPA/ARA ratio: 0.9, 12.0μg VA g(-1)). Larvae fed High ARA+VA were shorter at 29dph compared to the other groups and had significantly less mineralized bones when comparing larvae of similar size, showing interaction effects between VA and ARA. Although transcriptomic analysis did not reveal any interaction effects, a higher number of genes were differentially expressed in the high ARA fed larvae compared to control+VA fed larvae. Furthermore, bglap1, bglap2 and col10a1 were all down-regulated in larvae fed High ARA-diets and to a greater extent than larvae fed VA supplemented diet, indicating an additive effect on mineralization. In conclusion, this study showed that the dietary increase in ARA and VA altered the skeletal metabolism during larval development, most likely through signaling pathways specific for each nutrient rather than an interaction. The present study also demonstrates that VA could affect the larval response to ARA, even within the accepted non-toxic/non-deficient range.

  16. Comparison of Transcriptional Heterogeneity of Eight Genes between Batch Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilm and Planktonic Culture at a Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhenhua; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) biofilm formed on metal surfaces can change the physicochemical properties of metals and cause metal corrosion. To enhance understanding of differential gene expression in Desulfovibrio vulgaris under planktonic and biofilm growth modes, a single-cell based RT-qPCR approach was applied to determine gene expression levels of 8 selected target genes in four sets of the 31 individual cells isolated from each growth condition (i.e., biofilm formed on a mild steel (SS) and planktonic cultures, exponential and stationary phases). The results showed obvious gene-expression heterogeneity for the target genes among D. vulgaris single cells of both biofilm and planktonic cultures. In addition, an increased gene-expression heterogeneity in the D. vulgaris biofilm when compared with the planktonic culture was also observed for seven out of eight selected genes at exponential phase, and six out of eight selected genes at stationary phase, respectively, which may be contributing to the increased complexity in terms of structures and morphology in the biofilm. Moreover, the results showed up-regulation of DVU0281 gene encoding exopolysaccharide biosynthesis protein, and down-regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism (i.e., DVU0434 and DVU0588), stress responses (i.e., DVU2410) and response regulator (i.e., DVU3062) in the D. vulgaris biofilm cells. Finally, the gene (DVU2571) involved in iron transportation was found down-regulated, and two genes (DVU1340 and DVU1397) involved in ferric uptake repressor and iron storage were up-regulated in D. vulgaris biofilm, suggesting their possible roles in maintaining normal metabolism of the D. vulgaris biofilm under environments of high concentration of iron. This study showed that the single-cell based analysis could be a useful approach in deciphering metabolism of microbial biofilms. PMID:27199927

  17. Comparison of Transcriptional Heterogeneity of Eight Genes between Batch Desulfovibrio vulgaris Biofilm and Planktonic Culture at a Single-Cell Level

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Zhenhua; Chen, Lei; Zhang, Weiwen

    2016-01-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) biofilm formed on metal surfaces can change the physicochemical properties of metals and cause metal corrosion. To enhance understanding of differential gene expression in Desulfovibrio vulgaris under planktonic and biofilm growth modes, a single-cell based RT-qPCR approach was applied to determine gene expression levels of 8 selected target genes in four sets of the 31 individual cells isolated from each growth condition (i.e., biofilm formed on a mild steel (SS) and planktonic cultures, exponential and stationary phases). The results showed obvious gene-expression heterogeneity for the target genes among D. vulgaris single cells of both biofilm and planktonic cultures. In addition, an increased gene-expression heterogeneity in the D. vulgaris biofilm when compared with the planktonic culture was also observed for seven out of eight selected genes at exponential phase, and six out of eight selected genes at stationary phase, respectively, which may be contributing to the increased complexity in terms of structures and morphology in the biofilm. Moreover, the results showed up-regulation of DVU0281 gene encoding exopolysaccharide biosynthesis protein, and down-regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism (i.e., DVU0434 and DVU0588), stress responses (i.e., DVU2410) and response regulator (i.e., DVU3062) in the D. vulgaris biofilm cells. Finally, the gene (DVU2571) involved in iron transportation was found down-regulated, and two genes (DVU1340 and DVU1397) involved in ferric uptake repressor and iron storage were up-regulated in D. vulgaris biofilm, suggesting their possible roles in maintaining normal metabolism of the D. vulgaris biofilm under environments of high concentration of iron. This study showed that the single-cell based analysis could be a useful approach in deciphering metabolism of microbial biofilms. PMID:27199927

  18. Complex transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of an enzyme for Lipopolysaccharide modification

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyung; Six, David A.; Lee, Hyun-Jung; Raetz, Christian R.H.; Gottesman, Susan

    2013-01-01

    Summary The PhoQ/PhoP two-component system activates many genes for lipopolysaccharide (LPS) modification when cells are grown at low Mg2+ concentrations. An additional target of PhoQ and PhoP is MgrR, an Hfq-dependent small RNA that negatively regulates expression of eptB, also encoding a protein that carries out LPS modification. Examination of LPS confirmed that MgrR effectively silences EptB; the phosphoethanolamine modification associated with EptB is found in ΔmgrR::kan but not mgrR+ cells. Sigma E has been reported to positively regulate eptB, although the eptB promoter does not have the expected Sigma E recognition motifs. The effects of Sigma E and deletion of mgrR on levels of eptB mRNA were independent, and the same 5′ end was found in both cases. In vitro transcription and the behavior of transcriptional and translational fusions demonstrate that Sigma E acts directly at the level of transcription initiation for eptB, from the same start point as Sigma 70. The results suggest that when Sigma E is active, synthesis of eptB transcript outstrips MgrR-dependent degradation; presumably the modification of LPS is important under these conditions. Adding to the complexity of eptB regulation is a second sRNA, ArcZ, which also directly and negatively regulates eptB. PMID:23659637

  19. Response of cbb gene transcription levels of four typical sulfur-oxidizing bacteria to the CO2 concentration and its effect on their carbon fixation efficiency during sulfur oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya-Nan; Wang, Lei; Tsang, Yiu Fai; Fu, Xiaohua; Hu, Jiajun; Li, Huan; Le, Yiquan

    2016-10-01

    The variability in carbon fixation capability of four sulfur-oxidizing bacteria (Thiobacillus thioparus DSM 505, Halothiobacillus neapolitanus DSM 15147, Starkeya novella DSM 506, and Thiomonas intermedia DSM 18155) during sulfur oxidation was studied at low and high concentrations of CO2. The mechanism underlying the variability in carbon fixation was clarified by analyzing the transcription of the cbb gene, which encodes the key enzyme ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase. DSM 15147 and DSM 505 fixed carbon more efficiently during sulfur oxidation than DSM 506 and DSM 18155 at 0.5% and 10% CO2, which was mainly because their cbb gene transcription levels were much higher than those of DSM 506 and DSM 18155. A high CO2 concentration significantly stimulated the carbon fixation efficiency of DSM 505 by greatly increasing the cbb gene transcription efficiency. Moreover, the influence of the CO2 concentration on the carbon fixation efficiency of the four strains differed greatly during sulfur oxidation. PMID:27542742

  20. Diversity of transcripts and transcript processing forms in plastids of the dinoflagellate alga Karenia mikimotoi.

    PubMed

    Dorrell, Richard G; Hinksman, George A; Howe, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Plastids produce a vast diversity of transcripts. These include mature transcripts containing coding sequences, and their processing precursors, as well as transcripts that lack direct coding functions, such as antisense transcripts. Although plastid transcriptomes have been characterised for many plant species, less is known about the transcripts produced in other plastid lineages. We characterised the transcripts produced in the fucoxanthin-containing plastids of the dinoflagellate alga Karenia mikimotoi. This plastid lineage, acquired through tertiary endosymbiosis, utilises transcript processing pathways that are very different from those found in plants and green algae, including 3' poly(U) tail addition, and extensive substitutional editing of transcript sequences. We have sequenced the plastid transcriptome of K. mikimotoi, and have detected evidence for divergent evolution of fucoxanthin plastid genomes. We have additionally characterised polycistronic and monocistronic transcripts from two plastid loci, psbD-tRNA (Met)-ycf4 and rpl36-rps13-rps11. We find evidence for a range of transcripts produced from each locus that differ in terms of editing state, 5' end cleavage position, and poly(U) tail addition. Finally, we identify antisense transcripts in K. mikimotoi, which appear to undergo different processing events from the corresponding sense transcripts. Overall, our study provides insights into the diversity of transcripts and processing intermediates found in plastid lineages across the eukaryotes.

  1. Spontaneous sleep-wake cycle and sleep deprivation differently induce Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a DNA methylation and transcripts levels in the basal forebrain and frontal cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Ventskovska, Olena; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja; Karpova, Nina N

    2015-04-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) regulates neuronal plasticity, slow wave activity and sleep homeostasis. Environmental stimuli control Bdnf expression through epigenetic mechanisms, but there are no data on epigenetic regulation of Bdnf by sleep or sleep deprivation. Here we investigated whether 5-methylcytosine (5mC) DNA modification at Bdnf promoters p1, p4 and p9 influences Bdnf1, Bdnf4 and Bdnf9a expression during the normal inactive phase or after sleep deprivation (SD) (3, 6 and 12 h, end-times being ZT3, ZT6 and ZT12) in rats in two brain areas involved in sleep regulation, the basal forebrain and cortex. We found a daytime variation in cortical Bdnf expression: Bdnf1 expression was highest at ZT6 and Bdnf4 lowest at ZT12. Such variation was not observed in the basal forebrain. Also Bdnf p1 and p9 methylation levels differed only in the cortex, while Bdnf p4 methylation did not vary in either area. Factorial analysis revealed that sleep deprivation significantly induced Bdnf1 and Bdnf4 with the similar pattern for Bdnf9a in both basal forebrain and cortex; 12 h of sleep deprivation decreased 5mC levels at the cortical Bdnf p4 and p9. Regression analysis between the 5mC promoter levels and the corresponding Bdnf transcript expression revealed significant negative correlations for the basal forebrain Bdnf1 and cortical Bdnf9a transcripts in only non-deprived rats, while these correlations were lost after sleep deprivation. Our results suggest that Bdnf transcription during the light phase of undisturbed sleep-wake cycle but not after SD is regulated at least partially by brain site-specific DNA methylation.

  2. Physiological, biochemical, and genome-wide transcriptional analysis reveals that elevated CO2 mitigates the impact of combined heat wave and drought stress in Arabidopsis thaliana at multiple organizational levels.

    PubMed

    Zinta, Gaurav; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Domagalska, Malgorzata A; Vergauwen, Lucia; Knapen, Dries; Nijs, Ivan; Janssens, Ivan A; Beemster, Gerrit T S; Asard, Han

    2014-12-01

    Climate changes increasingly threaten plant growth and productivity. Such changes are complex and involve multiple environmental factors, including rising CO2 levels and climate extreme events. As the molecular and physiological mechanisms underlying plant responses to realistic future climate extreme conditions are still poorly understood, a multiple organizational level analysis (i.e. eco-physiological, biochemical, and transcriptional) was performed, using Arabidopsis exposed to incremental heat wave and water deficit under ambient and elevated CO2 . The climate extreme resulted in biomass reduction, photosynthesis inhibition, and considerable increases in stress parameters. Photosynthesis was a major target as demonstrated at the physiological and transcriptional levels. In contrast, the climate extreme treatment induced a protective effect on oxidative membrane damage, most likely as a result of strongly increased lipophilic antioxidants and membrane-protecting enzymes. Elevated CO2 significantly mitigated the negative impact of a combined heat and drought, as apparent in biomass reduction, photosynthesis inhibition, chlorophyll fluorescence decline, H2 O2 production, and protein oxidation. Analysis of enzymatic and molecular antioxidants revealed that the stress-mitigating CO2 effect operates through up-regulation of antioxidant defense metabolism, as well as by reduced photorespiration resulting in lowered oxidative pressure. Therefore, exposure to future climate extreme episodes will negatively impact plant growth and production, but elevated CO2 is likely to mitigate this effect.

  3. Mechanism of Transcriptional Bursting in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Shasha; Chen, Chongyi; Ge, Hao; Xie, X. Sunney

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Transcription of highly expressed genes has been shown to occur in stochastic bursts. But the origin of such ubiquitous phenomenon has not been understood. Here we present the mechanism in bacteria. We developed a high-throughput in vitro single-molecule assay to follow transcription on individual DNA templates in real time. We showed that positive supercoiling buildup on a DNA segment by transcription slows down transcription elongation and eventually stops transcription initiation. Transcription can be resumed upon gyrase binding to the DNA segment. Furthermore, using single-cell mRNA counting fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), we found the extent of transcriptional bursting depends on the intracellular gyrase concentration. Together, these findings prove that transcriptional bursting of highly expressed genes in bacteria is primarily caused by reversible gyrase dissociation from and rebinding to a DNA segment, changing the supercoiling level of the segment. PMID:25036631

  4. Transcriptional Regulation of Heart Development in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Fei; Langenbacher, Adam D.; Chen, Jau-Nian

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac transcription factors orchestrate the complex cellular and molecular events required to produce a functioning heart. Misregulation of the cardiac transcription program leads to embryonic developmental defects and is associated with human congenital heart diseases. Recent studies have expanded our understanding of the regulation of cardiac gene expression at an additional layer, involving the coordination of epigenetic and transcriptional regulators. In this review, we highlight and discuss discoveries made possible by the genetic and embryological tools available in the zebrafish model organism, with a focus on the novel functions of cardiac transcription factors and epigenetic and transcriptional regulatory proteins during cardiogenesis. PMID:27148546

  5. Epigenetic hereditary transcription profiles II, aging revisited

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Johannes WIM

    2007-01-01

    Background Previously, we have shown that deviations from the average transcription profile of a group of functionally related genes can be epigenetically transmitted to daughter cells, thereby implicating nuclear programming as the cause. As a first step in further characterizing this phenomenon it was necessary to determine to what extent such deviations occur in non-tumorigenic tissues derived from normal individuals. To this end, a microarray database derived from 90 human donors aged between 22 to 87 years was used to study deviations from the average transcription profile of the proteasome genes. Results Increase in donor age was found to correlate with a decrease in deviations from the general transcription profile with this decline being gender-specific. The age-related index declined at a faster rate for males although it started from a higher level. Additionally, transcription profiles from similar tissues were more alike than those from different tissues, indicating that deviations arise during differentiation. Conclusion These findings suggest that aging and differentiation are related to epigenetic changes that alter the transcription profile of proteasomal genes. Since alterations in the structure and function of the proteasome are unlikely, such changes appear to occur without concomitant change in gene function. These findings, if confirmed, may have a significant impact on our understanding of the aging process. Open peer review This article was reviewed by Nathan Bowen (nominated by I. King Jordan), Timothy E. Reddy (nominated by Charles DeLisi) and by Martijn Huynen. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers'comments section. PMID:18163906

  6. Epigenetic and transcriptional control of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Huehn, Jochen; Beyer, Marc

    2015-02-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg cells) present a unique T-cell lineage that plays a key role for the initiation and maintenance of immunological tolerance. Treg cells are characterized by the expression of the forkhead box transcription factor Foxp3, which acts as a lineage-specifying factor and determines the unique properties of these immunosuppressive cells. Work over the past few years has shown that well-defined and precisely controlled events on transcriptional and epigenetic level are required to ensure stable expression of Foxp3 in Treg cells. More recent work suggested that in addition to stable Foxp3 expression, epigenetic modifications of Treg-cell specific genes contribute to the unique phenotype of Treg cells by imprinting their transcriptional program and stabilizing the expression of molecules being essential for the suppressive properties of Treg cells. In this review, we will highlight how Foxp3 expression itself is epigenetically and transcriptionally controlled, how the Treg-cell specific epigenetic signature is achieved, how Foxp3 as transcription factor influences the gene expression programs in Treg cells and how unique properties of Treg-cell subsets are defined by other transcription factors.

  7. Temperature regulates fatty acid desaturases at a transcriptional level and modulates the fatty acid profile in the Antarctic microalga Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L.

    PubMed

    An, Meiling; Mou, Shanli; Zhang, Xiaowen; Ye, Naihao; Zheng, Zhou; Cao, Shaona; Xu, Dong; Fan, Xiao; Wang, Yitao; Miao, Jinlai

    2013-04-01

    Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L which can thrive in extreme environments of the Antarctic is a major biomass producer. The FAD genes in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L were obtained and sequence alignment showed that these genes are homologous to known FADs with conserved histidine motifs. In this study, we analyzed the transcription of five FADs and FA compositions at different temperatures. The results showed that the expressions of Δ9CiFAD, ω3CiFAD1 and ω3CiFAD2 were apparently up-regulated at 0°C, however, the up-regulation of Δ6CiFAD intensified with rising temperature. Meanwhile, analysis of the FA compositions showed that PUFAs were dominant compositions, accounting for more than 75% TFA in Chlamydomonas sp. ICE-L. Furthermore, PUFAs were significantly increased at 0 and 5°C, which may be attributed to higher proportions of C18:3 and C20:3. Moreover, PUFAs were significantly decreased at 15°C whereas SFAs were significantly increased.

  8. The Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome associated protein interacts with HsNip7 and its down-regulation affects gene expression at the transcriptional and translational levels

    SciTech Connect

    Hesling, Cedric; Oliveira, Carla C.; Castilho, Beatriz A.; Zanchin, Nilson I.T.

    2007-12-10

    The Shwachman-Bodian-Diamond syndrome (SDS) is an autosomal disorder with pleiotropic phenotypes including pancreatic, skeletal and bone marrow deficiencies and predisposition to hematological dysfunctions. SDS has been associated to mutations in the SBDS gene, encoding a highly conserved protein that was shown to function in ribosome biogenesis in yeast. In this work, we show that SBDS is found in complexes containing the human Nip7 ortholog. Analysis of pre-rRNA processing in a stable SBDS knock-down HEK293-derivative cell line revealed accumulation of a small RNA which is a further indication of SBDS involvement in rRNA biosynthesis. Global transcription and polysome-bound mRNA profiling revealed that SBDS knock-down affects expression of critical genes involved in brain development and function, bone morphogenesis, blood cell proliferation and differentiation, and cell adhesion. Expression of a group of growth and signal transduction factors and of DNA damage response genes is also affected. In SBDS knock-down cells, 34 mRNAs showed decreased and 55 mRNAs showed increased association to polysomes, among which is a group encoding proteins involved in alternative splicing and RNA modification. These results indicate that SBDS is required for accurate expression of genes important for proper brain, skeletal, and blood cell development.

  9. MONITORING MYCOTOXIN PRODUCTION AT THE GENETIC LEVEL ON VARIOUS GROWTH SUBSTRATES USING QUANTITATIVE REVERSE TRANSCRIPTION POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION?EXPERIMENT DESIGN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes a method of analyzing the production of mycotoxins at the genetic level by monitoring the intracellular levels of messenger RNA (mRNA). Initial work will focus on threshing out the mycotoxin gene clusters in Stachybotrys chartarum followed by analysis of toxin...

  10. The transcriptional foundation of pluripotency.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Ian; Tomlinson, Simon R

    2009-07-01

    A fundamental goal in biology is to understand the molecular basis of cell identity. Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cell identity is governed by a set of transcription factors centred on the triumvirate of Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog. These proteins often bind to closely localised genomic sites. Recent studies have identified additional transcriptional modulators that bind to chromatin near sites occupied by Oct4, Sox2 and Nanog. This suggests that the combinatorial control of gene transcription might be fundamental to the ES cell state. Here we discuss how these observations advance our understanding of the transcription factor network that controls pluripotent identity and highlight unresolved issues that arise from these studies. PMID:19542351

  11. Genomewide identification of genes under directional selection: gene transcription Q(ST) scan in diverging Atlantic salmon subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Roberge, C; Guderley, H; Bernatchez, L

    2007-10-01

    Evolutionary genomics has benefited from methods that allow identifying evolutionarily important genomic regions on a genomewide scale, including genome scans and QTL mapping. Recently, genomewide scanning by means of microarrays has permitted assessing gene transcription differences among species or populations. However, the identification of differentially transcribed genes does not in itself suffice to measure the role of selection in driving evolutionary changes in gene transcription. Here, we propose and apply a "transcriptome scan" approach to investigating the role of selection in shaping differential profiles of gene transcription among populations. We compared the genomewide transcription levels between two Atlantic salmon subpopulations that have been diverging for only six generations. Following assessment of normality and unimodality on a gene-per-gene basis, the additive genetic basis of gene transcription was estimated using the animal model. Gene transcription h(2) estimates were significant for 1044 (16%) of all detected cDNA clones. In an approach analogous to that of genome scans, we used the distribution of the Q(ST) values estimated from intra- and intersubpopulation additive genetic components of the transcription profiles to identify 16 outlier genes (average Q(ST) estimate = 0.11) whose transcription levels are likely to have evolved under the influence of directional selection within six generations only. Overall, this study contributes both empirically and methodologically to the quantitative genetic exploration of gene transcription data. PMID:17720934

  12. Effects of plant species, stage of maturity, and level of formic acid addition on lipolysis, lipid content, and fatty acid composition during ensiling.

    PubMed

    Koivunen, E; Jaakkola, S; Heikkilä, T; Lampi, A-M; Halmemies-Beauchet-Filleau, A; Lee, M R F; Winters, A L; Shingfield, K J; Vanhatalo, A

    2015-09-01

    Forage type and management influences the nutritional quality and fatty acid composition of ruminant milk. Replacing grass silage with red clover (RC; L.) silage increases milk fat 18:3-3 concentration. Red clover has a higher polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity compared with grasses, which has been suggested to decrease lipolysis and . The present study characterized the abundance and fatty acid composition of esterified lipid and NEFA before and after ensiling of grass and RC to investigate the influence of forage species, growth stage, and extent of fermentation on lipolysis. A randomized block design with a 2 × 3 × 4 factorial arrangement of treatments was used. Treatments comprised RC or a mixture of timothy ( L.) and meadow fescue ( Huds.) harvested at 3 growth stages and treated with 4 levels of formic acid (0, 2, 4, and 6 L/t). Lipid in silages treated with 0 or 6 L/t formic acid were extracted and separated into 4 fractions by TLC. Total PPO activity in fresh herbage and the content of soluble bound phenols in all silages were determined. Concentrations of 18:3-3 and total fatty acids (TFA) were higher ( < 0.001) for RC than for grass. For both forage species, 18:3-3 and TFA content decreased linearly ( < 0.001) with advancing growth stage, with the highest abundance at the vegetative stage. Most of lipid in fresh RC and grass herbage (97%) was esterified, whereas NEFA accounted for 71% of TFA in both silages. Ensiling resulted in marginal increases in TFA content and the amounts of individual fatty acids compared with fresh herbages. Herbage total PPO activity was higher ( < 0.001) for RC than grass (11 vs. 0.11 μkatal/g leaf fresh weight). Net lipolysis during ensiling was extensive for both forage species (660 to 759 g/kg fatty acid for grass and 563 to 737 g/kg fatty acid for RC). Formic acid application (0 vs. 6 L/t) resulted in a marked decrease ( = 0.026) in net lipolysis during the ensiling of RC, whereas the opposite was true ( = 0.026) for grass

  13. [Effects of water levels and the additions of different nitrogen forms on soil net nitrogen transformation rate and N2O emission in subtropical forest soils].

    PubMed

    Ma, Fen; Ma, Hong-liang; Qiu, Hong; Yang, Hong-yu

    2015-02-01

    An incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of the additions of different nitrogen forms on nitrogen transformation in red soils of subtropical forest under soil moisture conditions with 40%, 70% and 110% of water holding capacity (WHC). The results showed that soil net mineralization and ammonification rates were maximum at 70% WHC and minimum at 40% WHC. Compared with the control, the addition of NO(3-)-N decreased the soil net mineralization and ammonification rates by 56.1% and 43.0% under 70% WHC condition, and decreased by 68.2% and 19.0% under 110% WHC, respectively. However, the proportion of ammonification to mineralization increased at 70% and 110% WHC, which suggested that nitrate addition inhibited the nitrification. With addition of NO(3-)-N at 110% WHC, the net nitrification rate was lowest while N20 emission was highest with the concomitant decrease of nitrate content, indicating that N2O emission was largely derived from denitrification. However, at 40% WHC and 70% WHC, the maximum N20 flux was found at the early stage of incubation. Even with addition of NH(4+)-N and NO(3-)-N, N2O flux did not change much at the latter stage of incubation, indicating that autotrophic nitrification was dominant for N20 production at the early stage of incubation. Under 40% WHC condition, soluble organic carbon increased more and it increased largely with NH(4+)-N addition, which meant NH(4+)-N addition could enhance the mineralization of soil organic matter. Under 40% and 110% WHC conditions, the addition of NH(4+)-N increased significantly the soil soluble organic nitrogen (SON) by 73.6% and 176.6% compared with the control, respectively. A significant increase of 78.7% for SON was only found at 40% WHC under addition of NO(3-)-N compared with the control. These results showed that high soil moisture condition and addition of NH(4+)-N were of benefit to SON formation.

  14. Transcription of Trypanosoma brucei maxicircles

    SciTech Connect

    Michelotti, E.F.; Hajduk, S.L.

    1987-05-01

    Trypanosoma brucei is a protozoan parasite which developmentally regulates mitochondrial activity. In the mammal T. brucei produces ATP entirely by glycolysis while cytochrome mediated respiration resumes in the life-stage in the midgut of the insect vector. Using quantitative S1 nuclease protection assays two types of regulation of the steady state levels of the mitochondrial transcripts were found. Transcription of cytochrome b, cytochrome oxidase, and the rRNA genes is repressed in early bloodstream developmental stages, undergoes dramatic activation in later bloodstream stages, and finally a lesser activation in the insect developmental stage. Transcription of NADH dehydrogenase genes, however, is unregulated. Mitochondrial transcripts with a 5' triphosphate terminus, representing the site of transcription initiation, were capped using guanylyl transferase. The in vitro capped RNA hybridized to only one of eight mitochondrial restriction fragments on a Southern blot, however, hybridization of Southern blots with RNA from ..cap alpha..-/sup 32/P-UTP pulsed mitochondria labelled all restriction fragments equally. These results suggest that each DNA strand has a single promoter which directs the transcription of a full-length RNA which is subsequently processed. Different mitochondrial genes, despite being expressed on the same precursor RNA molecule, are independently regulated by both transcription initiation and RNA processing.

  15. A low-pH medium in vitro or the environment within a macrophage decreases the transcriptional levels of fimA, fimZ and lrp in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ke-Chuan; Hsu, Yuan-Hsun; Huang, Yi-Ning; Chen, Ter-Hsin; Lin, Jiunn-Horng; Hsuan, Shih-Ling; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Lee, Wei-Cheng; Yeh, Kuang-Sheng

    2013-09-01

    Many Salmonella Typhimurium isolates produce type 1 fimbriae and exhibit fimbrial phase variation in vitro. Static broth culture favours the production of fimbriae, while solid agar medium inhibits the generation of these appendages. Little information is available regarding whether S. Typhimurium continues to produce type 1 fimbriae during in vivo growth. We used a type 1 fimbrial phase-variable strain S. Typhimurium LB5010 and its derivatives to infect RAW 264.7 macrophages. Following entry into macrophages, S. Typhimurium LB5010 gradually decreased the transcript levels of fimbrial subunit gene fimA, positive regulatory gene fimZ, and global regulatory gene lrp. A similar decrease in transcript levels was detected by RT-PCRwhen the pH of static brothmediumwas shifted frompH 7 to amore acidic pH 4. A fimA-deleted strain continued to multiply within macrophages as did the parental strain. An lrp deletion strain was unimpaired for in vitro growth at pH 7 or pH 4, while a strain harboring an lrp-containing plasmid exhibited impaired in vitro growth at pH 4. We propose that acidic medium, which resembles one aspect of the intracellular environment in a macrophage, inhibits type 1 fimbrial production by down-regulation of the expression of lrp, fimZ and fimA.

  16. Long-term pancreatic beta cell exposure to high levels of glucose but not palmitate induces DNA methylation within the insulin gene promoter and represses transcriptional activity.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Kota; Tsunekawa, Shin; Ikeniwa, Makoto; Izumoto, Takako; Iida, Atsushi; Ogata, Hidetada; Uenishi, Eita; Seino, Yusuke; Ozaki, Nobuaki; Sugimura, Yoshihisa; Hamada, Yoji; Kuroda, Akio; Shinjo, Keiko; Kondo, Yutaka; Oiso, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have implicated epigenetics in the pathophysiology of diabetes. Furthermore, DNA methylation, which irreversibly deactivates gene transcription, of the insulin promoter, particularly the cAMP response element, is increased in diabetes patients. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. We aimed to investigate insulin promoter DNA methylation in an over-nutrition state. INS-1 cells, the rat pancreatic beta cell line, were cultured under normal-culture-glucose (11.2 mmol/l) or experimental-high-glucose (22.4 mmol/l) conditions for 14 days, with or without 0.4 mmol/l palmitate. DNA methylation of the rat insulin 1 gene (Ins1) promoter was investigated using bisulfite sequencing and pyrosequencing analysis. Experimental-high-glucose conditions significantly suppressed insulin mRNA and increased DNA methylation at all five CpG sites within the Ins1 promoter, including the cAMP response element, in a time-dependent and glucose concentration-dependent manner. DNA methylation under experimental-high-glucose conditions was unique to the Ins1 promoter; however, palmitate did not affect DNA methylation. Artificial methylation of Ins1 promoter significantly suppressed promoter-driven luciferase activity, and a DNA methylation inhibitor significantly improved insulin mRNA suppression by experimental-high-glucose conditions. Experimental-high-glucose conditions significantly increased DNA methyltransferase activity and decreased ten-eleven-translocation methylcytosine dioxygenase activity. Oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress did not affect DNA methylation of the Ins1 promoter. High glucose but not palmitate increased ectopic triacylglycerol accumulation parallel to DNA methylation. Metformin upregulated insulin gene expression and suppressed DNA methylation and ectopic triacylglycerol accumulation. Finally, DNA methylation of the Ins1 promoter increased in isolated islets from Zucker diabetic fatty rats. This study helps to clarify the

  17. Rs6295 promoter variants of the serotonin type 1A receptor are differentially activated by c-Jun in vitro and correlate to transcript levels in human epileptic brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Pernhorst, Katharina; van Loo, Karen M J; von Lehe, Marec; Priebe, Lutz; Cichon, Sven; Herms, Stefan; Hoffmann, Per; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Sander, Thomas; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J

    2013-03-01

    Many brain disorders, including epilepsy, migraine and depression, manifest with episodic symptoms that may last for various time intervals. Transient alterations of neuronal function such as related to serotonin homeostasis generally underlie this phenomenon. Several nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in gene promoters associated with these diseases have been described. For obvious reasons, their regulatory roles on gene expression particularly in human brain tissue remain largely enigmatic. The rs6295 G-/C-allelic variant is located in the promoter region of the human HTR1a gene, encoding the G-protein-coupled receptor for 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT1AR). In addition to reported transcriptional repressor binding, our bioinformatic analyses predicted a reduced binding affinity of the transcription factor (TF) c-Jun for the G-allele. In vitro luciferase transfection assays revealed c-Jun to (a) activate the rs6295 C- significantly stronger than the G-allelic variant and (b) antagonize efficiently the repressive effect of Hes5 on the promoter. The G-allele of rs6295 is known to be associated with aspects of major depression and migraine. In order to address a potential role of rs6295 variants in human brain tissue, we have isolated DNA and mRNA from fresh frozen hippocampal tissue of pharmacoresistant temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients (n=140) after epilepsy surgery for seizure control. We carried out SNP genotyping studies and mRNA analyses in order to determine HTR1a mRNA expression in human hippocampal samples stratified according to the rs6295 allelic variant. The mRNA expression of HTR1a was significantly more abundant in hippocampal mRNA of TLE patients homozygous for the rs6295 C-allele as compared to those with the GG-genotype. These data may point to a novel, i.e., rs6295 allelic variant and c-Jun dependent transcriptional 5HT1AR 'receptoropathy'. PMID:23333373

  18. Conserved enhancer and silencer elements responsible for differential Adh transcription in Drosophila cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Ayer, S; Benyajati, C

    1990-01-01

    The distal promoter of Adh is differentially expressed in Drosophila tissue culture cell lines. After transfection with an exogenous Adh gene, there was a specific increase in distal alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) transcripts in ADH-expressing (ADH+) cells above the levels observed in transfected ADH-nonexpressing (ADH-) cells. We used deletion mutations and a comparative transient-expression assay to identify the cis-acting elements responsible for enhanced Adh distal transcription in ADH+ cells. DNA sequences controlling high levels of distal transcription were localized to a 15-base-pair (bp) region nearly 500 bp upstream of the distal RNA start site. In addition, a 61-bp negative cis-acting element was found upstream from and adjacent to the enhancer. When this silencer element was deleted, distal transcription increased only in the ADH+ cell line. These distant upstream elements must interact with the promoter elements, the Adf-1-binding site and the TATA box, as they only influenced transcription when at least one of these two positive distal promoter elements was present. Internal deletions targeted to the Adf-1-binding site or the TATA box reduced transcription in both cell types but did not affect the transcription initiation site. Distal transcription in transfected ADH- cells appears to be controlled primarily through these promoter elements and does not involve the upstream regulatory elements. Evolutionary conservation in distantly related Drosophila species suggests the importance of these upstream elements in correct developmental and tissue-specific expression of ADH. Images PMID:1694013

  19. Transcriptional regulators of Na,K-ATPase subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqin; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic α-subunit, the β-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids, and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits has been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease. PMID:26579519

  20. Transcriptional analysis of differential carbohydrate utilization by Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Servinsky, Matthew D; Kiel, James T; Dupuy, Nicole F; Sund, Christian J

    2010-11-01

    Transcriptional analysis was performed on Clostridium acetobutylicum with the goal of identifying sugar-specific mechanisms for the transcriptional regulation of transport and metabolism genes. DNA microarrays were used to determine transcript levels from total RNA isolated from cells grown on media containing eleven different carbohydrates, including two pentoses (xylose, arabinose), four hexoses (glucose, mannose, galactose, fructose), four disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, cellobiose) and one polysaccharide (starch). Sugar-specific induction of many transport and metabolism genes indicates that these processes are regulated at the transcriptional level and are subject to carbon catabolite repression. The results show that C. acetobutylicum utilizes symporters and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters for the uptake of pentose sugars, while disaccharides and hexoses are primarily taken up by phosphotransferase system (PTS) transporters and a gluconate : H(+) (GntP) transporter. The transcription of some transporter genes was induced by specific sugars, while others were induced by a subset of the sugars tested. Sugar-specific transport roles are suggested, based on expression comparisons, for various transporters of the PTS, the ABC superfamily and members of the major facilitator superfamily (MFS), including the GntP symporter family and the glycoside-pentoside-hexuronide (GPH)-cation symporter family. Additionally, updates to the C. acetobutylicum genome annotation are proposed, including the identification of genes likely to encode proteins involved in the metabolism of arabinose and xylose via the pentose phosphate pathway.

  1. Transcriptional Regulation of Hepatic Lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhui; Viscarra, Jose; Kim, Sun-Joong; Sul, Hei Sook

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acid and fat synthesis in liver is a highly regulated metabolic pathway critical for energy distribution. Having common features at their promoter regions, lipogenic genes are coordinately regulated at the transcription level. Transcription factors, such as USF, SREBP-1c, LXR and ChREBP play critical roles in this process. Recently, insights have been gained into how various signaling pathways regulate these transcription factors. After feeding, high blood glucose and insulin induce lipogenic genes through several pathways, including DNA-PK, aPKC and Akt-mTOR. Various transcription factors and coregulators undergo specific modifications, such as phosphorylation, acetylation, or ubiquitination, which affect their function, stability, or localization. Dysregulation of lipogenesis can contribute to hepatosteatosis, which is associated with obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:26490400

  2. RNA Polymerase Pausing during Initial Transcription.

    PubMed

    Duchi, Diego; Bauer, David L V; Fernandez, Laurent; Evans, Geraint; Robb, Nicole; Hwang, Ling Chin; Gryte, Kristofer; Tomescu, Alexandra; Zawadzki, Pawel; Morichaud, Zakia; Brodolin, Konstantin; Kapanidis, Achillefs N

    2016-09-15

    In bacteria, RNA polymerase (RNAP) initiates transcription by synthesizing short transcripts that are either released or extended to allow RNAP to escape from the promoter. The mechanism of initial transcription is unclear due to the presence of transient intermediates and molecular heterogeneity. Here, we studied initial transcription on a lac promoter using single-molecule fluorescence observations of DNA scrunching on immobilized transcription complexes. Our work revealed a long pause ("initiation pause," ∼20 s) after synthesis of a 6-mer RNA; such pauses can serve as regulatory checkpoints. Region sigma 3.2, which contains a loop blocking the RNA exit channel, was a major pausing determinant. We also obtained evidence for RNA backtracking during abortive initial transcription and for additional pausing prior to escape. We summarized our work in a model for initial transcription, in which pausing is controlled by a complex set of determinants that modulate the transition from a 6- to a 7-nt RNA. PMID:27618490

  3. RNA Polymerase Pausing during Initial Transcription.

    PubMed

    Duchi, Diego; Bauer, David L V; Fernandez, Laurent; Evans, Geraint; Robb, Nicole; Hwang, Ling Chin; Gryte, Kristofer; Tomescu, Alexandra; Zawadzki, Pawel; Morichaud, Zakia; Brodolin, Konstantin; Kapanidis, Achillefs N

    2016-09-15

    In bacteria, RNA polymerase (RNAP) initiates transcription by synthesizing short transcripts that are either released or extended to allow RNAP to escape from the promoter. The mechanism of initial transcription is unclear due to the presence of transient intermediates and molecular heterogeneity. Here, we studied initial transcription on a lac promoter using single-molecule fluorescence observations of DNA scrunching on immobilized transcription complexes. Our work revealed a long pause ("initiation pause," ∼20 s) after synthesis of a 6-mer RNA; such pauses can serve as regulatory checkpoints. Region sigma 3.2, which contains a loop blocking the RNA exit channel, was a major pausing determinant. We also obtained evidence for RNA backtracking during abortive initial transcription and for additional pausing prior to escape. We summarized our work in a model for initial transcription, in which pausing is controlled by a complex set of determinants that modulate the transition from a 6- to a 7-nt RNA.

  4. [Effects of water levels and the additions of different nitrogen forms on soil net nitrogen transformation rate and N2O emission in subtropical forest soils].

    PubMed

    Ma, Fen; Ma, Hong-liang; Qiu, Hong; Yang, Hong-yu

    2015-02-01

    An incubation experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of the additions of different nitrogen forms on nitrogen transformation in red soils of subtropical forest under soil moisture conditions with 40%, 70% and 110% of water holding capacity (WHC). The results showed that soil net mineralization and ammonification rates were maximum at 70% WHC and minimum at 40% WHC. Compared with the control, the addition of NO(3-)-N decreased the soil net mineralization and ammonification rates by 56.1% and 43.0% under 70% WHC condition, and decreased by 68.2% and 19.0% under 110% WHC, respectively. However, the proportion of ammonification to mineralization increased at 70% and 110% WHC, which suggested that nitrate addition inhibited the nitrification. With addition of NO(3-)-N at 110% WHC, the net nitrification rate was lowest while N20 emission was highest with the concomitant decrease of nitrate content, indicating that N2O emission was largely derived from denitrification. However, at 40% WHC and 70% WHC, the maximum N20 flux was found at the early stage of incubation. Even with addition of NH(4+)-N and NO(3-)-N, N2O flux did not change much at the latter stage of incubation, indicating that autotrophic nitrification was dominant for N20 production at the early stage of incubation. Under 40% WHC condition, soluble organic carbon increased more and it increased largely with NH(4+)-N addition, which meant NH(4+)-N addition could enhance the mineralization of soil organic matter. Under 40% and 110% WHC conditions, the addition of NH(4+)-N increased significantly the soil soluble organic nitrogen (SON) by 73.6% and 176.6% compared with the control, respectively. A significant increase of 78.7% for SON was only found at 40% WHC under addition of NO(3-)-N compared with the control. These results showed that high soil moisture condition and addition of NH(4+)-N were of benefit to SON formation. PMID:26094450

  5. Resistance of Biomphalaria glabrata 13–16-R1 snails to Schistosoma mansoni PR1 is a function of haemocyte abundance and constitutive levels of specific transcripts in haemocytes☆

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Maureen K.; Bender, Randal C.; Bayne, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Continuing transmission of human intestinal schistosomiasis depends on the parasite’s access to susceptible snail intermediate hosts (often Biomphalaria glabrata). Transmission fails when parasite larvae enter resistant individuals in wild snail populations. The genetic basis for differences in snail susceptibility/resistance is being intensively investigated as a means to devise novel control strategies based on resistance genes. Reactive oxygen species produced by the snail’s defence cells (haemocytes) are effectors of resistance. We hypothesised that genes relevant to production and consumption of reactive oxygen species would be expressed differentially in the haemocytes of snail hosts with different susceptibility/resistance phenotypes. By restricting the genetic diversity of snails, we sought to facilitate identification of resistance genes. By inbreeding, we procured from a 13–16-R1 snail population with both susceptible and resistant individuals 52 lines of B. glabrata (expected homozygosity ~87.5%), and determined the phenotype of each in regard to susceptibility/resistance to Schistosoma mansoni. The inbred lines were found to have line-specific differences in numbers of spreading haemocytes; these were enumerated in both juvenile and adult snails. Lines with high cell numbers were invariably resistant to S. mansoni, whereas lines with lower cell numbers could be resistant or susceptible. Transcript levels in haemocytes were quantified for 18 potentially defence-related genes. Among snails with low cell numbers, the different susceptibility/resistance phenotypes correlated with differences in transcript levels for two redox-relevant genes: an inferred phagocyte oxidase component and a peroxiredoxin. Allograft inflammatory factor (potentially a regulator of leucocyte activation) was expressed at higher levels in resistant snails regardless of spread cell number. Having abundant spreading haemocytes is inferred to enable a snail to kill parasite

  6. Exploring Ribosome Positioning on Translating Transcripts with Ribosome Profiling.

    PubMed

    Spealman, Pieter; Wang, Hao; May, Gemma; Kingsford, Carl; McManus, C Joel

    2016-01-01

    Recent technological advances (e.g., microarrays and massively parallel sequencing) have facilitated genome-wide measurement of many aspects of gene regulation. Ribosome profiling is a high-throughput sequencing method used to measure gene expression at the level of translation. This is accomplished by quantifying both the number of translating ribosomes and their locations on mRNA transcripts. The inventors of this approach have published several methods papers detailing its implementation and addressing the basics of ribosome profiling data analysis. Here we describe our lab's procedure, which differs in some respects from those published previously. In addition, we describe a data analysis pipeline, Ribomap, for ribosome profiling data. Ribomap allocates sequence reads to alternative mRNA isoforms, normalizes sequencing bias along transcripts using RNA-seq data, and outputs count vectors of per-codon ribosome occupancy for each transcript.

  7. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  8. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  9. The sequence-specific transcription factor c-Jun targets Cockayne syndrome protein B to regulate transcription and chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Lake, Robert J; Boetefuer, Erica L; Tsai, Pei-Fang; Jeong, Jieun; Choi, Inchan; Won, Kyoung-Jae; Fan, Hua-Ying

    2014-04-01

    Cockayne syndrome is an inherited premature aging disease associated with numerous developmental and neurological defects, and mutations in the gene encoding the CSB protein account for the majority of Cockayne syndrome cases. Accumulating evidence suggests that CSB functions in transcription regulation, in addition to its roles in DNA repair, and those defects in this transcriptional activity might contribute to the clinical features of Cockayne syndrome. Transcription profiling studies have so far uncovered CSB-dependent effects on gene expression; however, the direct targets of CSB's transcriptional activity remain largely unknown. In this paper, we report the first comprehensive analysis of CSB genomic occupancy during replicative cell growth. We found that CSB occupancy sites display a high correlation to regions with epigenetic features of promoters and enhancers. Furthermore, we found that CSB occupancy is enriched at sites containing the TPA-response element. Consistent with this binding site preference, we show that CSB and the transcription factor c-Jun can be found in the same protein-DNA complex, suggesting that c-Jun can target CSB to specific genomic regions. In support of this notion, we observed decreased CSB occupancy of TPA-response elements when c-Jun levels were diminished. By modulating CSB abundance, we found that CSB can influence the expression of nearby genes and impact nucleosome positioning in the vicinity of its binding site. These results indicate that CSB can be targeted to specific genomic loci by sequence-specific transcription factors to regulate transcription and local chromatin structure. Additionally, comparison of CSB occupancy sites with the MSigDB Pathways database suggests that CSB might function in peroxisome proliferation, EGF receptor transactivation, G protein signaling and NF-κB activation, shedding new light on the possible causes and mechanisms of Cockayne syndrome.

  10. TBX21-1993T/C (rs4794067) polymorphism is associated with increased risk of chronic periodontitis and increased T-bet expression in periodontal lesions, but does not significantly impact the IFN-g transcriptional level or the pattern of periodontophatic bacterial infection

    PubMed Central

    Cavalla, Franco; Biguetti, Claudia Cristina; Colavite, Priscila Maria; Silveira, Elcia Varise; Martins, Walter; Letra, Ariadne; Trombone, Ana Paula Favaro; Silva, Renato Menezes; Garlet, Gustavo Pompermaier

    2015-01-01

    Th1-polarized host response, mediated by IFN-γ, has been associated with increased severity of periodontal disease as well as control of periodontal infection. The functional polymorphism TBX21-1993T/C (rs4794067) increases the transcriptional activity of the TBX21 gene (essential for Th1 polarization) resulting in a predisposition to a Th-1 biased immune response. Thus, we conducted a case-control study, including a population of healthy controls (H, n = 218), chronic periodontitis (CP, n = 197), and chronic gingivitis patients (CG, n = 193), to investigate if genetic variations in TBX21 could impact the development of Th1 responses, and consequently influence the pattern of bacterial infection and periodontitis outcome. We observed that the polymorphic allele T was significantly enriched in the CP patients compared to CG subjects, while the H controls demonstrated and intermediate genotype. Also, investigating the putative functionality TBX21-1993T/C in the modulation of local response, we observed that the transcripts levels of T-bet, but not of IFN-γ, were upregulated in homozygote and heterozygote polymorphic subjects. In addition, TBX21-1993T/C did not influence the pattern of bacterial infection or the clinical parameters of disease severity, being the presence/absence of red complex bacteria the main factor associated with the disease status and the subrogate variable probing depth (PD) in the logistic regression analysis. PMID:25832120

  11. Transcriptional regulation of plant phosphate transporters

    PubMed Central

    Muchhal, Umesh S.; Raghothama, K. G.

    1999-01-01

    Phosphorus is acquired by plant roots primarily via the high-affinity inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporters. The transcripts for Pi transporters are highly inducible upon Pi starvation, which also results in enhanced Pi uptake when Pi is resupplied. Using antibodies specific to one of the tomato Pi transporters (encoded by LePT1), we show that an increase in the LePT1 transcript under Pi starvation leads to a concurrent increase in the transporter protein, suggesting a transcriptional regulation for Pi acquisition. LePT1 protein accumulates rapidly in tomato roots in response to Pi starvation. The level of transporter protein accumulation depends on the Pi concentration in the medium, and it is reversible upon resupply of Pi. LePT1 protein accumulates all along the roots under Pi starvation and is localized primarily in the plasma membranes. These results clearly demonstrate that plants increase their capacity for Pi uptake during Pi starvation by synthesis of additional transporter molecules. PMID:10318976

  12. Monoamine oxidase B levels are highly expressed in human gliomas and are correlated with the expression of HiF-1α and with transcription factors Sp1 and Sp3

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, Martyn A.; Baskin, David S.

    2016-01-01

    Monoamine oxidases A and B (MAOA and MAOB) are highly expressed in many cancers. Here we investigated the level of MAOB in gliomas and confirmed its high expression. We found that MAOB levels correlated with tumor grade and hypoxia-inducible factor 1-alpha (HiF-1α) expression. HiF-1α was localized to the nuclei in high-grade gliomas, but it was primarily cytosolic in low-grade gliomas and normal human astrocytes. Expression of both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and MAOB are correlated to HiF-1α expression levels. Levels of MAOB are correlated by the levels of transcription factor Sp3 in the majority of GBM examined, but this control of MAOB expression by Sp3 in low grade astrocytic gliomas is significantly different from control in the in the majority of glioblastomas. The current findings support previous suggestions that MAOB can be exploited for the killing of cancer cells. Selective cell toxicity can be achieved by designing non-toxic prodrugs that require MAOB for their catalytic conversion into mature cytotoxic chemotherapeutics. PMID:26689994

  13. Las Matematicas: Lenguaje Universal. Nivel 2a: Suma y Resta de Numeros Enteros (Mathematics: A Universal Language. Level 2a: Addition and Subtraction of Whole Numbers).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    This is one of a series of student booklets designed for use in a bilingual mathematics program in grades 6-8. The general format is to present each page in both Spanish and English. The mathematical topics in this booklet include addition and subtraction. (MK)

  14. Las Matematicas: Lenguaje Universal. Grados Intermedios, Nivel 6a: Suma de Fracciones (Mathematics: A Universal Language. Intermediate Grades, Level 6a: Addition of Fractions).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dissemination and Assessment Center for Bilingual Education, Austin, TX.

    This is one of a series of student booklets designed for use in a bilingual mathematics program in grades 6-8. The general format is to present each page in both Spanish and English. The mathematical topics in this booklet include addition of fractions and mixed numbers. (MK)

  15. Improvement of texture and sensory properties of cakes by addition of potato peel powder with high level of dietary fiber and protein.

    PubMed

    Ben Jeddou, Khawla; Bouaziz, Fatma; Zouari-Ellouzi, Soumaya; Chaari, Fatma; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia; Ellouz-Ghorbel, Raoudha; Nouri-Ellouz, Oumèma

    2017-02-15

    Demand for health oriented products such as low calories and high fiber product is increasing. The aim of the present work was to determine the effect of the addition of potato peel powders as protein and dietary fiber source on the quality of the dough and the cake. Powders obtained from the two types of peel flour showed interesting water binding capacity and fat absorption capacity. Potato peel flours were incorporated in wheat flours at different concentration. The results showed that peel powders additionally considerably improved the Alveograph profile of dough and the texture of the prepared cakes. In addition color measurements showed a significant difference between the control dough and the dough containing potato peels. The replacement of wheat flour with the potato powders reduced the cake hardness significantly and the L(*) and b(*) dough color values. The increased consumption of cake enriched with potato peel fiber is proposed for health reasons. The study demonstrated that protein/fiber-enriched cake with good sensory quality could be produced by the substitution of wheat flour by 5% of potato peel powder. In addition and technological point of view, the incorporation of potato peel powder at 5% increase the dough strength and elasticity-to-extensibility ratio (P/L). PMID:27664685

  16. Improvement of texture and sensory properties of cakes by addition of potato peel powder with high level of dietary fiber and protein.

    PubMed

    Ben Jeddou, Khawla; Bouaziz, Fatma; Zouari-Ellouzi, Soumaya; Chaari, Fatma; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia; Ellouz-Ghorbel, Raoudha; Nouri-Ellouz, Oumèma

    2017-02-15

    Demand for health oriented products such as low calories and high fiber product is increasing. The aim of the present work was to determine the effect of the addition of potato peel powders as protein and dietary fiber source on the quality of the dough and the cake. Powders obtained from the two types of peel flour showed interesting water binding capacity and fat absorption capacity. Potato peel flours were incorporated in wheat flours at different concentration. The results showed that peel powders additionally considerably improved the Alveograph profile of dough and the texture of the prepared cakes. In addition color measurements showed a significant difference between the control dough and the dough containing potato peels. The replacement of wheat flour with the potato powders reduced the cake hardness significantly and the L(*) and b(*) dough color values. The increased consumption of cake enriched with potato peel fiber is proposed for health reasons. The study demonstrated that protein/fiber-enriched cake with good sensory quality could be produced by the substitution of wheat flour by 5% of potato peel powder. In addition and technological point of view, the incorporation of potato peel powder at 5% increase the dough strength and elasticity-to-extensibility ratio (P/L).

  17. The leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat-containing protein (LRPPRC) does not activate transcription in mammalian mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Harmel, Julia; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Terzioglu, Mügen; Spåhr, Henrik; Falkenberg, Maria; Larsson, Nils-Göran

    2013-05-31

    Regulation of mtDNA expression is critical for controlling oxidative phosphorylation capacity and has been reported to occur at several different levels in mammalian mitochondria. LRPPRC (leucine-rich pentatricopeptide repeat-containing protein) has a key role in this regulation and acts at the post-transcriptional level to stabilize mitochondrial mRNAs, to promote mitochondrial mRNA polyadenylation, and to coordinate mitochondrial translation. However, recent studies have suggested that LRPPRC may have an additional intramitochondrial role by directly interacting with the mitochondrial RNA polymerase POLRMT to stimulate mtDNA transcription. In this study, we have further examined the intramitochondrial roles for LRPPRC by creating bacterial artificial chromosome transgenic mice with moderately increased LRPPRC expression and heterozygous Lrpprc knock-out mice with moderately decreased LRPPRC expression. Variation of LRPPRC levels in mice in vivo, occurring within a predicted normal physiological range, strongly affected the levels of an unprocessed mitochondrial precursor transcript (ND5-cytochrome b) but had no effect on steady-state levels of mitochondrial transcripts or de novo transcription of mtDNA. We further assessed the role of LRPPRC in mitochondrial transcription by performing size exclusion chromatography and immunoprecipitation experiments in human cell lines and mice, but we found no interaction between LRPPRC and POLRMT. Furthermore, addition of purified LRPPRC to a recombinant human in vitro transcription system did not activate mtDNA transcription. On the basis of these data, we conclude that LRPPRC does not directly regulate mtDNA transcription but rather acts as a post-transcriptional regulator of mammalian mtDNA expression. PMID:23599432

  18. Characterization of Protein and Transcript Levels of the Chaperonin Containing Tailless Complex Protein-1 and Tubulin during Light-Regulated Growth of Oat Seedlings1

    PubMed Central

    Moser, Michael; Schäfer, Eberhard; Ehmann, Bruno

    2000-01-01

    In grass seedlings the network of cortical microtubules is reorganized during light-dependent growth of coleoptiles and mesocotyls. We investigated the effects of light-dependent growth on the relative steady-state levels of the mRNAs and protein levels of α-tubulin and the ε-subunit of the chaperonin containing tailless complex protein-1 in oat (Avena sativa) coleoptiles, which were grown in different light conditions to establish different growth responses. The soluble pools of the ε-subunit of the chaperonin containing tailless complex protein-1 and α-tubulin decreased in nonelongating coleoptiles, suggesting that the dynamics of the light-regulated soluble pool reflect the processes occurring during reorganization of cortical microtubules. The shifts in pool sizes are discussed in relation to the machinery that controls the dynamic structure of cortical microtubules in plant cells. PMID:10982445

  19. Widespread Inducible Transcription Downstream of Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Vilborg, Anna; Passarelli, Maria C.; Yario, Therese A.; Tycowski, Kazimierz T.; Steitz, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pervasive transcription of the human genome generates RNAs whose mode of formation and functions are largely uncharacterized. Here, we combine RNA-Seq with detailed mechanistic studies to describe a transcript type derived from protein-coding genes. The resulting RNAs, which we call DoGs for downstream of gene containing transcripts, possess long non-coding regions (often >45 kb) and remain chromatin bound. DoGs are inducible by osmotic stress through an IP3 receptor signaling-dependent pathway, indicating active regulation. DoG levels are increased by decreased termination of the upstream transcript, a previously undescribed mechanism for rapid transcript induction. Relative depletion of polyA signals in DoG regions correlates with increased levels of DoGs after osmotic stress. We detect DoG transcription in several human cell lines and provide evidence for thousands of DoGs genome-wide. PMID:26190259

  20. Effects of Quartz Particle Size and Sucrose Addition on Melting Behavior of a Melter Feed for High-Level Waste Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Marcial, Jose; Hrma, Pavel R; Schweiger, Michael J; Swearingen, Kevin J; Tegrotenhuis, Nathan E; Henager, Samuel H

    2010-08-11

    The behavior of melter feed (a mixture of nuclear waste and glass-forming additives) during waste-glass processing has a significant impact on the rate of the vitrification process. We studied the effects of silica particle size and sucrose addition on the volumetric expansion (foaming) of a high-alumina feed and the rate of dissolution of silica particles in feed samples heated at 5°C/min up to 1200°C. The initial size of quartz particles in feed ranged from 5 to 195 µm. The fraction of the sucrose added ranged from 0 to 0.20 g per g glass. Extensive foaming occurred only in feeds with 5-μm quartz particles; particles >150 µm formed clusters. Particles of 5 µm completely dissolved by 900°C whereas particles >150 µm did not fully dissolve even when the temperature reached 1200°C. Sucrose addition had virtually zero impact on both foaming and the dissolution of silica particles.

  1. Effect of abscisic and gibberellic acids on malate synthase transcripts in germinating castor bean seeds.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, D; Dommes, J; Northcote, D H

    1987-05-01

    Several clones complementary to malate synthase mRNA have been identified in a complementary-DNA library to mRNA from castor bean endosperm. One of these clones has been used as a probe to measure levels of transcripts during seed germination and the effects of gibberellic acid and abscisic acid on these levels have been examined.Malate synthase transcripts increased during germination and GA3 advanced their appearance in the endosperm. Exogenously applied ABA inhibited the accumulation of transcripts over a time course of germination but the addition of GA3 counteracted its inhibitory effects. The data confirmed previous reports which indicated that the action of both growth regulators was on transcript accumulation and that there is a coordinated induction of the enzymes involved in the lipid metabolism in oil seeds.

  2. Additions to the spectrum and energy levels and a critical compilation of helium-like and hydrogen-like boron, B IV and B V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, A. E.; Ryabtsev, A. N.; Ekberg, J. O.; Kink, I.; Mannervik, S.; Martinson, I.

    2008-08-01

    Using beam-foil spectroscopy, we have observed several new lines in the B IV and B V spectra. This experimental work was combined with theoretical calculations using ab initio and semi-empirical techniques. We have also critically evaluated all previous and recent experimental and theoretical data for these spectra. Complete data on wavelengths and energy levels based on this analysis are tabulated.

  3. Lytic infection of Lactococcus lactis by bacteriophages Tuc2009 and c2 triggers alternative transcriptional host responses.

    PubMed

    Ainsworth, Stuart; Zomer, Aldert; Mahony, Jennifer; van Sinderen, Douwe

    2013-08-01

    Here we present an entire temporal transcriptional profile of Lactococcus lactis subsp. cremoris UC509.9 undergoing lytic infection with two distinct bacteriophages, Tuc2009 and c2. Furthermore, corresponding high-resolution whole-phage genome tiling arrays of both bacteriophages were performed throughout lytic infection. Whole-genome microarrays performed at various time points postinfection demonstrated a rather modest impact on host transcription. The majority of changes in the host transcriptome occur during late infection stages; few changes in host gene transcription occur during the immediate and early infection stages. Alterations in the L. lactis UC509.9 transcriptome during lytic infection appear to be phage specific, with relatively few differentially transcribed genes shared between cells infected with Tuc2009 and those infected with c2. Despite the apparent lack of a coordinated general phage response, three themes common to both infections were noted: alternative transcription of genes involved in catabolic flux and energy production, differential transcription of genes involved in cell wall modification, and differential transcription of genes involved in the conversion of ribonucleotides to deoxyribonucleotides. The transcriptional profiles of both bacteriophages during lytic infection generally correlated with the findings of previous studies and allowed the confirmation of previously predicted promoter sequences. In addition, the host transcriptional response to lysogenization with Tuc2009 was monitored along with tiling array analysis of Tuc2009 in the lysogenic state. Analysis identified 44 host genes with altered transcription during lysogeny, 36 of which displayed levels of transcription significantly reduced from those for uninfected cells.

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of higher-level relationships within Hydroidolina (Cnidaria: Hydrozoa) using mitochondrial genome data and insight into their mitochondrial transcription

    PubMed Central

    Bentlage, Bastian; Cartwright, Paulyn; Yanagihara, Angel A.; Lindsay, Dhugal J.; Hopcroft, Russell R.; Collins, Allen G.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrozoans display the most morphological diversity within the phylum Cnidaria. While recent molecular studies have provided some insights into their evolutionary history, sister group relationships remain mostly unresolved, particularly at mid-taxonomic levels. Specifically, within Hydroidolina, the most speciose hydrozoan subclass, the relationships and sometimes integrity of orders are highly unsettled. Here we obtained the near complete mitochondrial sequence of twenty-six hydroidolinan hydrozoan species from a range of sources (DNA and RNA-seq data, long-range PCR). Our analyses confirm previous inference of the evolution of mtDNA in Hydrozoa while introducing a novel genome organization. Using RNA-seq data, we propose a mechanism for the expression of mitochondrial mRNA in Hydroidolina that can be extrapolated to the other medusozoan taxa. Phylogenetic analyses using the full set of mitochondrial gene sequences provide some insights into the order-level relationships within Hydroidolina, including siphonophores as the first diverging clade, a well-supported clade comprised of Leptothecata-Filifera III–IV, and a second clade comprised of Aplanulata-Capitata s.s.-Filifera I–II. Finally, we describe our relatively inexpensive and accessible multiplexing strategy to sequence long-range PCR amplicons that can be adapted to most high-throughput sequencing platforms. PMID:26618080

  5. Quantification of EVI1 transcript levels in acute myeloid leukemia by RT-qPCR analysis: A study by the ALFA Group.

    PubMed

    Smol, Thomas; Nibourel, Olivier; Marceau-Renaut, Alice; Celli-Lebras, Karine; Berthon, Céline; Quesnel, Bruno; Boissel, Nicolas; Terré, Christine; Thomas, Xavier; Castaigne, Sylvie; Dombret, Hervé; Preudhomme, Claude; Renneville, Aline

    2015-12-01

    EVI1 overexpression confers poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Quantification of EVI1 expression has been mainly assessed by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) based on relative quantification of EVI1-1D splice variant. In this study, we developed a RT-qPCR assay to perform quantification of EVI1 expression covering the different splice variants. A sequence localized in EVI1 exons 14 and 15 was cloned into plasmids that were used to establish RT-qPCR standard curves. Threshold values to define EVI1 overexpression were determined using 17 bone marrow (BM) and 31 peripheral blood (PB) control samples and were set at 1% in BM and 0.5% in PB. Samples from 64 AML patients overexpressing EVI1 included in the ALFA-0701 or -0702 trials were collected at diagnosis and during follow-up (n=152). Median EVI1 expression at AML diagnosis was 23.3% in BM and 3.6% in PB. EVI1 expression levels significantly decreased between diagnostic and post-induction samples, with an average variation from 21.6% to 3.56% in BM and from 4.0% to 0.22% in PB, but did not exceed 1 log10 reduction. Our study demonstrates that the magnitude of reduction in EVI1 expression levels between AML diagnosis and follow-up is not sufficient to allow sensitive detection of minimal residual disease.

  6. Methyl protodioscin increases ABCA1 expression and cholesterol efflux while inhibiting gene expressions for synthesis of cholesterol and triglycerides by suppressing SREBP transcription and microRNA 33a/b levels.

    PubMed

    Ma, Weilie; Ding, Hang; Gong, Xiaohua; Liu, Zhen; Lin, Yalin; Zhang, Zhizhen; Lin, Guorong

    2015-04-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) regulate homeostasis of LDL, HDL and triglycerides. This study was aimed to determine if inhibition of SREBPs by methyl protodioscin (MPD) regulates downstream gene and protein expressions of lipid metabolisms. In THP-1 macrophages, MPD increases levels of ABCA1 mRNA and protein in dose- and time-dependent manners, and apoA-1-mediated cholesterol efflux. The underlying mechanisms for the effects is that MPD inhibits the transcription of SREBP1c and SREBP2, and decreases levels of microRNA 33a/b hosted in the introns of SREBPs, which leads to reciprocally increase ABCA1 levels. In HepG2 cells, MPD shows the same effects as these observed in THP-1 macrophages. MPD also decreases the gene expressions of HMGCR, FAS and ACC for cholesterol and fatty acid synthesis. MPD further promotes LDL receptor through reducing the PCSK9 level. Collectively, the study demonstrates that MPD potentially increase HDL cholesterol while reducing LDL cholesterol and triglycerides. PMID:25733328

  7. Genetic Variations in ABCA7 Can Increase Secreted Levels of Amyloid-β40 and Amyloid-β42 Peptides and ABCA7 Transcription in Cell Culture Models.

    PubMed

    Bamji-Mirza, Michelle; Li, Yan; Najem, Dema; Liu, Qing Yan; Walker, Douglas; Lue, Lih-Fen; Stupak, Jacek; Chan, Kenneth; Li, Jianjun; Ghani, Mahdi; Yang, Ze; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Zhang, Wandong

    2016-06-13

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by extracellular deposits of amyloid-β (Aβ) in the brain. ABCA7 is highly expressed in the brain and a susceptibility gene for late-onset AD (LOAD). The minor alleles at two ABCA7 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs3764650 (T>G; intron13) and rs3752246 at a predicted myristoylation site (C>G; exon33; p.Gly1527Ala), are significantly associated with LOAD risk; however, the mechanism of this association is unknown. Functional consequences of both SNPs were examined in HEK293 and CHO cells stably expressing AβPPSwe. Luciferase reporter assays in HEK293 cells suggested that intron13 carrying rs3764650 major T-allele (int13-T) possessed promoter-enhancing capabilities. Co-transfection experiments with hABCA7 and int13-T resulted in significantly increased ABCA7 protein level relative to that with int13-G. Expression of hABCA7 carrying rs3752246 risk allele led to increases in secreted Aβ40 and Aβ42 and β-secretase activity in CHO- and HEK-AβPPSwe cells. Hydroxymyristic acid treatment of cells expressing hABCA7 carrying the rs3752246 major G allele resulted in increased β-secretase activity and levels of Aβ, suggesting that lack of myristoylation contributes to the observed cell-phenotypes. Molecular weight determination, by gel-electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, of hABCA7 peptides spanning position 1527 showed loss of post-translational modification in the risk-allele peptide. These results suggest that decreased expression, or impaired function, of ABCA7 may contribute to AD pathology. PMID:27314524

  8. Opportunistic virus DNA levels after pediatric stem cell transplantation: serostatus matching, anti-thymocyte globulin, and total body irradiation are additive risk factors.

    PubMed

    Kullberg-Lindh, C; Mellgren, K; Friman, V; Fasth, A; Ascher, H; Nilsson, S; Lindh, M

    2011-04-01

    Viral opportunistic infections remain a threat to survival after stem cell transplantation (SCT). We retrospectively investigated infections caused by cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesvirus type 6 (HHV6), or adenovirus (AdV) during the first 6-12 months after pediatric SCT. Serum samples from 47 consecutive patients were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. DNAemia at any time point occurred for CMV in 47%, for EBV in 45%, for HHV6 in 28%, and for AdV in 28%. Three patients (6.3%) died of CMV-, EBV-, or AdV-related complications 4, 9, and 24 weeks after SCT, respectively, representing 21% of total mortality. These 3 cases were clearly distinguishable by DNAemia increasing to high levels. Serum positivity for CMV immunoglobulin G in either recipient or donor at the time of SCT, total body irradiation, and anti-thymocyte globulin conditioning were independent risk factors for high CMV or EBV DNA levels. We conclude that DNAemia levels help to distinguish significant viral infections, and that surveillance and prophylactic measures should be focused on patients with risk factors in whom viral complications rapidly can become fatal.

  9. Murine Leukemia Virus Uses TREX Components for Efficient Nuclear Export of Unspliced Viral Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Sakuma, Toshie; Tonne, Jason M.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Previously we reported that nuclear export of both unspliced and spliced murine leukemia virus (MLV) transcripts depends on the nuclear export factor (NXF1) pathway. Although the mRNA export complex TREX, which contains Aly/REF, UAP56, and the THO complex, is involved in the NXF1-mediated nuclear export of cellular mRNAs, its contribution to the export of MLV mRNA transcripts remains poorly understood. Here, we studied the involvement of TREX components in the export of MLV transcripts. Depletion of UAP56, but not Aly/REF, reduced the level of both unspliced and spliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, depletion of THO components, including THOC5 and THOC7, affected only unspliced viral transcripts in the cytoplasm. Moreover, the RNA immunoprecipitation assay showed that only the unspliced viral transcript interacted with THOC5. These results imply that MLV requires UAP56, THOC5 and THOC7, in addition to NXF1, for nuclear export of viral transcripts. Given that naturally intronless mRNAs, but not bulk mRNAs, require THOC5 for nuclear export, it is plausible that THOC5 plays a key role in the export of unspliced MLV transcripts. PMID:24618812

  10. Dexamethasone Enhances 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Effects by Increasing Vitamin D Receptor Transcription*

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Alejandro A.; Deeb, Kristin K.; Pike, J. Wesley; Johnson, Candace S.; Trump, Donald L.

    2011-01-01

    Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, in combination with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) has been shown to increase the antitumor effects of calcitriol in squamous cell carcinoma. In this study we found that pretreatment with Dex potentiates calcitriol effects by inhibiting cell growth and increasing vitamin D receptor (VDR) and VDR-mediated transcription. Treatment with actinomycin D inhibits Vdr mRNA synthesis, indicating that Dex regulates VDR expression at transcriptional level. Real time PCR shows that treatment with Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a time- and a dose-dependent manner, indicating that Dex directly regulates expression of Vdr. RU486, an inhibitor of glucocorticoids, inhibits Dex-induced Vdr expression. In addition, the silencing of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) abolishes the induction of Vdr by Dex, indicating that Dex increases Vdr transcripts in a GR-dependent manner. A fragment located 5.2 kb upstream of Vdr transcription start site containing two putative glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) was evaluated using a luciferase-based reporter assay. Treatment with 100 nm Dex induces transcription of luciferase driven by the fragment. Deletion of the GRE distal to transcription start site was sufficient to abolish Dex induction of luciferase. Also, chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals recruitment of GR to distal GRE with Dex treatment. We conclude that Dex increases VDR and vitamin D effects by increasing Vdr de novo transcription in a GR-dependent manner. PMID:21868377

  11. Unexpected complexity of the Reef-Building Coral Acropora millepora transcription factor network

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Coral reefs are disturbed on a global scale by environmental changes including rising sea surface temperatures and ocean acidification. Little is known about how corals respond or adapt to these environmental changes especially at the molecular level. This is mostly because of the paucity of genome-wide studies on corals and the application of systems approaches that incorporate the latter. Like in any other organism, the response of corals to stress is tightly controlled by the coordinated interplay of many transcription factors. Results Here, we develop and apply a new system-wide approach in order to infer combinatorial transcription factor networks of the reef-building coral Acropora millepora. By integrating sequencing-derived transcriptome measurements, a network of physically interacting transcription factors, and phylogenetic network footprinting we were able to infer such a network. Analysis of the network across a phylogenetically broad sample of five species, including human, reveals that despite the apparent simplicity of corals, their transcription factors repertoire and interaction networks seem to be largely conserved. In addition, we were able to identify interactions among transcription factors that appear to be species-specific lending strength to the novel concept of "Taxonomically Restricted Interactions". Conclusions This study provides the first look at transcription factor networks in corals. We identified a transcription factor repertoire encoded by the coral genome and found consistencies of the domain architectures of transcription factors and conserved regulatory subnetworks across eumetazoan species, providing insight into how regulatory networks have evolved. PMID:21526989

  12. Transcriptional and epigenetic regulation of autophagy in aging.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Louis R; Kumsta, Caroline; Sandri, Marco; Ballabio, Andrea; Hansen, Malene

    2015-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a major intracellular degradation process recognized as playing a central role in cell survival and longevity. This multistep process is extensively regulated at several levels, including post-translationally through the action of conserved longevity factors such as the nutrient sensor TOR. More recently, transcriptional regulation of autophagy genes has emerged as an important mechanism for ensuring the somatic maintenance and homeostasis necessary for a long life span. Autophagy is increased in many long-lived model organisms and contributes significantly to their longevity. In turn, conserved transcription factors, particularly the helix-loop-helix transcription factor TFEB and the forkhead transcription factor FOXO, control the expression of many autophagy-related genes and are important for life-span extension. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the contribution of these transcription factors to macroautophagy regulation in the context of aging. We also review current research on epigenetic changes, such as histone modification by the deacetylase SIRT1, that influence autophagy-related gene expression and additionally affect aging. Understanding the molecular regulation of macroautophagy in relation to aging may offer new avenues for the treatment of age-related diseases.

  13. Post-transcriptional control of GRF transcription factors by microRNA miR396 and GIF co-activator affects leaf size and longevity.

    PubMed

    Debernardi, Juan M; Mecchia, Martin A; Vercruyssen, Liesbeth; Smaczniak, Cezary; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Inze, Dirk; Rodriguez, Ramiro E; Palatnik, Javier F

    2014-08-01

    The growth-regulating factors (GRFs) are plant-specific transcription factors. They form complexes with GRF-interacting factors (GIFs), a small family of transcriptional co-activators. In Arabidopsis thaliana, seven out of the nine GRFs are controlled by microRNA miR396. Analysis of Arabidopsis plants carrying a GRF3 allele insensitive to miR396 revealed a strong boost in the number of cells in leaves, which was further enhanced synergistically by an additional increase of GIF1 levels. Genetic experiments revealed that GRF3 can still increase cell number in gif1 mutants, albeit to a much lesser extent. Genome-wide transcript profiling indicated that the simultaneous increase of GRF3 and GIF1 levels causes additional effects in gene expression compared to either of the transgenes alone. We observed that GIF1 interacts in vivo with GRF3, as well as with chromatin-remodeling complexes, providing a mechanistic explanation for the synergistic activities of a GRF3-GIF1 complex. Interestingly, we found that, in addition to the leaf size, the GRF system also affects the organ longevity. Genetic and molecular analysis revealed that the functions of GRFs in leaf growth and senescence can be uncoupled, demonstrating that the miR396-GRF-GIF network impinges on different stages of leaf development. Our results integrate the post-transcriptional control of the GRF transcription factors with the progression of leaf development.

  14. Sub1 associates with Spt5 and influences RNA polymerase II transcription elongation rate.

    PubMed

    García, Alicia; Collin, Alejandro; Calvo, Olga

    2012-11-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Sub1 has been implicated in several steps of mRNA metabolism in yeast, such as the activation of transcription, termination, and 3'-end formation. In addition, Sub1 globally regulates RNA polymerase II phosphorylation, and most recently it has been shown that it is a functional component of the preinitiation complex. Here we present evidence that Sub1 plays a significant role in transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). We show that SUB1 genetically interacts with the gene encoding the elongation factor Spt5, that Sub1 influences Spt5 phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain of RNAPII largest subunit by the kinase Bur1, and that both Sub1 and Spt5 copurify in the same complex, likely during early transcription elongation. Indeed, our data indicate that Sub1 influences Spt5-Rpb1 interaction. In addition, biochemical and molecular data show that Sub1 influences transcription elongation of constitutive and inducible genes and associates with coding regions in a transcription-dependent manner. Taken together, our results indicate that Sub1 associates with Spt5 and influences Spt5-Rpb1 complex levels and consequently transcription elongation rate.

  15. Sub1 associates with Spt5 and influences RNA polymerase II transcription elongation rate

    PubMed Central

    García, Alicia; Collin, Alejandro; Calvo, Olga

    2012-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Sub1 has been implicated in several steps of mRNA metabolism in yeast, such as the activation of transcription, termination, and 3′-end formation. In addition, Sub1 globally regulates RNA polymerase II phosphorylation, and most recently it has been shown that it is a functional component of the preinitiation complex. Here we present evidence that Sub1 plays a significant role in transcription elongation by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). We show that SUB1 genetically interacts with the gene encoding the elongation factor Spt5, that Sub1 influences Spt5 phosphorylation of the carboxy-terminal domain of RNAPII largest subunit by the kinase Bur1, and that both Sub1 and Spt5 copurify in the same complex, likely during early transcription elongation. Indeed, our data indicate that Sub1 influences Spt5–Rpb1 interaction. In addition, biochemical and molecular data show that Sub1 influences transcription elongation of constitutive and inducible genes and associates with coding regions in a transcription-dependent manner. Taken together, our results indicate that Sub1 associates with Spt5 and influences Spt5–Rpb1 complex levels and consequently transcription elongation rate. PMID:22973055

  16. Three Genes Are Required for trans-Activation of Ty Transcription in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Winston, Fred; Dollard, Catherine; Malone, Elizabeth A.; Clare, Jeffrey; Kapakos, James G.; Farabaugh, Philip; Minehart, Patricia L.

    1987-01-01

    Mutations in the SPT3 gene were isolated as one class of suppressors of Ty and solo δ insertion mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previous work has shown that null mutations in SPT3 abolish the normal Ty δ-δ transcript; instead, a transcript that initiates 800 bases farther downstream is made, suggesting that SPT3 is required for transcription initiation in δ sequences. We have selected for new spt mutations and have screened for those with the unique suppression pattern of spt3 mutations with respect to two insertion mutations. Our selection and screen has identified two additional genes, SPT7 and SPT8, that are also required for transcription initiation in δ sequences. We show that mutations in SPT7 or SPT8 result in the same alteration of Ty transcription as do mutations in SPT3. In addition, mutations in all three genes cause a sporulation defect. By assay of a Ty-lacZ fusion we have shown that spt3, spt7 and spt8 mutations reduce transcription from a δ sequence by 10–25-fold. Finally, we show that SPT3 mRNA levels are unaffected in either spt7 or spt8 mutants, suggesting that these two genes do not regulate transcription of SPT3. PMID:3034719

  17. The pseudorabies immediate early protein stimulates in vitro transcription by facilitating TFIID: promoter interactions.

    PubMed

    Abmayr, S M; Workman, J L; Roeder, R G

    1988-05-01

    The pseudorabies virus immediate early (IE) protein, partially purified from infected HeLa cells, stimulated transcription initiation by RNA polymerase II and associated factors in HeLa nuclear extracts. This stimulation was maximal at low template concentrations, where the basal level of transcription was also low. In an analysis of the limitations on transcription under these conditions, it was found that transcription could be increased drastically not only by IE addition but also by (1) the addition of nonpromoter-containing DNA, which titrated nonspecific DNA-binding proteins in the crude nuclear extract, and (2) preincubation of the template with either the nuclear extract (in the absence of Mg2+) or with the TATA box-binding factor, TFIID. These results suggest that in the absence of IE, nonspecific DNA-binding proteins competed with TFIID for binding to the promoter, thus making TFIID: promoter interactions limiting for transcription. The stimulation of transcription effected by IE was essentially the same as that observed following preassociation of TFIID with the template or by titration of nonspecific DNA-binding proteins. Moreover, the presence of IE under the latter conditions did not stimulate transcription further. These observations strongly suggest that all of these manipulations affected the same limiting step and, thus, that IE accentuated the rate or extent of formation of a preinitiation complex involving the TATA factor, rather than subsequent initiation or elongation steps.

  18. The influence of long-term copper contaminated agricultural soil at different pH levels on microbial communities and springtail transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Tjalf E; Taş, Neslihan; Braster, Martin; Temminghoff, Erwin J M; Röling, Wilfred F M; Roelofs, Dick

    2012-01-01

    Copper has long been applied for agricultural practises. Like other metals, copper is highly persistent in the environment and biologically active long after its use has ceased. Here we present a unique study on the long-term effects (27 years) of copper and pH on soil microbial communities and on the springtail Folsomia candida an important representative of the soil macrofauna, in an experiment with a full factorial, random block design. Bacterial communities were mostly affected by pH. These effects were prominent in Acidobacteria, while Actinobacteria and Gammaroteobacteria communities were affected by original and bioavailable copper. Reproduction and survival of the collembolan F. candida was not affected by the studied copper concentrations. However, the transcriptomic responses to copper reflected a mechanism of copper transport and detoxification, while pH exerted effects on nucleotide and protein metabolism and (acute) inflammatory response. We conclude that microbial community structure reflected the history of copper contamination, while gene expression analysis of F. candida is associated with the current level of bioavailable copper. The study is a first step in the development of a molecular strategy aiming at a more comprehensive assessment of various aspects of soil quality and ecotoxicology. PMID:21882881

  19. IKAROS: a multifunctional regulator of the polymerase II transcription cycle.

    PubMed

    Bottardi, Stefania; Mavoungou, Lionel; Milot, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Transcription factors are important determinants of lineage specification during hematopoiesis. They favor recruitment of cofactors involved in epigenetic regulation, thereby defining patterns of gene expression in a development- and lineage-specific manner. Additionally, transcription factors can facilitate transcription preinitiation complex (PIC) formation and assembly on chromatin. Interestingly, a few lineage-specific transcription factors, including IKAROS, also regulate transcription elongation. IKAROS is a tumor suppressor frequently inactivated in leukemia and associated with a poor prognosis. It forms a complex with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) complex and the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb), which is required for productive transcription elongation. It has also been reported that IKAROS interacts with factors involved in transcription termination. Here we review these and other recent findings that establish IKAROS as the first transcription factor found to act as a multifunctional regulator of the transcription cycle in hematopoietic cells.

  20. Expression levels of Protocadherin-alpha transcripts are decreased by nonsense-mediated mRNA decay with frameshift mutations and by high DNA methylation in their promoter regions.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Ryosuke; Kawaguchi, Masahumi; Toyama, Tomoko; Taguchi, Yusuke; Yagi, Takeshi

    2009-02-01

    The mouse protocadherin (Pcdh) clusters, Pcdh-alpha, -beta, and -gamma, are located on chromosome 18. Many polymorphic variations are found in the Pcdh-alpha genes in wild-derived and laboratory mouse strains. In comparing the expression levels of Pcdh-alpha isoforms among several strains, we observed lower expression levels of Pcdh-alpha9 in BLG2 and BFM/2, and of Pcdh-alpha8 in C57BL/6 (B6) than in the other strains. For Pcdh-alpha8, high DNA methylation (72.7%) in the promoter region was found only in B6, whereas 36.4-44.3% methylation was seen in the other strains. On the other hand, the Pcdh-alpha9 DNA-methylation levels were similar (23.6-36.3%) among the strains regardless of the difference in expression levels. Interestingly, however, the Pcdh-alpha9 variable exon in both BLG2 and BFM/2 included a premature termination codon (PTC) generated by a nucleotide deletion or insertion. Treatment with emetine, a potent inhibitor of nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), increased the expression level of Pcdh-alpha9 from the BLG2-Pcdh-alpha locus. These data indicate that the transcription levels of mature Pcdh-alpha mRNAs are decreased by the DNA-methylation state of the Pcdh-alpha promoter regions and by the NMD pathway during RNA maturation. And we correct some previous data on Sugino, H., Toyama, T., Taguchi, Y., Esumi, S., Miyazaki, M., Yagi, T., (2004) Negative and positive effects of an IAP-LTR on nearby Pcdaalpha gene expression in the central nervous system and neuroblastoma cell lines, Gene 337 91-103.

  1. Transcription in archaea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted transcription factors or transcription-associated proteins in the four archaeal genomes, of which 168 have homologs only in Bacteria, 51 have homologs only in Eucarya, and the remaining 61 have homologs in both phylogenetic domains. Although bacterial and eukaryotic transcription have very few factors in common, each exclusively shares a significantly greater number with the Archaea, especially the Bacteria. This last fact contrasts with the obvious close relationship between the archaeal and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms per se, and in particular, basic transcription initiation. We interpret these results to mean that the archaeal transcription system has retained more ancestral characteristics than have the transcription mechanisms in either of the other two domains.

  2. The Expression Levels of Transcription Factors T-bet, GATA-3, RORγt and FOXP3 in Peripheral Blood Lymphocyte (PBL) of Patients with Liver Cancer and their Significance

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ze-Wei; Wu, Li-Xuan; Xie, Yong; Ou, Xi; Tian, Pei-Kai; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Min, Jun; Wang, Jie; Chen, Ru-Fu; Chen, Ya-Jing; Liu, Chao; Ye, Hua; Ou, Qing-Jia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the expression of transcriptional factors (TFs) T-bet, GATA-3, RORγt and FOXP in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and to evaluate the correlation between the imbalances of Th1/Th2, Th17/Treg at the expression levels and liver cancer Methods: The peripheral venous blood was drawn from 20 HCC-patients (HCC-group) and 20 health participants (C-group). The expression levels of Th1, Th2 and Th17 and the major Treg-specific TFs T-bet, GATA-3, RORγt and FOXP3 in the PBMC were measured with quantitative real-time PCR(RT-qPCR). Results: The mRNA level of Th1-specific TF T-bet in HCC-group was significantly lower than that of C-group (52.34±34.07 VS 104.01±56.00, P<0.01); the mRNA level of Th2-specifc TF, GATA-3, in HCC group was significantly higher than that in C-group (1.38±1.15 VS 0.58±0.65, P<0.05) and T-bet mRNA/GATA-3 mRNA ratio was significantly lower in HCC-group than in C-group (86.01±116.71 VS 461.88±708.81, P<0.05). The mRNA level of Th17-specific TF RORγt in HCC-group was significantly higher than that of C-group (72.32±32.82 VS 33.07±22.86, P<0.01). Treg-specific TF FOXP3 mRNA level was significant higher in HCC-group than in C-group (3.17±1.59 VS 1.39±1.13, P<0.01) Conclusion: T-bet mRNA level was reduced whereas GATA-3 mRNA level was increased and T-bet/GATA-3 ratio was significantly reduced in PBMC, indicating that Th1/Th2 ratio was of imbalance at TF levels in PBMC of HCC, displaying Th2 thrift phenomena. The mRNA levels of RORγt and FOXP3 in PBMC of HCC were significantly increased, indicating the existence of a predominant phenomenon of Th17- and Treg-expressing PBMC in HCC. PMID:25552913

  3. Different Effect of the Additional Electron-Withdrawing Cyano Group in Different Conjugation Bridge: The Adjusted Molecular Energy Levels and Largely Improved Photovoltaic Performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiyang; Fang, Manman; Hou, Yingqin; Tang, Runli; Yang, Yizhou; Zhong, Cheng; Li, Qianqian; Li, Zhen

    2016-05-18

    Four organic sensitizers (LI-68-LI-71) bearing various conjugated bridges were designed and synthesized, in which the only difference between LI-68 and LI-69 (or LI-70 and LI-71) was the absence/presence of the CN group as the auxiliary electron acceptor. Interestingly, compared to the reference dye of LI-68, LI-69 bearing the additional CN group exhibited the bad performance with the decreased Jsc and Voc values. However, once one thiophene moiety near the anchor group was replaced by pyrrole with the electron-rich property, the resultant LI-71 exhibited a photoelectric conversion efficiency increase by about 3 folds from 2.75% (LI-69) to 7.95% (LI-71), displaying the synergistic effect of the two moieties (CN and pyrrole). Computational analysis disclosed that pyrrole as the auxiliary electron donor (D') in the conjugated bridge can compensate for the lower negative charge in the electron acceptor, which was caused by the CN group as the electron trap, leading to the more efficient electron injection and better photovoltaic performance.

  4. Different Effect of the Additional Electron-Withdrawing Cyano Group in Different Conjugation Bridge: The Adjusted Molecular Energy Levels and Largely Improved Photovoltaic Performance.

    PubMed

    Li, Huiyang; Fang, Manman; Hou, Yingqin; Tang, Runli; Yang, Yizhou; Zhong, Cheng; Li, Qianqian; Li, Zhen

    2016-05-18

    Four organic sensitizers (LI-68-LI-71) bearing various conjugated bridges were designed and synthesized, in which the only difference between LI-68 and LI-69 (or LI-70 and LI-71) was the absence/presence of the CN group as the auxiliary electron acceptor. Interestingly, compared to the reference dye of LI-68, LI-69 bearing the additional CN group exhibited the bad performance with the decreased Jsc and Voc values. However, once one thiophene moiety near the anchor group was replaced by pyrrole with the electron-rich property, the resultant LI-71 exhibited a photoelectric conversion efficiency increase by about 3 folds from 2.75% (LI-69) to 7.95% (LI-71), displaying the synergistic effect of the two moieties (CN and pyrrole). Computational analysis disclosed that pyrrole as the auxiliary electron donor (D') in the conjugated bridge can compensate for the lower negative charge in the electron acceptor, which was caused by the CN group as the electron trap, leading to the more efficient electron injection and better photovoltaic performance. PMID:27101840

  5. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Cholesterol screening for kids?

    MedlinePlus

    ... transcript102416.html To Your Health: NLM update Transcript Cholesterol screening for kids? : 10/24/2016 To use ... the need for children to be screened for cholesterol levels in their bloodstream, finds a recent article ...

  6. Transcriptional responses to fluctuating thermal regimes underpinning differences in survival in the solitary bee Megachile rotundata.

    PubMed

    Torson, Alex S; Yocum, George D; Rinehart, Joseph P; Kemp, William P; Bowsher, Julia H

    2015-04-01

    The transcriptional responses of insects to long-term, ecologically relevant temperature stress are poorly understood. Long-term exposure to low temperatures, commonly referred to as chilling, can lead to physiological effects collectively known as chill injury. Periodically increasing temperatures during long-term chilling has been shown to increase survival in many insects. However, the transcripts responsible for this increase in survival have never been characterized. Here, we present the first transcriptome-level analysis of increased longevity under fluctuating temperatures during chilling. Overwintering post-diapause quiescent alfalfa leafcutting bees (Megachile rotundata) were exposed to a constant temperature of 6°C, or 6°C with a daily fluctuation to 20°C. RNA was collected at two different time points, before and after mortality rates began to diverge between temperature treatments. Expression analysis identified differentially regulated transcripts between pairwise comparisons of both treatments and time points. Transcripts functioning in ion homeostasis, metabolic pathways and oxidative stress response were up-regulated in individuals exposed to periodic temperature fluctuations during chilling. The differential expression of these transcripts provides support for the hypotheses that fluctuating temperatures protect against chill injury by reducing oxidative stress and returning ion concentrations and metabolic function to more favorable levels. Additionally, exposure to fluctuating temperatures leads to increased expression of transcripts functioning in the immune response and neurogenesis, providing evidence for additional mechanisms associated with increased survival during chilling in M. rotundata. PMID:25657206

  7. Bidirectional Transcription Directs Both Transcriptional Gene Activation and Suppression in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Kevin V.; Santoso, Sharon; Turner, Anne-Marie; Pastori, Chiara; Hawkins, Peter G.

    2008-01-01

    Small RNAs targeted to gene promoters in human cells have been shown to modulate both transcriptional gene suppression and activation. However, the mechanism involved in transcriptional activation has remained poorly defined, and an endogenous RNA trigger for transcriptional gene silencing has yet to be identified. Described here is an explanation for siRNA-directed transcriptional gene activation, as well as a role for non-coding antisense RNAs as effector molecules driving transcriptional gene silencing. Transcriptional activation of p21 gene expression was determined to be the result of Argonaute 2–dependent, post-transcriptional silencing of a p21-specific antisense transcript, which functions in Argonaute 1–mediated transcriptional control of p21 mRNA expression. The data presented here suggest that in human cells, bidirectional transcription is an endogenous gene regulatory mechanism whereby an antisense RNA directs epigenetic regulatory complexes to a sense promoter, resulting in RNA-directed epigenetic gene regulation. The observations presented here support the notion that epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes, such as p21, may be the result of an imbalance in bidirectional transcription levels. This imbalance allows the unchecked antisense RNA to direct silent state epigenetic marks to the sense promoter, resulting in stable transcriptional gene silencing. PMID:19008947

  8. Full transcription of the chloroplast genome in photosynthetic eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Chao; Wang, Shuo; Xia, En-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Zeng, Fan-Chun; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes possess a simple genome transcription system that is different from that of eukaryotes. In chloroplasts (plastids), it is believed that the prokaryotic gene transcription features govern genome transcription. However, the polycistronic operon transcription model cannot account for all the chloroplast genome (plastome) transcription products at whole-genome level, especially regarding various RNA isoforms. By systematically analyzing transcriptomes of plastids of algae and higher plants, and cyanobacteria, we find that the entire plastome is transcribed in photosynthetic green plants, and that this pattern originated from prokaryotic cyanobacteria — ancestor of the chloroplast genomes that diverged about 1 billion years ago. We propose a multiple arrangement transcription model that multiple transcription initiations and terminations combine haphazardly to accomplish the genome transcription followed by subsequent RNA processing events, which explains the full chloroplast genome transcription phenomenon and numerous functional and/or aberrant pre-RNAs. Our findings indicate a complex prokaryotic genome regulation when processing primary transcripts. PMID:27456469

  9. Full transcription of the chloroplast genome in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chao; Wang, Shuo; Xia, En-Hua; Jiang, Jian-Jun; Zeng, Fan-Chun; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Prokaryotes possess a simple genome transcription system that is different from that of eukaryotes. In chloroplasts (plastids), it is believed that the prokaryotic gene transcription features govern genome transcription. However, the polycistronic operon transcription model cannot account for all the chloroplast genome (plastome) transcription products at whole-genome level, especially regarding various RNA isoforms. By systematically analyzing transcriptomes of plastids of algae and higher plants, and cyanobacteria, we find that the entire plastome is transcribed in photosynthetic green plants, and that this pattern originated from prokaryotic cyanobacteria - ancestor of the chloroplast genomes that diverged about 1 billion years ago. We propose a multiple arrangement transcription model that multiple transcription initiations and terminations combine haphazardly to accomplish the genome transcription followed by subsequent RNA processing events, which explains the full chloroplast genome transcription phenomenon and numerous functional and/or aberrant pre-RNAs. Our findings indicate a complex prokaryotic genome regulation when processing primary transcripts. PMID:27456469

  10. Catching transcriptional regulation by thermostatistical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Till D.; Cheong, Alex; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Kholodenko, Boris N.

    2012-08-01

    Gene expression is frequently regulated by multiple transcription factors (TFs). Thermostatistical methods allow for a quantitative description of interactions between TFs, RNA polymerase and DNA, and their impact on the transcription rates. We illustrate three different scales of the thermostatistical approach: the microscale of TF molecules, the mesoscale of promoter energy levels and the macroscale of transcriptionally active and inactive cells in a cell population. We demonstrate versatility of combinatorial transcriptional activation by exemplifying logic functions, such as AND and OR gates. We discuss a metric for cell-to-cell transcriptional activation variability known as Fermi entropy. Suitability of thermostatistical modeling is illustrated by describing the experimental data on transcriptional induction of NFκB and the c-Fos protein.

  11. Role of amino acids as additives on sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation levels at pre-freeze and post-thawed ram semen.

    PubMed

    Sangeeta, Sharon; Arangasamy, A; Kulkarni, S; Selvaraju, S

    2015-10-01

    The possibility of including amino acids for cryopreservation of ram semen to improve the quality of frozen semen was explored in this study in sheep model. 24 samples were collected in triplicate from 8 rams of 2-3 year old Bannur cross bred rams maintained at the Institute Experimental Livestock Unit. Semen was diluted in tris-egg yolk glycerol diluent and made into 7 aliquots as follows: aliquot 1 served as control, "l-alanine" was added at 100 and 135mM in the aliquots 2 and 3, "l-glutamine" was added at 20 and 25mM in the aliquots 4 and 5 and "l-proline" was added at 25 and 50mM in the aliquots 6 and 7, respectively. Diluted semen was filled in 0.25ml French straws and frozen in LN2. Inclusion of "l-proline" and "l-glutamine" in the diluent increased the percent live sperm (P<0.001), total motility (P<0.05) and maintained higher functional membrane and acrosomal integrity (P<0.001) by decreasing lipid peroxidation (P<0.001) compared to the control group. In contrast, "l-alanine" decreased the percentage of total motility, fast progressive spermatozoa and increased (P<0.01) the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. It can be concluded that 20mM "l-glutamine" and 25mM "l-proline" can be used as semen additive to freeze ram semen as they prevented cryoinjuries to sperm and improved the pre-freeze and post-thaw semen characteristics. PMID:26362050

  12. Role of amino acids as additives on sperm motility, plasma membrane integrity and lipid peroxidation levels at pre-freeze and post-thawed ram semen.

    PubMed

    Sangeeta, Sharon; Arangasamy, A; Kulkarni, S; Selvaraju, S

    2015-10-01

    The possibility of including amino acids for cryopreservation of ram semen to improve the quality of frozen semen was explored in this study in sheep model. 24 samples were collected in triplicate from 8 rams of 2-3 year old Bannur cross bred rams maintained at the Institute Experimental Livestock Unit. Semen was diluted in tris-egg yolk glycerol diluent and made into 7 aliquots as follows: aliquot 1 served as control, "l-alanine" was added at 100 and 135mM in the aliquots 2 and 3, "l-glutamine" was added at 20 and 25mM in the aliquots 4 and 5 and "l-proline" was added at 25 and 50mM in the aliquots 6 and 7, respectively. Diluted semen was filled in 0.25ml French straws and frozen in LN2. Inclusion of "l-proline" and "l-glutamine" in the diluent increased the percent live sperm (P<0.001), total motility (P<0.05) and maintained higher functional membrane and acrosomal integrity (P<0.001) by decreasing lipid peroxidation (P<0.001) compared to the control group. In contrast, "l-alanine" decreased the percentage of total motility, fast progressive spermatozoa and increased (P<0.01) the percentage of immotile spermatozoa. It can be concluded that 20mM "l-glutamine" and 25mM "l-proline" can be used as semen additive to freeze ram semen as they prevented cryoinjuries to sperm and improved the pre-freeze and post-thaw semen characteristics.

  13. Pancreatic and duodenal homeobox protein 1 (Pdx-1) maintains endoplasmic reticulum calcium l