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Sample records for addition transmission electron

  1. Electronically controlled automatic transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Ohkubo, M.; Shiba, H.; Nakamura, K.

    1989-03-28

    This patent describes an electronically controlled automatic transmission having a manual valve working in connection with a manual shift lever, shift valves operated by solenoid valves which are driven by an electronic control circuit previously memorizing shift patterns, and a hydraulic circuit controlled by these manual valve and shift valves for driving brakes and a clutch in order to change speed. Shift patterns of 2-range and L-range, in addition to a shift pattern of D-range, are memorized previously in the electronic control circuit, an operation switch is provided which changes the shift pattern of the electronic control circuit to any shift pattern among those of D-range, 2-range and L-range at time of the manual shift lever being in a D-range position, a releasable lock mechanism is provided which prevents the manual shift lever from entering 2-range and L-range positions, and the hydraulic circuit is set to a third speed mode when the manual shift lever is in the D-range position. The circuit is set to a second speed mode when it is in the 2-range position, and the circuit is set to a first speed mode when it is in the L-range position, respectively, in case where the shift valves are not working.

  2. Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-10-12

    Dynamic transmission electron microscopy (DTEM) combines the benefits of high spatial resolution electron microscopy with the high temporal resolution of ultrafast lasers. The incorporation of these two components into a single instrument provides a perfect platform for in situ observations of material processes. However, previous DTEM applications have focused on observing structural changes occurring in samples exposed to high vacuum. Therefore, in order to expand the pump-probe experimental regime to more natural environmental conditions, in situ gas and liquid chambers must be coupled with Dynamic TEM. This chapter describes the current and future applications of in situ liquid DTEM to permit time-resolved atomic scale observations in an aqueous environment, Although this chapter focuses mostly on in situ liquid imaging, the same research potential exists for in situ gas experiments and the successful integration of these techniques promises new insights for understanding nanoparticle, catalyst and biological protein dynamics with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution.

  3. Electron Diffraction Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bendersky, Leonid A.; Gayle, Frank W.

    2001-01-01

    Electron diffraction via the transmission electron microscope is a powerful method for characterizing the structure of materials, including perfect crystals and defect structures. The advantages of electron diffraction over other methods, e.g., x-ray or neutron, arise from the extremely short wavelength (≈2 pm), the strong atomic scattering, and the ability to examine tiny volumes of matter (≈10 nm3). The NIST Materials Science and Engineering Laboratory has a history of discovery and characterization of new structures through electron diffraction, alone or in combination with other diffraction methods. This paper provides a survey of some of this work enabled through electron microscopy. PMID:27500060

  4. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-01

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  5. Liquid Cell Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hong-Gang; Zheng, Haimei

    2016-05-27

    Liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has attracted significant interest in recent years. With nanofabricated liquid cells, it has been possible to image through liquids using TEM with subnanometer resolution, and many previously unseen materials dynamics have been revealed. Liquid cell TEM has been applied to many areas of research, ranging from chemistry to physics, materials science, and biology. So far, topics of study include nanoparticle growth and assembly, electrochemical deposition and lithiation for batteries, tracking and manipulation of nanoparticles, catalysis, and imaging of biological materials. In this article, we first review the development of liquid cell TEM and then highlight progress in various areas of research. In the study of nanoparticle growth, the electron beam can serve both as the illumination source for imaging and as the input energy for reactions. However, many other research topics require the control of electron beam effects to minimize electron beam damage. We discuss efforts to understand electron beam-liquid matter interactions. Finally, we provide a perspective on future challenges and opportunities in liquid cell TEM.

  6. Aberration corrected Lorentz scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    McVitie, S; McGrouther, D; McFadzean, S; MacLaren, D A; O'Shea, K J; Benitez, M J

    2015-05-01

    We present results from an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope which has been customised for high resolution quantitative Lorentz microscopy with the sample located in a magnetic field free or low field environment. We discuss the innovations in microscope instrumentation and additional hardware that underpin the imaging improvements in resolution and detection with a focus on developments in differential phase contrast microscopy. Examples from materials possessing nanometre scale variations in magnetisation illustrate the potential for aberration corrected Lorentz imaging as a tool to further our understanding of magnetism on this lengthscale.

  7. Analytical transmission electron microscopy in materials science

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.L.

    1980-01-01

    Microcharacterization of materials on a scale of less than 10 nm has been afforded by recent advances in analytical transmission electron microscopy. The factors limiting accurate analysis at the limit of spatial resolution for the case of a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy are examined in this paper.

  8. Vehicular transmission with additional low speed

    SciTech Connect

    Okubo, K.

    1987-07-28

    A vehicular transmission is described comprising a main speed change mechanism having plural gear trains capable of being established selectively between parallel input and output shafts and a sub speed change mechanism having a reduction gear train for providing a speed lower than the speed of the lowest gear train of the main speed change mechanism. The sub speed change mechanism has an intermediate shaft and a counter shaft parallel with the input and output shafts. A counter input gear in mesh with a gear mounted on the input shaft at all times rotatably supports on the intermediate shaft. A counter input gear is in mesh with a gear mounted on the output shaft at all times and supported by the counter shaft. The reduction gear train is capable of selectively connecting between the counter input gear and the counter output gear. A synchronizing mechanism selectively establishes the reduction gear train.

  9. Nanometric crystal defects in transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Schäublin, Robin

    2006-05-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is revisited in order to define methods for the identification of nanometric defects. Nanometric crystal defects play an important role as they influence, generally in a detrimental way, physical properties. For instance, radiation-induced damage in metals strongly degrades mechanical properties, rendering the material stronger but brittle. The difficulty in using TEM to identify the nature and size of such defects resides in their small size. TEM image simulations are deployed to explore limits and possible ways to improve on spatial resolution and contrast. The contrast of dislocation loops, cavities, and a stacking fault tetrahedra (SFT) are simulated in weak beam, interfering reflections (HRTEM), and scanned condensed electron probe (STEM) mode. Results indicate that STEM is a possible way to image small defects. In addition, a new objective aperture is proposed to improve resolution in diffraction contrast. It is investigated by simulations of the weak beam imaging of SFT and successfully applied in experimental observations.

  10. Low voltage transmission electron microscopy of graphene.

    PubMed

    Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Zhao, Jiong; Gorantla, Sandeep Madhukar; Martinez, Ignacio Guillermo Gonzalez; Wiedermann, Jerzy; Lee, Changgu; Eckert, Juergen; Rummeli, Mark Hermann

    2015-02-01

    The initial isolation of graphene in 2004 spawned massive interest in this two-dimensional pure sp(2) carbon structure due to its incredible electrical, optical, mechanical, and thermal effects. This in turn led to the rapid development of various characterization tools for graphene. Examples include Raman spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. However, the one tool with the greatest prowess for characterizing and studying graphene is the transmission electron microscope. State-of-the-art (scanning) transmission electron microscopes enable one to image graphene with atomic resolution, and also to conduct various other characterizations simultaneously. The advent of aberration correctors was timely in that it allowed transmission electron microscopes to operate with reduced acceleration voltages, so that damage to graphene is avoided while still providing atomic resolution. In this comprehensive review, a brief introduction is provided to the technical aspects of transmission electron microscopes relevant to graphene. The reader is then introduced to different specimen preparation techniques for graphene. The different characterization approaches in both transmission electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy are then discussed, along with the different aspects of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The use of graphene for other electron microscopy approaches such as in-situ investigations is also presented.

  11. Transmission electron microscope CCD camera

    DOEpatents

    Downing, Kenneth H.

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve the performance of a CCD camera on a high voltage electron microscope, an electron decelerator is inserted between the microscope column and the CCD. This arrangement optimizes the interaction of the electron beam with the scintillator of the CCD camera while retaining optimization of the microscope optics and of the interaction of the beam with the specimen. Changing the electron beam energy between the specimen and camera allows both to be optimized.

  12. Transmission electron microscope studies of extraterrestrial materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.

    1995-01-01

    Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-Ray spectrometry and electron-energy-loss spectroscopy are used to analyse carbon in interplanetary dust particles. Optical micrographs are shown depicting cross sections of the dust particles embedded in sulphur. Selected-area electron diffraction patterns are shown. Transmission Electron Microscope specimens of lunar soil were prepared using two methods: ion-milling and ultramicrotomy. A combination of high resolution TEM imaging and electron diffraction is used to characterize the opaque assemblages. The opaque assemblages analyzed in this study are dominated by ilmenite with lesser rutile and spinel exsolutions, and traces of Fe metal.

  13. Transmission electron microscopy: Visualizing fullerene chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrones, Mauricio

    2010-02-01

    Chemical reactions of fullerenes and metallofullerenes lined up inside single-walled carbon nanotubes can be monitored at the atomic scale inside an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope.

  14. Quantitative characterization of electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ruskin, Rachel S; Yu, Zhiheng; Grigorieff, Nikolaus

    2013-12-01

    A new generation of direct electron detectors for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) promises significant improvement over previous detectors in terms of their modulation transfer function (MTF) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). However, the performance of these new detectors needs to be carefully monitored in order to optimize imaging conditions and check for degradation over time. We have developed an easy-to-use software tool, FindDQE, to measure MTF and DQE of electron detectors using images of a microscope's built-in beam stop. Using this software, we have determined the DQE curves of four direct electron detectors currently available: the Gatan K2 Summit, the FEI Falcon I and II, and the Direct Electron DE-12, under a variety of total dose and dose rate conditions. We have additionally measured the curves for the Gatan US4000 and TVIPS TemCam-F416 scintillator-based cameras. We compare the results from our new method with published curves. PMID:24189638

  15. Ponderomotive phase plate for transmission electron microscopes

    DOEpatents

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2012-07-10

    A ponderomotive phase plate system and method for controllably producing highly tunable phase contrast transfer functions in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) for high resolution and biological phase contrast imaging. The system and method includes a laser source and a beam transport system to produce a focused laser crossover as a phase plate, so that a ponderomotive potential of the focused laser crossover produces a scattering-angle-dependent phase shift in the electrons of the post-sample electron beam corresponding to a desired phase contrast transfer function.

  16. Isotope analysis in the transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susi, Toma; Hofer, Christoph; Argentero, Giacomo; Leuthner, Gregor T.; Pennycook, Timothy J.; Mangler, Clemens; Meyer, Jannik C.; Kotakoski, Jani

    2016-10-01

    The Ångström-sized probe of the scanning transmission electron microscope can visualize and collect spectra from single atoms. This can unambiguously resolve the chemical structure of materials, but not their isotopic composition. Here we differentiate between two isotopes of the same element by quantifying how likely the energetic imaging electrons are to eject atoms. First, we measure the displacement probability in graphene grown from either 12C or 13C and describe the process using a quantum mechanical model of lattice vibrations coupled with density functional theory simulations. We then test our spatial resolution in a mixed sample by ejecting individual atoms from nanoscale areas spanning an interface region that is far from atomically sharp, mapping the isotope concentration with a precision better than 20%. Although we use a scanning instrument, our method may be applicable to any atomic resolution transmission electron microscope and to other low-dimensional materials.

  17. Electronic transmission in quasiperiodic serial stub structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Samar; Chakrabarti, Arunava

    2004-01-01

    We present exact results on the electronic transmission through quantum stub waveguides arranged in a Fibonacci quasiperiodic pattern. Discretizing the Schrödinger equation, we map the problem into an equivalent tight binding form and study the transmission spectrum using the transfer matrix method. We emphasize the effect of local positional correlations in a Fibonacci quantum stub array that may lead to resonant eigenstates. Using the real space renormalization group ideas we unravel various local clusters of stubs responsible for resonance. Extended eigenstates have been shown to exist and we find that, under some special circumstances, the electronic charge density exhibits a totally periodic character in such a non-periodic sequence. Our method is completely general and can be applied to any arbitrary sequence of stubs: periodic, quasiperiodic or random. This may lead to a possible experimental verification of the role of positional correlations in the transport behaviour of a class of mesoscopic devices.

  18. Analytical transmission electron microscopy in minerals processing

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser, H.L.; Hsieh, K.C.; Twigg, M.E.

    1981-01-01

    A review of the possibilities of performing microchemical analysis in thin sections using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy of x-rays is given. Particular attention is paid to the factors that limit accurate analysis at the highest spatial resolution. As an example of the use of these techniques applied to a potential problem in minerals processing, the identification of pyrite and pyrrhotite particles in Illinois, Herrin number 6 coal is presented.

  19. Atmospheric pressure scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Niels; Bigelow, Wilbur C; Veith, Gabriel M

    2010-03-10

    Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of gold nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure have been recorded through a 0.36 mm thick mixture of CO, O2, and He. This was accomplished using a reaction cell consisting of two electron-transparent silicon nitride membranes. Gold nanoparticles of a full width at half-maximum diameter of 1.0 nm were visible above the background noise, and the achieved edge resolution was 0.4 nm in accordance with calculations of the beam broadening.

  20. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor... Corporation approval of the electronic system as a condition to the electronic transmission and reception...

  1. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor... Corporation approval of the electronic system as a condition to the electronic transmission and reception...

  2. Scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological structures.

    PubMed

    Colliex, C; Mory, C

    1994-01-01

    The design of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) has been conceived to optimize its detection efficiency of the different elastic and inelastic signals resulting from the interaction of the high energy primary electrons with the specimen. Its potential use to visualize and measure biological objects was recognized from the first studies by Crewe and coworkers in the seventies. Later the real applications have not followed the initial hopes. The purpose of the present paper is to describe how the instrument has practically evolved and recently begun to demonstrate all its potentialities for quantitative electron microscopy of a wide range of biological specimens, from freeze-dried isolated macromolecules to unstained cryosections. Emphasis will be put on the mass-mapping, multi-signal and elemental mapping modes which are unique features of the STEM instruments.

  3. Quantitative Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Electronic and Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovich, Andrew B.

    Electronic and nanostructured materials have been investigated using advanced scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) techniques. The first topic is the microstructure of Ga and Sb-doped ZnO. Ga-doped ZnO is a candidate transparent conducting oxide material. The microstructure of GZO thin films grown by MBE under different growth conditions and different substrates were examined using various electron microscopy (EM) techniques. The microstructure, prevalent defects, and polarity in these films strongly depend on the growth conditions and substrate. Sb-doped ZnO nanowires have been shown to be the first route to stable p-type ZnO. Using Z-contrast STEM, I have showed that an unusual microstructure of Sb-decorated head-to-head inversion domain boundaries and internal voids contain all the Sb in the nanowires and cause the p-type conduction. InGaN thin films and InGaN / GaN quantum wells (QW) for light emitting diodes are the second topic. Low-dose Z-contrast STEM, PACBED, and EDS on InGaN QW LED structures grown by MOCVD show no evidence for nanoscale composition variations, contradicting previous reports. In addition, a new extended defect in GaN and InGaN was discovered. The defect consists of a faceted pyramid-shaped void that produces a threading dislocation along the [0001] growth direction, and is likely caused by carbon contamination during growth. Non-rigid registration (NRR) and high-precision STEM of nanoparticles is the final topic. NRR is a new image processing technique that corrects distortions arising from the serial nature of STEM acquisition that previously limited the precision of locating atomic columns and counting the number of atoms in images. NRR was used to demonstrate sub-picometer precision in STEM images of single crystal Si and GaN, the best achieved in EM. NRR was used to measure the atomic surface structure of Pt nanoacatalysts and Au nanoparticles, which revealed new bond length variation phenomenon of surface atoms. In

  4. Phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Minoda, Hiroki; Tamai, Takayuki; Iijima, Hirofumi; Hosokawa, Fumio; Kondo, Yukihito

    2015-06-01

    This report introduces the first results obtained using phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy (P-STEM). A carbon-film phase plate (PP) with a small center hole is placed in the condenser aperture plane so that a phase shift is introduced in the incident electron waves except those passing through the center hole. A cosine-type phase-contrast transfer function emerges when the phase-shifted scattered waves interfere with the non-phase-shifted unscattered waves, which passed through the center hole before incidence onto the specimen. The phase contrast resulting in P-STEM is optically identical to that in phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy that is used to provide high contrast for weak phase objects. Therefore, the use of PPs can enhance the phase contrast of the STEM images of specimens in principle. The phase shift resulting from the PP, whose thickness corresponds to a phase shift of π, has been confirmed using interference fringes displayed in the Ronchigram of a silicon single crystal specimen. The interference fringes were found to abruptly shift at the edge of the PP hole by π.

  5. Nonlinear transmission line based electron beam driver

    SciTech Connect

    French, David M.; Hoff, Brad W.; Tang Wilkin; Heidger, Susan; Shiffler, Don; Allen-Flowers, Jordan

    2012-12-15

    Gated field emission cathodes can provide short electron pulses without the requirement of laser systems or cathode heating required by photoemission or thermionic cathodes. The large electric field requirement for field emission to take place can be achieved by using a high aspect ratio cathode with a large field enhancement factor which reduces the voltage requirement for emission. In this paper, a cathode gate driver based on the output pulse train from a nonlinear transmission line is experimentally demonstrated. The application of the pulse train to a tufted carbon fiber field emission cathode generates short electron pulses. The pulses are approximately 2 ns in duration with emission currents of several mA, and the train contains up to 6 pulses at a frequency of 100 MHz. Particle-in-cell simulation is used to predict the characteristic of the current pulse train generated from a single carbon fiber field emission cathode using the same technique.

  6. Electronic automatic gear transmission control apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Koshizawa, T.

    1989-04-25

    This patent describes an electronic automatic gear transmission control apparatus having a shift schedule map for commanding an optimum gear position based on a vehicle speed signal and an accelerator opening signal, the electronic automatic gear transmission control apparatus comprising: first means for comparing a gear position commanded by the shift schedule map with a present gear position; second means for effecting a gear shift to a gear position which is one gear position higher than the present gear position and for restraining a gear shift to the commanded gear position for a prescribed period of time, if the commanded gear position requires an upshift to a gear position which is two or more gear positions higher than the present gear position as a result of the comparison performed by the first means; and third means for holding the gear position which is one gear position higher than the present gear position until an accelerator pedal is depressed again, when the accelerator opening signal indicates an idling position while the gear shift up to the gear position which is one gear position higher than the present gear position, is being effected by the second means.

  7. Concurrent in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Hattar, K.; Bufford, D. C.; Buller, D. L.

    2014-08-29

    An in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope has been developed and is operational at Sandia National Laboratories. This facility permits high spatial resolution, real time observation of electron transparent samples under ion irradiation, implantation, mechanical loading, corrosive environments, and combinations thereof. This includes the simultaneous implantation of low-energy gas ions (0.8–30 keV) during high-energy heavy ion irradiation (0.8–48 MeV). In addition, initial results in polycrystalline gold foils are provided to demonstrate the range of capabilities.

  8. Characterization of nanomaterials with transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, D. H.

    2016-08-01

    The field of nanotechnology is about research and development on materials whose at least one dimension is in the range of 1 to 100 nanometers. In recent years, the research activity for developing nano-materials has grown exponentially owing to the fact that they offer better solutions to the challenges faced by various fields such as energy, food, and environment. In this paper, the importance of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) based techniques is demonstrated for investigating the properties of nano-materials. Specifically the nano-materials that are investigated in this report include gold nano-particles (Au-NPs), silver atom-clusters (Ag-ACs), tantalum single-atoms (Ta-SAs), carbon materials functionalized with iron cobalt (Fe-Co) NPs and titania (TiO2) NPs, and platinum loaded Ceria (Pt-CeO2) Nano composite. TEM techniques that are employed to investigate nano-materials include aberration corrected bright-field TEM (BF-TEM), high-angle dark-field scanning TEM (HAADF-STEM), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), and BF-TEM electron tomography (ET). With the help presented of results in this report, it is proved herein that as many TEM techniques as available in a given instrument are essential for a comprehensive nano-scale analysis of nanomaterials.

  9. Integrated fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Agronskaia, Alexandra V; Valentijn, Jack A; van Driel, Linda F; Schneijdenberg, Chris T W M; Humbel, Bruno M; van Bergen en Henegouwen, Paul M P; Verkleij, Arie J; Koster, Abraham J; Gerritsen, Hans C

    2008-11-01

    Correlative microscopy is a powerful technique that combines the strengths of fluorescence microscopy and electron microscopy. The first enables rapid searching for regions of interest in large fields of view while the latter exhibits superior resolution over a narrow field of view. Routine use of correlative microscopy is seriously hampered by the cumbersome and elaborate experimental procedures. This is partly due to the use of two separate microscopes for fluorescence and electron microscopy. Here, an integrated approach to correlative microscopy is presented based on a laser scanning fluorescence microscope integrated in a transmission electron microscope. Using this approach the search for features in the specimen is greatly simplified and the time to carry out the experiment is strongly reduced. The potential of the integrated approach is demonstrated at room temperature on specimens of rat intestine cells labeled with AlexaFluor488 conjugated to wheat germ agglutinin and on rat liver peroxisomes immunolabeled with anti-catalase antibodies and secondary AlexaFluor488 antibodies and 10nm protein A-gold.

  10. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic transmission and receiving system. 400.209... Contract-Standards for Approval § 400.209 Electronic transmission and receiving system. Any Contractor...; (b) Maintain an electronic system which must be tested and approved by the Corporation; (c)...

  11. In-Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdi, Beata L; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas; Xu, WU; Nasybulin, Eduard; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chongmin; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James E; Browning, Nigel

    2014-01-01

    The recent development of in-situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in-situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in-situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  12. In Situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy for Battery Research

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdi, Beata L.; Gu, Meng; Parent, Lucas R.; Xu, Wu; Nasybulin, Eduard N.; Chen, Xilin; Unocic, Raymond R.; Xu, Pinghong; Welch, David A.; Abellan, Patricia; Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.; Arslan, Ilke; Evans, James E.; Browning, Nigel D.

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of in situ liquid stages for (scanning) transmission electron microscopes now makes it possible for us to study the details of electrochemical processes under operando conditions. As electrochemical processes are complex, care must be taken to calibrate the system before any in situ/operando observations. In addition, as the electron beam can cause effects that look similar to electrochemical processes at the electrolyte/electrode interface, an understanding of the role of the electron beam in modifying the operando observations must also be understood. In this paper we describe the design, assembly, and operation of an in situ electrochemical cell, paying particular attention to the method for controlling and quantifying the experimental parameters. The use of this system is then demonstrated for the lithiation/delithiation of silicon nanowires.

  13. A transmission electron microscopical study of dysplastic naevi.

    PubMed

    Beitner, H; Nakatani, T; Hedblad, M A

    1990-01-01

    In this study those features of naevi that fulfil the clinical and light microscopical criteria of dysplastic naevi have been further examined with transmission electron microscopy. The results have been compared with the structure of normal control skin and compound naevi. In dysplastic naevi most melanosomes were abnormal, with spherical melansomes, an incomplete inner structure and uneven melanin deposit, cigar-shaped melanosomes and macromelanosomes. The intraepidermal border between the nests of dysplastic naevi were uneven and the dysplastic melanocytes extended their cell bodies among surrounding keratinocytes with a tendency to invade the epidermis in an upward direction. These findings will serve as additional criteria for dysplastic naevi.

  14. A scanning transmission electron microscopy study of two dental amalgams.

    PubMed

    Williams, K R

    1983-10-01

    Two fully aged amalgam alloys were examined using a scanning transmission electron microscope both in the transmission and scanning mode. The dispersed type amalgam containing a distribution of silver-copper spheres in addition to the Ag3Sn powder showed a markedly reduced gamma 1 grain size compared to a conventional Ag3Sn type amalgam. It is suggested that the increased compressive creep strength of the dispersed type material is a direct result of the reduced gamma 1 grain size and not due to a dispersion hardening effect from the cores of the remaining Ag-Cu spheres. Similarly, the formation of complex Cu-Sn intermediate phases at the Ag-Cu sphere surfaces are unlikely to lead to a dispersion strengthening effect. It is postulated that the reduced grain size in high copper amalgams is a consequence of the enhanced nucleating effect of a copper based phase on gamma 1. PMID:6640049

  15. Transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging of electropolished and FIB manufactured TEM specimens

    SciTech Connect

    Zieliński, W. Płociński, T.; Kurzydłowski, K.J.

    2015-06-15

    We present a study of the efficiency of the utility of scanning electron microscope (SEM)-based transmission methods for characterizing grain structure in thinned bulk metals. Foils of type 316 stainless steel were prepared by two methods commonly used for transmission electron microscopy — double-jet electropolishing and focused ion beam milling. A customized holder allowed positioning of the foils in a configuration appropriate for both transmission electron forward scatter diffraction, and for transmission imaging by the use of a forescatter detector with two diodes. We found that both crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field transmitted images could be obtained for specimens prepared by either method. However, for both methods, preparation-induced artifacts may affect the quality or accuracy of transmission SEM data, especially those acquired by the use of transmission Kikuchi diffraction. Generally, the quality of orientation data was better for specimens prepared by electropolishing, due to the absence of ion-induced damage. - Highlights: • The transmission imaging and diffraction techniques are emerging in scanning electron microscopy (SEM) as promising new field of materials characterization. • The manuscript titled: “Transmission Kikuchi Diffraction and Transmission Electron Forescatter Imaging of Electropolished and FIB Manufactured TEM Specimens” documents how different specimen thinning procedures can effect efficiency of transmission Kikuchi diffraction and transmission electron forescatter imaging. • The abilities to make precision crystallographic orientation maps and dark-field images in transmission was studied on electropolished versus focus ion beam manufactured TEM specimens. • Depending on the need, electropolished and focused ion beam technique may produce suitable specimens for transmission imaging and diffraction in SEM.

  16. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Itokawa Regolith Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In a remarkable engineering achievement, the JAXA space agency successfully recovered the Hayabusa space-craft in June 2010, following a non-optimal encounter and sur-face sampling mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa. These are the first direct samples ever obtained and returned from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special op-portunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal sur-faces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the effects of space weathering. Here we report on our preliminary TEM measurements on two Itokawa samples. Methods: We were allocated particles RA-QD02-0125 and RA-QD02-0211. Both particles were embedded in low viscosity epoxy and thin sections were prepared using ultramicrotomy. High resolution images and electron diffraction data were ob-tained using a JEOL 2500SE 200 kV field-emission scanning-transmission electron microscope. Quantitative maps and anal-yses were obtained using a Thermo thin-window energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectrometer. Results: Both particles are olivine-rich (Fo70) with µm-sized inclusions of FeS and have microstructurally complex rims. Par-ticle RA-QD02-0125 is rounded and has numerous sub-µm grains attached to its surface including FeS, albite, olivine, and rare melt droplets. Solar flare tracks have not been observed, but the particle is surrounded by a continuous 50 nm thick, stuctur-ally disordered rim that is compositionally similar to the core of the grain. One of the surface adhering grains is pyrrhotite show-ing a S-depleted rim (8-10 nm thick) with nanophase Fe metal grains (<5 nm) decorating the outermost surface. The pyrrhotite displays a complex superstructure in its core that is absent in the S-depleted rim. Particle RA-QD02-0211 contains solar flare particle tracks (2x109 cm-2) and shows a structurally disordered rim 100 nm thick. The track density corresponds to a surface exposure of 103-104 years based on the track production rate

  17. In situ transmission electron microscopy of electron-beam induced damage process in nuclear grade graphite

    SciTech Connect

    C. Karthik; J. Kane; D. P. Butt; W. E. Windes; R. Ubic

    2011-05-01

    Atomic level processes involved in the swelling and crack-closing in nuclear grade graphite under electron irradiation have been observed in real-time using transmission electron microscopy. Noise-filtered lattice images show the formation of vacancy loops, interstitial loops and resulting dislocations with unprecedented clarity. The dislocation dipoles formed via vacancy loops were found to undergo climb resulting in extra basal planes. Concurrent EELS studies showed a reduction in the atomic density because of the breakage of hexagonal carbon rings. The formation of new basal planes via dislocation climb in addition to the bending/breaking of basal planes leads to swelling and closing of micro-cracks.

  18. Image Resolution in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A.R.

    2008-06-26

    Digital images captured with electron microscopes are corrupted by two fundamental effects: shot noise resulting from electron counting statistics and blur resulting from the nonzero width of the focused electron beam. The generic problem of computationally undoing these effects is called image reconstruction and for decades has proved to be one of the most challenging and important problems in imaging science. This proposal concerned the application of the Pixon method, the highest-performance image-reconstruction algorithm yet devised, to the enhancement of images obtained from the highest-resolution electron microscopes in the world, now in operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  19. Standardless atom counting in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    LeBeau, James M; Findlay, Scott D; Allen, Leslie J; Stemmer, Susanne

    2010-11-10

    We demonstrate that high-angle annular dark-field imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy allows for quantification of the number and location of all atoms in a three-dimensional, crystalline, arbitrarily shaped specimen without the need for a calibration standard. We show that the method also provides for an approach to directly measure the finite effective source size of a scanning transmission electron microscope.

  20. Quantitative phase-sensitive imaging in a transmission electron microscope

    PubMed

    Bajt; Barty; Nugent; McCartney; Wall; Paganin

    2000-05-01

    This paper presents a new technique for forming quantitative phase and amplitude electron images applicable to a conventional transmission electron microscope. With magnetised cobalt microstructures used as a test object, we use electron holography to obtain an independent measurement of the phase shift. After a suitable calibration of the microscope, we obtain quantitative agreement of the phase shift imposed on the 200 keV electrons passing through the sample.

  1. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed. PMID:27179301

  2. Angularly-selective transmission imaging in a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Holm, Jason; Keller, Robert R

    2016-08-01

    This work presents recent advances in transmission scanning electron microscopy (t-SEM) imaging control capabilities. A modular aperture system and a cantilever-style sample holder that enable comprehensive angular selectivity of forward-scattered electrons are described. When combined with a commercially available solid-state transmission detector having only basic bright-field and dark-field imaging capabilities, the advances described here enable numerous transmission imaging modes. Several examples are provided that demonstrate how contrast arising from diffraction to mass-thickness can be obtained. Unanticipated image contrast at some imaging conditions is also observed and addressed.

  3. Microstructural studies of dental amalgams using analytical transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooghan, Tejpal Kaur

    Dental amalgams have been used for centuries as major restorative materials for decaying teeth. Amalgams are prepared by mixing alloy particles which contain Ag, Sn, and Cu as the major constituent elements with liquid Hg. The study of microstructure is essential in understanding the setting reactions and improving the properties of amalgams. Until the work reported in this dissertation, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffractometry (XRD) were used commonly to analyze amalgam microstructures. No previous systematic transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study has been performed due to sample preparation difficulties and composite structure of dental amalgams. The goal of this research was to carry out detailed microstructural and compositional studies of dental amalgams. This was accomplished using the enhanced spatial resolution of the TEM and its associated microanalytical techniques, namely, scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) and micro-microdiffraction (mumuD). A new method was developed for thinning amalgam samples to electron transparency using the "wedge technique." Velvalloy, a low-Cu amalgam, and Tytin, a high-Cu amalgam, were the two amalgams characterized. Velvalloy is composed of a Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) matrix surrounding unreacted Agsb3Sn (gamma) particles. In addition, hitherto uncharacterized reaction layers between Agsb3Sn(gamma)/Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb2)\\ and\\ Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1)/HgSnsb{7-9}\\ (gammasb2) were observed and analyzed. An Ag-Hg-Sn (betasb1) phase was clearly identified for the first time. In Tytin, the matrix consists of Agsb2Hgsb3\\ (gammasb1) grains. Fine precipitates of Cusb6Snsb5\\ (etasp') are embedded inside the gammasb1 and at the grain boundaries. These precipitates are responsible for the improved creep resistance of Tytin compared to Velvalloy. The additional Cu has completely eliminated the gammasb

  4. Bespoke contrast-matched diblock copolymer nanoparticles enable the rational design of highly transparent Pickering double emulsions† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: GPC chromatograms, additional transmission electron micrographs, digital photographs, visible absorption spectra and laser diffraction data, further optical and fluorescence micrographs. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03856e Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kate L.; Derry, Matthew J.; Warren, Nicholas J.; Ratcliffe, Liam P. D.; Williams, Clive N.; Brown, Steven L.

    2016-01-01

    We report the preparation of highly transparent oil-in-water Pickering emulsions using contrast-matched organic nanoparticles. This is achieved via addition of judicious amounts of either sucrose or glycerol to an aqueous dispersion of poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)56–poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate)500 [PGMA–PTFEMA] diblock copolymer nanoparticles prior to high shear homogenization with an equal volume of n-dodecane. The resulting Pickering emulsions comprise polydisperse n-dodecane droplets of 20–100 μm diameter and exhibit up to 96% transmittance across the visible spectrum. In contrast, control experiments using non-contrast-matched poly(glycerol monomethacrylate)56–poly(benzyl methacrylate)300 [PGMA56–PBzMA300] diblock copolymer nanoparticles as a Pickering emulsifier only produced conventional highly turbid emulsions. Thus contrast-matching of the two immiscible phases is a necessary but not sufficient condition for the preparation of highly transparent Pickering emulsions: it is essential to use isorefractive nanoparticles in order to minimize light scattering. Furthermore, highly transparent oil-in-water-in-oil Pickering double emulsions can be obtained by homogenizing the contrast-matched oil-in-water Pickering emulsion prepared using the PGMA56–PTFEMA500 nanoparticles with a contrast-matched dispersion of hydrophobic poly(lauryl methacrylate)39–poly(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl methacrylate)800 [PLMA39–PTFEMA800] diblock copolymer nanoparticles in n-dodecane. Finally, we show that an isorefractive oil-in-water Pickering emulsion enables fluorescence spectroscopy to be used to monitor the transport of water-insoluble small molecules (pyrene and benzophenone) between n-dodecane droplets. Such transport is significantly less efficient than that observed for the equivalent isorefractive surfactant-stabilized emulsion. Conventional turbid emulsions do not enable such a comparison to be made because the intense light scattering leads to

  5. Analysis on electronic control unit of continuously variable transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Shuanggui

    Continuously variable transmission system can ensure that the engine work along the line of best fuel economy, improve fuel economy, save fuel and reduce harmful gas emissions. At the same time, continuously variable transmission allows the vehicle speed is more smooth and improves the ride comfort. Although the CVT technology has made great development, but there are many shortcomings in the CVT. The CVT system of ordinary vehicles now is still low efficiency, poor starting performance, low transmission power, and is not ideal controlling, high cost and other issues. Therefore, many scholars began to study some new type of continuously variable transmission. The transmission system with electronic systems control can achieve automatic control of power transmission, give full play to the characteristics of the engine to achieve optimal control of powertrain, so the vehicle is always traveling around the best condition. Electronic control unit is composed of the core processor, input and output circuit module and other auxiliary circuit module. Input module collects and process many signals sent by sensor and , such as throttle angle, brake signals, engine speed signal, speed signal of input and output shaft of transmission, manual shift signals, mode selection signals, gear position signal and the speed ratio signal, so as to provide its corresponding processing for the controller core.

  6. Quantitative Energy-filtering Transmission Electron Microscopy in Materials Science.

    PubMed

    Grogger; Hofer; Warbichler; Kothleitner

    2000-03-01

    Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) can be used to acquire elemental distribution images at high lateral resolution within short acquisition times. In this article, we present an overview of typical problems from materials science which can be preferentially solved by means of EFTEM. In the first example, we show how secondary phases in a steel specimen can be easily detected by recording jump ratio images of the matrix element under rocking beam illumination. Secondly, we describe how elemental maps can be converted into concentration maps. A Ba-Nd-titanate ceramics serves as a typical materials science example exhibiting three different compounds with varying composition. In order to reduce diffraction and/or thickness variation effects which may be a problem for quantification of crystalline specimens, we calculated atomic ratio maps by dividing two elemental maps and subsequent normalizing by the partial ionization cross-sections (or k-factors). Additionally, the atomic ratio maps are correlated using the scatter diagram technique thus leading to quantitative chemical phase maps. Finally, we show how the near-edge structures (electron energy-loss near edge fine structures, or ELNES) can be used for mapping chemical bonding states thus differentiating between various modifications of an element. In order to distinguish between diamond and non-diamond carbon in diamond coated materials, we have investigated a diamond layer on a substrate with the help of ELNES mapping utilizing the pi*-peak of the C-K ionization edge. PMID:10742404

  7. Application of transmission electron tomography for modeling the renal corpuscle.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Delfine; Shen, Sylvie; Chen, Xin-Ming; Pollock, Carol; Braet, Filip

    2013-11-01

    Structural alteration to the microanatomical organization of the glomerular filtration barrier results in proteinuria. Conventional transmission electron microscopy is an important diagnostic tool to assess the degree of ultrastructural damage of the corpusclar filtration unit. However, this approach lacks the ability to collect accurate stereological insights in a relative large tissue volume. Transmission electron tomography offers the ability to gather three-dimensional information with relative ease. Therefore, this contribution aims to highlight what electron tomography can bring to the pathologist in this challenging area of diagnostic practice. Kidney tissue was prepared for routine ultrastructural transmission electron microscopy investigation. Three-dimensional data stacks were automatically acquired by tilting semi-thin sections of 270 nm in an angular range of typically -60° to +60° with 1° increment. Subsequently, models of the filtration unit were produced by computer-assisted tracking of structures of interest. This short report illustrates the capability that transmission electron tomography can offer in the fine structure-function assessment of the porous fenestrated glomerular capillary endothelium, the underlying basement membrane and the podocyte filtration slits. Furthermore, this approach allows the generation of morphometric data about size, shape and volume alterations of the kidney's filtration barrier at the nanoscale.

  8. Kaolinite flocculation induced by smectite addition - a transmission X-ray microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Zbik, Marek S; Song, Yen-Fang; Frost, Ray L

    2010-09-01

    The influence of smectite addition on kaolinite suspensions in water was investigated by transmission X-ray microscopy (TXM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Sedimentation test screening was also conducted. Micrographs were processed by the STatistic IMage Analysing (STIMAN) program and structural parameters were calculated. From the results of the sedimentation tests important influences of small smectite additions to about 3wt.% on kaolinite suspension flocculation has been found. In order to determine the reason for this smectite impact on kaolinite suspension, macroscopic behaviour micro-structural examination using Transmission X-ray Microscope (TXM) and SEM has been undertaken. TXM & SEM micrographs of freeze-dried kaolinite-smectite suspensions with up to 20% smectite showed a high degree of orientation of the fabric made of highly oriented particles and greatest density when 3wt.% of smectite was added to the 10wt.% dense kaolinite suspension. In contrast, suspensions containing pure kaolinite do not show such platelet mutual orientation but homogenous network of randomly oriented kaolinite platelets. This suggests that in kaolinite-smectite suspensions, smectite forms highly oriented basic framework into which kaolinite platelets may bond in face to face preferential contacts strengthening structure and allowing them to show plastic behaviour which is cause of platelets orientation. PMID:20621806

  9. Cryo-scanning transmission electron tomography of vitrified cells.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Sharon Grayer; Houben, Lothar; Elbaum, Michael

    2014-04-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) of fully hydrated, vitrified biological specimens has emerged as a vital tool for biological research. For cellular studies, the conventional imaging modality of transmission electron microscopy places stringent constraints on sample thickness because of its dependence on phase coherence for contrast generation. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of using scanning transmission electron microscopy for cryo-tomography of unstained vitrified specimens (CSTET). We compare CSTET and CET for the imaging of whole bacteria and human tissue culture cells, finding favorable contrast and detail in the CSTET reconstructions. Particularly at high sample tilts, the CSTET signals contain more informative data than energy-filtered CET phase contrast images, resulting in improved depth resolution. Careful control over dose delivery permits relatively high cumulative exposures before the onset of observable beam damage. The increase in acceptable specimen thickness broadens the applicability of electron cryo-tomography.

  10. Quantification of the Information Limit of Transmission Electron Microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barthel, J.; Thust, A.

    2008-11-14

    The resolving power of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes is characterized by the information limit, which reflects the size of the smallest object detail observable with a particular instrument. We introduce a highly accurate measurement method for the information limit, which is suitable for modern aberration-corrected electron microscopes. An experimental comparison with the traditionally applied Young's fringe method yields severe discrepancies and confirms theoretical considerations according to which the Young's fringe method does not reveal the information limit.

  11. Multiple reaction pathways of metallofullerenes investigated by transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koshino, Masanori

    2014-05-28

    Recent advances in molecule-by-molecule transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have provided time-series structural information of individual molecules supported by nano-carbon materials, enabling researchers to trace their motions and reactions. In this paper, the chemical reactions of fullerenes and metallofullerene derivatives, focusing on their deformation process, are reviewed and discussed based on the single-molecule-resolved TEM analysis.

  12. Highlighting material structure with transmission electron diffraction correlation coefficient maps.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Ákos K; Rauch, Edgar F; Lábár, János L

    2016-04-01

    Correlation coefficient maps are constructed by computing the differences between neighboring diffraction patterns collected in a transmission electron microscope in scanning mode. The maps are shown to highlight material structural features like grain boundaries, second phase particles or dislocations. The inclination of the inner crystal interfaces are directly deduced from the resulting contrast.

  13. Nanowire growth kinetics in aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chou, Yi -Chia; Panciera, Federico; Reuter, Mark C.; Stach, Eric A.; Ross, Frances M.

    2016-03-15

    Here, we visualize atomic level dynamics during Si nanowire growth using aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy, and compare with lower pressure results from ultra-high vacuum microscopy. We discuss the importance of higher pressure observations for understanding growth mechanisms and describe protocols to minimize effects of the higher pressure background gas.

  14. Preparation of zeolites for TEM (Transmission Electron Microscopy) using microtomy

    SciTech Connect

    Csencsits, R.; Gronsky, R.

    1987-12-01

    The application of microtomy to Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) specimen preparation of zeolite catalysts is explained. Using a new acrylic resin (LR White) thin sections (less than or equal to60 nm) may be cut with relative ease. Although the details described are specific to catalysts, microtomy and the use of the acrylic resin are applicable to any hard ceramic powder sample. 3 figs.

  15. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Minor, Andrew M.

    2002-12-02

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids.

  16. Writing silica structures in liquid with scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    van de Put, Marcel W P; Carcouët, Camille C M C; Bomans, Paul H H; Friedrich, Heiner; de Jonge, Niels; Sommerdijk, Nico A J M

    2015-02-01

    Silica nanoparticles are imaged in solution with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) using a liquid cell with silicon nitride (SiN) membrane windows. The STEM images reveal that silica structures are deposited in well-defined patches on the upper SiN membranes upon electron beam irradiation. The thickness of the deposits is linear with the applied electron dose. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) demonstrate that the deposited patches are a result of the merging of the original 20 nm-diameter nanoparticles, and that the related surface roughness depends on the electron dose rate used. Using this approach, sub-micrometer scale structures are written on the SiN in liquid by controlling the electron exposure as function of the lateral position.

  17. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-01

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  18. Foucault imaging by using non-dedicated transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Taniguchi, Yoshifumi; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Harada, Ken

    2012-08-27

    An electron optical system for observing Foucault images was constructed using a conventional transmission electron microscope without any special equipment for Lorentz microscopy. The objective lens was switched off and an electron beam was converged by a condenser optical system to the crossover on the selected area aperture plane. The selected area aperture was used as an objective aperture to select the deflected beam for Foucault mode, and the successive image-forming lenses were controlled for observation of the specimen images. The irradiation area on the specimen was controlled by selecting the appropriate diameter of the condenser aperture.

  19. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Buban, James P.; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D.; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM. PMID:19915208

  20. High-resolution low-dose scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Buban, James P; Ramasse, Quentin; Gipson, Bryant; Browning, Nigel D; Stahlberg, Henning

    2010-01-01

    During the past two decades instrumentation in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has pushed toward higher intensity electron probes to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of recorded images. While this is suitable for robust specimens, biological specimens require a much reduced electron dose for high-resolution imaging. We describe here protocols for low-dose STEM image recording with a conventional field-emission gun STEM, while maintaining the high-resolution capability of the instrument. Our findings show that a combination of reduced pixel dwell time and reduced gun current can achieve radiation doses comparable to low-dose TEM.

  1. Atomic resolution imaging of graphene by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robertson, Alex W.; Warner, Jamie H.

    2013-05-01

    The atomic structure of a material influences its electronic, chemical, magnetic and mechanical properties. Characterising carbon nanomaterials, such as fullerenes, nanotubes and graphene, at the atomic level is challenging due to their chemical reactivity and low atomic mass. Transmission electron microscopy and scanning probe microscopy are two of the leading methods for imaging graphene at the atomic level. Here, we report on recent advances in atomic resolution imaging of graphene using aberration-corrected high resolution transmission electron microscopy and how it has revealed many of the structural deviations from the pristine monolayer form. Structures in graphene such as vacancy defects, edges, grain boundaries, linear chains, impurity dopants, layer number, layer stacking and bond rotations are explored.

  2. Transmission of electrons inside the cryogenic pumps of ITER injector.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    Large cryogenic pumps are installed in the vessel of large neutral beam injectors (NBIs) used to heat the plasma in nuclear fusion experiments. The operation of such pumps can be compromised by the presence of stray secondary electrons that are generated along the beam path. In this paper, we present a numerical model to analyze the propagation of the electrons inside the pump. The aim of the study is to quantify the power load on the active pump elements, via evaluation of the transmission probabilities across the domain of the pump. These are obtained starting from large datasets of particle trajectories, obtained by numerical means. The transmission probability of the electrons across the domain is calculated for the NBI of the ITER and for its prototype Megavolt ITer Injector and Concept Advancement (MITICA) and the results are discussed. PMID:26932041

  3. Transmission of electrons inside the cryogenic pumps of ITER injector.

    PubMed

    Veltri, P; Sartori, E

    2016-02-01

    Large cryogenic pumps are installed in the vessel of large neutral beam injectors (NBIs) used to heat the plasma in nuclear fusion experiments. The operation of such pumps can be compromised by the presence of stray secondary electrons that are generated along the beam path. In this paper, we present a numerical model to analyze the propagation of the electrons inside the pump. The aim of the study is to quantify the power load on the active pump elements, via evaluation of the transmission probabilities across the domain of the pump. These are obtained starting from large datasets of particle trajectories, obtained by numerical means. The transmission probability of the electrons across the domain is calculated for the NBI of the ITER and for its prototype Megavolt ITer Injector and Concept Advancement (MITICA) and the results are discussed.

  4. Characterization of nanoparticles by scanning electron microscopy in transmission mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhr, E.; Senftleben, N.; Klein, T.; Bergmann, D.; Gnieser, D.; Frase, C. G.; Bosse, H.

    2009-08-01

    A conventional scanning electron microscope operated in transmission mode (TSEM) was used for imaging silica, gold and latex nanoparticles. Particles were applied to conventional transmission electron microscope (TEM) grids with different supporting films. A semiconductor detector capable of accomplishing both bright-field and dark-field imaging was used to record transmitted electrons. Particle diameter was determined from the images by comparing measured data with the results of corresponding Monte Carlo simulations which took into account particle and instrument properties. Measured and simulated line profiles agreed well; the method is sensitive to changes in diameter in the nano- and sub-nanometre range. It is concluded that TSEM imaging is a promising tool for dimensional characterization of nanoparticles. Necessary extensions to the technique in order to achieve traceable measurements are discussed.

  5. Analysis of virus textures in transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Loris; Paci, Michelangelo; Caetano Dos Santos, Florentino Luciano; Brahnam, Sheryl; Hyttinen, Jari

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we propose an ensemble of texture descriptors for analyzing virus textures in transmission electron microscopy images. Specifically, we present several novel multi-quinary (MQ) codings of local binary pattern (LBP) variants: the MQ version of the dense LBP, the MQ version of the rotation invariant co-occurrence among adjacent LBPs, and the MQ version of the LBP histogram Fourier. To reduce computation time as well as to improve performance, a feature selection approach is utilized to select the thresholds used in the MQ approaches. In addition, we propose new variants of descriptors where two histograms, instead of the standard one histogram, are produced for each descriptor. The two histograms (one for edge pixels and the other for non-edge pixels) are calculated for training two different SVMs, whose results are then combined by sum rule. We show that a bag of features approach works well with this problem. Our experiments, using a publicly available dataset of 1500 images with 15 classes and same protocol as in previous works, demonstrate the superiority of our new proposed ensemble of texture descriptors. The MATLAB code of our approach is available at https://www.dei.unipd.it/node/2357. PMID:25488214

  6. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of corroded metal waste forms.

    SciTech Connect

    Dietz, N. L.

    2005-04-15

    This report documents the results of analyses with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and selected area electron diffraction (ED) of samples of metallic waste form (MWF) materials that had been subjected to various corrosion tests. The objective of the TEM analyses was to characterize the composition and microstructure of surface alteration products which, when combined with other test results, can be used to determine the matrix corrosion mechanism. The examination of test samples generated over several years has resulted in refinements to the TEM sample preparation methods developed to preserve the orientation of surface alteration layers and the underlying base metal. The preservation of microstructural spatial relationships provides valuable insight for determining the matrix corrosion mechanism and for developing models to calculate radionuclide release in repository performance models. The TEM results presented in this report show that oxide layers are formed over the exposed steel and intermetallic phases of the MWF during corrosion in aqueous solutions and humid air at elevated temperatures. An amorphous non-stoichiometric ZrO{sub 2} layer forms at the exposed surfaces of the intermetallic phases, and several nonstoichiometric Fe-O layers form over the steel phases in the MWF. These oxide layers adhere strongly to the underlying metal, and may be overlain by one or more crystalline Fe-O phases that probably precipitated from solution. The layer compositions are consistent with a corrosion mechanism of oxidative dissolution of the steel and intermetallic phases. The layers formed on the steel and intermetallic phases form a continuous layer over the exposed waste form, although vertical splits in the layer and corrosion in pits and crevices were seen in some samples. Additional tests and analyses are needed to verify that these layers passivate the underlying metals and if passivation can break

  7. Studying Atomic Structures by Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urban, Knut W.

    2008-07-01

    Seventy-five years after its invention, transmission electron microscopy has taken a great step forward with the introduction of aberration-corrected electron optics. An entirely new generation of instruments enables studies in condensed-matter physics and materials science to be performed at atomic-scale resolution. These new possibilities are meeting the growing demand of nanosciences and nanotechnology for the atomic-scale characterization of materials, nanosynthesized products and devices, and the validation of expected functions. Equipped with electron-energy filters and electron-energy loss spectrometers, the new instruments allow studies not only of structure but also of elemental composition and chemical bonding. The energy resolution is about 100 milli electron volts, and the accuracy of spatial measurements has reached a few picometers. However, understanding the results is generally not straightforward and only possible with extensive quantum-mechanical computer calculations.

  8. Studying atomic structures by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Urban, Knut W

    2008-07-25

    Seventy-five years after its invention, transmission electron microscopy has taken a great step forward with the introduction of aberration-corrected electron optics. An entirely new generation of instruments enables studies in condensed-matter physics and materials science to be performed at atomic-scale resolution. These new possibilities are meeting the growing demand of nanosciences and nanotechnology for the atomic-scale characterization of materials, nanosynthesized products and devices, and the validation of expected functions. Equipped with electron-energy filters and electron-energy-loss spectrometers, the new instruments allow studies not only of structure but also of elemental composition and chemical bonding. The energy resolution is about 100 milli-electron volts, and the accuracy of spatial measurements has reached a few picometers. However, understanding the results is generally not straightforward and only possible with extensive quantum-mechanical computer calculations. PMID:18653874

  9. Secondary electron imaging of monolayer materials inside a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Cretu, Ovidiu Lin, Yung-Chang; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2015-08-10

    A scanning transmission electron microscope equipped with a backscattered and secondary electron detector is shown capable to image graphene and hexagonal boron nitride monolayers. Secondary electron contrasts of the two lightest monolayer materials are clearly distinguished from the vacuum level. A signal difference between these two materials is attributed to electronic structure differences, which will influence the escape probabilities of the secondary electrons. Our results show that the secondary electron signal can be used to distinguish between the electronic structures of materials with atomic layer sensitivity, enhancing its applicability as a complementary signal in the analytical microscope.

  10. Interaction of electrons with light metal hydrides in the transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongming; Wakasugi, Takenobu; Isobe, Shigehito; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei

    2014-12-01

    Transmission electron microscope (TEM) observation of light metal hydrides is complicated by the instability of these materials under electron irradiation. In this study, the electron kinetic energy dependences of the interactions of incident electrons with lithium, sodium and magnesium hydrides, as well as the constituting element effect on the interactions, were theoretically discussed, and electron irradiation damage to these hydrides was examined using in situ TEM. The results indicate that high incident electron kinetic energy helps alleviate the irradiation damage resulting from inelastic or elastic scattering of the incident electrons in the TEM. Therefore, observations and characterizations of these materials would benefit from increased, instead decreased, TEM operating voltage.

  11. Facilities for in situ ion beam studies in transmission electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, C.W.; Ohnuki, S.; Takahashi, H.

    1993-08-01

    Interfacing an ion accelerator to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) allows the analytical functions of TEM imaging and electron diffraction from very small regions to be employed during ion-irradiation effects studies. At present there are ten such installations in Japan, one in France and one in the USA. General specifications of facilities which are operational in 1993 are summarized, and additional facilities which are planned or being proposed are briefly described.

  12. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... manifest data relative to that alien passenger in accordance with 19 CFR 4.7b or 19 CFR 122.49a. Upon... relative to that alien passenger in accordance with 19 CFR 4.64 and 19 CFR 122.75a. (b) If a carrier fails... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electronic data transmission...

  13. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... manifest data relative to that alien passenger in accordance with 19 CFR 4.7b or 19 CFR 122.49a. Upon... relative to that alien passenger in accordance with 19 CFR 4.64 and 19 CFR 122.75a. (b) If a carrier fails... VISA WAIVER PROGRAM § 217.7 Electronic data transmission requirement. (a) An alien who applies...

  14. High Brightness and high polarization electron source using transmission photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Naoto; Jin Xiuguang; Ujihara, Toru; Takeda, Yoshikazu; Mano, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Yasuhide; Nakanishi, Tsutomu; Okumi, Shoji; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Konomi, Taro; Ohshima, Takashi; Saka, Takashi; Kato, Toshihiro; Horinaka, Hiromichi; Yasue, Tsuneo; Koshikawa, Takanori

    2009-08-04

    A transmission photocathode was fabricated based on GaAs-GaAsP strained superlattice layers on a GaP substrate and a 20 kV-gun was built to generate the polarized electron beams with the diameter of a few micro-meter. As the results, the reduced brightness of 1.3x10{sup 7} A/cm{sup 2}/sr and the polarization of 90% were achieved.

  15. Transmission of High-Power Electron Beams Through Small Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Tschalaer, Christoph; Alarcon, Ricardo O.; Balascuta, S.; Benson, Stephen V.; Bertozzi, William; Boyce, James R.; Cowan, Ray Franklin; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fisher, Peter H.; Ihloff, Ernest E.; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kelleher, Aidan Michael; Legg, Robert A.; Milner, Richard; Neil, George R.; Ou, Longwu; Schmookler, Barak Abraham; Tennant, Christopher D.; Williams, Gwyn P.; Zhang, Shukui

    2013-11-01

    Tests were performed to pass a 100 MeV, 430 kWatt c.w. electron beam from the energy-recovery linac at the Jefferson Laboratory's FEL facility through a set of small apertures in a 127 mm long aluminum block. Beam transmission losses of 3 p.p.m. through a 2 mm diameter aperture were maintained during a 7 hour continuous run.

  16. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... manifest data relative to that alien passenger in accordance with 19 CFR 4.7b or 19 CFR 122.49a. Upon... relative to that alien passenger in accordance with 19 CFR 4.64 and 19 CFR 122.75a. (b) If a carrier fails... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electronic data transmission...

  17. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Sadana, D.K.

    1982-10-01

    A method to prepare cross-sectional (X) semiconductor specimens for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been described. The power and utility of XTEM has been demonstrated. It has been shown that accuracy and interpretation of indirect structural-defects profiling techniques, namely, MeV He/sup +/ channeling and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) can be greatly enhanced by comparing their results with those obtained by XTEM from the same set of samples.

  18. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  19. Studying localized corrosion using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chee, See Wee; Pratt, Sarah H.; Hattar, Khalid; Duquette, David; Ross, Frances M.; Hull, Robert

    2014-11-07

    Using liquid cell transmission electron microscopy (LCTEM), localized corrosion of Cu and Al thin films immersed in aqueous NaCl solutions was studied. We demonstrate that potentiostatic control can be used to initiate pitting and that local compositional changes, due to focused ion beam implantation of Au+ ions, can modify the corrosion susceptibility of Al films. Likewise, a discussion on strategies to control the onset of pitting is also presented.

  20. In situ formation of bismuth nanoparticles through electron-beam irradiation in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepulveda-Guzman, S.; Elizondo-Villarreal, N.; Ferrer, D.; Torres-Castro, A.; Gao, X.; Zhou, J. P.; Jose-Yacaman, M.

    2007-08-01

    In this work, bismuth nanoparticles were synthesized when a precursor, sodium bismuthate, was exposed to an electron beam at room temperature in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The irradiation effects were investigated in situ using selected-area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. After the electron irradiation, bismuth nanoparticles with a rhombohedral structure and diameter of 6 nm were observed. The average particle size increased with the irradiation time. The electron-induced reduction is attributed to the desorption of oxygen ions. This method offers a one-step route to synthesize bismuth nanoparticles using electron irradiation, and the particle size can be controlled by the irradiation time.

  1. Transmission electron microscopic characterization of hypersensitive human radicular dentin

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshiyama, M.; Noiri, Y.; Ozaki, K.; Uchida, A.; Ishikawa, Y.; Ishida, H. )

    1990-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray microanalysis (XMA) were used for the study of the ultrastructure of the lumens of dentinal tubules in superficial layers of dentin specimens obtained by use of a new biopsy technique from both hypersensitive and naturally desensitized areas of exposed root surfaces, in vivo. The TEM images showed clearly that the lumens of most of the tubules were occluded with mineral crystals in naturally desensitized areas, but such lumens were empty and surrounded with peritubular and intertubular dentin in hypersensitive areas. Moreover, electron-dense structures that lined peritubular dentin were observed in the empty lumens of dentinal tubules.

  2. Scanning transmission electron microscopy: Albert Crewe's vision and beyond.

    PubMed

    Krivanek, Ondrej L; Chisholm, Matthew F; Murfitt, Matthew F; Dellby, Niklas

    2012-12-01

    Some four decades were needed to catch up with the vision that Albert Crewe and his group had for the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) in the nineteen sixties and seventies: attaining 0.5Å resolution, and identifying single atoms spectroscopically. With these goals now attained, STEM developments are turning toward new directions, such as rapid atomic resolution imaging and exploring atomic bonding and electronic properties of samples at atomic resolution. The accomplishments and the future challenges are reviewed and illustrated with practical examples.

  3. Transmission electron microscopy of a model crystalline organic, theophylline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattle, J.; S'ari, M.; Hondow, N.; Abellán, P.; Brown, A. P.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2015-10-01

    We report on the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to analyse the diffraction patterns of the model crystalline organic theophylline to investigate beam damage in relation to changing accelerating voltage, sample temperature and TEM grid support films. We find that samples deposited on graphene film grids have the longest lifetimes when also held at -190 °C and imaged at 200 kV accelerating voltage. Finally, atomic lattice images are obtained in bright field STEM by working close to the estimated critical electron dose for theophylline.

  4. Pulsed Power for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    dehope, w j; browning, n; campbell, g; cook, e; king, w; lagrange, t; reed, b; stuart, b; Shuttlesworth, R; Pyke, B

    2009-06-25

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has converted a commercial 200kV transmission electron microscope (TEM) into an ultrafast, nanoscale diagnostic tool for material science studies. The resulting Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) has provided a unique tool for the study of material phase transitions, reaction front analyses, and other studies in the fields of chemistry, materials science, and biology. The TEM's thermionic electron emission source was replaced with a fast photocathode and a laser beam path was provided for ultraviolet surface illumination. The resulting photoelectron beam gives downstream images of 2 and 20 ns exposure times at 100 and 10 nm spatial resolution. A separate laser, used as a pump pulse, is used to heat, ignite, or shock samples while the photocathode electron pulses, carefully time-synchronized with the pump, function as probe in fast transient studies. The device functions in both imaging and diffraction modes. A laser upgrade is underway to make arbitrary cathode pulse trains of variable pulse width of 10-1000 ns. Along with a fast e-beam deflection scheme, a 'movie mode' capability will be added to this unique diagnostic tool. This talk will review conventional electron microscopy and its limitations, discuss the development and capabilities of DTEM, in particularly addressing the prime and pulsed power considerations in the design and fabrication of the DTEM, and conclude with the presentation of a deflector and solid-state pulser design for Movie-Mode DTEM.

  5. High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Using Negative Spherical Aberration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Chun-Lin; Lentzen, Markus

    2004-04-01

    A novel imaging mode for high-resolution transmission electron microscopy is described. It is based on the adjustment of a negative value of the spherical aberration CS of the objective lens of a transmission electron microscope equipped with a multipole aberration corrector system. Negative spherical aberration applied together with an overfocus yields high-resolution images with bright-atom contrast. Compared to all kinds of images taken in conventional transmission electron microscopes, where the then unavoidable positive spherical aberration is combined with an underfocus, the contrast is dramatically increased. This effect can only be understood on the basis of a full nonlinear imaging theory. Calculations show that the nonlinear contrast contributions diminish the image contrast relative to the linear image for a positive-CS setting whereas they reinforce the image contrast relative to the linear image for a negative-CS setting. The application of the new mode to the imaging of oxygen in SrTiO3 and YBa2Cu3O7 demonstrates the benefit to materials science investigations. It allows us to image directly, without further image processing, strongly scattering heavy-atom columns together with weakly scattering light-atom columns.

  6. Tailoring of electron flow current in magnetically insulated transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, J. P.; Savage, M. E.; Pointon, T. D.; Gilmore, M. A.

    2009-03-01

    It is desirable to optimize (minimizing both the inductance and electron flow) the magnetically insulated vacuum sections of low impedance pulsed-power drivers. The goal of low inductance is understandable from basic efficiency arguments. The goal of low electron flow results from two observations: (1) flowing electrons generally do not deliver energy to (or even reach) most loads, and thus constitute a loss mechanism; (2) energetic electrons deposited in a small area can cause anode damage and anode plasma formation. Low inductance and low electron flow are competing goals; an optimized system requires a balance of the two. While magnetically insulated systems are generally forgiving, there are times when optimization is crucial. For example, in large pulsed-power drivers used to energize high energy density physics loads, the electron flow as a fraction of total current is small, but that flow often reaches the anode in relatively small regions. If the anode temperature becomes high enough to desorb gas, the resulting plasma initiates a gap closure process that can impact system performance. Magnetic-pressure driven (z pinches and material equation of state) loads behave like a fixed inductor for much of the drive pulse. It is clear that neither fixed gap nor constant-impedance transmission lines are optimal for driving inductive loads. This work shows a technique for developing the optimal impedance profile for the magnetically insulated section of a high-current driver. Particle-in-cell calculations are used to validate the impedance profiles developed in a radial disk magnetically insulated transmission line geometry. The input parameters are the spacing and location of the minimum gap, the effective load inductance, and the desired electron flow profile. The radial electron flow profiles from these simulations are in good agreement with theoretical predictions when driven at relatively high voltage (i.e., V≥2MV).

  7. Photocathode Optimization for a Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope: Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, P; Flom, Z; Heinselman, K; Nguyen, T; Tung, S; Haskell, R; Reed, B W; LaGrange, T

    2011-08-04

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) team at Harvey Mudd College has been sponsored by LLNL to design and build a test setup for optimizing the performance of the DTEM's electron source. Unlike a traditional TEM, the DTEM achieves much faster exposure times by using photoemission from a photocathode to produce electrons for imaging. The DTEM team's work is motivated by the need to improve the coherence and current density of the electron cloud produced by the electron gun in order to increase the image resolution and contrast achievable by DTEM. The photoemission test setup is nearly complete and the team will soon complete baseline tests of electron gun performance. The photoemission laser and high voltage power supply have been repaired; the optics path for relaying the laser to the photocathode has been finalized, assembled, and aligned; the internal setup of the vacuum chamber has been finalized and mostly implemented; and system control, synchronization, and data acquisition has been implemented in LabVIEW. Immediate future work includes determining a consistent alignment procedure to place the laser waist on the photocathode, and taking baseline performance measurements of the tantalum photocathode. Future research will examine the performance of the electron gun as a function of the photoemission laser profile, the photocathode material, and the geometry and voltages of the accelerating and focusing components in the electron gun. This report presents the team's progress and outlines the work that remains.

  8. Precision electron flow measurements in a disk transmission line.

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Waylon T.; Pelock, Michael D.; Martin, Jeremy Paul; Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Savage, Mark Edward; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.; Pointon, Timothy David

    2008-01-01

    An analytic model for electron flow in a system driving a fixed inductive load is described and evaluated with particle in cell simulations. The simple model allows determining the impedance profile for a magnetically insulated transmission line given the minimum gap desired, and the lumped inductance inside the transition to the minimum gap. The model allows specifying the relative electron flow along the power flow direction, including cases where the fractional electron flow decreases in the power flow direction. The electrons are able to return to the cathode because they gain energy from the temporally rising magnetic field. The simulations were done with small cell size to reduce numerical heating. An experiment to compare electron flow to the simulations was done. The measured electron flow is {approx}33% of the value from the simulations. The discrepancy is assumed to be due to a reversed electric field at the cathode because of the inductive load and falling electron drift velocity in the power flow direction. The simulations constrain the cathode electric field to zero, which gives the highest possible electron flow.

  9. Precession electron diffraction and its utility for structural fingerprinting in the transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeck, Peter; Rouvimov, Sergei; Nicolopoulos, Stavros

    2009-09-01

    Precession electron diffraction (PED) in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is discussed in order to illustrate its utility for structural fingerprinting of nanocrystals. While individual nanocrystals may be fingerprinted structurally from PED spot patterns, ensembles of nanocrystals may be fingerprinted from powder PED ring patterns.

  10. Mapping unoccupied electronic states of freestanding graphene by angle-resolved low-energy electron transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicki, Flavio; Longchamp, Jean-Nicolas; Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Escher, Conrad; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2016-08-01

    We report angle-resolved electron transmission measurements through freestanding graphene sheets in the energy range of 18 to 30 eV above the Fermi level. The measurements are carried out in a low-energy electron point source microscope, which allows simultaneously probing the transmission for a large angular range. The characteristics of low-energy electron transmission through graphene depend on its electronic structure above the vacuum level. The experimental technique described here allows mapping of the unoccupied band structure of freestanding two-dimensional materials as a function of the energy and probing angle, respectively, in-plane momentum. Our experimental findings are consistent with theoretical predictions of a resonance in the band structure of graphene above the vacuum level [V. U. Nazarov, E. E. Krasovskii, and V. M. Silkin, Phys. Rev. B 87, 041405 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.041405].

  11. Design and implementation of a fs-resolved transmission electron microscope based on thermionic gun technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, L.; Masiel, D. J.; LaGrange, T.; Reed, B. W.; Barwick, B.; Carbone, Fabrizio

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, the design and implementation of a femtosecond-resolved ultrafast transmission electron microscope is presented, based on a thermionic gun geometry. Utilizing an additional magnetic lens between the electron acceleration and the nominal condenser lens system, a larger percentage of the electrons created at the cathode are delivered to the specimen without degrading temporal, spatial and energy resolution significantly, while at the same time maintaining the femtosecond temporal resolution. Using the photon-induced near field electron microscopy effect (PINEM) on silver nanowires the cross-correlation between the light and electron pulses was measured, showing the impact of the gun settings and initiating laser pulse duration on the electron bunch properties. Tuneable electron pulses between 300 fs and several ps can be obtained, and an overall energy resolution around 1 eV was achieved.

  12. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy study of hot-deformed gamma-TiAl-based alloy microstructure.

    PubMed

    Chrapoński, J; Rodak, K

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the changes in the microstructure of hot-deformed specimens made of alloys containing 46-50 at.% Al, 2 at.% Cr and 2 at.% Nb (and alloying additions such as carbon and boron) with the aid of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. After homogenization and heat treatment performed in order to make diverse lamellae thickness, the specimens were compressed at 1000 degrees C. Transmission electron microscopy examinations of specimens after the compression test revealed the presence of heavily deformed areas with a high density of dislocation. Deformation twins were also observed. Dynamically recrystallized grains were revealed. For alloys no. 2 and no. 3, the recovery and recrystallization processes were more extensive than for alloy no. 1.

  13. High resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy of magnetic recording media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risner, Juliet Danielle

    Since the invention of the hard disk drive in 1954, the density of bits per disk has increased exponentially. This trend is partly due to improvements to the magnetic recording media. In current hard disks, each bit is approximately 0.04 mum in its smallest dimension and comprises ˜100 hexagonal close packed Co-alloy magnetic grains. These grains have magnetic "easy" axes oriented longitudinally, or parallel to the film plane. Future recording media have easy axes oriented perpendicular to the film plane. Perpendicular media are expected to provide continued increases in storage density above the limit of longitudinal media. Quantum-mechanical exchange coupling between magnetic grains degrades the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and limits storage density in both media types. Controlling exchange coupling is possible by creating nonmagnetic grain boundaries which compositionally isolate the magnetic grains. High-resolution analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is required to study these media because of their nano-scale grains and grain boundaries. Examining the microstructure and elemental distribution in these films at near atomic level is paramount to understanding their magnetic performance. The microstructure and elemental distribution in longitudinal and perpendicular media were examined using high resolution analytical TEM techniques, such as energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) using a 1.5 nm electron probe, and spectrum imaging with a scanning TEM. These techniques successfully determined how grain boundary Cr segregation varies with grain orientation in longitudinal media. Boundaries misoriented by 0° and 90° commonly occur and were found to have minimal Cr segregation, which limits storage density improvement in these media. Analytical TEM techniques applied to oxygen-enriched perpendicular media, fabricated using different deposition methods, effectively related microstructure and composition to magnetic

  14. Time Resolved Phase Transitions via Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; Armstrong, M R; Blobaum, K J; Browning, N D; Burnham, A K; Campbell, G H; Gee, R; Kim, J S; King, W E; Maiti, A; Piggott, W T; Torralva, B R

    2007-02-22

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) project is developing an in situ electron microscope with nanometer- and nanosecond-scale resolution for the study of rapid laser-driven processes in materials. We report on the results obtained in a year-long LDRD-supported effort to develop DTEM techniques and results for phase transitions in molecular crystals, reactive multilayer foils, and melting and resolidification of bismuth. We report the first in situ TEM observation of the HMX {beta}-{delta} phase transformation in sub-{micro}m crystals, computational results suggesting the importance of voids and free surfaces in the HMX transformation kinetics, and the first electron diffraction patterns of intermediate states in fast multilayer foil reactions. This project developed techniques which are applicable to many materials systems and will continue to be employed within the larger DTEM effort.

  15. Pushing the envelope of in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ramachandramoorthy, Rajaprakash; Bernal, Rodrigo; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2015-05-26

    Recent major improvements to the transmission electron microscope (TEM) including aberration-corrected electron optics, light-element-sensitive analytical instrumentation, sample environmental control, and high-speed and sensitive direct electron detectors are becoming more widely available. When these advances are combined with in situ TEM tools, such as multimodal testing based on microelectromechanical systems, key measurements and insights on nanoscale material phenomena become possible. In particular, these advances enable metrology that allows for unprecedented correlation to quantum mechanics and the predictions of atomistic models. In this Perspective, we provide a summary of recent in situ TEM research that has leveraged these new TEM capabilities as well as an outlook of the opportunities that exist in the different areas of in situ TEM experimentation. Although these advances have improved the spatial and temporal resolution of TEM, a critical analysis of the various in situ TEM fields reveals that further progress is needed to achieve the full potential of the technology. PMID:25942405

  16. Transmission electron microscopic examination of phosphoric acid fuel cell components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pebler, A.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to physically characterize tested and untested phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) components. Those examined included carbon-supported platinum catalysts, carbon backing paper, and Teflon-bonded catalyst layers at various stages of fabrication and after testing in pressurized PAFC's. Applicability of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy for identifying the various phases was explored. The discussion focuses on the morphology and size distribution of platinum, the morphology and structural aspects of Teflon in catalyst layers, and the structural evidence of carbon corrosion. Reference is made to other physical characterization techniques where appropriate. A qualitative model of the catalyst layer that emerged from the TEM studies is presented.

  17. Effects of instrument imperfections on quantitative scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Florian F; Schowalter, Marco; Grieb, Tim; Müller-Caspary, Knut; Mehrtens, Thorsten; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2016-02-01

    Several instrumental imperfections of transmission electron microscopes are characterized and their effects on the results of quantitative scanning electron microscopy (STEM) are investigated and quantified using simulations. Methods to either avoid influences of these imperfections during acquisition or to include them in reference calculations are proposed. Particularly, distortions inflicted on the diffraction pattern by an image-aberration corrector can cause severe errors of more than 20% if not accounted for. A procedure for their measurement is proposed here. Furthermore, afterglow phenomena and nonlinear behavior of the detector itself can lead to incorrect normalization of measured intensities. Single electrons accidentally impinging on the detector are another source of error but can also be exploited for threshold-less calibration of STEM images to absolute dose, incident beam current determination and measurement of the detector sensitivity.

  18. In-Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy with Nanosecond Temporal Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, Nigel

    2012-02-01

    The dynamic transmission electron microscope (DTEM) can obtain both high spatial (˜1nm or better) and high temporal (˜1μs or faster) resolution. The high temporal resolution is achieved by using a short pulse laser to create the pulse of electrons through photo-emission. This pulse of electrons is propagated down the microscope column in the same way as in a conventional high-resolution TEM. The only difference is that the spatial resolution is limited by the electron-electron interactions in the pulse (a typical 10ns pulse contains ˜10^9 electrons). To synchronize this pulse of electrons with a particular dynamic event, a second laser is used to ``drive'' the sample a defined time interval prior to the arrival of the laser pulse. The important aspect of the DTEM is that one pulse of electrons is used to form the whole image, allowing irreversible transitions and cumulative phenomena such as nucleation and growth, to be studied directly in the microscope. The use of the drive laser for fast heating of the specimen presents differences and several advantages over conventional resistive heating in-situ TEM -- such as the ability to drive the sample into non-equilibrium states. So far, the drive laser has been used for in-situ processing of nanoscale materials, rapid and high temperature phase transformations, and controlled thermal activation of materials. In this presentation, a summary of the development of the DTEM and in-situ stages to control the environment around the specimen will be described. Particular attention will be paid to the potential for gas stages to study catalytic processes and liquid stages to study biological specimens in their live hydrated states. The future potential improvements in spatial and temporal resolution that can be expected through the implementation of upgrades to the lasers, electron optics and detectors will also be discussed.

  19. How Ubiquitous is Total Electron Transmission through Nanostructures (Quantum Dragons)?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novotny, Mark

    2015-03-01

    In transport through nanostructures connected to two semi-infinite leads, the transmission probability calT (E) as a function of the energy E of the incoming electron plays a central role in the Landauer calculation of the electrical conductance G. A quantum dragon nanostructure is one which when connected to appropriate leads has total electron transmission for all energies, calT (E) =1. In two-lead measurements of single-channel quantum dragons, the quantum of conductance, G0 = 2e2 / h , should be observed. A quantum dragon may have strong scattering. In the disorder was along the axis of electron propagation, the z axis. We show that quantum dragon nanostructures can be found for strong disorder perpendicular to the z axis. In select types of nanostructures, we find the ratio of the dimension of the parameter space where quantum dragons exist to that of the complete parameter space. The results use the single-band tight-binding model, and are for the case with only one open channel and homogeneous leads. One type of nanostructure with calT (E) =1 has completely disordered slices perpendicular to the z axis, but identical slices along the z direction. Supported in part by NSF Grant DMR-1206233.

  20. Nanocrystal size distribution analysis from transmission electron microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Sebille, Martijn; van der Maaten, Laurens J. P.; Xie, Ling; Jarolimek, Karol; Santbergen, Rudi; van Swaaij, René A. C. M. M.; Leifer, Klaus; Zeman, Miro

    2015-12-01

    We propose a method, with minimal bias caused by user input, to quickly detect and measure the nanocrystal size distribution from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images using a combination of Laplacian of Gaussian filters and non-maximum suppression. We demonstrate the proposed method on bright-field TEM images of an a-SiC:H sample containing embedded silicon nanocrystals with varying magnifications and we compare the accuracy and speed with size distributions obtained by manual measurements, a thresholding method and PEBBLES. Finally, we analytically consider the error induced by slicing nanocrystals during TEM sample preparation on the measured nanocrystal size distribution and formulate an equation to correct this effect.We propose a method, with minimal bias caused by user input, to quickly detect and measure the nanocrystal size distribution from transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images using a combination of Laplacian of Gaussian filters and non-maximum suppression. We demonstrate the proposed method on bright-field TEM images of an a-SiC:H sample containing embedded silicon nanocrystals with varying magnifications and we compare the accuracy and speed with size distributions obtained by manual measurements, a thresholding method and PEBBLES. Finally, we analytically consider the error induced by slicing nanocrystals during TEM sample preparation on the measured nanocrystal size distribution and formulate an equation to correct this effect. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06292f

  1. Structural Fingerprinting of Nanocrystals in the Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouvimov, Sergei; Plachinda, Pavel; Moeck, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Three novel strategies for the structurally identification of nanocrystals in a transmission electron microscope are presented. Either a single high-resolution transmission electron microscopy image [1] or a single precession electron diffractogram (PED) [2] may be employed. PEDs from fine-grained crystal powders may also be utilized. Automation of the former two strategies is in progress and shall lead to statistically significant results on ensembles of nanocrystals. Open-access databases such as the Crystallography Open Database which provides more than 81,500 crystal structure data sets [3] or its mainly inorganic and educational subsets [4] may be utilized. [1] http://www.scientificjournals.org/journals 2007/j/of/dissertation.htm [2] P. Moeck and S. Rouvimov, in: {Drugs and the Pharmaceutical Sciences}, Vol. 191, 2009, 270-313 [3] http://cod.ibt.lt, http://www.crystallography.net, http://cod.ensicaen.fr, http://nanocrystallography.org, http://nanocrystallography.net, http://journals.iucr.org/j/issues/2009/04/00/kk5039/kk5039.pdf [4] http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/CIF-searchable

  2. Three-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens.

    PubMed

    de Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian M; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-02-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2-3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original dataset. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy. However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved dataset.

  3. Three-dimensional scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological specimens

    SciTech Connect

    De Jonge, Niels; Sougrat, Rachid; Northan, Brian; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of the cytoskeleton and a clathrin-coated pit in mammalian cells has been achieved from a focal-series of images recorded in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The specimen was a metallic replica of the biological structure comprising Pt nanoparticles 2 - 3 nm in diameter, with a high stability under electron beam radiation. The 3D dataset was processed by an automated deconvolution procedure. The lateral resolution was 1.1 nm, set by pixel size. Particles differing by only 10 nm in vertical position were identified as separate objects with greater than 20% dip in contrast between them. We refer to this value as the axial resolution of the deconvolution or reconstruction, the ability to recognize two objects, which were unresolved in the original data set. The precision of the height determination was 0.2 nm. The resolution of the reconstruction is comparable to that achieved by tilt-series transmission electron microscopy (TEM). However, the focal-series method does not require mechanical tilting and is therefore much faster. 3D STEM images were also recorded of the Golgi ribbon in conventional thin sections containing 3T3 cells with a comparable axial resolution in the deconvolved data set.

  4. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1355 - Electronic Data Transmission Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Electronic Data Transmission Format C Appendix C.... 1355, App. C Appendix C to Part 1355—Electronic Data Transmission Format All AFCARS data to be sent... be four semi-annual electronic data transmissions from the title IV-E agency to the...

  5. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available.

  6. Extreme ultraviolet spectrometer based on a transmission electron microscopy grid

    SciTech Connect

    Sistrunk, Emily; Gühr, Markus

    2014-12-12

    Here, we performed extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy using an 80 lines/mm transmission electron microscope mesh as the dispersive element. We also present the usefulness of this instrument for dispersing a high harmonic spectrum from the 13th to the 29th harmonic of a Ti:sapph laser, corresponding to a wavelength range from 60 to 27 nm. The resolution of the instrument is limited by the image size of the high harmonic generation region on the detector. Finally, the resolution in first order diffraction is under 2 nm over the entire spectral range with a resolving power around 30.

  7. Extreme ultraviolet spectrometer based on a transmission electron microscopy grid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sistrunk, Emily; Gühr, Markus

    2015-01-01

    We performed extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy using an 80 lines/mm transmission electron microscope mesh as the dispersive element. We present the usefulness of this instrument for dispersing a high harmonic spectrum from the 13th to the 29th harmonic of a Ti:sapph laser, corresponding to a wavelength range from 60 to 27 nm. The resolution of the instrument is limited by the image size of the high harmonic generation region on the detector. The resolution in first order diffraction is under 2 nm over the entire spectral range with a resolving power around 30.

  8. Transmission electron microscopy of undermined passive films on stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Isaacs, H.S.; Zhu, Y.; Sabatini, R.L.; Ryan, M.P.

    1999-06-01

    A study has been made of the passive film remaining over pits on stainless steel using a high resolution transmission electron microscope. Type 305 stainless steel was passivated in a borate buffer solution and pitted in ferric chloride. Passive films formed at 0.2 V relative to a saturated calomel electrode were found to be amorphous. Films formed at higher potentials showed only broad diffraction rings. The passive film was found to cover a remnant lacy structure formed over pits passivated at 0.8 V. The metallic strands of the lace were roughly hemitubular in shape with the curved surface facing the center of the pit.

  9. Segmentation of virus particle candidates in transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Kylberg, G; Uppström, M; Hedlund, K-O; Borgefors, G; Sintorn, I-M

    2012-02-01

    In this paper, we present an automatic segmentation method that detects virus particles of various shapes in transmission electron microscopy images. The method is based on a statistical analysis of local neighbourhoods of all the pixels in the image followed by an object width discrimination and finally, for elongated objects, a border refinement step. It requires only one input parameter, the approximate width of the virus particles searched for. The proposed method is evaluated on a large number of viruses. It successfully segments viruses regardless of shape, from polyhedral to highly pleomorphic.

  10. Zinc deficiency in the 11 day rat embryo: a scanning and transmission electron microscope study

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, A.J.; Dreosti, I.E.; Tulsi, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Zinc deficient rat embryos were obtained on the 11th day of pregnancy and examined by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy revealed an increase in the number of deformed embryos, as well as embryonic growth retardation. In addition, the epithelium of zinc deficient embryos displayed a marked increase in surface microvilli, as well as the presence of blebbing. Transmission electron microscopy indicated extensive cell death in the neural epithelium which was apparently more severely damaged by zinc deficiency than were mesenchymal cells. Mitochondrial cristae were affected to a greater degree than any other membrane of the cell and cristael disintegration appeared to represent the principal cellular lesion preceding necrosis of neural cells and neural tube teratology. 29 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  11. Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre G; Lupini, Andrew R; Kubel, Christian; Slusallek, Phillip; De Jonge, Niels

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller missing wedge artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  12. Automatic transmission electronic gearshift control having altitude corrected shift criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Baltusis, P.A.; Greene, T.L.; Palansky, B.J.

    1990-07-24

    This patent describes a method for controlling gearshifts in an automatic transmission of a motor vehicle having an engine, electronic computer, electronic memory accessible to the computer. It comprises: generating an engine speed signal; storing in memory engine speeds corresponding to a wide open throttle condition at which gearshifts are scheduled to occur at a reference barometric pressure; calculating a engine speed barometric pressure correction to account for a difference between reference barometric pressure and current ambient barometric pressure; generating, in response to the engine speed barometric pressure correction, an altitude corrected engine speed signal representing engine speed corresponding to a wide open throttle condition at which gearshifts are to occur at current ambient barometric pressure; comparing the current engine speed signal to the barometric pressure corrected engine speed signal; and producing a gearshift when the comparison indicates current engine speed exceeds the barometric pressure corrected engine speed.

  13. Modeling atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images.

    PubMed

    Findlay, Scott D; Oxley, Mark P; Allen, Leslie J

    2008-02-01

    A real-space description of inelastic scattering in scanning transmission electron microscopy is derived with particular attention given to the implementation of the projected potential approximation. A hierarchy of approximations to expressions for inelastic images is presented. Emphasis is placed on the conditions that must hold in each case. The expressions that justify the most direct, visual interpretation of experimental data are also the most approximate. Therefore, caution must be exercised in selecting experimental parameters that validate the approximations needed for the analysis technique used. To make the most direct, visual interpretation of electron-energy-loss spectroscopic images from core-shell excitations requires detector improvements commensurate with those that aberration correction provides for the probe-forming lens. Such conditions can be relaxed when detailed simulations are performed as part of the analysis of experimental data. PMID:18096101

  14. Modelling atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy images

    SciTech Connect

    Findlay, Scott D.; Oxley, Mark P; Allen, L. J.

    2008-01-01

    A real-space description of inelastic scattering in scanning transmission electron microscopy is derived with particular attention given to the implementation of the projected potential approximation. A hierarchy of approximations to expressions for inelastic images is presented. Emphasis is placed on the conditions that must hold in each case. The expressions that justify the most direct, visual interpretation of experimental data are also the most approximate. Therefore, caution must be exercised in selecting experimental parameters that validate the approximations needed for the analysis technique used. To make the most direct, visual interpretation of electron-energy-loss spectroscopic images from core-shell excitations requires detector improvements commensurate with those that aberration correction provides for the probe-forming lens. Such conditions can be relaxed when detailed simulations are performed as part of the analysis of experimental data.

  15. In situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minor, Andrew Murphy

    This dissertation presents the development of the novel mechanical testing technique of in situ nanoindentation in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). This technique makes it possible to simultaneously observe and quantify the mechanical behavior of nano-scale volumes of solids. Chapter 2 details the unique specimen preparation techniques employed to meet the geometrical constraints of the in situ experiments. These techniques include bulk silicon micromachining and the use of a focused ion beam. In section 2.4 a method of voltage-controlled mechanical testing is derived theoretically and proven experimentally. This method enables the quantification of the mechanical behavior during in situ nanoindentation experiments. Three classes of material systems were studied with this new technique: (1) bulk single crystal, (2) a soft thin film on a harder substrate and (3) a hard thin film on a softer substrate. Section 3.2 provides the first direct evidence of dislocation nucleation in single crystal silicon at room temperature. In contrast to the observation of phase transformations during conventional indentation experiments, the unique geometry employed for the in situ experiments resulted in dislocation plasticity. In section 3.3 results from in situ nanoindentation of Al films on Si substrates are presented. These results include the correlation of the microstructural deformation behavior with load vs. displacement data. It is shown that a sharp change in the force-displacement response at the elastic-to-plastic transition signifies the nucleation of dislocations. Additionally, the softening of sub-micron grains with size is observed. Section 3.4 discussed the influence of the substrate on the indentation response of two thin film/substrate systems where the films were harder than the substrate. Amorphous diamond on Si and epitaxial TiN on MgO (001) systems were studied. It was found that the deformation in the harder films was controlled by the deformation in

  16. The use of specimen tilt in transmission electron microscopy of the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Milroy, A M; Ralston, D D

    1988-09-01

    Thin sections of nervous tissue were viewed at different tilt angles using a transmission electron microscope equipped with a eucentric goniometer stage. In a comparison study of various degrees of tilt, one can observe additional morphological features within synaptic profiles, define subsynaptic structures such as Taxi-bodies, and clearly see the crystalline formation of cytochemical tracers. This study demonstrates the value of tilting thin-sections in the analysis of synapses and other biological material at the ultrastructural level. PMID:3193243

  17. Contamination mitigation strategies for scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, D R G

    2015-06-01

    Modern scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) enables imaging and microanalysis at very high magnification. In the case of aberration-corrected STEM, atomic resolution is readily achieved. However, the electron fluxes used may be up to three orders of magnitude greater than those typically employed in conventional STEM. Since specimen contamination often increases with electron flux, specimen cleanliness is a critical factor in obtaining meaningful data when carrying out high magnification STEM. A range of different specimen cleaning methods have been applied to a variety of specimen types. The contamination rate has been measured quantitatively to assess the effectiveness of cleaning. The methods studied include: baking, cooling, plasma cleaning, beam showering and UV/ozone exposure. Of the methods tested, beam showering is rapid, experimentally convenient and very effective on a wide range of specimens. Oxidative plasma cleaning is also very effective and can be applied to specimens on carbon support films, albeit with some care. For electron beam-sensitive materials, cooling may be the method of choice. In most cases, preliminary removal of the bulk of the contamination by methods such as baking or plasma cleaning, followed by beam showering, where necessary, can result in a contamination-free specimen suitable for extended atomic scale imaging and analysis.

  18. An additional channel for FM signal transmission in standard fiber-optic AM communication lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, V. V.; Anufriev, K. M.; Toguzov, N. V.; Il'ichev, I. V.; Shamray, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    A paradigm has been developed according to which an additional FM signal transfer channel is formed in a standard optical fiber transmission line without violating the main AM channel operation. Using the proposed approach, an RS-232 interface signal has been experimentally transferred via a standard intraobject 100-Mbit Ethernet line based on an SMF-28 single-mode optical fiber.

  19. Transmission zero in a quantum dot with strong electron-electron interaction: Perturbative conductance calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sejoong; Lee, Hyun-Woo

    2006-05-01

    A pioneering experiment [E. Schuster, E. Buks, M. Heiblum, D. Mahalu, V. Umansky, and Hadas Shtrikman, Nature 385, 417 (1997)] reported the measurement of the transmission phase of an electron traversing a quantum dot and found the intriguing feature of a sudden phase drop in the conductance valleys. Based on the Friedel sum rule for a spinless effective one-dimensional system, it has been previously argued [H.-W. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 82, 2358 (1999)] that the sudden phase drop should be accompanied by the vanishing of the transmission amplitude, or transmission zero. Here we address roles of strong electron-electron interactions on the electron transport through a two-level quantum dot where one level couples with the leads much more strongly than the other level does [P. G. Silvestrov and Y. Imry, Phys. Rev. Lett. 85, 2565 (2000)]. We perform a perturbative conductance calculation with an explicit account of large charging energy and verify that the resulting conductance exhibits transmission zero, in agreement with the analysis based on the Friedel sum rule.

  20. Radiation belt electron precipitation by man-made VLF transmissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamble, Rory J.; Rodger, Craig J.; Clilverd, Mark A.; Sauvaud, Jean-André; Thomson, Neil R.; Stewart, S. L.; McCormick, Robert J.; Parrot, Michel; Berthelier, Jean-Jacques

    2008-10-01

    Enhancements of drift-loss cone fluxes in the inner radiation belt have been observed to coincide with the geographic location of the powerful VLF transmitter NWC. In this paper we expand upon the earlier study to examine the occurrence frequency of drift-loss cone enhancements observed above transmitters and the intensity of the flux enhancements and to demonstrate the linkage to transmitter operation. Our study has confirmed the strong dependence that these enhancements have upon nighttime ionospheric conditions. No enhancements were observed during daytime periods, consistent with the increased ionospheric absorption. We have also confirmed the persistent occurrence of the wisp features east of the NWC transmitter. The enhancements are initially observed within a few degrees west of NWC and are present in 95% of the nighttime orbital data east of the transmitter for time periods when the transmitter is broadcasting. No enhancements are observed when NWC is not broadcasting. This provides conclusive evidence of the linkage between these drift-loss cone electron flux enhancements and transmissions from NWC. When contrasted with periods when NWC is nonoperational, there are typically ˜430 times more 100-260 keV resonant electrons present in the drift-loss cone across L = 1.67-1.9 owing to NWC transmissions. There are almost no wisp-like enhancements produced by the transmitter NPM, despite its low-latitude location and relatively high output power. The lack of any wisp enhancement for L < 1.6 suggests that nonducted propagation is an inefficient mechanism for scattering electrons, which explains the lower cutoff in L of the NWC-generated wisps and the lack of NPM-generated wisps.

  1. Nanometres-resolution Kikuchi patterns from materials science specimens with transmission electron forward scatter diffraction in the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Brodusch, N; Demers, H; Gauvin, R

    2013-04-01

    A charge-coupled device camera of an electron backscattered diffraction system in a scanning electron microscope was positioned below a thin specimen and transmission Kikuchi patterns were collected. Contrary to electron backscattered diffraction, transmission electron forward scatter diffraction provides phase identification and orientation mapping at the nanoscale. The minimum Pd particle size for which a Kikuchi diffraction pattern was detected and indexed reliably was 5.6 nm. An orientation mapping resolution of 5 nm was measured at 30 kV. The resolution obtained with transmission electron forward scatter diffraction was of the same order of magnitude than that reported in electron nanodiffraction in the transmission electron microscope. An energy dispersive spectrometer X-ray map and a transmission electron forward scatter diffraction orientation map were acquired simultaneously. The high-resolution chemical, phase and orientation maps provided at once information on the chemical form, orientation and coherency of precipitates in an aluminium-lithium 2099 alloy.

  2. Concurrent in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Hattar, K.; Bufford, D. C.; Buller, D. L.

    2014-08-29

    An in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope has been developed and is operational at Sandia National Laboratories. This facility permits high spatial resolution, real time observation of electron transparent samples under ion irradiation, implantation, mechanical loading, corrosive environments, and combinations thereof. This includes the simultaneous implantation of low-energy gas ions (0.8–30 keV) during high-energy heavy ion irradiation (0.8–48 MeV). In addition, initial results in polycrystalline gold foils are provided to demonstrate the range of capabilities.

  3. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented.

  4. Factors influencing quantitative liquid (scanning) transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abellan, P; Woehl, T J; Parent, L R; Browning, N D; Evans, J E; Arslan, I

    2014-05-18

    One of the experimental challenges in the study of nanomaterials in liquids in the (scanning) transmission electron microscope ((S)TEM) is gaining quantitative information. A successful experiment in the fluid stage will depend upon the ability to plan for sensitive factors such as the electron dose applied, imaging mode, acceleration voltage, beam-induced solution chemistry changes, and the specifics of solution reactivity. In this paper, we make use of a visual approach to show the extent of damage of different instrumental and experimental factors in liquid samples imaged in the (S)TEM. Previous results as well as new insights are presented to create an overview of beam-sample interactions identified for changing imaging and experimental conditions. This work establishes procedures to understand the effect of the electron beam on a solution, provides information to allow for a deliberate choice of the optimal experimental conditions to enable quantification, and identifies the experimental factors that require further analysis for achieving fully quantitative results in the liquid (S)TEM.

  5. Transmission electron microscopy in molecular structural biology: A historical survey.

    PubMed

    Harris, J Robin

    2015-09-01

    In this personal, historic account of macromolecular transmission electron microscopy (TEM), published data from the 1940s through to recent times is surveyed, within the context of the remarkable progress that has been achieved during this time period. The evolution of present day molecular structural biology is described in relation to the associated biological disciplines. The contribution of numerous electron microscope pioneers to the development of the subject is discussed. The principal techniques for TEM specimen preparation, thin sectioning, metal shadowing, negative staining and plunge-freezing (vitrification) of thin aqueous samples are described, with a selection of published images to emphasise the virtues of each method. The development of digital image analysis and 3D reconstruction is described in detail as applied to electron crystallography and reconstructions from helical structures, 2D membrane crystals as well as single particle 3D reconstruction of icosahedral viruses and macromolecules. The on-going development of new software, algorithms and approaches is highlighted before specific examples of the historical progress of the structural biology of proteins and viruses are presented. PMID:25475529

  6. 46 CFR 530.10 - Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... transmission errors. 530.10 Section 530.10 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN..., cancellation, and electronic transmission errors. (a) Terms. When used in this section, the following terms... in appendix A to this part. (d) Electronic transmission errors. An authorized person who...

  7. Transmission electron microscope sample holder with optical features

    DOEpatents

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2012-03-27

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  8. Simultaneous orientation and thickness mapping in transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Özdöl, V. Burak; Koch, Christoph T.

    2014-12-04

    In this paper we introduce an approach for simultaneous thickness and orientation mapping of crystalline samples by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local thickness and orientation values can be extracted from experimental dark-field (DF) image data acquired at different specimen tilts. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map thickness and crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a commercial semiconductor device, containing multiple 22 nm technology transistor structures. The performance and limitations of our method are discussed and comparedmore » to those of other techniques available.« less

  9. [Multiple transmission electron microscopic image stitching based on sift features].

    PubMed

    Li, Mu; Lu, Yanmeng; Han, Shuaihu; Wu, Zhuobin; Chen, Jiajing; Liu, Zhexing; Cao, Lei

    2015-08-01

    We proposed a new stitching method based on sift features to obtain an enlarged view of transmission electron microscopic (TEM) images with a high resolution. The sift features were extracted from the images, which were then combined with fitted polynomial correction field to correct the images, followed by image alignment based on the sift features. The image seams at the junction were finally removed by Poisson image editing to achieve seamless stitching, which was validated on 60 local glomerular TEM images with an image alignment error of 62.5 to 187.5 nm. Compared with 3 other stitching methods, the proposed method could effectively reduce image deformation and avoid artifacts to facilitate renal biopsy pathological diagnosis. PMID:26403733

  10. Temperature Calibration for In Situ Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Winterstein, JP; Lin, PA; Sharma, R

    2016-01-01

    In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) experiments require specimen heating holders to study material behavior in gaseous environments at elevated temperatures. In order to extract meaningful kinetic parameters, such as activation energies, it is essential to have a direct and accurate measurement of local sample temperature. This is particularly important if the sample temperature might fluctuate, for example when room temperature gases are introduced to the sample area. Using selected-area diffraction (SAD) in an ETEM, the lattice parameter of Ag nanoparticles was measured as a function of the temperature and pressure of hydrogen gas to provide a calibration of the local sample temperature. SAD permits measurement of temperature to an accuracy of ± 30 °C using Ag lattice expansion. Gas introduction can cause sample cooling of several hundred degrees celsius for gas pressures achievable in the ETEM. PMID:26441334

  11. Electronic transmission of prescriptions: towards realising the dream.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Darren; Chadwick, David W

    2004-01-01

    The UK National Health Service (NHS) is about to commence upon major computerisation of its processes as part of a government plan of modernisation. One of these is the Electronic Transmission of Prescription (ETP). To achieve success it is important to know what benefits are expected from the new system and what barriers to adoption the systems will face. This paper reviews substantial ETP published material, and identifies 17 issues that need to be addressed. These issues are categorised under four major headings of stakeholders, cost, technology, and current process and practice, and are then further classified as positive or negative influences on the project's success. Many of these influences will be common to most of the computerisation projects to be undertaken by the NHS, and therefore this paper has wider applicability than ETP. PMID:18048207

  12. Annular dark field transmission electron microscopy for protein structure determination.

    PubMed

    Koeck, Philip J B

    2016-02-01

    Recently annular dark field (ADF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been advocated as a means of recording images of biological specimens with better signal to noise ratio (SNR) than regular bright field images. I investigate whether and how such images could be used to determine the three-dimensional structure of proteins given that an ADF aperture with a suitable pass-band can be manufactured and used in practice. I develop an approximate theory of ADF-TEM image formation for weak amplitude and phase objects and test this theory using computer simulations. I also test whether these simulated images can be used to calculate a three-dimensional model of the protein using standard software and discuss problems and possible ways to overcome these. PMID:26656466

  13. Dynamics of a nanodroplet under a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Fong Yew; Mirsaidov, Utkur M.; Matsudaira, Paul; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the cyclical stick-slip motion of water nanodroplets on a hydrophilic substrate viewed with and stimulated by a transmission electron microscope. Using a continuum long wave theory, we show how the electrostatic stress imposed by non-uniform charge distribution causes a pinned convex drop to deform into a toroidal shape, with the shape characterized by the competition between the electrostatic stress and the surface tension of the drop, as well as the charge density distribution which follows a Poisson equation. A horizontal gradient in the charge density creates a lateral driving force, which when sufficiently large, overcomes the pinning induced by surface heterogeneities in the substrate disjoining pressure, causing the drop to slide on the substrate via a cyclical stick-slip motion. Our model predicts step-like dynamics in drop displacement and surface area jumps, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  14. Dynamics of a nanodroplet under a transmission electron microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Leong, Fong Yew; Mirsaidov, Utkur M.; Matsudaira, Paul; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-01-15

    We investigate the cyclical stick-slip motion of water nanodroplets on a hydrophilic substrate viewed with and stimulated by a transmission electron microscope. Using a continuum long wave theory, we show how the electrostatic stress imposed by non-uniform charge distribution causes a pinned convex drop to deform into a toroidal shape, with the shape characterized by the competition between the electrostatic stress and the surface tension of the drop, as well as the charge density distribution which follows a Poisson equation. A horizontal gradient in the charge density creates a lateral driving force, which when sufficiently large, overcomes the pinning induced by surface heterogeneities in the substrate disjoining pressure, causing the drop to slide on the substrate via a cyclical stick-slip motion. Our model predicts step-like dynamics in drop displacement and surface area jumps, qualitatively consistent with experimental observations.

  15. Transmission electron microscope cells for use with liquid samples

    DOEpatents

    Khalid, Waqas; Alivisatos, Paul A.; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-08-09

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and devices related to transmission electron microscopy cells for use with liquids. In one aspect a device includes a substrate, a first graphene layer, and a second graphene layer. The substrate has a first surface and a second surface. The first surface defines a first channel, a second channel, and an outlet channel. The first channel and the second channel are joined to the outlet channel. The outlet channel defines a viewport region forming a though hole in the substrate. The first graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including an interior area of the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel. The second graphene layer overlays the first surface of the substrate, including open regions defined by the first channel, the second channel, and the outlet channel.

  16. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy: aqueous suspensions of nanoscale objects.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Nathan D; Penn, R Lee

    2013-12-01

    Direct imaging of nanoscale objects suspended in liquid media can be accomplished using cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). Cryo-TEM has been used with particular success in microbiology and other biological fields. Samples are prepared by plunging a thin film of sample into an appropriate cryogen, which essentially produces a snapshot of the suspended objects in their liquid medium. With successful sample preparation, cryo-TEM images can facilitate elucidation of aggregation and self-assembly, as well as provide detailed information about cells and viruses. This work provides an explanation of sample preparation, detailed examples of the many artifacts found in cryo-TEM of aqueous samples, and other key considerations for successful cryo-TEM imaging.

  17. Detector non-uniformity in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Findlay, S D; LeBeau, J M

    2013-01-01

    A non-uniform response across scanning transmission electron microscope annular detectors has been found experimentally, but is seldom incorporated into simulations. Through case study simulations, we establish the nature and scale of the discrepancies which may arise from failing to account for detector non-uniformity. If standard detectors are used at long camera lengths such that the detector is within or near to the bright field region, we find errors in contrast of the order of 10%, sufficiently small for qualitative work but non-trivial as experiments become more quantitative. In cases where the detector has been characterized in advance, we discuss the detector response normalization and how it may be incorporated in simulations.

  18. Nanocrystal Phase Identification by Lattice Fringe Fingerprinting from High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjorge, Ruben; Seipel, Bjoern; Moeck, Peter; Fraundorf, Philip

    2006-05-01

    Lattice fringe fingerprinting is a novel and powerful method of identifying and characterizing nanocrystalline structures or materials based on images from direct space high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We examine Fourier transformed HRTEM images of nanocrystals in certain orientations (i.e. lattice fringes and cross fringes) in order to obtain a lattice fringe fingerprint plot. Such plots are used to identify a crystalline nanoparticle by comparing the experimental data with data that are derived from a comprehensive database. A lattice fringe fingerprint plot is similar to a classical X-ray powder diffractogram, but an important advantage is that the intersection angles of lattice fringes give us additional information. When transmission electron microscope image acquisition and data interpretation are automated and connected to a comprehensive database (such as our Nano-Crystallography Database, http://nanocrystallography.research.pdx.edu/), fringe fingerprinting will be able to compete with powder X-ray diffraction in identifying unknown nanocrystals on a routine basis.

  19. Depth Sectioning with the Aberration-Corrected Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Borisevich, Albina Y; Lupini, Andrew R; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2006-01-01

    The ability to correct the aberrations of the probe-forming lens in the scanning transmission electron microscope provides not only a significant improvement in transverse resolution but in addition brings depth resolution at the nanometer scale. Aberration correction therefore opens up the possibility of 3D imaging by optical sectioning. Here we develop a definition for the depth resolution for scanning transmission electron microscope depth sectioning and present initial results from this method. Objects such as catalytic metal clusters and single atoms on various support materials are imaged in three dimensions with a resolution of several nanometers. Effective focal depth is determined by statistical analysis and the contributing factors are discussed. Finally, current challenges and future capabilities available through new instruments are discussed.

  20. Scanning transmission electron microscopy strain measurement from millisecond frames of a direct electron charge coupled device

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Knut; Rosenauer, Andreas; Ryll, Henning; Ordavo, Ivan; Ihle, Sebastian; Soltau, Heike; Strueder, Lothar; Volz, Kerstin; Zweck, Josef

    2012-11-19

    A high-speed direct electron detection system is introduced to the field of transmission electron microscopy and applied to strain measurements in semiconductor nanostructures. In particular, a focused electron probe with a diameter of 0.5 nm was scanned over a fourfold quantum layer stack with alternating compressive and tensile strain and diffracted discs have been recorded on a scintillator-free direct electron detector with a frame time of 1 ms. We show that the applied algorithms can accurately detect Bragg beam positions despite a significant point spread each 300 kV electron causes during detection on the scintillator-free camera. For millisecond exposures, we find that strain can be measured with a precision of 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}, enabling, e.g., strain mapping in a 100 Multiplication-Sign 100 nm{sup 2} region with 0.5 nm resolution in 40 s.

  1. Scanning transmission electron microscopy strain measurement from millisecond frames of a direct electron charge coupled device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Knut; Ryll, Henning; Ordavo, Ivan; Ihle, Sebastian; Strüder, Lothar; Volz, Kerstin; Zweck, Josef; Soltau, Heike; Rosenauer, Andreas

    2012-11-01

    A high-speed direct electron detection system is introduced to the field of transmission electron microscopy and applied to strain measurements in semiconductor nanostructures. In particular, a focused electron probe with a diameter of 0.5 nm was scanned over a fourfold quantum layer stack with alternating compressive and tensile strain and diffracted discs have been recorded on a scintillator-free direct electron detector with a frame time of 1 ms. We show that the applied algorithms can accurately detect Bragg beam positions despite a significant point spread each 300 kV electron causes during detection on the scintillator-free camera. For millisecond exposures, we find that strain can be measured with a precision of 1.3 × 10-3, enabling, e.g., strain mapping in a 100×100 nm2 region with 0.5 nm resolution in 40 s.

  2. Development of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray emission spectrometers for transmission electron microscopes--an introduction of valence electron spectroscopy for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Terauchi, Masami; Koike, Masato; Fukushima, Kurio; Kimura, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Two types of wavelength-dispersive soft X-ray spectrometers, a high-dispersion type and a conventional one, for transmission electron microscopes were constructed. Those spectrometers were used to study the electronic states of valence electrons (bonding electrons). Both spectrometers extended the acceptable energy regions to higher than 2000 eV. The best energy resolution of 0.08 eV was obtained for an Al L-emission spectrum by using the high-dispersion type spectrometer. By using the spectrometer, C K-emission of carbon allotropes, Cu L-emission of Cu(1-x)Zn(x) alloys and Pt M-emission spectra were presented. The FWHM value of 12 eV was obtained for the Pt Malpha-emission peak. The performance of the conventional one was also presented for ZnS and a section specimen of a multilayer device. W-M and Si-K emissions were clearly resolved. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has an advantage for obtaining spectra from a single crystalline specimen with a defined crystal setting. As an example of anisotropic soft X-ray emission, C K-emission spectra of single crystalline graphite with different crystal settings were presented. From the spectra, density of states of pi- and sigma-bondings were separately derived. These results demonstrated a method to analyse the electronic states of valence electrons of materials in the nanometre scale based on TEM. PMID:20371492

  3. Scanning tunneling and scanning transmission electron microscopy of biological membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemmer, A.; Reichelt, R.; Engel, A.; Rosenbusch, J. P.; Ringger, M.; Hidber, H. R.; Güntherodt, H. J.

    1987-03-01

    The feasibility of imaging porin membrane, which is a reconstituted biological membrane consisting of phospholipid and protein, was studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Due to detailed knowledge of its composition from biochemical and its three-dimensional (3D) structure from electron microscopical analysis, porin vesicles seem to be a suitable model specimen for exploring the application of STM in biology. Unstained vesicles adsorbed onto a thin amorphous carbon film supported by a finder grid were localized using a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) at low irradiation doses ( < 100 {e -}/{nm 2}). Suitable areas of the sample were then positioned in the STM by a light optical telescope. STM images taken under ambient pressure from empty amorphous carbon films exhibited corrugations in the range of ⩽ 1 nm, whereas steps having a height of 5 nm were reproducibly observed on grids with porin vesicles. Since this value is in good agreement with that obtained from air-dried metal shadowed vesicles, we interpret these steps as the edges of porin membranes.

  4. Combined scanning transmission electron microscopy tilt- and focal series.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Tim; Baudoin, Jean-Pierre; Lupini, Andrew R; Kübel, Christian; Slusallek, Philipp; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-04-01

    In this study, a combined tilt- and focal series is proposed as a new recording scheme for high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) tomography. Three-dimensional (3D) data were acquired by mechanically tilting the specimen, and recording a through-focal series at each tilt direction. The sample was a whole-mount macrophage cell with embedded gold nanoparticles. The tilt-focal algebraic reconstruction technique (TF-ART) is introduced as a new algorithm to reconstruct tomograms from such combined tilt- and focal series. The feasibility of TF-ART was demonstrated by 3D reconstruction of the experimental 3D data. The results were compared with a conventional STEM tilt series of a similar sample. The combined tilt- and focal series led to smaller "missing wedge" artifacts, and a higher axial resolution than obtained for the STEM tilt series, thus improving on one of the main issues of tilt series-based electron tomography.

  5. High cycle fatigue in the transmission electron microscope

    DOE PAGES

    Bufford, Daniel C.; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M.; Syed Asif, S. A.; Boyce, Brad L.; Hattar, Khalid

    2016-06-28

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this paper, the tension–tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were appliedmore » at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 106 cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ~10–12 m·cycle–1. This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. Finally, these observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu.« less

  6. High Cycle Fatigue in the Transmission Electron Microscope.

    PubMed

    Bufford, Daniel C; Stauffer, Douglas; Mook, William M; Syed Asif, S A; Boyce, Brad L; Hattar, Khalid

    2016-08-10

    One of the most common causes of structural failure in metals is fatigue induced by cyclic loading. Historically, microstructure-level analysis of fatigue cracks has primarily been performed post mortem. However, such investigations do not directly reveal the internal structural processes at work near micro- and nanoscale fatigue cracks and thus do not provide direct evidence of active microstructural mechanisms. In this study, the tension-tension fatigue behavior of nanocrystalline Cu was monitored in real time at the nanoscale by utilizing a new capability for quantitative cyclic mechanical loading performed in situ in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Controllable loads were applied at frequencies from one to several hundred hertz, enabling accumulations of 10(6) cycles within 1 h. The nanometer-scale spatial resolution of the TEM allows quantitative fatigue crack growth studies at very slow crack growth rates, measured here at ∼10(-12) m·cycle(-1). This represents an incipient threshold regime that is well below the tensile yield stress and near the minimum conditions for fatigue crack growth. Evidence of localized deformation and grain growth within 150 nm of the crack tip was observed by both standard imaging and precession electron diffraction orientation mapping. These observations begin to reveal with unprecedented detail the local microstructural processes that govern damage accumulation, crack nucleation, and crack propagation during fatigue loading in nanocrystalline Cu. PMID:27351706

  7. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Levin, Barnaby D.A.; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M.C.; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D.; Robinson, Richard D.; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F.; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A.; Hovden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data. PMID:27272459

  8. High-resolution imaging in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Jesson, D. E.

    1992-03-01

    The high-resolution imaging of crystalline materials in the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is reviewed with particular emphasis on the conditions under which an incoherent image can be obtained. It is shown that a high-angle annular detector can be used to break the coherence of the imaging process, in the transverse plane through the geometry of the detector, or in three dimensions if multiphonon diffuse scattering is detected. In the latter case, each atom can be treated as a highly independent source of high-angle scattering. The most effective fast electron states are therefore tightly bound s-type Bloch states. Furthermore, they add constructively for each incident angle in the coherent STEM probe, so that s states are responsible for practically the entire image contrast. Dynamical effects are largely removed, and almost perfect incoherent imaging is achieved. S states are relatively insensitive to neighboring strings, so that incoherent imaging is maintained for superlattice and interfaces, and supercell calculations are unnecessary. With an optimum probe profile, the incoherent image represents a direct image of the crystal projection, with compositional sensitivity built in through the strong dependence of the scattering cross sections on atomic number Z.

  9. Thin Dielectric Film Thickness Determination by Advanced Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, A. C.; Foran, B.; Kisielowski, C.; Muller, D. A.; Pennycook, S. J.; Principe, E.; Stemmer, S.

    2003-12-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) has been used as the ultimate method of thickness measurement for thin films. The appearance of phase contrast interference patterns in HR-TEM images has long been confused as the appearance of a crystal lattice by nonspecialists. Relatively easy to interpret crystal lattice images are now directly observed with the introduction of annular dark-field detectors for scanning TEM (STEM). With the recent development of reliable lattice image processing software that creates crystal structure images from phase contrast data, HR-TEM can also provide crystal lattice images. The resolution of both methods has been steadily improved reaching now into the sub-Ångstrom region. Improvements in electron lens and image analysis software are increasing the spatial resolution of both methods. Optimum resolution for STEM requires that the probe beam be highly localized. In STEM, beam localization is enhanced by selection of the correct aperture. When STEM measurement is done using a highly localized probe beam, HR-TEM and STEM measurement of the thickness of silicon oxynitride films agree within experimental error. In this article, the optimum conditions for HR-TEM and STEM measurement are discussed along with a method for repeatable film thickness determination. The impact of sample thickness is also discussed. The key result in this article is the proposal of a reproducible method for film thickness determination.

  10. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D; Robinson, Richard D; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A; Hovden, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data. PMID:27272459

  11. Thin dielectric film thickness determination by advanced transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diebold, A.C.; Foran, B.; Kisielowski, C.; Muller, D.; Pennycook, S.; Principe, E.; Stemmer, S.

    2003-09-01

    High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM) has been used as the ultimate method of thickness measurement for thin films. The appearance of phase contrast interference patterns in HR-TEM images has long been confused as the appearance of a crystal lattice by non-specialists. Relatively easy to interpret crystal lattice images are now directly observed with the introduction of annular dark field detectors for scanning TEM (STEM). With the recent development of reliable lattice image processing software that creates crystal structure images from phase contrast data, HR-TEM can also provide crystal lattice images. The resolution of both methods was steadily improved reaching now into the sub Angstrom region. Improvements in electron lens and image analysis software are increasing the spatial resolution of both methods. Optimum resolution for STEM requires that the probe beam be highly localized. In STEM, beam localization is enhanced by selection of the correct aperture. When STEM measurement is done using a highly localized probe beam, HR-TEM and STEM measurement of the thickness of silicon oxynitride films agree within experimental error. In this paper, the optimum conditions for HR-TEM and STEM measurement are discussed along with a method for repeatable film thickness determination. The impact of sample thickness is also discussed. The key result in this paper is the proposal of a reproducible method for film thickness determination.

  12. Nanomaterial datasets to advance tomography in scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Levin, Barnaby D A; Padgett, Elliot; Chen, Chien-Chun; Scott, M C; Xu, Rui; Theis, Wolfgang; Jiang, Yi; Yang, Yongsoo; Ophus, Colin; Zhang, Haitao; Ha, Don-Hyung; Wang, Deli; Yu, Yingchao; Abruña, Hector D; Robinson, Richard D; Ercius, Peter; Kourkoutis, Lena F; Miao, Jianwei; Muller, David A; Hovden, Robert

    2016-06-07

    Electron tomography in materials science has flourished with the demand to characterize nanoscale materials in three dimensions (3D). Access to experimental data is vital for developing and validating reconstruction methods that improve resolution and reduce radiation dose requirements. This work presents five high-quality scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) tomography datasets in order to address the critical need for open access data in this field. The datasets represent the current limits of experimental technique, are of high quality, and contain materials with structural complexity. Included are tomographic series of a hyperbranched Co2P nanocrystal, platinum nanoparticles on a carbon nanofibre imaged over the complete 180° tilt range, a platinum nanoparticle and a tungsten needle both imaged at atomic resolution by equal slope tomography, and a through-focal tilt series of PtCu nanoparticles. A volumetric reconstruction from every dataset is provided for comparison and development of post-processing and visualization techniques. Researchers interested in creating novel data processing and reconstruction algorithms will now have access to state of the art experimental test data.

  13. Amyloid structure and assembly: insights from scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Goldsbury, Claire; Baxa, Ulrich; Simon, Martha N; Steven, Alasdair C; Engel, Andreas; Wall, Joseph S; Aebi, Ueli; Müller, Shirley A

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  14. High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) of nanophase ferric oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, D. C.; Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Iron oxide minerals are the prime candidates for Fe(III) signatures in remotely sensed Martian surface spectra. Magnetic, Mossbauer, and reflectance spectroscopy have been carried out in the laboratory in order to understand the mineralogical nature of Martian analog ferric oxide minerals of submicron or nanometer size range. Out of the iron oxide minerals studied, nanometer sized ferric oxides are promising candidates for possible Martian spectral analogs. 'Nanophase ferric oxide (np-Ox)' is a generic term for ferric oxide/oxihydroxide particles having nanoscale (less than 10 nm) particle dimensions. Ferrihydrite, superparamagnetic particles of hematite, maghemite and goethite, and nanometer sized particles of inherently paramagnetic lepidocrocite are all examples of nanophase ferric oxides. np-Ox particles in general do not give X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with well defined peaks and would often be classified as X-ray amorphous. Therefore, different np-Oxs preparations should be characterized using a more sensitive technique e.g., high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The purpose of this study is to report the particle size, morphology and crystalline order, of five np-Ox samples by HRTEM imaging and electron diffraction (ED).

  15. Amyloid Structure and Assembly: Insights from Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsbury, C.; Wall, J.; Baxa, U.; Simon, M. N.; Steven, A. C.; Engel, A.; Aebi, U.; Muller, S. A.

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are filamentous protein aggregates implicated in several common diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes. Similar structures are also the molecular principle of the infectious spongiform encephalopathies such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans, scrapie in sheep, and of the so-called yeast prions, inherited non-chromosomal elements found in yeast and fungi. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is often used to delineate the assembly mechanism and structural properties of amyloid aggregates. In this review we consider specifically contributions and limitations of STEM for the investigation of amyloid assembly pathways, fibril polymorphisms and structural models of amyloid fibrils. This type of microscopy provides the only method to directly measure the mass-per-length (MPL) of individual filaments. Made on both in vitro assembled and ex vivo samples, STEM mass measurements have illuminated the hierarchical relationships between amyloid fibrils and revealed that polymorphic fibrils and various globular oligomers can assemble simultaneously from a single polypeptide. The MPLs also impose strong constraints on possible packing schemes, assisting in molecular model building when combined with high-resolution methods like solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR).

  16. Non-additive model for specific heat of electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmo, D. H. A. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Silva, R.; Mello, V. D.

    2016-10-01

    By using non-additive Tsallis entropy we demonstrate numerically that one-dimensional quasicrystals, whose energy spectra are multifractal Cantor sets, are characterized by an entropic parameter, and calculate the electronic specific heat, where we consider a non-additive entropy Sq. In our method we consider an energy spectra calculated using the one-dimensional tight binding Schrödinger equation, and their bands (or levels) are scaled onto the [ 0 , 1 ] interval. The Tsallis' formalism is applied to the energy spectra of Fibonacci and double-period one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We analytically obtain an expression for the specific heat that we consider to be more appropriate to calculate this quantity in those quasiperiodic structures.

  17. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Magnetite Plaquettes in Orgueil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Q. H. S.; Han, J.; Zolensky, M.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetite sometimes takes the form of a plaquette - barrel-shaped stack of magnetite disks - in carbonaceous chondrites (CC) that show evidence of aqueous alteration. The asymmetric nature of the plaquettes caused Pizzarello and Groy to propose magnetite plaquettes as a naturally asymmetric mineral that can indroduce symmetry-breaking in organic molecules. Our previous synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (SXRCT) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of the magnetite plaquettes in fifteen CCs indicate that magnetite plaquettes are composed of nearly parallel discs, and the crystallographic orientations of the discs change around a rotational axis normal to the discs surfaces. In order to further investigate the nanostructures of magnetite plaquettes, we made two focused ion beam (FIB) sections of nine magnetite plaquettes from a thin section of CI Orgueil for transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. The X-ray spectrum imaging shows that the magnetite discs are purely iron oxide Fe3O4 (42.9 at% Fe and 57.1 at% O), which suggest that the plaquettes are of aqueous origin as it is difficult to form pure magnetite as a nebular condensate. The selected area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns acquired across the plaquettes show that the magnetite discs are single crystals. SEM and EBSD analyses suggest that the planar surfaces of the magnetite discs belong to the {100} planes of the cubic inverse spinel structure, which are supported by our TEM observations. Kerridge et al. suggested that the epitaxial relationship between magnetite plaquette and carbonate determines the magnetite face. However, according to our TEM observation, the association of magnetite with porous networks of phyllosilicate indicates that the epitaxial relationship with carbonate is not essential to the formation of magnetite plaquettes. It was difficult to determine the preferred rotational orientation of the plaquettes due to the symmetry of the cubic structure

  18. Spatial Resolution in Scanning Electron Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Without a Specimen Vacuum Chamber.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Kayla X; Holtz, Megan E; Richmond-Decker, Justin; Muller, David A

    2016-08-01

    A long-standing goal of electron microscopy has been the high-resolution characterization of specimens in their native environment. However, electron optics require high vacuum to maintain an unscattered and focused probe, a challenge for specimens requiring atmospheric or liquid environments. Here, we use an electron-transparent window at the base of a scanning electron microscope's objective lens to separate column vacuum from the specimen, enabling imaging under ambient conditions, without a specimen vacuum chamber. We demonstrate in-air imaging of specimens at nanoscale resolution using backscattered scanning electron microscopy (airSEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy. We explore resolution and contrast using Monte Carlo simulations and analytical models. We find that nanometer-scale resolution can be obtained at gas path lengths up to 400 μm, although contrast drops with increasing gas path length. As the electron-transparent window scatters considerably more than gas at our operating conditions, we observe that the densities and thicknesses of the electron-transparent window are the dominant limiting factors for image contrast at lower operating voltages. By enabling a variety of detector configurations, the airSEM is applicable to a wide range of environmental experiments including the imaging of hydrated biological specimens and in situ chemical and electrochemical processes.

  19. Investigation of microstructure in additive manufactured Inconel 625 by spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Gao, Yan; Dial, Laura C.; Grazzi, Francesco; Shinohara, Takenao

    2016-07-08

    Non-destructive testing techniques based on neutron imaging and diffraction can provide information on the internal structure of relatively thick metal samples (up to several cm), which are opaque to other conventional non-destructive methods. Spatially resolved neutron transmission spectroscopy is an extension of traditional neutron radiography, where multiple images are acquired simultaneously, each corresponding to a narrow range of energy. The analysis of transmission spectra enables studies of bulk microstructures at the spatial resolution comparable to the detector pixel. In this study we demonstrate the possibility of imaging (with ~100 μm resolution) distribution of some microstructure properties, such as residual strain,more » texture, voids and impurities in Inconel 625 samples manufactured with an additive manufacturing method called direct metal laser melting (DMLM). Although this imaging technique can be implemented only in a few large-scale facilities, it can be a valuable tool for optimization of additive manufacturing techniques and materials and for correlating bulk microstructure properties to manufacturing process parameters. Additionally, the experimental strain distribution can help validate finite element models which many industries use to predict the residual stress distributions in additive manufactured components.« less

  20. Sample thickness determination by scanning transmission electron microscopy at low electron energies.

    PubMed

    Volkenandt, Tobias; Müller, Erich; Gerthsen, Dagmar

    2014-02-01

    Sample thickness is a decisive parameter for any quantification of image information and composition in transmission electron microscopy. In this context, we present a method to determine the local sample thickness by scanning transmission electron microscopy at primary energies below 30 keV. The image intensity is measured with respect to the intensity of the incident electron beam and can be directly compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Screened Rutherford and Mott scattering cross-sections are evaluated with respect to fitting experimental data with simulated image intensities as a function of the atomic number of the sample material and primary electron energy. The presented method is tested for sample materials covering a wide range of atomic numbers Z, that is, fluorenyl hexa-peri-hexabenzocoronene (Z = 3.5), carbon (Z = 6), silicon (Z = 14), gallium nitride (Z = 19), and tungsten (Z = 74). Investigations were conducted for two primary energies (15 and 30 keV) and a sample thickness range between 50 and 400 nm.

  1. Scanning transmission electron microscopy methods for the analysis of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Arturo; Mejía-Rosales, Sergio; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Here we review the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) characterization technique and STEM imaging methods. We describe applications of STEM for studying inorganic nanoparticles, and other uses of STEM in biological and health sciences and discuss how to interpret STEM results. The STEM imaging mode has certain benefits compared with the broad-beam illumination mode; the main advantage is the collection of the information about the specimen using a high angular annular dark field (HAADF) detector, in which the images registered have different levels of contrast related to the chemical composition of the sample. Another advantage of its use in the analysis of biological samples is its contrast for thick stained sections, since HAADF images of samples with thickness of 100-120 nm have notoriously better contrast than those obtained by other techniques. Combining the HAADF-STEM imaging with the new aberration correction era, the STEM technique reaches a direct way to imaging the atomistic structure and composition of nanostructures at a sub-angstrom resolution. Thus, alloying in metallic nanoparticles is directly resolved at atomic scale by the HAADF-STEM imaging, and the comparison of the STEM images with results from simulations gives a very powerful way of analysis of structure and composition. The use of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy attached to the electron microscope for STEM mode is also described. In issues where characterization at the atomic scale of the interaction between metallic nanoparticles and biological systems is needed, all the associated techniques to STEM become powerful tools for the best understanding on how to use these particles in biomedical applications. PMID:22791456

  2. Scanning transmission electron microscopy methods for the analysis of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ponce, Arturo; Mejía-Rosales, Sergio; José-Yacamán, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Here we review the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) characterization technique and STEM imaging methods. We describe applications of STEM for studying inorganic nanoparticles, and other uses of STEM in biological and health sciences and discuss how to interpret STEM results. The STEM imaging mode has certain benefits compared with the broad-beam illumination mode; the main advantage is the collection of the information about the specimen using a high angular annular dark field (HAADF) detector, in which the images registered have different levels of contrast related to the chemical composition of the sample. Another advantage of its use in the analysis of biological samples is its contrast for thick stained sections, since HAADF images of samples with thickness of 100-120 nm have notoriously better contrast than those obtained by other techniques. Combining the HAADF-STEM imaging with the new aberration correction era, the STEM technique reaches a direct way to imaging the atomistic structure and composition of nanostructures at a sub-angstrom resolution. Thus, alloying in metallic nanoparticles is directly resolved at atomic scale by the HAADF-STEM imaging, and the comparison of the STEM images with results from simulations gives a very powerful way of analysis of structure and composition. The use of X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy attached to the electron microscope for STEM mode is also described. In issues where characterization at the atomic scale of the interaction between metallic nanoparticles and biological systems is needed, all the associated techniques to STEM become powerful tools for the best understanding on how to use these particles in biomedical applications.

  3. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of minerals in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Kuang-Chien

    1982-01-01

    Minerals in eight coals from different mines were characterized in the micron-size range by using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were thinned by ion-milling wafers cut from these coals; a cold stage cooled by liquid nitrogen was used to reduce thermal degradation of the minerals by the ion-beam. Different mineral compounds were observed in different coals. The major minerals are clays, sulfides, oxides, carbonates and some minor-element-bearing phosphates. Clays (kaolinite, illite and others) have been most commonly found as either flat sheets or round globules. Iron sulfide was mostly found in the No. 5 and No. 6 coals from Illinois, distributed as massive polycrystals, as clusters of single crystals (framboids) or as isolated single crystals with size range down to some 0.25 microns. Other sulfides and some oxides were found in other coals with particle size as small as some 200 angstroms. Quartz, titanium oxides and many other carbonates and phosphate compounds were also characterized. Brief TEM work in the organic mass of coal was also introduced to study the nature of the coal macerals.

  4. Characterization of paired helical filaments by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ksiezak-Reding, Hanna; Wall, Joseph S

    2005-07-01

    Paired helical filaments (PHFs) are abnormal twisted filaments composed of hyperphosphorylated tau protein. They are found in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders designated as tauopathies. They are a major component of intracellular inclusions known as neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs). The objective of this review is to summarize various structural studies of PHFs in which using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has been particularly informative. STEM provides shape and mass per unit length measurements important for studying ultrastructural aspects of filaments. These include quantitative comparisons between dispersed and aggregated populations of PHFs as well as comparative studies of PHFs in Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. Other approaches are also discussed if relevant or complementary to studies using STEM, e.g., application of a novel staining reagent, Nanovan. Our understanding of the PHF structure and the development of PHFs into NFTs is presented from a historical perspective. Others goals are to describe the biochemical and ultrastructural complexity of authentic PHFs, to assess similarities between authentic and synthetic PHFs, and to discuss recent advances in PHF modeling.

  5. Visualizing aquatic bacteria by light and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Silva, Thiago P; Noyma, Natália P; Duque, Thabata L A; Gamalier, Juliana P; Vidal, Luciana O; Lobão, Lúcia M; Chiarini-Garcia, Hélio; Roland, Fábio; Melo, Rossana C N

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of the functional role of aquatic bacteria in microbial food webs is largely dependent on methods applied to the direct visualization and enumeration of these organisms. While the ultrastructure of aquatic bacteria is still poorly known, routine observation of aquatic bacteria by light microscopy requires staining with fluorochromes, followed by filtration and direct counting on filter surfaces. Here, we used a new strategy to visualize and enumerate aquatic bacteria by light microscopy. By spinning water samples from varied tropical ecosystems in a cytocentrifuge, we found that bacteria firmly adhere to regular slides, can be stained by fluorochoromes with no background formation and fast enumerated. Significant correlations were found between the cytocentrifugation and filter-based methods. Moreover, preparations through cytocentrifugation were more adequate for bacterial viability evaluation than filter-based preparations. Transmission electron microscopic analyses revealed a morphological diversity of bacteria with different internal and external structures, such as large variation in the cell envelope and capsule thickness, and presence or not of thylakoid membranes. Our results demonstrate that aquatic bacteria represent an ultrastructurally diverse population and open avenues for easy handling/quantification and better visualization of bacteria by light microscopy without the need of filter membranes.

  6. Transmission electron microscopy of Terfenol-D crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, A. P.; Lord, D. G.; Grundy, P. J.

    1996-04-01

    Magnetic domain and microstructure observations are presented from samples of pseudo-single-crystal Terfenol-D examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This ternary alloy is of significant technological interest since it exhibits the highest known magnetostriction to anisotropy ratio near room temperature. Specimens for TEM studies in (110), (111), and (112) orientations have also shown regions of unusual diffraction contrast in bright field which appears to be very sensitive to specimen tilt. Lorentz mode TEM has subsequently shown such regions to correspond exactly with magnetic domains. This contrast is attributed to the high magnetostrictive strain causing a local distortion of the lattice and thus a local deviation from the Bragg condition. This conclusion has been investigated and supported by TEM observations with the samples cooled below the spin reorientation temperature. When this transition is reached the diffraction contrast in bright field is considerably decreased and cannot be made to vary by tilting the specimen. The latter experiments also indicate that the change from <111> to <100> easy axis is not a well-defined one but, rather, that the spin reorientation is a sluggish change. High-resolution lattice images show the coherency of the twin boundaries.

  7. TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY STUDY OF HELIUM BEARING FUSION WELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Tosten, M; Michael Morgan, M

    2008-12-12

    A transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study was conducted to characterize the helium bubble distributions in tritium-charged-and-aged 304L and 21Cr-6Ni-9Mn stainless steel fusion welds containing approximately 150 appm helium-3. TEM foils were prepared from C-shaped fracture toughness test specimens containing {delta} ferrite levels ranging from 4 to 33 volume percent. The weld microstructures in the low ferrite welds consisted mostly of austenite and discontinuous, skeletal {delta} ferrite. In welds with higher levels of {delta} ferrite, the ferrite was more continuous and, in some areas of the 33 volume percent sample, was the matrix/majority phase. The helium bubble microstructures observed were similar in all samples. Bubbles were found in the austenite but not in the {delta} ferrite. In the austenite, bubbles had nucleated homogeneously in the grain interiors and heterogeneously on dislocations. Bubbles were not found on any austenite/austenite grain boundaries or at the austenite/{delta} ferrite interphase interfaces. Bubbles were not observed in the {delta} ferrite because of the combined effects of the low solubility and rapid diffusion of tritium through the {delta} ferrite which limited the amount of helium present to form visible bubbles.

  8. In Situ Microstructural Control and Mechanical Testing Inside the Transmission Electron Microscope at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Baoming; Haque, M. A.

    2015-08-01

    With atomic-scale imaging and analytical capabilities such as electron diffraction and energy-loss spectroscopy, the transmission electron microscope has allowed access to the internal microstructure of materials like no other microscopy. It has been mostly a passive or post-mortem analysis tool, but that trend is changing with in situ straining, heating and electrical biasing. In this study, we design and demonstrate a multi-functional microchip that integrates actuators, sensors, heaters and electrodes with freestanding electron transparent specimens. In addition to mechanical testing at elevated temperatures, the chip can actively control microstructures (grain growth and phase change) of the specimen material. Using nano-crystalline aluminum, nickel and zirconium as specimen materials, we demonstrate these novel capabilities inside the microscope. Our approach of active microstructural control and quantitative testing with real-time visualization can influence mechanistic modeling by providing direct and accurate evidence of the fundamental mechanisms behind materials behavior.

  9. Below band-gap laser ablation of diamond for transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, T.; Foote, M. C.; Vasquez, R. P.; Fortier, E. P.; Posthill, J. B.

    1993-01-01

    A 248 nm excimer laser was used to thin naturally occurring type 1a diamond substrates at normal and glancing (22 deg) incidence. Perforation of a 250-micron-thick substrate was achieved in about 15 min at normal incidence. While the substrate thinned at glancing incidence was found to have large electron-transparent areas, that thinned at normal incidence required additional argon-ion milling to achieve electron transparency. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of the back surface of the diamond failed to detect any graphite or glassy carbon, confirming that damage due to laser ablation occurs only at the incident surface. Samples prepared using this technique imaged in the transmission electron microscope were observed to have retained the nitrogen platelets characteristic of such type 1a diamonds.

  10. A Monte Carlo investigation of contaminant electrons due to a novel in vivo transmission detector.

    PubMed

    Asuni, G; Jensen, J M; McCurdy, B M C

    2011-02-21

    A novel transmission detector (IBA Dosimetry, Germany) developed as an IMRT quality assurance tool, intended for in vivo patient dose measurements, is studied here. The goal of this investigation is to use Monte Carlo techniques to characterize treatment beam parameters in the presence of the detector and to compare to those of a plastic block tray (a frequently used clinical device). Particular attention is paid to the impact of the detector on electron contamination model parameters of two commercial dose calculation algorithms. The linac head together with the COMPASS transmission detector (TRD) was modeled using BEAMnrc code. To understand the effect of the TRD on treatment beams, the contaminant electron fluence, energy spectra, and angular distributions at different SSDs were analyzed for open and non-open (i.e. TRD and block tray) fields. Contaminant electrons in the BEAMnrc simulations were separated according to where they were created. Calculation of surface dose and the evaluation of contributions from contaminant electrons were performed using the DOSXYZnrc user code. The effect of the TRD on contaminant electrons model parameters in Eclipse AAA and Pinnacle(3) dose calculation algorithms was investigated. Comparisons of the fluence of contaminant electrons produced in the non-open fields versus open field show that electrons created in the non-open fields increase at shorter SSD, but most of the electrons at shorter SSD are of low energy with large angular spread. These electrons are out-scattered or absorbed in air and contribute less to surface dose at larger SSD. Calculated surface doses with the block tray are higher than those with the TRD. Contribution of contaminant electrons to dose in the buildup region increases with increasing field size. The additional contribution of electrons to surface dose increases with field size for TRD and block tray. The introduction of the TRD results in a 12% and 15% increase in the Gaussian widths used in the

  11. Thin silicon strip devices for direct electron detection in transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moldovan, Grigore; Li, Xiaobing; Wilshaw, Peter; Kirkland, Angus

    2008-06-01

    Indirect imaging detection systems used in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) impose a range of restrictions limiting performance that can be easily surpassed with direct sensing devices. A set of generic requirements is presented here first, illustrating the present detection needs and setting the context for further development in electron detection at TEM energy range. The use of directly exposed Si strip detectors in TEM is then investigated by means of Monte Carlo simulation of the electron-sensor interaction, showing that a sensitive layer with a thickness in the range of 50 μm is needed to achieve satisfactory efficiency. The results obtained here strongly indicate that improved performance would be achieved by replacing current indirect imaging systems with directly exposed thin Si strip detectors.

  12. Reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy and imaging for surface studies in transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z L; Bentley, J

    1992-02-15

    A review is given on the techniques and applications of high-energy reflection electron energy-loss spectroscopy (REELS) and reflection electron microscopy (REM) for surface studies in scanning transmission electron microscopes (STEM) and conventional transmission electron microscopes (TEM). A diffraction method is introduced to identify a surface orientation in the geometry of REM. The surface dielectric response theory is presented and applied for studying alpha-alumina surfaces. Domains of the alpha-alumina (012) surface initially terminated with oxygen can be reduced by an intense electron beam to produce Al metal; the resistance to beam damage of surface domains initially terminated with Al+3 ions is attributed to the screening effect of adsorbed oxygen. Surface energy-loss near-edge structure (ELNES), extended energy-loss fine structure (EXELFS), and microanalysis using REELS are illustrated based on the studies of TiO2 and MgO. Effects of surface resonances (or channeling) on the REELS signal-to-background ratio are described. The REELS detection of a monolayer of oxygen adsorption on diamond (111) surfaces is reported. It is shown that phase contrast REM image content can be significantly increased with the use of a field emission gun (FEG). Phase contrast effects close to the core of a screw dislocation are discussed and the associated Fresnel fringes around a surface step are observed. Finally, an in situ REM experiment is described for studying atomic desorption and diffusion processes on alpha-alumina surfaces at temperatures of 1,300-1,400 degrees C.

  13. 45 CFR Appendix C to Part 1355 - Electronic Data Transmission Format

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic Data Transmission Format C Appendix C to Part 1355 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN.... 1355, App. C Appendix C to Part 1355—Electronic Data Transmission Format All AFCARS data to be...

  14. Transmission Electron Microscopy of Iron Metal in Almahata Sitta Ureilite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Yubuta, K.; Sugiyama, K.; Aoyagi, Y.; Yasuhara, A.; Mihira, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Goodrich, C. A.

    2013-01-01

    Almahata Sitta (AS) is a polymict breccia mainly composed of variable ureilite lithologies with small amounts of chondritic lithologies [1]. Fe metal is a common accessory phase in ureilites, but our earlier study on Fe metals in one of AS fragments (#44) revealed a unique mineralogy never seen in other ureilites [2,3]. In this abstract we report detailed transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on these metal grains to better understand the thermal history of ureilites. We prepared FIB sections of AS#44 by JEOL JIB-4000 from the PTS that was well characterized by SEM-EBSD in our earlier study [2]. The sections were then observed by STEM (JEOL JEM- 2100F). One of the FIB sections shows a submicron-sized symplectic intergrown texture composed of Fe metal (kamacite), Fe carbide (cohenite), Fe phosphide (schreibersite), and Fe sulfide (troilite). Each phase has an identical SAED pattern in spite of its complex texture, suggesting co-crystallization of all phases. This is probably caused by shock re-melting of pre-existing metal + graphite to form a eutectic-looking texture. The other FIB section is mostly composed of homogeneous Fe metal (93 wt% Fe, 5 wt% Ni, and 2 wt% Si), but BF-STEM images exhibited the presence of elongated lathy grains (approx. 2 microns long) embedded in the interstitial matrix. The SAED patterns from these lath grains could be indexed by alpha-Fe (bcc) while interstitial areas are gamma-Fe (fcc). The elongated alpha-Fe grains show tweed-like structures suggesting martensite transformation. Such a texture can be formed by rapid cooling from high temperature where gamma-Fe was stable. Subsequently alpha-Fe crystallized, but gamma-Fe remained in the interstitial matrix due to quenching from high temperature. This scenario is consistent with very rapid cooling history of ureilites suggested by silicate mineralogy.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy of subsolidus oxidation and weathering of olivine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banfield, J.F.; Veblen, D.R.; Jones, B.F.

    1990-01-01

    Olivine crystals in basaltic andesites which crop out in the Abert Rim, south-central Oregon have been studied by high-resolution and analytical transmission electron microscopy. The observations reveal three distinct assemblages of alteration products that seem to correspond to three episodes of olivine oxidation. The olivine crystals contain rare, dense arrays of coherently intergrown Ti-free magnetite and inclusions of a phase inferred to be amorphous silica. We interpret this first assemblage to be the product of an early subsolidus oxidation event in the lava. The second olivine alteration assemblage contains complex ordered intergrowths on (001) of forsterite-rich olivine and laihunite (distorted olivine structure with Fe3+ charge balanced by vacancies). Based on experimental results for laihunite synthesis (Kondoh et al. 1985), these intergrowths probably formed by olivine oxidation between 400 and 800??C. The third episode of alteration involves the destruction of olivine by low-temperature hydrothermal alteration and weathering. Elongate etch-pits and channels in the margins of fresh olivine crystals contain semi-oriented bands of smectite. Olivine weathers to smectite and hematite, and subsequently to arrays of oriented hematite crystals. The textures resemble those reported by Eggleton (1984) and Smith et al. (1987). We find no evidence for a metastable phase intermediate between olivine and smectite ("M" - Eggleton 1984). The presence of laihunite exerts a strong control on the geometry of olivine weathering. Single laihunite layers and laihunite-forsteritic olivine intergrowths increase the resistance of crystals to weathering. Preferential development of channels between laihunite layers occurs where growth of laihunite produced compositional variations in olivine, rather than where coherency-strain is associated with laihunite-olivine interfaces. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy investigation of auto catalyst and cobalt germanide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiping

    The modern ceria-zirconia based catalysts are used in automobiles to reduce exhaust pollutants. Cobalt germanides have potential applications as electrical contacts in the future Ge-based semiconductor devices. In this thesis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques were used to study the atomic scale interactions between metallic nanostructures and crystalline substrates in the two material systems mentioned above. The model catalyst samples consisted of precious metal nano-particles (Pd, Rh) supported on the surface of (Ce,Zr)O2 thin films. The response of the microstructure of the metal-oxide interface to the reduction and oxidation treatments was investigated by cross-sectional high resolution TEM. Atomic detail of the metal-oxide interface was obtained. It was found that Pd and Rh showed different sintering and interaction behaviors on the oxide surface. The preferred orientation of Pd particles in this study was Pd(111)//CZO(111). Partial encapsulation of Pd particles by reduced (Ce,Zr)O 2 surface was observed and possible mechanisms of the encapsulation were discussed. The characteristics of the metal-oxide interaction depend on the properties of the oxide, as well as their relative orientation. The results provide experimental evidence for understanding the thermodynamics of the equilibrium morphology of a solid particle supported on a solid surface that is not considered as inert. The reaction of Co with Ge to form epitaxial Co5Ge7 was studied by in situ ultra-high vacuum (UHV) TEM using two methods. One was reactive deposition of Co on Ge, in which the Ge substrate was maintained at 350°C during deposition. The other method was solid state reaction, in which the deposition of Co on Ge was carried out at room temperature followed by annealing to higher temperatures. During reactive deposition, the deposited Co reacted with Ge to form nanosized 3D Co 5Ge7 islands. During solid state reaction, a continuous epitaxial Co5Ge7 film on the (001) Ge

  17. Hybrid additive manufacturing of 3D electronic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Wasley, T.; Nguyen, T. T.; Ta, V. D.; Shephard, J. D.; Stringer, J.; Smith, P.; Esenturk, E.; Connaughton, C.; Kay, R.

    2016-10-01

    A novel hybrid additive manufacturing (AM) technology combining digital light projection (DLP) stereolithography (SL) with 3D micro-dispensing alongside conventional surface mount packaging is presented in this work. This technology overcomes the inherent limitations of individual AM processes and integrates seamlessly with conventional packaging processes to enable the deposition of multiple materials. This facilitates the creation of bespoke end-use products with complex 3D geometry and multi-layer embedded electronic systems. Through a combination of four-point probe measurement and non-contact focus variation microscopy, it was identified that there was no obvious adverse effect of DLP SL embedding process on the electrical conductivity of printed conductors. The resistivity maintained to be less than 4  ×  10-4 Ω · cm before and after DLP SL embedding when cured at 100 °C for 1 h. The mechanical strength of SL specimens with thick polymerized layers was also identified through tensile testing. It was found that the polymerization thickness should be minimised (less than 2 mm) to maximise the bonding strength. As a demonstrator a polymer pyramid with embedded triple-layer 555 LED blinking circuitry was successfully fabricated to prove the technical viability.

  18. Harmonic Resonance in Power Transmission Systems due to the Addition of Shunt Capacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Hardik U.

    Shunt capacitors are often added in transmission networks at suitable locations to improve the voltage profile. In this thesis, the transmission system in Arizona is considered as a test bed. Many shunt capacitors already exist in the Arizona transmission system and more are planned to be added. Addition of these shunt capacitors may create resonance conditions in response to harmonic voltages and currents. Such resonance, if it occurs, may create problematic issues in the system. It is main objective of this thesis to identify potential problematic effects that could occur after placing new shunt capacitors at selected buses in the Arizona network. Part of the objective is to create a systematic plan for avoidance of resonance issues. For this study, a method of capacitance scan is proposed. The bus admittance matrix is used as a model of the networked transmission system. The calculations on the admittance matrix were done using Matlab. The test bed is the actual transmission system in Arizona; however, for proprietary reasons, bus names are masked in the thesis copy intended for the public domain. The admittance matrix was obtained from data using the PowerWorld Simulator after equivalencing the 2016 summer peak load (planning case). The full Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) system data were used. The equivalencing procedure retains only the Arizona portion of the WECC. The capacitor scan results for single capacitor placement and multiple capacitor placement cases are presented. Problematic cases are identified in the form of 'forbidden response. The harmonic voltage impact of known sources of harmonics, mainly large scale HVDC sources, is also presented. Specific key results for the study indicated include: (1) The forbidden zones obtained as per the IEEE 519 standard indicates the bus 10 to be the most problematic bus. (2) The forbidden zones also indicate that switching values for the switched shunt capacitor (if used) at bus 3 should be

  19. Visualization of macromolecular complexes using cryo-electron microscopy with FEI Tecnai transmission electron microscopes

    PubMed Central

    Grassucci, Robert A; Taylor, Derek; Frank, Joachim

    2009-01-01

    This protocol details the steps used for visualizing the frozen-hydrated grids as prepared following the accompanying protocol entitled ‘Preparation of macromolecular complexes for visualization using cryo-electron microscopy.’ This protocol describes how to transfer the grid to the microscope using a standard cryo-transfer holder or, alternatively, using a cryo-cartridge loading system, and how to collect low-dose data using an FEI Tecnai transmission electron microscope. This protocol also summarizes and compares the various options that are available in data collection for three-dimensional (3D) single-particle reconstruction. These options include microscope settings, choice of detectors and data collection strategies both in situations where a 3D reference is available and in the absence of such a reference (random-conical and common lines). PMID:18274535

  20. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-06-01

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field.

  1. In situ conversion of nanostructures from solid to hollow in transmission electron microscopes using electron beam.

    PubMed

    El Mel, Abdel-Aziz; Bittencourt, Carla

    2016-06-01

    With the current development of electron beam sources, the use of transmission electron microscopes is no more limited to imaging or chemical analysis but has rather been extended to nanoengineering. This includes the e-beam induced growth, etching and structural transformation of nanomaterials. In this review we summarize recent progress on the e-beam induced morphological transformation of nanostructures from solid to hollow. We provide a detailed account of the processes reported so far in the literature with a special emphasis on the mechanistic understanding of the e-beam induced hollowing of nanomaterials. Through an important number of examples, we discuss how one can achieve a precise control of such hollowing processes by understanding the fundamental mechanisms occurring at the atomic scale during the irradiation of solid nanostructures. Finally, we conclude with remarks and our own view on the prospective future directions of this research field. PMID:27172892

  2. Functional Materials characterizations by Scanning/Transmission Electron Microscopy and Electron Energy Loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Bo

    Along with the fast development of science and technology, the studied materials are becoming more complicated and smaller. All these achievements have advanced with the fast development of powerful tools currently, such as Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Focused Ion Beam (FIB), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and so on. SiTiO3 thin film, which is grown on Si (100) single crystals, attracts a lot of interest in its structural and electronic properties close to its interface. Valence EELS is used to investigate the Plasmon excitations of the ultrathin SrTiO3 thin film which is sandwiched between amorphous Si and crystalline Si layers. On the other hand, theoretical simulations based on dielectric functions have been done to interpret the experimental results. Our findings demonstrate the value of valence electron energy-loss spectroscopy in detecting a local change in the effective electron mass. Recently it is reported that ZnO-LiYbO2 hybrid phosphor is an efficient UV-infrared convertor for silicon solar cell but the mechanism is still not very clear. The microstructure of Li and Yb co-doped ZnO has been studied by SEM and EDX, and our results suggest that a reaction (or diffusion) zone is very likely to exist between LiYbO2 and ZnO. Such diffusion regions may be responsible for the enhanced infrared emission in the Yb and Li co-doped ZnO. Furthermore, to help us study the diffusion zone under TEM in future, the radiation damage on synthesized LiYbO2 has been studied at first, and then the electronic structure of the synthesized LiYbO2 is compared with Yb2O 3 experimentally and theoretically, by EELS and FEFF8 respectively.

  3. Photochemical electron transfer mediated addition of naphthylamine derivatives to electron-deficient alkenes.

    PubMed

    Jahjah, Rabih; Gassama, Abdoulaye; Dumur, Frédéric; Marinković, Siniša; Richert, Sabine; Landgraf, Stephan; Lebrun, Aurélien; Cadiou, Cyril; Sellès, Patrice; Hoffmann, Norbert

    2011-09-01

    Using photochemical electron transfer, N,N-dimethylnaphthylamine derivatives are added to α,β-unsaturated carboxylates. The addition takes place exclusively in the α-position of electron-deficient alkenes and mainly in the 4-position of N,N-dimethylnaphthalen-1-amine. A minor regioisomer results from the addition in the 5-position of this naphthylamine. A physicochemical study reveals that the fluorescence quenching of N,N-dimethylnaphthalen-1-amine is diffusion-controlled and that the back electron transfer is highly efficient. Therefore no transformation is observed at lower concentrations. To overcome this limitation and to induce an efficient transformation, minor amounts of water or another proton donor as well as an excess of the naphthylamine derivative are necessary. A mechanism involving a contact radical ion pair is discussed. Isotopic labeling experiments reveal that no hydrogen is directly transferred between the substrates. The hydrogen transfer to the furanone moiety observed in the overall reaction therefore results from an exchange with the reaction medium. An electrophilic oxoallyl radical generated from the furanone reacts with the naphthylamine used in excess. Concerning some mechanistic details, the reaction is compared with radical and electrophilic aromatic substitutions. The transformation was carried out with a variety of electron-deficient alkenes. Sterically hindered furanone derivatives are less reactive under standard conditions. In a first experiment, such a compound was transformed using heterogeneous electron transfer photocatalysis with TiO(2).

  4. Balamuthia mandrillaris: Further morphological observations of trophozoites by light, scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    González-Robles, Arturo; Lares-Villa, Fernando; Lares-Jiménez, Luis Fernando; Omaña-Molina, Maritza; Salazar-Villatoro, Lizbeth; Martínez-Palomo, Adolfo

    2015-10-01

    Additional morphological features of Balamuthia mandrillaris observed by light and electron microscopy are reported. Trophozoites were extremely pleomorphic: their cell shapes ranged from rounded to elongated and sometimes they appeared exceptionally stretched out and branched. By transmission electron microscopy it was possible to observe two different cytoplasmic areas, the ectoplasm and the endoplasm and often sections of rough endoplasmic reticulum were found in the transition zone. The cytoplasm was very fibrogranular and most of the organelles typically found in eukaryotic cells were observed. A particular finding was the presence of numerous mitochondria with a different structure from those of other free-living amoebae. The observations reported here may reinforce the morphological knowledge of this amoeba and provide a background for further analyses.

  5. Identification of light elements in silicon nitride by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Idrobo, Juan C; Walkosz, Weronika; Klie, Robert F; Oğüt, Serdar

    2012-12-01

    In silicon nitride structural ceramics, the overall mechanical and thermal properties are controlled by the atomic and electronic structures at the interface between the ceramic grains and the amorphous intergranular films (IGFs) formed by various sintering additives. In the last ten years the atomic arrangements of heavy elements (rare-earths) at the Si(3)N(4)/IGF interfaces have been resolved. However, the atomic position of light elements, without which it is not possible to obtain a complete description of the interfaces, has been lacking. This review article details the authors' efforts to identify the atomic arrangement of light elements such as nitrogen and oxygen at the Si(3)N(4)/SiO(2) interface and in bulk Si(3)N(4) using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

  6. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic study of the lung of the newt, Triturus alpestris Laur.

    PubMed

    Goniakowska-Witalińska, L

    1980-01-01

    The lungs of Triturus alpestris Laur. were investigated with the scanning and transmission electron microscopes. Dimensions of the cell bodies of pneumocytes and ciliated cells, as well as the thickness of the air-blood barrier, were determined. The lungs of the newt form two simple sacs without septa. A ciliated epithelium containing goblet cells lines the pulmonary vein and partially the pulmonary artery. The remainder of the lung surface is covered internally by respiratory epithelium consisting of one type of cell and only occasionally showing the presence of single ciliated cells. All cells, ciliated, goblet and pneumocytes, contain in their cytoplasm lamellar bodies. Multivesicular bodies and numerous vesicles of variable electron density also occur in the cytoplasm of pneumocytes. Atypical mitochondria can be found in all cell types of the lung. Fixation with addition of tannic acid reveals the surface lining film. Tubular myelin figures were not observed.

  7. Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy of High Temperature Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Software and hardware updates to further extend the capability of the electron microscope were carried out. A range of materials such as intermetallics, metal-matrix composites, ceramic-matrix composites, ceramics and intermetallic compounds, based on refractory elements were examined under this research. Crystal structure, size, shape and volume fraction distribution of various phases which constitute the microstructures were examined. Deformed materials were studied to understand the effect of interfacial microstructure on the deformation and fracture behavior of these materials. Specimens tested for a range of mechanical property requirements, such as stress rupture, creep, low cycle fatigue, high cycle fatigue, thermomechanical fatigue, etc. were examined. Microstructural and microchemical stability of these materials exposed to simulated operating environments were investigated. The EOIM Shuttle post-flight samples were also examined to understand the influence of low gravity processing on microstructure. In addition, fractographic analyses of Nb-Zr-W, titanium aluminide, molybdenum silicide and silicon carbide samples were carried out. Extensive characterization of sapphire fibers in the fiber-reinforced composites made by powder cloth processing was made. Finally, pressure infiltration casting of metal-matrix composites was carried out.

  8. Practical spatial resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Shah, A B; Ramasse, Q M; Wen, J G; Bhattacharya, A; Zuo, J M

    2011-08-01

    The resolution of electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) is limited by delocalization of inelastic electron scattering rather than probe size in an aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). In this study, we present an experimental quantification of EELS spatial resolution using chemically modulated 2×(LaMnO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) and 2×(SrVO(3))/2×(SrTiO(3)) superlattices by measuring the full width at half maxima (FWHM) of integrated Ti M(2,3), Ti L(2,3), V L(2,3), Mn L(2,3), La N(4,5), La N(2,3) La M(4,5) and Sr L(3) edges over the superlattices. The EELS signals recorded using large collection angles are peaked at atomic columns. The FWHM of the EELS profile, obtained by curve-fitting, reveals a systematic trend with the energy loss for the Ti, V, and Mn edges. However, the experimental FWHM of the Sr and La edges deviates significantly from the observed experimental tendency.

  9. Atomic imaging using secondary electrons in a scanning transmission electron microscope: experimental observations and possible mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Inada, H; Su, D; Egerton, R F; Konno, M; Wu, L; Ciston, J; Wall, J; Zhu, Y

    2011-06-01

    We report detailed investigation of high-resolution imaging using secondary electrons (SE) with a sub-nanometer probe in an aberration-corrected transmission electron microscope, Hitachi HD2700C. This instrument also allows us to acquire the corresponding annular dark-field (ADF) images both simultaneously and separately. We demonstrate that atomic SE imaging is achievable for a wide range of elements, from uranium to carbon. Using the ADF images as a reference, we studied the SE image intensity and contrast as functions of applied bias, atomic number, crystal tilt, and thickness to shed light on the origin of the unexpected ultrahigh resolution in SE imaging. We have also demonstrated that the SE signal is sensitive to the terminating species at a crystal surface. A possible mechanism for atomic-scale SE imaging is proposed. The ability to image both the surface and bulk of a sample at atomic-scale is unprecedented, and can have important applications in the field of electron microscopy and materials characterization.

  10. 21 CFR 1311.05 - Standards for technologies for electronic transmission of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Standards for technologies for electronic... JUSTICE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRONIC ORDERS AND PRESCRIPTIONS (Eff. 6-1-10) General § 1311.05 Standards for technologies for electronic transmission of orders. (a) A registrant or a person with power of attorney to...

  11. A scanning transmission electron microscopy approach to analyzing large volumes of tissue to detect nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kempen, Paul J; Thakor, Avnesh S; Zavaleta, Cristina; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Sinclair, Robert

    2013-10-01

    The use of nanoparticles for the diagnosis and treatment of cancer requires the complete characterization of their toxicity, including accurately locating them within biological tissues. Owing to their size, traditional light microscopy techniques are unable to resolve them. Transmission electron microscopy provides the necessary spatial resolution to image individual nanoparticles in tissue, but is severely limited by the very small analysis volume, usually on the order of tens of cubic microns. In this work, we developed a scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) approach to analyze large volumes of tissue for the presence of polyethylene glycol-coated Raman-active-silica-gold-nanoparticles (PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs). This approach utilizes the simultaneous bright and dark field imaging capabilities of STEM along with careful control of the image contrast settings to readily identify PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs in mouse liver tissue without the need for additional time-consuming analytical characterization. We utilized this technique to analyze 243,000 mm³ of mouse liver tissue for the presence of PEG-R-Si-Au-NPs. Nanoparticles injected into the mice intravenously via the tail vein accumulated in the liver, whereas those injected intrarectally did not, indicating that they remain in the colon and do not pass through the colon wall into the systemic circulation.

  12. Specimen thickness dependence of hydrogen evolution during cryo-transmission electron microscopy of hydrated soft materials.

    PubMed

    Yakovlev, S; Misra, M; Shi, S; Libera, M

    2009-12-01

    The evolution of hydrogen from many hydrated cryo-preserved soft materials under electron irradiation in the transmission electron microscope can be observed at doses of the order of 1000 e nm(-2) and above. Such hydrogen causes artefacts in conventional transmission electron microscope or scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging as well as in analyses by electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Here we show that the evolution of hydrogen depends on specimen thickness. Using wedge-shaped specimens of frozen-hydrated Nafion, a perfluorinated ionomer, saturated with the organic solvent DMMP together with both thin and thick sections of frozen-hydrated porcine skin, we show that there is a thickness below which hydrogen evolution is not detected either by bubble observation in transmission electron microscope image mode or by spectroscopic analysis in STEM electron energy-loss spectroscopy mode. We suggest that this effect is due to the diffusion of hydrogen, whose diffusivity remains significant even at liquid nitrogen temperature over the length scales and time scales relevant to transmission electron microscopy analysis of thin specimens. In short, we speculate that sufficient hydrogen can diffuse to the specimen surface in thin sections so that concentrations are too low for bubbling or for spectroscopic detection. Significantly, this finding indicates that higher electron doses can be used during the imaging of radiation-sensitive hydrated soft materials and, consequently, higher spatial resolution can be achieved, if sufficiently thin specimens are used in order to avoid the evolution of hydrogen-based artefacts.

  13. Transmission of electrons through insulating PET foils: Dependence on charge deposition, tilt angle and incident energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthisinghe, D.; Dassanayake, B. S.; Wickramarachchi, S. J.; Stolterfoht, N.; Tanis, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    Transmission of electrons through insulating polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nanocapillaries was observed as a function of charge deposition, angular and energy dependence. Two samples with capillary diameters 100 and 200 nm and pore densities 5 × 108/cm2 and 5 × 107/cm2, respectively, were studied for incident electron energies of 300, 500 and 800 eV. Transmission and steady state of the electrons were attained after a time delay during which only a few electron counts were observed. The transmission through the capillaries depended on the tilt angle with both elastic and inelastic electrons going through. The guiding ability of electrons was found to increase with the incident energy in contrast to previous measurements in our laboratory for a similar PET foil.

  14. 36 CFR 1236.22 - What are the additional requirements for managing electronic mail records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirements for managing electronic mail records? 1236.22 Section 1236.22 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.22 What are the additional requirements for managing electronic...

  15. 36 CFR 1236.22 - What are the additional requirements for managing electronic mail records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirements for managing electronic mail records? 1236.22 Section 1236.22 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.22 What are the additional requirements for managing electronic...

  16. 36 CFR 1236.22 - What are the additional requirements for managing electronic mail records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirements for managing electronic mail records? 1236.22 Section 1236.22 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.22 What are the additional requirements for managing electronic...

  17. 36 CFR 1236.22 - What are the additional requirements for managing electronic mail records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirements for managing electronic mail records? 1236.22 Section 1236.22 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.22 What are the additional requirements for managing electronic...

  18. Xenon Implantation in Nanodiamonds: In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Study and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiryaev, A. A.; Hinks, J.; Marks, N.; Greaves, G.; Donnelly, S.; Fisenko, A. V.; Kiwi, M.

    2016-08-01

    We present results of the first investigation of the Xe implantation process into nanodiamonds of various sizes studied in situ in transmission electron microscope (TEM), complemented by advanced molecular dynamics simulations.

  19. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... transporting the alien electronically transmitted to Customs and Border Protection (CBP) passenger arrival manifest data relative to that alien passenger in accordance with 19 CFR 4.7b or 19 CFR 122.49a. Upon... appropriate official of the transporting carrier must electronically transmit to CBP departure manifest...

  20. 8 CFR 217.7 - Electronic data transmission requirement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... transporting the alien electronically transmitted to Customs and Border Protection (CBP) passenger arrival manifest data relative to that alien passenger in accordance with 19 CFR 4.7b or 19 CFR 122.49a. Upon... appropriate official of the transporting carrier must electronically transmit to CBP departure manifest...

  1. Measurements of the UV and VUV transmission of optical materials during high energy electron irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palma, G. E.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental program was conducted in which the optical transmission of several transparent materials was measured during high energy electron irradiation. These experiments were conducted using the Dynamitron electron accelerator as a continuous source of 1.5 MeV electrons and the LINAC electron accelerator as a pulsed source of 5-7 MeV electrons. The experimental program consisted of three major portions. The first portion, the optical transmission of fused silica, BeO, MgF2, and LiF was measured at vacuum ultraviolet wavelengths in the range 1550-2000 A during ambient temperature, 1.5 MeV electron irradiation at ionizing dose rates to 0.5 Mrad/sec. In the second portion of the program, the optical transmission of fused silica and BeO was measured in the range 2000-3000 A during high dose rate, elevated temperature 1.5 MeV electron irradiation. In particular, accurate measurements of the optical transmission were made at ionizing dose rates as high as 10 Mrad/sec. In the final portion of the program, the optical transmission of fused silica and BeO was measured in the wavelength range 2000-3000 A during pulsed 5 and 7 MeV electron irradiation from the LINAC accelerator. The maximum time averaged ionizing dose rate was limited to 0.75 Mrad/sec due to accelerator limitations.

  2. Deciphering the physics and chemistry of perovskites with transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Polking, Mark J

    2016-03-28

    Perovskite oxides exhibit rich structural complexity and a broad range of functional properties, including ferroelectricity, ferromagnetism, and superconductivity. The development of aberration correction for the transmission electron microscope and concurrent progress in electron spectroscopy, electron holography, and other techniques has fueled rapid progress in the understanding of the physics and chemistry of these materials. New techniques based on the transmission electron microscope are first surveyed, and the applications of these techniques for the study of the structure, chemistry, electrostatics, and dynamics of perovskite oxides are then explored in detail, with a particular focus on ferroelectric materials.

  3. Electron tomography of HEK293T cells using scanning electron microscope-based scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    You, Yun-Wen; Chang, Hsun-Yun; Liao, Hua-Yang; Kao, Wei-Lun; Yen, Guo-Ji; Chang, Chi-Jen; Tsai, Meng-Hung; Shyue, Jing-Jong

    2012-10-01

    Based on a scanning electron microscope operated at 30 kV with a homemade specimen holder and a multiangle solid-state detector behind the sample, low-kV scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is presented with subsequent electron tomography for three-dimensional (3D) volume structure. Because of the low acceleration voltage, the stronger electron-atom scattering leads to a stronger contrast in the resulting image than standard TEM, especially for light elements. Furthermore, the low-kV STEM yields less radiation damage to the specimen, hence the structure can be preserved. In this work, two-dimensional STEM images of a 1-μm-thick cell section with projection angles between ±50° were collected, and the 3D volume structure was reconstructed using the simultaneous iterative reconstructive technique algorithm with the TomoJ plugin for ImageJ, which are both public domain software. Furthermore, the cross-sectional structure was obtained with the Volume Viewer plugin in ImageJ. Although the tilting angle is constrained and limits the resulting structural resolution, slicing the reconstructed volume generated the depth profile of the thick specimen with sufficient resolution to examine cellular uptake of Au nanoparticles, and the final position of these nanoparticles inside the cell was imaged.

  4. Nanoscale 3D cellular imaging by axial scanning transmission electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Hohmann-Marriott, Martin F.; Sousa, Alioscka A.; Azari, Afrouz A.; Glushakova, Svetlana; Zhang, Guofeng; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Leapman, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Electron tomography provides three-dimensional structural information about supramolecular assemblies and organelles in a cellular context but image degradation, caused by scattering of transmitted electrons, limits applicability in specimens thicker than 300 nm. We show that scanning transmission electron tomography of 1000 nm thick samples using axial detection provides resolution comparable to conventional electron tomography. The method is demonstrated by reconstructing a human erythrocyte infected with the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. PMID:19718033

  5. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the data elements in the Summary of Protection; (5) Transmit crop insurance data electronically, via... Section 400.209 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Agency Sales and...

  6. 7 CFR 400.209 - Electronic transmission and receiving system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the data elements in the Summary of Protection; (5) Transmit crop insurance data electronically, via... Section 400.209 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Agency Sales and...

  7. The effect of different electrodes on the electronic transmission of benzene junctions: Analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohebbi, Razie; Seyed-Yazdi, Jamileh

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we have investigated the electronic transmission of systems electrode-benzene-electrode using the Landauer approach. The effect of different electrodes made of metal (Au) and semiconductors (Si, TiO2) is investigated. These three electrodes are compared between them and the results show that the electronic transmission of benzene junctions, when using semiconductor electrodes, is associated to a gap in transmission which is due to the electrodes band gap. As a consequence, a threshold voltage is necessary to obtain conducting channels.

  8. Interaction between single gold atom and the graphene edge: A study via aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongtao; Li, Kun; Cheng, Yingchun; Wang, Qingxiao; Yao, Yingbang; Schwingenschlögl, Udo; Zhang, Xixiang; Yang, Wei

    2012-04-01

    Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms.Interaction between single noble metal atoms and graphene edges has been investigated via aberration-corrected and monochromated transmission electron microscopy. A collective motion of the Au atom and the nearby carbon atoms is observed in transition between energy-favorable configurations. Most trapping and detrapping processes are assisted by the dangling carbon atoms, which are more susceptible to knock-on displacements by electron irradiation. Thermal energy is lower than the activation barriers in transition among different energy-favorable configurations, which suggests electron-beam irradiation can be an efficient way of engineering the graphene edge with metal atoms. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional Figures for characterization of mono-layer CVD graphene samples with free edges and Pt atoms decorations and analysis of the effect of electron irradiation; supporting movie on edge evolution. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr00059h

  9. Use of Atomic Force Microscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy for Correlative Studies of Bacterial Capsules▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Stukalov, Oleg; Korenevsky, Anton; Beveridge, Terry J.; Dutcher, John R.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria can possess an outermost assembly of polysaccharide molecules, a capsule, which is attached to their cell wall. We have used two complementary, high-resolution microscopy techniques, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), to study bacterial capsules of four different gram-negative bacterial strains: Escherichia coli K30, Pseudomonas aeruginosa FRD1, Shewanella oneidensis MR-4, and Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA. TEM analysis of bacterial cells using different preparative techniques (whole-cell mounts, conventional embeddings, and freeze-substitution) revealed capsules for some but not all of the strains. In contrast, the use of AFM allowed the unambiguous identification of the presence of capsules on all strains used in the present study, including those that were shown by TEM to be not encapsulated. In addition, the use of AFM phase imaging allowed the visualization of the bacterial cell within the capsule, with a depth sensitivity that decreased with increasing tapping frequency. PMID:18606791

  10. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy study: preparation of vesicular dispersions by quenching microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Lee, H S; Morrison, E D; Zhang, Q; McCormick, A V

    2016-09-01

    We previously showed that long-lived nanoemulsions, seeming initially vesicular, might be prepared simply by diluting and cooling (quenching) warm microemulsions with n-hexadecane with precooled water. In this paper, we confirm that these systems are vesicular dispersions when fresh, and they can be made with similar structures and compositional dependence using alkanes with chain lengths ranging from octane to hexadecane. The nanostructures of fresh nanoemulsions are imaged with cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We confirm that water-continuous microemulsions give simple dispersions of vesicles (sometimes unilamellar), typically less than 100 nm in diameter; these systems can avoid separation for over 2 months. Selected samples were also prepared using halogenated alkanes to create additional contrast in the cryo-TEM, allowing us to confirm that the oil is located in the observed vesicular structures.

  11. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy study: preparation of vesicular dispersions by quenching microemulsions.

    PubMed

    Lee, H S; Morrison, E D; Zhang, Q; McCormick, A V

    2016-09-01

    We previously showed that long-lived nanoemulsions, seeming initially vesicular, might be prepared simply by diluting and cooling (quenching) warm microemulsions with n-hexadecane with precooled water. In this paper, we confirm that these systems are vesicular dispersions when fresh, and they can be made with similar structures and compositional dependence using alkanes with chain lengths ranging from octane to hexadecane. The nanostructures of fresh nanoemulsions are imaged with cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We confirm that water-continuous microemulsions give simple dispersions of vesicles (sometimes unilamellar), typically less than 100 nm in diameter; these systems can avoid separation for over 2 months. Selected samples were also prepared using halogenated alkanes to create additional contrast in the cryo-TEM, allowing us to confirm that the oil is located in the observed vesicular structures. PMID:26937849

  12. Transmission electron microscopy specimen preparation perpendicular to the long axis of high aspect ratio features

    SciTech Connect

    Irwin, R. B.; Anciso, A.; Jones, P. J.; Glenn, A. L.; Williams, B. L.; Sridhar, S.; Arshad, S.

    2009-11-15

    A new variation of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen preparation is introduced. By thinning a tall high aspect ratio structure perpendicular to the long dimension (i.e., from the side) rather than from perpendicular to the short dimension (either the top or the bottom), it is possible to obtain a more uniformly thin TEM specimen over the entire long dimension of the structure. This article will describe the rational for this variation in specimen preparation. The necessary modifications of four different specimen preparation methods (in situ lift-out, traditional H-bar, ex situ lift-out, and tripod polishing) will be discussed and images of specimens obtained by both of these first two methods will be shown. Additional potential advantages and other applications of this specimen preparation method will be covered.

  13. Matched Backprojection Operator for Combined Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Tilt- and Focal Series.

    PubMed

    Dahmen, Tim; Kohr, Holger; de Jonge, Niels; Slusallek, Philipp

    2015-06-01

    Combined tilt- and focal series scanning transmission electron microscopy is a recently developed method to obtain nanoscale three-dimensional (3D) information of thin specimens. In this study, we formulate the forward projection in this acquisition scheme as a linear operator and prove that it is a generalization of the Ray transform for parallel illumination. We analytically derive the corresponding backprojection operator as the adjoint of the forward projection. We further demonstrate that the matched backprojection operator drastically improves the convergence rate of iterative 3D reconstruction compared to the case where a backprojection based on heuristic weighting is used. In addition, we show that the 3D reconstruction is of better quality.

  14. Biological Applications and Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigations of Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Trewyn, Brian G.

    2006-01-01

    antioxidant dependent release was measured. Finally, the biological interaction of the material was determined along with TEM measurements. An electron investigation proved that the pore openings of the MSN were indeed blocked by the Fe3O4 nanoparticles. The biological interaction investigation demonstrated Fe3O4-capped MSN endocytosis into HeLa cells. Not only does the material enter the cells through endocytosis, but it seems that fluorescein was released from the pores most probably caused by disulfide bond reducing molecules, antioxidants. In addition to endocytosis and release, the Fe3O4-capped MSN propelled the cells across a cuvette upon induction of a magnet force. Finally, an important aspect of materials characterization is transmission electron microscopy. A TEM investigation demonstrated that incorporating different functional groups during the synthesis (co-condensation) changed the particle and pore morphologies.

  15. Quantum Interference and Ballistic Transmission in Nanotube Electron Waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, Jing; Yenilmez, Erhan; Tombler, Thomas W.; Kim, Woong; Dai, Hongjie; Laughlin, Robert B.; Liu, Lei; Jayanthi, C. S.; Wu, S. Y.

    2001-09-03

    The electron transport properties of well-contacted individual single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated in the ballistic regime. Phase coherent transport and electron interference manifest as conductance fluctuations as a function of Fermi energy. Resonance with standing waves in finite-length tubes and localized states due to imperfections are observed for various Fermi energies. Two units of quantum conductance 2G{sub 0}=4e{sup 2}/h are measured for the first time, corresponding to the maximum conductance limit for ballistic transport in two channels of a nanotube.

  16. Solving the Accelerator-Condenser Coupling Problem in a Nanosecond Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, B W; LaGrange, T; Shuttlesworth, R M; Gibson, D J; Campbell, G H; Browning, N D

    2009-12-29

    We describe a modification to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) that allows it to briefly (using a pulsed-laser-driven photocathode) operate at currents in excess of 10 mA while keeping the effects of condenser lens aberrations to a minimum. This modification allows real-space imaging of material microstructure with a resolution of order 10 nm over regions several {micro}m across with an exposure time of 15 ns. This is more than 6 orders of magnitude faster than typical video-rate TEM imaging. The key is the addition of a weak magnetic lens to couple the large-diameter high-current beam exiting the accelerator into the acceptance aperture of a conventional TEM condenser lens system. We show that the performance of the system is essentially consistent with models derived from ray tracing and finite element simulations. The instrument can also be operated as a conventional TEM by using the electron gun in a thermionic mode. The modification enables very high electron current densities in {micro}m-sized areas and could also be used in a non-pulsed system for high-throughput imaging and analytical TEM.

  17. Energy-Filtering Transmission Electron Microscopy on the Nanometer Length Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Grogger, Werner; Varela del Arco, Maria; Ristau, Roger; Schaffer, Bernhard; Hofer, Ferdinand; Krishnan, Kannan M.

    2004-01-01

    Energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), developed about ten years ago, is now a routine analysis tool in the characterization of materials. Based on the physical principles of electron energy-loss spectrometry (EELS), but with the addition of in-column or post-column energy-filters, it forms images of microstructures using a narrow energy band of inelastically scattered electrons. Post-column energy-filters, developed commercially by Gatan (Gatan Imaging Filter, GIF) in the early 1990s, could be attached to nearly any TEM. Almost at the same time, the introduction of the EM-912 microscope with an integrated {Omega}-filter by Zeiss, made it possible to use in-column filters as well. These two developments made EFTEM possible on an almost routine basis. The operation of these filters is rather straightforward and it is now possible to acquire element specific images within a few minutes. However, the optimal setup for data acquisition, the judicious choice of experimental parameters to solve specific materials science problems and the interpretation of the results can be rather difficult. For best results, a fundamental knowledge of the underlying physics of EELS and a systematic development of the technical details is necessary. In this work, we discuss the current status of EFTEM in terms of spatial resolution and illustrate it with a few technologically relevant applications at the nanometer length scale.

  18. Free electron lasers for transmission of energy in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segall, S. B.; Hiddleston, H. R.; Catella, G. C.

    1981-01-01

    A one-dimensional resonant-particle model of a free electron laser (FEL) is used to calculate laser gain and conversion efficiency of electron energy to photon energy. The optical beam profile for a resonant optical cavity is included in the model as an axial variation of laser intensity. The electron beam profile is matched to the optical beam profile and modeled as an axial variation of current density. Effective energy spread due to beam emittance is included. Accelerators appropriate for a space-based FEL oscillator are reviewed. Constraints on the concentric optical resonator and on systems required for space operation are described. An example is given of a space-based FEL that would produce 1.7 MW of average output power at 0.5 micrometer wavelength with over 50% conversion efficiency of electrical energy to laser energy. It would utilize a 10 m-long amplifier centered in a 200 m-long optical cavity. A 3-amp, 65 meV electrostatic accelerator would provide the electron beam and recover the beam after it passes through the amplifier. Three to five shuttle flights would be needed to place the laser in orbit.

  19. Low impact to fixed cell processing aiming transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Ortrud Monika; da Silva, Marcos Alexandre Nunes; Barreto-Vieira, Debora Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    In cell culture, cell structures suffer strong impact due to centrifugation during processing for electron microscope observation. In order to minimise this effect, a new protocol was successfully developed. Using conventional reagents and equipments, it took over one week, but cell compression was reduced to none or the lowest deformation possible. PMID:27276186

  20. 46 CFR 530.10 - Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic... SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE SERVICE CONTRACTS Filing Requirements § 530.10 Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors. (a) Terms. When used in this section, the following...

  1. The Design and Construction of a Simple Transmission Electron Microscope for Educational Purposes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hearsey, Paul K.

    This document presents a model for a simple transmission electron microscope for educational purposes. This microscope could demonstrate thermonic emission, particle acceleration, electron deflection, and flourescence. It is designed to be used in high school science courses, particularly physics, taking into account the size, weight, complexity…

  2. 36 CFR 1236.24 - What are the additional requirements for managing unstructured electronic records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for managing unstructured electronic records? 1236.24 Section 1236.24 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION RECORDS MANAGEMENT ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT Additional Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.24 What are the additional requirements for...

  3. Incident energy and charge deposition dependences of electron transmission through a microsized tapered glass capillary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickramarachchi, S. J.; Ikeda, T.; Dassanayake, B. S.; Keerthisinghe, D.; Tanis, J. A.

    2016-09-01

    An experimental study of electron transmission and guiding through a tapered glass capillary has been performed. Electrons were transmitted for tilt angles up to ∼6.5° and ∼9.5° (laboratory angles) for incident energies of 500 and 1000 eV, respectively. It is found that elastic and inelastic contributions give rise to distinguishable peaks in the transmitted profile. For 500 eV elastic transmission dominates the profile, while for 1000 eV both elastic and inelastic contributions are present. The transmission for both energies was studied as a function of the charge (time) deposition and found to be strongly dependent. Results suggest fundamental differences between 500 and 1000 eV incident electrons. For 500 eV the transmission slowly increases suggesting charge up of the capillary wall, reaching relative stability with infrequent breakdowns for all angles investigated. For 1000 eV for tilt angles near zero degrees the time dependent profile shows oscillations in the transmission, which never reached a stable condition, while for the larger angle investigated the transmission reached near equilibrium. Inelastic processes dominated the transmission for 1000 eV even at very small tilt angles, but was generally elastic (due to Coulomb deflection) for 500 eV even for the largest tilt angle measured.

  4. Applying an information transmission approach to extract valence electron information from reconstructed exit waves.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiang; Zandbergen, Henny W; Van Dyck, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    The knowledge of the valence electron distribution is essential for understanding the properties of materials. However this information is difficult to obtain from HREM images because it is easily obscured by the large scattering contribution of core electrons and by the strong dynamical scattering process. In order to develop a sensitive method to extract the information of valence electrons, we have used an information transmission approach to describe the electron interaction with the object. The scattered electron wave is decomposed in a set of basic functions, which are the eigen functions of the Hamiltonian of the projected electrostatic object potential. Each basic function behaves as a communication channel that transfers the information of the object with its own transmission characteristic. By properly combining the components of the different channels, it is possible to design a scheme to extract the information of valence electron distribution from a series of exit waves. The method is described theoretically and demonstrated by means of computer simulations.

  5. Electronic control system for control of electronic electric shift apparatus for manual transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Tury, E.L.; Thoe, G.A.

    1989-04-18

    An electrical control apparatus is described for control of a manual transmission apparatus in a motor vehicle having a plurality of transmission states selected by the position of a shift select lever, the electrical control apparatus comprising: a first electric motor; means drive by the first electric motor and operative in response to energization of the first electric motor to move the shift select lever laterally between left, center, and right locations; a second electric motor; means driven by the second electric motor and operative in response to energization of the second electric motor to move the shift select lever longitudinally between forward, neutral, and rearward locations; operator input means operative to generate a desired transmission sate signal corresponding to manual operator input; a first transmission state sensing means for indicating the left, center, or right location of the shift select lever; a second transmission state sensing means for indicating the forward, neutral or rearward location of the shift select lever; and a logic control unit connected to the operator input means and the first and second transmission state sensing means for generation of a sequence of motor drive signals corresponding to the sequence of motions required for movement of the shift select lever from the present transmission state to the desired transmission state when the desired transmission state differs from the present transmission state, the motor drive signals including a clockwise motor drive signal, a counter-clockwise motor drive signal, a shift up motor drive signal and a shift down motor drive signal.

  6. Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Using Selective High-Order Laue Zones: Three-Dimensional Atomic Ordering in Sodium Cobaltate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.-T.; Gloter, A.; Chu, M.-W.; Chou, F. C.; Shu, G. J.; Liu, L.-K.; Chen, C. H.; Colliex, C.

    2010-09-01

    A new scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging technique using high-order Laue zones (named HOLZ-STEM), a diffraction contrast which has been strenuously avoided or minimized in traditional STEM imaging, can be used to obtain the additional 1D periodic information along the electron propagation axis without sacrificing atomic resolution in the lateral (2D) dimension. HOLZ-STEM has been demonstrated to resolve the 3D long-range Na ordering of Na0.71CoO2. Direct evidence of spiral-like Na-trimer chains twisting along the c axis is unambiguously established in real space.

  7. 36 CFR 1236.22 - What are the additional requirements for managing electronic mail records?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for managing electronic mail records? 1236.22 Section 1236.22 Parks, Forests, and Public Property... Requirements for Electronic Records § 1236.22 What are the additional requirements for managing electronic mail... requirements for electronic mail records: (1) The names of sender and all addressee(s) and date the message...

  8. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images.

    PubMed

    Lee, Z; Rose, H; Lehtinen, O; Biskupek, J; Kaiser, U

    2014-10-01

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions.

  9. Electron dose dependence of signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution in transmission electron microscope images.

    PubMed

    Lee, Z; Rose, H; Lehtinen, O; Biskupek, J; Kaiser, U

    2014-10-01

    In order to achieve the highest resolution in aberration-corrected (AC) high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images, high electron doses are required which only a few samples can withstand. In this paper we perform dose-dependent AC-HRTEM image calculations, and study the dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio, atom contrast and resolution on electron dose and sampling. We introduce dose-dependent contrast, which can be used to evaluate the visibility of objects under different dose conditions. Based on our calculations, we determine optimum samplings for high and low electron dose imaging conditions. PMID:24566042

  10. Sculpting nanoelectrodes with a transmission electron beam for electrical and geometrical characterization of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zandbergen, Henny W; van Duuren, Robert J H A; Alkemade, Paul F A; Lientschnig, Günther; Vasquez, Oscar; Dekker, Cees; Tichelaar, Frans D

    2005-03-01

    A method to produce metal electrodes with a gap of a few nanometers with a highly focused electron beam in a transmission electron microscope (TEM) is described. With this method the electrical and geometrical characterization of the same particle is possible. The I-V characteristics of a gold particle trapped between such electrodes showed the expected single-electron tunneling behavior, with a Coulomb gap corresponding to the geometry of the particle as observed with high-resolution TEM.

  11. A transmission electron microscopy study of porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abrams, K. J.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2006-02-01

    Porous silicon (PoSi) has been investigated for more than a decade because of its room-temperature photoluminescence resulting from quantum confinement effects. PoSi is, however, also biodegradable, biocompatible and often bioactive, rendering it of considerable research interest for a number of possible applications as a biomaterial. This paper presents details of work which forms part of a PhD study of the use of PoSi in drug delivery systems. In the current work, a method of utilising electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) to obtain a porosity value is being developed.

  12. Quantitative transmission electron microscopy analysis of the nanocrystallization kinetics of soft magnetic alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujan, R. V.; Zhang, Y. R.

    2006-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy was used for the first time to obtain quantitative values of the diffusional crystallization kinetics of initially amorphous Fe74.5Si13.5B9Nb3 , Fe76.5Si13.5B9Cu1 and Fe73.5Si13.5B9Nb3Cu1 and Fe77.5Si13.5Nb3Cu1 (Finemet) alloys. The role of Cu and Nb alloying additions was elucidated. Contrary to some models of the crystallization process, it is demonstrated that both Nb and Cu alloying additions can influence the nucleation and growth processes. Combined additions of both Cu and Nb induce drastic reduction in crystal size to about 10nm and 1000 times higher crystal number density. The high nucleation rate observed in the Fe-Si-B-Nb-Cu alloy was attributed to the formation of both Cu and Nb rich regions which provide a high number of heterogeneous nucleation sites, consistent with the Hampel and Pradell models, the low growth rate was consistent with the Hunziker model.

  13. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy method and studies of implant damage in single crystal diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Hickey, D.P.; Kuryliw, E.; Siebein, K.; Jones, K.S.; Chodelka, R.; Elliman, R.

    2006-07-15

    Few transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of single crystal diamond have been reported, most likely due to the time and difficulty involved in sample preparation. A method is described for creating a TEM cross section of single crystal diamond using a focused ion beam and in situ lift-out. The method results in samples approximately 10 {mu}m long by 3 {mu}m deep with an average thickness of 100-300 nm. The total time to prepare a cross-sectional TEM sample of diamond is less than 5 h. The method also allows for additional thinning to facilitate high resolution TEM imaging, and can be applied to oddly shaped diamond samples. This sample preparation technique has been applied to the study of ion implantation damage in single crystal diamond and its evolution upon annealing. High-pressure-high-temperature diamonds were implanted with Si{sup +} at an energy of 1 MeV and a temperature of 30 deg. C. One sample, with a (110) surface, was implanted with a dose of 1x10{sup 14} Si cm{sup -2} and annealed at 950 deg. C for 10 and 40 min. No significant defect formation or evolution was discernible by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy. Another sample, with a (100) orientation, was implanted with 1 MeV at 1x10{sup 15} Si cm{sup -2} and annealed at 1050 deg. C for 10 min. Prior to annealing, a heavily damaged but still crystalline region was observed. Upon annealing, the sample showed no signs of conversion either to an amorphous form of carbon or to graphite. This is unexpected as the energy and dose are above the previously reported graphitization threshold for diamond. Higher annealing temperatures and possibly a high vacuum will be required for future study of defect formation, evolution, and phase transformations in ion-implanted single crystal diamond.

  14. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  15. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    DOE PAGES

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. In this paper, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature andmore » does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. Finally, however, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.« less

  16. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography.

    PubMed

    Jesse, S; Chi, M; Belianinov, A; Beekman, C; Kalinin, S V; Borisevich, A Y; Lupini, A R

    2016-05-23

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called "big-data" methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy.

  17. Big Data Analytics for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy Ptychography

    PubMed Central

    Jesse, S.; Chi, M.; Belianinov, A.; Beekman, C.; Kalinin, S. V.; Borisevich, A. Y.; Lupini, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Electron microscopy is undergoing a transition; from the model of producing only a few micrographs, through the current state where many images and spectra can be digitally recorded, to a new mode where very large volumes of data (movies, ptychographic and multi-dimensional series) can be rapidly obtained. Here, we discuss the application of so-called “big-data” methods to high dimensional microscopy data, using unsupervised multivariate statistical techniques, in order to explore salient image features in a specific example of BiFeO3 domains. Remarkably, k-means clustering reveals domain differentiation despite the fact that the algorithm is purely statistical in nature and does not require any prior information regarding the material, any coexisting phases, or any differentiating structures. While this is a somewhat trivial case, this example signifies the extraction of useful physical and structural information without any prior bias regarding the sample or the instrumental modality. Further interpretation of these types of results may still require human intervention. However, the open nature of this algorithm and its wide availability, enable broad collaborations and exploratory work necessary to enable efficient data analysis in electron microscopy. PMID:27211523

  18. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  19. A high-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope at Nagoya University.

    PubMed

    Hibino, M; Shimoyama, H; Maruse, S

    1989-07-01

    A high-voltage scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) H-1250ST of the maximum accelerating voltage of 1.25 MV was constructed at Nagoya University in 1983. The microscope, equipped with a field-emission gun, is designed with high-level STEM performance as well as conventional transmission microscopy mode operation. The aim of developing the microscope, basic design schemes, principal instrumentation, and techniques developed are described.

  20. Electronic transport on the nanoscale: ballistic transmission and Ohm's law.

    PubMed

    Homoth, J; Wenderoth, M; Druga, T; Winking, L; Ulbrich, R G; Bobisch, C A; Weyers, B; Bannani, A; Zubkov, E; Bernhart, A M; Kaspers, M R; Möller, R

    2009-04-01

    If a current of electrons flows through a normal conductor (in contrast to a superconductor), it is impeded by local scattering at defects as well as phonon scattering. Both effects contribute to the voltage drop observed for a macroscopic complex system as described by Ohm's law. Although this concept is well established, it has not yet been measured around individual defects on the atomic scale. We have measured the voltage drop at a monatomic step in real space by restricting the current to a surface layer. For the Si(111)-( [see text]3 x [see text]3)-Ag surface a monotonous transition with a width below 1 nm was found. A numerical analysis of the data maps the current flow through the complex network and the interplay between defect-free terraces and monatomic steps.

  1. The spatial coherence function in scanning transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, D T; Findlay, S D; Etheridge, J

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the implications of the form of the spatial coherence function, also referred to as the effective source distribution, for quantitative analysis in scanning transmission electron microscopy, and in particular for interpreting the spatial origin of imaging and spectroscopy signals. These questions are explored using three different source distribution models applied to a GaAs crystal case study. The shape of the effective source distribution was found to have a strong influence not only on the scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) image contrast, but also on the distribution of the scattered electron wavefield and hence on the spatial origin of the detected electron intensities. The implications this has for measuring structure, composition and bonding at atomic resolution via annular dark field, X-ray and electron energy loss STEM imaging are discussed.

  2. Batteryless wireless transmission system for electronic drum uses piezoelectric generator for play signal and power source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, H.; Yoshimi, A.; Takemura, K.; Tanaka, A.; Douseki, T.

    2015-12-01

    A batteryless self-powered wireless transmission system has been developed that sends a signal from a drum pad to a synthesizer. The power generated by a piezoelectric generator functions both as the “Play” signal for the synthesizer and as the power source for the transmitter. An FM transmitter, which theoretically operates with zero latency, and a receiver with quick-response squelch of the received signal were developed for wireless transmission with a minimum system delay. Experimental results for an electronic drum without any connecting wires fully demonstrated the feasibility of self-powered wireless transmission with a latency of 900 μs.

  3. An efficient and cost-effective method for preparing transmission electron microscopy samples from powders

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Haiming; Lin, Yaojun; Seidman, David N.; Schoenung, Julie M.; van Rooyen, Isabella J.; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2015-09-09

    The preparation of transmission electron microcopy (TEM) samples from powders with particle sizes larger than ~100 nm poses a challenge. The existing methods are complicated and expensive, or have a low probability of success. Herein, we report a modified methodology for preparation of TEM samples from powders, which is efficient, cost-effective, and easy to perform. This method involves mixing powders with an epoxy on a piece of weighing paper, curing the powder–epoxy mixture to form a bulk material, grinding the bulk to obtain a thin foil, punching TEM discs from the foil, dimpling the discs, and ion milling the dimpled discs to electron transparency. Compared with the well established and robust grinding–dimpling–ion-milling method for TEM sample preparation for bulk materials, our modified approach for preparing TEM samples from powders only requires two additional simple steps. In this article, step-by-step procedures for our methodology are described in detail, and important strategies to ensure success are elucidated. Furthermore, our methodology has been applied successfully for preparing TEM samples with large thin areas and high quality for many different mechanically milled metallic powders.

  4. Transmission electron microscopy of heart and liver tissues from rats fed with gums arabic and tragacanth.

    PubMed

    Anderson, D M; Ashby, P; Busuttil, A; Kempson, S A; Lawson, M E

    1984-04-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to examine the ultrastructure of rat hearts and livers after diet supplementation with (a) 0, 0.5, 1.5, 2.5 and 3.5% (w/w) gum tragacanth (GT) for 91 days, (b) 0 and 1% GT for 5 days (c) 0, 1, 4 and 8% (w/w) gum arabic (GA) for 28 days. The preparation and scrutiny of the electron micrographs was undertaken by two independent teams of specialists. There were no detectable abnormalities in any of the organelles in the heart and liver specimens from any of the test animals and no inclusions nor other pathological changes were observed. All micrographs showed normal, healthy tissues; particular attention was given to the mitochondria in hepatocytes as they serve as sensitive indicators of the health and state of activity of cells. In addition, the data obtained from assays of the microsomal protein and cytochrome P-450 content of the livers showed that GA and GT did not cause inductive effects. These results do not support earlier suggestions, based on in vitro assays, that GA and GT cause changes in the function of rat heart and liver mitochondria and liver microsomes; however, they confirm a report by Zbinden that the ingestion of GT does not produce abnormalities in the cardiac function of rats.

  5. FASTDEF: fast defocus and astigmatism estimation for high-throughput transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargas, J; Otón, J; Marabini, R; Jonic, S; de la Rosa-Trevín, J M; Carazo, J M; Sorzano, C O S

    2013-02-01

    In this work we present a fast and automated algorithm for estimating the contrast transfer function (CTF) of a transmission electron microscope. The approach is very suitable for High Throughput work because: (a) it does not require any initial defocus estimation, (b) it is almost an order of magnitude faster than existing approaches, (c) it opens the way to well-defined extensions to the estimation of higher order aberrations, at the same time that provides defocus and astigmatism estimations comparable in accuracy to well established methods, such as Xmipp and CTFFIND3 approaches. The new algorithm is based on obtaining the wrapped modulating phase of the power spectra density pattern by the use of a quadrature filter. This phase is further unwrapped in order to obtain the continuous and smooth absolute phase map; then a Zernike polynomial fitting is performed and the defocus and astigmatism parameters are determined. While the method does not require an initial estimation of the defocus parameters or any non-linear optimization procedure, these approaches can be used if further refinement is desired. Results of the CTF estimation method are presented for standard negative stained images, cryo-electron microscopy images in the absence of carbon support, as well as micrographs with only ice. Additionally, we have also tested the proposed method with micrographs acquired from tilted and untilted samples, obtaining good results. The algorithm is freely available as a part of the Xmipp package [http://xmipp.cnb.csic.es].

  6. An efficient and cost-effective method for preparing transmission electron microscopy samples from powders

    DOE PAGES

    Wen, Haiming; Lin, Yaojun; Seidman, David N.; Schoenung, Julie M.; van Rooyen, Isabella J.; Lavernia, Enrique J.

    2015-09-09

    The preparation of transmission electron microcopy (TEM) samples from powders with particle sizes larger than ~100 nm poses a challenge. The existing methods are complicated and expensive, or have a low probability of success. Herein, we report a modified methodology for preparation of TEM samples from powders, which is efficient, cost-effective, and easy to perform. This method involves mixing powders with an epoxy on a piece of weighing paper, curing the powder–epoxy mixture to form a bulk material, grinding the bulk to obtain a thin foil, punching TEM discs from the foil, dimpling the discs, and ion milling the dimpledmore » discs to electron transparency. Compared with the well established and robust grinding–dimpling–ion-milling method for TEM sample preparation for bulk materials, our modified approach for preparing TEM samples from powders only requires two additional simple steps. In this article, step-by-step procedures for our methodology are described in detail, and important strategies to ensure success are elucidated. Furthermore, our methodology has been applied successfully for preparing TEM samples with large thin areas and high quality for many different mechanically milled metallic powders.« less

  7. Application of high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy to the characterization of nanoparticles in the environment.

    PubMed

    Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Ewing, Rodney C

    2003-02-15

    A major challenge to the development of a fundamental understanding of transport and retardation mechanisms of trace metal contaminants (<10 ppm) is their identification and characterization at the nanoscale. Atomic-scale techniques, such as conventional transmission electron microscopy, although powerful, are limited by the extremely small amounts of material that are examined. However, recent advances in electron microscopy provide a number of new analytical techniques that expand its application in environmental studies, particularly those concerning heavy metals on airborne particulates or water-borne colloids. High-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), STEM-energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX), and energy-filtered TEM (EFTEM) can be effectively used to identify and characterize nanoparticles. The image contrast in HAADF-STEM is strongly correlated to the atomic mass: heavier elements contribute to brighter contrast. Gold nanocrystals in pyrite and uranium nanocrystals in atmospheric aerosols have been identified by HAADF-STEM and STEM-EDX mapping and subsequently characterized by high-resolution TEM (HRTEM). EFTEM was used to identify U and Fe nanocrystals embedded in an aluminosilicate. A rare, As-bearing nanophase, westerveldite (FeAs), was identified by STEM-EDX and HRTEM. The combined use of these techniques greatly expands the effective application of electron microscopy in environmental studies, especially when applied to metals of very low concentrations. This paper describes examples of how these electron microbeam techniques can be used in combination to characterize a low concentration of heavy metals (a few ppm) on nanoscale particles.

  8. A novel exact solution to transmission problem of electron wave in a nonlinear Kronig-Penney superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Chao; Hai, Kuo; Tan, Jintao; Chen, Hao; Hai, Wenhua

    2016-03-01

    Nonlinear Kronig-Penney model has been frequently employed to study transmission problem of electron wave in a doped semiconductor superlattice or in a nonlinear electrified chain. Here from an integral equation we derive a novel exact solution of the problem, which contains a simple nonlinear map connecting transmission coefficient with system parameters. Consequently, we propose a scheme to manipulate electronic distribution and transmission by adjusting the system parameters. A new quantum coherence effect is evidenced by the strict expression of transmission coefficient, which results in the aperiodic electronic distributions and different transmission coefficients including the approximate zero transmission and total transmission, and the multiple transmissions. The method based on the concise exact solution can be applied directly to some nonlinear cold atomic systems and a lot of linear Kronig-Penney systems, and also can be extended to investigate electronic transport in different discrete nonlinear systems.

  9. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy nanostructural study of shed microparticles.

    PubMed

    Issman, Liron; Brenner, Benjamin; Talmon, Yeshayahu; Aharon, Anat

    2013-01-01

    Microparticles (MPs) are sub-micron membrane vesicles (100-1000 nm) shed from normal and pathologic cells due to stimulation or apoptosis. MPs can be found in the peripheral blood circulation of healthy individuals, whereas elevated concentrations are found in pregnancy and in a variety of diseases. Also, MPs participate in physiological processes, e.g., coagulation, inflammation, and angiogenesis. Since their clinical properties are important, we have developed a new methodology based on nano-imaging that provides significant new data on MPs nanostructure, their composition and function. We are among the first to characterize by direct-imaging cryogenic transmitting electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) the near-to-native nanostructure of MP systems isolated from different cell types and stimulation procedures. We found that there are no major differences between the MP systems we have studied, as most particles were spherical, with diameters from 200 to 400 nm. However, each MP population is very heterogeneous, showing diverse morphologies. We investigated by cryo-TEM the effects of standard techniques used to isolate and store MPs, and found that either high-g centrifugation of MPs for isolation purposes, or slow freezing to -80 °C for storage introduce morphological artifacts, which can influence MP nanostructure, and thus affect the efficiency of these particles as future diagnostic tools.

  10. Visualization of newt aragonitic otoconial matrices using transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyger, P. S.; Wiederhold, M. L.

    1995-01-01

    Otoconia are calcified protein matrices within the gravity-sensing organs of the vertebrate vestibular system. These protein matrices are thought to originate from the supporting or hair cells in the macula during development. Previous studies of mammalian calcitic, barrel-shaped otoconia revealed an organized protein matrix consisting of a thin peripheral layer, a well-defined organic core and a flocculent matrix inbetween. No studies have reported the microscopic organization of the aragonitic otoconial matrix, despite its protein characterization. Pote et al. (1993b) used densitometric methods and inferred that prismatic (aragonitic) otoconia have a peripheral protein distribution, compared to that described for the barrel-shaped, calcitic otoconia of birds, mammals, and the amphibian utricle. By using tannic acid as a negative stain, we observed three kinds of organic matrices in preparations of fixed, decalcified saccular otoconia from the adult newt: (1) fusiform shapes with a homogenous electron-dense matrix; (2) singular and multiple strands of matrix; and (3) more significantly, prismatic shapes outlined by a peripheral organic matrix. These prismatic shapes remain following removal of the gelatinous matrix, revealing an internal array of organic matter. We conclude that prismatic otoconia have a largely peripheral otoconial matrix, as inferred by densitometry.

  11. Unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from experimental transmission data, with direct independent validation

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, E. S. M.; McEwen, M. R.; Rogers, D. W. O.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: In a recent computational study, an improved physics-based approach was proposed for unfolding linac photon spectra and incident electron energies from transmission data. In this approach, energy differentiation is improved by simultaneously using transmission data for multiple attenuators and detectors, and the unfolding robustness is improved by using a four-parameter functional form to describe the photon spectrum. The purpose of the current study is to validate this approach experimentally, and to demonstrate its application on a typical clinical linac. Methods: The validation makes use of the recent transmission measurements performed on the Vickers research linac of National Research Council Canada. For this linac, the photon spectra were previously measured using a NaI detector, and the incident electron parameters are independently known. The transmission data are for eight beams in the range 10-30 MV using thick Be, Al and Pb bremsstrahlung targets. To demonstrate the approach on a typical clinical linac, new measurements are performed on an Elekta Precise linac for 6, 10 and 25 MV beams. The different experimental setups are modeled using EGSnrc, with the newly added photonuclear attenuation included. Results: For the validation on the research linac, the 95% confidence bounds of the unfolded spectra fall within the noise of the NaI data. The unfolded spectra agree with the EGSnrc spectra (calculated using independently known electron parameters) with RMS energy fluence deviations of 4.5%. The accuracy of unfolding the incident electron energy is shown to be {approx}3%. A transmission cutoff of only 10% is suitable for accurate unfolding, provided that the other components of the proposed approach are implemented. For the demonstration on a clinical linac, the unfolded incident electron energies and their 68% confidence bounds for the 6, 10 and 25 MV beams are 6.1 {+-} 0.1, 9.3 {+-} 0.1, and 19.3 {+-} 0.2 MeV, respectively. The unfolded spectra

  12. Visualizing Macromolecular Complexes with In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, James E.; Jungjohann, K. L.; Wong, Peony C. K.; Chiu, Po-Lin; Dutrow, Gavin H.; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-11-01

    A central focus of biological research is understanding the structure/function relationship of macromolecular protein complexes. Yet conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques are limited to static observations. Here we present the first direct images of purified macromolecular protein complexes using in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy. Our results establish the capability of this technique for visualizing the interface between biology and nanotechnology with high fidelity while also probing the interactions of biomolecules within solution. This method represents an important advancement towards allowing future high-resolution observations of biological processes and conformational dynamics in real-time.

  13. Macroporous silicon membranes as electron and x-ray transmissive windows

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, J.; Scherer, A.; Goesele, U.; Kolbe, M.

    2004-08-16

    Macroporous silicon membranes are fabricated whose pores are terminated with 60 nm thin silicon dioxide shells. The transmission of electrons with energies of 5 kV-25 kV through these membranes was investigated reaching a maximum of 22% for 25 kV. Furthermore, the transmission of electromagnetic radiation ranging from the far-infrared to the x-ray region was determined. The results suggest the application of the membrane as window material for electron optics and energy dispersive x-ray detectors.

  14. Visualizing macromolecular complexes with in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Evans, James E; Jungjohann, Katherine L; Wong, Peony C K; Chiu, Po-Lin; Dutrow, Gavin H; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2012-11-01

    A central focus of biological research is understanding the structure/function relationship of macromolecular protein complexes. Yet conventional transmission electron microscopy techniques are limited to static observations. Here we present the first direct images of purified macromolecular protein complexes using in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy. Our results establish the capability of this technique for visualizing the interface between biology and nanotechnology with high fidelity while also probing the interactions of biomolecules within solution. This method represents an important advancement towards allowing future high-resolution observations of biological processes and conformational dynamics in real-time.

  15. Meat and bone meal and mineral feed additives may increase the risk of oral prion disease transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; McKenzie, Debbie; Pedersen, Joel A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of prion-contaminated materials is postulated to be a primary route of prion disease transmission. Binding of prions to soil (micro)particles dramatically enhances peroral disease transmission relative to unbound prions, and it was hypothesized that micrometer-sized particles present in other consumed materials may affect prion disease transmission via the oral route of exposure. Small, insoluble particles are present in many substances, including soil, human foods, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds. It is known that meat and bone meal (MBM), a feed additive believed responsible for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), contains particles smaller than 20 μm and that the pathogenic prion protein binds to MBM. The potentiation of disease transmission via the oral route by exposure to MBM or three micrometer-sized mineral feed additives was determined. Data showed that when the disease agent was bound to any of the tested materials, the penetrance of disease was increased compared to unbound prions. Our data suggest that in feed or other prion-contaminated substances consumed by animals or, potentially, humans, the addition of MBM or the presence of microparticles could heighten risks of prion disease acquisition.

  16. Meat and bone meal and mineral feed additives may increase the risk of oral prion disease transmission

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.J.; McKenzie, D.; Pedersen, J.A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of prion-contaminated materials is postulated to be a primary route of prion disease transmission. Binding of prions to soil (micro)particles dramatically enhances peroral disease transmission relative to unbound prions, and it was hypothesized that micrometer-sized particles present in other consumed materials may affect prion disease transmission via the oral route of exposure. Small, insoluble particles are present in many substances, including soil, human foods, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds. It is known that meat and bone meal (MBM), a feed additive believed responsible for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), contains particles smaller than 20 ??m and that the pathogenic prion protein binds to MBM. The potentiation of disease transmission via the oral route by exposure to MBM or three micrometer-sized mineral feed additives was determined. Data showed that when the disease agent was bound to any of the tested materials, the penetrance of disease was increased compared to unbound prions. Our data suggest that in feed or other prion-contaminated substances consumed by animals or, potentially, humans, the addition of MBM or the presence of microparticles could heighten risks of prion disease acquisition. Copyright ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  17. MEAT AND BONE MEAL AND MINERAL FEED ADDITIVES MAY INCREASE THE RISK OF ORAL PRION DISEASE TRANSMISSION

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher J.; McKenzie, Debbie; Pedersen, Joel A.; Aiken, Judd M.

    2011-01-01

    Ingestion of prion-contaminated materials is postulated to be a primary route of prion disease transmission. Binding of prions to soil (micro)particles dramatically enhances peroral disease transmission relative to unbound prions, and it was hypothesized that micrometer–sized particles present in other consumed materials may affect prion disease transmission via the oral route of exposure. Small, insoluble particles are present in many substances, including soil, human foods, pharmaceuticals, and animal feeds. It is known that meat and bone meal (MBM), a feed additive believed responsible for the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), contains particles smaller than 20 μm and that the pathogenic prion protein binds to MBM. The potentiation of disease transmission via the oral route by exposure to MBM or three micrometer-sized mineral feed additives was determined. Data showed that when the disease agent was bound to any of the tested materials, the penetrance of disease was increased compared to unbound prions. Our data suggest that in feed or other prion–contaminated substances consumed by animals or, potentially, humans, the addition of MBM or the presence of microparticles could heighten risks of prion disease acquisition. PMID:21218345

  18. Characterization of aluminum oxide tunnel barriers by combining transport measurements and transmission electron microscopy imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Aref, T.; Averin, A.; Nguyend, H. Q.; Pekola, J. P.; Dijken, S. van; Yao, L. D.; Ferring, A.; Koberidze, M.; Nieminen, R. M.

    2014-08-21

    We present two approaches for studying the uniformity of a tunnel barrier. The first approach is based on measuring single-electron and two-electron tunneling in a hybrid single-electron transistor. Our measurements indicate that the effective area of a conduction channel is about one order of magnitude larger than predicted by theoretical calculations. With the second method, transmission electron microscopy, we demonstrate that variations in the barrier thickness are a plausible explanation for the larger effective area and an enhancement of higher order tunneling processes.

  19. A toolkit for the characterization of CCD cameras for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vulovic, M; Rieger, B; van Vliet, L J; Koster, A J; Ravelli, R B G

    2010-01-01

    Charge-coupled devices (CCD) are nowadays commonly utilized in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for applications in life sciences. Direct access to digitized images has revolutionized the use of electron microscopy, sparking developments such as automated collection of tomographic data, focal series, random conical tilt pairs and ultralarge single-particle data sets. Nevertheless, for ultrahigh-resolution work photographic plates are often still preferred. In the ideal case, the quality of the recorded image of a vitrified biological sample would solely be determined by the counting statistics of the limited electron dose the sample can withstand before beam-induced alterations dominate. Unfortunately, the image is degraded by the non-ideal point-spread function of the detector, as a result of a scintillator coupled by fibre optics to a CCD, and the addition of several inherent noise components. Different detector manufacturers provide different types of figures of merit when advertising the quality of their detector. It is hard for most laboratories to verify whether all of the anticipated specifications are met. In this report, a set of algorithms is presented to characterize on-axis slow-scan large-area CCD-based TEM detectors. These tools have been added to a publicly available image-processing toolbox for MATLAB. Three in-house CCD cameras were carefully characterized, yielding, among others, statistics for hot and bad pixels, the modulation transfer function, the conversion factor, the effective gain and the detective quantum efficiency. These statistics will aid data-collection strategy programs and provide prior information for quantitative imaging. The relative performance of the characterized detectors is discussed and a comparison is made with similar detectors that are used in the field of X-ray crystallography. PMID:20057054

  20. The Development of a Hibachi Window for Electron Beam Transmission in a KrF Laser

    SciTech Connect

    C.A. Gentile; R. Parsells; J.E. Butler; J.D. Sethian; L. Ciebiera; F. Hegeler; C. Jun; S. Langish; M. Myers

    2003-11-07

    In support of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), a 150 {micro}m thick silicon (Si) wafer coated on one side with a 1.2 {micro}m nanocrystalline diamond foil is being fabricated as an electron beam transmission (hibachi) window for use in KrF lasers. The hibachi window separates the lasing medium from the electron beam source while allowing the electron beam to pass through. The hibachi window must be capable of withstanding the challenging environment presented in the lasing chamber, which include: fluorine gas, delta pressure >2 atm at 5 Hz, and a high heat flux due to the transmission of electrons passing through the foil. Tests at NRL/Electra and at PPPL have shown that a device employing these novel components in the stated configuration provide for a robust hibachi window with structural integrity.

  1. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  2. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  3. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals. PMID:26923483

  4. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, making it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.

  5. Biological applications and transmission electron microscopy investigation of mesoporous silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trewyn, Brian G.

    endocytosis into HeLa cells. Not only does the material enter the cells through endocytosis, but it seems that fluorescein was released from the pores, most probably caused by disulfide bond reducing molecules, antioxidants. In addition to endocytosis and release, the Fe3O4-capped MSN propelled the cells across a cuvette upon induction of a magnet force. Finally, an important aspect of materials characterization is transmission electron microscopy. A TEM investigation demonstrated that incorporating different functional groups during the synthesis (co-condensation) changed the particle and pore morphologies.

  6. Ultrastructure of Candida albicans pleomorphic forms: phase-contrast microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Staniszewska, Monika; Bondaryk, Małgorzata; Siennicka, Katarzyna; Kurzatkowski, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    A modified method of glutaraldeyde-osmium tetroxide fixation was adjusted to characterize the ultrastructure of Candida albicans pleomorphic forms, using phase-contrast microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The discovered morphological criteria defining the individual morphotypes are discussed in terms of mycological and histopathological diagnostics of candidiasis. The relations are discussed between fungal pleomorphism, virulence and susceptibility of different morphotypes to fungicides.

  7. Phase reconstruction in annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takafumi; Kawasaki, Tadahiro; Tanji, Takayoshi; Kodama, Tetsuji; Matsutani, Takaomi; Ogai, Keiko; Ikuta, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    A novel technique for reconstructing the phase shifts of electron waves was applied to Cs-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). To realize this method, a new STEM system equipped with an annular aperture, annularly arrayed detectors and an arrayed image processor has been developed and evaluated in experiments. We show a reconstructed phase image of graphite particles and demonstrate that this new method works effectively for high-resolution phase imaging. PMID:25387907

  8. Phase reconstruction in annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Takafumi; Kawasaki, Tadahiro; Tanji, Takayoshi; Kodama, Tetsuji; Matsutani, Takaomi; Ogai, Keiko; Ikuta, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    A novel technique for reconstructing the phase shifts of electron waves was applied to Cs-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). To realize this method, a new STEM system equipped with an annular aperture, annularly arrayed detectors and an arrayed image processor has been developed and evaluated in experiments. We show a reconstructed phase image of graphite particles and demonstrate that this new method works effectively for high-resolution phase imaging.

  9. Consecutive light microscopy, scanning-transmission electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy of traumatic human brain oedema and ischaemic brain damage.

    PubMed

    Castejon, O J; Castejon, H V; Diaz, M; Castellano, A

    2001-10-01

    Cortical biopsies of 11 patients with traumatic brain oedema were consecutively studied by light microscopy (LM) using thick plastic sections, scanning-transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) using semithin plastic sections and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using ultrathin sections. Samples were glutaraldehyde-osmium fixed and embedded in Araldite or Epon. Thick sections were stained with toluidine-blue for light microscopy. Semithin sections were examined unstained and uncoated for (S)TEM. Ultrathin sections were stained with uranyl and lead. Perivascular haemorrhages and perivascular extravasation of proteinaceous oedema fluid were observed in both moderate and severe oedema. Ischaemic pyramidal and non-pyramidal nerve cells appeared shrunken, electron dense and with enlargement of intracytoplasmic membrane compartment. Notably swollen astrocytes were observed in all samples examined. Glycogen-rich and glycogen-depleted astrocytes were identified in anoxic-ischaemic regions. Dark and hydropic satellite, interfascicular and perivascular oligodendrocytes were also found. The status spongiosus of severely oedematous brain parenchyma observed by LM and (S)TEM was correlated with the enlarged extracellular space and disrupted neuropil observed by TEM. The (S)TEM is recommended as a suitable technique for studying pathological processes in the central nervous system and as an informative adjunct to LM and TEM.

  10. 21 CFR 1311.05 - Standards for technologies for electronic transmission of orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Standards for technologies for electronic transmission of orders. 1311.05 Section 1311.05 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... orders for Schedule I and II controlled substances may use any technology to sign and...

  11. 46 CFR 531.8 - Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., cancellation, and electronic transmission errors. (a) Amendment. (1) NSAs may be amended by mutual agreement of... § 531.5 and Appendix A to this part. (i) Where feasible, NSAs should be amended by amending only the affected specific term(s) or subterms. (ii) Each time any part of an NSA is amended, the filer shall...

  12. 46 CFR 531.8 - Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., cancellation, and electronic transmission errors. (a) Amendment. (1) NSAs may be amended by mutual agreement of... § 531.5 and Appendix A to this part. (i) Where feasible, NSAs should be amended by amending only the affected specific term(s) or subterms. (ii) Each time any part of an NSA is amended, the filer shall...

  13. 46 CFR 531.8 - Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., cancellation, and electronic transmission errors. (a) Amendment. (1) NSAs may be amended by mutual agreement of... § 531.5 and Appendix A to this part. (i) Where feasible, NSAs should be amended by amending only the affected specific term(s) or subterms. (ii) Each time any part of an NSA is amended, the filer shall...

  14. 46 CFR 531.8 - Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., cancellation, and electronic transmission errors. (a) Amendment. (1) NSAs may be amended by mutual agreement of... § 531.5 and Appendix A to this part. (i) Where feasible, NSAs should be amended by amending only the affected specific term(s) or subterms. (ii) Each time any part of an NSA is amended, the filer shall...

  15. 46 CFR 531.8 - Amendment, correction, cancellation, and electronic transmission errors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., cancellation, and electronic transmission errors. (a) Amendment. (1) NSAs may be amended by mutual agreement of... § 531.5 and Appendix A to this part. (i) Where feasible, NSAs should be amended by amending only the affected specific term(s) or subterms. (ii) Each time any part of an NSA is amended, the filer shall...

  16. 77 FR 50932 - Electronic Transmission of Customs Data-Outbound International Letter-Post Items

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... 20 Electronic Transmission of Customs Data--Outbound International Letter-Post Items AGENCY: Postal... Standards of the United States Postal Service, International Mail Manual (IMM ) to require that customs data... receive your comments on or before September 24, 2012. ADDRESSES: Mail or deliver written comments to...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals. 1926.1420 Section 1926.1420 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other...

  18. Transmission electron microscope specimen preparation for exploring the buried interfaces in plan view.

    PubMed

    Radnóczi, G Z; Pécz, B

    2006-12-01

    A relatively easy and convenient process for the preparation of transmission electron microscope specimens of buried interfaces is described. The method is based on the alignment and realignment of the specimen rotation centre during ion milling. The ion-milling time interval in which good samples are obtained is substantially extended in this way.

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals. 1926.1420 Section 1926.1420 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals. 1926.1420 Section 1926.1420 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other...

  1. 29 CFR 1926.1420 - Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Signals-radio, telephone or other electronic transmission of signals. 1926.1420 Section 1926.1420 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL... CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in Construction § 1926.1420 Signals—radio, telephone or other...

  2. Observation of microporous cesium salts of 12-tungstosilicic acid using scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hiyoshi, Norihito; Kamiya, Yuichi

    2015-06-21

    Heteropolyanions and their arrays in microporous cesium salts of 12-tungstosilicic acid, Cs2.5H1.5[SiW12O40] and Cs4.0[SiW12O40], were observed by aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. Microstructures that form micropores in the polyoxometalates were visualized.

  3. Method and apparatus for a high-resolution three dimensional confocal scanning transmission electron microscope

    DOEpatents

    de Jonge, Niels [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-08-17

    A confocal scanning transmission electron microscope which includes an electron illumination device providing an incident electron beam propagating in a direction defining a propagation axis, and a precision specimen scanning stage positioned along the propagation axis and movable in at least one direction transverse to the propagation axis. The precision specimen scanning stage is configured for positioning a specimen relative to the incident electron beam. A projector lens receives a transmitted electron beam transmitted through at least part of the specimen and focuses this transmitted beam onto an image plane, where the transmitted beam results from the specimen being illuminated by the incident electron beam. A detection system is placed approximately in the image plane.

  4. Additional heritable virus in the parasitic wasp Leptopilina boulardi: prevalence, transmission and phenotypic effects.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Julien; Lepetit, David; Ravallec, Marc; Fleury, Frédéric; Varaldi, Julien

    2016-02-01

    Parasitoid wasps can be found in association with heritable viruses. Although some viruses have been shown to profoundly affect the biology and evolution of parasitoid wasps, the genetic and phenotypic diversity of parasitoid-associated viruses remains largely unexplored. We previously discovered a behaviour-manipulating DNA virus in the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi. In this species, which lays its eggs inside Drosophila larvae, Leptopilina boulardi filamentous virus (LbFV) forces the females to lay their eggs in already parasitized Drosophila larvae. This behavioural manipulation increases the chances for the horizontal transmission of the virus. Here, we describe in the same parasitoid species another virus, which we propose to call Leptopilina boulardi toti-like virus (LbTV). This double-stranded RNA virus is highly prevalent in insect laboratory lines as well as in parasitoids caught in the field. In some cases, LbTV was found in coinfection with LbFV, but did not affect the behaviour of the wasp. Instead we found that the presence of LbTV correlates with an increase in the number of offspring, mostly due to increased survival of parasitoid larvae. LbTV is vertically transmitted mostly through the maternal lineage even if frequent paternal transmission also occurs. Unlike LbFV, LbTV is not horizontally transmitted. Its genome encodes a putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) showing similarities with RdRps of Totiviridae. These results underline the high incidence and diversity of inherited viruses in parasitoids as well as their potential impact on the phenotype of their hosts.

  5. Scanning image detection (SID) system for conventional transmission electron microscope (CTEM) images.

    PubMed

    Tanji, T; Tomita, M; Kobayashi, H

    1990-08-01

    A new image detection system has been developed to display transmission electron microscope (TEM) images on a CRT without a video camera system. Deflection coils placed in both the upper space of an objective lens and in the lower space of the first intermediate lens scan a small electron probe simultaneously. The electrical signal acquired through an improved scintillator and a photomultiplier is synchronized with the scanning signal and displayed in a similar fashion to a conventional scanning TEM (STEM) instrument. A preliminary system using a 100 kV conventional TEM (CTEM) equipped with a hairpin-type electron gun, produced an image with a spatial resolution of 1 nm.

  6. Charged nanoparticle dynamics in water induced by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    White, E R; Mecklenburg, Matthew; Shevitski, Brian; Singer, S B; Regan, B C

    2012-02-28

    Using scanning transmission electron microscopy we image ~4 nm platinum nanoparticles deposited on an insulating membrane, where the membrane is one of two electron-transparent windows separating an aqueous environment from the microscope's high vacuum. Upon receiving a relatively moderate dose of ~10(4) e/nm(2), initially immobile nanoparticles begin to move along trajectories that are directed radially outward from the center of the field of view. With larger dose rates the particle motion becomes increasingly dramatic. These observations demonstrate that, even under mild imaging conditions, the in situ electron microscopy of aqueous environments can produce electrophoretic charging effects that dominate the dynamics of nanoparticles under observation.

  7. High-pressure freezing for scanning transmission electron tomography analysis of cellular organelles.

    PubMed

    Walther, Paul; Schmid, Eberhard; Höhn, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Using an electron microscope's scanning transmission mode (STEM) for collection of tomographic datasets is advantageous compared to bright field transmission electron microscopic (TEM). For image formation, inelastic scattering does not cause chromatic aberration, since in STEM mode no image forming lenses are used after the beam has passed the sample, in contrast to regular TEM. Therefore, thicker samples can be imaged. It has been experimentally demonstrated that STEM is superior to TEM and energy filtered TEM for tomography of samples as thick as 1 μm. Even when using the best electron microscope, adequate sample preparation is the key for interpretable results. We adapted protocols for high-pressure freezing of cultivated cells from a physiological state. In this chapter, we describe optimized high-pressure freezing and freeze substitution protocols for STEM tomography in order to obtain high membrane contrast.

  8. Investigating the mesostructure of ordered porous silica nanocomposites by transmission electron microscopy techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Bullita, S.; Casula, M. F.; Piludu, M.; Falqui, A.; Carta, D.; Corrias, A.

    2014-10-21

    Nanocomposites made out of FeCo alloy nanocrystals supported onto pre-formed mesoporous ordered silica which features a cubic arrangement of pores (SBA-16) were investigated. Information on the effect of the nanocrystals on the mesostructure (i.e. pore arrangement symmetry, pore size, and shape) were deduced by a multitechnique approach including N2 physisorption, low angle X-ray diffraction, and Transmission electron microscopy. It is shown that advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques are required, however, to gain direct evidence on key compositional and textural features of the nanocomposites. In particular, electron tomography and microtomy techniques make clear that the FeCo nanocrystals are located within the pores of the SBA-16 silica, and that the ordered mesostructure of the nanocomposite is retained throughout the observed specimen.

  9. Development of a novel straining holder for transmission electron microscopy compatible with single tilt-axis electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Sato, K; Miyazaki, H; Gondo, T; Miyazaki, S; Murayama, M; Hata, S

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a newly designed straining specimen holder for in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) compatible with high-angle single tilt-axis electron tomography. The holder can deform a TEM specimen under tensile stress with the strain rate between 1.5 × 10(-6) and 5.2 × 10(-3) s(-1). We have also confirmed that the maximum tilt angle of the specimen holder reaches ±60° with a rectangular shape aluminum specimen. The new specimen holder, termed as 'straining and tomography holder', will have wide range potential applications in materials science. PMID:25904643

  10. Nanoscale Energy-Filtered Scanning Confocal Electron Microscopy Using a Double-Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Peng; Behan, Gavin; Kirkland, Angus I.; Nellist, Peter D.; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Mitsuishi, Kazutaka; Shimojo, Masayuki

    2010-05-21

    We demonstrate that a transmission electron microscope fitted with two spherical-aberration correctors can be operated as an energy-filtered scanning confocal electron microscope. A method for establishing this mode is described and initial results showing 3D chemical mapping with nanoscale sensitivity to height and thickness changes in a carbon film are presented. Importantly, uncorrected chromatic aberration does not limit the depth resolution of this technique and moreover performs an energy-filtering role, which is explained in terms of a combined depth and energy-loss response function.

  11. Characterization of virus-like particles in GARDASIL® by cryo transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Qinjian; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Lander, Gabriel; Sworen, Jaime; Towne, Victoria; Abraham, Dicky; Duncan, Paul; Washabaugh, Michael W; Sitrin, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryoTEM) is a powerful characterization method for assessing the structural properties of biopharmaceutical nanoparticles, including Virus Like Particle-based vaccines. We demonstrate the method using the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) VLPs in GARDASIL®. CryoTEM, coupled to automated data collection and analysis, was used to acquire images of the particles in their hydrated state, determine their morphological characteristics, and confirm the integrity of the particles when absorbed to aluminum adjuvant. In addition, we determined the three-dimensional structure of the VLPs, both alone and when interacting with neutralizing antibodies. Two modes of binding of two different neutralizing antibodies were apparent; for HPV type 11 saturated with H11.B2, 72 potential Fab binding sites were observed at the center of each capsomer, whereas for HPV 16 interacting with H16.V5, it appears that 60 pentamers (each neighboring 6 other pentamers) bind five Fabs per pentamer, for the total of 300 potential Fab binding sites per VLP. PMID:24299977

  12. Ultrastructure of the Odontocete organ of Corti: scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Morell, Maria; Lenoir, Marc; Shadwick, Robert E; Jauniaux, Thierry; Dabin, Willy; Begeman, Lineke; Ferreira, Marisa; Maestre, Iranzu; Degollada, Eduard; Hernandez-Milian, Gema; Cazevieille, Chantal; Fortuño, José-Manuel; Vogl, Wayne; Puel, Jean-Luc; André, Michel

    2015-02-15

    The morphological study of the Odontocete organ of Corti, together with possible alterations associated with damage from sound exposure, represents a key conservation approach to assess the effects of acoustic pollution on marine ecosystems. By collaborating with stranding networks from several European countries, 150 ears from 13 species of Odontocetes were collected and analyzed by scanning (SEM) and transmission (TEM) electron microscopy. Based on our analyses, we first describe and compare Odontocete cochlear structures and then propose a diagnostic method to identify inner ear alterations in stranded individuals. The two species analyzed by TEM (Phocoena phocoena and Stenella coeruleoalba) showed morphological characteristics in the lower basal turn of high-frequency hearing species. Among other striking features, outer hair cell bodies were extremely small and were strongly attached to Deiters cells. Such morphological characteristics, shared with horseshoe bats, suggest that there has been convergent evolution of sound reception mechanisms among echolocating species. Despite possible autolytic artifacts due to technical and experimental constraints, the SEM analysis allowed us to detect the presence of scarring processes resulting from the disappearance of outer hair cells from the epithelium. In addition, in contrast to the rapid decomposition process of the sensory epithelium after death (especially of the inner hair cells), the tectorial membrane appeared to be more resistant to postmortem autolysis effects. Analysis of the stereocilia imprint pattern at the undersurface of the tectorial membrane may provide a way to detect possible ultrastructural alterations of the hair cell stereocilia by mirroring them on the tectorial membrane.

  13. High resolution transmission electron microscopy of melamine-formaldehyde aerogels and silica aerogels

    SciTech Connect

    Ruben, G.C. . Dept. of Biological Sciences)

    1991-09-01

    The goal of the high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) was to image the structure of two tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) and two melamine-formaldehyde (MF) aerogels at the single polymer chain level{sup 1,2}. With this level of structural resolution we hoped to interrelate each aerogel's structure with its physical properties and its method of synthesis. Conventional single-step base catalysed TMOS aerogels show strings of spheroidal particles linked together with minimal necking. The spheroidal particles range from 86--132 {Angstrom} and average 113{plus minus}10 {Angstrom} in diameter{sup 2}. In contrast the TMOS aerogels reported on here were made by a two step method. After extended silica chains are grown in solution under acidic conditions with a substoichiometric amount of water, the reaction is stopped and the methanol hydrolysed from TMOS is removed. Then base catalysis and additional water are added to cause gel formation is a nonalcoholic solvent. The MF aerogels were prepared for HRTEM by fracturing them on a stereo microscope stage with razor knife so that fractured pieces with smooth flat surfaces could be selected for platinum-carbon replication. The two silica (TMOS) aerogels were both transparent and difficult to see. These aerogels were fractured on a stereo microscope stage with tweezers. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Perspectives on low voltage transmission electron microscopy as applied to cell biology.

    PubMed

    Bendayan, Moise; Paransky, Eugene

    2014-12-01

    Low voltage transmission electron microscopy (LVTEM) with accelerating voltages as low as 5 kV was applied to cell biology. To take advantage of the increased contrast given by LVTEM, tissue preparation was modified omitting all heavy metals such as osmium, uranium, and lead from the fixation, on block staining and counterstaining. Nonstained ultra-thin tissue sections (40 nm thick) generated highly contrasted images. While the aspect of the cells remains similar to that obtained by conventional TEM, some new substructures were revealed. The pancreatic acinar cells granules present a heterogeneous matrix with partitions corresponding to segregation of their different secretory proteins. Microvilli display their core of microfilaments anchored to the dense top membrane. Mitochondria revealed the presence of distinct particles along their cristea membranes that may correspond to the ATP synthase complexes or oxysomes. The dense nuclear chromatin displays a honey-comb appearance while distinct beads aligned along thin threads were seen in the dispersed chromatin. These new features revealed by LVTEM correlate with structures described or predicted through other approaches. Masking effects due to thickness of the tissue sections and to the presence of heavy metals must have prevented their observation by conventional TEM. Furthermore, the immunogold was adapted to LVTEM revealing nuclear lamin-A at the edge of the dense chromatin ribbons. Combining cytochemistry with LVTEM brings additional advantages to this new approach in cell biology.

  15. Correlative Fluorescence Microscopy and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Quantum Dot Labeled Proteins in Whole Cells in Liquid

    PubMed Central

    Dukes, Madeline J.; Peckys, Diana B.; de Jonge, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a state-of-the-art microscopy methodology to study cellular function, combining the functionality of light microscopy with the high resolution of electron microscopy. However, this technique involves complex sample preparation procedures due to its need for either thin sections or frozen samples for TEM imaging. Here, we introduce a novel correlative approach capable of imaging whole eukaryotic cells in liquid with fluorescence microscopy and with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); there is no additional sample preparation necessary for the electron microscopy. Quantum dots (QDs) were bound to epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors of COS7 fibroblast cells. Fixed whole cells in saline water were imaged with fluorescence microscopy and subsequently with STEM. The STEM images were correlated with fluorescence images of the same cellular regions. QDs of dimensions 7 × 12 nm were visible in a 5 μm thick layer of saline water, consistent with calculations. A spatial resolution of 3 nm was achieved on the QDs. PMID:20550177

  16. Correlative fluorescence microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy of quantum-dot-labeled proteins in whole cells in liquid.

    PubMed

    Dukes, Madeline J; Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2010-07-27

    Correlative fluorescence microscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a state-of-the-art microscopy methodology to study cellular function, combining the functionality of light microscopy with the high resolution of electron microscopy. However, this technique involves complex sample preparation procedures due to its need for either thin sections or frozen samples for TEM imaging. Here, we introduce a novel correlative approach capable of imaging whole eukaryotic cells in liquid with fluorescence microscopy and with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM); there is no additional sample preparation necessary for the electron microscopy. Quantum dots (QDs) were bound to epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors of COS7 fibroblast cells. Fixed whole cells in saline water were imaged with fluorescence microscopy and subsequently with STEM. The STEM images were correlated with fluorescence images of the same cellular regions. QDs of dimensions 7x12 nm were visible in a 5 microm thick layer of saline water, consistent with calculations. A spatial resolution of 3 nm was achieved on the QDs.

  17. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotube structure tailoring and time-resolved transport measurements in a transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Pedro MFJ; Golberg, Dmitri; Mitome, Masanori; Bando, Yoshio

    2007-11-01

    A dynamical response of the current-voltage characteristics of ropes and individual structures of multiwalled nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes has been observed inside a transmission electron microscope. The drastic change of the current transport properties is thought to be due to purging of contaminating gaseous surface adsorbed species. In addition, an in situ methodology was developed to obtain individually pure and length-tailored nanotubes. By carefully controlling the current flow across the nanotubes, residual surface-decorating and encapsulated catalyst particles were eliminated, and short sections of the nanotubes (200to500nm) were cut.

  18. In Situ Observation of Carbonaceous Material in the Matrices of CV and CM Carbonaceous Chondrites: Preliminary Results from Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brearley, A. J.; Abreu, N. M.

    2001-01-01

    Energy filtered transmission electron microscopy shows that organic matter can be detected in situ in the matrices of carbonaceous chondrites at a spatial resolution of at least 1 nm. In CM chondrites, carbon is often associated with sulfide particles. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Large-scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Nanotomy) of Healthy and Injured Zebrafish Brain.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Jeroen; Kalicharan, Ruby D; Wolters, Anouk H G; van Ham, Tjakko J; Giepmans, Ben N G

    2016-05-25

    Large-scale 2D electron microscopy (EM), or nanotomy, is the tissue-wide application of nanoscale resolution electron microscopy. Others and we previously applied large scale EM to human skin pancreatic islets, tissue culture and whole zebrafish larvae(1-7). Here we describe a universally applicable method for tissue-scale scanning EM for unbiased detection of sub-cellular and molecular features. Nanotomy was applied to investigate the healthy and a neurodegenerative zebrafish brain. Our method is based on standardized EM sample preparation protocols: Fixation with glutaraldehyde and osmium, followed by epoxy-resin embedding, ultrathin sectioning and mounting of ultrathin-sections on one-hole grids, followed by post staining with uranyl and lead. Large-scale 2D EM mosaic images are acquired using a scanning EM connected to an external large area scan generator using scanning transmission EM (STEM). Large scale EM images are typically ~ 5 - 50 G pixels in size, and best viewed using zoomable HTML files, which can be opened in any web browser, similar to online geographical HTML maps. This method can be applied to (human) tissue, cross sections of whole animals as well as tissue culture(1-5). Here, zebrafish brains were analyzed in a non-invasive neuronal ablation model. We visualize within a single dataset tissue, cellular and subcellular changes which can be quantified in various cell types including neurons and microglia, the brain's macrophages. In addition, nanotomy facilitates the correlation of EM with light microscopy (CLEM)(8) on the same tissue, as large surface areas previously imaged using fluorescent microscopy, can subsequently be subjected to large area EM, resulting in the nano-anatomy (nanotomy) of tissues. In all, nanotomy allows unbiased detection of features at EM level in a tissue-wide quantifiable manner.

  20. Large-scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Nanotomy) of Healthy and Injured Zebrafish Brain

    PubMed Central

    Kuipers, Jeroen; Kalicharan, Ruby D.; Wolters, Anouk H. G.

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale 2D electron microscopy (EM), or nanotomy, is the tissue-wide application of nanoscale resolution electron microscopy. Others and we previously applied large scale EM to human skin pancreatic islets, tissue culture and whole zebrafish larvae1-7. Here we describe a universally applicable method for tissue-scale scanning EM for unbiased detection of sub-cellular and molecular features. Nanotomy was applied to investigate the healthy and a neurodegenerative zebrafish brain. Our method is based on standardized EM sample preparation protocols: Fixation with glutaraldehyde and osmium, followed by epoxy-resin embedding, ultrathin sectioning and mounting of ultrathin-sections on one-hole grids, followed by post staining with uranyl and lead. Large-scale 2D EM mosaic images are acquired using a scanning EM connected to an external large area scan generator using scanning transmission EM (STEM). Large scale EM images are typically ~ 5 - 50 G pixels in size, and best viewed using zoomable HTML files, which can be opened in any web browser, similar to online geographical HTML maps. This method can be applied to (human) tissue, cross sections of whole animals as well as tissue culture1-5. Here, zebrafish brains were analyzed in a non-invasive neuronal ablation model. We visualize within a single dataset tissue, cellular and subcellular changes which can be quantified in various cell types including neurons and microglia, the brain's macrophages. In addition, nanotomy facilitates the correlation of EM with light microscopy (CLEM)8 on the same tissue, as large surface areas previously imaged using fluorescent microscopy, can subsequently be subjected to large area EM, resulting in the nano-anatomy (nanotomy) of tissues. In all, nanotomy allows unbiased detection of features at EM level in a tissue-wide quantifiable manner. PMID:27285162

  1. Large-scale Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (Nanotomy) of Healthy and Injured Zebrafish Brain.

    PubMed

    Kuipers, Jeroen; Kalicharan, Ruby D; Wolters, Anouk H G; van Ham, Tjakko J; Giepmans, Ben N G

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale 2D electron microscopy (EM), or nanotomy, is the tissue-wide application of nanoscale resolution electron microscopy. Others and we previously applied large scale EM to human skin pancreatic islets, tissue culture and whole zebrafish larvae(1-7). Here we describe a universally applicable method for tissue-scale scanning EM for unbiased detection of sub-cellular and molecular features. Nanotomy was applied to investigate the healthy and a neurodegenerative zebrafish brain. Our method is based on standardized EM sample preparation protocols: Fixation with glutaraldehyde and osmium, followed by epoxy-resin embedding, ultrathin sectioning and mounting of ultrathin-sections on one-hole grids, followed by post staining with uranyl and lead. Large-scale 2D EM mosaic images are acquired using a scanning EM connected to an external large area scan generator using scanning transmission EM (STEM). Large scale EM images are typically ~ 5 - 50 G pixels in size, and best viewed using zoomable HTML files, which can be opened in any web browser, similar to online geographical HTML maps. This method can be applied to (human) tissue, cross sections of whole animals as well as tissue culture(1-5). Here, zebrafish brains were analyzed in a non-invasive neuronal ablation model. We visualize within a single dataset tissue, cellular and subcellular changes which can be quantified in various cell types including neurons and microglia, the brain's macrophages. In addition, nanotomy facilitates the correlation of EM with light microscopy (CLEM)(8) on the same tissue, as large surface areas previously imaged using fluorescent microscopy, can subsequently be subjected to large area EM, resulting in the nano-anatomy (nanotomy) of tissues. In all, nanotomy allows unbiased detection of features at EM level in a tissue-wide quantifiable manner. PMID:27285162

  2. Ghost transmission: How large basis sets can make electron transport calculations worse

    SciTech Connect

    Herrmann, Carmen; Solomon, Gemma C.; Subotnik, Joseph E.; Mujica, Vladimiro; Ratner, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    The Landauer approach has proven to be an invaluable tool for calculating the electron transport properties of single molecules, especially when combined with a nonequilibrium Green’s function approach and Kohn–Sham density functional theory. However, when using large nonorthogonal atom-centered basis sets, such as those common in quantum chemistry, one can find erroneous results if the Landauer approach is applied blindly. In fact, basis sets of triple-zeta quality or higher sometimes result in an artificially high transmission and possibly even qualitatively wrong conclusions regarding chemical trends. In these cases, transport persists when molecular atoms are replaced by basis functions alone (“ghost atoms”). The occurrence of such ghost transmission is correlated with low-energy virtual molecular orbitals of the central subsystem and may be interpreted as a biased and thus inaccurate description of vacuum transmission. An approximate practical correction scheme is to calculate the ghost transmission and subtract it from the full transmission. As a further consequence of this study, it is recommended that sensitive molecules be used for parameter studies, in particular those whose transmission functions show antiresonance features such as benzene-based systems connected to the electrodes in meta positions and other low-conducting systems such as alkanes and silanes.

  3. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy losses in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-28

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. We found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a friction term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.

  4. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy loss in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    DOE PAGES

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-29

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. As a result, we found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a frictionmore » term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.« less

  5. Additive effects of electronic and nuclear energy loss in irradiation-induced amorphization of zircon

    SciTech Connect

    Zarkadoula, Eva; Toulemonde, Marcel; Weber, William J.

    2015-12-29

    We used a combination of ion cascades and the unified thermal spike model to study the electronic effects from 800 keV Kr and Xe ion irradiation in zircon. We compared the damage production for four cases: (a) due to ion cascades alone, (b) due to ion cascades with the electronic energy loss activated as a friction term, (c) due to the thermal spike from the combined electronic and nuclear energy losses, and (d) due to ion cascades with electronic stopping and the electron-phonon interactions superimposed. As a result, we found that taking the electronic energy loss out as a friction term results in reduced damage, while the electronic electron-phonon interactions have additive impact on the final damage created per ion.

  6. Formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam with additional deceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, E. N. Koronovskii, A. A.; Kurkin, S. A.; Hramov, A. E.

    2013-11-15

    Results of numerical simulations and analysis of the formation and nonlinear dynamics of the squeezed state of a helical electron beam in a vircator with a magnetron injection gun as an electron source and with additional electron deceleration are presented. The ranges of control parameters where the squeezed state can form in such a system are revealed, and specific features of the system dynamics are analyzed. It is shown that the formation of a squeezed state of a nonrelativistic helical electron beam in a system with electron deceleration is accompanied by low-frequency longitudinal dynamics of the space charge.

  7. Spin-dependent electron transmission through bacteriorhodopsin embedded in purple membrane.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Debabrata; Markus, Tal Z; Naaman, Ron; Kettner, Matthias; Göhler, Benjamin; Zacharias, Helmut; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai; Fontanesi, Claudio

    2013-09-10

    Spin-dependent photoelectron transmission and spin-dependent electrochemical studies were conducted on purple membrane containing bacteriorhodopsin (bR) deposited on gold, aluminum/aluminum-oxide, and nickel substrates. The result indicates spin selectivity in electron transmission through the membrane. Although the chiral bR occupies only about 10% of the volume of the membrane, the spin polarization found is on the order of 15%. The electrochemical studies indicate a strong dependence of the conduction on the protein's structure. Denaturation of the protein causes a sharp drop in the conduction through the membrane. PMID:23980184

  8. Measurement of amyloid fibril mass-per-length by tilted-beam transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Thurber, Kent R.; Shewmaker, Frank; Wickner, Reed B.; Tycko, Robert

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that accurate values of mass-per-length (MPL), which serve as strong constraints on molecular structure, can be determined for amyloid fibrils by quantification of intensities in dark-field electron microscope images obtained in the tilted-beam mode of a transmission electron microscope. MPL values for fibrils formed by residues 218–289 of the HET-s fungal prion protein, for 2-fold- and 3-fold-symmetric fibrils formed by the 40-residue β-amyloid peptide, and for fibrils formed by the yeast prion protein Sup35NM are in good agreement with previous results from scanning transmission electron microscopy. Results for fibrils formed by the yeast prion protein Rnq1, for which the MPL value has not been previously reported, support an in-register parallel β-sheet structure, with one Rnq1 molecule per 0.47-nm β-sheet repeat spacing. Since tilted-beam dark-field images can be obtained on many transmission electron microscopes, this work should facilitate MPL determination by a large number of research groups engaged in studies of amyloid fibrils and similar supramolecular assemblies. PMID:19706519

  9. A scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of the cerebral aqueduct in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Meller, S T; Dennis, B J

    1993-09-01

    An examination of the surface of the cerebral aqueduct with the scanning electron microscope revealed that the walls of the cerebral aqueduct were so heavily ciliated that most of the ependymal surface was obscured, yet certain specialized supraependymal structures could be discerned lying on (or embedded within) this matt of cilia. These structures were determined by transmission electron microscopy and Golgi analysis to be either macrophages, supraependymal neurons, dendrites from medial periaqueductal gray neurons, or axons of unknown origin. Some axons, which were found to contain vesicles, appeared to make synaptic contacts with ependymal cells. Using the transmission electron microscope, the ependymal lining was found to consist of two different cell types: normal ependymal cells and tanycytes which have a long tapering basal process that was observed to contact blood vessels or, more rarely, seemed to terminate in relation to neuronal elements. While there have been previous reports on the structure of the third and lateral ventricles in other species, there are limited reports in the rabbit. The present report is not only the first description for the rabbit, but it is the first complete scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of the cerebral aqueduct in any species.

  10. Addressing preservation of elastic contrast in energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Brown, H G; D'Alfonso, A J; Forbes, B D; Allen, L J

    2016-01-01

    Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) images with resolutions of the order of an Ångström can be obtained using modern microscopes corrected for chromatic aberration. However, the delocalized nature of the transition potentials for atomic ionization often confounds direct interpretation of EFTEM images, leading to what is known as "preservation of elastic contrast". In this paper we demonstrate how more interpretable images might be obtained by scanning with a focused coherent probe and incoherently averaging the energy-filtered images over probe position. We dub this new imaging technique energy-filtered imaging scanning transmission electron microscopy (EFISTEM). We develop a theoretical framework for EFISTEM and show that it is in fact equivalent to precession EFTEM, where the plane wave illumination is precessed through a range of tilts spanning the same range of angles as the probe forming aperture in EFISTEM. It is demonstrated that EFISTEM delivers similar results to scanning transmission electron microscopy with an electron energy-loss spectrometer but has the advantage that it is immune to coherent aberrations and spatial incoherence of the probe and is also more resilient to scan distortions.

  11. An in-situ analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigation of structure-property relationships in electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Andrew James

    As electronic and mechanical devices are scaled downward in size and upward in complexity, macroscopic principles no longer apply. Synthesis of three-dimensionally confined structures exhibit quantum confinement effects allowing, for example, silicon nanoparticles to luminesce. The reduction in size of classically brittle materials reveals a ductile-to-brittle transition. Such a transition, attributed to a reduction in defects, increases elasticity. In the case of silicon, elastic deformation can improve electronic carrier mobility by over 50%, a vital attribute of modern integrated circuits. The scalability of such principles and the changing atomistic processes which contribute to them presents a vitally important field of research. Beginning with the direct observation of dislocations and lattice planes in the 1950s, the transmission electron microscope has been a powerful tool in materials science. More recently, as nanoscale technologies have proliferated modern life, their unique ability to spatially resolve nano- and atomic-scale structures has become a critical component of materials research and characterization. Signals produced by an incident beam of high-energy electrons enables researchers to both image and chemically analyze materials at the atomic scale. Coherently and elastically-scattered electrons can be collected to produce atomic-scale images of a crystalline sample. New specimen stages have enabled routine investigation of samples heated up to 1000 °C and cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. MEMS-based transducers allow for sub-nm scale mechanical testing and ultrathin membranes allow study of liquids and gases. Investigation of a myriad of previously "unseeable" processes can now be observed within the TEM, and sometimes something new is found within the old. High-temperature annealing of pure a Si:H films leads to crystallization of the film. Such films provide higher carrier mobility compared to amorphous films, offering improved

  12. An in-situ analytical scanning and transmission electron microscopy investigation of structure-property relationships in electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Andrew James

    As electronic and mechanical devices are scaled downward in size and upward in complexity, macroscopic principles no longer apply. Synthesis of three-dimensionally confined structures exhibit quantum confinement effects allowing, for example, silicon nanoparticles to luminesce. The reduction in size of classically brittle materials reveals a ductile-to-brittle transition. Such a transition, attributed to a reduction in defects, increases elasticity. In the case of silicon, elastic deformation can improve electronic carrier mobility by over 50%, a vital attribute of modern integrated circuits. The scalability of such principles and the changing atomistic processes which contribute to them presents a vitally important field of research. Beginning with the direct observation of dislocations and lattice planes in the 1950s, the transmission electron microscope has been a powerful tool in materials science. More recently, as nanoscale technologies have proliferated modern life, their unique ability to spatially resolve nano- and atomic-scale structures has become a critical component of materials research and characterization. Signals produced by an incident beam of high-energy electrons enables researchers to both image and chemically analyze materials at the atomic scale. Coherently and elastically-scattered electrons can be collected to produce atomic-scale images of a crystalline sample. New specimen stages have enabled routine investigation of samples heated up to 1000 °C and cooled to liquid nitrogen temperatures. MEMS-based transducers allow for sub-nm scale mechanical testing and ultrathin membranes allow study of liquids and gases. Investigation of a myriad of previously "unseeable" processes can now be observed within the TEM, and sometimes something new is found within the old. High-temperature annealing of pure a Si:H films leads to crystallization of the film. Such films provide higher carrier mobility compared to amorphous films, offering improved

  13. High Speed, Radiation Hard CMOS Pixel Sensors for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Doering, Dionisio; Joseph, John; Krieger, Brad

    CMOS monolithic active pixel sensors are currently being established as the technology of choice for new generation digital imaging systems in Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). A careful sensor design that couples μm-level pixel pitches with high frame rate readout and radiation hardness to very high electron doses enables the fabrication of direct electron detectors that are quickly revolutionizing high-resolution TEM imaging in material science and molecular biology. This paper will review the principal characteristics of this novel technology and its advantages over conventional, optically-coupled cameras, and retrace the sensor development driven by the Transmission Electron Aberration corrected Microscope (TEAM) project at the LBNL National Center for Electron Microscopy (NCEM), illustrating in particular the imaging capabilities enabled by single electron detection at high frame rate. Further, the presentation will report on the translation of the TEAM technology to a finer feature size process, resulting in a sensor with higher spatial resolution and superior radiation tolerance currently serving as the baseline for a commercial camera system.

  14. Synergy between transmission electron microscopy and powder diffraction: application to modulated structures.

    PubMed

    Batuk, Dmitry; Batuk, Maria; Abakumov, Artem M; Hadermann, Joke

    2015-04-01

    The crystal structure solution of modulated compounds is often very challenging, even using the well established methodology of single-crystal X-ray crystallography. This task becomes even more difficult for materials that cannot be prepared in a single-crystal form, so that only polycrystalline powders are available. This paper illustrates that the combined application of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and powder diffraction is a possible solution to the problem. Using examples of anion-deficient perovskites modulated by periodic crystallographic shear planes, it is demonstrated what kind of local structural information can be obtained using various TEM techniques and how this information can be implemented in the crystal structure refinement against the powder diffraction data. The following TEM methods are discussed: electron diffraction (selected area electron diffraction, precession electron diffraction), imaging (conventional high-resolution TEM imaging, high-angle annular dark-field and annular bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy) and state-of-the-art spectroscopic techniques (atomic resolution mapping using energy-dispersive X-ray analysis and electron energy loss spectroscopy).

  15. Manual shift control lever device and self-contained electronic control for transmissions

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, F.F.

    1986-09-09

    A unitized shift control lever device is described for the remote activation of an electrically controlled transmission comprising: a housing; a manually operable range selector lever pivotally supported in the housing for selective movements to predetermined operating positions respectively indicative of a required operating condition of an associated electrically controlled transmission; means in the housing providing a source of radiations; radiation controlled switching means for generating discrete control signals in response to the presence and non-presence of the radiations; means interposed in the radiation path between the source and the switching means operable in response to the movement of the range selector lever for selectively determining the presence or non-presence of the radiations with respect to the switching means at each range selector position of the lever; and electronic circuit control means having input connections for receiving the generated signals and output connections adapted for connection with electrically activated condition controlling devices on the transmission.

  16. The backscatter electron signal as an additional tool for phase segmentation in electron backscatter diffraction.

    PubMed

    Payton, E J; Nolze, G

    2013-08-01

    The advent of simultaneous energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) data collection has vastly improved the phase separation capabilities for electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) mapping. A major problem remains, however, in distinguishing between multiple cubic phases in a specimen, especially when the compositions of the phases are similar or their particle sizes are small, because the EDS interaction volume is much larger than that of EBSD and the EDS spectra collected during spatial mapping are generally noisy due to time limitations and the need to minimize sample drift. The backscatter electron (BSE) signal is very sensitive to the local composition due to its atomic number (Z) dependence. BSE imaging is investigated as a complimentary tool to EDS to assist phase segmentation and identification in EBSD through examination of specimens of meteorite, Cu dross, and steel oxidation layers. The results demonstrate that the simultaneous acquisition of EBSD patterns, EDS spectra, and the BSE signal can provide new potential for advancing multiphase material characterization in the scanning electron microscope. PMID:23575349

  17. Recent developments of the in situ wet cell technology for transmission electron microscopies.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xin; Li, Chang; Cao, Hongling

    2015-03-21

    In situ wet cells for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allow studying structures and processes in a liquid environment with high temporal and spatial resolutions, and have been attracting increasing research interests in many fields. In this review, we highlight the structural and functional developments of the wet cells for TEM and STEM. One of the key features of the wet cells is the sealing technique used to isolate the liquid sample from the TEM/STEM vacuum environments, thus the existing in situ wet cells are grouped by different sealing methods. In this study, the advantages and shortcomings of each type of in situ wet cells are discussed, the functional developments of different wet cells are presented, and the future trends of the wet cell technology are addressed. It is suggested that in the future the in situ wet cell TEM/STEM technology will have an increasing impact on frontier nanoscale research.

  18. Recent developments of the in situ wet cell technology for transmission electron microscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xin; Li, Chang; Cao, Hongling

    2015-03-01

    In situ wet cells for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) allow studying structures and processes in a liquid environment with high temporal and spatial resolutions, and have been attracting increasing research interests in many fields. In this review, we highlight the structural and functional developments of the wet cells for TEM and STEM. One of the key features of the wet cells is the sealing technique used to isolate the liquid sample from the TEM/STEM vacuum environments, thus the existing in situ wet cells are grouped by different sealing methods. In this study, the advantages and shortcomings of each type of in situ wet cells are discussed, the functional developments of different wet cells are presented, and the future trends of the wet cell technology are addressed. It is suggested that in the future the in situ wet cell TEM/STEM technology will have an increasing impact on frontier nanoscale research.

  19. Electron transmission characteristics of Au/1,4-benzenedithiol/Au junctions.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, K; Tsutsui, M; Kurokawa, S; Sakai, A

    2009-01-14

    Electron transmission through individual 1,4-benzenedithiol molecules bridging between two gold electrodes (Au/BDT/Au junctions) has been studied by measuring the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Measurements were made at room temperature on three junction states of conductance 0.005G(0), 0.01G(0), and 0.1G(0), respectively, where G(0) is the quantum unit of conductance. All I-V curves are linear around zero bias and nonlinearly increase upward for biases above approximately 0.2 V. Absence of plateaus in the observed I-V characteristics up to +/- 1 V indicates that the electron transmission spectrum of Au/BDT/Au has no peaks within +/- 0.5 eV from the Fermi level.

  20. Double-twist cylinders in liquid crystalline cholesteric blue phases observed by transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kawata, Yuto; Kuwahara, Ryusuke; Nishi, Ryuji; Ozaki, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Cholesteric blue phases are liquid crystalline phases in which the constituent rod-like molecules spontaneously form three-dimensional, helical structures. Despite theoretical predictions that they are composed of cylindrical substructures within which the liquid crystal molecules are doubly twisted, real space observation of the arrangement of such structures had not been performed. Through transmission electron microscopy of photopolymerized blue phases with controlled lattice plane orientations, we report real space observation and comparison of the lattice structures of blue phases I and II. The two systems show distinctly different contrasts, reflecting the theoretically predicted, body centred and simple cubic arrangement of the double-twist cylinders. Transmission electron microscopy also reveals different tendencies of the two blue phases to align on unidirectionally rubbed surfaces. We thus show that TEM observation of alignment-controlled, photopolymerized liquid crystals can be a powerful tool to investigate complex liquid crystalline order. PMID:26530779

  1. Double-twist cylinders in liquid crystalline cholesteric blue phases observed by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shu; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Kawata, Yuto; Kuwahara, Ryusuke; Nishi, Ryuji; Ozaki, Masanori

    2015-11-01

    Cholesteric blue phases are liquid crystalline phases in which the constituent rod-like molecules spontaneously form three-dimensional, helical structures. Despite theoretical predictions that they are composed of cylindrical substructures within which the liquid crystal molecules are doubly twisted, real space observation of the arrangement of such structures had not been performed. Through transmission electron microscopy of photopolymerized blue phases with controlled lattice plane orientations, we report real space observation and comparison of the lattice structures of blue phases I and II. The two systems show distinctly different contrasts, reflecting the theoretically predicted, body centred and simple cubic arrangement of the double-twist cylinders. Transmission electron microscopy also reveals different tendencies of the two blue phases to align on unidirectionally rubbed surfaces. We thus show that TEM observation of alignment-controlled, photopolymerized liquid crystals can be a powerful tool to investigate complex liquid crystalline order.

  2. Specimen-thickness effects on transmission Kikuchi patterns in the scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Rice, K P; Keller, R R; Stoykovich, M P

    2014-06-01

    We report the effects of varying specimen thickness on the generation of transmission Kikuchi patterns in the scanning electron microscope. Diffraction patterns sufficient for automated indexing were observed from films spanning nearly three orders of magnitude in thickness in several materials, from 5 nm of hafnium dioxide to 3 μm of aluminum, corresponding to a mass-thickness range of ~5 to 810 μg cm(-2) . The scattering events that are most likely to be detected in transmission are shown to be very near the exit surface of the films. The energies, spatial distribution and trajectories of the electrons that are transmitted through the film and are collected by the detector are predicted using Monte Carlo simulations.

  3. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for themore » analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.« less

  4. Nanoscale deformation analysis with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and digital image correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xueju; Pan, Zhipeng; Fan, Feifei; Wang, Jiangwei; Liu, Yang; Mao, Scott X.; Zhu, Ting; Xia, Shuman

    2015-09-10

    We present an application of the digital image correlation (DIC) method to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images for nanoscale deformation analysis. The combination of DIC and HRTEM offers both the ultrahigh spatial resolution and high displacement detection sensitivity that are not possible with other microscope-based DIC techniques. We demonstrate the accuracy and utility of the HRTEM-DIC technique through displacement and strain analysis on amorphous silicon. Two types of error sources resulting from the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image noise and electromagnetic-lens distortions are quantitatively investigated via rigid-body translation experiments. The local and global DIC approaches are applied for the analysis of diffusion- and reaction-induced deformation fields in electrochemically lithiated amorphous silicon. As a result, the DIC technique coupled with HRTEM provides a new avenue for the deformation analysis of materials at the nanometer length scales.

  5. Ruthenium red preserves glycoprotein peplomers of C-type retroviruses for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fassel, T A; Raisch, K P; Chetty, N; Grossberg, S E; Kushnaryov, V M

    1998-07-01

    Peplomers, the glycoprotein projections of the outer viral envelope, are distinctive for many viruses. Peplomers of retroviral C-type particles are fragile and are not preserved in standard preparations for transmission electron microscopy of thin sections, whereas the peplomers of B- and D- type retroviruses are usually preserved. Ruthenium red, extensively used in transmission electron microscopy to enhance the preservation of glycosylated proteins, was used in the preparation of three retrovirus-producing lymphoblastoid cell lines: murine SC-1 cells producing the C-type murine leukemia retrovirus LP-BM5 that causes immunodeficiency, human DG-75 cells producing a murine leukemia retrovirus, and human C5/MJ cells producing human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I). Fixation of cells was carried out with ruthenium red present in the glutaraldehyde, osmium tetroxide, and the ethanol dehydration through the 70% ethanol step. The detailed structure of peplomers of these three different viruses was well preserved. PMID:9735881

  6. A specimen preparation technique for plane-view studies of surfaces using transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Foss, Steinar; Taftø, Johan; Haakenaasen, Randi

    2010-01-01

    A method for preparing plane-view transmission electron microscope (TEM) samples is presented. With this inclined pseudo-plane-view technique, the undisturbed surface of the sample can be studied in plane view. Thus, nanostructures on the surface of a substrate can be studied with TEM in much the same way as with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), but in transmission at a much higher spatial resolution and with the opportunity of performing nanoscale diffraction. A glued sandwich with two surfaces facing each other was thinned at a low angle relative to the surfaces. The resultant construction contained thin wedges of the surfaces upon which it was possible to do TEM analysis. SEM analysis before and TEM analysis after such sample preparation was found to be consistent.

  7. Annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) tomography of polymer systems.

    PubMed

    Lu, Kangbo; Sourty, Erwan; Loos, Joachim

    2010-08-01

    We have utilized bright-field conventional transmission electron microscopy tomography and annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (ADF-STEM) tomography to characterize a well-defined carbon black (CB)-filled polymer nanocomposite with known CB volume concentration. For both imaging methods, contrast can be generated between the CB and the surrounding polymer matrix. The involved contrast mechanisms, in particular for ADF-STEM, will be discussed in detail. The obtained volume reconstructions were analysed and the CB volume concentrations were carefully determined from the reconstructed data. For both imaging modes, the measured CB volume concentrations are substantially different and only quantification based on the ADF-STEM data revealed about the same value as the known CB loading. Moreover, when applying low-convergence angles for imaging ADF-STEM tomography, data can be obtained of micrometre-thick samples.

  8. Picometre-precision analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy images of platinum nanocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Yankovich, Andrew B; Berkels, Benjamin; Dahmen, W; Binev, P; Sanchez, S I; Bradley, S A; Li, Ao; Szlufarska, Izabela; Voyles, Paul M

    2014-06-11

    Measuring picometre-scale shifts in the positions of individual atoms in materials provides new insight into the structure of surfaces, defects and interfaces that influence a broad variety of materials' behaviour. Here we demonstrate sub-picometre precision measurements of atom positions in aberration-corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy images based on the non-rigid registration and averaging of an image series. Non-rigid registration achieves five to seven times better precision than previous methods. Non-rigidly registered images of a silica-supported platinum nanocatalyst show pm-scale contraction of atoms at a (111)/(111) corner towards the particle centre and expansion of a flat (111) facet. Sub-picometre precision and standardless atom counting with <1 atom uncertainty in the same scanning transmission electron microscopy image provide new insight into the three-dimensional atomic structure of catalyst nanoparticle surfaces, which contain the active sites controlling catalytic reactions.

  9. Correlative super-resolution fluorescence and metal replica transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sochacki, Kem A.; Shtengel, Gleb; van Engelenburg, Schuyler B.; Hess, Harald F.; Taraska, Justin W.

    2014-01-01

    Super-resolution localization microscopy is combined with a complementary imaging technique, transmission electron microscopy of metal replicas, to locate proteins on the landscape of the cellular plasma membrane at the nanoscale. Robust correlation on the scale of 20 nm is validated by imaging endogenous clathrin (with 2D and 3D PALM/TEM) and the method is further used to find the previously unknown 3D position of epsin on clathrin coated structures. PMID:24464288

  10. Graphene as a transparent conductive support for studying biological molecules by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, R. R.; Blake, P.; Blake, J. R.; Zan, R.; Anissimova, S.; Bangert, U.; Golovanov, A. P.; Morozov, S. V.; Geim, A. K.; Novoselov, K. S.; Latychevskaia, T.

    2010-10-01

    We demonstrate the application of graphene as a support for imaging individual biological molecules in transmission electron microscope (TEM). A simple procedure to produce free-standing graphene membranes has been designed. Such membranes are extremely robust and can support practically any submicrometer object. Tobacco mosaic virus has been deposited on graphene samples and observed in a TEM. High contrast has been achieved even though no staining has been applied.

  11. Barrier layers against oxygen transmission on the basis of electron beam cured methacrylated gelatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherzer, Tom

    1997-08-01

    The development of barrier layers against oxygen transmission on the basis of radiation-curable methacrylated gelatin will be reported. The electron beam cured gelatin coatings show an extremely low oxygen permeability and a high resistance against boiling water. Moreover, the methacrylated gelatins possess good adhesion characteristics. Therefore, they are suited as barrier adhesives in laminates for food packaging applications. If substrate foils from biodegradable polymers are used, the development of completely biodegradable packaging materials seems to be possible.

  12. A Transmission Electron Microscope Investigation of Space Weathering Effects in Hayabusa Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Berger, Eve L.

    2014-01-01

    The Hayabusa mission to asteroid 25143 Itokawa successfully returned the first direct samples of the regolith from the surface of an asteroid. The Hayabusa samples thus present a special opportunity to directly investigate the evolution of asteroidal surfaces, from the development of the regolith to the study of the more complex effects of space weathering. Here we describe the mineralogy, microstructure and composition of three Hayabusa mission particles using transmission electron microscope (TEM) techniques

  13. Graphene as a transparent conductive support for studying biological molecules by transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, R. R.; Anissimova, S.; Novoselov, K. S.; Blake, P.; Blake, J. R.; Geim, A. K.; Zan, R.; Bangert, U.; Golovanov, A. P.; Morozov, S. V.; Latychevskaia, T.

    2010-10-11

    We demonstrate the application of graphene as a support for imaging individual biological molecules in transmission electron microscope (TEM). A simple procedure to produce free-standing graphene membranes has been designed. Such membranes are extremely robust and can support practically any submicrometer object. Tobacco mosaic virus has been deposited on graphene samples and observed in a TEM. High contrast has been achieved even though no staining has been applied.

  14. Quantitative measurements in in situ straining experiments in transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pettinari, F; Couret, A; Caillard, D; Molénat, G; Clément, N; Coujou, A

    2001-07-01

    Several examples of recent studies by in situ straining experiments in a transmission electron microscope performed in the Toulouse group (France) are presented. In particular, quantitative measurements of the features of the dislocation motion are described. These examples deal with individual or collective propagation of dislocations, which are submitted to various types of obstacle. Different metallic materials are investigated: magnesium, intermetallics, aluminium alloys and gamma phase of a superalloy. PMID:11454154

  15. Microwave Transmission Through the Electron Cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector: Simulation and Comparison with Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, Paul L.G.; Veitzer, Seth Andrew; /Tech-X, Boulder

    2009-04-01

    Simulations of the microwave transmission properties through the electron cloud at the Fermilab Main Injector have been implemented using the plasma simulation code 'VORPAL'. Phase shifts and attenuation curves have been calculated for the lowest frequency TE mode, slightly above the cutoff frequency, in field free regions, in the dipoles and quadrupoles. Preliminary comparisons with experimental results for the dipole case are showed and will guide the next generation of experiments.

  16. Comparison of preparation techniques for nuclear materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM)

    SciTech Connect

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel; Madden, James W.; Miller, Brandon D; Cole, James I; Gan, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Preparation of highly radioactive and irradiated nuclear fuels and materials for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is conjoined with a set of unique challenges, including but not limited to personnel radiation exposure and contamination. The paper evaluates three specimen preparation techniques for preparation of irradiated materials and determines which technique yields to the most reliable characterization of radiation damage microstructure. Various specimen preparation artifacts associated with each technique are considered and ways of minimizing these artifacts are addressed.

  17. Reliable strain measurement in transistor arrays by robust scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhyun; Kim, Joong Jung; Jung, Younheum; Lee, Kyungwoo; Byun, Gwangsun; Hwang, KyoungHwan; Lee, Sunyoung; Lee, Kyupil

    2013-09-15

    Accurate measurement of the strain field in the channels of transistor arrays is critical for strain engineering in modern electronic devices. We applied atomic-resolution high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy to quantitative measurement of the strain field in transistor arrays. The quantitative strain profile over 20 transistors was obtained with high reliability and a precision of 0.1%. The strain field was found to form homogeneously in the channels of the transistor arrays. Furthermore, strain relaxation due to the thin foil effect was quantitatively investigated for thicknesses of 35 to 275 nm.

  18. Transmission Electron Microscopy Analysis of Skin Lesions from Sporotrichosis Epidemic in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Porto Ferreira, Cassio; Oliveira de Almeida, Ana Cristina; Corte-Real, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy can yield useful information in a range of scientific fields; it is capable of imaging at a significantly higher resolution than light microscopes and has been a very useful tool in the identification of morphological changes of the dermis as well as assessment of changes in the extracellular matrix. Our aim is to characterize by electron microscopy the cellular profile of lesions caused by Sporothrix schenckii from the sporotrichosis epidemic in its zoonotic form that occurs in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PMID:25653392

  19. Polyparaphenylene-based low-temperature carbons studied by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, T.; Endo, M.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2000-08-01

    A comparison of the microtexture and structure of the low temperature heat-treated polyparaphenylene (PPP)-based carbons which are promising for the Li ion battery has been performed using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. It is found that the PPP-based carbon prepared by Kovacic method remains in suitable microtexture for high Li storage over a wider temperature range relative to that obtained by Yamamoto method. This characteristic of the Kovacic PPP-based carbon could lead to a more controlled microtexture for obtaining a higher Li storage capacity for Li ion battery applications.

  20. Metal resist for extreme ultraviolet lithography characterized by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toriumi, Minoru; Sato, Yuta; Koshino, Masanori; Suenaga, Kazu; Itani, Toshiro

    2016-03-01

    We characterized the structures of metal resists used in EUV lithography by low-voltage aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS). This study presents the first atomic-level observation of resist components in resist film. The structures of metal (zirconium or titanium) oxide cores are unambiguously identified, and the local elemental distribution in the resist film is obtained. The initial size of zirconium oxide cores is well maintained in the resist film. However, titanium oxide cores tend to aggregate to form an indefinite structure. The spatial distribution of metal cores may influence lithographic characteristics.

  1. Chemically sensitive structure-imaging with a scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennycook, S. J.; Boatner, L. A.

    1988-12-01

    Problems associated with the phase-contrast method of conventional high-resolution electron microscopy may be avoided, and high atomic-number contrast in the sample obtained, by using a high-angle detector in a scanning transmission electron microscope. Results of this technique applied to single crystals of the high-transition temperature superconductors YBa2Cu3O(7-x) and ErBa2Cu3O(7-x) are presented. The heavy-atom planes are directly imaged as bright lines, and the probable structure of an observed defect is directly inferred from its image.

  2. Characterization of LiBC by phase-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Krumeich, Frank; Wörle, Michael; Reibisch, Philipp; Nesper, Reinhard

    2014-08-01

    LiBC was used as a model compound for probing the applicability of phase-contrast (PC) imaging in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to visualize lithium distributions. In the LiBC structure, boron and carbon are arranged to hetero graphite layers between which lithium is incorporated. The crystal structure is reflected in the PC-STEM images recorded perpendicular to the layers. The experimental images and their defocus dependence match with multi-slice simulations calculated utilizing the reciprocity principle. The observation that a part of the Li positions is not occupied is likely an effect of the intense electron beam triggering Li displacement.

  3. Method of multilayer semiconductor structures cross section preparation for transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karasyov, Vladimir Y.; Skornyakov, Alexander V.; Kuznetsov, Mikhail G.

    1995-09-01

    The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) are frequently applied for defects and failures ULCI analysis. The preparation of the electron transparent big area flat- parallel semiconductor thin films is needed. The simple and speed automated method of the thin films (less 10 micrometers ) and cross-sections of the multilayer semiconductor structures and devices preparation is described in this paper. It is based on the mechanical and chem- mechanical grinding and polishing of the semiconductor sample with a free abrasive. This method allows to form the flat-parallel and composition uniform thin films with electron transparent area more that 2 mm2 after ion-etching treatment. The original equipment which consists of a local treatment unit, planar treatment unit and wire saw unit is developed.

  4. Conventional transmission electron microscopy imaging beyond the diffraction and information limits.

    PubMed

    Rosenauer, Andreas; Krause, Florian F; Müller, Knut; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten

    2014-08-29

    There are mainly two complementary imaging modes in transmission electron microscopy (TEM): Conventional TEM (CTEM) and scanning TEM (STEM). In the CTEM mode the specimen is illuminated with a plane electron wave, and the direct image formed by the objective lens is recorded in the image plane. STEM is based on scanning the specimen surface with a focused electron beam and collecting scattered electrons with an extended disk or ring-shaped detector. Here we show that combination of CTEM imaging with STEM illumination generally allows extending the point resolution of CTEM imaging beyond the diffraction limit. This new imaging mode improves imaging characteristics, is more robust against chromatic aberration, exhibits direct structural imaging with superior precision, visualizes light elements with excellent contrast, and even allows us to overcome the conventional information limit of a microscope. PMID:25215995

  5. Conventional Transmission Electron Microscopy Imaging beyond the Diffraction and Information Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenauer, Andreas; Krause, Florian F.; Müller, Knut; Schowalter, Marco; Mehrtens, Thorsten

    2014-08-01

    There are mainly two complementary imaging modes in transmission electron microscopy (TEM): Conventional TEM (CTEM) and scanning TEM (STEM). In the CTEM mode the specimen is illuminated with a plane electron wave, and the direct image formed by the objective lens is recorded in the image plane. STEM is based on scanning the specimen surface with a focused electron beam and collecting scattered electrons with an extended disk or ring-shaped detector. Here we show that combination of CTEM imaging with STEM illumination generally allows extending the point resolution of CTEM imaging beyond the diffraction limit. This new imaging mode improves imaging characteristics, is more robust against chromatic aberration, exhibits direct structural imaging with superior precision, visualizes light elements with excellent contrast, and even allows us to overcome the conventional information limit of a microscope.

  6. Possibilities and limitations of advanced transmission electron microscopy for carbon-based nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, Carla; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2015-01-01

    Summary A major revolution for electron microscopy in the past decade is the introduction of aberration correction, which enables one to increase both the spatial resolution and the energy resolution to the optical limit. Aberration correction has contributed significantly to the imaging at low operating voltages. This is crucial for carbon-based nanomaterials which are sensitive to electron irradiation. The research of carbon nanomaterials and nanohybrids, in particular the fundamental understanding of defects and interfaces, can now be carried out in unprecedented detail by aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy (AC-TEM). This review discusses new possibilities and limits of AC-TEM at low voltage, including the structural imaging at atomic resolution, in three dimensions and spectroscopic investigation of chemistry and bonding. In situ TEM of carbon-based nanomaterials is discussed and illustrated through recent reports with particular emphasis on the underlying physics of interactions between electrons and carbon atoms. PMID:26425406

  7. Strain mapping of semiconductor specimens with nm-scale resolution in a transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Cooper, David; Denneulin, Thibaud; Bernier, Nicolas; Béché, Armand; Rouvière, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    The last few years have seen a great deal of progress in the development of transmission electron microscopy based techniques for strain mapping. New techniques have appeared such as dark field electron holography and nanobeam diffraction and better known ones such as geometrical phase analysis have been improved by using aberration corrected ultra-stable modern electron microscopes. In this paper we apply dark field electron holography, the geometrical phase analysis of high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images, nanobeam diffraction and precession diffraction, all performed at the state-of-the-art to five different types of semiconductor samples. These include a simple calibration structure comprising 10-nm-thick SiGe layers to benchmark the techniques. A SiGe recessed source and drain device has been examined in order to test their capabilities on 2D structures. Devices that have been strained using a nitride stressor have been examined to test the sensitivity of the different techniques when applied to systems containing low values of deformation. To test the techniques on modern semiconductors, an electrically tested device grown on a SOI wafer has been examined. Finally a GaN/AlN superlattice was tested in order to assess the different methods of measuring deformation on specimens that do not have a perfect crystalline structure. The different deformation mapping techniques have been compared to one another and the strengths and weaknesses of each are discussed.

  8. Atomic-Scale Study Of Complex Cobalt Oxide Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulec, Ahmet

    Cobalt oxides offer a rich ?eld for the formation of novel phases, including superconductors and exotic magnetic phases, involving a mixed valence state for cobalt and/or the presence of oxygen vacancies. Having spin states, such as, low spin (LS), high spin (HS), and intermediate spin (IS), cobalt oxides differ from other 3d metal oxides The presence of such spin states make the physics of the cobalt oxides so complicated that it has not yet been completely understood. In order to improve our understanding of the various phase transitions observed in Cobalt oxides and to comprehend the relationship between crystal and electronic structure, both high energy resolution and high spatial resolution are essential. Fortunately, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a technique which is capable of ful?lling both of these requirements. In this thesis, I have utilized unique techniques in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to analyze the atomic-scale structure-property relationship, both at room temperature and through insitu cooling to liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. In particular, by using correlated Z-contrast imaging, electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) and electron energy loss magnetic circular dichroism (EMCD), the structure, composition, bonding and magnetic behavior are characterized directly on the atomic scale.

  9. Scanning transmission and computer-aided volumic electron microscopy: 3-D modeling of entire cells by electronic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bron, Christophe; Gremillet, Philip; Launay, D.; Jourlin, Michel; Gautschi, H. P.; Baechi, Thomas; Schuepbach, Joerg

    1990-05-01

    The digital processing of electron microscopic images from serial sections containing laser-induced topographical references allows a 3-D reconstruction at a depth resolution of 30 to 40 nm of entire cells by the use of image analysis methods, as already demonstrated for Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) coupled with a video camera. We decided to use a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope (STEM) to get higher contrast and better resolution at medium magnification. The scanning of our specimens at video frequencies is an attractive and easy way to link a STEM with an image processing system but the hysteresis of the electronic spools responsible for the magnetic deviation of the scanning electron beam induces deformations of images which have to be modelized and corrected before registration. Computer algorithms developed for image analysis and treatment correct the artifacts caused by the use of STEM and by serial sectioning to automatically reconstruct the third dimension of the cells. They permit the normalization of the images through logarithmic processing of the original grey level infonnation. The automatic extraction of cell limits allows to link the image analysis and treatments with image synthesis methods by minimal human intervention. The surface representation and the registered images provide an ultrastructural data base from which quantitative 3-D morphological parameters, as well as otherwise impossible visualizations, can be computed. This 3-D image processing named C.A.V.U.M. for Computer Aided Volumic Ultra-Microscopy offers a new tool for the documentation and analysis of cell ultrastructure and for 3-D morphometric studies at EM magnifications. Further, a virtual observer can be computed in such a way as to simulate a visit of the reconstructed object.

  10. In-situ observation of xenon nanocrystals in aluminum under electron and ion irradiation in transmission electron microscope.

    SciTech Connect

    Furuya, K.

    1998-11-11

    In-situ ion irradiation in the transmission electron microscope (TEM) is one of the unique techniques to investigate the structural evolution of materials induced by particle bombardments. In spite of many efforts to get clear results from in-situ ion irradiation, the results were sometimes unclear because of physical and technical problems associated with TEM and ion beam hardwares. This paper describes a newly developed ion beam interface with an ultra-high voltage TEM (HVTEM) for in-situ observation of ion implantation of metals and alloys in atomic scale.

  11. Tandem High-pressure Freezing and Quick Freeze Substitution of Plant Tissues for Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bobik, Krzysztof; Dunlap, John R.; Burch-Smith, Tessa M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1940s transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been providing biologists with ultra-high resolution images of biological materials. Yet, because of laborious and time-consuming protocols that also demand experience in preparation of artifact-free samples, TEM is not considered a user-friendly technique. Traditional sample preparation for TEM used chemical fixatives to preserve cellular structures. High-pressure freezing is the cryofixation of biological samples under high pressures to produce very fast cooling rates, thereby restricting ice formation, which is detrimental to the integrity of cellular ultrastructure. High-pressure freezing and freeze substitution are currently the methods of choice for producing the highest quality morphology in resin sections for TEM. These methods minimize the artifacts normally associated with conventional processing for TEM of thin sections. After cryofixation the frozen water in the sample is replaced with liquid organic solvent at low temperatures, a process called freeze substitution. Freeze substitution is typically carried out over several days in dedicated, costly equipment. A recent innovation allows the process to be completed in three hours, instead of the usual two days. This is typically followed by several more days of sample preparation that includes infiltration and embedding in epoxy resins before sectioning. Here we present a protocol combining high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution that enables plant sample fixation to be accomplished within hours. The protocol can readily be adapted for working with other tissues or organisms. Plant tissues are of special concern because of the presence of aerated spaces and water-filled vacuoles that impede ice-free freezing of water. In addition, the process of chemical fixation is especially long in plants due to cell walls impeding the penetration of the chemicals to deep within the tissues. Plant tissues are therefore particularly challenging, but

  12. Tandem high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution of plant tissues for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bobik, Krzysztof; Dunlap, John R; Burch-Smith, Tessa M

    2014-10-13

    Since the 1940s transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been providing biologists with ultra-high resolution images of biological materials. Yet, because of laborious and time-consuming protocols that also demand experience in preparation of artifact-free samples, TEM is not considered a user-friendly technique. Traditional sample preparation for TEM used chemical fixatives to preserve cellular structures. High-pressure freezing is the cryofixation of biological samples under high pressures to produce very fast cooling rates, thereby restricting ice formation, which is detrimental to the integrity of cellular ultrastructure. High-pressure freezing and freeze substitution are currently the methods of choice for producing the highest quality morphology in resin sections for TEM. These methods minimize the artifacts normally associated with conventional processing for TEM of thin sections. After cryofixation the frozen water in the sample is replaced with liquid organic solvent at low temperatures, a process called freeze substitution. Freeze substitution is typically carried out over several days in dedicated, costly equipment. A recent innovation allows the process to be completed in three hours, instead of the usual two days. This is typically followed by several more days of sample preparation that includes infiltration and embedding in epoxy resins before sectioning. Here we present a protocol combining high-pressure freezing and quick freeze substitution that enables plant sample fixation to be accomplished within hours. The protocol can readily be adapted for working with other tissues or organisms. Plant tissues are of special concern because of the presence of aerated spaces and water-filled vacuoles that impede ice-free freezing of water. In addition, the process of chemical fixation is especially long in plants due to cell walls impeding the penetration of the chemicals to deep within the tissues. Plant tissues are therefore particularly challenging, but

  13. The Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation in Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Whole Cells in Liquid.

    PubMed

    Hermannsdörfer, Justus; Tinnemann, Verena; Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Whole cells can be studied in their native liquid environment using electron microscopy, and unique information about the locations and stoichiometry of individual membrane proteins can be obtained from many cells thus taking cell heterogeneity into account. Of key importance for the further development of this microscopy technology is knowledge about the effect of electron beam radiation on the samples under investigation. We used environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detection to examine the effect of radiation for whole fixed COS7 fibroblasts in liquid. The main observation was the localization of nanoparticle labels attached to epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). It was found that the relative distances between the labels remained mostly unchanged (<1.5%) for electron doses ranging from the undamaged native state at 10 e-/Å2 toward 103 e-/Å2. This dose range was sufficient to determine the EGFR locations with nanometer resolution and to distinguish between monomers and dimers. Various different forms of radiation damage became visible at higher doses, including severe dislocation, and the dissolution of labels. PMID:27137077

  14. The Effect of Electron Beam Irradiation in Environmental Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy of Whole Cells in Liquid.

    PubMed

    Hermannsdörfer, Justus; Tinnemann, Verena; Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2016-06-01

    Whole cells can be studied in their native liquid environment using electron microscopy, and unique information about the locations and stoichiometry of individual membrane proteins can be obtained from many cells thus taking cell heterogeneity into account. Of key importance for the further development of this microscopy technology is knowledge about the effect of electron beam radiation on the samples under investigation. We used environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) detection to examine the effect of radiation for whole fixed COS7 fibroblasts in liquid. The main observation was the localization of nanoparticle labels attached to epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFRs). It was found that the relative distances between the labels remained mostly unchanged (<1.5%) for electron doses ranging from the undamaged native state at 10 e-/Å2 toward 103 e-/Å2. This dose range was sufficient to determine the EGFR locations with nanometer resolution and to distinguish between monomers and dimers. Various different forms of radiation damage became visible at higher doses, including severe dislocation, and the dissolution of labels.

  15. Visualization and quantitative analysis of nanoparticles in the respiratory tract by transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Mühlfeld, Christian; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Vanhecke, Dimitri; Blank, Fabian; Gehr, Peter; Ochs, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Nanotechnology in its widest sense seeks to exploit the special biophysical and chemical properties of materials at the nanoscale. While the potential technological, diagnostic or therapeutic applications are promising there is a growing body of evidence that the special technological features of nanoparticulate material are associated with biological effects formerly not attributed to the same materials at a larger particle scale. Therefore, studies that address the potential hazards of nanoparticles on biological systems including human health are required. Due to its large surface area the lung is one of the major sites of interaction with inhaled nanoparticles. One of the great challenges of studying particle-lung interactions is the microscopic visualization of nanoparticles within tissues or single cells both in vivo and in vitro. Once a certain type of nanoparticle can be identified unambiguously using microscopic methods it is desirable to quantify the particle distribution within a cell, an organ or the whole organism. Transmission electron microscopy provides an ideal tool to perform qualitative and quantitative analyses of particle-related structural changes of the respiratory tract, to reveal the localization of nanoparticles within tissues and cells and to investigate the 3D nature of nanoparticle-lung interactions. This article provides information on the applicability, advantages and disadvantages of electron microscopic preparation techniques and several advanced transmission electron microscopic methods including conventional, immuno and energy-filtered electron microscopy as well as electron tomography for the visualization of both model nanoparticles (e.g. polystyrene) and technologically relevant nanoparticles (e.g. titanium dioxide). Furthermore, we highlight possibilities to combine light and electron microscopic techniques in a correlative approach. Finally, we demonstrate a formal quantitative, i.e. stereological approach to analyze the

  16. Few-layer graphene as a support film for transmission electron microscopy imaging of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    McBride, James R; Lupini, Andrew R; Schreuder, Michael A; Smith, Nathanael J; Pennycook, Stephen J; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2009-12-01

    One consistent limitation for high-resolution imaging of small nanoparticles is the high background signal from the amorphous carbon support film. With interest growing for smaller and smaller nanostructures, state of the art electron microscopes are becoming necessary for rudimentary tasks, such as nanoparticle sizing. As a monolayer of carbon, free-standing graphene represents the ultimate support film for nanoparticle imaging. In this work, conventional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were used to assess the benefits and feasibility of few-layer graphene support films. Suspensions of few-layer graphene to produce the support films were prepared by simple sonication of exfoliated graphite. The greatest benefit was observed for conventional HRTEM, where lattice resolved imaging of sub 2 nm CdSe nanocrystals was achieved. The few-layer graphene films were also used as a support film for C(s)-corrected STEM and electron energy loss spectroscopy of CuInSe(2) nanocrystals. PMID:20356171

  17. Contamination-free transmission electron microscopy for high-resolution carbon elemental mapping of polymers.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Shin; Hanada, Takeshi; Ebisawa, Masaharu; Matsuda, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Motoyasu; Takahara, Atsushi

    2009-05-26

    Specimen contamination induced by electron beam irradiation has long been a serious problem for high-resolution imaging and analysis by a transmission electron microscope (TEM). It creates a deposition of carbonaceous compounds on a region under study, causing the loss of resolution. We developed a method to reduce the beam-induced specimen contamination by cleaning a TEM with activated oxygen radicals. The hydrocarbon contaminants accumulated inside the microscope's chamber can be etched away by gentle chemical oxidation without causing any damage to the microscope. The "contamination-free TEM" can effectively suppress the deposition of carbon-rich products on a specimen and therefore enables us to perform high-resolution carbon elemental mapping by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM). In this study, we investigated the structure of polymer brushes immobilized on a silica nanoparticle (SiNP), of which molecular weight, length, and density of the brushes had been characterized in detail. The isolated particle showed the stretched formations of the polymer chains growing from the surface, while the densely distributed particles showed the connection of the polymer chains between neighboring particles. Moreover, the polymer brush layer and the surface initiator could be differentiated from each other by the component-specific contrast achieved by electron spectroscopic imaging (ESI). The contamination-free TEM can allow us to perform high-resolution carbon mapping and is expected to provide deep insights of soft materials' nanostructures. PMID:19402650

  18. Liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy: imaging protein complexes in their native environment in whole eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-04-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of specimens in liquid, so-called Liquid STEM, is capable of imaging the individual subunits of macromolecular complexes in whole eukaryotic cells in liquid. This paper discusses this new microscopy modality within the context of state-of-the-art microscopy of cells. The principle of operation and equations for the resolution are described. The obtained images are different from those acquired with standard transmission electron microscopy showing the cellular ultrastructure. Instead, contrast is obtained on specific labels. Images can be recorded in two ways, either via STEM at 200 keV electron beam energy using a microfluidic chamber enclosing the cells, or via environmental scanning electron microscopy at 30 keV of cells in a wet environment. The first series of experiments involved the epidermal growth factor receptor labeled with gold nanoparticles. The labels were imaged in whole fixed cells with nanometer resolution. Since the cells can be kept alive in the microfluidic chamber, it is also feasible to detect the labels in unfixed, live cells. The rapid sample preparation and imaging allows studies of multiple whole cells.

  19. Efficient linear phase contrast in scanning transmission electron microscopy with matched illumination and detector interferometry

    DOE PAGES

    Ophus, Colin; Ciston, Jim; Pierce, Jordan; Harvey, Tyler R.; Chess, Jordan; McMorran, Benjamin J.; Czarnik, Cory; Rose, Harald H.; Ercius, Peter

    2016-02-29

    The ability to image light elements in soft matter at atomic resolution enables unprecedented insight into the structure and properties of molecular heterostructures and beam-sensitive nanomaterials. In this study, we introduce a scanning transmission electron microscopy technique combining a pre-specimen phase plate designed to produce a probe with structured phase with a high-speed direct electron detector to generate nearly linear contrast images with high efficiency. We demonstrate this method by using both experiment and simulation to simultaneously image the atomic-scale structure of weakly scattering amorphous carbon and strongly scattering gold nanoparticles. Our method demonstrates strong contrast for both materials, makingmore » it a promising candidate for structural determination of heterogeneous soft/hard matter samples even at low electron doses comparable to traditional phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy. Ultimately, simulated images demonstrate the extension of this technique to the challenging problem of structural determination of biological material at the surface of inorganic crystals.« less

  20. High-energy x-ray and transmission electron microscopy study of structural transformations in Ti-V

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsteiner, I. B.; Schöps, A.; Phillipp, F.; Kelsch, M.; Reichert, H.; Dosch, H.; Honkimäki, V.

    2006-01-01

    The binary system Ti-V is a paradigm for the technically important class of Ti β alloys. In the past, it received attention as a candidate for transient ordering. We elucidate the nature of structural transformations by combining transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a high-energy x-ray diffraction technique. The latter allows to study precipitation processes time resolved and in situ, while TEM is a powerful tool to identify individual phases. In addition to α -Ti precipitation we observe the formation of TiC from minor carbon impurities. Additional diffraction peaks accompanying the α -Ti precipitation and hinting at the existence of a B2-type superstructure are shown to originate from the precipitates. No transient ordering was found.

  1. Elastic and inelastic transmission of electrons through insulating polyethylene terephthalate nanocapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keerthisinghe, D.; Dassanayake, B. S.; Wickramarachchi, S. J.; Stolterfoht, N.; Tanis, J. A.

    2015-07-01

    The transmission of electrons with incident energies of 300, 500, and 800 eV through insulating polyethylene terephthalate (PET) nanocapillaries for small tilt angles near 0° was studied. The exiting electrons showed elastic and inelastic behaviors with the inelasticity increasing with the tilt angle. This paper is an extension of our earlier work for electrons on PET reported by Das et al. [Phys. Rev. A 76, 042716 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevA.76.042716], but the present study goes further by investigating the transmission for very small tilt angles near 0° with the small step sizes revealing distinct regions of behavior. The work performed here was conducted for two samples with different capillary diameters and pore densities: sample 1 with 100-nm diameter capillaries in a foil of 12-µm thickness and a pore density of 5 ×108/cm2 , and sample 2 with 200-nm diameter capillaries with the same foil thickness and a pore density of 5 ×107/cm2 . Two distinct regions of transmission depending on the sample tilt angle for both samples corresponding to direct and guided electrons as well as the transition region between them were observed. The angular centers and widths of the transmission for each angle investigated were found and are discussed in terms of the tilt angle variation in the foil. For the widths, comparison with the inherent angular width of the electron spectrometer is made. Energy loss of electrons was studied from the centroids of the energy spectra with these energies corresponding to the peak centers of the angular profiles. The broadness of the energy distributions due to inelasticity was investigated from the full width at half maxima (in eV) of the spectra. The results for both samples agreed well despite the differences in capillary diameters and pore densities. The results are in partial agreement with the previous work performed for PET nanocapillaries by Das et al. [Phys. Rev. A 76, 042716 (2007), 10.1103/PhysRevA.76.042716], but differences are

  2. In situ Transmission Electron Microscopy observation of Ag nanocrystal evolution by surfactant free electron-driven synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Elson; Avansi, Waldir; Bettini, Jefferson; Andrés, Juan; Gracia, Lourdes

    2016-01-01

    The study of the interaction of electron irradiation with matter and the response of the material to the passage of electrons is a very challenging problem. However, the growth mechanism observed during nanostructural evolution appears to be a broad and promising scientific field in nanotechnology. We report the in situ TEM study of nanostructural evolution of electron-driven silver (Ag) nanocrystals through an additive-free synthetic procedure. Observations revealed the direct effect of the electron beam on the morphological evolution of Ag nanocrystals through different mechanisms, such as mass transport, site-selective coalescence, and an appropriate structural configuration after coalescence leading to a more stable configuration. A fundamental understanding of the growth and formation mechanisms of Ag nanocrystals, which interact with the electron beam, is essential to improve the nanocrystal shape-control mechanisms as well as the future design and study of nanomaterials. PMID:26979671

  3. Rapid discrimination of slimming capsules based on illegal additives by electronic nose and flash gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhenzhen; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2015-02-01

    The discrimination of counterfeit and/or illegally manufactured medicines is an important task in the pharmaceutical industry for pharmaceutical safety. In this study, 22 slimming capsule samples with illegally added sibutramine and phenolphthalein were analyzed by electronic nose and flash gas chromatography. To reveal the difference among the different classes of samples, principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis were employed to analyze the data acquired from electronic nose and flash gas chromatography, respectively. The samples without illegal additives can be discriminated from the ones with illegal additives by using electronic nose or flash gas chromatography data individually. To improve the performance of classification, a data fusion strategy was applied to integrate the data from electronic nose and flash gas chromatography data into a single model. The results show that the samples with phenolphthalein, sibutramine and both can be classified well by using fused data.

  4. Nucleation of diamond by pure carbon ion bombardment--a transmission electron microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Y.; Liao, M.Y.; Wang, Z.G.; Lifshitz, Y.; Lee, S.

    2005-08-08

    A cross-sectional high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) study of a film deposited by a 1 keV mass-selected carbon ion beam onto silicon held at 800 deg. C is presented. Initially, a graphitic film with its basal planes perpendicular to the substrate is evolving. The precipitation of nanodiamond crystallites in upper layers is confirmed by HRTEM, selected area electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The nucleation of diamond on graphitic edges as predicted by Lambrecht et al. [W. R. L. Lambrecht, C. H. Lee, B. Segall, J. C. Angus, Z. Li, and M. Sunkara, Nature, 364 607 (1993)] is experimentally confirmed. The results are discussed in terms of our recent subplantation-based diamond nucleation model.

  5. Wet cells and dry cells: In situ transmission electron microscopy of electrically-driven, dynamical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Edward Robert, IV

    Recent developments in nanofabrication techniques allow thin, wet systems to be imaged with high spatial and temporal resolution in the electron microscope. Coupling this ability with simultaneous, measured, electrical control, we cycle processes in liquid systems representing different electrochemical battery components. Dynamic processes imaged with these techniques, which represent a new state-of-the-art, include nanobubble collapse, dendrite growth, ion diffusion, and graphite intercalation. We also develop a sensitive system for measuring electron beam induced currents (EBIC) in the transmission electron microscope and apply it to graphene-MoS2 heterostructures. This new hybrid material has strong light-matter interactions, and the EBIC measurements map the minority carrier diffusion length, which we observe to decrease with increasing radiation damage. These results have direct implications for the function and service lifetime of solar cells based on molybdenum disulfide.

  6. Probing plasmons in three dimensions by combining complementary spectroscopies in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachtel, J. A.; Marvinney, C.; Mouti, A.; Mayo, D.; Mu, R.; Pennycook, S. J.; Lupini, A. R.; Chisholm, M. F.; Haglund, R. F.; Pantelides, S. T.

    2016-04-01

    The nanoscale optical response of surface plasmons in three-dimensional metallic nanostructures plays an important role in many nanotechnology applications, where precise spatial and spectral characteristics of plasmonic elements control device performance. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) within a scanning transmission electron microscope have proven to be valuable tools for studying plasmonics at the nanoscale. Each technique has been used separately, producing three-dimensional reconstructions through tomography, often aided by simulations for complete characterization. Here we demonstrate that the complementary nature of the two techniques, namely that EELS probes beam-induced electronic excitations while CL probes radiative decay, allows us to directly obtain a spatially- and spectrally-resolved picture of the plasmonic characteristics of nanostructures in three dimensions. The approach enables nanoparticle-by-nanoparticle plasmonic analysis in three dimensions to aid in the design of diverse nanoplasmonic applications.

  7. Tip alignment system in a sextupole-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Shengyang; Kapp, Oscar H.

    1993-03-01

    Tip alignment and replacement in ultrahigh vacuum field-emission electron microscopes is traditionally a time-consuming endeavor. A convenient autodrive system for the 200 kV scanning transmission electron microscope was developed to facilitate the alignment of field-emission tips, thus saving a great deal of experimenter time. Under computer control, a series of automatic electrical and mechanical processes are initiated to systematically adjust various parameters to effect passage of the electron beam through the various apertures of the microscope column. The task of ``finding the beam'' is thus performed automatically. In this process the tip holder is moved in a raster parallel to the first anode. Feedback from various detectors placed throughout the column direct the positioning of the tip for optimal alignment. This process is routinely performed in about 45 min.

  8. MULTISLICE SIMULATION OF TRANSMISSION ELECTRON MICROSCOPY IMAGING OF HELIUM BUBBLES IN IRON

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Bo; Edwards, Danny J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Odette, George R.; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2011-04-17

    The objective of this task is to establish the size correlation between transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaged helium (He) bubbles and the actual bubbles in an iron (Fe) matrix. SUMMARY The results of this simulation study show that the size of TEM imaged He bubbles, represented by the inner diameter of the first dark Fresnel ring under defocused condition (Din), deviated from the actual bubble size (Do). Din was found to be larger than Do when imaged with a highly incoherent electron beam, but smaller than Do if the beam is coherent. The deviation of Din from Do increases with increasing defocus. On the other hand, the electron beam accelerating voltage, bubble size, bubble position, and TEM sample thickness do not significantly affect the value of D0/Do. This study also suggests that He bubbles can be differentiated from argon (Ar) bubbles by differences in Fresnel contrast.

  9. Fast microstructure and phase analyses of nanopowders using combined analysis of transmission electron microscopy scattering patterns.

    PubMed

    Boullay, P; Lutterotti, L; Chateigner, D; Sicard, L

    2014-09-01

    The full quantitative characterization of nanopowders using transmission electron microscopy scattering patterns is shown. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the application of so-called combined analysis, a global approach for phase identification, structure refinement, characterization of anisotropic crystallite sizes and shapes, texture analysis and texture variations with the probed scale, using electron diffraction patterns of TiO2 and Mn3O4 nanocrystal aggregates and platinum films. Electron diffraction pattern misalignments, positioning, and slight changes from pattern to pattern are directly integrated and refined within this approach. The use of a newly developed full-pattern search-match methodology for phase identification of nanopowders and the incorporation of the two-wave dynamical correction for diffraction patterns are also reported and proved to be efficient. PMID:25176993

  10. In-situ transmission electron microscopy growth of nanoparticles under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luce, F. P.; Oliviero, E.; Azevedo, G. de M.; Baptista, D. L.; Zawislak, F. C.; Fichtner, P. F. P.

    2016-01-01

    The formation and time resolved behavior of individual Pb nanoparticles embedded in silica have been studied by in-situ transmission electron microscopy observations at high temperatures (400-1100 °C) and under 200 keV electron irradiation. It is shown that under such extreme conditions, nanoparticles can migrate at long distances presenting a Brownian-like behavior and eventually coalesce. The particle migration phenomenon is discussed considering the influence of the thermal energy and the electron irradiation effects on the atomic diffusion process which is shown to control particle migration. These results and comparison with ex-situ experiments tackle the stability and the microstructure evolution of nanoparticles systems under extreme conditions. It elucidates on the effects of energetic particle irradiation-annealing treatments either as a tool or as a detrimental issue that could hamper their long-term applications in radiation-harsh environments such as in space or nuclear sectors.

  11. Fast microstructure and phase analyses of nanopowders using combined analysis of transmission electron microscopy scattering patterns.

    PubMed

    Boullay, P; Lutterotti, L; Chateigner, D; Sicard, L

    2014-09-01

    The full quantitative characterization of nanopowders using transmission electron microscopy scattering patterns is shown. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the application of so-called combined analysis, a global approach for phase identification, structure refinement, characterization of anisotropic crystallite sizes and shapes, texture analysis and texture variations with the probed scale, using electron diffraction patterns of TiO2 and Mn3O4 nanocrystal aggregates and platinum films. Electron diffraction pattern misalignments, positioning, and slight changes from pattern to pattern are directly integrated and refined within this approach. The use of a newly developed full-pattern search-match methodology for phase identification of nanopowders and the incorporation of the two-wave dynamical correction for diffraction patterns are also reported and proved to be efficient.

  12. Photocurrent enhancement in nonpolar liquids by the addition of electron scavengers

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, G.A.; Lee, K.; Tweeten, D.W.; Lipsky, S.

    1988-07-14

    The photocurrent from anthracene, triphenylamine, and N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine excited above their ionization thresholds in liquid n-pentane or n-hexane is found to be enhanced by the addition of low concentrations (/approx lt/0.02 M) of the electron scavengers perfluoromethylcyclohexane or perfluorodecalin. The enhancement is not observed in solvents of higher electron mobility (e.g.,. cyclohexane, isooctane, etc.) or for scavengers of lower electron affinity (e.g., n-perfluorohexane). For the solute naphthalene, no enhancement is observed under any conditions. The effects of excitation energy and applied electric field strength are reported.

  13. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud density In the Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, Mauro T.F.; Krasnykh, Anatoly K.; Byrd, John; De Santis, Stefano; Sonnaad, Kiran G.; Caspers, Fritz; Kroyer, Tom

    2008-06-18

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electrons clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appears to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regionsif the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  14. Microwave Transmission Measurements of the Electron Cloud Density In The Positron Ring of PEP-II

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; Krasnykh, A.K; Byrd, J.; Santis, S.De; Sonnad, K.G.; Caspers, F.; Kroyer, T.; /CERN

    2008-07-03

    Clouds of electrons in the vacuum chambers of accelerators of positively charged particle beams present a serious limitation for operation of these machines at high currents. Because of the size of these accelerators, it is difficult to probe the low energy electron clouds over substantial lengths of the beam pipe. We applied a novel technique to directly measure the electron cloud density via the phase shift induced in a TE wave which is independently excited and transmitted over a straight section of the accelerator. The modulation in the wave transmission which appear to increase in depth when the clearing solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the section. Furthermore, we expect a larger phase shift of a wave transmitted through magnetic dipole field regions if the transmitted wave couples with the gyration motion of the electrons. We have used this technique to measure the average electron cloud density (ECD) specifically for the first time in magnetic field regions of a new 4-dipole chicane in the positron ring of the PEP-II collider at SLAC. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Low Energy Ring (LER) between 2006 and 2008.

  15. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams. PMID:26750260

  16. Sub-Angstrom Low Voltage Performance of a Monochromated, Aberration-Corrected Transmission Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Bell, David C.; Russo, Christopher J.; Benner, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    Lowering the electron energy in the transmission electron microscope allows for a significant improvement in contrast of light elements, and reduces knock-on damage for most materials. If low-voltage electron microscopes are defined as those with accelerating voltages below 100 kV, the introduction of aberration correctors and monochromators to the electron microscope column enables Ångstrom-level resolution, which was previously reserved for higher voltage instruments. Decreasing electron energy has three important advantages: 1) knock-on damage is lower, which is critically important for sensitive materials such as graphene and carbon nanotubes; 2) cross sections for electron-energy-loss spectroscopy increase, improving signal-to-noise for chemical analysis; 3) elastic scattering cross sections increase, improving contrast in high-resolution, zero-loss images. The results presented indicate that decreasing the acceleration voltage from 200 kV to 80 kV in a monochromated, aberration-corrected microscope enhances the contrast while retaining sub-angstrom resolution. These improvements in low-voltage performance are expected to produce many new results and enable a wealth of new experiments in materials science. PMID:20598206

  17. High Dynamic Range Pixel Array Detector for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tate, Mark W; Purohit, Prafull; Chamberlain, Darol; Nguyen, Kayla X; Hovden, Robert; Chang, Celesta S; Deb, Pratiti; Turgut, Emrah; Heron, John T; Schlom, Darrell G; Ralph, Daniel C; Fuchs, Gregory D; Shanks, Katherine S; Philipp, Hugh T; Muller, David A; Gruner, Sol M

    2016-02-01

    We describe a hybrid pixel array detector (electron microscope pixel array detector, or EMPAD) adapted for use in electron microscope applications, especially as a universal detector for scanning transmission electron microscopy. The 128×128 pixel detector consists of a 500 µm thick silicon diode array bump-bonded pixel-by-pixel to an application-specific integrated circuit. The in-pixel circuitry provides a 1,000,000:1 dynamic range within a single frame, allowing the direct electron beam to be imaged while still maintaining single electron sensitivity. A 1.1 kHz framing rate enables rapid data collection and minimizes sample drift distortions while scanning. By capturing the entire unsaturated diffraction pattern in scanning mode, one can simultaneously capture bright field, dark field, and phase contrast information, as well as being able to analyze the full scattering distribution, allowing true center of mass imaging. The scattering is recorded on an absolute scale, so that information such as local sample thickness can be directly determined. This paper describes the detector architecture, data acquisition system, and preliminary results from experiments with 80-200 keV electron beams.

  18. Practical Considerations for High Spatial and Temporal Resolution Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, M; Boyden, K; Browning, N D; Campbell, G H; Colvin, J D; DeHope, B; Frank, A M; Gibson, D J; Hartemann, F; Kim, J S; King, W E; LaGrange, T B; Pyke, B J; Reed, B W; Shuttlesworth, R M; Stuart, B C; Torralva, B R

    2006-05-01

    Although recent years have seen significant advances in the spatial resolution possible in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), the temporal resolution of most microscopes is limited to video rate at best. This lack of temporal resolution means that our understanding of dynamic processes in materials is extremely limited. High temporal resolution in the TEM can be achieved, however, by replacing the normal thermionic or field emission source with a photoemission source. In this case the temporal resolution is limited only by the ability to create a short pulse of photoexcited electrons in the source, and this can be as short as a few femtoseconds. The operation of the photo-emission source and the control of the subsequent pulse of electrons (containing as many as 5 x 10{sup 7} electrons) create significant challenges for a standard microscope column that is designed to operate with a single electron in the column at any one time. In this paper, the generation and control of electron pulses in the TEM to obtain a temporal resolution <10{sup -6} s will be described and the effect of the pulse duration and current density on the spatial resolution of the instrument will be examined. The potential of these levels of temporal and spatial resolution for the study of dynamic materials processes will also be discussed.

  19. Theory of magnetically insulated electron flows in coaxial pulsed power transmission lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawconnell, Robert I.; Neri, Jesse

    1990-03-01

    The Cartesian magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL) theory of Mendel et al. [Appl. Phys. 50, 3830 (1979); Phys. Fluids 26, 3628 (1983)] is extended to cylindrical coordinates. A set of equations that describe arbitrary electron flows in cylindrical coordinates is presented. These equations are used to derive a general theory for laminar magnetically insulated electron flows. The laminar theory allows one to specify the potentials, fields, and densities across a coaxial line undergoing explosive electron emission at the cathode. The theory is different from others available in cylindrical coordinates in that the canonical momentum and total energy for each electron may be nonzero across the electron sheath. A nonzero canonical momentum and total energy for the electrons in the sheath allows the model to produce one-dimensional flows that resemble flows from lines with impedance mismatches and perturbing structures. The laminar theory is used to derive two new self-consistent cylindrical flow solutions: (1) for a constant density profile and (2) for a quadratic density profile of the form ρ=ρc[(r2m-r2)/(r2m-r2c)]. This profile is of interest in that it is similar to profiles observed in a long MITL simulation [Appl. Phys. 50, 4996 (1979)]. The theoretical flows are compared to numerical results obtained with two-dimensional (2-D) electromagnetic particle-in-cell (PIC) codes.

  20. Electronically controlled surface plasmon dispersion and optical transmission through metallic hole arrays using liquid crystal.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Wayne; Wurtz, Gregory A; Evans, Paul R; Pollard, Robert J; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2008-01-01

    The enhanced optical properties of metal films periodically perforated with an array of sub-wavelength size holes have recently been widely studied in the field of surface plasmon optics. The ability to design the optical transmission of such nanostructures, which act as plasmonic crystals, by varying their geometrical parameters gives them great flexibility for numerous applications in photonics, opto-electronics, and sensing. Transforming these passive optical elements into devices that may be actively controlled has presented a new challenge. Here, we report on the realization of an electrically controlled nanostructured optical system based on the unique properties of surface plasmon polaritonic crystals in contact with a liquid crystal (LC) layer. We discuss the effect of LC layer modulation on the surface plasmon dispersion, the related optical transmission and the underlying mechanism. The reported effect may be used to achieve active spectral tuneability and switching in a wide range of applications.

  1. Combined scanning transmission X-ray and electron microscopy for the characterization of bacterial endospores.

    PubMed

    Jamroskovic, Jan; Shao, Paul P; Suvorova, Elena; Barak, Imrich; Bernier-Latmani, Rizlan

    2014-09-01

    Endospores (also referred to as bacterial spores) are bacterial structures formed by several bacterial species of the phylum Firmicutes. Spores form as a response to environmental stress. These structures exhibit remarkable resistance to harsh environmental conditions such as exposure to heat, desiccation, and chemical oxidants. The spores include several layers of protein and peptidoglycan that surround a core harboring DNA as well as high concentrations of calcium and dipicolinic acid (DPA). A combination of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, scanning transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy was used for the direct quantitative characterization of bacterial spores. The concentration and localization of DPA, Ca(2+) , and other elements were determined and compared for the core and cortex of spores from two distinct genera: Bacillus subtilis and Desulfotomaculum reducens. This micro-spectroscopic approach is uniquely suited for the direct study of individual bacterial spores, while classical molecular and biochemical methods access only bulk characteristics.

  2. Measurement of the transmission phase of an electron in a quantum two-path interferometer

    SciTech Connect

    Takada, S. Watanabe, K.; Yamamoto, M.; Bäuerle, C.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.; Tarucha, S.

    2015-08-10

    A quantum two-path interferometer allows for direct measurement of the transmission phase shift of an electron, providing useful information on coherent scattering problems. In mesoscopic systems, however, the two-path interference is easily smeared by contributions from other paths, and this makes it difficult to observe the true transmission phase shift. To eliminate this problem, multi-terminal Aharonov-Bohm (AB) interferometers have been used to derive the phase shift by assuming that the relative phase shift of the electrons between the two paths is simply obtained when a smooth shift of the AB oscillations is observed. Nevertheless, the phase shifts using such a criterion have sometimes been inconsistent with theory. On the other hand, we have used an AB ring contacted to tunnel-coupled wires and acquired the phase shift consistent with theory when the two output currents through the coupled wires oscillate with well-defined anti-phase. Here, we investigate thoroughly these two criteria used to ensure a reliable phase measurement, the anti-phase relation of the two output currents, and the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation. We confirm that the well-defined anti-phase relation ensures a correct phase measurement with a quantum two-path interference. In contrast, we find that even in a situation where the anti-phase relation is less well-defined, the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation can still occur but does not give the correct transmission phase due to contributions from multiple paths. This indicates that the phase relation of the two output currents in our interferometer gives a good criterion for the measurement of the true transmission phase, while the smooth phase shift in the AB oscillation itself does not.

  3. Imaging faces of shadowed magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) crystals from magnetotactic bacteria with energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lins, U; Kachar, B; Farina, M

    We used energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy to image magnetite crystals isolated from uncultured magnetotactic bacteria. These magnetite crystals were shadowed in high vacuum with platinum at 45 degrees. The shadowed crystals were observed in a Zeiss (Thornwood, NY) CEM902 transmission electron microscope. Imaging shadowed crystals with inelastically scattered electrons provided information of the decoration pattern of small platinum particles over crystal surfaces, and thus information on surface characteristics of crystals. Results were comparable to those obtained from scanning electron microscopy using a field emitter gun. Electron energy loss spectra of the crystals as well as of the supporting film were recorded to evaluate variations of image contrast with energy losses. Results indicated that the contrast is attenuated with inelastic imaging and that the effect of contrast tuning caused a contrast inversion at a given point between 100 and 150 eV. We believe this approach can be useful for studying multilayered materials by transmission electron microscopy.

  4. Structural analysis of nano structured carbon by transmission electron microscopy and image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshida, K.; Murata, M.; Fujiwara, K.; Itaya, T.; Yanagisawa, T.; Kimura, K.; Nakazawa, T.; Kim, Y. A.; Endo, M.; Kim, B.-H.; Yang, K. S.

    2013-06-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is one of the highest resolution analysis methods of materials. The three dimensional recognition of the materials is difficult by TEM because the observation data is projection images through the materials. In this study, space structure of carbon nanotubes loaded with metal particles was analyzed by three dimensional TEM (3D-TEM) [1,2]. The nano structured carbons are also observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) with Cs corrector. Cup-stack type carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs) loaded with Pt particles (2-3 nm in diameter) prepared by GSI Creos Corporation were analyzed by these methods. Pt particles are bound selectively to the edges of hexagonal carbon layers of inside and outer surface of CSCNTs efficiently and can be expected to work well as catalysts of electrodes of fuel cell. It is sometimes difficult that the nano sized area is analyzed by selected area electron diffraction (SAD) because the selected area aperture cannot be so small. The HRTEM and image processing technique give similar results of SAD when it works and revealed to be useful to analyze nano structured carbons.

  5. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of ampullary segment of oviduct during estrous cycle in caprines.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Singh, R; Bhardwaj, J K

    2015-01-01

    The ampullary segment of the mammalian oviduct provides suitable milieu for fertilization and development of zygote before implantation into uterus. It is, therefore, in the present study, the cyclic changes in the morphology of ampullary segment of goat oviduct were studied during follicular and luteal phases using scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Topographical analysis revealed the presence of uniformly ciliated ampullary epithelia, concealing apical processes of non-ciliated cells along with bulbous secretory cells during follicular phase. The luteal phase was marked with decline in number of ciliated cells with increased occurrence of secretory cells. The ultrastructure analysis has demonstrated the presence of indented nuclear membrane, supranuclear cytoplasm, secretory granules, rough endoplasmic reticulum, large lipid droplets, apically located glycogen masses, oval shaped mitochondria in the secretory cells. The ciliated cells were characterized by the presence of elongated nuclei, abundant smooth endoplasmic reticulum, oval or spherical shaped mitochondria with crecentric cristae during follicular phase. However, in the luteal phase, secretory cells were possessing highly indented nucleus with diffused electron dense chromatin, hyaline nucleosol, increased number of lipid droplets. The ciliated cells had numerous fibrous granules and basal bodies. The parallel use of scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques has enabled us to examine the cyclic and hormone dependent changes occurring in the topography and fine structure of epithelium of ampullary segment and its cells during different reproductive phases that will be great help in understanding major bottle neck that limits success rate in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer technology. PMID:25491952

  6. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic analysis of ampullary segment of oviduct during estrous cycle in caprines.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R K; Singh, R; Bhardwaj, J K

    2015-01-01

    The ampullary segment of the mammalian oviduct provides suitable milieu for fertilization and development of zygote before implantation into uterus. It is, therefore, in the present study, the cyclic changes in the morphology of ampullary segment of goat oviduct were studied during follicular and luteal phases using scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques. Topographical analysis revealed the presence of uniformly ciliated ampullary epithelia, concealing apical processes of non-ciliated cells along with bulbous secretory cells during follicular phase. The luteal phase was marked with decline in number of ciliated cells with increased occurrence of secretory cells. The ultrastructure analysis has demonstrated the presence of indented nuclear membrane, supranuclear cytoplasm, secretory granules, rough endoplasmic reticulum, large lipid droplets, apically located glycogen masses, oval shaped mitochondria in the secretory cells. The ciliated cells were characterized by the presence of elongated nuclei, abundant smooth endoplasmic reticulum, oval or spherical shaped mitochondria with crecentric cristae during follicular phase. However, in the luteal phase, secretory cells were possessing highly indented nucleus with diffused electron dense chromatin, hyaline nucleosol, increased number of lipid droplets. The ciliated cells had numerous fibrous granules and basal bodies. The parallel use of scanning and transmission electron microscopy techniques has enabled us to examine the cyclic and hormone dependent changes occurring in the topography and fine structure of epithelium of ampullary segment and its cells during different reproductive phases that will be great help in understanding major bottle neck that limits success rate in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer technology.

  7. Transient Thermometry and High-Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Analysis of Filamentary Resistive Switches.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jonghan; Sharma, Abhishek A; Chen, Chao-Yang; Fantini, Andrea; Jurczak, Malgorzata; Herzing, Andrew A; Bain, James A; Picard, Yoosuf N; Skowronski, Marek

    2016-08-10

    We present data on the filament size and temperature distribution in Hf0.82Al0.18Ox-based Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) devices obtained by transient thermometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The thermometry shows that the temperature of the nonvolatile conducting filament can reach temperatures as high as 1600 K at the onset of RESET at voltage of 0.8 V and power of 40 μW. The size of the filament was estimated at about 1 nm in diameter. Hot filament increases the temperature of the surrounding high resistivity oxide, causing it to conduct and carry a significant fraction of the total current. The current spreading results in slowing down the filament temperature increase at higher power. The results of thermometry have been corroborated by HRTEM analysis of the as-fabricated and switched RRAM devices. The functional HfAlOx layer in as-fabricated devices is amorphous. In devices that were switched, we detected a small crystalline region of 10-15 nm in size. The crystallization temperature of the HfAlOx was determined to be 850 K in an independent annealing experiment. The size of the crystalline region agrees with thermal modeling based on the thermometry data. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (TEM) coordinated with electron energy loss spectroscopy could not detect changes in the chemical makeup of the filament. PMID:27351065

  8. Atomic-scale imaging and spectroscopy for in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jungjohann, Katherine L; Evans, James E; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2012-06-01

    Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics, and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope. In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle and demonstrate that characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration-corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution-based catalysis. PMID:22640968

  9. Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy for In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jungjohann, K. L.; Evans, James E.; Aguiar, Jeff; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-06-04

    Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle, and demonstrate characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution based catalysis and biological research.

  10. Chemical mapping and quantification at the atomic scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ming-Wen; Chen, Cheng Hsuan

    2013-06-25

    With innovative modern material-growth methods, a broad spectrum of fascinating materials with reduced dimensions-ranging from single-atom catalysts, nanoplasmonic and nanophotonic materials to two-dimensional heterostructural interfaces-is continually emerging and extending the new frontiers of materials research. A persistent central challenge in this grand scientific context has been the detailed characterization of the individual objects in these materials with the highest spatial resolution, a problem prompting the need for experimental techniques that integrate both microscopic and spectroscopic capabilities. To date, several representative microscopy-spectroscopy combinations have become available, such as scanning tunneling microscopy, tip-enhanced scanning optical microscopy, atom probe tomography, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Among these tools, STEM boasts unique chemical and electronic sensitivity at unparalleled resolution. In this Perspective, we elucidate the advances in STEM and chemical mapping applications at the atomic scale by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy with a focus on the ultimate challenge of chemical quantification with atomic accuracy.

  11. Atomic-scale imaging and spectroscopy for in situ liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jungjohann, Katherine L; Evans, James E; Aguiar, Jeffery A; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D

    2012-06-01

    Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics, and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope. In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle and demonstrate that characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration-corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution-based catalysis.

  12. [Transmissing electron microscopy of the vitreo-macular border in clinically significant diabetic macular edema].

    PubMed

    Synek, S; Pác, L; Synková, M

    2007-09-01

    The authors examined samples of the epimacular tissue in clinically significant macular edema by means of the transmissing electron microscopy. They did not found morphological differences between samples from patients already treated by means of laser photocoagulation before the pars plana vitrectomy and those without the laser treatment. Findings may be divided into three groups: (1) the inner limiting membrane (ILM) covered with collagen vitreous fibers, (2) cells' elements of the fibroblasts category, and (3) fibrous astrocytes in the vitreous cortex constituting one- or multilayer cellular membranes.

  13. [Transmission electronic microscopy of the inner limiting membrane and epiretinal tissue in idiopathic macular hole].

    PubMed

    Synek, S; Pác, L

    2005-03-01

    The authors examined samples of epimacular tissue obtained during the surgeries of the idiopathic macular hole in different stages of the disease by means of transmission electronic microscopy. In the early stages of the disease only the inner limiting membrane with isolated cells on the vitreous side was present, in later ones of the disease the connective tissue membrane was attached. In rare cases of the later stages of the disease they found the presence of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). They suppose the RPE plays an important role in the regeneration of the defects of the retina.

  14. In situ transmission electron microscopy of individual carbon nanotetrahedron/ribbon structures in bending

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, Hideo; Masuda, Yusuke

    2015-05-11

    When the direction of flattening of a carbon nanotube changes during growth mediated by a metal nanoparticle, a carbon nanotetrahedron is formed in the middle of the carbon nanoribbon. We report the bending properties of the carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure using a micro-manipulator system in a transmission electron microscope. In many cases, bending occurs at an edge of the carbon nanotetrahedron. No significant change is observed in the tetrahedron's shape during bending, and the bending is reversible and repeatable. Our results show that the carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure has good durability against mechanical bending.

  15. Characterization of magnetic nanoparticles using energy-selected transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sayagués, María J; Rojas, Teresa C; Fernández, Asunción; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Doole, Ron C; Hutchison, John L

    2002-10-01

    Fe, Co, and Ni magnetic nanoparticles have been characterized using energy-selected imaging in a high-resolution transmission electron microscope. The samples comprised Fe/FeO x and Co/CoO x nanoparticles synthesized by inert gas evaporation and a Ni/C nano-composite prepared by a sonochemical method. All of the particles examined were found to be between 5 and 30 nm in size, with the Fe and Co crystals coated in 5-10 nm of metal oxide layer and the Ni metallic crystallites embedded in an amorphous carbon spherical matrix.

  16. Transmission electron microscopy of an interplanetary dust particle with links to CI chondrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Lindsay P.; Thomas, Kathie L.; Mckay, David S.

    1991-01-01

    The majority of hydrated interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) have compositions that resemble CI and CM chondrites, however, their mineralogies are most similar to the fine grained material in certain altered type-3 carbonaceous and ordinary chondrites. During the transmission electron microscope studies of hydrated IDPs, a unique particle was discovered whose mineralogy is very similar to that reported from CI chondrites. W7013F5 is the first IDP whose mineralogy and chemistry approximates that of CI chondrites. The similarity in mineralogy and mineral chemistry suggests that W7013F5 was altered under conditions similar to those that existed on the CI parent bodies.

  17. Liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy: Nanoscale imaging in micrometers-thick liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuh, Tobias; de Jonge, Niels

    2014-02-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of specimens in liquid is possible using a microfluidic chamber with thin silicon nitride windows. This paper includes an analytic equation of the resolution as a function of the sample thickness and the vertical position of an object in the liquid. The equipment for STEM of liquid specimen is briefly described. STEM provides nanometer resolution in micrometer-thick liquid layers with relevance for both biological research and materials science. Using this technique, we investigated tagged proteins in whole eukaryotic cells, and gold nanoparticles in liquid with time-lapse image series. Possibly future applications are discussed.

  18. Visualizing gold nanoparticle uptake in live cells with liquid scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; de Jonge, Niels

    2011-04-13

    The intracellular uptake of 30 nm diameter gold nanoparticles (Au-NPs) was studied at the nanoscale in pristine eukaryotic cells. Live COS-7 cells were maintained in a microfluidic chamber and imaged using scanning transmission electron microscopy. A quantitative image analysis showed that Au-NPs bound to the membranes of vesicles, possibly lysosomes, and occupied 67% of the available surface area. The vesicles accumulated to form a micrometer-sized cluster after 24 h of incubation. Two clusters were analyzed and found to consist of 117 ± 9 and 164 ± 4 NP-filled vesicles.

  19. On the visibility of very thin specimens in annular bright field scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, P. J.; Klie, R. F.

    2013-07-15

    Annular bright field (ABF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is emerging as an important observation mode for its ability to simultaneously image both heavy and light elements. However, recent results have demonstrated that in the limit of a very thin specimen (a few atomic layers), the ABF and high angle annular dark field (HAADF) signals cease to be intuitively related: a phenomenon which is generally irrelevant when imaging 'normal' specimens. ABF/HAADF STEM observations and multislice image simulations of two catalyst samples of differing atomic weights are presented; it is shown that the nature of the ABF signal is specimen dependent.

  20. Soot Nanostructure: Using Fringe Analysis Software on High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of Carbon Soot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, James D.

    2004-01-01

    Using high resolution transmission electron images of carbon nanotubes and carbon particles, we are able to use image analysis program to determine several carbon fringe properties, including length, separation, curvature and orientation. Results are shown in the form of histograms for each of those quantities. The combination of those measurements can give a better indication of the graphic structure within nanotubes and particles of carbon and can distinguish carbons based upon fringe properties. Carbon with longer, straighter and closer spaced fringes are considered graphite, while amorphous carbon contain shorter, less structured fringes.

  1. Nanocrystal Diffusion in a Liquid Thin Film Observed by in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Haimei; Claridge, Shelley A.; Minor, Andrew M.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Dahmen, Ulrich

    2009-04-17

    We have directly observed motion of inorganic nanoparticles during fluid evaporation using a Transmission Electron Microscope. Tracking real-time diffusion of both spherical (5-15 nm) and rod-shaped (5x10 nm) gold nanocrystals in a thin-film of water-15percentglycerol reveals complex movements, such as rolling motions coupled to large-step movements and macroscopic violations of the Stokes-Einstein relation for diffusion. As drying patches form during the final stages of evaporation, particle motion is dominated by the nearby retracting liquid front.

  2. Robust atomic resolution imaging of light elements using scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Findlay, S. D.; Shibata, N.; Sawada, H.; Okunishi, E.; Kondo, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Ikuhara, Y.

    2009-11-01

    We show that an annular detector placed within the bright field cone in scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of light elements in crystals. In contrast to common high angle annular dark field imaging, both light and heavy atom columns are visible simultaneously. In contrast to common bright field imaging, the images are directly and robustly interpretable over a large range of thicknesses. We demonstrate this through systematic simulations and present a simple physical model to obtain some insight into the scattering dynamics.

  3. Robust atomic resolution imaging of light elements using scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Findlay, S. D.; Shibata, N.; Sawada, H.; Okunishi, E.; Kondo, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Ikuhara, Y.

    2009-11-09

    We show that an annular detector placed within the bright field cone in scanning transmission electron microscopy allows direct imaging of light elements in crystals. In contrast to common high angle annular dark field imaging, both light and heavy atom columns are visible simultaneously. In contrast to common bright field imaging, the images are directly and robustly interpretable over a large range of thicknesses. We demonstrate this through systematic simulations and present a simple physical model to obtain some insight into the scattering dynamics.

  4. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.

    2002-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e. soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  5. Carbon Nanostructure Examined by Lattice Fringe Analysis of High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randy L.; Tomasek, Aaron J.; Street, Kenneth; Thompson, William K.; Hull, David R.

    2003-01-01

    The dimensions of graphitic layer planes directly affect the reactivity of soot towards oxidation and growth. Quantification of graphitic structure could be used to develop and test correlations between the soot nanostructure and its reactivity. Based upon transmission electron microscopy images, this paper provides a demonstration of the robustness of a fringe image analysis code for determining the level of graphitic structure within nanoscale carbon, i.e., soot. Results, in the form of histograms of graphitic layer plane lengths, are compared to their determination through Raman analysis.

  6. Structural defects in GaN revealed by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liliental-Weber, Zuzanna

    2014-09-08

    This paper reviews the various types of structural defects observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy in GaN heteroepitaxial layers grown on foreign substrates and homoepitaxial layers grown on bulk GaN substrates. The structural perfection of these layers is compared to the platelet self-standing crystals grown by High Nitrogen Pressure Solution. Defects in undoped and Mg doped GaN are discussed. Lastly, some models explaining the formation of inversion domains in heavily Mg doped layers that are possible defects responsible for the difficulties of p-doping in GaN are also reviewed.

  7. Visualizing non-equilibrium lithiation of spinel oxide via in situ transmission electron microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    He, Kai; Zhang, Sen; Li, Jing; Yu, Xiqian; Meng, Qingping; Zhu, Yizhou; Hu, Enyuan; Sun, Ke; Yun, Hongseok; Yang, Xiao -Qing; et al

    2016-05-09

    In this study, spinel transition metal oxides are an important class of materials that are being considered as electrodes for lithium-ion batteries, due to their low cost and high theoretical capacity. The lithiation of these compounds is known to undergo a two-step reaction, whereby intercalation and conversion occur in a sequential fashion. These two reactions are known to have distinct reaction dynamics, but it is unclear how the kinetics of these processes affect the overall electrochemical response. Here, we explore the lithiation of nanosized magnetite (Fe3O4) by employing a new strain-sensitive, bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy approach.

  8. Transmission Electron Microscopy Investigation of Krypton Bubbles in Polycrystalline CeO2

    SciTech Connect

    Lingfeng He; Clarissa Yablinsky; Mahima Gupta; Jian Gan; Marquis A. Kirk; Todd R. Allen

    2013-05-01

    To gain an understanding of gas bubble transport in oxide nuclear fuel, this paper uses polycrystalline CeO2, composed of both nanograins and micrograins, as a surrogate material for UO2. The CeO2 was implanted with 150-keV Kr ions up to a dose of 1 x 1016 ions/cm2 at 600 degrees C. Transmission electron microscopy characterizations of small Kr bubbles in nanograin and micrograin regions were compared. The grain boundary acted as an efficient defect sink, as evidenced by smaller bubbles and a lower bubble density in the nanograin region as compared to the micrograin region.

  9. Gas mixing system for imaging of nanomaterials under dynamic environments by environmental transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Akatay, M. Cem; Zvinevich, Yury; Ribeiro, Fabio H. E-mail: estach@bnl.gov; Baumann, Philipp; Stach, Eric A. E-mail: estach@bnl.gov

    2014-03-15

    A gas mixing manifold system that is capable of delivering a stable pressure stream of a desired composition of gases into an environmental transmission electron microscope has been developed. The system is designed to provide a stable imaging environment upon changes of either the composition of the gas mixture or upon switching from one gas to another. The design of the system is described and the response of the pressure inside the microscope, the sample temperature, and sample drift in response to flow and composition changes of the system are reported.

  10. Transmission electron microscopy specimen preparation method for multiphase porous functional ceramics.

    PubMed

    Zhang, W; Kuhn, L Theil; Jørgensen, P S; Thydén, K; Bentzen, J J; Abdellahi, E; Sudireddy, B R; Chen, M; Bowen, J R

    2013-04-01

    An optimum method is proposed to prepare thin foil transmission electron microscopy (TEM) lamellae of multiphase porous functional ceramics: prefilling the pore space of these materials with an epoxy resin prior to focused ion beam milling. Several advantages of epoxy impregnation are demonstrated by successful preparation of TEM specimens that maintain the structural integrity of the entire lamella. Feasibility of the TEM alignment procedure is demonstrated, and ideal TEM analyses are illustrated on solid oxide fuel cell and solid oxide electrolysis cell materials. Some potential drawbacks of the TEM specimen preparation method are listed for other samples.

  11. GHz laser-free time-resolved transmission electron microscopy: A stroboscopic high-duty-cycle method.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiaqi; Ha, Gwanghui; Jing, Chunguang; Baryshev, Sergey V; Reed, Bryan W; Lau, June W; Zhu, Yimei

    2016-02-01

    A device and a method for producing ultrashort electron pulses with GHz repetition rates via pulsing an input direct current (dc) electron beam are provided. The device and the method are based on an electromagnetic-mechanical pulser (EMMP) that consists of a series of transverse deflecting cavities and magnetic quadrupoles. The EMMP modulates and chops the incoming dc electron beam and converts it into pico- and sub-pico-second electron pulse sequences (pulse trains) at >1GHz repetition rates, as well as controllably manipulates the resulting pulses. Ultimately, it leads to negligible electron pulse phase-space degradation compared to the incoming dc beam parameters. The temporal pulse length and repetition rate for the EMMP can be continuously tunable over wide ranges. Applying the EMMP to a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with any dc electron source (e.g. thermionic, Schottky, or field-emission source), a GHz stroboscopic high-duty-cycle TEM can be realized. Unlike in many recent developments in time-resolved TEM that rely on a sample pumping laser paired with a laser launching electrons from a photocathode to probe the sample, there is no laser in the presented experimental set-up. This is expected to be a significant relief for electron microscopists who are not familiar with laser systems. The EMMP and the sample are externally driven by a radiofrequency (RF) source synchronized through a delay line. With no laser pumping the sample, the problem of the pump laser induced residual heating/damaging the sample is eliminated. As many RF-driven processes can be cycled indefinitely, sampling rates of 1-50GHz become accessible. Such a GHz stroboscopic TEM would open up a new paradigm for in situ and in operando experiments to study samples externally driven electromagnetically. Complementary to the lower (MHz) repetition rates experiments enabled by laser photocathode TEM, new experiments in the multi-GHz regime will be enabled by the proposed RF design

  12. Thermal imaging for assessment of electron-beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) additive manufacturing deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalameda, Joseph N.; Burke, Eric R.; Hafley, Robert A.; Taminger, Karen M.; Domack, Christopher S.; Brewer, Amy; Martin, Richard E.

    2013-05-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapidly growing field where 3-dimensional parts can be produced layer by layer. NASA's electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3) technology is being evaluated to manufacture metallic parts in a space environment. The benefits of EBF3 technology are weight savings to support space missions, rapid prototyping in a zero gravity environment, and improved vehicle readiness. The EBF3 system is composed of 3 main components: electron beam gun, multi-axis position system, and metallic wire feeder. The electron beam is used to melt the wire and the multi-axis positioning system is used to build the part layer by layer. To insure a quality deposit, a near infrared (NIR) camera is used to image the melt pool and solidification areas. This paper describes the calibration and application of a NIR camera for temperature measurement. In addition, image processing techniques are presented for deposit assessment metrics.

  13. Analysis of catalytic gas products using electron energy-loss spectroscopy and residual gas analysis for operando transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Benjamin K; Crozier, Peter A

    2014-06-01

    Operando transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of catalytic reactions requires that the gas composition inside the TEM be known during the in situ reaction. Two techniques for measuring gas composition inside the environmental TEM are described and compared here. First, electron energy-loss spectroscopy, both in the low-loss and core-loss regions of the spectrum was utilized. The data were quantified using a linear combination of reference spectra from individual gasses to fit a mixture spectrum. Mass spectrometry using a residual gas analyzer was also used to quantify the gas inside the environmental cell. Both electron energy-loss spectroscopy and residual gas analysis were applied simultaneously to a known 50/50 mixture of CO and CO2, so the results from the two techniques could be compared and evaluated. An operando TEM experiment was performed using a Ru catalyst supported on silica spheres and loaded into the TEM on a specially developed porous pellet TEM sample. Both techniques were used to monitor the conversion of CO to CO2 over the catalyst, while simultaneous atomic resolution imaging of the catalyst was performed.

  14. Strain mapping at the nanoscale using precession electron diffraction in transmission electron microscope with off axis camera

    SciTech Connect

    Vigouroux, M. P.; Delaye, V.; Bernier, N.; Lafond, D.; Audoit, G.; Bertin, F.; Cipro, R.; Baron, T.; Martin, M.; Rouvière, J. L.; Chenevier, B.

    2014-11-10

    Precession electron diffraction is an efficient technique to measure strain in nanostructures by precessing the electron beam, while maintaining a few nanometre probe size. Here, we show that an advanced diffraction pattern treatment allows reproducible and precise strain measurements to be obtained using a default 512 × 512 DigiSTAR off-axis camera both in advanced or non-corrected transmission electron microscopes. This treatment consists in both projective geometry correction of diffraction pattern distortions and strain Delaunay triangulation based analysis. Precision in the strain measurement is improved and reached 2.7 × 10{sup −4} with a probe size approaching 4.2 nm in diameter. This method is applied to the study of the strain state in InGaAs quantum-well (QW) devices elaborated on Si substrate. Results show that the GaAs/Si mismatch does not induce in-plane strain fluctuations in the InGaAs QW region.

  15. Switching behaviour of individual Ag-TCNQ nanowires: an in situ transmission electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ran, Ke; Rösner, Benedikt; Butz, Benjamin; Fink, Rainer H; Spiecker, Erdmann

    2016-10-21

    The organic semiconductor silver-tetracyanoquinodimethane (Ag-TCNQ) exhibits electrical switching and memory characteristics. Employing a scanning tunnelling microscopy setup inside a transmission electron microscope, the switching behaviour of individual Ag-TCNQ nanowires (NWs) is investigated in detail. For a large number of NWs, the switching between a high (OFF) and a low (ON) resistance state was successfully stimulated by negative bias sweeps. Fitting the experimental I-V curves with a Schottky emission function makes the switching features prominent and thus enables a direct evaluation of the switching process. A memory cycle including writing, reading and erasing features is demonstrated at an individual NW. Moreover, electronic failure mechanisms due to Joule heating are discussed. These findings have a significant impact on our understanding of the switching behaviour of Ag-TCNQ. PMID:27622904

  16. The Microstructure of Cellulose Nanocrystal Aerogels as Revealed by Transmission Electron Microscope Tomography.

    PubMed

    Buesch, Christian; Smith, Sean W; Eschbach, Peter; Conley, John F; Simonsen, John

    2016-09-12

    The microstructure of highly porous cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels is investigated via transmission electron microscope (TEM) tomography. The aerogels were fabricated by first supercritically drying a carboxylated CNC organogel and then coating via atomic layer deposition with a thin conformal layer of Al2O3 to protect the CNCs against prolonged electron beam exposure. A series of images was then acquired, reconstructed, and segmented in order to generate a three-dimensional (3D) model of the aerogel. The model agrees well with theory and macroscopic measurements, indicating that a thin conformal inorganic coating enables TEM tomography as an analysis tool for microstructure characterization of CNC aerogels. The 3D model also reveals that the aerogels consist of randomly orientated CNCs that attach to one another primarily in three ways: end to end contact, "T″ contact, and "X″ contact.

  17. In situ transmission electron microscopy of solid-liquid phase transition of silica encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jianjun; Hong, Yan; Muratore, Chris; Su, Ming; Voevodin, Andrey A.

    2011-09-01

    The solid-liquid phase transition of silica encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles was studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nanoparticles were prepared by a two-step chemical synthesis process involving thermal decomposition of organometallic precursors for nucleating bismuth and a sol-gel process for growing silica. The microstructural and chemical analyses of the nanoparticles were performed using high-resolution TEM, Z-contrast imaging, focused ion beam milling, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. Solid-liquid-solid phase transitions of the nanoparticles were directly recorded by electron diffractions and TEM images. The silica encapsulation of the nanoparticles prevented agglomeration and allowed particles to preserve their original volume upon melting, which is desirable for applications of phase change nanoparticles with consistently repeatable thermal properties.

  18. In situ transmission electron microscopy of solid-liquid phase transition of silica encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianjun; Hong, Yan; Muratore, Chris; Su, Ming; Voevodin, Andrey A

    2011-09-01

    The solid-liquid phase transition of silica encapsulated bismuth nanoparticles was studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The nanoparticles were prepared by a two-step chemical synthesis process involving thermal decomposition of organometallic precursors for nucleating bismuth and a sol-gel process for growing silica. The microstructural and chemical analyses of the nanoparticles were performed using high-resolution TEM, Z-contrast imaging, focused ion beam milling, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy. Solid-liquid-solid phase transitions of the nanoparticles were directly recorded by electron diffractions and TEM images. The silica encapsulation of the nanoparticles prevented agglomeration and allowed particles to preserve their original volume upon melting, which is desirable for applications of phase change nanoparticles with consistently repeatable thermal properties.

  19. Localization and preparation of recombination-active extended defects for transmission electron microscopy analysis.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, M A; Schuhmann, H; Seibt, M; Radisch, V

    2010-06-01

    Recombination-active extended defects in semiconductors frequently occur at a low density which makes their structural and chemical analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques virtually impossible. Here an approach is described that uses in situ electron beam induced current (EBIC) in a focused ion beam machine to localize such defects for TEM lamella preparation. As an example, a defect complex occurring in block-cast multicrystalline silicon with a density of less than 10(4) cm(-3) has been prepared and analyzed by TEM. The chemical sensitivity of the technique is estimated to be about 10(13) atoms cm(-2) which is comparable to synchrotron-based x-ray techniques. The localization accuracy of the TEM lamella is shown to be better than 50 nm when low-energy EBIC is used.

  20. Switching behaviour of individual Ag-TCNQ nanowires: an in situ transmission electron microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ran, Ke; Rösner, Benedikt; Butz, Benjamin; Fink, Rainer H.; Spiecker, Erdmann

    2016-10-01

    The organic semiconductor silver-tetracyanoquinodimethane (Ag-TCNQ) exhibits electrical switching and memory characteristics. Employing a scanning tunnelling microscopy setup inside a transmission electron microscope, the switching behaviour of individual Ag-TCNQ nanowires (NWs) is investigated in detail. For a large number of NWs, the switching between a high (OFF) and a low (ON) resistance state was successfully stimulated by negative bias sweeps. Fitting the experimental I-V curves with a Schottky emission function makes the switching features prominent and thus enables a direct evaluation of the switching process. A memory cycle including writing, reading and erasing features is demonstrated at an individual NW. Moreover, electronic failure mechanisms due to Joule heating are discussed. These findings have a significant impact on our understanding of the switching behaviour of Ag-TCNQ.

  1. Transmission electron microscopy study on ion-beam-synthesized amorphous Fe-Si thin layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naito, Muneyuki; Ishimaru, Manabu; Hirotsu, Yoshihiko; Valdez, James A.; Sickafus, Kurt E.

    2005-12-01

    Ion-beam-synthesized amorphous Fe-Si thin layers have been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in combination with imaging plate techniques. Si single crystals with a (111) orientation were irradiated with 120keV Fe+ ions to a fluence of 4.0×1017cm-2 at cryogenic temperature (120K). Cross-sectional TEM observations indicated the formation of an amorphous bilayer on the topmost layer of the Si substrate. It was found that the upper layer is an amorphous Fe-Si with the composition, in terms of atomic ratio, of Fe /Si ˜1/2, while the lower one is an amorphous Si. Atomic pair-distribution functions extracted from microbeam electron diffraction patterns revealed that the nature of short-range order in amorphous Fe-Si thin layer can be well described by the atomic arrangements of crystalline iron silicides.

  2. The structure of Escherichia coli signal recognition particle revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mainprize, Iain L; Beniac, Daniel R; Falkovskaia, Elena; Cleverley, Robert M; Gierasch, Lila M; Ottensmeyer, F Peter; Andrews, David W

    2006-12-01

    Structural studies on various domains of the ribonucleoprotein signal recognition particle (SRP) have not converged on a single complete structure of bacterial SRP consistent with the biochemistry of the particle. We obtained a three-dimensional structure for Escherichia coli SRP by cryoscanning transmission electron microscopy and mapped the internal RNA by electron spectroscopic imaging. Crystallographic data were fit into the SRP reconstruction, and although the resulting model differed from previous models, they could be rationalized by movement through an interdomain linker of Ffh, the protein component of SRP. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments determined interdomain distances that were consistent with our model of SRP. Docking our model onto the bacterial ribosome suggests a mechanism for signal recognition involving interdomain movement of Ffh into and out of the nascent chain exit site and suggests how SRP could interact and/or compete with the ribosome-bound chaperone, trigger factor, for a nascent chain during translation.

  3. The Microstructure of Cellulose Nanocrystal Aerogels as Revealed by Transmission Electron Microscope Tomography.

    PubMed

    Buesch, Christian; Smith, Sean W; Eschbach, Peter; Conley, John F; Simonsen, John

    2016-09-12

    The microstructure of highly porous cellulose nanocrystal (CNC) aerogels is investigated via transmission electron microscope (TEM) tomography. The aerogels were fabricated by first supercritically drying a carboxylated CNC organogel and then coating via atomic layer deposition with a thin conformal layer of Al2O3 to protect the CNCs against prolonged electron beam exposure. A series of images was then acquired, reconstructed, and segmented in order to generate a three-dimensional (3D) model of the aerogel. The model agrees well with theory and macroscopic measurements, indicating that a thin conformal inorganic coating enables TEM tomography as an analysis tool for microstructure characterization of CNC aerogels. The 3D model also reveals that the aerogels consist of randomly orientated CNCs that attach to one another primarily in three ways: end to end contact, "T″ contact, and "X″ contact. PMID:27500897

  4. Detection of pharmaceutical crystals in polymer particles by transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricarte, Ralm; Hillmyer, Marc; Lodge, Timothy

    2015-03-01

    The use of solid dispersions, blends of an active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and a polymer excipient, may significantly enhance the dissolution performance of a poorly water soluble drug. However, the polymer's role in inhibiting API crystallization within the solid dispersion is not well understood. One of the main challenges in elucidating this mechanism is the difficulty of detecting small amounts of API crystals (less than 5 volume percent) within the polymer matrix. In this work, we explore the use of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize the crystallinity of griseofulvin (GF) in hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate (HPMCAS) solid dispersions. Using both real-space images and electron diffraction patterns from TEM, GF crystals in the HPMCAS matrix were unambiguously identified with nanometer resolution and with a crystal detection sensitivity superior to both wide-angle X-ray scattering and differential scanning calorimetry. TEM shows great potential for characterizing even trace API crystallinity in solid polymeric dispersions.

  5. High contrast hollow-cone dark field transmission electron microscopy for nanocrystalline grain size quantification.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bo; Sun, Tik; Warren, Andrew; Heinrich, Helge; Barmak, Katayun; Coffey, Kevin R

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we describe hollow-cone dark field (HCDF) transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging, with a slightly convergent beam, as an improved technique that is suitable to form high contrast micrographs for nanocrystalline grain size quantification. We also examine the various factors that influence the HCDF TEM image quality, including the conditions of microscopy (alignment, focus and objective aperture size), the properties of the materials imaged (e.g., atomic number, strain, defects), and the characteristics of the TEM sample itself (e.g., thickness, ion milling artifacts). Sample preparation was found to be critical and an initial thinning by wet etching of the substrate (for thin film samples) or tripod polishing (for bulk samples), followed by low-angle ion milling was found to be the preferred approach for preparing high-quality electron transparent samples for HCDF imaging. PMID:20018512

  6. Dendritic gold nanowire growth observed in liquid with transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Tobias; de Jonge, Niels

    2013-07-01

    The growth of nanoscale gold dendrites was studied in situ in a thin liquid film with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using a liquid cell with silicon nitride (SiN) windows. Gold nanoparticle seeds were covered by a thin liquid layer containing precursor solution. Dendrite nucleation was induced by the electron beam leading to an initial burst of growth. The growth then settled at tip velocities between 0.1 and 2.0 nm/s for different dendrites. Tip velocities fluctuated as different dendrite geometries grew from the tips. Those dendrites showing granularities in their structure experienced the largest growth speed. Comparison of the observed velocities with diffusion-limited growth rates suggests that dendrite growth in thin films at this scale is limited by diffusion. The described method may find application in research on the mechanisms behind dendrite growth and also to study other types of anisotropic growth of nanomaterials driven by crystal and twin geometries.

  7. Development of a fast electromagnetic beam blanker for compressed sensing in scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béché, A.; Goris, B.; Freitag, B.; Verbeeck, J.

    2016-02-01

    The concept of compressed sensing was recently proposed to significantly reduce the electron dose in scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) while still maintaining the main features in the image. Here, an experimental setup based on an electromagnetic beam blanker placed in the condenser plane of a STEM is proposed. The beam blanker deflects the beam with a random pattern, while the scanning coils are moving the beam in the usual scan pattern. Experimental images at both the medium scale and high resolution are acquired and reconstructed based on a discrete cosine algorithm. The obtained results confirm that compressed sensing is highly attractive to limit beam damage in experimental STEM even though some remaining artifacts need to be resolved.

  8. On the optical stability of high-resolution transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Barthel, J; Thust, A

    2013-11-01

    In the recent two decades the technique of high-resolution transmission electron microscopy experienced an unprecedented progress through the introduction of hardware aberration correctors and by the improvement of the achievable resolution to the sub-Ångström level. The important aspect that aberration correction at a given resolution requires also a well defined amount of optical stability has received little attention so far. Therefore we investigate the qualification of a variety of high-resolution electron microscopes to maintain an aberration corrected optical state in terms of an optical lifetime. We develop a comprehensive statistical framework for the estimation of the optical lifetime and find remarkably low values between tens of seconds and a couple of minutes. Probability curves are introduced, which inform the operator about the chance to work still in the fully aberration corrected state.

  9. Image transfer with spatial coherence for aberration corrected transmission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Fumio; Sawada, Hidetaka; Shinkawa, Takao; Sannomiya, Takumi

    2016-08-01

    The formula of spatial coherence involving an aberration up to six-fold astigmatism is derived for aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Transfer functions for linear imaging are calculated using the newly derived formula with several residual aberrations. Depending on the symmetry and origin of an aberration, the calculated transfer function shows characteristic symmetries. The aberrations that originate from the field's components, having uniformity along the z direction, namely, the n-fold astigmatism, show rotational symmetric damping of the coherence. The aberrations that originate from the field's derivatives with respect to z, such as coma, star, and three lobe, show non-rotational symmetric damping. It is confirmed that the odd-symmetric wave aberrations have influences on the attenuation of an image via spatial coherence. Examples of image simulations of haemoglobin and Si [211] are shown by using the spatial coherence for an aberration-corrected electron microscope.

  10. Unscrambling Mixed Elements using High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Bos, Karel H. W.; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T.; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Nellist, Peter D.; Van Aert, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    The development of new nanocrystals with outstanding physicochemical properties requires a full three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale. For homogeneous nanocrystals, counting the number of atoms in each atomic column from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images has been shown to be a successful technique to get access to this 3D information. However, technologically important nanostructures often consist of more than one chemical element. In order to extend atom counting to heterogeneous materials, a new atomic lensing model is presented. This model takes dynamical electron diffraction into account and opens up new possibilities for unraveling the 3D composition at the atomic scale. Here, the method is applied to determine the 3D structure of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods, but it is applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous complex nanostructures.

  11. Switching behaviour of individual Ag-TCNQ nanowires: an in situ transmission electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Ran, Ke; Rösner, Benedikt; Butz, Benjamin; Fink, Rainer H; Spiecker, Erdmann

    2016-10-21

    The organic semiconductor silver-tetracyanoquinodimethane (Ag-TCNQ) exhibits electrical switching and memory characteristics. Employing a scanning tunnelling microscopy setup inside a transmission electron microscope, the switching behaviour of individual Ag-TCNQ nanowires (NWs) is investigated in detail. For a large number of NWs, the switching between a high (OFF) and a low (ON) resistance state was successfully stimulated by negative bias sweeps. Fitting the experimental I-V curves with a Schottky emission function makes the switching features prominent and thus enables a direct evaluation of the switching process. A memory cycle including writing, reading and erasing features is demonstrated at an individual NW. Moreover, electronic failure mechanisms due to Joule heating are discussed. These findings have a significant impact on our understanding of the switching behaviour of Ag-TCNQ.

  12. Accurate Nanoscale Crystallography in Real-Space Using Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Dycus, J Houston; Harris, Joshua S; Sang, Xiahan; Fancher, Chris M; Findlay, Scott D; Oni, Adedapo A; Chan, Tsung-Ta E; Koch, Carl C; Jones, Jacob L; Allen, Leslie J; Irving, Douglas L; LeBeau, James M

    2015-08-01

    Here, we report reproducible and accurate measurement of crystallographic parameters using scanning transmission electron microscopy. This is made possible by removing drift and residual scan distortion. We demonstrate real-space lattice parameter measurements with <0.1% error for complex-layered chalcogenides Bi2Te3, Bi2Se3, and a Bi2Te2.7Se0.3 nanostructured alloy. Pairing the technique with atomic resolution spectroscopy, we connect local structure with chemistry and bonding. Combining these results with density functional theory, we show that the incorporation of Se into Bi2Te3 causes charge redistribution that anomalously increases the van der Waals gap between building blocks of the layered structure. The results show that atomic resolution imaging with electrons can accurately and robustly quantify crystallography at the nanoscale.

  13. Mass mapping of large globin complexes by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wall, Joseph S; Simon, Martha N; Lin, Beth Y; Vinogradov, Serge N

    2008-01-01

    Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) of unstained, freeze-dried biological macromolecules in the dark-field mode provides an image based on the number of electrons elastically scattered by the constituent atoms of the macromolecule. The image of each isolated particle provides information about the projected structure of the latter, and its integrated intensity is directly related to the mass of the selected particle. Particle images can be sorted by shape, providing independent histograms of mass to study assembly/disassembly intermediates. STEM is optimized for low-dose imaging and is suitable for accurate measurement of particle masses over the range from about 30 kDa to 1,000 MDa. This article describes the details of the method developed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory STEM facility and illustrates its application to the mass mapping of large globin complexes.

  14. Unscrambling Mixed Elements using High Angle Annular Dark Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    van den Bos, Karel H W; De Backer, Annick; Martinez, Gerardo T; Winckelmans, Naomi; Bals, Sara; Nellist, Peter D; Van Aert, Sandra

    2016-06-17

    The development of new nanocrystals with outstanding physicochemical properties requires a full three-dimensional (3D) characterization at the atomic scale. For homogeneous nanocrystals, counting the number of atoms in each atomic column from high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy images has been shown to be a successful technique to get access to this 3D information. However, technologically important nanostructures often consist of more than one chemical element. In order to extend atom counting to heterogeneous materials, a new atomic lensing model is presented. This model takes dynamical electron diffraction into account and opens up new possibilities for unraveling the 3D composition at the atomic scale. Here, the method is applied to determine the 3D structure of Au@Ag core-shell nanorods, but it is applicable to a wide range of heterogeneous complex nanostructures.

  15. Cellulose Nanocrystals as Chiral Inducers: Enantioselective Catalysis and Transmission Electron Microscopy 3D Characterization.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Madhu; Basu, Kaustuv; Benoit, Charles; Cirtiu, Ciprian M; Vali, Hojatollah; Moores, Audrey

    2015-05-20

    Cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs), derived from cellulose, provide us with an opportunity to devise more sustainable solutions to current technological challenges. Enantioselective catalysis, especially heterogeneous, is the preferred method for the synthesis of pure chiral molecules in the fine chemical industries. Cellulose has been long sought as a chiral inducer in enantioselective catalysis. We report herein an unprecedentedly high enantiomeric excess (ee) for Pd patches deposited onto CNCs used as catalysts for the hydrogenation of prochiral ketones in water at room temperature and 4 bar H2. Our system, where CNCs acted as support and sole chiral source, achieved an ee of 65% with 100% conversions. Cryo-electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and tomography were used for the first time to study the 3D structure of a metal functionalized CNC hybrid. It established the presence of sub-nanometer-thick Pd patches at the surface of CNCs and provided insight into the chiral induction mechanism.

  16. Investigation of diesel ash particulate matter: A scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liati, A.; Dimopoulos Eggenschwiler, P.; Müller Gubler, E.; Schreiber, D.; Aguirre, M.

    2012-03-01

    Investigation of ash PM deposited in a diesel particulate filter (DPF) operating on a light truck by means of SEM and TEM reveals the following: ash inside the DPF occurs in form of chemically very inhomogeneous, mostly brittle agglomerates accumulated at the plugged ends of inlet channels and deposited directly on the inlet channel walls all along the filter length. Ash agglomerates occur within pores of the channel walls. A minor part of ash PM may escape to the atmosphere. The individual ash phases are mostly crystalline with round outlines and sizes between ca. 170 and 60 nm, down to 7-12 nm, that is far below the breathable size range PM10. Aggregation of the predominantly finest fraction of ash particles leads to densification, which may translate to fewer breakouts from the DPF. EDX mapping and chemical analyses of the bulk ash reveal that ash consists mainly of Ca, Mg, P, Zn, S, O and minor Fe, Al and Si. Based on TEM diffraction data of ash single phases, combined with data on their chemistry, the diversity of ash phases is higher than previously presumed. Comparison with the ash particles of a heavily used DPF from a passenger car operating with Fe-based fuel-borne additives reveals characteristics very similar to those found for the light truck DPF with a tendency to generally lower sizes of the participating phases, mostly between 30 and 60 nm. 4-40 nm large, locally abundant Pt particles deriving from the coating material of the diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) upstream the DPF occur within ash agglomerates of both DPFs. Ash collected from the exhaust gas at the exit of the light truck DPF under normal engine operation reveals that some fine particles, as well as a few of the larger (200-600 nm) ash-bearing agglomerates escape filtration. Very fine ash particles are reaching the atmosphere also attached onto soot agglomerates.

  17. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials.

    PubMed

    Agudo Jácome, L; Eggeler, G; Dlouhý, A

    2012-11-01

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects. PMID:22982351

  18. High resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization of a milled oxide dispersion strengthened steel powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loyer-Prost, M.; Merot, J.-S.; Ribis, J.; Le Bouar, Y.; Chaffron, L.; Legendre, F.

    2016-10-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) steels are promising materials for generation IV fuel claddings as their dense nano-oxide dispersion provides good creep and irradiation resistance. Even if they have been studied for years, the formation mechanism of these nano-oxides is still unclear. Here we report for the first time a High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy and Energy Filtered Transmission Electron Microscopy characterization of an ODS milled powder. It provides clear evidence of the presence of small crystalline nanoclusters (NCs) enriched in titanium directly after milling. Small NCs (<5 nm) have a crystalline structure and seem partly coherent with the matrix. They have an interplanar spacing close to the (011) bcc iron structure. They coexist with larger crystalline spherical precipitates of 15-20 nm in size. Their crystalline structure may be metastable as they are not consistent with any Y-Ti-O or Ti-O structure. Such detailed observations in the as-milled grain powder confirm a mechanism of Y, Ti, O dissolution in the ferritic matrix followed by a NC precipitation during the mechanical alloying process of ODS materials.

  19. A high-efficiency power and data transmission system for biomedical implanted electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamici, Zoubir; Itti, Roland; Champier, Jacques

    1996-02-01

    In biomedical engineering, inductive transcutaneous links can be used for power and data transfer between external systems and implanted electronic devices. The development of a micro-telemeter having a significant implantation depth needs a high-efficiency magnetic transcutaneous link. This paper presents a new system, which uses a multi-frequency load network for transmitter coil based on the class E power amplifier. At the carrier frequency used, the resistive load is influenced by the coupling of the coils and by the variation of the implant equivalent resistance. Modulating this latter between two rails permits one to modulate the amplitude of the external transmitter current and then to transmit internal data without the use of the classical implanted emitter design. Furthermore, the fact that the modulation index depends on the coupling factor, allows one to find the external coil's correct position using a position feedback loop. A complete study of the concept of digital data transmission by impedance modulation associated with a class E power amplifier is presented. Internal data transmission using this system yields a decrease of the internal electronic circuitry bulk and constitutes a high-efficiency energizing device. A theoretical investigation shows that the efficiency of the power transfer varies between 44 and 75% within a wide range of implantation depths (20 - 40 mm).

  20. Advanced scanning transmission stereo electron microscopy of structural and functional engineering materials.

    PubMed

    Agudo Jácome, L; Eggeler, G; Dlouhý, A

    2012-11-01

    Stereo transmission electron microscopy (TEM) provides a 3D impression of the microstructure in a thin TEM foil. It allows to perform depth and TEM foil thickness measurements and to decide whether a microstructural feature lies inside of a thin foil or on its surface. It allows appreciating the true three-dimensional nature of dislocation configurations. In the present study we first review some basic elements of classical stereo TEM. We then show how the method can be extended by working in the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) mode of a modern analytical 200 kV TEM equipped with a field emission gun (FEG TEM) and a high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector. We combine two micrographs of a stereo pair into one anaglyph. When viewed with special colored glasses the anaglyph provides a direct and realistic 3D impression of the microstructure. Three examples are provided which demonstrate the potential of this extended stereo TEM technique: a single crystal Ni-base superalloy, a 9% Chromium tempered martensite ferritic steel and a NiTi shape memory alloy. We consider the effect of camera length, show how foil thicknesses can be measured, and discuss the depth of focus and surface effects.

  1. Assessing the structure and function of single biomolecules with scanning transmission electron and atomic force microscopes.

    PubMed

    Müller, Shirley A; Müller, Daniel J; Engel, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    The scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) and the atomic force microscope (AFM) have provided a wealth of useful information on a wide variety of biological structures. These instruments have in common that they raster-scan a probe over a sample and are able to address single molecules. In the STEM the probe is a focused electron beam that is deflected by the scan-coils. Detectors collecting the scattered electrons provide quantitative information for each sub-nanometer sized sample volume irradiated. These electron scattering data can be reconstituted to images of single macromolecules or can be integrated to provide the mass of the macromolecules. Samples need to be dehydrated for such quantitative STEM imaging. In contrast, the AFM raster-scans a sharp tip over a sample surface submerged in a buffer solution to acquire information on the sample's surface topography at sub-nanometer resolution. Direct observation of function-related structural changes induced by variation of temperature, pH, ionic strength, and applied force provides insight into the structure-function relationship of macromolecules. Further, the AFM allows single molecules to be addressed and quantitatively unfolded using the tip as nano-tweezers. The performance of these two scanning probe approaches is illustrated by several examples including the chaperonin GroEL, bacterial surface layers, protein crystals, and bacterial appendices.

  2. Ultrastructural analysis of testicular tissue and sperm by transmission and scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chemes, Hector E

    2013-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies have provided the basis for an in-depth understanding of the cell biology and normal functioning of the testis and male gametes and have opened the way to characterize the functional role played by specific organelles in spermatogenesis and sperm function. The development of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) extended these boundaries to the recognition of cell and organ surface features and the architectural array of cells and tissues. The merging of immunocytochemical and histochemical approaches with electron microscopy has completed a series of technical improvements that integrate structural and functional features to provide a broad understanding of cell biology in health and disease. With these advances the detailed study of the intricate structural and molecular organization as well as the chemical composition of cellular organelles is now possible. Immunocytochemistry is used to identify proteins or other components and localize them in specific cells or organelles with high specificity and sensitivity, and histochemistry can be used to understand their function (i.e., enzyme activity). When these techniques are used in conjunction with electron microscopy their resolving power is further increased to subcellular levels. In the present chapter we will describe in detail various ultrastructural techniques that are now available for basic or translational research in reproductive biology and reproductive medicine. These include TEM, ultrastructural immunocytochemistry, ultrastructural histochemistry, and SEM.

  3. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy Modulation of Transport in Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) electronic transport measurements in nanoscale systems have been previously confined to two-electrode configurations. Here, we use the focused electron beam of a TEM to fabricate a three-electrode geometry from a continuous 2D material where the third electrode operates as side gate in a field-effect transistor configuration. Specifically, we demonstrate TEM nanosculpting of freestanding graphene sheets into graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) with proximal graphene side gates, together with in situ TEM transport measurements of the resulting GNRs, whose conductance is modulated by the side-gate potential. The TEM electron beam displaces carbon atoms from the graphene sheet, and its position is controlled with nanometer precision, allowing the fabrication of GNRs of desired width immediately prior to each transport measurement. We also model the corresponding electric field profile in this three-terminal geometry. The implementation of an in situ TEM three-terminal platform shown here further extends the use of a TEM for device characterization. This approach can be easily generalized for the investigation of other nanoscale systems (2D materials, nanowires, and single molecules) requiring the correlation of transport and atomic structure. PMID:27010816

  4. Development of Parallel Image Detection System Using Annular Pupils for Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Matsutani, Takaomi; Taya, Masaki; Ikuta, Takashi; Tanaka, Takeo; Kimura, Yoshihide; Takai, Yoshizo; Kawasaki, Tadahiro; Ichihashi, Mikio

    2010-10-13

    A parallel image detection system using an annular pupil for electron optics were developed to realize an increase in the depth of focus, aberration-free imaging and separation of amplitude and phase images under scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Apertures for annular pupils able to suppress high-energy electron scattering were developed using a focused ion beam (FIB) technique. The annular apertures were designed with outer diameter of oe 40 {mu}m and inner diameter of oe32 {mu}m. A taper angle varying from 20 deg. to 1 deg. was applied to the slits of the annular apertures to suppress the influence of high-energy electron scattering. Each azimuth angle image on scintillator was detected by a multi-anode photomultiplier tube assembly through 40 optical fibers bundled in a ring shape. To focus the image appearing on the scintillator on optical fibers, an optical lens relay system attached with CCD camera was developed. The system enables the taking of 40 images simultaneously from different scattered directions.

  5. The probe profile and lateral resolution of scanning transmission electron microscopy of thick specimens.

    PubMed

    Demers, Hendrix; Ramachandra, Ranjan; Drouin, Dominique; de Jonge, Niels

    2012-06-01

    Lateral profiles of the electron probe of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) were simulated at different vertical positions in a micrometers-thick carbon sample. The simulations were carried out using the Monte Carlo method in CASINO software. A model was developed to fit the probe profiles. The model consisted of the sum of a Gaussian function describing the central peak of the profile and two exponential decay functions describing the tail of the profile. Calculations were performed to investigate the fraction of unscattered electrons as a function of the vertical position of the probe in the sample. Line scans were also simulated over gold nanoparticles at the bottom of a carbon film to calculate the achievable resolution as a function of the sample thickness and the number of electrons. The resolution was shown to be noise limited for film thicknesses less than 1 μm. Probe broadening limited the resolution for thicker films. The validity of the simulation method was verified by comparing simulated data with experimental data. The simulation method can be used as quantitative method to predict STEM performance or to interpret STEM images of thick specimens.

  6. The heterogeneous composition of working place aerosols in a nickel refinery: a transmission and scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Weinbruch, Stephan; van Aken, Peter; Ebert, Martin; Thomassen, Yngvar; Skogstad, Asbjørn; Chashchin, Valery P; Nikonov, Alexander

    2002-06-01

    Size, morphology and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles collected in a nickel refinery were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). The phase composition was determined by selected area electron diffraction and EDX in a transmission electron microscope. Most particles are heterogeneous on a nanometer scale and consist of various phases. Nickel phases observed in the roasting and anode casting departments include metallic nickel, bunsenite (NiO), trevorite (Ni,Cu)Fe2O4, heazlewoodite Ni3S2, godlevskite (Ni,Cu)9S8, orthorhombic NiSO4 and an amorphous Ni,Cu.Al,Pb sulfate of variable composition. Additional phases encountered include corundum (Al2O3), murdochite (PbCu6O8), hexagonal Na2SO4, anhydrite (CaSO4), graphite (C) and amorphous carbon. The implications of the occurrence of the different Ni phases and their nanometer size for the study of adverse health effects are explored. PMID:12094927

  7. Computer Simulation of High Resolution Transmission Electron Micrographs: Theory and Analysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilaas, Roar

    Computer simulation of electron micrographs is an invaluable aid in their proper interpretation and in defining optimum conditions for obtaining images experimentally. Since modern instruments are capable of atomic resolution, simulation techniques employing high precision are required. This thesis makes contributions to four specific areas of this field. First, the validity of a new method for simulating high resolution electron microscope images has been critically examined. This method, which has been termed the real space method (RSP) since the entire calculation is performed without any Fourier transforms, offers a considerable reduction in computing time over the conventional multislice approach when identical sampling conditions are employed. However, for the same level of accuracy the real space method requires more sampling points and more computing time than the conventional multislice method. These characteristics are illustrated with calculated results using both methods to identify practical limitations. Second, three different methods for computing scattering amplitudes in High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) have been investigated as to their ability to include upper Laue layer (ULL) interaction. The conventional first order multislice method using fast Fourier transform (FFT) and the second order multislice (SOM) method are shown to yield calculated intensities of first order Laue reflections with the use of slice thicknesses smaller than the crystal periodicity along the incident electron beam direction. It is argued that the calculated intensities of ULL reflections approach the correct values in the limiting case of vanishing slice thickness and electron wavelength. The third method, the improved phasegrating method (IPG) does also in principle include ULL effects, but is severely limited as to choice of slice thickness and sampling interval. A practical way to use slice thicknesses less than the crystal periodicity along the

  8. Dynamic Processes in Biology, Chemistry, and Materials Science: Opportunities for UltraFast Transmission Electron Microscopy - Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kabius, Bernd C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Diehl, Barbara L.; Stach, Eric A.

    2012-07-25

    mission. This workshop built on previous workshops and included three breakout sessions identifying scientific challenges in biology, biogeochemistry, catalysis, and materials science frontier areas of fundamental science that underpin energy and environmental science that would significantly benefit from ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM). In addition, the current status of time-resolved electron microscopy was examined, and the technologies that will enable future advances in spatio-temporal resolution were identified in a fourth breakout session.

  9. Measurement of vibrational spectrum of liquid using monochromated scanning transmission electron microscopy-electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Tomohiro; Fukuyama, Mao; Hibara, Akihide; Okunishi, Eiji; Mukai, Masaki; Mizoguchi, Teruyasu

    2014-10-01

    Investigations on the dynamic behavior of molecules in liquids at high spatial resolution are greatly desired because localized regions, such as solid-liquid interfaces or sites of reacting molecules, have assumed increasing importance with respect to improving material performance. In application to liquids, electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) observed with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a promising analytical technique with the appropriate resolutions. In this study, we obtained EELS spectra from an ionic liquid, 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethyl-sulfonyl) imide (C2mim-TFSI), chosen as the sampled liquid, using monochromated scanning TEM (STEM). The molecular vibrational spectrum and the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO)-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) gap of the liquid were investigated. The HOMO-LUMO gap measurement coincided with that obtained from the ultraviolet-visible spectrum. A shoulder in the spectrum observed ∼0.4 eV is believed to originate from the molecular vibration. From a separately performed infrared observation and first-principles calculations, we found that this shoulder coincided with the vibrational peak attributed to the C-H stretching vibration of the [C2mim(+)] cation. This study demonstrates that a vibrational peak for a liquid can be observed using monochromated STEM-EELS, and leads one to expect observations of chemical reactions or aids in the analysis of the dynamic behavior of molecules in liquid.

  10. Properties of Inconel 625 Mesh Structures Grown by Electron Beam Additive Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    List III, Frederick Alyious; Dehoff, Ryan R; Lowe, Larry E; Sames, William J

    2014-01-01

    Relationships between electron beam parameters (beam current, beam speed, and beam focus) and physical properties (mass, diameter, elastic modulus, and yield strength) have been investigated for Inconel 625 mesh cubes fabricated using an additive manufacturing technology based on electron beam melting. The elastic modulus and yield strength of the mesh cubes have been systematically varied by approximately a factor of ten by changing the electron beam parameters. Simple models have been used to understand better these relationships. Structural anisotropies of the mesh associated with the layered build architecture have been observed and may contribute, along with microstructural anisotropies, to the anisotropic mechanical properties of the mesh. Knowledge of this kind is likely applicable to other metal and alloy systems and is essential to rapidly realize the full potential of this burgeoning technology.

  11. Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Lupini, Andrew R; Borisevich, Albina Y; Cullen, David A; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-08-25

    The highly energetic electron beam (e-beam) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can induce local changes in the state of matter, ranging from knock-on and atomic movement, to amorphization/crystallization, and to localized chemical/electrochemical reactions. To date, fundamental studies of e-beam induced phenomena and practical applications have been limited by conventional STEM e-beam rastering modes that allow only for uniform e-beam exposures. Here, an automated liquid phase nanolithography method has been developed that enables the direct writing of nanometer scaled features within microfabricated liquid cells. An external e-beam control system, connected to the scan coils of an aberration-corrected STEM, is used to precisely control the position, dwell time, and scan rate of a sub-nanometer STEM probe. Site-specific locations in a sealed liquid cell containing an aqueous solution of H2PdCl4 are irradiated to deposit palladium nanocrystals onto silicon nitride membranes in a highly controlled manner. The threshold electron dose required for the radiolytic deposition of metallic palladium has been determined, the influence of electron dose on the nanolithographically patterned feature size and morphology is explored, and a feedback-controlled monitoring method for active control of the nanofabricated structures through STEM detector signal monitoring is proposed. This approach enables fundamental studies of electron beam induced interactions with matter in liquid cells and opens new pathways to fabricate nanostructures with tailored architectures and chemistries via shape-controlled nanolithographic patterning from liquid-phase precursors. PMID:27510435

  12. Platinum blue as an alternative to uranyl acetate for staining in transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Inaga, Sumire; Katsumoto, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Keiichi; Kameie, Toshio; Nakane, Hironobu; Naguro, Tomonori

    2007-04-01

    This paper introduces an aqueous solution of platinum blue (Pt-blue) as an alternative to uranyl acetate (UA) for staining in transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Pt-blue was prepared from a reaction of cis-dichlorodiamine-platinum (II) (cis-platin) with thymidine. When Pt-blue was dried on a microgrid and observed by TEM it showed a uniform appearance with tiny particles less than 1 nm in diameter. The effect of Pt-blue as an electron stain was then examined not only for positive staining of conventional ultrathin resin sections and counterstaining of post-embedding immuno-electron microscopy but also for negative staining. In ultrathin sections of the rat liver and renal glomerulus, Pt-blue provided good contrast images, especially in double staining combined with a lead stain (Pb). Almost all cell organelles were clearly observed with high contrast in these sections. Glycogen granules in the hepatic parenchymal cells were particularly electron dense in Pt-blue stained sections compared with those treated with UA. In longitudinal and transverse sections of budding influenza A viruses, a specific arrangement of rod-like structures, which correspond to the ribonucleoprotein complexes, was clearly shown in each virion stained with Pt-blue and Pb. When post-embedding immunoelectron microscopy was performed in ultrathin sections of HeLa cells embedded in Lowicryl K4M, the localization of Ki-67 protein was sufficiently detected even after Pt-blue and Pb staining. The present study also revealed that Pt-blue could be used for the negative staining of E. coli, allowing the visualization of a flagellum. These findings indicate that Pt-blue is a useful, safe, and easily obtainable electron stain that is an alternative to UA for TEM preparations. PMID:17558143

  13. Direct-write liquid phase transformations with a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Unocic, Raymond R; Lupini, Andrew R; Borisevich, Albina Y; Cullen, David A; Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen

    2016-08-25

    The highly energetic electron beam (e-beam) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) can induce local changes in the state of matter, ranging from knock-on and atomic movement, to amorphization/crystallization, and to localized chemical/electrochemical reactions. To date, fundamental studies of e-beam induced phenomena and practical applications have been limited by conventional STEM e-beam rastering modes that allow only for uniform e-beam exposures. Here, an automated liquid phase nanolithography method has been developed that enables the direct writing of nanometer scaled features within microfabricated liquid cells. An external e-beam control system, connected to the scan coils of an aberration-corrected STEM, is used to precisely control the position, dwell time, and scan rate of a sub-nanometer STEM probe. Site-specific locations in a sealed liquid cell containing an aqueous solution of H2PdCl4 are irradiated to deposit palladium nanocrystals onto silicon nitride membranes in a highly controlled manner. The threshold electron dose required for the radiolytic deposition of metallic palladium has been determined, the influence of electron dose on the nanolithographically patterned feature size and morphology is explored, and a feedback-controlled monitoring method for active control of the nanofabricated structures through STEM detector signal monitoring is proposed. This approach enables fundamental studies of electron beam induced interactions with matter in liquid cells and opens new pathways to fabricate nanostructures with tailored architectures and chemistries via shape-controlled nanolithographic patterning from liquid-phase precursors.

  14. Analytic model of a magnetically insulated transmission line with collisional flow electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stygar, W. A.; Wagoner, T. C.; Ives, H. C.; Corcoran, P. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Douglas, J. W.; Gilliland, T. L.; Mazarakis, M. G.; Ramirez, J. J.; Seamen, J. F.; Seidel, D. B.; Spielman, R. B.

    2006-09-01

    We have developed a relativistic-fluid model of the flow-electron plasma in a steady-state one-dimensional magnetically insulated transmission line (MITL). The model assumes that the electrons are collisional and, as a result, drift toward the anode. The model predicts that in the limit of fully developed collisional flow, the relation between the voltage Va, anode current Ia, cathode current Ik, and geometric impedance Z0 of a 1D planar MITL can be expressed as Va=IaZ0h(χ), where h(χ)≡[(χ+1)/4(χ-1)]1/2-ln⁡⌊χ+(χ2-1)1/2⌋/2χ(χ-1) and χ≡Ia/Ik. The relation is valid when Va≳1MV. In the minimally insulated limit, the anode current Ia,min⁡=1.78Va/Z0, the electron-flow current If,min⁡=1.25Va/Z0, and the flow impedance Zf,min⁡=0.588Z0. {The electron-flow current If≡Ia-Ik. Following Mendel and Rosenthal [Phys. Plasmas 2, 1332 (1995)PHPAEN1070-664X10.1063/1.871345], we define the flow impedance Zf as Va/(Ia2-Ik2)1/2.} In the well-insulated limit (i.e., when Ia≫Ia,min⁡), the electron-flow current If=9Va2/8IaZ02 and the flow impedance Zf=2Z0/3. Similar results are obtained for a 1D collisional MITL with coaxial cylindrical electrodes, when the inner conductor is at a negative potential with respect to the outer, and Z0≲40Ω. We compare the predictions of the collisional model to those of several MITL models that assume the flow electrons are collisionless. We find that at given values of Va and Z0, collisions can significantly increase both Ia,min⁡ and If,min⁡ above the values predicted by the collisionless models, and decrease Zf,min⁡. When Ia≫Ia,min⁡, we find that, at given values of Va, Z0, and Ia, collisions can significantly increase If and decrease Zf. Since the steady-state collisional model is valid only when the drift of electrons toward the anode has had sufficient time to establish fully developed collisional flow, and collisionless models assume there is no net electron drift toward the anode, we expect these two types

  15. Sea Spray Aerosol Structure and Composition Using Cryogenic Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The composition and surface properties of atmospheric aerosol particles largely control their impact on climate by affecting their ability to uptake water, react heterogeneously, and nucleate ice in clouds. However, in the vacuum of a conventional electron microscope, the native surface and internal structure often undergo physicochemical rearrangement resulting in surfaces that are quite different from their atmospheric configurations. Herein, we report the development of cryogenic transmission electron microscopy where laboratory generated sea spray aerosol particles are flash frozen in their native state with iterative and controlled thermal and/or pressure exposures and then probed by electron microscopy. This unique approach allows for the detection of not only mixed salts, but also soft materials including whole hydrated bacteria, diatoms, virus particles, marine vesicles, as well as gel networks within hydrated salt droplets—all of which will have distinct biological, chemical, and physical processes. We anticipate this method will open up a new avenue of analysis for aerosol particles, not only for ocean-derived aerosols, but for those produced from other sources where there is interest in the transfer of organic or biological species from the biosphere to the atmosphere. PMID:26878061

  16. Unravelling kinetic and thermodynamic effects on the growth of gold nanoplates by liquid transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Alloyeau, Damien; Dachraoui, Walid; Javed, Yasir; Belkahla, Hannen; Wang, Guillaume; Lecoq, Hélène; Ammar, Souad; Ersen, Ovidiu; Wisnet, Andreas; Gazeau, Florence; Ricolleau, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The growth of colloidal nanoparticles is simultaneously driven by kinetic and thermodynamic effects that are difficult to distinguish. We have exploited in situ scanning transmission electron microscopy in liquid to study the growth of Au nanoplates by radiolysis and unravel the mechanisms influencing their formation and shape. The electron dose provides a straightforward control of the growth rate that allows quantifying the kinetic effects on the planar nanoparticles formation. Indeed, we demonstrate that the surface-reaction rate per unit area has the same dose-rate dependent behavior than the concentration of reducing agents in the liquid cell. Interestingly, we also determine a critical supply rate of gold monomers for nanoparticle faceting, corresponding to three layers per second, above which the formation of nanoplates is not possible because the growth is then dominated by kinetic effects. At lower electron dose, the growth is driven by thermodynamic and the formation and shape of nanoplates are directly related to the twin-planes formed during the growth.

  17. Measured Radiation and Background Levels During Transmission of Megawatt Electron Beams Through Millimeter Apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Alarcon, Ricardo; Balascuta, S.; Benson, Stephen V.; Bertozzi, William; Boyce, James R.; Cowan, Ray; Douglas, David R.; Evtushenko, Pavel; Fisher, P.; Ihloff, Ernest E.; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kelleher, Aidan Michael; Krossler, W. J.; Legg, Robert A.; Long, Elena; Milner, Richard; Neil, George R.; Ou, Longwu; Schmookler, Barack Abraham; Tennant, Christopher D.; Tschalar, C.; Williams, Gwyn P.; Zhang, Shukui

    2013-11-01

    We report measurements of photon and neutron radiation levels observed while transmitting a 0.43 MW electron beam through millimeter-sized apertures and during beam-off, but accelerating gradient RF-on, operation. These measurements were conducted at the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) facility of the Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory (JLab) using a 100 MeV electron beam from an energy-recovery linear accelerator. The beam was directed successively through 6 mm, 4 mm, and 2 mm diameter apertures of length 127 mm in aluminum at a maximum current of 4.3 mA (430 kW beam power). This study was conducted to characterize radiation levels for experiments that need to operate in this environment, such as the proposed DarkLight Experiment. We find that sustained transmission of a 430 kW continuous-wave (CW) beam through a 2 mm aperture is feasible with manageable beam-related backgrounds. We also find that during beam-off, RF-on operation, multipactoring inside the niobium cavities of the accelerator cryomodules is the primary source of ambient radiation when the machine is tuned for 130 MeV operation.

  18. Nanoscale imaging of whole cells using a liquid enclosure and a scanning transmission electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Peckys, Diana B; Veith, Gabriel M; Joy, David C; de Jonge, Niels

    2009-12-14

    Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7) were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM) laboratory.

  19. Direct whole-mount imaging of fungal spores by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ki Woo

    2009-02-01

    Whole-mount fungal spores were examined by energy-filtering transmission electron microscopy. Conidia of Penicillium species and Ustilaginoidea virens were suspended in distilled water and directly placed on a glow-discharged formvar-coated copper grid. Energy-filtered images were taken from 0 to 100eV loss regions. Due to their considerable inherent thickness, their globose morphology was evident. In zero-loss images, the fungal spores appeared to have higher contrast in general, showing darker periphery than unfiltered images. Most spores in zero-loss images exhibited almost homogeneous electron density across the spores. The contrast was partially inversed in low-loss images where more details of the outer cell wall ornamentations of spores could be discerned than zero-loss images. As obvious advantages of whole-mount spore imaging, it allows for ensuring two-dimensional images with higher spatial resolution than light microscopy and conventional scanning electron microscopy. If a higher resolution is needed to observe fungal surface structures such as fimbriae and rodlet layers, or discriminate an outer sheath enveloping spores, whole-mount spore imaging can be employed to unravel structural details. PMID:18707893

  20. Nanoscale Imaging of Whole Cells Using a Liquid Enclosure and a Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Peckys, Diana B.; Veith, Gabriel M.; Joy, David C.; de Jonge, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7) were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM) laboratory. PMID:20020038

  1. Multislice simulation of transmission electron microscopy imaging of helium bubbles in Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Bo; Edwards, Danny J.; Kurtz, Richard J.; Odette, George R.; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2012-10-04

    Formation of nanoscale helium (He) bubbles in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels may lead to degradation of mechanical properties of materials. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has been commonly used to image the Fresnel contrast of He bubbles using a defocus of 0.5 µm ~ 1 µm. This paper presents our study of multislice simulation of the size correlation between imaged Fresnel rings and the actual He bubbles. It was found that for bubbles equal to or larger than 3 nm in diameter, the imaged bubble size, represented by its inner diameter of the first dark Fresnel ring (Din) in under-focused imaging conditions, increases with increasing electron-beam incoherency, but decreases with increasing defocus. The electron-beam accelerating voltage, bubble size, bubble position, and TEM sample thickness were found to have no significant influence on the deviation of Din from the actual bubble size (D0). For bubbles equal to or smaller than 2 nm, however, Din/Do increases dramatically with increasing defocus when it is above a threshold defocus. It was also suggested by this study that He bubbles can be differentiated from argon (Ar) bubbles by contrast differences.

  2. Multislice simulation of transmission electron microscopy imaging of helium bubbles in Fe.

    PubMed

    Yao, Bo; Edwards, Danny J; Kurtz, Richard J; Odette, G Robert; Yamamoto, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    Formation of nanoscale helium (He) bubbles in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steels may lead to degradation of mechanical properties of materials. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has commonly been used to image the Fresnel contrast of He bubbles, using an underfocus of 0.5-1 µm. This paper presents our study of multislice simulation of the size correlation between imaged Fresnel rings and the actual He bubbles. It was found that for bubbles equal to or >3 nm in diameter, the imaged bubble size, represented by its inner diameter of the first dark Fresnel ring (D(in)) in underfocused imaging conditions, increases with increasing electron-beam incoherency, but decreases with increasing underfocus. The electron-beam accelerating voltage, bubble size, bubble position and TEM sample thickness were found to have no significant influence on the deviation of D(in) from the actual bubble size (D(0)). However, for bubbles equal to or <2 nm, D(in)/D(0) increases dramatically with increasing underfocus when it is above a threshold limit (e.g. Δf = -1 µm for a 2-nm bubble). The results of this study also suggested that He bubbles can be differentiated from argon (Ar) bubbles by contrast differences.

  3. Isotope substitution extends the lifetime of organic molecules in transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, Thomas W; Biskupek, Johannes; Skowron, Stephen T; Bayliss, Peter A; Bichoutskaia, Elena; Kaiser, Ute; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2015-02-01

    Structural characterisation of individual molecules by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) is fundamentally limited by the element and electron energy-specific interactions of the material with the high energy electron beam. Here, the key mechanisms controlling the interactions between the e-beam and C-H bonds, present in all organic molecules, are examined, and the low atomic weight of hydrogen-resulting in its facile atomic displacement by the e-beam-is identified as the principal cause of the instability of individual organic molecules. It is demonstrated theoretically and proven experimentally that exchanging all hydrogen atoms within molecules with the deuterium isotope, and therefore doubling the atomic weight of the lightest atoms in the structure, leads to a more than two-fold increase in the stability of organic molecules in the e-beam. Substitution of H for D significantly reduces the amount of kinetic energy transferred from the e-beam to the atom (main factor contributing to stability) and also increases the barrier for bond dissociation, primarily due to the changes in the zero-point energy of the C-D vibration (minor factor). The extended lifetime of coronene-d12 , used as a model molecule, enables more precise analysis of the inter-molecular spacing and more accurate measurement of the molecular orientations.

  4. Nanoscale imaging of whole cells using a liquid enclosure and a scanning transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    De Jonge, Niels; Peckys, Diana B; Veith, Gabriel M; Joy, David Charles

    2009-01-01

    Nanoscale imaging techniques are needed to investigate cellular function at the level of individual proteins and to study the interaction of nanomaterials with biological systems. We imaged whole fixed cells in liquid state with a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) using a micrometer-sized liquid enclosure with electron transparent windows providing a wet specimen environment. Wet-STEM images were obtained of fixed E. coli bacteria labeled with gold nanoparticles attached to surface membrane proteins. Mammalian cells (COS7) were incubated with gold-tagged epidermal growth factor and fixed. STEM imaging of these cells resulted in a resolution of 3 nm for the gold nanoparticles. The wet-STEM method has several advantages over conventional imaging techniques. Most important is the capability to image whole fixed cells in a wet environment with nanometer resolution, which can be used, e.g., to map individual protein distributions in/on whole cells. The sample preparation is compatible with that used for fluorescent microscopy on fixed cells for experiments involving nanoparticles. Thirdly, the system is rather simple and involves only minimal new equipment in an electron microscopy (EM) laboratory.

  5. Quantifying Transient States in Materials with the Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, G; LaGrange, T; Kim, J; Reed, B; Browning, N

    2009-09-21

    The Dynamic Transmission Electron Microscope (DTEM) offers a means of capturing rapid evolution in a specimen through in-situ microscopy experiments by allowing 15 ns electron micrograph exposure times. The rapid exposure time is enabled by creating a burst of electrons at the emitter by ultraviolet pulsed laser illumination. This burst arrives a specified time after a second laser initiates the specimen reaction. The timing of the two Q-switched lasers is controlled by high-speed pulse generators with a timing error much less than the pulse duration. Both diffraction and imaging experiments can be performed, just as in a conventional TEM. The brightness of the emitter and the total current control the spatial and temporal resolutions. We have demonstrated 7 nm spatial resolution in single 15 ns pulsed images. These single-pulse imaging experiments have been used to study martensitic transformations, nucleation and crystallization of an amorphous metal, and rapid chemical reactions. Measurements have been performed on these systems that are possible by no other experimental approaches currently available.

  6. An in situ transmission electron microscopy study of the ion irradiation induced amorphisation of silicon by He and Xe

    DOE PAGES

    Edmondson, P. D.; Abrams, K. J.; Hinks, J. A.; Greaves, G.; Pawley, C. J.; Hanif, I.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2015-11-21

    We used transmission electron microscopy with in situ ion irradiation to examine the ion-beam-induced amorphisation of crystalline silicon under irradiation with light (He) and heavy (Xe) ions at room temperature. Analysis of the electron diffraction data reveal the heterogeneous amorphisation mechanism to be dominant in both cases. Moreover, for the differences in the amorphisation curves are discussed in terms of intra-cascade dynamic recovery, and the role of electronic and nuclear loss mechanisms.

  7. Experimental Investigation of Space Radiation Processing in Lunar Soil Ilmenite: Combining Perspectives from Surface Science and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christoffersen, R.; Keller, L. P.; Rahman, Z.; Baragiola, R.

    2010-01-01

    Energetic ions mostly from the solar wind play a major role in lunar space weathering because they contribute structural and chemical changes to the space-exposed surfaces of lunar regolith grains. In mature mare soils, ilmenite (FeTiO3) grains in the finest size fraction have been shown in transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies to exhibit key differences in their response to space radiation processing relative to silicates [1,2,3]. In ilmenite, solar ion radiation alters host grain outer margins to produce 10-100 nm thick layers that are microstructurally complex, but dominantly crystalline compared to the amorphous radiation-processed rims on silicates [1,2,3]. Spatially well-resolved analytical TEM measurements also show nm-scale compositional and chemical state changes in these layers [1,3]. These include shifts in Fe/Ti ratio from strong surface Fe-enrichment (Fe/Ti >> 1), to Fe depletion (Fe/Ti < 1) at 40-50 nm below the grain surface [1,3]. These compositional changes are not observed in the radiation-processed rims on silicates [4]. Several mechanism(s) to explain the overall relations in the ilmenite grain rims by radiation processing and/or additional space weathering processes were proposed by [1], and remain under current consideration [3]. A key issue has concerned the ability of ion radiation processing alone to produce some of the deeper- penetrating compositional changes. In order to provide some experimental constraints on these questions, we have performed a combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field-emission scanning transmission electron (FE-STEM) study of experimentally ion-irradiated ilmenite. A key feature of this work is the combination of analytical techniques sensitive to changes in the irradiated samples at depth scales going from the immediate surface (approx.5 nm; XPS), to deeper in the grain interior (5-100 nm; FE-STEM).

  8. Dengue virus identification by transmission electron microscopy and molecular methods in fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Limonta, D; Falcón, V; Torres, G; Capó, V; Menéndez, I; Rosario, D; Castellanos, Y; Alvarez, M; Rodríguez-Roche, R; de la Rosa, M C; Pavón, A; López, L; González, K; Guillén, G; Diaz, J; Guzmán, M G

    2012-12-01

    Dengue virus is the most significant virus transmitted by arthropods worldwide and may cause a potentially fatal systemic disease named dengue hemorrhagic fever. In this work, dengue virus serotype 4 was detected in the tissues of one fatal dengue hemorrhagic fever case using electron immunomicroscopy and molecular methods. This is the first report of dengue virus polypeptides findings by electron immunomicroscopy in human samples. In addition, not-previously-documented virus-like particles visualized in spleen, hepatic, brain, and pulmonary tissues from a dengue case are discussed.

  9. Advances in cryogenic transmission electron microscopy for the characterization of dynamic self-assembling nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    Newcomb, Christina J.; Moyer, Tyson J.; Lee, Sungsoo S.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2012-01-01

    Elucidating the structural information of nanoscale materials in their solvent-exposed state is crucial, as a result, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) has become an increasingly popular technique in the materials science, chemistry, and biology communities. Cryo-TEM provides a method to directly visualize the specimen structure in a solution-state through a thin film of vitrified solvent. This technique complements X-ray, neutron, and light scattering methods that probe the statistical average of all species present; furthermore, cryo-TEM can be used to observe changes in structure over time. In the area of self-assembly, this tool has been particularly powerful for the characterization of natural and synthetic small molecule assemblies, as well as hybrid organic–inorganic composites. In this review, we discuss recent advances in cryogenic TEM in the context of self-assembling systems with emphasis on characterization of transitions observed in response to external stimuli. PMID:23204913

  10. Transmission electron microscopy of the 'LOW-CA' hydrated interplanetary dust particle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomeoka, K.; Buseck, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy of a hydrated interplanetary dust particle indicates that it consists largely of a poorly crystalline phyllosilicate containing Fe, Mg and Al with an interlayer spacing of 10 to 12 A and so is distinct from the major phyllosilicate in CI and CM carbonaceous chondrites. The silicate is probably an Fe- and Mg-rich smectite or mica. Submicron, spherical to euhedral pyrrhotite and pentlandite are prominent. Unusual, low-Ni pentlandite is also common and typically occurs as rectangular platelets. Unlike many chondritic interplanetary dust particles, olivine is rare and pyroxene was not observed. Other less abundant phases are magnetite, chromite, and an unidentified phase containing Fe, Mg, Si, Ca, and Mn. This particle differs from a hydrated micrometeorite described previously by Brownlee (1978), indicating there are mineralogically different subsets of hydrated interplanetary dust particles. Despite gross similarities in mineralogy between the particle and the carbonaceous chondrites, they show appreciable differences in detail.

  11. Rendering graphene supports hydrophilic with non-covalent aromatic functionalization for transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pantelic, Radosav S.; Fu, Wangyang; Schoenenberger, Christian; Stahlberg, Henning

    2014-03-31

    Amorphous carbon films have been routinely used to enhance the preparation of frozen-hydrated samples for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), either in retaining protein concentration, providing mechanical stability or dissipating sample charge. However, strong background signal from the amorphous carbon support obstructs that of the sample, and the insulating properties of thin amorphous carbon films preclude any efficiency in dispersing charge. Graphene addresses the limitations of amorphous carbon. Graphene is a crystalline material with virtually no phase or amplitude contrast and unparalleled, high electrical carrier mobility. However, the hydrophobic properties of graphene have prevented its routine application in Cryo-TEM. This Letter reports a method for rendering graphene TEM supports hydrophilic—a convenient approach maintaining graphene's structural and electrical properties based on non-covalent, aromatic functionalization.

  12. In situ transmission electron microscopy of light-induced photocatalytic reactions.

    PubMed

    Cavalca, F; Laursen, A B; Kardynal, B E; Dunin-Borkowski, R E; Dahl, S; Wagner, J B; Hansen, T W

    2012-02-24

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) makes it possible to obtain insight into the structure, composition and reactivity of photocatalysts, which are of fundamental interest for sustainable energy research. Such insight can be used for further material optimization. Here, we combine conventional TEM analysis of photocatalysts with environmental TEM (ETEM) and photoactivation using light. Two novel types of TEM specimen holder that enable in situ illumination are developed to study light-induced phenomena in photoactive materials, systems and photocatalysts at the nanoscale under working conditions. The technological development of the holders is described and two representative photo-induced phenomena are studied: the photodegradation of Cu₂O and the photodeposition of Pt onto a GaN:ZnO photocatalyst.

  13. Investigation on Deformation Behavior of Nickel Aluminum Bronze by Neutron Diffraction and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Hong; Lv, Yuting; Lu, Weijie; Sun, Guangai

    2016-05-01

    The deformation behavior, deformation microstructures, and generated inter-phase stresses of nickel aluminum bronze were investigated by in situ neutron diffraction instrument and transmission electron microscopy in this paper. Lattice strains calculated by both peak shifting and broadening by Gaussian fitting of α and κ phase neutron diffraction peak profiles at both holding stress conditions and unloaded stress conditions were compared. Twining and stacking faults in α matrix were observed after deformed by different tensile stresses. Compressive internal/residual stress in α matrix and tensile internal stress in κ phase in elasto-plastic region were calculated based on neutron diffraction analysis. The piled-up dislocations around hard κ phases increase with increasing the deformation degree, which raise the stress concentration near α/ κ interface and increase the internal stresses.

  14. Improved microchip design and application for in situ transmission electron microscopy of macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Dukes, Madeline J; Thomas, Rebecca; Damiano, John; Klein, Kate L; Balasubramaniam, Sharavanan; Kayandan, Sanem; Riffle, Judy S; Davis, Richey M; McDonald, Sarah M; Kelly, Deborah F

    2014-04-01

    Understanding the fundamental properties of macromolecules has enhanced the development of emerging technologies used to improve biomedical research. Currently, there is a critical need for innovative platforms that can illuminate the function of biomedical reagents in a native environment. To address this need, we have developed an in situ approach to visualize the dynamic behavior of biomedically relevant macromolecules at the nanoscale. Newly designed silicon nitride devices containing integrated "microwells" were used to enclose active macromolecular specimens in liquid for transmission electron microscopy imaging purposes.We were able to successfully examine novel magnetic resonance imaging contrast reagents, micelle suspensions, liposome carrier vehicles, and transcribing viral assemblies. With each specimen tested, the integrated microwells adequately maintained macromolecules in discrete local environments while enabling thin liquid layers to be produced.

  15. Large area strain analysis using scanning transmission electron microscopy across multiple images

    SciTech Connect

    Oni, A. A.; Sang, X.; LeBeau, J. M.; Raju, S. V.; Saxena, S.; Dumpala, S.; Broderick, S.; Rajan, K.; Kumar, A.; Sinnott, S.

    2015-01-05

    Here, we apply revolving scanning transmission electron microscopy to measure lattice strain across a sample using a single reference area. To do so, we remove image distortion introduced by sample drift, which usually restricts strain analysis to a single image. Overcoming this challenge, we show that it is possible to use strain reference areas elsewhere in the sample, thereby enabling reliable strain mapping across large areas. As a prototypical example, we determine the strain present within the microstructure of a Ni-based superalloy directly from atom column positions as well as geometric phase analysis. While maintaining atomic resolution, we quantify strain within nanoscale regions and demonstrate that large, unit-cell level strain fluctuations are present within the intermetallic phase.

  16. Dynamics of soft Nanomaterials captured by transmission electron microscopy in liquid water

    SciTech Connect

    Proetto, Maria T.; Rush, Anthony M.; Chien, Miao-Ping; Abellan Baeza, Patricia; Patterson, Joseph P.; Thompson, Matthew P.; Olson, Norman H.; Moore, Curtis E.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Andolina, Christopher; Millstone, Jill; Howell, Stephen B.; Browning, Nigel D.; Evans, James E.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2014-01-14

    In this paper we present in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of soft, synthetic nanoparticles with a comparative analysis using conventional TEM methods. This comparison is made with the simple aim of describing what is an unprecedented example of in situ imaging by TEM. However, we contend the technique will quickly become essential in the characterization of analogous systems, especially where dynamics are of interest in the solvated state. In this case, particles were studied which were obtained from the direct polymerization of an oxaliplatin analog, designed for an ongoing program in novel chemotherapeutic delivery systems. The resulting nanoparticles provided sufficient contrast for facile imaging in situ, and point toward key design parameters that enable this new characterization approach for organic nanomaterials. We describe the preparation of the synthetic micellar nanoparticles to- gether with their characterization in liquid water.

  17. Multi-pore carbon phase plate for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sannomiya, Takumi; Junesch, Juliane; Hosokawa, Fumio; Nagayama, Kuniaki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Kayama, Yoko

    2014-11-01

    A new fabrication method of carbon based phase plates for phase-contrast transmission electron microscopy is presented. This method utilizes colloidal masks to produce pores as well as disks on thin carbon membranes for phase modulation. Since no serial process is involved, carbon phase plate membranes containing hundreds of pores can be mass-produced on a large scale, which allows "disposal" of contaminated or degraded phase modulating objects after use. Due to the spherical shape of the mask colloid particles, the produced pores are perfectly circular. The pore size and distribution can be easily tuned by the mask colloid size and deposition condition. By using the stencil method, disk type phase plates can also be fabricated on a pore type phase plate. Both pore and disk type phase plates were tested by measuring amorphous samples and confirmed to convert the sinus phase contrast transfer function to the cosine shape. PMID:25129640

  18. Quantitative Description of Crystal Nucleation and Growth from in Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ievlev, Anton V; Jesse, Stephen; Cochell, Thomas J; Unocic, Raymond R; Protopopescu, Vladimir A; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2015-12-22

    Recent advances in liquid cell (scanning) transmission electron microscopy (S)TEM has enabled in situ nanoscale investigations of controlled nanocrystal growth mechanisms. Here, we experimentally and quantitatively investigated the nucleation and growth mechanisms of Pt nanostructures from an aqueous solution of K2PtCl6. Averaged statistical, network, and local approaches have been used for the data analysis and the description of both collective particles dynamics and local growth features. In particular, interaction between neighboring particles has been revealed and attributed to reduction of the platinum concentration in the vicinity of the particle boundary. The local approach for solving the inverse problem showed that particles dynamics can be simulated by a stationary diffusional model. The obtained results are important for understanding nanocrystal formation and growth processes and for optimization of synthesis conditions.

  19. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) for studying the morphology of colloidal drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Kuntsche, Judith; Horst, Jennifer C; Bunjes, Heike

    2011-09-30

    Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) has evolved into an indispensable tool for the characterization of colloidal drug delivery systems. It can be applied to study the size, shape and internal structure of nanoparticulate carrier systems as well as the overall colloidal composition of the corresponding dispersions. This review gives a short overview over the instrumentation used in cryo-TEM experiments and over the sample preparation procedure. Selected examples of cryo-TEM studies on colloidal drug carrier systems, including liposomes, colloidal lipid emulsions, solid lipid nanoparticles, thermotropic and lyotropic liquid crystalline nanoparticles, polymer-based colloids and delivery systems for nucleic acids, are presented in order to illustrate the wealth of information that can be obtained by this technique.

  20. Advances in cryogenic transmission electron microscopy for the characterization of dynamic self-assembling nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Christina J; Moyer, Tyson J; Lee, Sungsoo S; Stupp, Samuel I

    2012-12-01

    Elucidating the structural information of nanoscale materials in their solvent-exposed state is crucial, as a result, cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) has become an increasingly popular technique in the materials science, chemistry, and biology communities. Cryo-TEM provides a method to directly visualize the specimen structure in a solution-state through a thin film of vitrified solvent. This technique complements X-ray, neutron, and light scattering methods that probe the statistical average of all species present; furthermore, cryo-TEM can be used to observe changes in structure over time. In the area of self-assembly, this tool has been particularly powerful for the characterization of natural and synthetic small molecule assemblies, as well as hybrid organic-inorganic composites. In this review, we discuss recent advances in cryogenic TEM in the context of self-assembling systems with emphasis on characterization of transitions observed in response to external stimuli.

  1. A transmission electron microscopy study of mineralization in age-induced transparent dentin.

    PubMed

    Porter, Alexandra E; Nalla, Ravi K; Minor, Andrew; Jinschek, Joerg R; Kisielowski, Christian; Radmilovic, Velimir; Kinney, John H; Tomsia, Antoni P; Ritchie, R O

    2005-12-01

    It is known that fractures are more likely to occur in altered teeth, particularly following restoration or endodontic repair; consequently, it is important to understand the structure of altered forms of dentin, the most abundant tissue in the human tooth, in order to better define the increased propensity for such fractures. Transparent (or sclerotic) dentin, wherein the dentinal tubules become occluded with mineral as a natural progressive consequence of aging, is one such altered form. In the present study, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy is used to investigate the effect of aging on the mineral phase of dentin. Such studies revealed that the intertubular mineral crystallites were smaller in transparent dentin, and that the intratubular mineral (larger crystals deposited within the tubules) was chemically similar to the surrounding intertubular mineral. Exit-wave reconstructed lattice-plane images suggested that the intratubular mineral had nanometer-size grains. These observations support a "dissolution and reprecipitation" mechanism for the formation of transparent dentin.

  2. A study of endometrial adenocarcinoma treated with tamoxifen by scanning and transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Rigano, A; Irato, S; Scalisi, R; Adamo, V; Altavilla, G; Buda, C

    1985-01-01

    By scanning and transmission electron microscopy the Authors studied four cases of endometrial adenocarcinoma (stage I, G1) after 15-days treatment with Tamoxifen (20 mg X 2) before surgery. The ultrastructural findings, similar to those observed in untreated adenocarcinomas but quite different from those obtained in MAP-responsive cases - as other Authors reported too - seem to indicate an almost complete absence of secretory or cytotoxic induction at least as far as 15-days treatment is concerned. According to the Authors this study raises many doubts about the usefulness of a first-instance therapeutical protocol based on Tamoxifen alone. However they believe that Tamoxifen can be utilized combined with a progestational agent in a simultaneous or sequence treatment.

  3. Visualizing non-equilibrium lithiation of spinel oxide via in situ transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Kai; Zhang, Sen; Li, Jing; Yu, Xiqian; Meng, Qingping; Zhu, Yizhou; Hu, Enyuan; Sun, Ke; Yun, Hongseok; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhu, Yimei; Gan, Hong; Mo, Yifei; Stach, Eric A.; Murray, Christopher B.; Su, Dong

    2016-05-01

    Spinel transition metal oxides are important electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries, whose lithiation undergoes a two-step reaction, whereby intercalation and conversion occur in a sequential manner. These two reactions are known to have distinct reaction dynamics, but it is unclear how their kinetics affects the overall electrochemical response. Here we explore the lithiation of nanosized magnetite by employing a strain-sensitive, bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy approach. This method allows direct, real-time, high-resolution visualization of how lithiation proceeds along specific reaction pathways. We find that the initial intercalation process follows a two-phase reaction sequence, whereas further lithiation leads to the coexistence of three distinct phases within single nanoparticles, which has not been previously reported to the best of our knowledge. We use phase-field theory to model and describe these non-equilibrium reaction pathways, and to directly correlate the observed phase evolution with the battery's discharge performance.

  4. Unraveling irradiation induced grain growth with in situ transmission electron microscopy and coordinated modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bufford, D. C.; Abdeljawad, F. F.; Foiles, S. M.; Hattar, K.

    2015-11-09

    Nanostructuring has been proposed as a method to enhance radiation tolerance, but many metallic systems are rejected due to significant concerns regarding long term grain boundary and interface stability. This work utilized recent advancements in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to quantitatively characterize the grain size, texture, and individual grain boundary character in a nanocrystalline gold model system before and after in situ TEM ion irradiation with 10 MeV Si. The initial experimental measurements were fed into a mesoscale phase field model, which incorporates the role of irradiation-induced thermal events on boundary properties, to directly compare the observed and simulated grain growth with varied parameters. The observed microstructure evolution deviated subtly from previously reported normal grain growth in which some boundaries remained essentially static. In broader terms, the combined experimental and modeling techniques presented herein provide future avenues to enhance quantification and prediction of the thermal, mechanical, or radiation stability of grain boundaries in nanostructured crystalline systems.

  5. High resolution transmission electron microscopic in-situ observations of plastic deformation of compressed nanocrystalline gold

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Guoyong; Lian, Jianshe; Jiang, Qing; Sun, Sheng; Zhang, Tong-Yi

    2014-09-14

    Nanocrystalline (nc) metals possess extremely high strength, while their capability to deform plastically has been debated for decades. Low ductility has hitherto been considered an intrinsic behavior for most nc metals, due to the lack of five independent slip systems actively operating during deformation in each nanograin. Here we report in situ high resolution transmission electron microscopic (HRTEM) observations of deformation process of nc gold under compression, showing the excellent ductility of individual and aggregate nanograins. Compression causes permanent change in the profile of individual nanograins, which is mediated by dislocation slip and grain rotation. The high rate of grain boundary sliding and large extent of widely exited grain rotation may meet the boundary compatibility requirements during plastic deformation. The in situ HRTEM observations suggest that nc gold is not intrinsically brittle under compressive loading.

  6. Nano features of Al/Au ultrasonic bond interface observed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Hongjun; Li Mingyu Kim, Jong-Myung; Kim, Dae-Won; Wang Chunqing

    2008-10-15

    Nano-scale interfacial details of ultrasonic AlSi1 wire wedge bonding to a Au/Ni/Cu pad were investigated using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The intermetallic phase Au{sub 8}Al{sub 3} formed locally due to diffusion and reaction activated by ultrasound at the Al/Au bond interface. Multilayer sub-interfaces roughly parallel to the wire/pad interface were observed among this phase, and interdiffusional features near the Au pad resembled interference patterns, alternately dark and bright bars. Solid-state diffusion theory cannot be used to explain why such a thick compound formed within milliseconds at room temperature. The major formation of metallurgical bonds was attributed to ultrasonic cyclic vibration.

  7. Image accumulation, storage, and display system for a scanning transmission electron microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubin, J. A.; Wiggins, J. W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes a high resolution scanning transmission electron microscope data collection, storage, and display system. Included are a novel analog-to-digital converter, a digital hardware divider, a direct memory access interface to a PDP 11/20, a flicker-free gray scale TV display, two new gray scale hardcopy devices, and a software description of the system. The system described here accepts three 8-bit channels of image data from a single picture element every 30 μs. Each picture element intensity is measured simultaneously by three detectors. Scans of 64, 128, 256, or 512 lines of picture elements are provided. All the data are stored on one of eight disk files, and one of the three simultaneous data channels is displayed on a digitally refreshed TV screen in real time. Production of hard-copy images and magnetic tape images, and other manipulations of the data are provided after data accumulation is terminated.

  8. Bright-field imaging of compound semiconductors using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Toshihiro; Lu, Jing; McCartney, Martha R.; Smith, David J.

    2016-09-01

    This study reports the observation of six different zincblende compound semiconductors in [110] projection using large-collection-angle bright-field (LABF) imaging with an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Phase contrast is completely suppressed when the collection semi-angle is set equal to the convergence semi-angle and there are no reversals in image contrast with changes in defocus or thickness. The optimum focus for imaging closely separated pairs of atomic columns (‘dumbbells’) is unique and easily recognized, and the positions of atomic columns occupied by heavier atoms always have darker intensity than those occupied by lighter atoms. Thus, the crystal polarity of compound semiconductors can be determined unambiguously. Moreover, it is concluded that the LABF imaging mode will be highly beneficial for studying other more complicated heterostructures at the atomic scale.

  9. Two-dimensional misorientation mapping by rocking dark-field transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tyutyunnikov, Dmitry; Mitsuhara, Masatoshi; Koch, Christoph T

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we introduce an approach for precise orientation mapping of crystalline specimens by means of transmission electron microscopy. We show that local orientation values can be reconstructed from experimental dark-field image data acquired at different specimen tilts and multiple Bragg reflections. By using the suggested method it is also possible to determine the orientation of the tilt axis with respect to the image or diffraction pattern. The method has been implemented to automatically acquire the necessary data and then map crystal orientation for a given region of interest. We have applied this technique to a specimen prepared from a Ni-based super-alloy CMSX-4. The functionality and limitations of our method are discussed and compared to those of other techniques available. PMID:26255118

  10. Avoiding drying-artifacts in transmission electron microscopy: Characterizing the size and colloidal state of nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Michen, Benjamin; Geers, Christoph; Vanhecke, Dimitri; Endes, Carola; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Balog, Sandor; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2015-01-01

    Standard transmission electron microscopy nanoparticle sample preparation generally requires the complete removal of the suspending liquid. Drying often introduces artifacts, which can obscure the state of the dispersion prior to drying and preclude automated image analysis typically used to obtain number-weighted particle size distribution. Here we present a straightforward protocol for prevention of the onset of drying artifacts, thereby allowing the preservation of in-situ colloidal features of nanoparticles during TEM sample preparation. This is achieved by adding a suitable macromolecular agent to the suspension. Both research- and economically-relevant particles with high polydispersity and/or shape anisotropy are easily characterized following our approach (http://bsa.bionanomaterials.ch), which allows for rapid and quantitative classification in terms of dimensionality and size: features that are major targets of European Union recommendations and legislation. PMID:25965905

  11. Design and application of a novel in situ nano-manipulation stage for transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Koo, Bon-Woong; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Kim, Seong-Il; Kang, Chan S; Han, Sang-Sub; Oh, Kyu H; Kim, Young-Woon

    2015-04-01

    A novel nano-scale manipulator capable of handling low-dimensional materials with three-dimensional linear motion, gripping action, and push-pull action of the gripper was developed for an in situ experiment in transmission electron microscopy. X-Y-Z positioning and push-pull action were accomplished by a piezotubing system, combined with a specially designed assembly stage that consisted of a lever-action gripping tip backed by a push-pull piezostack. The gripper tip consisted of tungsten wire fabricated by electrochemical etching followed by a focused ion beam process. Performance of the nano-scale manipulator was demonstrated in a grab-and-pick test of a single silver nanowire and in an in situ tensile test of a pearlitic steel sample with a specific orientation. PMID:25776965

  12. Microtubules in Plant Cells: Strategies and Methods for Immunofluorescence, Transmission Electron Microscopy, and Live Cell Imaging.

    PubMed

    Celler, Katherine; Fujita, Miki; Kawamura, Eiko; Ambrose, Chris; Herburger, Klaus; Holzinger, Andreas; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules (MTs) are required throughout plant development for a wide variety of processes, and different strategies have evolved to visualize and analyze them. This chapter provides specific methods that can be used to analyze microtubule organization and dynamic properties in plant systems and summarizes the advantages and limitations for each technique. We outline basic methods for preparing samples for immunofluorescence labeling, including an enzyme-based permeabilization method, and a freeze-shattering method, which generates microfractures in the cell wall to provide antibodies access to cells in cuticle-laden aerial organs such as leaves. We discuss current options for live cell imaging of MTs with fluorescently tagged proteins (FPs), and provide chemical fixation, high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution, and post-fixation staining protocols for preserving MTs for transmission electron microscopy and tomography. PMID:26498784

  13. Avoiding drying-artifacts in transmission electron microscopy: Characterizing the size and colloidal state of nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Michen, Benjamin; Geers, Christoph; Vanhecke, Dimitri; Endes, Carola; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Balog, Sandor; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2015-05-12

    Standard transmission electron microscopy nanoparticle sample preparation generally requires the complete removal of the suspending liquid. Drying often introduces artifacts, which can obscure the state of the dispersion prior to drying and preclude automated image analysis typically used to obtain number-weighted particle size distribution. Here we present a straightforward protocol for prevention of the onset of drying artifacts, thereby allowing the preservation of in-situ colloidal features of nanoparticles during TEM sample preparation. This is achieved by adding a suitable macromolecular agent to the suspension. Both research- and economically-relevant particles with high polydispersity and/or shape anisotropy are easily characterized following our approach (http://bsa.bionanomaterials.ch), which allows for rapid and quantitative classification in terms of dimensionality and size: features that are major targets of European Union recommendations and legislation.

  14. Identifying dislocations and stacking faults in GaN films by scanning transmission electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, X. J.; Niu, M. T.; Zeng, X. H.; Huang, J.; Zhang, J. C.; Zhang, J. P.; Wang, J. F.; Xu, K.

    2016-08-01

    The application of annular bright field (ABF) and medium-angle annular dark field (MAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) imaging to crystalline defect analysis has been extended to dislocations and stacking faults (SFs). Dislocations and SFs have been imaged under zone-axis and two-beam diffraction conditions. Comparing to conventional two-beam diffraction contrast images, the ABF and MAADF images of dislocations and SFs not only are complementary and symmetrical with their peaks at dislocation core and SFs plane, but also show similar extinction phenomenon. It is demonstrated that conventional TEM rules for diffraction contrast, i.e. g · b and g · R invisibility criteria remain applicable. The contrast mechanism and extinction of dislocation and SFs in ABF and MAADF STEM are illuminated by zero-order Laue zone Kikuchi diffraction.

  15. Transmission electron microscopy of dislocations in cementite deformed at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mussi, A.; Cordier, P.; Ghosh, S.; Garvik, N.; Nzogang, B. C.; Carrez, Ph.; Garruchet, S.

    2016-06-01

    Polycrystalline aggregates of cementite (Fe3C) and (Fe,Ni)3C have been synthesised at 10 GPa and 1250 °C in the multianvil apparatus. Further, deformation of the carbides by stress relaxation has been carried out at temperature of 1250 °C and for 8 h at the same pressure. Dislocations have been characterised by transmission electron microscopy. They are of the [1 0 0] and [0 0 1] type, [1 0 0] being the most frequent. [1 0 0] dislocations are dissociated and glide in the (0 1 0) plane. [0 0 1] dislocations glide in (1 0 0) and (0 1 0). Given the plastic anisotropy of cementite, the morphology of the lamellae in pearlitic steels appears to have a major role in the strengthening role played by this phase, since activation of easy slip systems is geometrically inhibited in most cases.

  16. Microtubules in Plant Cells: Strategies and Methods for Immunofluorescence, Transmission Electron Microscopy and Live Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Celler, Katherine; Fujita, Miki; Kawamura, Eiko; Ambrose, Chris; Herburger, Klaus; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are required throughout plant development for a wide variety of processes, and different strategies have evolved to visualize and analyze them. This chapter provides specific methods that can be used to analyze microtubule organization and dynamic properties in plant systems and summarizes the advantages and limitations for each technique. We outline basic methods for preparing samples for immunofluorescence labelling, including an enzyme-based permeabilization method, and a freeze-shattering method, which generates microfractures in the cell wall to provide antibodies access to cells in cuticle-laden aerial organs such as leaves. We discuss current options for live cell imaging of MTs with fluorescently tagged proteins (FPs), and provide chemical fixation, high pressure freezing/freeze substitution, and post-fixation staining protocols for preserving MTs for transmission electron microscopy and tomography. PMID:26498784

  17. Polishing methods for metallic and ceramic transmission electron microscopy specimens: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Kestel, B.J.

    1986-03-01

    In recent years, the increasing sophistication of transmission electron microscope (TEM) studies of materials has necessitated more exacting methods of specimen preparation. The present report describes improved equipment and techniques for electropolishing and chemically polishing a wide variety of specimens. Many of the specimens used in developing or improving the techniques to be described were irradiated with heavy ions such as nickel or vanadium to study radiation damage. The high cost of these specimens increased the need for reproducible methods of initial preparation postirradiation processing, and final thinning for TEM examination. A technique was also developed to salvage specimens that had previously been thinned but were unusable for various reasons. Jet polishing is, in general, the method of choice for surface polishing, sectioning, and thinning. The older beaker electropolishing method is included in this report because it is inexpensive and simple, and gives some insight into how the more recent methods were developed.

  18. Preparation of the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea for high-resolution histology and transmission electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Brubacher, John L.; Vieira, Ana P.; Newmark, Phillip A.

    2014-01-01

    The flatworm Schmidtea mediterranea is an emerging model species in such fields as stem-cell biology, regeneration, and evolutionary biology. Excellent molecular tools have been developed for S. mediterranea, but ultrastructural techniques have received far less attention. Processing specimens for histology and transmission electron microscopy is notoriously idiosyncratic for particular species or specimen types. Unfortunately however, most methods for S. mediterranea described in the literature lack numerous essential details, and those few that do provide them rely on specialized equipment that may not be readily available. Here we present an optimized protocol for ultrastructural preparation of S. mediterranea. The protocol can be completed in six days, much of which is “hands-off” time. To aid with troubleshooting, we also illustrate the significant effects of seemingly minor variations in fixative, buffer concentration, and dehydration steps. This procedure will be useful for all planarian researchers, particularly those with relatively little experience in tissue processing. PMID:24556788

  19. Enhanced light element imaging in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Findlay, S D; Kohno, Y; Cardamone, L A; Ikuhara, Y; Shibata, N

    2014-01-01

    We show that an imaging mode based on taking the difference between signals recorded from the bright field (forward scattering region) in atomic resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy provides an enhancement of the detectability of light elements over existing techniques. In some instances this is an enhancement of the visibility of the light element columns relative to heavy element columns. In all cases explored it is an enhancement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the image at the light column site. The image formation mechanisms are explained and the technique is compared with earlier approaches. Experimental data, supported by simulation, are presented for imaging the oxygen columns in LaAlO₃. Case studies looking at imaging hydrogen columns in YH₂ and lithium columns in Al₃Li are also explored through simulation, particularly with respect to the dependence on defocus, probe-forming aperture angle and detector collection aperture angles.

  20. Visualizing non-equilibrium lithiation of spinel oxide via in situ transmission electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    He, Kai; Zhang, Sen; Li, Jing; Yu, Xiqian; Meng, Qingping; Zhu, Yizhou; Hu, Enyuan; Sun, Ke; Yun, Hongseok; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Zhu, Yimei; Gan, Hong; Mo, Yifei; Stach, Eric A; Murray, Christopher B; Su, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Spinel transition metal oxides are important electrode materials for lithium-ion batteries, whose lithiation undergoes a two-step reaction, whereby intercalation and conversion occur in a sequential manner. These two reactions are known to have distinct reaction dynamics, but it is unclear how their kinetics affects the overall electrochemical response. Here we explore the lithiation of nanosized magnetite by employing a strain-sensitive, bright-field scanning transmission electron microscopy approach. This method allows direct, real-time, high-resolution visualization of how lithiation proceeds along specific reaction pathways. We find that the initial intercalation process follows a two-phase reaction sequence, whereas further lithiation leads to the coexistence of three distinct phases within single nanoparticles, which has not been previously reported to the best of our knowledge. We use phase-field theory to model and describe these non-equilibrium reaction pathways, and to directly correlate the observed phase evolution with the battery's discharge performance.