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Sample records for addition-fragmentation chain-transfer raft

  1. 'Green' reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsarilar, Mona; Perrier, Sébastien

    2010-10-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization has revolutionized the field of polymer synthesis as a versatile tool for the production of complex polymeric architectures. As for all chemical processes, research and development in RAFT have to focus on the design and application of chemical products and processes that have a minimum environmental impact, and follow the principles of 'green' chemistry. In this Review, we summarize some of the green features of the RAFT process, and review the recent advances in the production of degradable polymers obtained from RAFT polymerization. Its use to modify biodegradable and renewable inorganic and organic materials to yield more functional products with enhanced applications is also covered. RAFT is a promising candidate for answering both the increasing need of modern society to employ highly functional polymeric materials and the global requirements for developing sustainable chemicals and processes.

  2. Gamma radiation induced synthesis of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) mediated by Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiraç, Feyza; Güven, Olgun

    2015-07-01

    Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNiPAAm) is synthesized by gamma radiation induced Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The monomer is polymerized in the presence of two different trithiocarbonate-based RAFT agents i.e., Cyanomethyldodecyltrithiocarbonate (CDTC) and 2-(Dodecylthiocarbonothioylthio)-2-methylpropionic acid (DMPA) in dimethylformamide (DMF) at room temperature under nitrogen atmosphere. Number-average molecular weights (Mn) and dispersities of the polymers were determined by Size Exclusion Chromatography (SEC). Dispersities (Ɖ) of the resulting polymers are narrow, i.e., Ɖ≤1.18, indicating the occurrence of well-controlled polymerization via radiation induced RAFT process. %Conversion is determined by gravimetric method and also confirmed by Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (1H-NMR) Spectroscopy. By selecting proper [Monomer]/[RAFT] ratio and controlling conversion it is possible to synthesize PNiPAAm in the molecular weight range of 2400-72400 with extremely low molecular weight distributions with the anticipation of preparing corresponding size-controlled nanogels. The phase transition of PNiPAAm with low dispersity synthesized by RAFT is sharper than PNiPAAm synthesized by free radical polymerization.

  3. Biomedical applications of polymers derived by reversible addition - fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT).

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, Benjamin D; Gunatillake, Pathiraja A; Meagher, Laurence

    2015-08-30

    RAFT- mediated polymerization, providing control over polymer length and architecture as well as facilitating post polymerization modification of end groups, has been applied to virtually every facet of biomedical materials research. RAFT polymers have seen particularly extensive use in drug delivery research. Facile generation of functional and telechelic polymers permits straightforward conjugation to many therapeutic compounds while synthesis of amphiphilic block copolymers via RAFT allows for the generation of self-assembled structures capable of carrying therapeutic payloads. With the large and growing body of literature employing RAFT polymers as drug delivery aids and vehicles, concern over the potential toxicity of RAFT derived polymers has been raised. While literature exploring this complication is relatively limited, the emerging consensus may be summed up in three parts: toxicity of polymers generated with dithiobenzoate RAFT agents is observed at high concentrations but not with polymers generated with trithiocarbonate RAFT agents; even for polymers generated with dithiobenzoate RAFT agents, most reported applications call for concentrations well below the toxicity threshold; and RAFT end-groups may be easily removed via any of a variety of techniques that leave the polymer with no intrinsic toxicity attributable to the mechanism of polymerization. The low toxicity of RAFT-derived polymers and the ability to remove end groups via straightforward and scalable processes make RAFT technology a valuable tool for practically any application in which a polymer of defined molecular weight and architecture is desired. PMID:26050529

  4. Study on the performance of polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Binbin; Zeng, Zhong; Ren, Qinyu; Chen, Yang; Liang, Mei; Zou, Huawei

    2016-09-01

    A series of block type polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers (PCs) with different molecular architectures were synthesized with macromonomer butenyl alkylene polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene ether (BAPP) and acrylic acid (AA) by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Fourier-Transformed Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were applied to investigate the PCs' molecular structure. The dispersion capacity of the PCs in cement were also measured, and the results showed that the polycarboxylic dispersing agents prepared by this method were suitable for portlant cement. It was found that the PCs could affect the hydration process, which was performed through retarding the generation of ettringite in the hydrated product. Our studies with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compressive strength measurement of hydrated production were all supporting this conclusion.

  5. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization in microemulsion.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Jennifer M

    2012-04-21

    This tutorial review first details the uncontrolled microemulsion polymerization mechanism, and the RAFT polymerization mechanism to provide the necessary background for examining the RAFT microemulsion polymerization mechanism. The effect of the chain transfer agent per micelle ratio and the chain transfer agent aqueous solubility on the RAFT microemulsion polymerization kinetics, polymer molecular weight and polydispersity, and polymer nanoparticle size are discussed with a focus on oil-in-water microemulsions. Modeling of RAFT microemulsion polymerization kinetics and the resulting final polymer molecular weight are presented to assist with the analysis of observed experimental trends. Lastly, the current significance of RAFT microemulsion polymerization and the future directions are discussed. PMID:22246214

  6. Facile Synthesis of Thiol-terminated Poly(styrene-ran-vinyl phenol) (PSVPh) Copolymers via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) Polymerization and Their Use in the Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles with Controllable Hydrophilicity

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Uk; Roy, Debashish; Dadmun, Mark D

    2010-01-01

    A facile approach to prepare thiol-terminated poly(styrene-ran-vinyl phenol) (PSVPh) copolymers and PSVPh-coated gold nanoparticles is reported with the goal of creating stabilizing ligands for nanoparticles with controlled hydrophilicity. Dithioester-terminated poly(styrene-ran-acetoxystyrene) copolymers were synthesized via RAFT polymerization using cumyl dithiobenzoate as a chain transfer agent. These copolymers were converted to thiol-terminated PSVPh copolymers by a one step hydrazinolysis reaction using hydrazine hydrate to simultaneously convert dithioester-terminal and acetoxypendant groups to thiol-terminal and hydroxyl-pendant groups, respectively. Spectroscopic observations including NMR and IR confirm end- and pendant-group conversion. PSVPh-coated gold nanoparticles were synthesized in the presence of a mixture of thiol-terminated PSVPh and PSVPh copolymers containing disulfides as stabilizing ligands in a water/toluene, two-phase system. The size and size distribution of core gold nanoparticles were determined by TEM and image analysis. The hydrodynamic radius of PSVPh-coated gold nanoparticles was also determined by dynamic light scattering experiment, which confirms the particle analysis by TEM. This procedure provides a facile technique to control the polarity and hydrophilicity of metal nanoparticle surfaces and could prove critical in advancing the control of nanoparticle placement in biological and hierarchically ordered systems, such as diblock copolymers.

  7. [Preparation of epitope imprinted particles for transferrin recognition by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer strategy].

    PubMed

    Li, Qinran; Yang, Kaiguang; Li, Senwu; Liu, Jianxi; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-10-01

    A kind of novel epitope surface imprinted particles was prepared by the reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) strategy. The epitope of transferrin, N-terminal peptide of the protein with nine amino acid residues, was chosen as the template and immobi- lized with covalent interaction on the surface of silica particles through the truss arm glutaraldehyde. The living/controlled polymerization was initialed by 2,2'-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) at 70 °C in the solution of N,N-dimethylformamide, with the regulation by triothioester agent 2-(dodecylthiocarbonothioylthio)-2-methylpropanoic acid. Methacrylic acid and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate were chosen as the functional monomers and N, N-methylenebisacrylamide was chosen as the cross-linker in this polymerization. For this material, the binding capacity of the nine residue peptide could reach 2.36 mg/g with the imprinting factor (IF) of 1.89, while that for transferrin could reach 4.98 mg/g with IF of 1.61. The equilibrium could be achieved in 120 min for the transferrin recognition. In multi-protein competitive recognition, the imprinted factor of transferrin was the highest in the mixture of transferrin and other competitive proteins, such as cytochrome C and β-lactoglobulin. The results indicated that these epitope surface imprinted particles with RAFT strategy could recognize not only the nine residue peptide but also the transferrin with good selectivity, high binding capacity and fast mass transfer. PMID:25739262

  8. Biodegradable Multiblock Poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerization and Click Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Kui; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopečková, Pavla; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2011-01-01

    A new bifunctional chain transfer agent (CTA) containing alkyne end groups was designed, synthesized and used for direct synthesis of clickable telechelic polymers. Good control of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) was achieved by using the new CTA, as indicated by a linear increase of number average molecular weight (Mn) with conversion and low polydispersity (PDI) (<1.1). In particular, enzymatically degradable multiblock HPMA polymers were readily prepared by subsequent reaction with αω, -diazido oligopeptide (GFLG) sequence via CuI catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition. Upon exposure of high molecular weight fractions of multiblock polyHPMA to papain or cathepsin B, the polymer was degraded into segments of molecular weight and narrow polydispersity similar to those of the initial telechelic polyHPMA. PMID:21552355

  9. Surface-imprinted magnetic particles for highly selective sulfonamides recognition prepared by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xia; Pan, Xiaoyan; Chen, Liang; Wang, Sicen

    2016-01-01

    In this work, novel magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) were prepared by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using sulfamerazine as the template. With the controlled/living property of RAFT polymerization, the resulting MMIPs showed high selectivity for sulfonamides recognition. The MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, vibrating sample magnetometer, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The static and selectivity binding experiments demonstrated the desirable adsorption capacity and high selectivity of the MMIPs. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four sulfonamides from aqueous solution. The recoveries of the spiked pond water ranged from 61.2 to 94.1% with RSD lower than 6.5%. This work demonstrated a versatile approach for the preparation of well-constructed MMIPs for application in the field of solid-phase extraction. PMID:26637219

  10. Restricted access chiral stationary phase synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization for direct analysis of biological samples by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Song, Wen-Jun; Wei, Ji-Ping; Wang, Su-Ying; Wang, Huai-Song

    2014-06-17

    Novel hydrophilic microparticles containing β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) were prepared via one-pot synthesis using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) precipitation polymerization, a "controlled/living" radical polymerization technique. The polymerization was initiated by hydrophilic macromolecular chain-transfer agent [poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), PHEMA]. The hydrophilic PHEMA on the surface of microparticles can well improve their surface hydrophilicity and lead to their biological compatibility. As chiral restricted access material (RAM), the hydrophilic microparticles can be used for determination of enantiomers in biological samples with direct injection via HPLC analysis. PMID:24890695

  11. The Potential of Poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerization as Safe Nanocarrier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Guo, Chunhua; Li, Shuo; Luo, Kui; Hu, Jiani; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-06-01

    N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers have been presented as nanoscale drug/gene delivery systems and imaging probes, and the well-defined HPMA copolymers prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization promote their to clinical trials, as the significant enhanced anticancer efficacy. The biosafety is another issue associated with the carriers. In this study, we prepared the linear and branched HPMA copolymers labeled with Cy5.5 via RAFT polymerization and click chemistry, and their potential biosafety was studied. The linear copolymer was prepared via RAFT polymerization mediated by the ends-functionalized peptide chain transfer agent (peptide2CTA), resulting in well-defined and block linear HPMA copolymer with molecular weight (MW) of 98 kDa. Additionally, the branched HPMA copolymer was also prepared via RAFT polymerization. Followed by Cy5.5 labeling, the two copolymers showed negative zeta potential and their accumulation into tumor was studied by in vivo optical fluorescence imaging in the nude mice with breast tumors. The biosafety studies on in vitro cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility studies, including hemolysis tests, plasma coagulation and thromboelastography assay were carried out well, demonstrating that the linear HPMA copolymer-Cy5.5 with MW around 100 kDa and biodegradable moiety in the main chain might be utilized as safe nanoscale carrier. PMID:27427626

  12. Surface protein imprinted core-shell particles for high selective lysozyme recognition prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer strategy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinran; Yang, Kaiguang; Liang, Yu; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Jianxi; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2014-12-24

    A novel kind of lysozyme (Lys) surface imprinted core-shell particles was synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) strategy. With controllable polymer shell chain length, such particles showed obviously improved selectivity for protein recognition. After the RAFT initial agent and template protein was absorbed on silica particles, the prepolymerization solution, with methacrylic acid and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate as the monomers, and N,N'-methylenebis(acrylamide) as the cross-linker, was mixed with the silica particles, and the polymerization was performed at 40 °C in aqueous phase through the oxidation-reduction initiation. Ater polymerization, with the template protein removal and destroying dithioester groups with hexylamine, the surface Lyz imprinted particles were obtained with controllable polymer chain length. The binding capacity of the Lys imprinted particles could reach 5.6 mg protein/g material, with the imprinting factor (IF) as 3.7, whereas the IF of the control material prepared without RAFT strategy was only 1.6. The absorption equilibrium could be achieved within 60 min. Moreover, Lys could be selectively recognized by the imprinted particles from both a four-proteins mixture and egg white sample. All these results demonstrated that these particles prepared by RAFT strategy are promising to achieve the protein recognition with high selectivity. PMID:25434676

  13. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer strategy and its application in the Sudan dyes residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liang; Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Sicen

    2015-07-31

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have become a hotspot owing to the dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the MMIPs were obtained by the surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using Sudan I as the template. The resultant MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and X-ray diffraction. Benefiting from the controlled/living property of the RAFT strategy, the uniform MIP layer was successfully grafted on the surface of RAFT agent-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, favoring the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four Sudan dyes (Sudan I, II, III, and IV) from chili powder samples. The recoveries of the spiked samples in chili powder samples ranged from 74.1 to 93.3% with RSD lower than 6.4% and the relative standard uncertainty lower than 0.029. This work provided a good platform for the extraction and removal of Sudan dyes in complicated matrixes and demonstrated a bright future for the application of the well-constructed MMIPs in the field of solid-phase extraction. PMID:26077971

  14. Novel Dental Restorative Materials having Low Polymerization Shrinkage Stress via Stress Relaxation by Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Young; Kloxin, Christopher J.; Abuelyaman, Ahmed S.; Oxman, Joe D.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To produce a reduced stress dental restorative material while simultaneously maintaining excellent mechanical properties, we have incorporated an allyl sulfide functional group into norbornene-methacrylate comonomer resins. We hypothesize that the addition-fragmentation chain transfer (AFCT) enabled by the presence of the allyl sulfide relieves stress in these methacrylate-based systems while retaining excellent mechanical properties owing to the high glass transition temperature of norbornene-containing resins. Methods An allyl sulfide-containing dinorbornene was stoichiometrically formulated with a ring-containing allyl sulfide-possessing methacrylate. To evaluate the stress relaxation effect as a function of the allyl sulfide concentration, a propyl sulfide-based dinorbornene, not capable of addition-fragmentation, was also formulated with the methacrylate monomer. Shrinkage stress, the glass transition temperature and the elastic modulus were all measured. The composite flexural strength and modulus were also measured. ANOVA (CI 95%) was conducted to determine differences between the means. Results Increasing the allyl sulfide content in the resin dramatically reduces the final stress in the norbornene-methacrylate systems. Both norbornene-methacrylate resins demonstrated almost zero stress (more than 96% stress reduction) compared with the conventional BisGMA/TEGDMA 70/30 wt% control. Mechanical properties of the allyl sulfide-based dental composites were improved to the point of being statistically indistinguishable from the control BisGMA-TEGDMA by changing the molar ratio between the methacrylate and norbornene functionalities. Significance The allyl sulfide-containing norbornene-methacrylate networks possessed super-ambient Tg, and demonstrated significantly lower shrinkage stress when compared with the control (BisGMA/TEGDMA 70 to 30 wt%). Although additional development remains, these low stress materials exhibit excellent mechanical

  15. Z-Group ketone chain transfer agents for RAFT polymer nanoparticle modification via hydrazone conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Saibal; Xia, Xin; Maiseiyeu, Andrei; Mihai, Georgeta; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    A ketal-containing trithiocarbonyl compound has been synthesized and characterized as a chain transfer agent (CTA) in Reversible Addition Fragmentation Transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The ketal functionality does not interfere with RAFT polymerization of acrylate monomers, which proceeds as previously reported to yield macro-CTA polymers and block co-polymers. Post-polymerization ketal cleavage revealed ketone functionality at the polar terminus of an amphiphilic block co-polymer. Hydrazone-formation was facile in both organic solution as well as in aqueous buffer where polymer nanoparticle assemblies were formed, indicating a conjugation/end-functionalization yield of 40–50%. Conjugation was verified with fluorescein, biotin and Gd-DOTA derivatives, and though the trithiocarbonate linkage is hydrolytically labile, we observed stable conjugation for several days at pH 7.4. and 37°C. As expected, streptavidin binding to biotinylated polymer micelles was observed, and size-change based relaxivity increases were observed when Gd-DOTA hydrazide was conjugated to polymer micelles. Cell-uptake of fluorescently labeled polymer micelles was also readily tracked by FACS and fluorescence microscopy. These polymer derivatives demonstrate a range of potential theranostic/biotechnological applications for this conveniently accessible keto-CTA, which include ligand-based nanoparticle targeting and fluorescent/MR nanoparticle contrast agents. PMID:23148126

  16. Reversible Addition Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) Polymerization in Undergraduate Polymer Science Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, T. L. U.; Bennet, Francesca; Stenzel, Martina H.; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    This 8-hour experiment (spread over two 4-hour sessions) is designed to equip students with essential skills in polymer synthesis, particularly in synthesizing polymers of well-defined molecular weight. The experiment involves the synthesis and characterization of poly(vinyl neodecanoate) via living free radical polymerization, specifically the…

  17. Preparation of a bifunctional pyrazosulfuron-ethyl imprinted polymer with hydrophilic external layers by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization and its application in the sulfonylurea residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Meixian; Zhang, Yingying; Lin, Shen; Yang, Xinlin; Fan, Zhijin; Yang, Lixia; Dong, Xiangchao

    2013-09-30

    A new bifunctional pyrazosulfuron-ethyl imprinted polymer was synthesized by the combination of molecular imprinting technology and living radical polymerization. In the synthesis, the pyrazosulfuron-ethyl imprinted polymer was obtained by the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) precipitation polymerization followed by grafting poly(glyceryl monomethacrylate) (pGMMA) by the post-RAFT polymerization. In this research, we used polyethylene glycol (PEG) as the polymeric porogen in order to increase the porosity of the material which is a new porogen application in the precipitation polymerization. The imprinted polymer has selectivity for the template and ability of humic acids exclusion which has shown the merits of molecularly imprinted polymers and restricted access materials. An online solid-phase extraction/HPLC method for the analysis of three sulfonylurea residues in soil samples has been developed and validated. The recovery of 81-99% in the spiked levels of 40-200 μg kg(-1) was obtained and the limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were less than 4.8 and 15.9 μg kg(-1) respectively. The results demonstrated that this bifunctional material can be used for the efficient pyrazosulfuron-ethyl extraction in the sulfonylurea residue analysis from environmental samples. PMID:23953454

  18. Molecularly imprinted polymer coated solid-phase microextraction fiber prepared by surface reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization for monitoring of Sudan dyes in chilli tomato sauce and chilli pepper samples.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaogang; Fan, Yanan; Zhang, Yi; Dai, Guimei; Cai, Quanling; Cao, Yujuan; Guo, Changjuan

    2012-06-20

    Surface reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization method was firstly applied to the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) coated silicon solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fibers. With Sudan I as template, an ultra-thin MIP coating with about 0.55-μm thickness was obtained with homogeneous structure and controlled composition, due to the controllable radical growing and chain propagation in surface RAFT polymerization. The MIP-coated fibers were found with enhanced selectivity coefficients (3.0-6.5) to Sudan I-IV dyes in contrast with those reported in our previous work. Furthermore, the ultra-thin thickness of MIP coating was helpful to the effective elution of template and fast adsorption/desorption kinetics, so only about 18 min was needed for MIP-coated SPME operation. The detection limits of 21-55 ng L(-1) were achieved for four Sudan dyes, when MIP-coated SPME was coupled with liquid chromatography (LC) and mass spectrometry (MS) detection. The MIP-coated SPME-LC-MS/MS method was tested for the monitoring of ultra trace Sudan dyes in spiked chilli tomato sauce and chilli pepper samples, and high enrichment effect, remarkable matrix peaks-removing capability, and consequent high sensitivities were achieved to four Sudan dyes. PMID:22652263

  19. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers synthesized by surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization for the enrichment and determination of synthetic estrogens in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Zhang, Jingjing; Wang, Minjun; Kong, Jie

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers have attracted significant interest because of their multifunctionality of selective recognition of target molecules and rapid magnetic response. In this contribution, magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized via surface-initiated reversible addition addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization using diethylstilbestrol as the template for the enrichment of synthetic estrogens. The uniform imprinted surface layer and the magnetic property of the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers favored a fast binding kinetics and rapid analysis of target molecules. The static and selective binding experiments demonstrated a desirable adsorption capacity and good selectivity of the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers in comparison to magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers. Accordingly, a corresponding analytical method was developed in which magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were employed as magnetic solid-phase extraction materials for the concentration and determination of four synthetic estrogens (diethylstilbestrol, hexestrol, dienestrol, and bisphenol A) in fish pond water. The recoveries of these synthetic estrogens in spiked fish pond water samples ranged from 61.2 to 99.1% with a relative standard deviation of lower than 6.3%. This study provides a versatile approach to prepare well-defined magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers sorbents for the analysis of synthetic estrogens in water solution. PMID:25989155

  20. Thermally conductive, electrically insulating and melt-processable polystyrene/boron nitride nanocomposites prepared by in situ reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xingyi; Wang, Shen; Zhu, Ming; Yang, Ke; Jiang, Pingkai; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    Thermally conductive and electrically insulating polymer/boron nitride (BN) nanocomposites are highly attractive for various applications in many thermal management fields. However, so far most of the preparation methods for polymer/BN nanocomposites have usually caused difficulties in the material post processing. Here, an in situ grafting approach is designed to fabricate thermally conductive, electrically insulating and post-melt processable polystyrene (PS)/BN nanosphere (BNNS) nanocomposites by initiating styrene (St) on the surface functionalized BNNSs via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The nanocomposites exhibit significantly enhanced thermal conductivity. For example, at a St/BN feeding ratio of 5:1, an enhancement ratio of 1375% is achieved in comparison with pure PS. Moreover, the dielectric properties of the nanocomposites show a desirable weak dependence on frequency, and the dielectric loss tangent of the nanocomposites remains at a very low level. More importantly, the nanocomposites can be subjected to multiple melt processing to form different shapes. Our method can become a universal approach to prepare thermally conductive, electrically insulating and melt-processable polymer nanocomposites with diverse monomers and nanofillers. PMID:25493655

  1. Thermally conductive, electrically insulating and melt-processable polystyrene/boron nitride nanocomposites prepared by in situ reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xingyi; Wang, Shen; Zhu, Ming; Yang, Ke; Jiang, Pingkai; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Zhi, Chunyi

    2015-01-01

    Thermally conductive and electrically insulating polymer/boron nitride (BN) nanocomposites are highly attractive for various applications in many thermal management fields. However, so far most of the preparation methods for polymer/BN nanocomposites have usually caused difficulties in the material post processing. Here, an in situ grafting approach is designed to fabricate thermally conductive, electrically insulating and post-melt processable polystyrene (PS)/BN nanosphere (BNNS) nanocomposites by initiating styrene (St) on the surface functionalized BNNSs via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The nanocomposites exhibit significantly enhanced thermal conductivity. For example, at a St/BN feeding ratio of 5:1, an enhancement ratio of 1375% is achieved in comparison with pure PS. Moreover, the dielectric properties of the nanocomposites show a desirable weak dependence on frequency, and the dielectric loss tangent of the nanocomposites remains at a very low level. More importantly, the nanocomposites can be subjected to multiple melt processing to form different shapes. Our method can become a universal approach to prepare thermally conductive, electrically insulating and melt-processable polymer nanocomposites with diverse monomers and nanofillers.

  2. Surface molecular imprinting onto fluorescein-coated magnetic nanoparticlesvia reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization: A facile three-in-one system for recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Dong, Cunku; Chu, Jia; Qi, Jingyao; Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we present a general protocol for the making of surface-imprinted magnetic fluorescence beads viareversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The resulting composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized beads exhibited homogeneous polymer films (thickness of about 5.7 nm), spherical shape, high fluorescence intensity and magnetic property (Magnetization (Ms) = 3.67 emu g-1). The hybrids bind the original template 17β-estradiol with an appreciable selectivity over structurally related compounds. In addition, the resulting hybrids performed without obvious deterioration after five repeated cycles. This study therefore demonstrates the potential of molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals.In this study, we present a general protocol for the making of surface-imprinted magnetic fluorescence beads viareversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The resulting composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized beads exhibited homogeneous polymer films (thickness of about 5.7 nm), spherical shape, high fluorescence intensity and magnetic property (Magnetization (Ms) = 3.67 emu g-1). The hybrids bind the original template 17β-estradiol with an appreciable selectivity over structurally related compounds. In addition, the resulting hybrids performed without obvious deterioration after five repeated cycles. This study therefore demonstrates the potential of molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals. Electronic

  3. Facile Fabrication of Water Dispersible Latex Particles with Homogeneous or Chain-Segregated Surface from RAFT Polymerization Using a Mixture of Two Macromolecular Chain Transfer Agents.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Hong, Liangzhi; Wang, Chaoyang

    2016-04-01

    Water dispersible latex particles with randomly mixed shells or chain segregated surface are synthesized from one-pot reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer heterogeneous polymerization of benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) using a mixture of poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PGMA) and poly(2,3-bis(succinyloxy)propyl methacrylate) (PBSPMA) macromolecular chain transfer agents. In methanol, the two in situ synthesized PGMA-b-PBzMA and PBSPMA-b-PBzMA diblock copolymers coaggregate into spherical micelles, which contain PBzMA core and discrete PGMA and PBSPMA nanodomains on the shell. In contrast, in water-methanol mixture (V/V = 9/1), latex particles with homogeneous distribution of PGMA and PBSPMA polymer chains on the shell are obtained. The reasons leading to formation of latex particles with homogenous or chain-segregated surface are discussed, and polymerization kinetics and physical state of PBSPMA in methanol and water-methanol mixtures are ascribed. These polymeric micelles with patterned functional group on the surface are potentially important for application in supracolloidal hierarchical assemblies and catalysis. PMID:26954075

  4. Well-Defined Macromolecules Using Horseradish Peroxidase as a RAFT Initiase.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Alex P; Bailey-Van Kuren, Dylan; Lucius, Melissa E; Makaroff, Katherine; Williams, Cameron; Page, Richard C; Berberich, Jason A; Konkolewicz, Dominik

    2016-02-01

    Enzymatic catalysis and control over macromolecular architectures from reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) are combined to give a new method of making polymers. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is used to catalytically generate radicals using hydrogen peroxide and acetylacetone as a mediator. RAFT is used to control the polymer structure. HRP catalyzed RAFT polymerization gives acrylate and acrylamide polymers with relatively narrow molecular weight distributions. The polymerization is rapid, typically exceeding 90% monomer conversion in 30 min. Complex macromolecular architectures including a block copolymer and a protein-polymer conjugate are synthesized using HRP to catalytically initiate RAFT polymerization. PMID:26748786

  5. Molecular Imprinting of Silica Nanoparticle Surfaces via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Polymerization for Optical Biosensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluz, Zehra; Nayab, Sana; Kursun, Talya Tugana; Caykara, Tuncer; Yameen, Basit; Duran, Hatice

    Azo initiator modified surface of silica nanoparticles were coated via reversible addition-fragmentation polymerization (RAFT) of methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate using 2-phenylprop 2-yl dithobenzoate as chain transfer agent. Using L-phenylalanine anilide as template during polymerization led molecularly imprinted nanoparticles. RAFT polymerization offers an efficient control of grafting process, while molecularly imprinted polymers shows enhanced capacity as sensor. L-phenylalanine anilide imprinted silica particles were characterized by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM). Performances of the particles were followed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) after coating the final product on gold deposited glass substrate against four different analogous of analyte molecules: D-henylalanine anilide, L-tyrosine, L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine. Characterizations indicated that silica particles coated with polymer layer do contain binding sites for L-phenylalanine anilide, and are highly selective for the molecule of interest. This project was supported by TUBITAK (Project No:112M804).

  6. Addition-fragmentation reaction of thionoesters compounds in free-radical polymerisation (methyl, cyanomethyl and styryl): a theoretical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, Douniazed; Ouddai, Nadia; Arotçaréna, Michel; Chermette, Henry

    2015-07-01

    A joint experimental and theoretical study has been carried out on reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerisation (RAFT). We have performed density functional theory calculations at the (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) PBE/triple zeta plus polarisation level to analyse the RAFT mechanisms corresponding to these compounds. Global and local reactivity indices have been calculated to investigate the effect of the addition of methyl, cyanomethyl and styryl radicals on the double bond C=S of thionoester compounds producing an adduct radical. This mechanism is shown to be difficult when the cyanomethyl is used contrarily to the methyl and styryl radicals, in agreement with experimental results. The activation barrier of fragmentation of adduct radicals does not correlate well with the length of fragmented bond (O-Cα). The bond topological analysis of radical adduct predicts that the distance between the oxygen and a critical point (O-CP) in the fragment bond is a good parameter to estimate the activation energy of the fragmentation mechanism. It is shown that the nature of the free radicals is more selective than that of the thionoester compounds. With an overall large agreement with experiments, these theoretical results afford an explanation of the efficiency for the RAFT mechanism.

  7. Templateless synthesis of polyacrylamide-based Nanogels via RAFT dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; Xu, Yuanyuan; An, Zesheng

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of well-defined polyacrylamide-based nanogels via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion polymerization, highlighting a templateless route for the efficient synthesis of nanogels based on water-soluble polymers. RAFT dispersion polymerization of acrylamide in co-nonsolvents of water-tert-butanol mixtures by chain extension from poly(dimethylacrylamide) shows well-controlled polymerization process, uniform nanogel size, and excellent colloidal stability. The versatility of this approach is further demonstrated by introducing a hydrophobic co-monomer (butyl acrylate) without disturbing the dispersion polymerization process. PMID:25684634

  8. Improved Livingness and Control over Branching in RAFT Polymerization of Acrylates: Could Microflow Synthesis Make the Difference?

    PubMed

    Derboven, Pieter; Van Steenberge, Paul H M; Vandenbergh, Joke; Reyniers, Marie-Francoise; Junkers, Thomas; D'hooge, Dagmar R; Marin, Guy B

    2015-12-01

    The superior capabilities of structured microreactors over batch reactors are demonstrated for reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) solution polymerization of n-butyl acrylate with the aid of simulations, explicitly accounting for the chain length distribution of all macrospecies types. Since perfect isothermicity can be established in a microreactor, less side products due to backbiting and β-scission are formed compared to the batch operation in which ineffective heat removal leads to an undesirable temperature spike. For a given RAFT chain transfer agent (CTA), additional microstructural control results under microflow conditions by optimizing the reaction temperature, lowering the dilution degree, or decreasing the initial molar ratio of monomer to RAFT CTA. PMID:26400634

  9. Poly(vinyl ester) Block Copolymers Synthesized by Reversible Addition−Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerizations

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscomb, Corinne E.; Mahanthappa, Mahesh K.

    2009-07-31

    Homopolymerizations and block copolymerizations of vinyl acetate (VAc), vinyl pivalate (VPv), and vinyl benzoate (VBz) by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization have been studied. Polymerizations of VAc initiated with 2,2{prime}-azobis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) at 60 C using two different xanthate RAFT agents C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OC(=S)SR (R = -CH(CH{sub 3})CO{sub 2}C{sub 2}H{sub 5} (1) and -CH(CH{sub 3})O{sub 2}CC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} (2)) were examined to elucidate the dependence of the polydispersities of the resulting polymers on the RAFT agent leaving group R. RAFT agent 2, in which the leaving R-group mimics a growing vinyl ester polymer chain, consistently yields poly(vinyl acetates) having broader polydispersities than those synthesized using 1 (M{sub n} = 3.6-14 kg/mol and M{sub w}/M{sub n} = 1.15-1.33). While VPv exhibits similar controlled polymerization behavior to VAc, RAFT homopolymerizations of VBz mediated by 1 indicate this electron-deficient vinyl ester requires higher temperatures to effect controlled polymerizations to yield polymers having M{sub n} = 4-14 kg/mol and M{sub w}/M{sub n} = 1.29-1.53. Chain extension reactions from xanthate-terminated vinyl ester homopolymers with VAc, VPv, and VBz proceed with variable efficiencies to furnish block copolymers that microphase separate in the melt state as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering.

  10. Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) grafted polyethylene/polypropylene (PE/PP) nonwoven fabric by γ-initiation: Synthesis, characterization and benefits of RAFT mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Yasko; Barsbay, Murat; Güven, Olgun

    2014-12-01

    Polyethylene/polypropylene (PE/PP) nonwoven fabrics were functionalized by γ-initiated RAFT mediated grafting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), and the characterization of the grafted samples was carried out using various techniques. FTIR and XPS analysis showed an increase in the oxygenated content till a certain degree of grafting. The results implied a grafting process following the concept of ‘front mechanism’. The initial grafting occurred on the topmost surface layer, and then moved further into the bulk of the polymer matrix. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) mediated grafting yielded a better controlled grafting when compared to those obtained in conventional grafting.

  11. Early Career: Templating of Liquid Crystal Microstructures by Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Heinen, Jennifer M

    2014-12-31

    This research has shown that the microstructure of self-assembled copolymers can be decoupled from the polymer chemistry. The simplest polymer architecture, linear block copolymers, is valuable for a broad range of applications, including adhesives and coatings, medical devices, electronics and energy storage, because these block copolymers reproducibly self-assemble into microphase separated nanoscale domains. Unfortunately, the self-assembled microstructure is tuned by polymer composition, thus limiting the potential to simultaneously optimize chemical, mechanical, and transport properties for desired applications. To this end, much work was been put into manipulating block copolymer self-assembly independently of polymer composition. These efforts have included the use of additives or solvents to alter polymer chain conformation, the addition of a third monomer to produce ABC triblock terpolymers, architectures with mixed blocks, such as tapered/gradient polymers, and the synthesis of other nonlinear molecular architectures. This work has shown that the microstructures formed by linear ABC terpolymers can be altered by controlling the architecture of the polymer molecules at a constant monomer composition, so that the microstructure is tuned independently from the chemical properties.

  12. Cationic RAFT polymerization using ppm concentrations of organic acid.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Mineto; Satoh, Kotaro; Kamigaito, Masami

    2015-02-01

    A metal-free, cationic, reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization was proposed and realized. A series of thiocarbonylthio compounds were used in the presence of a small amount of triflic acid for isobutyl vinyl ether to give polymers with controlled molecular weight of up to 1×10(5) and narrow molecular-weight distributions (Mw /Mn <1.1). This "living" or controlled cationic polymerization is applicable to various electron-rich monomers including vinyl ethers, p-methoxystyrene, and even p-hydroxystyrene that possesses an unprotected phenol group. A transformation from cationic to radical RAFT polymerization enables the synthesis of block copolymers between cationically and radically polymerizable monomers, such as vinyl ether and vinyl acetate or methyl acrylate. PMID:25511364

  13. RAFT Polymerization of N-[3-(Trimethoxysilyl)-propyl]acrylamide and Its Versatile Use in Silica Hybrid Materials.

    PubMed

    Maçon, Anthony L B; Greasley, Sarah L; Becer, C Remzi; Jones, Julian R

    2015-12-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and characterization of an alkoxysilane acrylamide monomer using a trithiocarbonate chain transfer agent are described. Poly(N-[3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]acrylamide) (PTMSPAA) homopolymers are obtained with good control over the polymerization. A linear increase in the molecular weight is observed whereas the polydispersity values do not exceed 1.2 regardless of the monomer conversion. Moreover, PTMSPAA is used as a macro-RAFT agent to polymerize N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM). By varying the degree of polymerization of NIPAM within the block copolymer, different sizes of thermoresponsive particles are obtained. These particles are stabilized by the condensation of the alkoxysilane moieties of the polymers. Furthermore, a co-network of silica and PTMSPAA is prepared using the sol-gel process. After drying, transparent mesoporous hybrids are obtained with a surface area of up to 400 m(2) g(-1). PMID:26288010

  14. Elucidation of the Key Role of [Ru(bpy)3 ](2+) in Photocatalyzed RAFT Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Christmann, Julien; Ibrahim, Ahmad; Charlot, Vincent; Croutxé-Barghorn, Céline; Ley, Christian; Allonas, Xavier

    2016-08-01

    Photocatalysis reactions using [Ru(II) (bpy)3 ](2+) were studied on the example of visible-light-sensitized reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Although both photoinduced electron- and energy-transfer mechanisms are able to describe this interaction, no definitive experimental proof has been presented so far. This paper investigates the actual mechanism governing this reaction. A set of RAFT agents was selected, their redox potentials measured by cyclic voltammetry, and relaxed triplet energies calculated by quantum mechanics. Gibbs free-energy values were calculated for both electron- and energy-transfer mechanisms. Quenching rate constants were determined by laser flash photolysis. The results undoubtedly evidence the involvement of a photoinduced energy-transfer reaction. Controlled photopolymerization experiments are discussed in the light of the primary photochemical process and photodissociation ability of RAFT agent triplet states. PMID:27124095

  15. Rheology of Hyperbranched Poly(triglyceride)-Based Thermoplastic Elastomers via RAFT polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mengguo; Cochran, Eric

    2014-03-01

    In this contribution we discuss how melt- and solid-state properties are influenced by the degree of branching and molecular weight in a family of hyperbranched thermoplastics derived from soybean oil. Acrylated epoxidized triglycerides from soybean oils have been polymerized to hyperbranched thermoplastic elastomers using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. With the proper choice of chain transfer agent, both homopolymer and block copolymer can be synthesized. By changing the number of acrylic groups per triglycerides, the chain architectures can range from nearly linear to highly branched. We show how the fundamental viscoelastic properties (e.g. entanglement molecular weight, plateau modulus, etc.) are influenced by chain architecture and molecular weight.

  16. Polymerization-induced self-assembly of block copolymer nano-objects via RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Warren, Nicholas J; Armes, Steven P

    2014-07-23

    In this Perspective, we discuss the recent development of polymerization-induced self-assembly mediated by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) aqueous dispersion polymerization. This approach has quickly become a powerful and versatile technique for the synthesis of a wide range of bespoke organic diblock copolymer nano-objects of controllable size, morphology, and surface functionality. Given its potential scalability, such environmentally-friendly formulations are expected to offer many potential applications, such as novel Pickering emulsifiers, efficient microencapsulation vehicles, and sterilizable thermo-responsive hydrogels for the cost-effective long-term storage of mammalian cells. PMID:24968281

  17. Automated parallel freeze-evacuate-thaw degassing method for oxygen-sensitive reactions: RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Sanchez, Carlos; Keddie, Daniel J; Saubern, Simon; Chiefari, John

    2012-07-01

    An automated and parallel freeze-evacuate-thaw degassing method in a commercially available synthesizer is disclosed and tested for its applicability to reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The effectiveness of this method to eliminate oxygen in polymerization reactions is demonstrated by directly comparing it against experiments performed using conventional laboratory techniques. Apart from the demonstrated accuracy, the proposed method has also shown significant precision when performing RAFT polymerizations. The reported experimental technique can be easily adapted to other chemical systems where the removal of oxygen is mandatory. This new high-throughput method has the potential to significantly increase the productivity and/or research outcomes in laboratories where oxygen-sensitive reactions are carried out. PMID:22709484

  18. Selective Uptake of a Fructose Glycopolymer Prepared by RAFT Polymerization into Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    von der Ehe, Christian; Rinkenauer, Alexandra; Weber, Christine; Szamosvari, David; Gottschaldt, Michael; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2016-04-01

    A new methacrylic fructose glycomonomer is synthesized and copolymerized with N-isopropyl acrylamide by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) poly-merization. By additional copolymerization of the analog mannose, glucose, and galactose glycomonomers, a set of glycopolymers is obtained which vary in the type of sugar attached to the polyacrylamide backbone. The glycopolymers are subsequently deprotected and characterized by size exclusion chromatography, FT-IR and NMR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, as well as turbidimetry, revealing the thermoresponsive character of all synthesized glycopolymers. The deprotected glycopolymers are subsequently labeled with a Rhodamine B derivative, utilizing the thiol-functionalities derived from the RAFT endgroups. As concluded from the ArlamaBlue assay, the glycopolymers are not cytotoxic. Finally, cellular uptake studies reveal a higher uptake of the fructose polymer into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells compared to the other glycopolymers, which demonstrates the high potential of fructosylated polymers for potential applications in the targeted treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26688011

  19. Degradable PEGylated Protein Conjugates Utilizing RAFT Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Caitlin G.; Maynard, Heather D.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-protein therapeutics exhibit enhanced pharmacokinetics, but have drawbacks including decreased protein activities and polymer accumulation in the body. Therefore a major aim for second-generation polymer therapeutics is to introduce degradability into the backbone. Herein we describe the synthesis of poly(poly(ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate)) (pPEGMA) degradable polymers with protein-reactive end-groups via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and the subsequent covalent attachment to lysozyme through a reducible disulfide linkage. RAFT copolymerization of cyclic ketene acetal (CKA) monomer 5,6-benzo-2-methylene-1,3-dioxepane (BMDO) with PEGMA yielded two polymers with number-average molecular weight (Mn) (GPC) of 10.9 and 20.9 kDa and molecular weight dispersities (Ð) of 1.34 and 1.71, respectively. Hydrolytic degradation of the polymers was analyzed by 1H-NMR and GPC under basic and acidic conditions. The reversible covalent attachment of these polymers to lysozyme, as well as the hydrolytic and reductive cleavage of the polymer from the protein, was analyzed by gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Following reductive cleavage of the polymer, an increase in activity was observed for both conjugates, with the released protein having full activity. This represents a method to prepare PEGylated proteins, where the polymer is readily cleaved from the protein and the main chain of the polymer is degradable. PMID:25937643

  20. RAFT technology for the production of advanced photoresist polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Michael T.; Farnham, William B.; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Sounik, James R.; Clark, George

    2008-03-01

    Reversible Addition Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) technology has been developed for use in producing high yield low polydispersity (PD) polymers for many applications. RAFT technology is being used to produce low PD polymers and to allow control of the polymer architecture. A variety of polymers are being synthesized for use in advanced photoresists using this technique. By varying the RAFT reagent used we can modulate the system reactivity of the RAFT reagent and optimize it for use in acrylate or methacrylate monomer systems (193 and 193i photoresist polymers) or for use in styrenic monomer systems (248 nm photoresist polymers) to achieve PD as low as 1.05. RAFT polymerization technology also allows us to produce block copolymers using a wide variety of monomers. These block copolymers have been shown to be useful in self assembly polymer applications to produce unique and very small feature sizes. The mutual compatibilities of all the components within a single layer 193 photoresist are very important in order to achieve low LWR and low defect count. The advent of immersion imaging demands an additional element of protection at the solid/liquid interface. We have used RAFT technology to produce block copolymers comprising a random "resist" block with composition and size based on conventional dry photoresist materials, and a "low surface energy" block for use in 193i lithography. The relative block lengths and compositions may be varied to tune solution behavior, surface energy, contact angles, and solubility in developer. The use of this technique will be explored to produce polymers used in hydrophobic single layer resists as well as additives compatible with the main photoresist polymer.

  1. Antibacterial cellulose fiber via RAFT surface graft polymerization.

    PubMed

    Roy, Debashish; Knapp, Jeremy S; Guthrie, James T; Perrier, Sébastien

    2008-01-01

    2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) was polymerized from cellulosic filter paper via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The tertiary amino groups of the grafted PDMAEMA chains were subsequently quaternized with alkyl bromides of different chain lengths (C8-C16) to provide a large concentration of quaternary ammonium groups on the cellulose surface. The antibacterial activity of the quaternized and nonquaternized PDMAEMA-grafted cellulosic fibers was tested against Escherichia coli. The antibacterial activity was found to depend on the alkyl chain length and on the degree of quaternization, i.e., the amount of quaternary amino groups present in the cellulose graft copolymers. The PDMAEMA-grafted cellulose fiber with the highest degree of quaternization and quaternized with the shortest alkyl chains was found to exhibit particularly high activity against E. coli. PMID:18067264

  2. Synthesis of water-compatible surface-imprinted polymer via click chemistry and RAFT precipitation polymerization for highly selective and sensitive electrochemical assay of fenitrothion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijuan; Zhao, Faqiong; Zeng, Baizhao

    2014-12-15

    A novel water-compatible fenitrothion imprinted polymer was prepared on Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) by click chemistry and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) precipitation polymerization (RAFTPP). The RAFT chain-transfer agent was synthesized on the surface of AuNPs using click chemistry, then an imprinted polymer with hydrophilic polymer brushes was prepared on the RAFT chain-transfer agent modified AuNPs by RAFTPP, mediated by hydrophilic polyethylene glycol macromolecular cochain-transfer agent. The obtained molecularly imprinted material showed improved accessibility to fenitrothion and recognition property in water medium. When the material was immobilized on an ionic liquid functionalized graphene coated glassy carbon electrode for the electrochemical determination of fenitrothion, the resulting electrochemical sensor presented linear response in the range of 0.01-5 μM, with a sensitivity of 6.1 μA/μM mm(2). The low limit of detection was 8 nM (S/N=3). The sensor was successfully applied to the determination of real samples and the recovery for standard added was 95-108%. PMID:24973538

  3. Controlled RAFT Polymerization of 2-Vinyl-4,4-Dimethylazlactone (VDMA): A Facile Route to Bio-Inspired Polymer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lokitz, Bradley S; Messman, Jamie M; Hinestrosa Salazar, Juan Pablo; Alonzo Calderon, Jose E; Verduzco, Rafael; Brown, Rebecca H; Osa, Masashi; Ankner, John Francis; Kilbey, II, S Michael

    2009-01-01

    We report the controlled radical polymerization of 2-vinyl-4,4-dimethyl azlactone (VDMA), a 2-alkenyl-2-oxazolin-5-one monomer that contains a polymerizable vinyl moiety as well as a highly reactive, pendant azlactone as well as solution characterizations and surface attachment and functionaliztion. Reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) was used to polymerize of VDMA in benzene at 65 C using either 2-(2-cyanopropyl) dithiobenzoate (CPDB) or 2-dodecylsulfanylthiocarbonyl-sulfanyl-2-methylpropionic acid (DMP) as RAFT chain transfer agents (CTAs). The pseudo first order kinetics and resultant well-defined polymers of low polydispersity indicate that both CTAs afford control over the RAFT polymerization of VDMA. Dynamic and static light scattering and small angle neutron scattering were performed to determine the dn/dc, weight-average molecular weight, radius of gyration, and second virial coefficient of VDMA homopolymers in THF. Additionally, well-defined polymers of VDMA containing carboxyl end groups were covalently attached to epoxy modified silicon wafers via esterification to produce polymeric scaffolds that could be subsequently functionalized for various bio-inspired applications.

  4. Tailor-Made Fluorinated Copolymer/Clay Nanocomposite by Cationic RAFT Assisted Pickering Miniemulsion Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Arindam; Zhang, Longhe; Cavicchi, Kevin A; Weiss, R A; Singha, Nikhil K

    2015-11-17

    Fluorinated polymers in emulsion find enormous applications in hydrophobic surface coating. Currently, lots of efforts are being made to develop specialty polymer emulsions which are free from surfactants. This investigation reports the preparation of a fluorinated copolymer via Pickering miniemulsion polymerization. In this case, 2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl acrylate (PFPA), methyl methacrylate (MMA), and n-butyl acrylate (nBA) were copolymerized in miniemulsion using Laponite-RDS as the stabilizer. The copolymerization was carried out via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) process. Here, a cationic RAFT agent, S-1-dodecyl-S'-(methylbenzyltriethylammonium bromide) trithiocarbonate (DMTTC), was used to promote polymer-Laponite interaction by means of ionic attraction. The polymerization was much faster when Laponite content was 30 wt % or above with 1.2 wt % RAFT agent. The stability of the miniemulsion in terms of zeta potential was found to be dependent on the amount of both Laponite and RAFT agent. The miniemulsion had particle sizes in the range of 200-300 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses showed the formation of Laponite armored spherical copolymer particles. The fluorinated copolymer films had improved surface properties because of polymer-Laponite interaction. PMID:26492220

  5. Designing materials for advanced microelectronic patterning applications using controlled polymerization RAFT technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Michael T.; Farnham, William B.; Chambers, Charles R.; Tran, Hoang V.; Okazaki, Hiroshi; Brun, Yefim; Romberger, Matthew L.; Sounik, James R.

    2011-04-01

    Reversible Addition Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization technology enables the production of polymers possessing low polydispersity (PD) in high yield for many applications. RAFT technology also enables control over polymer architecture. With synthetic control over these polymer characteristics, a variety of polymers can be designed and manufactured for use in advanced electronic applications. By matching the specific RAFT reagent and monomer combinations, we can accommodate monomer reactivity and optimize acrylate or methacrylate polymerizations (193 and 193i photoresist polymers) or optimize styrenic monomer systems (248 nm photoresist polymers) to yield polymers with PD as low as 1.05. For 193i lithography, we have used RAFT technology to produce block copolymers comprising of a random "resist" block with composition and size based on conventional dry photoresist materials and a "low surface energy" block The relative block lengths and compositions may be varied to tune solution migration behavior, surface energy, contact angles, and solubility in developer. Directed self assembly is proving to be an interesting and innovative method to make 2- and even 3-dimensional periodic, uniform patterns. Two keys to acceptable performance of directed self assembly from block copolymers are the uniformity and the purity of the materials will be discussed.

  6. Facile and Efficient Preparation of Tri-component Fluorescent Glycopolymers via RAFT-controlled Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Lester, John M.; Amorosa, Anthony E.; Chance, Deborah L.; Mossine, Valeri V.; Mawhinney, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic glycopolymers are instrumental and versatile tools used in various biochemical and biomedical research fields. An example of a facile and efficient synthesis of well-controlled fluorescent statistical glycopolymers using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT)-based polymerization is demonstrated. The synthesis starts with the preparation of β-galactose-containing glycomonomer 2-lactobionamidoethyl methacrylamide obtained by reaction of lactobionolactone and N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide (AEMA). 2-Gluconamidoethyl methacrylamide (GAEMA) is used as a structural analog lacking a terminal β-galactoside. The following RAFT-mediated copolymerization reaction involves three different monomers: N-(2-hydroxyethyl) acrylamide as spacer, AEMA as target for further fluorescence labeling, and the glycomonomers. Tolerant of aqueous systems, the RAFT agent used in the reaction is (4-cyanopentanoic acid)-4-dithiobenzoate. Low dispersities (≤1.32), predictable copolymer compositions, and high reproducibility of the polymerizations were observed among the products. Fluorescent polymers are obtained by modifying the glycopolymers with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester targeting the primary amine functional groups on AEMA. Lectin-binding specificities of the resulting glycopolymers are verified by testing with corresponding agarose beads coated with specific glycoepitope recognizing lectins. Because of the ease of the synthesis, the tight control of the product compositions and the good reproducibility of the reaction, this protocol can be translated towards preparation of other RAFT-based glycopolymers with specific structures and compositions, as desired. PMID:26132587

  7. Fabrication of cell outer membrane mimetic polymer brush on polysulfone surface via RAFT technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qian; Zhang, Hui; Zhao, Jiang; Gong, Yong-Kuan

    2012-10-01

    Cell membrane mimetic antifouling polymer brush was grown on polysulfone (PSF) membrane by surface-induced reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC). The RAFT agent immobilized PSF substrate was prepared by successive chloromethylation, amination with ethylenediamine (EDA) and amidation of the amine group of grafted EDA with the carboxylic group of 4-cyanopentanoic acid dithiobenzoate (CPAD). The surface RAFT polymerization of MPC was initiated in aqueous solution by 4,4‧-azobis-4-cyanopentanoic acid (ACPA). The formation of PMPC brush coating is evidenced by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle measurements. The degree of polymerization of PMPC and the polymer grafting density were calculated from the high resolution XPS spectra. The platelet adhesion and protein adsorption results showed that the PMPC-grafted PSF surface has excellent antifouling ability to resist platelet adhesion completely and suppress protein adsorption significantly. This biomimetic and bio-friendly surface RAFT polymerization strategy could be promising for a variety of biomedical applications.

  8. Facile and Efficient Preparation of Tri-component Fluorescent Glycopolymers via RAFT-controlled Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Lester, John M; Amorosa, Anthony E; Chance, Deborah L; Mossine, Valeri V; Mawhinney, Thomas P

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic glycopolymers are instrumental and versatile tools used in various biochemical and biomedical research fields. An example of a facile and efficient synthesis of well-controlled fluorescent statistical glycopolymers using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT)-based polymerization is demonstrated. The synthesis starts with the preparation of β-galactose-containing glycomonomer 2-lactobionamidoethyl methacrylamide obtained by reaction of lactobionolactone and N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide (AEMA). 2-Gluconamidoethyl methacrylamide (GAEMA) is used as a structural analog lacking a terminal β-galactoside. The following RAFT-mediated copolymerization reaction involves three different monomers: N-(2-hydroxyethyl) acrylamide as spacer, AEMA as target for further fluorescence labeling, and the glycomonomers. Tolerant of aqueous systems, the RAFT agent used in the reaction is (4-cyanopentanoic acid)-4-dithiobenzoate. Low dispersities (≤1.32), predictable copolymer compositions, and high reproducibility of the polymerizations were observed among the products. Fluorescent polymers are obtained by modifying the glycopolymers with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester targeting the primary amine functional groups on AEMA. Lectin-binding specificities of the resulting glycopolymers are verified by testing with corresponding agarose beads coated with specific glycoepitope recognizing lectins. Because of the ease of the synthesis, the tight control of the product compositions and the good reproducibility of the reaction, this protocol can be translated towards preparation of other RAFT-based glycopolymers with specific structures and compositions, as desired. PMID:26132587

  9. Investigation on RAFT Polymerization of a Y-Shaped Amphiphilic Fluorinated Monomer and Anti-Fog and Oil-Repellent Properties of the Polymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yun; Dong, Qibao; Wang, Yanxue; Wang, Hu; Li, Guang; Bai, Ruke

    2010-10-18

    A Y-shaped amphiphilic fluorinated monomer, 1-(1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyloxy)-3-(3,6,9-trioxadecyloxy)-propan-2-yl acrylate has been synthesized and its polymerization by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) homopolymerization has been investigated. The results show that the molecular weights of the polymers are controlled and all the molecular weight distributions are lower than 1.4. Well-defined copolymers with 2-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate have been prepared by RAFT polymerization, and the surface properties of the block and random copolymers have been examined by contact angle measurement for water and hexadecane. It has been found that the surfaces of the block copolymers simultaneously exhibit excellent anti-fog and oil-repellent properties. PMID:21567599

  10. Thermoresponsive diblock glycopolymer by RAFT polymerization for lectin recognition.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kan; Xu, Muru; Zhou, Kaichun; Nie, Huali; Quan, Jing; Zhu, Limin

    2016-11-01

    A thermoresponsive double-hydrophilic diblock glycopolymer, poly(diethyl- eneglycol methacrylate)-block-poly(6-O-vinyladipoyl-d-glucose) (PDEGMA-b-POVAG), was successfully prepared by a combination of enzymatic synthesis and reversible addition-fragment chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization protocols using poly(diethyl- eneglycol methacrylate) (PDEGMA) as macro-RAFT agent. The block glycopolymer was characterized by (1)H NMR and GPC. UV-vis, DLS and TEM studies revealed that the glycopolymer PDEGMA-b-POVAG was thermoresponsive with LCST at 31.0°C, and was able to self-assemble into spherical micelles of various sizes in aqueous solution. The glucose pendants in the glycopolymer could interact with the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A), the average hydrodynamic diameters of glycopolymer micelles increased to 170nm from 110nm after recognizing Con A. The diblock glycopolymer micelles have excellent biocompatibility with pig iliac endothelial cells, as measured using the MTT assay, but micelles loaded with Con A could be used to induce apoptosis in human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells. PMID:27524009

  11. Precision synthesis of bio-based acrylic thermoplastic elastomer by RAFT polymerization of itaconic acid derivatives.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Kotaro; Lee, Dong-Hyung; Nagai, Kanji; Kamigaito, Masami

    2014-01-01

    Bio-based polymer materials from renewable resources have recently become a growing research focus. Herein, a novel thermoplastic elastomer is developed via controlled/living radical polymerization of plant-derived itaconic acid derivatives, which are some of the most abundant renewable acrylic monomers obtained via the fermentation of starch. The reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerizations of itaconic acid imides, such as N-phenylitaconimide and N-(p-tolyl)itaconimide, and itaconic acid esters, such as di-n-butyl itaconate and bis(2-ethylhexyl) itaconate, are examined using a series of RAFT agents to afford well-defined polymers. The number-average molecular weights of these polymers increase with the monomer conversion while retaining relatively narrow molecular weight distributions. Based on the successful controlled/living polymerization, sequential block copolymerization is subsequently investigated using mono- and di-functional RAFT agents to produce block copolymers with soft poly(itaconate) and hard poly(itaconimide) segments. The properties of the obtained triblock copolymer are evaluated as bio-based acrylic thermoplastic elastomers. PMID:24243816

  12. Synthesis of poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) with high cloud point by RAFT polymerization under γ-irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Jie; Peng, Jing; Li, Jiuqiang; Ju, Xuecheng; Zhai, Maolin

    2015-03-01

    γ-radiation initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) was carried out in acetone/water cosolvent system at room temperature with different chain transfer agents (CTAs). The influence of several parameters, such as the structure of CTAs, the molar ratio of DMAEMA to CTA, DMAEMA concentration, and irradiation conditions, was evaluated with regards to conversion and reaction time, as well as poly(dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) molecular weight and its distributions. When the dose rate was 20 Gy min-1, the reaction time could be limited in 100 min with a high conversion. The average molecular weight of PDMAEMA could be controlled from 2733 to 15835 g mol-1 with polydispersity indices lower than 1.3. The cloud point of the PDMAEMA aqueous solution was also detected to investigate the thermal sensitivity of the resultant PDMAEMA. Compared with the PDMAEMA synthesized through 2,2‧-azobis(isobutyronitrile) initiated method, the γ-ray initiated RAFT mediated PDMAEMA solution has a much higher cloud point (ca. 67 °C) than that of former polymer (ca. 37 °C) under the same experimental conditions.

  13. Fabrication of luminescent hydroxyapatite nanorods through surface-initiated RAFT polymerization: Characterization, biological imaging and drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Chunning; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Liu, Meiying; Xu, Dazhuang; Huang, Hongye; Deng, Fengjie; Hui, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanomaterials as an important class of nanomaterials, have been widely applied for different biomedical applications for their excellent biocompatibility, biodegradation potential and low cost. In this work, hydroxyapatite nanorods with uniform size and morphology were prepared through hydrothermal synthesis. The surfaces of these hydroxyapatite nanorods are covered with hydrophobic oleic acid, making them poor dispersibility in aqueous solution and difficult for biomedical applications. To overcome this issue, a simple surface initiated polymerization strategy has been developed via combination of the surface ligand exchange and reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Hydroxyapatite nanorods were first modified with Riboflavin-5-phosphate sodium (RPSSD) via ligand exchange reaction between the phosphate group of RPSSD and oleic acid. Then hydroxyl group of nHAp-RPSSD was used to immobilize chain transfer agent, which was used as the initiator for surface-initiated RAFT polymerization. The nHAp-RPSSD-poly(IA-PEGMA) nanocomposites were characterized by means of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis in detailed. The biocompatibility, biological imaging and drug delivery of nHAp-RPSSD-poly(IA-PEGMA) were also investigated. Results showed that nHAp-RPSSD-poly(IA-PEGMA) exhibited excellent water dispersibility, desirable optical properties, good biocompatibility and high drug loading capability, making them promising candidates for biological imaging and controlled drug delivery applications.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of transferrin-targeted chemotherapeutic delivery systems prepared via RAFT copolymerization of high molecular weight PEG macromonomers

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Debashish; Berguig, Geoffrey Y; Ghosn, Bilal; Lane, Daniel; Braswell, Scott; Stayton, Patrick S; Convertine, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was employed to prepare a nanoparticulate drug delivery system for chemotherapeutics. The nanoparticles contain a PEG “stealth” corona as well as reactive anhydride functionality designed for conjugating targeting proteins. The multifunctional carrier functionality was achieved by controlling the copolymerization of the hydrophobic monomer lauryl methacrylate (LMA), with a reactive anhydride functional methacrylate (TMA), and a large polyethyleneglycol methacrylate monomer (Mn~950 Da) (O950). RAFT polymerization kinetics of O950 were evaluated as a function of target degrees of polymerization (DP), initial chain transfer agent to initiator ratio ([CTA]o/[I]o), and solvent concentration. Excellent control over the polymerization was observed for target DPs of 25 and 50 at [CTA]o/[I]o ratio of 10 as evidenced by narrow and symmetric molecular weight distributions and the ability to prepare block copolymers. The TMA-functional copolymers were conjugated to the tumor targeting protein transferrin (Tf). The targeted copolymer was shown to encapsulate docetaxel at concentrations comparable to the commercial single vial formulation of docetaxel (Taxotere). In vitro cytotoxicity studies conducted in HeLa cells show that the Tf targeting enhances the cancer killing properties relative to the polymer encapsulated docetaxel formulation. PMID:25221630

  15. Synthesis of folate-functionalized RAFT polymers for targeted siRNA delivery

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Selvi; Shubin, Andrew D.; Stayton, Patrick S.

    2011-01-01

    Receptor-mediated, cell-specific delivery of siRNA enables silencing of target genes in specific tissues, opening the door to powerful therapeutic options for a multitude of diseases. However, development of delivery systems capable of targeted and effective siRNA delivery typically requires multiple steps and use of sophisticated, orthogonal chemistries. Previously, we developed diblock copolymers consisting of dimethaminoethyl methacrylate-b-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate-co-butyl methacrylate-copropylacrylic acid as potent siRNA delivery systems that protect siRNA from enzymatic degradation and enable its cytosolic delivery through pH-responsive, endosomolytic behavior.1,2 These architectures were polymerized using a living radical polymerization method, specifically reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, which employs a chain transfer agent (CTA) to modulate the rate of reaction, resulting in polymers with low polydispersity and telechelic chain ends reflecting the chemistry of the CTA. Here, we describe the straightforward, facile synthesis of a folate receptor-targeted diblock copolymer siRNA delivery system, as the folate receptor is an attractive target for tumor-selective therapies due to its overexpression in a number of cancers. Specifically, we detail the de novo synthesis of a folate-functionalized CTA, use the folate-CTA for controlled polymerizations of diblock copolymers, and demonstrate efficient, specific cellular folate receptor interaction and in vitro gene knockdown using the folate-functionalized polymer. PMID:21634800

  16. Electrochemical deposition and surface-initiated RAFT polymerization: protein and cell-resistant PPEGMEMA polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Tria, Maria Celeste R; Grande, Carlos David T; Ponnapati, Ramakrishna R; Advincula, Rigoberto C

    2010-12-13

    This paper introduces a novel and versatile method of grafting protein and cell-resistant poly(poly ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (PPEGMEMA) brushes on conducting Au surface. The process started with the electrochemical deposition and full characterization of an electro-active chain transfer agent (CTA) on the Au surface. The electrochemical behavior of the CTA was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) while the deposition and stability of the CTA on the surface were confirmed by ellipsometry, contact angle, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The capability of the electrodeposited CTA to mediate surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (SI-RAFT) polymerization on both the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA; model polymer) and PPEGMEMA brushes was demonstrated by the increase in thicknesses of the films after polymerization. Contact angles also decreased with the incorporation of the more hydrophilic brushes. Significant changes in the morphologies of the films before and after polymerization were also observed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses. Furthermore, XPS results showed an increase in the O 1s peak intensity relative to C 1s after polymerizations, which confirmed the grafting of polyethyleneglycol (PEG) bearing brushes. The ability of the PPEGMEMA-modified Au surface to resist nonspecific adhesion of proteins and cells was monitored and confirmed by XPS, ellipsometry, contact angle, AFM, and fluorescence imaging. The new method presented has potential application as robust protein and cell-resistant coatings for electrically conducting electrodes and biomedical devices. PMID:21028799

  17. Selective and Quantitative Oxidation of Xanthate End-Groups of RAFT Poly(n-butyl acrylate) Latexes by Ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Matioszek, Dimitri; Dufils, Pierre-Emmanuel; Vinas, Jérôme; Destarac, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    Although various successful strategies have been reported in the past for the postpolymerization modification of the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) terminal group in homogeneous media, no solution is proposed for the tedious case of aqueous polymer dispersions where most of the thiocarbonylthio terminal group is buried into the core of the polymer particle. In this work, ozone is proposed to tackle this important academic and industrial challenge. After preliminary model ozonolysis reactions performed on a xanthate RAFT agent and a derived low molar mass poly(n-butyl acrylate) (PBA) in dichloromethane solution, it is shown that the hydrophobic nature and strong oxidant properties of ozone are responsible for its efficient diffusion in aqueous PBA latex particles obtained by RAFT and selective and complete transformation of the xanthate terminal group into a thiocarbonate end-group. In addition to the beneficial total discoloration of the final product, this chemical treatment does not generate any volatile organic compound and leaves the colloidal stability of the polymer particles unaffected, provided that a PBA latex with a sufficiently high Mn of 5000 g mol(-1) is selected. PMID:25959658

  18. RAFT-synthesized Graft Copolymers that Enhance pH-dependent Membrane Destabilization and Protein Circulation Times

    PubMed Central

    Crownover, Emily; Duvall, Craig L.; Convertine, Anthony; Hoffman, Allan S.; Stayton, Patrick S.

    2012-01-01

    Here we describe a new graft copolymer architecture of poly(propylacrylic acid) (polyPAA) that displays potent pH-dependent, membrane-destabilizing activity and in addition is shown to enhance protein blood circulation kinetics. PolyPAA containing a single telechelic alkyne functionality was prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization with an alkyne-functional chain transfer agent (CTA) and coupled to RAFT polymerized poly(azidopropyl methacrylate) (polyAPMA) through azide-alkyne [3+2] Huisgen cycloaddition. The graft copolymers become membrane destabilizing at endosomal pH values and are active at significantly lower concentrations than the linear polyPAA. A biotin terminated polyPAA graft copolymer was prepared by grafting PAA onto polyAPMA polymerized with a biotin functional RAFT CTA. The blood circulation time and biodistribution of tritium labeled avidin conjugated to the polyPAA graft copolymer was characterized along with a clinically utilized 40 kDa branched polyethylene glycol (PEG) also possessing biotin functionalization. The linear and graft polyPAA increase the area under the curve (AUC) over avidin alone by 9 and 12 times, respectively. Furthermore, polyPAA graft copolymer conjugates accumulated in tumor tissue significantly more than the linear polyPAA and the branched PEG conjugates. The collective data presented in this report indicate that the polyPAA graft copolymers exhibit robust pH-dependent, membrane-destabilizing activity, low cytotoxicity and significantly enhance blood circulation time and tumor accumulation. PMID:21699931

  19. High chi polymer development for DSA applications using RAFT technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheehan, Michael T.; Farnham, William B.; Tran, Hoang V.; Londono, J. David; Brun, Yefim

    2013-03-01

    Directed self-assembly (DSA) of block copolymers is proving to be an interesting and innovative method to make three-dimensional periodic, uniform patterns useful in a variety of microelectronics applications. Attributes critical to acceptable DSA performance of block copolymers include molecular weight uniformity, final purity, and reproducibility in all the steps involved in producing the polymers. Reversible Addition Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerization technology enables the production of such materials provided that careful process monitoring and compositional homogeneity measurement systems are employed. It is uniquely suited to construction of multiblocks with components of widely divergent surface energies and functionality. We describe a high chi diblock system comprising partially fluorinated methacrylates and substituted styrenics. While special new polymer separation strategies involving controlled polymer particle assembly in liquid media are required for some monomer systems and molecular weight regimes, we have been able to demonstrate high yield and compositionally homogeneous diblocks of lamellar and cylindrical morphology with polydispersities < 1.1. During purification processes, these diblock materials undergo assembly processes in liquid media, and with appropriate controls, this allows for removal of soluble homopolymer contaminants. SAXS analyses of solid polymer samples provide estimates of lamellar d-spacing, and a good correlation with molecular weight is shown. This system will be described.

  20. Novel Tertiary Amino Containing Blinding Composite Membranes via Raft Polymerization and Their Preliminary CO2 Permeation Performance

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lifang; Zhou, Mali; Yang, Shanshan; Shen, Jiangnan

    2015-01-01

    Facile synthesis of poly (N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) star polymers on the basis of the prepolymer chains, PDMAEMA as the macro chain transfer agent and divinyl benzene (DVB) as the cross-linking reagent by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was described. The RAFT polymerizations of DMAEMA at 70 °C using four RAFT agents with different R and Z group were investigated. The RAFT agents used in these polymerizations were dibenzyl trithiocarbonate (DBTTC), s-1-dodecyl-s'-(α,α'-dimethyl-α-acetic acid) trithiocarbonate (MTTCD), s,s'-bis (2-hydroxyethyl-2'-dimethylacrylate) trithiocarbonate (BDATC) and s-(2-cyanoprop-2-yl)-s-dodecyltrithiocarbonate (CPTCD). The results indicated that the structure of the end-group of RAFT agents had significant effects on the ability to control polymerization. Compared with the above-mentioned RAFT agents, CPTCD provides better control over the molecular weight and molecular weight distribution. The polydispersity index (PDI) was determined to be within the scope of 1.26 to 1.36. The yields, molecular weight, and distribution of the star polymers can be tuned by changing the molar ratio of DVB/PDMAEMA-CPTCD. The chemical composition and structure of the linear and star polymers were characterized by GPC, FTIR, 1H NMR, XRD analysis. For the pure Chitosan membrane, a great improvement was observed for both CO2 permeation rate and ideal selectivity of the blending composite membrane upon increasing the content of SPDMAEMA-8. At a feed gas pressure of 37.5 cmHg and 30 °C, the blinding composite membrane (Cs: SPDMAEMA-8 = 4:4) has a CO2 permeation rate of 8.54 × 10−4 cm3 (STP) cm−2∙s−1∙cm∙Hg−1 and a N2 permeation rate of 6.76 × 10−5 cm3 (STP) cm−2∙s−1∙cm∙Hg−1, and an ideal CO2/N2 selectivity of 35.2. PMID:25915025

  1. Novel Tertiary Amino Containing Blinding Composite Membranes via Raft Polymerization and Their Preliminary CO2 Permeation Performance.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lifang; Zhou, Mali; Yang, Shanshan; Shen, Jiangnan

    2015-01-01

    Facile synthesis of poly (N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) star polymers on the basis of the prepolymer chains, PDMAEMA as the macro chain transfer agent and divinyl benzene (DVB) as the cross-linking reagent by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was described. The RAFT polymerizations of DMAEMA at 70 °C using four RAFT agents with different R and Z group were investigated. The RAFT agents used in these polymerizations were dibenzyl trithiocarbonate (DBTTC), s-1-dodecyl-s'-(α,α'-dimethyl-α-acetic acid) trithiocarbonate (MTTCD), s,s'-bis (2-hydroxyethyl-2'-dimethylacrylate) trithiocarbonate (BDATC) and s-(2-cyanoprop-2-yl)-s-dodecyltrithiocarbonate (CPTCD). The results indicated that the structure of the end-group of RAFT agents had significant effects on the ability to control polymerization. Compared with the above-mentioned RAFT agents, CPTCD provides better control over the molecular weight and molecular weight distribution. The polydispersity index (PDI) was determined to be within the scope of 1.26 to 1.36. The yields, molecular weight, and distribution of the star polymers can be tuned by changing the molar ratio of DVB/PDMAEMA-CPTCD. The chemical composition and structure of the linear and star polymers were characterized by GPC, FTIR, 1H NMR, XRD analysis. For the pure Chitosan membrane, a great improvement was observed for both CO₂ permeation rate and ideal selectivity of the blending composite membrane upon increasing the content of SPDMAEMA-8. At a feed gas pressure of 37.5 cmHg and 30 °C, the blinding composite membrane (Cs: SPDMAEMA-8 = 4:4) has a CO₂ permeation rate of 8.54 × 10⁻⁴ cm³ (STP) cm⁻²∙s⁻¹∙cm∙Hg⁻¹ and a N₂ permeation rate of 6.76 × 10⁻⁵ cm³ (STP) cm⁻²∙s⁻¹∙cm∙Hg⁻¹, and an ideal CO₂/N₂ selectivity of 35.2. PMID:25915025

  2. In vivo Targeting of Alveolar Macrophages via RAFT-Based Glycopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun-Ho; Manganiello, Matthew J.; Chow, Yu-Hua; Ghosn, Bilal; Convertine, Anthony J.; Stayton, Partick S.; Schnapp, Lynn M.; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Targeting cell populations via endogenous carbohydrate receptors is an appealing approach for drug delivery. However, to be effective, this strategy requires the production of high affinity carbohydrate ligands capable of engaging with specific cell-surface lectins. To develop materials that exhibit high affinity towards these receptors, we synthesized glycopolymers displaying pendant carbohydrate moieties from carbohydrate-functionalized monomer precursors via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. These glycopolymers were fluorescently labeled and used to determine macrophage-specific targeting both in vitro and in vivo. Mannose- and N-acetylglucosamine-containing glycopolymers were shown to specifically target mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in vitro in a dose-dependent manner as compared to a galactose-containing glycopolymer (30- and 19-fold higher uptake, respectively). In addition, upon macrophage differentiation, the mannose glycopolymer exhibited enhanced uptake in M2-polarized macrophages, an anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype prevalent in injured tissue. This carbohydrate-specific uptake was retained in vivo, as alveolar macrophages demonstrated 6-fold higher internalization of mannose glycopolymer, as compared to galactose, following intratracheal administration in mice. We have shown the successful synthesis of a class of functional RAFT glycopolymers capable of macrophage-type specific uptake both in vitro and in vivo, with significant implications for the design of future targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:22770567

  3. Gel Point Suppression in RAFT Polymerization of Pure Acrylic Cross-Linker Derived from Soybean Oil.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mengguo; Huang, Yuerui; Lu, Mingjia; Lin, Fang-Yi; Hernández, Nacú B; Cochran, Eric W

    2016-08-01

    Here we report the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO), a cross-linker molecule, to high conversion (>50%) and molecular weight (>100 kDa) without macrogelation. Surprisingly, gelation is suppressed in this system far beyond the expectations predicated both on Flory-Stockmeyer theory and multiple other studies of RAFT polymerization featuring cross-linking moieties. By varying AESO and initiator concentrations, we show how intra- versus intermolecular cross-linking compete, yielding a trade-off between the degree of intramolecular linkages and conversion at gel point. We measured polymer chain characteristics, including molecular weight, chain dimensions, polydispersity, and intrinsic viscosity, using multidetector gel permeation chromatography and NMR to track polymerization kinetics. We show that not only the time and conversion at macrogelation, but also the chain architecture, is largely affected by these reaction conditions. At maximal AESO concentration, the gel point approaches that predicted by the Flory-Stockmeyer theory, and increases in an exponential fashion as the AESO concentration decreases. In the most dilute solutions, macrogelation cannot be detected throughout the entire reaction. Instead, cyclization/intramolecular cross-linking reactions dominate, leading to microgelation. This work is important, especially in that it demonstrates that thermoplastic rubbers could be produced based on multifunctional renewable feedstocks. PMID:27359245

  4. Dually responsive multiblock copolymers via RAFT polymerization: Synthesis of temperature- and redox-responsive copolymers of PNIPAM and PDMAEMA.

    PubMed

    You, Ye-Zi; Zhou, Qing-Hui; Manickam, Devika Soundara; Wan, Lei; Mao, Guang-Zhao; Oupický, David

    2007-01-01

    We report synthesis of temperature- and redox-responsive multiblock copolymers by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Well-defined α,ω-bis(dithioester)-functionalized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) were prepared using 1,4-bis(thiobenzoylthiomethyl)benzene and 1,4-bis(2-(thiobenzoylthio)prop-2-yl)benzene as RAFT agents, respectively. Dually responsive multiblock copolymers were synthesized in a single aminolysis/oxidation step from the α,ω-bis(dithioester)-terminated PNIPAM and PDMAEMA. The copolymers and their stimulus-responsive behavior were characterized by size exclusion chromatography, NMR, light scattering and atomic force microscopy. Due to the presence of redox-sensitive disulfide bonds between the blocks, the copolymers were readily reduced to the starting polymer blocks. The presence of temperature-responsive PNIPAM blocks provided the copolymers with the ability to assemble into core-shell nanostructures with hydrophobic PNIPAM as a core and cationic PDMAEMA as stabilizing shell when above the phase transition temperatures of PNIPAM. The temperature-induced assembly of the copolymers also showed substantial pH sensitivity. The phase transition temperature increased with decreasing pH, while molecular weight of the assemblies decreased. PMID:18779877

  5. Shell-cross-linked micelles containing cationic polymers synthesized via the RAFT process: toward a more biocompatible gene delivery system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Nguyen, T L Uyen; Bernard, Julien; Davis, Thomas P; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Stenzel, Martina H

    2007-09-01

    Block copolymers poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(polyethylene glycol methacrylate) (PDMAEMA-b-P(PEGMA)) were prepared via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT). The polymerization was found to proceed with the expected living behavior resulting in block copolymers with varying block sizes of low polydispersity (PDI <1.3). The resulting block copolymer was self-assembled in an aqueous environment, leading to the formation of pH-responsive micelles. Further stabilization of the micellar system was performed in water using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate and the RAFT process to cross-link the shell. The cross-linked micelle was found to have properties significantly different from those of the uncross-linked block copolymer micelle. While a distinct critical micelle concentration (CMC) was observed using block copolymers, the CMC was absent in the cross-linked system. In addition, a better stability against disintegration was observed when altering the ionic strength such as the absence of changes of the hydrodynamic diameter with increasing NaCl concentration. Both cross-linked and uncross-linked micelles displayed good binding ability for genes. However, the cross-linked system exhibited a slightly superior tendency to bind oligonucleotides. Cytotoxicity tests confirmed a significant improvement of the biocompatibility of the synthesized cross-linked micelle compared to that of the highly toxic PDMAEMA. The cross-linked micelles were taken up by cells without causing any signs of cell damage, while the PDMAEMA homopolymer clearly led to cell death. PMID:17691844

  6. Guanidine-Containing Methacrylamide (Co)polymers via aRAFT: Toward a Cell Penetrating Peptide Mimica

    PubMed Central

    Treat, Nicolas J.; Smith, DeeDee; Teng, Chengwen; Flores, Joel D.; Abel, Brooks A.; York, Adam W.; Huang, Faqing; McCormick, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    We report the synthesis and controlled radical homo- and block copolymerization of 3-guanidinopropyl methacrylamide (GPMA) utilizing aqueous reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (aRAFT) polymerization. The resulting homopolymer and block copolymer with N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) were prepared to mimic the behavior of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) and poly(arginine) (> 6 units) which have been shown to cross cell membranes. The homopolymerization mediated by 4-cyano-4-(ethylsulfanylthiocarbonylsulfanyl)pentanoic acid (CEP) in aqueous buffer exhibited pseudo-first-order kinetics and linear growth of molecular weight with conversion. Retention of the “living” thiocarbonylthio ω-end-group was demonstrated through successful chain extension of the GPMA macroCTA yielding GPMA37-b-GPMA61 (Mw/Mn =1.05). Block copolymers of GPMA with the non-immunogenic, biocompatible HPMA were synthesized yielding HPMA271-b-GPMA13 (Mw/Mn = 1.15). Notably, intracellular uptake was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and flow cytometry experiments after 2.5 h incubation with KB cells at 4 °C and at 37 °C utilizing FITC-labeled, GPMA-containing copolymers. The observed facility of cellular uptake and the structural control afforded by aRAFT polymerization suggest significant potential for these synthetic (co)polymers as drug delivery vehicles in targeted therapies. PMID:22639734

  7. Dually responsive multiblock copolymers via RAFT polymerization: Synthesis of temperature- and redox-responsive copolymers of PNIPAM and PDMAEMA

    PubMed Central

    You, Ye-Zi; Zhou, Qing-Hui; Manickam, Devika Soundara; Wan, Lei; Mao, Guang-Zhao; Oupický, David

    2008-01-01

    We report synthesis of temperature- and redox-responsive multiblock copolymers by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Well-defined α,ω-bis(dithioester)-functionalized poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and poly(2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) were prepared using 1,4-bis(thiobenzoylthiomethyl)benzene and 1,4-bis(2-(thiobenzoylthio)prop-2-yl)benzene as RAFT agents, respectively. Dually responsive multiblock copolymers were synthesized in a single aminolysis/oxidation step from the α,ω-bis(dithioester)-terminated PNIPAM and PDMAEMA. The copolymers and their stimulus-responsive behavior were characterized by size exclusion chromatography, NMR, light scattering and atomic force microscopy. Due to the presence of redox-sensitive disulfide bonds between the blocks, the copolymers were readily reduced to the starting polymer blocks. The presence of temperature-responsive PNIPAM blocks provided the copolymers with the ability to assemble into core-shell nanostructures with hydrophobic PNIPAM as a core and cationic PDMAEMA as stabilizing shell when above the phase transition temperatures of PNIPAM. The temperature-induced assembly of the copolymers also showed substantial pH sensitivity. The phase transition temperature increased with decreasing pH, while molecular weight of the assemblies decreased. PMID:18779877

  8. Functional and surface-active membranes from poly(vinylidene fluoride)-graft-poly(acrylic acid) prepared via RAFT-mediated graft copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Ying, L; Yu, W H; Kang, E T; Neoh, K G

    2004-07-01

    Poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) with "living" poly (acrylic acid) (PAAc) side chains (PVDF-g-PAAc) was prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT)-mediated graft copolymerization of acrylic acid (AAc) with the ozone-pretreated PVDF. The chemical composition and structure of the copolymers were characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The copolymer could be readily cast into pH-sensitive microfiltration (MF) membranes with enriched living PAAc graft chains on the surface (including the pore surfaces) by phase inversion in an aqueous medium. The surface composition of the membranes was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The morphology of the membranes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The pore size distribution of the membranes was found to be much more uniform than that of the corresponding membranes cast from PVDF-g-PAAc prepared by the "conventional" free-radical graft copolymerization process. Most important of all, the MF membranes with surface-tethered PAAc macro chain transfer agents, or the living membrane surfaces, could be further functionalized via surface-initiated block copolymerization with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAM) to obtain the PVDF-g-PAAc-b-PNIPAAM MF membranes, which exhibited both pH- and temperature-dependent permeability to aqueous media. PMID:16459627

  9. Organic-inorganic random copolymers from methacrylate-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) with 3-methacryloxypropylheptaphenyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane: synthesis via RAFT polymerization and self-assembly behavior.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kun; Li, Lei; Zheng, Sixun; Wang, Ge; Liang, Qi

    2014-01-14

    In this contribution, we report the synthesis of organic-inorganic random polymers from methacrylate-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) (MAPEO) (Mn = 950) and 3-methacryloxypropylheptaphenyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (MAPOSS) macromers via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization with 4-cyano-4-(thiobenzoylthio) valeric acid (CTBTVA) as the chain transfer agent. The organic-inorganic random copolymers were characterized by means of (1)H NMR spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results of GPC indicate that the polymerizations were carried out in a controlled fashion. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the organic-inorganic random copolymers in bulk were microphase-separated and the POSS microdomains were formed via POSS-POSS interactions. In aqueous solutions the organic-inorganic random copolymers were capable of self-assembling into spherical nanoobjects as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic laser scattering (DLS). The self-assembly behavior of the organic-inorganic random copolymers was also found to occur in the mixtures with the precursors of epoxy. The nanostructures were further fixed via subsequent curing reaction and thus the organic-inorganic nanocomposites were obtained. The formation of nanophases in epoxy thermosets was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The organic-inorganic nanocomposites displayed the enhanced surface hydrophobicity as evidenced by surface contact angle measurements. PMID:24651714

  10. Surface modification of silk fibroin fibers with poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(tributylsilyl methacrylate) via RAFT polymerization for marine antifouling applications.

    PubMed

    Buga, Mihaela-Ramona; Zaharia, Cătălin; Bălan, Mihai; Bressy, Christine; Ziarelli, Fabio; Margaillan, André

    2015-06-01

    In this study, silk fibroin surface containing hydroxyl and aminogroups was firstly modified using a polymerizable coupling agent 3-(trimethoxysilyl) propyl methacrylate (MPS), in order to induce vinyl groups onto the fiber surface. The reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT)-mediated polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) and tributylsilyl methacrylate (TBSiMA) through the immobilized vinyl bond on the silk fibroin surface in the presence of 2-cyanoprop-2-yl dithiobenzoate (CPDB) as chain-transfer agent and 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) as initiator was conducted in toluene solution at 70°C for 24h. The structure and properties of the modified fiber were characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, (13)C, (29)Si Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), confirming the presence of the coupling molecule and the methacrylate groups onto the silk fibroin fiber surface. Molecular weight distributions were assessed by triple detection size exclusion chromatography (TD-SEC) in order to verify the livingness of the polymerization. PMID:25842130

  11. Compact biocompatible quantum dots via RAFT-mediated synthesis of imidazole-based random copolymer ligand

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenhao; Greytak, Andrew B.; Lee, Jungmin; Wong, Cliff R.; Park, Jongnam; Marshall, Lisa F.; Jiang, Wen; Curtin, Peter N.; Ting, Alice Y.; Nocera, Daniel G.; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2010-01-01

    We present a new class of polymeric ligands for quantum dot (QD) water solubilization to yield biocompatible and derivatizable QDs with compact size (~10-12 nm diameter), high quantum yields (>50%), excellent stability across a large pH range (pH 5-10.5), and low nonspecific binding. To address the fundamental problem of thiol instability in traditional ligand exchange systems, the polymers here employ a stable multidentate imidazole binding motif to the QD surface. The polymers are synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT)-mediated polymerization to produce molecular weight controlled monodisperse random copolymers from three types of monomers that feature imidazole groups for QD binding, polyethylene glycol (PEG) groups for water solubilization, and either primary amines or biotin groups for derivatization. The polymer architecture can be tuned by the monomer ratios to yield aqueous QDs with targeted surface functionalities. By incorporating amino-PEG monomers, we demonstrate covalent conjugation of a dye to form a highly efficient QD-dye energy transfer pair as well as covalent conjugation to streptavidin for high-affinity single molecule imaging of biotinylated receptors on live cells with minimal non-specific binding. The small size and low serum binding of these polymer-coated QDs also allow us to demonstrate their utility for in-vivo imaging of the tumor microenvironment in live mice. PMID:20025223

  12. Precision synthesis of functional materials via RAFT polymerization and click-type chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Joel Diez

    2011-12-01

    The need to tailor polymeric architectures with specific physico-chemical properties via the simplest, cleanest, and most efficient synthetic route possible has become the ultimate goal in polymer synthesis. Recent progress in macromolecular science, such as the discoveries of controlled/"living" free radical polymerization (CRP) methods, has brought about synthetic capabilities to prepare (co)polymers with advanced topologies, predetermined molecular weights, narrow molecular weight distributions, and precisely located functional groups. In addition, the establishment of click chemistry has redefined the selected few highly efficient chemical reactions that become highly useful in post-polymerization modification strategies. Hence, the ability to make well-defined topologies afforded by controlled polymerization techniques and the facile incorporation of functionalities along the chain via click-type reactions have yielded complex architectures, allowing the investigation of physical phenomena which otherwise could not be studied with systems prepared via conventional methods. The overarching theme of the research work described in this dissertation is the fusion of the excellent attributes of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization method, which is one of the CRP techniques, and click-type chemical reactions in the precision of synthesis of advanced functional materials. Chapter IV is divided into three sections. In Section I, the direct RAFT homopolymerization of 2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate (AOI) and subsequent post-polymerization modifications are described. The polymerization conditions were optimized in terms of the choice of RAFT chain transfer agent (CTA), polymerization temperature and the reaction medium. Direct RAFT polymerization of AOI requires a neutral CTA, and relatively low reaction temperature to yield AOI homopolymers with low polydispersities. Efficient side-chain functionalization of PAOI homopolymers was

  13. Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) grafted halloysite nanotubes as a molecular host matrix for luminescent ions prepared by surface-initiated RAFT polymerization and coordination chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Rafiqul; Bach, Long Giang; Lim, Kwon Taek

    2013-07-01

    A fluorescent nanohybrid complex comprising of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), and europium ions (Eu3+) was synthesized by the combination of surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (SI-RAFT) polymerization and coordination chemistry. Initially, PHEMA was grafted from the HNTs by SI-RAFT and then reacted with succinic anhydride to provide carboxyl acid groups on the external layers of HNTs-g-PHEMA nanohybrids. The subsequent coordination of the nanohybrids with Eu3+ ions afforded photoluminescent Eu3+ tagged HNTs-g-PHEMA nanohybrid complexes (HNTs-g-PHEMA-Eu3+). The structure, morphology, and fluorescence properties of the Eu3+ coordinated nanohybrid complexes were investigated by respective physical and spectral studies. FT-IR, XPS, and EDS analyses suggested the formation of the HNTs-g-PHEMA-Eu3+ nanohybrids. FE-SEM images indicated the immobilization of polymer layers on HNTs. TGA scans further demonstrated the grafting of PHEMA onto HNTs surface. The optical properties of HNTs-g-PHEMA-Eu3+ nanohybrid complexes were investigated by photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  14. Grafting of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate from PE/PP nonwoven fabric via radiation-induced RAFT polymerization and quaternization of the grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, Jordan F.; Barsbay, Murat; Abad, Lucille; Güven, Olgun

    2016-07-01

    Radiation induced grafting method is one of the most promising grafting techniques and it works successfully together with the reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, one of the most prominent controlled free-radical polymerization (CRP) methods. This study reports grafting of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) from the surface of polyethylene/polypropylene nonwoven fabric (PE/PP NWF) by the combination of radiation-induced initiation and the RAFT polymerization technique. Effects of monomer concentration, absorbed dose and solvent choice on the grafting yield have been investigated. The grafted NWF's were characterized by ATR-FTIR, XPS, SEM, EDX and thermal analysis methods. The results indicated that surface properties were completely altered after grafting compared to pristine PE/PP even for those with very low degree of PDMAEMA grafting. Free homopolymers in solution have been analyzed by GPC in order to obtain information about the grafts. The PDMAEMA grafts on the fabric surfaces were later quaternized with dimethyl sulfate to yield positively charged surfaces that were tested for antibacterial properties.

  15. RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization yields poly(ethylene glycol)-based diblock copolymer nano-objects with predictable single phase morphologies.

    PubMed

    Warren, Nicholas J; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Mahmood, Daniel; Ryan, Anthony J; Armes, Steven P

    2014-01-22

    A poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) macromolecular chain transfer agent (macro-CTA) is prepared in high yield (>95%) with 97% dithiobenzoate chain-end functionality in a three-step synthesis starting from a monohydroxy PEG113 precursor. This PEG113-dithiobenzoate is then used for the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) aqueous dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA). Polymerizations conducted under optimized conditions at 50 °C led to high conversions as judged by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and relatively low diblock copolymer polydispersities (M(w)/M(n) < 1.25) as judged by GPC. The latter technique also indicated good blocking efficiencies, since there was minimal PEG113 macro-CTA contamination. Systematic variation of the mean degree of polymerization of the core-forming PHPMA block allowed PEG113-PHPMA(x) diblock copolymer spheres, worms, or vesicles to be prepared at up to 17.5% w/w solids, as judged by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy studies. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis revealed that more exotic oligolamellar vesicles were observed at 20% w/w solids when targeting highly asymmetric diblock compositions. Detailed analysis of SAXS curves indicated that the mean number of membranes per oligolamellar vesicle is approximately three. A PEG113-PHPMA(x) phase diagram was constructed to enable the reproducible targeting of pure phases, as opposed to mixed morphologies (e.g., spheres plus worms or worms plus vesicles). This new RAFT PISA formulation is expected to be important for the rational and efficient synthesis of a wide range of biocompatible, thermo-responsive PEGylated diblock copolymer nano-objects for various biomedical applications. PMID:24400622

  16. Synthesis of carboxylic block copolymers via reversible addition fragmentation transfer polymerization for tooth erosion prevention.

    PubMed

    Lei, Y; Wang, T; Mitchell, J W; Qiu, J; Kilpatrick-Liverman, L

    2014-12-01

    Dental professionals are seeing a growing population of patients with visible signs of dental erosion. The approach currently being used to address the problem typically leverages the enamel protection benefits of fluoride. In this report, an alternative new block copolymer with a hydrophilic polyacrylic acid (PAA) block and a hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block was developed to similarly reduce the mineral loss from enamel under acidic conditions. This series of PMMA-b-PAA block copolymers was synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Their structures were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. The molar fractions of acrylic acid (AA) in the final block copolymer were finely controlled from 0.25 to 0.94, and the molecular weight (Mn) of PMMA-b-PAA was controlled from 10 kDa to 90 kDa. The binding capability of the block copolymer with hydroxyapatite (HAP) was investigated by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR spectra confirmed that the PMMA-b-PAA block copolymer could bind to HAP via bridging bidentate bonds. Both UV-Vis and FTIR spectra additionally indicated that a high polymer concentration and low solution pH favored the polymer binding to HAP. The erosion-preventing efficacy of the PMMA-b-PAA block copolymer in inhibiting HAP mineral loss was quantitatively evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Based on the results, polymer treatment reduced the amount of calcium released by 27% to 30% in comparison with the unprotected samples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations indicated that PMMA-b-PAA polymer treatment protected enamel from acid erosion. This new amphiphilic block copolymer has significant potential to be integrated into dentifrices or mouthrinses as an alternative non-fluoride ingredient to reduce tooth erosion. PMID:25248611

  17. Synthesis of Carboxylic Block Copolymers via Reversible Addition Fragmentation Transfer Polymerization for Tooth Erosion Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Y.; Wang, T.; Mitchell, J.W.; Qiu, J.; Kilpatrick-Liverman, L.

    2014-01-01

    Dental professionals are seeing a growing population of patients with visible signs of dental erosion. The approach currently being used to address the problem typically leverages the enamel protection benefits of fluoride. In this report, an alternative new block copolymer with a hydrophilic polyacrylic acid (PAA) block and a hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block was developed to similarly reduce the mineral loss from enamel under acidic conditions. This series of PMMA-b-PAA block copolymers was synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Their structures were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. The molar fractions of acrylic acid (AA) in the final block copolymer were finely controlled from 0.25 to 0.94, and the molecular weight (Mn) of PMMA-b-PAA was controlled from 10 kDa to 90 kDa. The binding capability of the block copolymer with hydroxyapatite (HAP) was investigated by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR spectra confirmed that the PMMA-b-PAA block copolymer could bind to HAP via bridging bidentate bonds. Both UV-Vis and FTIR spectra additionally indicated that a high polymer concentration and low solution pH favored the polymer binding to HAP. The erosion-preventing efficacy of the PMMA-b-PAA block copolymer in inhibiting HAP mineral loss was quantitatively evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Based on the results, polymer treatment reduced the amount of calcium released by 27% to 30% in comparison with the unprotected samples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations indicated that PMMA-b-PAA polymer treatment protected enamel from acid erosion. This new amphiphilic block copolymer has significant potential to be integrated into dentifrices or mouthrinses as an alternative non-fluoride ingredient to reduce tooth erosion. PMID:25248611

  18. Nonaqueous Dispersion Formed by an Emulsion Solvent Evaporation Method Using Block-Random Copolymer Surfactant Synthesized by RAFT Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ezaki, Naofumi; Watanabe, Yoshifumi; Mori, Hideharu

    2015-10-27

    As surfactants for preparation of nonaqueous microcapsule dispersions by the emulsion solvent evaporation method, three copolymers composed of stearyl methacrylate (SMA) and glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) with different monomer sequences (i.e., random, block, and block-random) were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Despite having the same comonomer composition, the copolymers exhibited different functionality as surfactants for creating emulsions with respective dispersed and continuous phases consisting of methanol and isoparaffin solvent. The optimal monomer sequence for the surfactant was determined based on the droplet sizes and the stabilities of the emulsions created using these copolymers. The block-random copolymer led to an emulsion with better stability than obtained using the random copolymer and a smaller droplet size than achieved with the block copolymer. Modification of the epoxy group of the GMA unit by diethanolamine (DEA) further decreased the droplet size, leading to higher stability of the emulsion. The DEA-modified block-random copolymer gave rise to nonaqueous microcapsule dispersions after evaporation of methanol from the emulsions containing colored dyes in their dispersed phases. These dispersions exhibited high stability, and the particle sizes were small enough for application to the inkjet printing process. PMID:26421355

  19. Controllable synthesis of new polymerizable macrosurfactants via CCTP and RAFT techniques and investigation of their performance in emulsion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Yan, Lili; Li, Qing; Wang, Caifeng; Chen, Su

    2010-02-01

    We reported herein the synthesis of poly(methacrylic acid)-b-poly(butyl acrylate) (PMAA-b-PBA) block copolymers (surfmers) and their performance as novel polymerizable macrosurfactants in emulsion polymerization. The surfmers bearing terminal unsaturated carbon-carbon double bonds were first successfully designed and sythesized via catalytic chain transfer polymerization (CCTP) and radical addition-fragmentation polymerization (RAFT) techniques. The structures of surfmers were characterized by Raman spectra, nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), and gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The critical micelle concentration of surfmers was determined. Subsequently, the surfmers were used as emulsifier to prepare polyacrylate latexes (PA-surf). The influence of the surfmer concentration as well as PMAA and PBA chain segment ratios of surfmer on their performance in emulsion polymerization was discussed thoroughly. The particle size, amount of coagulum, and stability against electrolyte solutions of the latexes were evaluated. Also, the relations between monomer conversion in emulsion polymerization, polymerization rate, emulsion particle size, surface tension, and reaction time were investigated, which showed some interesting information for the probable mechanism underlying this emulsion polymerization system. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectra (ATR FT-IR) were performed to investigate the surface morphology and component distribution of the latex films. The results show high efficiency of these surfmers in emulsion polymerization, suggesting that the resultant PMAA-b-PBA block copolymers act not only as the emulsifier but also as the stabilizer of monomer droplets as well as the so-called comonomer. PMID:19928970

  20. Fabrication of Fluoropolymer Microtubes via RAFT Copolymerization of N,N'-Methylene Bisacrylamide Gel Fibers and Fluoromonomer.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Wang, Yi; Tang, Liming

    2015-06-01

    Fluoropolymer microtubes with a smooth surface were fabricated in more than 70 % yield via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) co-polymerization of N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (MBA) gel fibers as both template and monomer, 2-(perfluoro-3-methylbutyl)ethyl acrylate (R-3420) as co-monomer, and pentaerythritol tetraacrylate (PET4A) as cross-linker. The resulting fluoropolymer microtubes were characterized fully by SEM, TEM, EDS, XPS, and FT-IR. The influence of the monomer composition on the yields and morphologies of the tubes were investigated in detail. The results indicated that polymer microtubes with a smooth surface were obtained at suitable amounts of R-3420 and PET4A. Because of the decreased solubility of MBA gel fibers, the wall thickness increased as more R-3420 was used. In the presence of PET4A, the solution polymerization could be facilitated and more R-3420 could be attached onto the tubes based on FT-IR analysis. The water contact angle and swelling ratio measurements both revealed the low hydrophilicity and high lipophilicity of the fluoropolymer microtubes, which made the sample able to absorb toluene selectively in a water/toluene two-phase system. PMID:25786386

  1. Xyloglucan-Functional Latex Particles via RAFT-Mediated Emulsion Polymerization for the Biomimetic Modification of Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Fiona L; Ruda, Marcus; Lansalot, Muriel; D'Agosto, Franck; Malmström, Eva; Carlmark, Anna

    2016-04-11

    Herein, we report a novel class of latex particles composed of a hemicellulose, xyloglucan (XG), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), specially designed to enable a biomimetic modification of cellulose. The formation of the latex particles was achieved utilizing reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) mediated surfactant-free emulsion polymerization employing XG as a hydrophilic macromolecular RAFT agent (macroRAFT). In an initial step, XG was functionalized at the reducing chain end to bear a dithioester. This XG macroRAFT was subsequently utilized in water and chain extended with methyl methacrylate (MMA) as hydrophobic monomer, inspired by a polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) process. This yielded latex nanoparticles with a hydrophobic PMMA core stabilized by the hydrophilic XG chains at the corona. The molar mass of PMMA targeted was varied, resulting in a series of stable latex particles with hydrophobic PMMA content between 22 and 68 wt % of the total solids content (5-10%). The XG-PMMA nanoparticles were subsequently adsorbed to a neutral cellulose substrate (filter paper), and the modified surfaces were analyzed by FT-IR and SEM analyses. The adsorption of the latex particles was also investigated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), where the nanoparticles were adsorbed to negatively charged model cellulose surfaces. The surfaces were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle (CA) measurements. QCM-D experiments showed that more mass was adsorbed to the surfaces with increasing molar mass of the PMMA present. AFM of the surfaces after adsorption showed discrete particles, which were no longer present after annealing (160 °C, 1 h) and the roughness (Rq) of the surfaces had also decreased by at least half. Interestingly, after annealing, the surfaces did not all become more hydrophobic, as monitored by CA measurements, indicating that the surface roughness was an important factor to

  2. Chain Transfer of Vegetable Oil Macromonomers in Acrylic Solution Copolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Micah; Messman, Jamie M; Rawlins, James

    2011-01-01

    Use of vegetable oil macromonomers (VOMMs) as comonomers in emulsion polymerization enables good film coalescence without the addition of solvents that constitute volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOMMs are derived from renewable resources and offer the potential of post-application crosslinking via auto-oxidation. However, chain transfer reactions of VOMMs with initiator and/or polymer radicals during emulsion polymerization reduce the amount of allylic hydrogen atoms available for primary auto-oxidation during drying. Vegetable oils and derivatives were reacted in combination with butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate via solution polymerization. The copolymerization was monitored using in situ infrared spectroscopy to determine the extent of chain transfer. 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the loci of chain transfer and the molecular weight characteristics of the polymers were characterized by SEC. Solution polymerization was utilized to minimize temperature fluctuations and maintain polymer solubility during the initial characterization.

  3. RAFT polymerization of temperature- and salt-responsive block copolymers as reversible hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Hemp, Sean T.; Smith, Adam E.; Bunyard, W. Clayton; Rubinstein, Michael H.; Long, Timothy E.

    2016-01-01

    Reversible-addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization enabled the synthesis of novel, stimuli-responsive, AB and ABA block copolymers. The B block contained oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (OEG) and was permanently hydrophilic in the conditions examined. The A block consisted of diethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate (DEG) and [2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl]trimethylammonium chloride (TMA). The A block displayed both salt- and temperature-response with lower critical solution temperatures (LCSTs) dependent on the molar content of TMA and the presence of salt. Higher TMA content in the AB diblock copolymers increased the critical micelle temperatures (CMT) in HPLC-grade water due to an increased hydrophilicity of the A block. Upon addition of 0.9 wt% NaCl, the CMTs of poly(OEG-b-DEG95TMA5) decreased from 50 °C to 36 °C due to screening of electrostatic repulsion between the TMA units. ABA triblock copolymers displayed excellent hydrogel properties with salt- and temperature-dependent gel points. TMA incorporation in the A block increased the gel points for all triblock copolymers, and salt-response increased with higher TMA composition in the A block. For example, poly(DEG98TMA2-b-OEG-b-DEG98TMA2) formed a hydrogel at 40 °C in HPLC-grade water and 26 °C in 0.9 wt% NaCl aqueous solution. These salt- and temperature-responsive AB diblock and ABA triblock copolymers find applications as drug delivery vehicles, adhesives, and hydrogels. PMID:27041771

  4. Facile fabrication of redox-responsive thiol-containing drug delivery system via RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Yuanyuan; Su, Yue; Peng, Yu; Wang, Dali; Deng, Hongping; Xi, Xiaodong; Zhu, Xinyuan; Lu, Yunfeng

    2014-04-14

    A novel kind of redox-responsive polymeric drug delivery system has been designed and prepared successfully through the coupling of the multithiol branched polymers and thiol-containing drugs. The branched poly((S-(4-vinyl) benzyl S'-propyltrithiocarbonate)-co-(poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate)) (poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA)) was synthesized by one-pot reaction via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) copolymerization. Subsequently, the hydrophobic thiol-containing anticancer drug 6-mercaptopurine (MP) was conjugated to poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA) by thiol-disulfide exchange reaction, resulting in the formation of poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA)-S-S-MP conjugate. Due to its amphiphilicity, poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA)-S-S-MP conjugate self-assembled into amphiphilic micelles in aqueous solution. Under a reductive environment, the disassembly of polymeric micelles resulted in the MP release. Flow cytometry and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) measurements demonstrated that the poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA)-S-S-MP micelles could be taken up by Raji cells (a Burkitt lymphoma cell line). The viability of the Raji cells incubated with the glutathione (GSH) mediated poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA)-S-S-MP micelles was investigated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. The experimental results showed that the viability of the glutathione monoester (GSH-OEt) pretreated cells was lower than that without pretreatment, while the viability of the buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) pretreated cells was higher than that without pretreatment. The poly(VBPT-co-PEGMA)-S-S-MP micelles could induce the apoptosis of Raji cells, and the apoptosis behavior was dose-dependent. This redox-responsive polymer-drug conjugate provides a promising platform for the delivery of thiol-containing biological molecules. PMID:24598057

  5. Facile Synthesis of Multivalent Folate-Block Copolymer Conjugates via Aqueous RAFT Polymerization: Targeted Delivery of siRNA and Subsequent Gene Suppression†

    PubMed Central

    York, Adam W.; Zhang, Yilin; Holley, Andrew C.; Guo, Yanlin; Huang, Faqing; McCormick, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    Cell specific delivery of small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA) using well-defined multivalent folate-conjugated block copolymers is reported. Primary amine functional, biocompatible, hydrophilic-block-cationic copolymers were synthesized via aqueous reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) (HPMA), a permanently hydrophilic monomer, was copolymerized with a primary amine containing monomer, N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide (APMA). Poly(HPMA) confers biocompatibility while APMA provides amine functionality allowing conjugation of folate derivatives. (HPMA-stat-APMA) was chain extended with a cationic block, poly(N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]methacrylamide) in order to promote electrostatic complexation between the copolymer and the negatively charged phosphate backbone of siRNA. Notably, poly(HPMA) stabilizes the neutral complexes in aqueous solution while APMA allows the conjugation of a targeting moiety, thus, dually circumventing problems associated with the delivery of genes via cationically charged complexes (universal transfection). Fluorescence microscopy and gene down-regulation studies indicate that these neutral complexes can be specifically delivered to cancer cells that over-express folate receptors. PMID:19290625

  6. Preparation of surface-imprinted polymer grafted with water-compatible external layer via RAFT precipitation polymerization for highly selective and sensitive electrochemical determination of brucine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijuan; Zhao, Faqiong; Zeng, Baizhao

    2014-10-15

    A novel brucine imprinted polymer was prepared on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) precipitation polymerization. The polymer was further grafted with hydrophilic poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) brushes to improve its water-compatibility. The obtained molecularly imprinted material showed enhanced accessibility to brucine and improved selective recognition property in water medium. When the material was supported on an ionic liquid functionalized graphene coated glassy carbon electrode for the electrochemical determination of brucine, the resulting electrochemical sensor presented good analytical performance. Under the optimized conditions, the peak current was linear to brucine concentration in the ranges of 0.006-0.6 μM and 0.6-5.0 μM with sensitivities of 15.3 μA/μMmm(2) and 5.4 μA/μM mm(2), respectively; the detection limit was 2 nM (S/N=3). The sensor was successfully applied to the determination of brucine in practical samples and the recovery for the standards added was 94-104%. PMID:24769450

  7. The ant raft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlot, Nathan; Hu, David; Equabai, Solomon

    2009-11-01

    To survive floods, fire ants link their arms together to assemble a raft with their own bodies. Because ants are nearly as dense as water, this cooperative behavior requires that a portion of the ant colony must sacrifice itself by remaining underwater to support the colony's weight. Surprisingly, few ants drown during this process due to a striking metamorphosis of the raft: as we show using time-lapse photography, the raft morphs from a spherical to a pancake shape. This pancake configuration--a monolayer of floating ants supporting their dry counterparts--allows all ants to both breathe and remain united as a colony. Data is presented in the form of the dimensions and the rates of formation of the ant raft. We use the statics of small floating bodies to account for the equilibrium raft size as a function of the initial mass and density of the ants.

  8. Self Righting Life Raft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Givens Buoy Raft was designed and manufactured for inventor Jim Givens of Givens Marine Survival Co. Inc., by RPR Industries, Inc. The Raft consists of a canopied topside and an underwater hemispheric ballast chamber. It has a heavy ballast stabilization system, adopted from NASA technology, which negates the capsizing problem. A "flapper valve" admits large amounts of water to the hemisphere chamber providing ballast to keep the center of gravity constant; stabilization system compensates for changes in wave angle and weight shifting of raft occupants. Mr. Givens has an exclusive patent license for use of the NASA technology. Produced in various sizes, capacities range from six to 20 persons. Raft is housed in a canister, available in several configurations. A pull on a line triggers the automatic inflation process, which takes 12 seconds. The raft has been credited with saving 230 lives in the last five years. It has found wide acceptance with operators of fishing boats, pleasure craft and other vessels. The Coast Guard is purchasing the rafts for use on its rescue helicopters and the Navy has a development program to adapt the system. The Coast Guard last year announced a proposed amendment of its regulations that would require large ballast chambers on inflatable life rafts.

  9. Mosquito, egg raft (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Mosquitoes of the Culex species lay their eggs in the form of egg rafts that float in ... feed on micro-organisms before developing into flying mosquitoes. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  10. State of research: environmental pathways and food chain transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, B E

    1984-01-01

    Data on the chemistry of biologically active components of petroleum, synthetic fuel oils, certain metal elements and pesticides provide valuable generic information needed for predicting the long-term fate of buried waste constituents and their likelihood of entering food chains. Components of such complex mixtures partition between solid and solution phases, influencing their mobility, volatility and susceptibility to microbial transformation. Estimating health hazards from indirect exposures to organic chemicals involves an ecosystem's approach to understanding the unique behavior of complex mixtures. Metabolism by microbial organisms fundamentally alters these complex mixtures as they move through food chains. Pathway modeling of organic chemicals must consider the nature and magnitude of food chain transfers to predict biological risk where metabolites may become more toxic than the parent compound. To obtain predictions, major areas are identified where data acquisition is essential to extend our radiological modeling experience to the field of organic chemical contamination. PMID:6428875

  11. Rafting in superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N.

    1996-03-01

    The phenomenon of rafting in superalloys is described, with particular reference to modern superalloys with a high volume fraction of the particulate {gamma}{prime} phase. It is shown that in the elastic regime, the thermodynamic driving force for rafting is proportional to the applied stress, to the difference between the lattice parameters of the {gamma} matrix and the {gamma}{prime} particles, and to the difference of their elastic constants. A qualitative argument gives the sign of this driving force, which agrees with that determined by Pineau for a single isolated particle. Drawing on the work of Pollock and Argon and of Socrate and Parks, it is shown that after a plastic strain of the sample of order 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, the driving force is proportional to the product of the applied stress and the lattice misfit, in agreement with the results of the calculations of Socrate and Parks. The rate of rafting is controlled by the diffusion of alloying elements. Here, the tendency of large atoms to move from regions of high hydrostatic pressure to those of low may outweigh the influence of concentration gradients. The deformation of the sample directly produced by rafting is small, of order 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. The rafted structure is resistant to creep under low stresses at high temperatures. Under most experimental conditions at relatively high stresses, rafting accelerates creep; this effect may be less pronounced at the small strains acceptable under operational conditions.

  12. End-Functionalized Polymers and Junction-Functionalized Diblock Copolymers Via RAFT Chain Extension with Maleimido Monomers

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Scott M.; Convertine, Anthony J.; Benoit, Danielle S. W.; Hoffman, Allan S.; Stayton, Patrick S.

    2010-01-01

    A new strategy is described for functionalizing the ω-terminal end of polymers synthesized by reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization that provides spatially controlled bioconjugation sites. Traditional methods for preparing ω-functional polymers require the reduction of the RAFT chain-transfer agent to yield secondary or tertiary thiols of low reactivity or the synthesis of novel chain-transfer agents that contain reactive groups. As an additional strategy, N-substituted maleimido monomers have been used in a modified block polymerization to add a single maleimido unit onto the RAFT polymer with nearly quantitative efficiency. Unique reactive groups contained in the N-substituent are thereby added to the ω-terminal end of the polymer and are subsequently available for conjugation reactions. This technique has been demonstrated using N-(2-aminoethyl)maleimide trifluoroacetate to introduce a single primary amine to the ω-terminus of poly(dimethy-laminoethyl methacrylate) and poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) and to a specialized block copolymer for siRNA delivery. Evidence for retention of functional RAFT endgroups is provided by synthesis results where chain-extended polyDMAEMA (Mn = 10 600 g/mol, Mw/Mn = 1.14) was used as a macro chain transfer agent for the polymerization of styrene, yielding a diblock polymer of low polydispersity (Mn = 20 300 g/mol, Mw/Mn = 1.11). It is thus also possible to construct diblock copolymers with a bioconjugation site precisely located at the junction between the two blocks. The chain-extended polymers are functionalized with an amine-reactive fluorescent dye or folic acid at conjugation efficiencies of 86 and 94%, respectively. The versatile chain-extension technique described here offers unique opportunities for the synthesis of well-defined polymeric conjugates to molecules of biological and targeting interest. PMID:19480416

  13. RaftProt: mammalian lipid raft proteome database

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Anup; Chen, David; Boda, Akash R.; Foster, Leonard J.; Davis, Melissa J.; Hill, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    RaftProt (http://lipid-raft-database.di.uq.edu.au/) is a database of mammalian lipid raft-associated proteins as reported in high-throughput mass spectrometry studies. Lipid rafts are specialized membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids thought to act as dynamic signalling and sorting platforms. Given their fundamental roles in cellular regulation, there is a plethora of information on the size, composition and regulation of these membrane microdomains, including a large number of proteomics studies. To facilitate the mining and analysis of published lipid raft proteomics studies, we have developed a searchable database RaftProt. In addition to browsing the studies, performing basic queries by protein and gene names, searching experiments by cell, tissue and organisms; we have implemented several advanced features to facilitate data mining. To address the issue of potential bias due to biochemical preparation procedures used, we have captured the lipid raft preparation methods and implemented advanced search option for methodology and sample treatment conditions, such as cholesterol depletion. Furthermore, we have identified a list of high confidence proteins, and enabled searching only from this list of likely bona fide lipid raft proteins. Given the apparent biological importance of lipid raft and their associated proteins, this database would constitute a key resource for the scientific community. PMID:25392410

  14. Chain termination in polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis: involvement of exogenous hydroxy-compounds as chain transfer agents.

    PubMed

    Madden, L A; Anderson, A J; Shah, D T; Asrar, J

    1999-01-01

    We have identified a range of compounds which, when present during poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) [P(3HB)] accumulation by Ralstonia eutropha (reclassified from Alcaligenes eutrophus), can act as chain transfer agents in the chain termination step of polymerization. End-group analysis by 31P NMR of polymer derivatized with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane revealed that all these compounds were covalently linked to P(3HB) at the carboxyl terminus. All chain transfer agents possessed one or more hydroxyl groups, and glycerol was selected for further investigation. The number-average molecular mass (Mn) of P(3HB) produced by R. eutropha from glycerol was substantially lower than for polymer produced from glucose, and we identified two new end-group structures. These were attributed to a glycerol molecule bound to the P(3HB) chain via the primary or secondary hydroxyl groups. When a primary hydroxyl group of glycerol is involved in chain transfer, the end-group structure is in both [R] and [S] configurations, implying that chain transfer to glycerol is a random transesterification and that PHA synthase does not catalyse chain transfer. 3-Hydroxybutyric acid is the most probable chain transfer agent in vivo, with propagation and termination reactions involving transfer of the P(3HB) chain to enzyme-bound and free 3-hydroxybutyrate, respectively. Only carboxyl end-groups were detected in P(3HB) extracted from exponentially growing bacteria. It is proposed that a compound other than 3-hydroxybutyryl-CoA acts as a primer in the initiation of polymer synthesis. PMID:10416649

  15. Capillary rafts and their destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Abkarian, Manouk; Aristoff, Jeffrey; Stone, Howard

    2010-11-01

    Small objects trapped at an interface are very common in Nature (insects walking on water, ant rafts, bubbles or pollen at the water-air interface, membranes...) and are found in many multiphase industrial processes. The study of such particle-laden interfaces is therefore of practical as well as fundamental importance. Here we report experiments on the self-assembly of spherical particles into capillary rafts at an oil-water interface and elucidate how such rafts sink. We characterize different types of sinking behavior and show that it is possible to obtain "armored droplets," whereby the sinking oil is encapsulated within a shell of particles.

  16. Europa Ice Rafts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This high resolution image shows the ice-rich crust of Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter. Seen here are crustal plates ranging up to 13 kilometers (8 miles) across, which have been broken apart and 'rafted' into new positions, superficially resembling the disruption of pack-ice on polar seas during spring thaws on Earth. The size and geometry of these features suggest that motion was enabled by ice-crusted water or soft ice close to the surface at the time of disruption.

    The area shown is about 34 kilometers by 42 kilometers (21 miles by 26 miles), centered at 9.4 degrees north latitude, 274 degrees west longitude, and the resolution is 54 meters (59 yards). This picture was taken by the Solid State Imaging system on board the Galileo spacecraft on February 20, 1997, from a distance of 5,340 kilometers (3,320 miles) during the spacecraft's close flyby of Europa.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at: http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  17. Lipid rafts: heterogeneity on the high seas.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Linda J

    2004-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that are enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. They have been implicated in processes as diverse as signal transduction, endocytosis and cholesterol trafficking. Recent evidence suggests that this diversity of function is accompanied by a diversity in the composition of lipid rafts. The rafts in cells appear to be heterogeneous both in terms of their protein and their lipid content, and can be localized to different regions of the cell. This review summarizes the data supporting the concept of heterogeneity among lipid rafts and outlines the evidence for cross-talk between raft components. Based on differences in the ways in which proteins interact with rafts, the Induced-Fit Model of Raft Heterogeneity is proposed to explain the establishment and maintenance of heterogeneity within raft populations. PMID:14662007

  18. Volume holographic recording in nanoparticle-polymer composites doped with multifunctional chain transfer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinxin; Fujii, Ryuta; Tomita, Yasuo

    2015-10-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of the properties of volume holographic recording in photopolymerizable nanoparticle-polymer composites (NPCs) doped with chain transferring multifunctional di- and tri-thiols as chain transfer agents. It is shown that the incorporation of the multifunctional thiols into NPCs more strongly influences on volume holographic recording than that doped with mono-thiol since more chemical reactions involve in the polymer network formation. It is found that, as similar to the case of mono-thiol doping, there exist optimum concentrations of di- and tri-thiols for maximizing the saturated refractive index modulation. It is also seen that recording sensitivity monotonically decreases with an increase in multifunctional thiol concentration due to the partial inhibition of the photopolymerization event by excessive thiols.

  19. Olefin polymerization at bis(pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) zirconium and -hafnium centers: Chain-transfer mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Resconi, L.; Piemontesi, F.; Franciscono, G.

    1992-01-29

    Chain transfer via {beta}-CH{sub 3} elimination by a homogeneous bimetallic Ziegler-Natta propylene polymerization catalyst is reported. Propylene is converted by Cp{sup {double_dagger}}{sub 2}MCl{sub 2}/MAO catalysts (Cp{sup {double_dagger}} = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl; M=Zr, Hf; MAO = methylalumoxane) to atactic propylene oligomers and low polymers. GC-MS and {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR analyses of the oligomers obtained at {degrees}C (P{sub n} {approx} 4.5 for Zr, 3.4 for Hf) show these products to be mainly allyl- and isobutyl-terminated (1/1 ratio). The allyl/vinylidene ratio is 92/8 for Zr and 98/2 for Hf. No other unsaturated end groups could be detected. This end group structure is produced by first monomer insertion into the M-CH{sub 3} bond and then chain transfer by {beta}-CH{sub 3} elimination. On the contrary, Cp{sup {double_dagger}}{sub 2}MCl{sub 2}/MAO promotes 1-butene polymerization with the chain transfer being exclusively {beta}-H elimination and transfer to Al: no {beta}-ethyl elimination could be detected. The behavior of these catalysts toward propylene and 1-butene is compared with known Cp{sub 2}MCl{sub 2}/MAO catalysts. 37 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly of Block Copolymer Nano-objects via RAFT Aqueous Dispersion Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this Perspective, we discuss the recent development of polymerization-induced self-assembly mediated by reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) aqueous dispersion polymerization. This approach has quickly become a powerful and versatile technique for the synthesis of a wide range of bespoke organic diblock copolymer nano-objects of controllable size, morphology, and surface functionality. Given its potential scalability, such environmentally-friendly formulations are expected to offer many potential applications, such as novel Pickering emulsifiers, efficient microencapsulation vehicles, and sterilizable thermo-responsive hydrogels for the cost-effective long-term storage of mammalian cells. PMID:24968281

  1. Lipid Raft in Cardiac Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Das, Manika; Das, Dipak K

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts are sphingolipid and cholesterol rich micro-domains of the plasma membrane that coordinate and regulate varieties of signaling processes. Lipid rafts are also present in cardiac myocytes and are enriched in signaling molecules and ion channel regulatory proteins. Lipid rafts are receiving increasing attention as cellular organelles contributing to the pathogenesis of several structural and functional processes including cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. At present, very little is known about the role of lipid rafts in cardiac function and dysfunction. This review will discuss the possible role of lipid rafts in cardiac health and disease. PMID:20436850

  2. You Sank My Lipid Rafts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Tessa N.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane is the membrane that serves as a boundary between the interior of a cell and its extracellular environment. Lipid rafts are microdomains within a cellular membrane that possess decreased fluidity due to the presence of cholesterol, glycolipids, and phospholipids containing longer fatty acids. These domains are involved in many…

  3. Targeting Acetylcholinesterase to Membrane Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Heidi Q.; Liang, Dong; Leung, K. Wing; Chen, Vicky P.; Zhu, Kevin Y.; Chan, Wallace K. B.; Choi, Roy C. Y.; Massoulié, Jean; Tsim, Karl W. K.

    2010-01-01

    In the mammalian brain, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is anchored in cell membranes by a transmembrane protein PRiMA (proline-rich membrane anchor). We present evidence that at least part of the PRiMA-linked AChE is integrated in membrane microdomains called rafts. A significant proportion of PRiMA-linked AChE tetramers from rat brain was recovered in raft fractions; this proportion was markedly higher at low rather than at high concentrations of cold Triton X-100. The detergent-resistant fraction increased during brain development. In NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells transfected with cDNAs encoding AChET and PRiMA, PRiMA-linked G4 AChE was found in membrane rafts and showed the same sensitivity to cold Triton X-100 extraction as in the brain. The association of PRiMA-linked AChE with rafts was weaker than that of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored G2 AChE or G4 QN-HC-linked AChE. It was found to depend on the presence of a cholesterol-binding motif, called CRAC (cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus), located at the junction of transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of both PRiMA I and II isoforms. The cytoplasmic domain of PRiMA, which differs between PRiMA I and PRiMA II, appeared to play some role in stabilizing the raft localization of G4 AChE, because the Triton X-100-resistant fraction was smaller with the shorter PRiMA II isoform than that with the longer PRiMA I isoform. PMID:20147288

  4. Theoretical study of chain transfer to solvent reactions of alkyl acrylates.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Nazanin; Srinivasan, Sriraj; Grady, Michael C; Rappe, Andrew M; Soroush, Masoud

    2014-07-24

    This computational and theoretical study deals with chain transfer to solvent (CTS) reactions of methyl acrylate (MA), ethyl acrylate (EA), and n-butyl acrylate (n-BA) self-initiated homopolymerization in solvents such as butanol (polar, protic), methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) (polar, aprotic), and p-xylene (nonpolar). The results indicate that abstraction of a hydrogen atom from the methylene group next to the oxygen atom in n-butanol, from the methylene group in MEK, and from a methyl group in p-xylene by a live polymer chain are the most likely mechanisms of CTS reactions in MA, EA, and n-BA. Energy barriers and molecular geometries of reactants, products, and transition states are predicted. The sensitivity of the predictions to three hybrid functionals (B3LYP, X3LYP, and M06-2X) and three different basis sets (6-31G(d,p), 6-311G(d), and 6-311G(d,p)) is investigated. Among n-butanol, sec-butanol, and tert-butanol, tert-butanol has the highest CTS energy barrier and the lowest rate constant. Although the application of the conductor-like screening model (COSMO) does not affect the predicted CTS kinetic parameter values, the application of the polarizable continuum model (PCM) results in higher CTS energy barriers. This increase in the predicted CTS energy barriers is larger for butanol and MEK than for p-xylene. The higher rate constants of chain transfer to n-butanol reactions compared to those of chain transfer to MEK and p-xylene reactions suggest the higher CTS reactivity of n-butanol. PMID:24971646

  5. Cationic polyelectrolyte-stabilized nanoparticles via RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Semsarilar, M; Ladmiral, V; Blanazs, A; Armes, S P

    2013-06-18

    We report the synthesis of cationic sterically stabilized diblock copolymer nanoparticles via polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) using a RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization formulation. The cationic steric stabilizer is a macromolecular chain-transfer agent (macro-CTA) based on quaternized poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PQDMA), and the hydrophobic core-forming block is based on poly(2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate) (PHPMA). The effect of varying synthesis parameters such as the salt concentration, solids content, relative block composition, and cationic charge density has been studied. In the absence of salt, self-assembly is problematic because of the strong repulsion between the highly cationic PQDMA stabilizer chains. However, in the presence of salt this problem can be overcome by reducing the charge density within the coronal stabilizer layer by either (i) statistically copolymerizing QDMA monomer with a nonionic comonomer (e.g., glycerol monomethacrylate, GMA) or (ii) using a binary mixture of a PQDMA macro-CTA and a poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PGMA) macro-CTA. These cationic diblock copolymer nanoparticles were analyzed by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and aqueous electrophoresis. NMR studies suggest that the HPMA polymerization is complete within 2 h at 70 °C. Depending on the specific reaction conditions, either spherical, wormlike or vesicular nanoparticles can be prepared with tunable cationic surface charge. PMID:23205729

  6. Raft River geoscience case study

    SciTech Connect

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically connected to the shallow thermal fluid of the Crook and BLM wells based upon both geochemistry and pressure response; (d) controlled by a mixture of diluted meteoric water recharging from the northwest and a saline sodium chloride water entering from the southwest. Although the hydrogeologic environment of the Raft River geothermal area is very complex and unique, it is typical of many Basin and Range systems.

  7. Preparation of polystyrene brush film by radical chain-transfer polymerization and micromechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Chen, Miao; An, Yanqing; Liu, Jianxi; Yan, Fengyuan

    2008-12-01

    A radical chain-transfer polymerization technique has been applied to graft-polymerize brushes of polystyrene (PSt) on single-crystal silicon substrates. 3-Mercapto-propyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS), as a chain-transfer agent for grafting, was immobilized on the silicon surface by a self-assembling process. The structure and morphology of the graft-functionalized silicon surfaces were characterized by the means of contact-angle measurement, ellipsometric thickness measurement, Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The nanotribological and micromechanical properties of the as-prepared polymer brush films were investigated by frictional force microscopy (FFM), force-volume analysis and scratch test. The results indicate that the friction properties of the grafted polymer films can be improved significantly by the treatment of toluene, and the chemically bonded polystyrene film exhibits superior scratch resistance behavior compared with the spin-coated polystyrene film. The resultant polystyrene brush film is expected to develop as a potential lubrication coating for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  8. RAFT polymers for protein recognition

    PubMed Central

    Tominey, Alan F; Liese, Julia; Wei, Sun; Kowski, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Summary A new family of linear polymers with pronounced affinity for arginine- and lysine-rich proteins has been created. To this end, N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAM) was copolymerized in water with a binding monomer and a hydrophobic comonomer using a living radical polymerization (RAFT). The resulting copolymers were water-soluble and displayed narrow polydispersities. They formed tight complexes with basic proteins depending on the nature and amount of the binding monomer as well as on the choice of the added hydrophobic comonomer. PMID:20703378

  9. Colorado Outward Bound School Rafting Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Al

    River rafting trips at the Colorado Outward Bound School (COBS) present participants with an opportunity for developing self-confidence, self-awareness, and concern for others through challenging and adventuresome group effort, combined with a program of instruction in rafting skills, safety consciousness, and awareness of the natural environment.…

  10. Electron-beam induced RAFT-graft polymerization of poly(acrylic acid) onto PVDF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasselli, M.; Betz, N.

    2005-07-01

    This paper explores for the first time the post-radiation-induced-graft polymerization on solid substrate using reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) mechanism. Radiation-induced graft polymerization onto polymers is a potentially interesting technique to create easily new materials from highly resistant polymers, e.g. surface graft polymerization of acrylic acid (AA) onto poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) improves its surface properties without losing its excellent mechanical properties. As a consequence of the radical nature of the polymerization processes it is difficult to control molecular weight of grafted chains, and therefore design and standardize the properties of the final product. RAFT polymerization is a suitable method to obtain monodisperse polymers. The ability of the RAFT agents to control the polymer chain length could be an interesting approach to improve the grafted polymers obtained by post-radiation-induced-graft polymerization technique. In this way, graft polymerization of AA onto electron-beam irradiated α-PVDF was performed using trithiocarbonic acid bis(1-phenylethyl) ester as a RAFT agent to control the radical polymerization. We studied several grafting parameters such as solvent, monomer concentration and grafting time in order to achieve a poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) layer onto PVDF surface. Acetic acid was found to be the best solvent for many reasons, as to drive graft polymerization mainly to the polymer surface, complete solubility and stability of all reactants. Hydrolysis of PAA chains was also studied in order to remove the trithiocarbonate functionality from the grafted polymer. A mild chemical condition was achieved in order to have thiol groups that were detected onto the modified PVDF by specific enzymatic reaction.

  11. Raft River geoscience case study: appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The following are included in these appendices: lithology, x-ray analysis, and cores; well construction data; borehole geophysical logs; chemical analyses from wells at the Raft River geothermal site; and bibliography. (MHR)

  12. Drop floating on a granular raft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Josserand, Christophe; Protiere, Suzie

    2015-11-01

    When a droplet comes in contact with a bath of the same liquid, it coalesces to minimize the surface energy. This phenomenon reduces emulsion stability and is usually fought with surfactant molecules. Another way to slow down coalescence is to use colloidal solid particles. In this case the particles spontaneously migrate to the interface to form ``Pickering'' emulsions and act as a barrier between droplets. Here we use dense, large particles (~ 500 μm) which form a monolayer at an oil/water interface that we call a granular raft. When a droplet is placed on top of such a raft, for a given set of particle properties (contact angle/size), the raft prevents coalescence indefinitely. However, in contrast to what happens when a droplet is placed on a hydrophobic surface and never wets the surface, here the droplet is strongly anchored to the raft and deforms it. We will use this specific configuration to probe the mechanical response of the granular raft: by controlling the droplet volume we can impose tensile or compressive stresses. Finally we will show that the drop, spherical at first, slowly takes a more complex shape as it's volume increases. This shape is not reversible as the drop volume is decreased. The drop can become oblate or prolate with wrinkling of the raft.

  13. Surface modification of carbon nanotubes via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Liu, Meiying; Zeng, Guangjian; Huang, Qiang; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qingsong; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2015-08-01

    In this work, a novel strategy for surface modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was developed via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization. First, pristine CNTs were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA), which is formed via self-polymerization of dopamine in alkaline conditions. These PDA functionalized CNTs can be further reacted with amino-terminated polymers (named as PDMC), which was synthesized through chain transfer free radical polymerization using cysteamine hydrochloride as chain transfer agent and methacryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride as the monomer. PDMC perfectly conjugated with CNT-PDA was ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dispersibility of obtained CNT nanocomposites (named as CNT-PDA-PDMC) was further examined. Results showed that the dispersibility of CNT-PDA-PDMC in aqueous and organic solutions was obviously enhanced. Apart from PDMC, many other amino-terminated polymers can also be used to functionalization of CNTs via similar strategy. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a general strategy for fabrication various polymer nanocomposites.

  14. Lipid Raft: A Floating Island Of Death or Survival

    PubMed Central

    George, Kimberly S.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-01-01

    Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, and play an important role in the initiation of many pharmacological agent-induced signaling pathways and toxicological effects. The structure of lipid rafts is dynamic, resulting in an ever-changing content of both lipids and proteins. Cholesterol, as a major component of lipid rafts, is critical for the formation and configuration of lipid rafts microdomains, which provide signaling platforms capable of activating both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. A change of cholesterol level can result in lipid rafts disruption and activate or deactivate raft-associated proteins, such as death receptor proteins, protein kinases, and calcium channels. Several anti-cancer drugs are able to suppress growth and induce apoptosis of tumor cells through alteration of lipid raft contents via disrupting lipid raft integrity. PMID:22289360

  15. Lipid raft: A floating island of death or survival.

    PubMed

    George, Kimberly S; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-03-15

    Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, and play an important role in the initiation of many pharmacological agent-induced signaling pathways and toxicological effects. The structure of lipid rafts is dynamic, resulting in an ever-changing content of both lipids and proteins. Cholesterol, as a major component of lipid rafts, is critical for the formation and configuration of lipid raft microdomains, which provide signaling platforms capable of activating both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. A change of cholesterol level can result in lipid raft disruption and activate or deactivate raft-associated proteins, such as death receptor proteins, protein kinases, and calcium channels. Several anti-cancer drugs are able to suppress growth and induce apoptosis of tumor cells through alteration of lipid raft contents via disrupting lipid raft integrity. PMID:22289360

  16. Raptor ecology of Raft River Valley, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Thurow, T.L.; White, C.M.; Howard, R.P.; Sullivan, J.F.

    1980-09-01

    Raptor data were gathered in the 988-km/sup 2/ Raft River Valley in southcentral Idaho while conducting a tolerance study on the nesting Ferruginous Hawk (Buteo regalis) near the Department of Energy's Raft River Geothermal Site. Prior research from 1972 to 1977 on the nesting activity of the Ferruginous Hawk population provided a historical information base. These data are combined with new Ferruginous Hawk data collected between 1978 and 1980 to give a continuous 9-year breeding survey. Information on the distribution, density, and production of the other raptor species found in the study area during 1978 and 1979 is also provided.

  17. Membrane rafts and caveolae in cardiovascular signaling

    PubMed Central

    Insel, Paul A.; Patel, Hemal H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Substantial evidence documents the key role of lipid (membrane) rafts and caveolae as microdomains that concentrate a wide variety of receptors and post-receptor components regulated by hormones, neurotransmitters and growth factors. Recent findings Recent data document that those microdomains are important in regulating vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells and renal epithelial cells, and in particular in signal transduction across the plasma membrane. Summary Raft/caveolae domains are cellular regions, including in cardiovascular and renal epithelial cells, that organize a large number of signal transduction components, thereby providing spatially and temporally efficient regulation of cell function. PMID:19077689

  18. Lipid raft: A floating island of death or survival

    SciTech Connect

    George, Kimberly S.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-03-15

    Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, and play an important role in the initiation of many pharmacological agent-induced signaling pathways and toxicological effects. The structure of lipid rafts is dynamic, resulting in an ever-changing content of both lipids and proteins. Cholesterol, as a major component of lipid rafts, is critical for the formation and configuration of lipid raft microdomains, which provide signaling platforms capable of activating both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. A change of cholesterol level can result in lipid raft disruption and activate or deactivate raft-associated proteins, such as death receptor proteins, protein kinases, and calcium channels. Several anti-cancer drugs are able to suppress growth and induce apoptosis of tumor cells through alteration of lipid raft contents via disrupting lipid raft integrity. -- Highlights: ► The role of lipid rafts in apoptosis ► The pro- and anti-apoptotic effects of lipid raft disruption ► Cancer treatments targeting lipid rafts.

  19. Dynamics of submersible mussel rafts in waves and current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-xin; Swift, M. Robinson; Dewhurst, Tobias; Tsukrov, Igor; Celikkol, Barbaros; Newell, Carter

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the dynamics of submersible mussel rafts, the finite element program Aqua-FE™, developed by the University of New Hampshire (UNH), was applied to rafts moored at the surface and submerged. The submerged configuration is used to reduce wave forcing and to avoid contact with floating ice during winters in northern waters. Each raft consists of three pontoons connected by a grid framework. Rafts are intended to support densely spaced mussel ropes hung from the framework. When submerged, the pontoons are flooded, and the raft is held vertically by floats attached by lines. The computer models were developed in Aqua-FE™ to simulate the effects of waves and current. They were validated by comparison with wave tank results by use of a 1/10 scale raft physical model. Comparisons showed good agreement for the important heave (vertical) and pitch (rotational) motions, though there was a tendency towards conservative results for wave and current drag. Full-scale simulations of surface and submerged single raft and two rafts connected in tandem were performed. Submerged raft wave response was found to be reduced relative to that at the surface for both the single and two-raft configurations. In particular, the vertical motion of mussel rope connection points was significantly reduced by submergence, resulting in reduced potential for mussel drop-off. For example, the maximum vertical velocities of mussel rope attachment points in the submerged two raft case were 7%-20% of the corresponding velocities when at the surface.

  20. Dynamics and shape of large fire ant rafts

    PubMed Central

    Mlot, Nathan J.; Tovey, Craig; Hu, David L.

    2012-01-01

    To survive floods, fire ants link their bodies together to build waterproof rafts. Such rafts can be quite large, exceeding 100,000 individuals in size. In this study, we make two improvements on a previously reported model on the construction rate of rafts numbering between 3,000 and 10,000 individuals. That model was based upon experimental observations of randomly-directed linear ant trajectories atop the raft. Here, we report anomalous behavior of ants atop larger rafts of up to 23,000 ants. As rafts increase in size, the behavior of ants approaches diffusion, which is in closer alignment with other studies on the foraging and scouting patterns of ants. We incorporate this ant behavior into the model. Our modified model predicts more accurately the growth of large rafts. Our previous model also relied on an assumption of raft circularity. We show that this assumption is not necessary for large rafts, because it follows from the random directionality of the ant trajectories. Our predicted relationship between raft size and circularity closely fits experimental data. PMID:23336030

  1. RAFT dispersion polymerization of 3-phenylpropyl methacrylate with poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate] macro-CTAs in ethanol and associated thermoreversible polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Pei, Yiwen; Dharsana, Nadia C; van Hensbergen, Johannes A; Burford, Robert P; Roth, Peter J; Lowe, Andrew B

    2014-08-21

    The direct synthesis of methacrylic-based soft polymeric nanoparticles via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer dispersion polymerization (RAFTDP) is described. The use of poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate]s, of varying average degree of polymerization (X¯n), as the stabilizing blocks for the RAFTDP of 3-phenylpropyl methacrylate (PPMA) in ethanol at 70 °C, at various total solids contents, yielded the full spectrum of self-assembled nanoparticles (spherical and worm aggregates and polymersomes). We also demonstrate that nanoparticle morphology can be tuned simply by controlling temperature. This is especially evident in the case of worm aggregates undergoing a thermoreversible transition to spherical species - a process that is accompanied by a macroscopic degelation-gelation process. PMID:24975501

  2. Raft River wellfield testing and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, B.F.

    1982-04-01

    The testing procedures and an overview of the expected performance of the Raft River wellfield during plant operation are presented. Four well-testing procedures were used to evaluate the seven geothermal wells: (1) artesian flow and airlift tests during and shortly after drilling; (2) short duration constant rate and variable-head artesian flow tests following drilling; (3) a series of pulse discharge and injection tests of short duration, with constant rate and variable head; and (4) pumping and injection tests of up to 30 days duration using permanently installed pumps. Productivity curves were plotted for each of the exploratory and production wells. It was concluded that the Raft River wellfield has the capability of supplying the necessary flow to operate the 5MW(e) facility. (MJF)

  3. Lipid Rafts in Mast Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Silveira e Souza, Adriana Maria Mariano; Mazucato, Vivian Marino; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells have long been recognized to have a direct and critical role in allergic and inflammatory reactions. In allergic diseases, these cells exert both local and systemic responses, including allergic rhinitis and anaphylaxis. Mast cell mediators are also related to many chronic inflammatory conditions. Besides the roles in pathological conditions, the biological functions of mast cells include roles in innate immunity, involvement in host defense mechanisms against parasites, immunomodulation of the immune system, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Despite their growing significance in physiological and pathological conditions, much still remains to be learned about mast cell biology. This paper presents evidence that lipid rafts or raft components modulate many of the biological processes in mast cells, such as degranulation and endocytosis, play a role in mast cell development and recruitment, and contribute to the overall preservation of mast cell structure and organization. PMID:21490812

  4. Thermally induced changes in lipid composition of raft and non-raft regions of hepatocyte plasma membranes of rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Zehmer, John K; Hazel, Jeffrey R

    2005-11-01

    In poikilotherms, increases in plasma membrane (PM) cholesterol and an increase in the degree of lipid acyl chain saturation commonly accompany an increase in growth temperature. This has typically been interpreted in terms of membrane fluidity/order homeostasis, but these changes would also be expected to stabilize the structure of PM rafts against thermal perturbation. Rafts are microdomains that organize the molecules of many signaling cascades and are formed as a result of interactions between lipids with saturated acyl chains and cholesterol. No study to date has examined the thermally induced compositional changes of raft and non-raft regions of the PM separately. In this study we have measured the phospholipid class composition and fatty acid composition of raft-enriched (raft) and raft-depleted PM (RDPM) of hepatocytes from trout Oncorhynchus mykiss acclimated to 5 degrees C and 20 degrees C. In the raft, warm acclimation was associated with a reduction in the proportion of phosphatidylcholine from 56% to 30% while phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol each increased from 8% to approximately 20% of the total phospholipid. Additionally, there were significantly fewer unsaturated fatty acids in the raft lipids from warm-acclimated (61%) than from the cold-acclimated trout (68%). In contrast, there were no significant changes in phospholipid class or acyl chain unsaturation in the RDPM. These data suggest that changes in raft lipid composition, rather than the PM as a whole, are particularly important during thermal acclimation. PMID:16272251

  5. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+, and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23087902

  6. Reactive oxygen species promote raft formation in T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Lu, Shu-Ping; Lin Feng, Ming-Hsien; Huang, Huey-Lan; Huang, Ya-Ching; Tsou, Wen-I; Lai, Ming-Zong

    2007-04-01

    Lipid rafts are involved in many cell biology events, yet the molecular mechanisms on how rafts are formed are poorly understood. In this study we probed the possible requirement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) for T-cell receptor (TCR)-induced lipid raft formation. Microscopy and biochemical analyses illustrated that blockage of ROS production, by superoxide dismutase-mimic MnTBAP, significantly reduced partitioning of LAT, phospho-LAT, and PLC-gamma in lipid rafts. Another antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) displayed a similar suppressive effect on the entry of phospho-LAT into raft microdomains. The involvement of ROS in TCR-mediated raft assembly was observed in T-cell hybridomas, T leukemia cells, and normal T cells. Removal of ROS was accompanied by an attenuated activation of LAT and PKCtheta, with reduced production of IL-2. Consistently, treating T cells with the ROS-producer tert-butyl hydrogen peroxide (TBHP) greatly enhanced membrane raft formation, distribution of phospho-LAT into lipid rafts, and increased IL-2 production. Our results indicate for the first time that ROS contribute to TCR-induced membrane raft formation. PMID:17349922

  7. Membrane raft association is a determinant of plasma membrane localization

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Rohrer, Blanca B.; Levental, Kandice R.; Simons, Kai; Levental, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    The lipid raft hypothesis proposes lateral domains driven by preferential interactions between sterols, sphingolipids, and specific proteins as a central mechanism for the regulation of membrane structure and function; however, experimental limitations in defining raft composition and properties have prevented unequivocal demonstration of their functional relevance. Here, we establish a quantitative, functional relationship between raft association and subcellular protein sorting. By systematic mutation of the transmembrane and juxtamembrane domains of a model transmembrane protein, linker for activation of T-cells (LAT), we generated a panel of variants possessing a range of raft affinities. These mutations revealed palmitoylation, transmembrane domain length, and transmembrane sequence to be critical determinants of membrane raft association. Moreover, plasma membrane (PM) localization was strictly dependent on raft partitioning across the entire panel of unrelated mutants, suggesting that raft association is necessary and sufficient for PM sorting of LAT. Abrogation of raft partitioning led to mistargeting to late endosomes/lysosomes because of a failure to recycle from early endosomes. These findings identify structural determinants of raft association and validate lipid-driven domain formation as a mechanism for endosomal protein sorting. PMID:24912166

  8. Planning and execution of Raft River stimulation treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Verity, R.V.; Crichlow, H.B.

    1980-02-07

    The following topics are discussed for two Raft River Valley wells: well characteristics and treatment objectives, treatment selection and design, treatment history, mechanical arrangements and job costs. (MHR)

  9. Desmosome Assembly and Disassembly Are Membrane Raft-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Faundez, Victor; Koval, Michael; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Strong intercellular adhesion is critical for tissues that experience mechanical stress, such as the skin and heart. Desmosomes provide adhesive strength to tissues by anchoring desmosomal cadherins of neighboring cells to the intermediate filament cytoskeleton. Alterations in assembly and disassembly compromise desmosome function and may contribute to human diseases, such as the autoimmune skin blistering disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV). We previously demonstrated that PV auto-antibodies directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) cause loss of adhesion by triggering membrane raft-mediated Dsg3 endocytosis. We hypothesized that raft membrane microdomains play a broader role in desmosome homeostasis by regulating the dynamics of desmosome assembly and disassembly. In human keratinocytes, Dsg3 is raft associated as determined by biochemical and super resolution immunofluorescence microscopy methods. Cholesterol depletion, which disrupts rafts, prevented desmosome assembly and adhesion, thus functionally linking rafts to desmosome formation. Interestingly, Dsg3 did not associate with rafts in cells lacking desmosomal proteins. Additionally, PV IgG-induced desmosome disassembly occurred by redistribution of Dsg3 into raft-containing endocytic membrane domains, resulting in cholesterol-dependent loss of adhesion. These findings demonstrate that membrane rafts are required for desmosome assembly and disassembly dynamics, suggesting therapeutic potential for raft targeting agents in desmosomal diseases such as PV. PMID:24498201

  10. Exploring the Existence of Lipid Rafts in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY An interesting concept in the organization of cellular membranes is the proposed existence of lipid rafts. Membranes of eukaryotic cells organize signal transduction proteins into membrane rafts or lipid rafts that are enriched in particular lipids such as cholesterol and are important for the correct functionality of diverse cellular processes. The assembly of lipid rafts in eukaryotes has been considered a fundamental step during the evolution of cellular complexity, suggesting that bacteria and archaea were organisms too simple to require such a sophisticated organization of their cellular membranes. However, it was recently discovered that bacteria organize many signal transduction, protein secretion, and transport processes in functional membrane microdomains, which are equivalent to the lipid rafts of eukaryotic cells. This review contains the most significant advances during the last 4 years in understanding the structural and biological role of lipid rafts in bacteria. Furthermore, this review shows a detailed description of a number of molecular and genetic approaches related to the discovery of bacterial lipid rafts as well as an overview of the group of tentative lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions that give consistency to these sophisticated signaling platforms. Additional data suggesting that lipid rafts are widely distributed in bacteria are presented in this review. Therefore, we discuss the available techniques and optimized protocols for the purification and analysis of raft-associated proteins in various bacterial species to aid in the study of bacterial lipid rafts in other laboratories that could be interested in this topic. Overall, the discovery of lipid rafts in bacteria reveals a new level of sophistication in signal transduction and membrane organization that was unexpected for bacteria and shows that bacteria are more complex than previously appreciated. PMID:25652542

  11. RAFT Aqueous Dispersion Polymerization Yields Poly(ethylene glycol)-Based Diblock Copolymer Nano-Objects with Predictable Single Phase Morphologies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) macromolecular chain transfer agent (macro-CTA) is prepared in high yield (>95%) with 97% dithiobenzoate chain-end functionality in a three-step synthesis starting from a monohydroxy PEG113 precursor. This PEG113-dithiobenzoate is then used for the reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) aqueous dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA). Polymerizations conducted under optimized conditions at 50 °C led to high conversions as judged by 1H NMR spectroscopy and relatively low diblock copolymer polydispersities (Mw/Mn < 1.25) as judged by GPC. The latter technique also indicated good blocking efficiencies, since there was minimal PEG113 macro-CTA contamination. Systematic variation of the mean degree of polymerization of the core-forming PHPMA block allowed PEG113-PHPMAx diblock copolymer spheres, worms, or vesicles to be prepared at up to 17.5% w/w solids, as judged by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy studies. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis revealed that more exotic oligolamellar vesicles were observed at 20% w/w solids when targeting highly asymmetric diblock compositions. Detailed analysis of SAXS curves indicated that the mean number of membranes per oligolamellar vesicle is approximately three. A PEG113-PHPMAx phase diagram was constructed to enable the reproducible targeting of pure phases, as opposed to mixed morphologies (e.g., spheres plus worms or worms plus vesicles). This new RAFT PISA formulation is expected to be important for the rational and efficient synthesis of a wide range of biocompatible, thermo-responsive PEGylated diblock copolymer nano-objects for various biomedical applications. PMID:24400622

  12. RAFT Aqueous Dispersion Polymerization of N-(2-(Methacryloyloxy)ethyl)pyrrolidone: A Convenient Low Viscosity Route to High Molecular Weight Water-Soluble Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    RAFT solution polymerization of N-(2-(methacryoyloxy)ethyl)pyrrolidone (NMEP) in ethanol at 70 °C was conducted to produce a series of PNMEP homopolymers with mean degrees of polymerization (DP) varying from 31 to 467. Turbidimetry was used to assess their inverse temperature solubility behavior in dilute aqueous solution, with an LCST of approximately 55 °C being observed in the high molecular weight limit. Then a poly(glycerol monomethacylate) (PGMA) macro-CTA with a mean DP of 63 was chain-extended with NMEP using a RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization formulation at 70 °C. The target PNMEP DP was systematically varied from 100 up to 6000 to generate a series of PGMA63–PNMEPx diblock copolymers. High conversions (≥92%) could be achieved when targeting up to x = 5000. GPC analysis confirmed high blocking efficiencies and a linear evolution in Mn with increasing PNMEP DP. A gradual increase in Mw/Mn was also observed when targeting higher DPs. However, this problem could be minimized (Mw/Mn < 1.50) by utilizing a higher purity grade of NMEP (98% vs 96%). This suggests that the broader molecular weight distributions observed at higher DPs are simply the result of a dimethacrylate impurity causing light branching, rather than an intrinsic side reaction such as chain transfer to polymer. Kinetic studies confirmed that the RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization of NMEP was approximately four times faster than the RAFT solution polymerization of NMEP in ethanol when targeting the same DP in each case. This is perhaps surprising because both 1H NMR and SAXS studies indicate that the core-forming PNMEP chains remain relatively solvated at 70 °C in the latter formulation. Moreover, dissolution of the initial PGMA63–PNMEPx particles occurs on cooling from 70 to 20 °C as the PNMEP block passes through its LCST. Hence this RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization formulation offers an efficient route to a high molecular weight water-soluble polymer in a rather

  13. Lipid Rafts Establish Calcium Waves in Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    NAGATA, JUN; GUERRA, MATEUS T.; SHUGRUE, CHRISTINE A.; GOMES, DAWIDSON A.; NAGATA, NAOKI; NATHANSON, MICHAEL H.

    2010-01-01

    Background & Aims Polarity is critical for hepatocyte function. Ca2+ waves are polarized in hepatocytes because the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (InsP3R) is concentrated in the pericanalicular region, but the basis for this localization is unknown. We examined whether pericanalicular localization of the InsP3R and its action to trigger Ca2+ waves depends on lipid rafts. Methods Experiments were performed using isolated rat hepatocyte couplets and pancreatic acini, plus SkHep1 cells as nonpolarized controls. The cholesterol depleting agent methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (mβCD) was used to disrupt lipid rafts. InsP3R isoforms were examined by immunoblot and immunofluorescence. Ca2+ waves were examined by confocal microscopy. Results Type II InsP3Rs initially were localized to only some endoplasmic reticulum fractions in hepatocytes, but redistributed into all fractions in mβCD-treated cells. This InsP3R isoform was concentrated in the pericanalicular region, but redistributed throughout the cell after mβCD treatment. Vasopressin-induced Ca2+ signals began as apical-to-basal Ca2+ waves, and mβCD slowed the wave speed and prolonged the rise time. MβCD had a similar effect on Ca2+ waves in acinar cells but did not affect Ca2+ signals in SkHep1 cells, suggesting that cholesterol depletion has similar effects among polarized epithelia, but this is not a nonspecific effect of mβCD. Conclusions Lipid rafts are responsible for the pericanalicular accumulation of InsP3R in hepatocytes, and for the polarized Ca2+ waves that result. Signaling microdomains exist not only in the plasma membrane, but also in the nearby endoplasmic reticulum, which in turn, helps establish and maintain structural and functional polarity. PMID:17631147

  14. Raft River aquaculture project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beleau, M.H.; Woiwode, J.G.

    1980-07-01

    The commercial potential for geothermal aquaculture was evaluated for 2 years at the Department of Energy's Raft River geothermal site in southcentral Idaho. Common carp '(Cyprinus carpio) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were selected as culture species. Objectives of the study included investigation of: (1) growth rates; (2) nutrition trials; (3) histological and physiological parameters; (4) bioaccumulation of heavy metals; and (5) reproductive capacity. The second year project efforts were primarily studying the effects of geothermal water on the reproductive capacity of common carp by: (1) determining the effects of geothermal water on gonadal development of common carp; and (2) determining the effects of geothermal water on common carp embryogenesis.

  15. Lipid rafts in immune signalling: current progress and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Pallavi; Yadav, Vikas; Saini, Neeru

    2016-09-01

    Lipid rafts are dynamic assemblies of proteins and lipids that harbour many receptors and regulatory molecules and so act as a platform for signal transduction. They float freely within the liquid-disordered bilayer of cellular membranes and can cluster to form larger ordered domains. Alterations in lipid rafts are commonly found to be associated with the pathogenesis of several human diseases and recent reports have shown that the raft domains can also be perturbed by targeting raft proteins through microRNAs. Over the last few years, the importance of lipid rafts in modulating both innate and acquired immune responses has been elucidated. Various receptors present on immune cells like B cells, T cells, basophils and mast cells associate with lipid rafts on ligand binding and initiate signalling cascades leading to inflammation. Furthermore, disrupting lipid raft integrity alters lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine secretion, IgE signalling, and B-cell and T-cell activation. The objective of this review is to summarize the recent progress in understanding the role of lipid rafts in the modulation of immune signalling and its related therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases and inflammatory disorders. PMID:27153983

  16. Ant workers exhibit specialization and memory during raft formation.

    PubMed

    Avril, Amaury; Purcell, Jessica; Chapuisat, Michel

    2016-06-01

    By working together, social insects achieve tasks that are beyond the reach of single individuals. A striking example of collective behaviour is self-assembly, a process in which individuals link their bodies together to form structures such as chains, ladders, walls or rafts. To get insight into how individual behavioural variation affects the formation of self-assemblages, we investigated the presence of task specialization and the role of past experience in the construction of ant rafts. We subjected groups of Formica selysi workers to two consecutive floods and monitored the position of individuals in rafts. Workers showed specialization in their positions when rafting, with the same individuals consistently occupying the top, middle, base or side position in the raft. The presence of brood modified workers' position and raft shape. Surprisingly, workers' experience in the first rafting trial with brood influenced their behaviour and raft shape in the subsequent trial without brood. Overall, this study sheds light on the importance of workers' specialization and memory in the formation of self-assemblages. PMID:27056046

  17. Ant workers exhibit specialization and memory during raft formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avril, Amaury; Purcell, Jessica; Chapuisat, Michel

    2016-06-01

    By working together, social insects achieve tasks that are beyond the reach of single individuals. A striking example of collective behaviour is self-assembly, a process in which individuals link their bodies together to form structures such as chains, ladders, walls or rafts. To get insight into how individual behavioural variation affects the formation of self-assemblages, we investigated the presence of task specialization and the role of past experience in the construction of ant rafts. We subjected groups of Formica selysi workers to two consecutive floods and monitored the position of individuals in rafts. Workers showed specialization in their positions when rafting, with the same individuals consistently occupying the top, middle, base or side position in the raft. The presence of brood modified workers' position and raft shape. Surprisingly, workers' experience in the first rafting trial with brood influenced their behaviour and raft shape in the subsequent trial without brood. Overall, this study sheds light on the importance of workers' specialization and memory in the formation of self-assemblages.

  18. Lipid rafts as major platforms for signaling regulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mollinedo, Faustino; Gajate, Consuelo

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling does not apparently occur randomly over the cell surface, but it seems to be integrated very often into cholesterol-rich membrane domains, termed lipid rafts. Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains that are enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides, and behave as major modulators of membrane geometry, lateral movement of molecules, traffic and signal transduction. Because the lipid and protein composition of membrane rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, they provide an additional level of compartmentalization, serving as sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction proteins. A wide number of signal transduction processes related to cell adhesion, migration, as well as to cell survival and proliferation, which play major roles in cancer development and progression, are dependent on lipid rafts. Despite lipid rafts harbor mainly critical survival signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, recent evidence suggests that these membrane domains can also house death receptor-mediated apoptotic signaling. Recruitment of this death receptor signaling pathway in membrane rafts can be pharmacologically modulated, thus opening up the possibility to regulate cell demise with a therapeutic use. The synthetic ether phospholipid edelfosine shows a high affinity for cholesterol and accumulates in lipid rafts in a number of malignant hematological cells, leading to an efficient in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity by inducing translocation of death receptors and downstream signaling molecules to these membrane domains. Additional antitumor drugs have also been shown to act, at least in part, by recruiting death receptors in lipid rafts. The partition of death receptors together with downstream apoptotic signaling molecules in membrane rafts has led us to postulate the concept of a special liquid-ordered membrane platform coined as

  19. How Do Spherical Diblock Copolymer Nanoparticles Grow during RAFT Alcoholic Dispersion Polymerization?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMA) chain transfer agent (CTA) is used for the reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) alcoholic dispersion polymerization of benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) in ethanol at 70 °C. THF GPC analysis indicated a well-controlled polymerization with molecular weight increasing linearly with conversion. GPC traces also showed high blocking efficiency with no homopolymer contamination apparent and Mw/Mn values below 1.35 in all cases. 1H NMR studies confirmed greater than 98% BzMA conversion for a target PBzMA degree of polymerization (DP) of up to 600. The PBzMA block becomes insoluble as it grows, leading to the in situ formation of sterically stabilized diblock copolymer nanoparticles via polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). Fixing the mean DP of the PDMA stabilizer block at 94 units and systematically varying the DP of the PBzMA block enabled a series of spherical nanoparticles of tunable diameter to be obtained. These nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, DLS, MALLS, and SAXS, with mean diameters ranging from 35 to 100 nm. The latter technique was particularly informative: data fits to a spherical micelle model enabled calculation of the core diameter, surface area occupied per copolymer chain, and the mean aggregation number (Nagg). The scaling exponent derived from a double-logarithmic plot of core diameter vs PBzMA DP suggests that the conformation of the PBzMA chains is intermediate between the collapsed and fully extended state. This is in good agreement with 1H NMR studies, which suggest that only 5−13% of the BzMA residues of the core-forming chains are solvated. The Nagg values calculated from SAXS and MALLS are in good agreement and scale approximately linearly with PBzMA DP. This suggests that spherical micelles grow in size not only as a result of the increase in copolymer molecular weight during the PISA synthesis but also by exchange of individual copolymer chains between micelles

  20. Dynamic Reorganization and Correlation among Lipid Raft Components.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Mónica M; Hovis, Jennifer S; Moss, Frank R; Boxer, Steven G

    2016-08-10

    Lipid rafts are widely believed to be an essential organizational motif in cell membranes. However, direct evidence for interactions among lipid and/or protein components believed to be associated with rafts is quite limited owing, in part, to the small size and intrinsically dynamic interactions that lead to raft formation. Here, we exploit the single negative charge on the monosialoganglioside GM1, commonly associated with rafts, to create a gradient of GM1 in response to an electric field applied parallel to a patterned supported lipid bilayer. The composition of this gradient is visualized by imaging mass spectrometry using a NanoSIMS. Using this analytical method, added cholesterol and sphingomyelin, both neutral and not themselves displaced by the electric field, are observed to reorganize with GM1. This dynamic reorganization provides direct evidence for an attractive interaction among these raft components into some sort of cluster. At steady state we obtain an estimate for the composition of this cluster. PMID:27447959

  1. Lipid Rafts Disruption Increases Ochratoxin A Cytotoxicity to Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Qi, Xiaozhe; Zheng, Juanjuan; Luo, Yunbo; Zhao, Changhui; Hao, Junran; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Kunlun; Xu, Wentao

    2016-02-01

    Lipid rafts are microdomains in plasma membrane and can mediate cytotoxicity. In this study, the role of lipid rafts in ochratoxin A-induced toxicity was investigated using Hepatoblastoma Cell Line HepG-2 cells. Disruption of cholesterol-containing lipid rafts enhanced Ochratoxin A (OTA) toxicity, as shown by increased lactate dehydrogenase leakage, increased reactive oxygen species level and reduction of superoxide dismutase activity in a time-dependent manner. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation-based proteomics of the cell membranes showed that nearly 85.5% proteins were downregulated by OTA, indicating that OTA inhibited the membrane protein synthesis. Most of altered proteins were involved in Gene Ontology "transport", "cell adhesion" and "vesicle-mediated transport". In conclusion, lipid rafts play a key role in OTA-induced cytotoxicity. This study provides insight into how OTA toxicity is regulated by the plasma membrane, especially the lipid rafts. PMID:26861962

  2. Disrupting membrane raft domains by alkylphospholipids.

    PubMed

    Gomide, A B; Thomé, C H; dos Santos, G A; Ferreira, G A; Faça, V M; Rego, E M; Greene, L J; Stabeli, R G; Ciancaglini, P; Itri, R

    2013-05-01

    Using phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy we study the influence of the alkylphospholipid, ALP, 10-(octyloxy) decyl-2-(trimethylammonium) ethyl phosphate, ODPC, in giant unilamellar vesicles, GUVs, composed of DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), brain sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol). The results show that adding 100μM ODPC (below CMC) to the outer solution of GUVs promotes DOPC membrane disruption over a period of 1h of continuous observation. On the other hand, the presence of SM and Chol in homogeneous fluid lipid bilayers protects the membrane from disruption. Interestingly, by adding 100μM ODPC to GUVs containing DOPC:SM:Chol (1:1:1), which display liquid ordered (Lo)-liquid disordered (Ld) phase coexistence, the domains rapidly disappear in less than 1min of ODPC contact with the membrane. The lipids are subsequently redistributed to liquid domains within a time course of 14-18min, reflecting that the homogenous phase was not thermodynamically stable, followed by rupture of the GUVs. A similar mechanism of action is also observed for perifosine, although to a larger extent. Therefore, the initial stage of lipid raft disruption by both ODPC and perifosine, and maybe other ALPS, by promoting lipid mixing, may be correlated with their toxicity upon neoplastic cells, since selective (dis)association of essential proteins within lipid raft microdomains must take place in the plasma membrane. PMID:23376656

  3. Bubble Velocities in Slowly Sheared Bubble Rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennin, Michael

    2004-03-01

    Many complex fluids, such as foams, emulsions, colloids, and granular matter, exhibit interesting flow behavior when subjected to slow, steady rates of strain. The flow is characterized by irregular fluctuations in the stress with corresponding nonlinear rearrangements of the individual particles. We focus on the flow behavior of a model two-dimensional system: bubble rafts. Bubble rafts consist of a single layer of soap bubbles floating on the surface of a liquid subphase, usually a soap-water solution. The bubbles are sheared using a Couette geometry, i.e. concentric cylinders. We rotate the outer cylinder at a constant rate and measure the motions of individual bubbles and the stress on the inner cylinder. We will report on the velocity profiles of the bubbles averaged over long-times and averaged over individual stress events. The long-time average velocities are well described by continuum models for fluids with the one surprising feature that there exists a critical radius at which the shear-rate is discontinuous. The individual profiles are highly nonlinear and strongly correlated with the stress fluctuations. We will discuss a number of interesting questions. Can the average profiles be understood in a simple way given the individual velocities? Is there a clear "classification" for the individual profiles, or are they purely random? What sets the critical radius for a given set of flow conditions?

  4. Direct 'in situ', low VOC, high yielding, CO2 expanded phase catalytic chain transfer polymerisation: towards scale-up.

    PubMed

    Adlington, Kevin; Green, Anthony; Wang, Wenxin; Howdle, Steven M; Irvine, Derek J

    2013-01-01

    The successful application of catalytic chain transfer polymerisation (CCTP) by adopting an 'in situ' catalyst preparation methodology in several polymerisation media is described. More specifically, this study is focused on reporting the development of 'in situ' CCTP within a CO(2) expanded phase polymerisation process, which achieved high yields of polymer whilst minimising both VOC footprint and CO(2) compression costs. The 'in situ' method is shown to be effective in controlling polymerisations conducted in both conventional solvents and bulk under inert atmosphere, delivering molecular weight reductions and a Cs value of appropriate similar magnitude to those achieved by the benchmark, commercially sourced CoPhBF catalyst. The 'in situ' effect has been achieved with equal efficiency when both using catalysts with different axial ligands and where the complex is required to undergo a facile ligand dissociation in order to create the required catalyst necessary to achieve CCTP control. Furthermore, both catalysts are shown to effectively control polymerisations in a CO(2) expanded phase process, in which a small amount of compressed CO(2) is introduced to reduce the viscosity of the reaction mixture, allowing for easy heat transfer and good catalyst diffusion during reaction. In this way, yield limitations imposed to avoid the Trommsdorff effect required in bulk processing and the need for post precipitation have been successfully overcome. Both of these factors further improve the sustainability of such a polymerisation process. However, the 'in situ', high pressure expanded phase environment was observed to retard the ligand dissociation required for catalyst activation. PMID:23085824

  5. Highly protein-resistant coatings and suspension cell culture thereon from amphiphilic block copolymers prepared by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Kazutoshi; Kubota, Kazuomi; Takada, Tetsuo; Mahara, Saori

    2014-06-01

    Novel amphiphilic block copolymers composed of hydrophobic (poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate): M) and hydrophilic (poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide): D) segments were synthesized by living radical polymerization: a reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Two types of amphiphilic block copolymers, triblock (MDM) and 4-arm block ((MD)4) copolymers with specific compositions (D/M = (750-1500)/250), were prepared by a versatile one-pot synthesis. These copolymers show good adhesion to various types of substrates (e.g., polystyrene, polycarbonate, polypropylene, Ti, and glass), and the surface coating showed high protein repellency and a low contact angle for water, regardless of the substrate. The two opposing characteristics of high protein repellency and good substrate adhesion were achieved by the combined effects of the molecular architecture of the block copolymers, the high molecular weight, and the characteristics of each segment, that is, low protein adsorption capability of both segments and low glass transition temperature of the hydrophobic segment. Further, a polystyrene dish coated with the MDM block copolymer could be sterilized by γ-ray irradiation and used as a good substrate for a suspension cell culture that exhibits low cell adhesion and good cell growth. PMID:24773089

  6. Localization and signaling of GPCRs in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Villar, Van Anthony M; Cuevas, Santiago; Zheng, Xiaoxu; Jose, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of how biological membranes are organized and how they function has evolved. Instead of just serving as a medium in which certain proteins are found, portions of the lipid bilayer have been demonstrated to form specialized platforms that foster the assembly of signaling complexes by providing a microenvironment that is conducive for effective protein-protein interactions. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and relevant signaling molecules, including the heterotrimeric G proteins, key enzymes such as kinases and phosphatases, trafficking proteins, and secondary messengers, preferentially partition to these highly organized cell membrane microdomains, called lipid rafts. As such, lipid rafts are crucial for the trafficking and signaling of GPCRs. The study of GPCR biology in the context of lipid rafts involves the localization of the GPCR of interest in lipid rafts, at the basal state and upon receptor agonism, and the evaluation of the biological functions of the GPCR in appropriate cell lines. The lack of standardized methodology to study lipid rafts, in general, and of the workings of GPCRs in lipid rafts, in particular, and the inherent drawbacks of current methods have hampered the complete understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Newer methodologies that allow the study of GPCRs in their native form are needed. The use of complementary approaches that produce mutually supportive results appear to be the best way for drawing conclusions with regards to the distribution and activity of GPCRs in lipid rafts. PMID:26928536

  7. Palladium(II)-catalyzed copolymerization of styrenes with carbon monoxide: mechanism of chain propagation and chain transfer.

    PubMed

    Rix, Francis C; Rachita, Michael J; Wagner, Mark I; Brookhart, Maurice; Milani, Barbara; Barborak, James C

    2009-11-01

    A mechanistic interpretation of the [(1,10-phenanthroline)Pd(CH(3))(CH(3)CN)](+)[BArF](-) (1a) and [(2,2'-bipyridine)Pd(CH(3))(CH(3)CN)](+)[BArF](-) (1b) (BArF = 3,5-(CF(3))(2)-C(6)H(3)) catalyzed perfectly alternating copolymerization of styrenes with CO is reported. The copolymerization in CH(2)Cl(2) or chlorobenzene has been found to be first order in styrene and inverse first order in CO concentrations. The microscopic steps involved in the catalytic cycle have been studied via low temperature NMR techniques. Palladium alkyl chelate complex [(2,2'-bipyridine)Pd(CHArCH(2)C(O)CH(3)](+)[BArF](-) (5b sigma) and [(2,2'-bipyridine)Pd(eta(3)-CH(CH(2)C(O)CH(3))Ar)](+)[BArF](-) (5b pi), existing in equilibrium, were prepared. Treatment of 5b sigma,pi with (13)CO followed by 4-tert-butylstyrene at -78 degrees C allowed for (13)C NMR monitoring of the alternating chain growth of a series of palladium acyl carbonyl complexes. The acyl carbonyl species, representing the catalyst resting state, is in equilibrium with a palladium acyl styrene complex. The equilibrium constant, K(4), measured between [(phen)Pd(CO)(C(O)CH(3)](+)[BArF](-) (3a) and [(phen)Pd(C(O)CH(3))-(C(6)H(5)C=CH(2))](+)[BArF](-) (8a), was determined to be 2.84 +/- 2.8 x 10(-7) at -66 degrees C. The barrier to migratory insertion in 8a was determined (DeltaG(double dagger) (-66 degrees C) = 15.6 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1)). From the experimentally determined kinetic and thermodynamic data for the copolymerization of styrene with CO a mechanistic model has been constructed. The ability of this model to predict catalyst turnover frequency (TOF) was used as a test of its validity. A series of para-substituted styrenes, p-XC(6)H(4)CH=CH(2) (X = -OCH(3), -CH(3), -H, -Cl), were copolymerized with CO. A Hammett treatment of TOF for the series showed that electron-donating groups increase the rate of copolymerization (rho p = -0.8). The ratio of chain transfer to chain propagation was found to increase with styrene

  8. Food chain transfer and potential renal toxicity of mercury to small mammals at a contaminated terrestrial field site.

    PubMed

    Talmage, S S; Walton, B T

    1993-12-01

    Mercury concentrations were determined in surface soil and biota at a contaminated terrestrial field site and were used to calculate transfer coefficients of mercury through various compartments of the ecosystem based on trophic relationships. Mercury concentrations in all compartments (soil, vegetation, invertebrates, and small mammals) were higher than mercury concentrations in corresponding samples at local reference sites. Nonetheless, mercury concentrations in biota did not exceed concentrations in the contaminated surface soil, which averaged 269 μg g(-1). Plant tissue concentrations of mercury were low (0.01 to 2.0 μg g(-1)) and yielded soil to plant transfer coefficients ranging from 3.7×10(-5) for seeds to 7.0×10(-3) for grass blades. Mercury concentrations in invertebrates ranged from 0.79 for harvestmen (Phalangida) to 15.5 μg g(-1) for undepurated earthworms (Oligochaeta). Mean food chain transfer coefficients for invertebrates were 0.88 for herbivores/omnivores and 2.35 for carnivores. Mean mercury concentrations in target tissue (kidney) were 1.16±1.16 μg g(-1) for the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), a granivore, and 38.8±24.6 μg g(-1) for the shorttail shrew (Blarina brevicauda), an insectivore. Transfer coefficients for diet to kidney were 0.75 and 4.40 for P. leucopus and B. brevicauda, respectively. A comparison of kidney mercury residues measured in this study with values from controlled laboratory feeding studies from the literature indicate that B. brevicauda but not P. leucopus may be ingesting mercury at levels that are nephrotoxic. PMID:24201735

  9. Simulation of radioactive cesium transfer in the southern Fukushima coastal biota using a dynamic food chain transfer model.

    PubMed

    Tateda, Yutaka; Tsumune, Daisuke; Tsubono, Takaki

    2013-10-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F NPP) accident occurred on 11 March 2011. The accident introduced (137)Cs into the coastal waters which was subsequently transferred to the local coastal biota thereby elevating the concentration of this radionuclide in coastal organisms. In this study, the radioactive cesium levels in coastal biota from the southern Fukushima area were simulated using a dynamic biological compartment model. The simulation derived the possible maximum radioactive cesium levels in organisms, indicating that the maximum (137)Cs concentrations in invertebrates, benthic fish and predator fish occurred during late April, late May and late July, respectively in the studied area where the source was mainly the direct leakage of (137)Cs effluent from the 1F NPP. The delay of a (137)Cs increase in fish was explained by the gradual food chain transfer of (137)Cs introduced to the ecosystem from the initial contamination of the seawater. The model also provided the degree of radionuclide depuration in organisms, and it demonstrated the latest start of the decontamination phase in benthic fish. The ecological half-lives, derived both from model simulation and observation, were 1-4 months in invertebrates, and 2-9 months in plankton feeding fish and coastal predator fish from the studied area. In contrast, it was not possible to similarly calculate these parameters in benthic fish because of an unidentified additional radionuclide source which was deduced from the biological compartment model. To adequately reconstruct the in-situ depuration of radiocesium in benthic fish in the natural ecosystem, a contamination source associated with the bottom sediments is necessary. PMID:23639689

  10. Evaluation of Isoprene Chain Extension from PEO Macromolecular Chain Transfer Agents for the Preparation of Dual, Invertible Block Copolymer Nanoassemblies

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Jeremy W.; Cauët, Solène I.; Billings, Peter L.; Lin, Lily Yun; Zhu, Jiahua; Fidge, Christopher; Pochan, Darrin J.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    Two RAFT-capable PEO macro-CTAs, 2 and 5 kDa, were prepared and used for the polymerization of isoprene which yielded well-defined block copolymers of varied lengths and compositions. GPC analysis of the PEO macro-CTAs and block copolymers showed remaining unreacted PEO macro-CTA. Mathematical deconvolution of the GPC chromatograms allowed for the estimation of the blocking efficiency, about 50% for the 5 kDa PEO macro-CTA and 64% for the 2 kDa CTA. Self assembly of the block copolymers in both water and decane was investigated and the resulting regular and inverse assemblies, respectively, were analyzed with DLS, AFM, and TEM to ascertain their dimensions and properties. Assembly of PEO-b-PIp block copolymers in aqueous solution resulted in well-defined micelles of varying sizes while the assembly in hydrophobic, organic solvent resulted in the formation of different morphologies including large aggregates and well-defined cylindrical and spherical structures. PMID:21399721

  11. Passive rafting is a powerful driver of transoceanic gene flow

    PubMed Central

    Nikula, Raisa; Spencer, Hamish G.; Waters, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    Dispersal by passive oceanic rafting is considered important for the assembly of biotic communities on islands. However, not much is known about levels of population genetic connectivity maintained by rafting over transoceanic distances. We assess the evolutionary impact of kelp-rafting by estimating population genetic differentiation in three kelp-associated invertebrate species across a system of islands isolated by oceanic gaps for over 5 million years, using mtDNA and AFLP markers. The species occur throughout New Zealand's subantarctic islands, but lack pelagic stages and any opportunity for anthropogenic transportation, and hence must rely on passive rafting for long-distance dispersal. They all have been directly observed to survive transoceanic kelp-rafting journeys in this region. Our analyses indicate that regular gene flow occurs among populations of all three species between all of the islands, especially those on either side of the subtropical front oceanographic boundary. Notwithstanding its perceived sporadic nature, long-distance kelp-rafting appears to enable significant gene flow among island populations separated by hundreds of kilometres of open ocean. PMID:23134782

  12. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    SONG, JIAN; PING, LING-YAN; DUONG, DUC M.; GAO, XIAO-YAN; HE, CHUN-YAN; WEI, LEI; WU, JUN-ZHU

    2016-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell-mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native-LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL-stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label-free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native-LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native-LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation. PMID:26781977

  13. Monolayer curvature stabilizes nanoscale raft domains in mixed lipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Meinhardt, Sebastian; Vink, Richard L. C.; Schmid, Friederike

    2013-01-01

    According to the lipid raft hypothesis, biological lipid membranes are laterally heterogeneous and filled with nanoscale ordered “raft” domains, which are believed to play an important role for the organization of proteins in membranes. However, the mechanisms stabilizing such small rafts are not clear, and even their existence is sometimes questioned. Here, we report the observation of raft-like structures in a coarse-grained molecular model for multicomponent lipid bilayers. On small scales, our membranes demix into a liquid ordered (lo) phase and a liquid disordered (ld) phase. On large scales, phase separation is suppressed and gives way to a microemulsion-type state that contains nanometer-sized lo domains in an ld environment. Furthermore, we introduce a mechanism that generates rafts of finite size by a coupling between monolayer curvature and local composition. We show that mismatch between the spontaneous curvatures of monolayers in the lo and ld phases induces elastic interactions, which reduce the line tension between the lo and ld phases and can stabilize raft domains with a characteristic size of the order of a few nanometers. Our findings suggest that rafts in multicomponent bilayers might be closely related to the modulated ripple phase in one-component bilayers. PMID:23487780

  14. "Grafting to" of RAFTed Responsive Polymers to Glass Substrates by Thiol-Ene and Critical Comparison to Thiol-Gold Coupling.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Caroline I; Walker, Marc; Gibson, Matthew I

    2016-08-01

    Surface-grafted polymers have been widely applied to modulate biological interfaces and introduce additional functionality. Polymers derived from reversible addition-fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization have a masked thiol at the ω-chain end providing an anchor point for conjugation and in particular displays high affinity for gold surfaces (both flat and particulate). In this work, we report the direct grafting of RAFTed polymers by a "thiol-ene click" (Michael addition) onto glass substrates rather than gold, which provides a more versatile surface for subsequent array-based applications but retains the simplicity. The immobilization of two thermoresponsive polymers are studied here, poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate] (pOEGMA) and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM). Using a range of surface analysis techniques the grafting efficiency was compared to thiol-gold and was quantitatively compared to the gold alternative using quartz crystal microbalance. It is shown that this method gives easy access to grafted polymer surfaces with pNIPAM resulting in significantly increased surface coverage compared to pOEGMA. The nonfouling (protein resistance) character of these surfaces is also demonstrated. PMID:27409356

  15. Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Armstrong, Clare L.; Yamani, Zahra; Kučerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2014-11-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano-or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking, and lipid or protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules, we observe raftlike structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to ordering of the cholesterol molecules in the raftlike structures were observed and indexed by two different structures: a monoclinic structure of ordered cholesterol pairs of alternating direction in equilibrium with cholesterol plaques, i.e., triclinic cholesterol bilayers.

  16. Involvement of glycosphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts in inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are membrane components consisting of hydrophobic ceramide and hydrophilic sugar moieties. GSLs cluster with cholesterol in cell membranes to form GSL-enriched lipid rafts. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that GSL-enriched lipid rafts contain several kinds of transducer molecules, including Src family kinases. Among the GSLs, lactosylceramide (LacCer, CDw17) can bind to various microorganisms, is highly expressed on the plasma membranes of human phagocytes, and forms lipid rafts containing the Src family tyrosine kinase Lyn. LacCer-enriched lipid rafts mediate immunological and inflammatory reactions, including superoxide generation, chemotaxis, and non-opsonic phagocytosis. Therefore, LacCer-enriched membrane microdomains are thought to function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed on microorganisms. LacCer also serves as a signal transduction molecule for functions mediated by CD11b/CD18-integrin (αM/β2-integrin, CR3, Mac-1), as well as being associated with several key cellular processes. LacCer recruits PCKα/ε and phospholipase A2 to stimulate PECAM-1 expression in human monocytes and their adhesion to endothelial cells, as well as regulating β1-integrin clustering and endocytosis on cell surfaces. This review describes the organizational and inflammation-related functions of LacCer-enriched lipid rafts. PMID:25553454

  17. Interaction of chiral rafts in self-assembled colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Sheng; Hagan, Michael F.; Pelcovits, Robert A.

    2016-03-01

    Colloidal membranes are monolayer assemblies of rodlike particles that capture the long-wavelength properties of lipid bilayer membranes on the colloidal scale. Recent experiments on colloidal membranes formed by chiral rodlike viruses showed that introducing a second species of virus with different length and opposite chirality leads to the formation of rafts—micron-sized domains of one virus species floating in a background of the other viruses [Sharma et al., Nature (London) 513, 77 (2014), 10.1038/nature13694]. In this article we study the interaction of such rafts using liquid crystal elasticity theory. By numerically minimizing the director elastic free energy, we predict the tilt angle profile for both a single raft and two rafts in a background membrane, and the interaction between two rafts as a function of their separation. We find that the chiral penetration depth in the background membrane sets the scale for the range of the interaction. We compare our results with the experimental data and find good agreement for the strength and range of the interaction. Unlike the experiments, however, we do not observe a complete collapse of the data when rescaled by the tilt angle at the raft edge.

  18. Lipid Raft Redox Signaling: Molecular Mechanisms in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Fan; Katirai, Foad

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Lipid rafts, the sphingolipid and cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains, are able to form different membrane macrodomains or platforms upon stimulations, including redox signaling platforms, which serve as a critical signaling mechanism to mediate or regulate cellular activities or functions. In particular, this raft platform formation provides an important driving force for the assembling of NADPH oxidase subunits and the recruitment of other related receptors, effectors, and regulatory components, resulting, in turn, in the activation of NADPH oxidase and downstream redox regulation of cell functions. This comprehensive review attempts to summarize all basic and advanced information about the formation, regulation, and functions of lipid raft redox signaling platforms as well as their physiological and pathophysiological relevance. Several molecular mechanisms involving the formation of lipid raft redox signaling platforms and the related therapeutic strategies targeting them are discussed. It is hoped that all information and thoughts included in this review could provide more comprehensive insights into the understanding of lipid raft redox signaling, in particular, of their molecular mechanisms, spatial-temporal regulations, and physiological, pathophysiological relevances to human health and diseases. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 15, 1043–1083. PMID:21294649

  19. Association of Influenza Virus Proteins with Membrane Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Veit, Michael; Thaa, Bastian

    2011-01-01

    Assembly and budding of influenza virus proceeds in the viral budozone, a domain in the plasma membrane with characteristics of cholesterol/sphingolipid-rich membrane rafts. The viral transmembrane glycoproteins hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) are intrinsically targeted to these domains, while M2 is seemingly targeted to the edge of the budozone. Virus assembly is orchestrated by the matrix protein M1, binding to all viral components and the membrane. Budding progresses by protein- and lipid-mediated membrane bending and particle scission probably mediated by M2. Here, we summarize the experimental evidence for this model with emphasis on the raft-targeting features of HA, NA, and M2 and review the functional importance of raft domains for viral protein transport, assembly and budding, environmental stability, and membrane fusion. PMID:22312341

  20. The chemical driving force for rafting in superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N. |

    1997-08-15

    Until recently, all theories of the driving force for rafting have considered the compositions of the two phases to be fixed, although accepting that the rate of rafting might be controlled by diffusion. When plastic flow occurs, the difference in elastic constants becomes negligible. A high energy density builds up in the transverse {gamma} sheets, and rafting occurs by outward motion of the transverse interfaces, reducing the volume which has a high energy density. The analysis considers only the change in enthalpy between two states, one in which the two phases have the compositions which are in equilibrium in the absence of external stress, the external stress has been applied, but no diffusion has occurred, and one in which the two phases have the homogeneous compositions which are in equilibrium under the applied stress. The authors do not attempt to treat the intermediate configuration in which some diffusion has occurred, but the compositions of the phases are inhomogeneous.

  1. Rapid, Long-Distance Dispersal by Pumice Rafting

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Scott E.; Cook, Alex G.; Evans, Jason P.; Hebden, Kerry; Hurrey, Lucy; Colls, Peter; Jell, John S.; Weatherley, Dion; Firn, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Pumice is an extremely effective rafting agent that can dramatically increase the dispersal range of a variety of marine organisms and connect isolated shallow marine and coastal ecosystems. Here we report on a significant recent pumice rafting and long-distance dispersal event that occurred across the southwest Pacific following the 2006 explosive eruption of Home Reef Volcano in Tonga. We have constrained the trajectory, and rate, biomass and biodiversity of transfer, discovering more than 80 species and a substantial biomass underwent a >5000 km journey in 7–8 months. Differing microenvironmental conditions on the pumice, caused by relative stability of clasts at the sea surface, promoted diversity in biotic recruitment. Our findings emphasise pumice rafting as an important process facilitating the distribution of marine life, which have implications for colonisation processes and success, the management of sensitive marine environments, and invasive pest species. PMID:22815770

  2. Dynamics of surfactant-driven fracture of particle rafts.

    PubMed

    Vella, Dominic; Kim, Ho-Young; Aussillous, Pascale; Mahadevan, L

    2006-05-01

    We investigate the dynamic fracture of a close-packed monolayer of particles, or particle raft, floating at a liquid-gas interface induced by the localized addition of surfactant. Unusually for a two-dimensional solid, our experiments show that the speed of crack propagation here is not affected by the elastic properties of the raft. Instead it is controlled by the rate at which surfactant is advected to the crack tip by means of the induced Marangoni flows. Further, the velocity of propagation is not constant in time and the length of the crack scales as t(3/4). More broadly, this surfactant-induced rupture of interfacial rafts suggests ways to manipulate them for applications. PMID:16712340

  3. ''SMART'' MULTIFUNCTIONAL POLYMERS FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Charles McCormick; Andrew Lowe

    2004-10-20

    Herein we report the aqueous polymerization of acrylamide using reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization to perform a comprehensive study on the polymerization of acrylamide. More specifically, the effect of polymerization conditions on the polymerization kinetics, molecular weight control, and blocking ability were examined. With this in mind, it was necessary to prepare ''A'' block (corona of the micelle) from a hydrophilic monomer. The responsive ''B'' block present in the core will be disclosed in the next two reports.

  4. Highly Ordered Structure Formation in RAFT-Synthesized PtBOS-b-P4VP Diblock Copolymers.

    PubMed

    Faber, Martin; Hofman, Anton H; Loos, Katja; Brinke, Gerrit Ten

    2016-06-01

    Linear poly(4-tert-butoxystyrene)-b-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PtBOS-b-P4VP) diblock copolymers are synthesized using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The self-assembly of four different PtBOS-b-P4VP diblock copolymers is studied using small-angle X-ray scattering and transmission electron microscopy and a number of interesting observations are made. A tBOS62 -b-4VP28 diblock copolymer with a weight fraction P4VP of 0.21 shows a disordered morphology of P4VP spheres with liquid-like short-range order despite an estimated value of χN of the order of 50. Increasing the length of the 4VP block to tBOS62 -b-4VP199 results in a diblock copolymer with a weight fraction P4VP of 0.66. It forms a remarkably well-ordered lamellar structure. Likewise, a tBOS146 -b-4VP120 diblock copolymer with a weight fraction P4VP of 0.33 forms an extremely well-ordered hexagonal structure of P4VP cylinders. Increasing the P4VP block of this block copolymer to tBOS146 -b-4VP190 with a weight fraction P4VP of 0.44 results in a bicontinuous gyroid morphology despite the estimated strong segregation of χN≅150. These results are discussed in terms of the architectural dissimilarity of the two monomers, characterized by the presence of the large side group of PtBOS, and the previously reported value of the interaction parameter, χ≅0.39, for this polymer pair. PMID:27079547

  5. Spatial frequency response of a volume hologram recorded in a ZrO2 nanoparticle-dispersed acrylate photopolymer film containing chain transfer agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jinxin; Fujii, Ryuta; Tomita, Yasuo

    2014-05-01

    Photopolymerizable nanoparticle-polymer composites (NPCs) have thus far shown their excellent performance in various applications, such as holographic data storage, nonlinear optics and neutron optics. Specifically, for such applications, a high spatial frequency material response is necessary, as it is the response to high spatial frequencies that determines their spatial resolution and diffraction properties. However, it is known that the spatial frequency response of a recorded hologram in multi-component photopolymers including NPCs and holographic polymer-dispersed liquid crystals exhibits a reduction in refractive index modulation at high spatial frequencies. In order to overcome this drawback, an addition of chain transfer agents (CTAs) may be useful as done for all-organic photopolymers to modify their nonlocal response and phase separation characteristics. In our work, we investigate the effect of CTAs on the spatial frequency response in NPCs. Here we employ various chain-transfer agents with three different thiol groups in a photopolymerizable ZrO2 NPC film. A range of CTA concentration is carried out, in order to explore the most effective material combination used in the examination of spatial frequency response. The significant improvement in spatial frequency response of NPCs through the addition of a CTA with the most appropriate concentration is presented.

  6. Raft-Like Membrane Domains in Pathogenic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Farnoud, Amir M.; Toledo, Alvaro M.; Konopka, James B.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; London, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane is thought to be compartmentalized by the presence of lipid-protein microdomains. In eukaryotic cells, microdomains composed of sterols and sphingolipids packed in a liquid-ordered state, commonly known as lipid rafts, are believed to exist. While less studied in bacterial cells, reports on the presence of sterol or protein-mediated microdomains in bacterial cell membranes are also appearing with increasing frequency. Recent efforts have been focused on addressing the biophysical and biochemical properties of lipid rafts. However, most studies have been focused on synthetic membranes, mammalian cells, and/or model, non-pathogenic microorganisms. Much less is known about microdomains in the plasma membrane of pathogenic microorganisms. This review attempts to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of lipid rafts in pathogenic fungi and the developing field of microdomains in pathogenic bacteria. The current literature on the structure and function and of microdomains is reviewed and the potential role of microdomains in growth, pathogenesis, and drug resistance of pathogens are discussed. Better insight into the structure and function of membrane microdomains in pathogenic microorganisms might lead to a better understanding of the process of pathogenesis and development of raft-mediated approaches for new methods of therapy. PMID:26015285

  7. Modifying lipid rafts promotes regeneration and functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Tassew, Nardos G; Mothe, Andrea J; Shabanzadeh, Alireza P; Banerjee, Paromita; Koeberle, Paulo D; Bremner, Rod; Tator, Charles H; Monnier, Philippe P

    2014-08-21

    Ideal strategies to ameliorate CNS damage should promote both neuronal survival and axon regeneration. The receptor Neogenin promotes neuronal apoptosis. Its ligand prevents death, but the resulting repulsive guidance molecule a (RGMa)-Neogenin interaction also inhibits axonal growth, countering any prosurvival benefits. Here, we explore strategies to inhibit Neogenin, thus simultaneously enhancing survival and regeneration. We show that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and RGMa-dependent recruitment of Neogenin into lipid rafts requires an interaction between RGMa and Neogenin subdomains. RGMa or Neogenin peptides that prevent this interaction, BMP inhibition by Noggin, or reduction of membrane cholesterol all block Neogenin raft localization, promote axon outgrowth, and prevent neuronal apoptosis. Blocking Neogenin raft association influences axonal pathfinding, enhances survival in the developing CNS, and promotes survival and regeneration in the injured adult optic nerve and spinal cord. Moreover, lowering cholesterol disrupts rafts and restores locomotor function after spinal cord injury. These data reveal a unified strategy to promote both survival and regeneration in the CNS. PMID:25127134

  8. Cholesterol lipids and cholesterol-containing lipid rafts in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; London, Erwin

    2016-09-01

    Sterols are important components of eukaryotic membranes, but rare in bacteria. Some bacteria obtain sterols from their host or environment. In some cases, these sterols form membrane domains analogous the lipid rafts proposed to exist in eukaryotic membranes. This review describes the properties and roles of sterols in Borrelia and Helicobacter. PMID:26964703

  9. Targeting the Raft-Associated Akt Signaling in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Lv, Ji-Yun; Shi, Jian-Fei; Yang, Mei; Liu, Shu-Hong; Li, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Shao-Geng; Liu, Zhen-Wen; Ding, Jin-Biao; Xu, Dong-Ping; Zhao, Jing-Min

    2014-01-01

    Caveolin-1 and flotillin-1 are considered as markers of lipid rafts which can be regarded as sorting platforms for targeted transport of transmembrane proteins and are involved in fundamental cellular events such as signal transduction, cell adhesion, lipid/protein sorting, and human cancer. We addressed caveolin-1 and flotillin-1 expression in 90 human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and adjacent noncancerous tissues (ANT) samples by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting with specific antibodies. Significant caveolin-1 and flotillin-1 overexpression was found in HCC tissues compared to ANT and was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Raft-associated Akt signaling pathway components involved in the regulation of cell survival were altered by western blotting in HCC microdomain-enriched subcellular fractions purified from paired HCC and ANT samples. Our results demonstrated that the activity of raft-associated but not total membrane Akt determines its cellular functions. Lipid rafts differ in different types of tissues, which allows for the possibility of tissue-type-specific targeting for cell survival. PMID:25243186

  10. Caveolin interaction governs Kv1.3 lipid raft targeting

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Verdaguer, Mireia; Capera, Jesusa; Martínez-Mármol, Ramón; Camps, Marta; Comes, Núria; Tamkun, Michael M.; Felipe, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The spatial localization of ion channels at the cell surface is crucial for their functional role. Many channels localize in lipid raft microdomains, which are enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Caveolae, specific lipid rafts which concentrate caveolins, harbor signaling molecules and their targets becoming signaling platforms crucial in cell physiology. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in such spatial localization are under debate. Kv1.3 localizes in lipid rafts and participates in the immunological response. We sought to elucidate the mechanisms of Kv1.3 surface targeting, which govern leukocyte physiology. Kv1 channels share a putative caveolin-binding domain located at the intracellular N-terminal of the channel. This motif, lying close to the S1 transmembrane segment, is situated near the T1 tetramerization domain and the determinants involved in the Kvβ subunit association. The highly hydrophobic domain (FQRQVWLLF) interacts with caveolin 1 targeting Kv1.3 to caveolar rafts. However, subtle variations of this cluster, putative ancillary associations and different structural conformations can impair the caveolin recognition, thereby altering channel’s spatial localization. Our results identify a caveolin-binding domain in Kv1 channels and highlight the mechanisms that govern the regulation of channel surface localization during cellular processes. PMID:26931497

  11. Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

  12. Astronaut Tamara Jernigan deploys life raft during WETF training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Tamara E. Jernigan, STS-67 payload commander, deploys a life raft during a session of emergency bailout training. The training took place in the 25-feet deep pool at JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF). Jernigan was joined by her crew mates for the training session. Several SCUBA-equipped divers who assisted in the training can be seen in this photograph.

  13. Caveolin interaction governs Kv1.3 lipid raft targeting.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Verdaguer, Mireia; Capera, Jesusa; Martínez-Mármol, Ramón; Camps, Marta; Comes, Núria; Tamkun, Michael M; Felipe, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The spatial localization of ion channels at the cell surface is crucial for their functional role. Many channels localize in lipid raft microdomains, which are enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Caveolae, specific lipid rafts which concentrate caveolins, harbor signaling molecules and their targets becoming signaling platforms crucial in cell physiology. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in such spatial localization are under debate. Kv1.3 localizes in lipid rafts and participates in the immunological response. We sought to elucidate the mechanisms of Kv1.3 surface targeting, which govern leukocyte physiology. Kv1 channels share a putative caveolin-binding domain located at the intracellular N-terminal of the channel. This motif, lying close to the S1 transmembrane segment, is situated near the T1 tetramerization domain and the determinants involved in the Kvβ subunit association. The highly hydrophobic domain (FQRQVWLLF) interacts with caveolin 1 targeting Kv1.3 to caveolar rafts. However, subtle variations of this cluster, putative ancillary associations and different structural conformations can impair the caveolin recognition, thereby altering channel's spatial localization. Our results identify a caveolin-binding domain in Kv1 channels and highlight the mechanisms that govern the regulation of channel surface localization during cellular processes. PMID:26931497

  14. Lipid rafts are required for Kit survival and proliferation signals

    PubMed Central

    Leifheit, Erica; Gooch, Stacie; Sindhu, Simran; Weinberg, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    In addition to its physiologic role as central regulator of the hematopoietic and reproductive systems, the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) is pathologically overexpressed in some forms of leukemia and constitutively activated by oncogenic mutations in mast-cell proliferations and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. To gain insight into the general activation and signaling mechanisms of RTKs, we investigated the activation-dependent dynamic membrane distributions of wild-type and oncogenic forms of Kit in hematopoietic cells. Ligand-induced recruitment of wild-type Kit to lipid rafts after stimulation by Kit ligand (KL) and the constitutive localization of oncogenic Kit in lipid rafts are necessary for Kit-mediated proliferation and survival signals. KL-dependent and oncogenic Kit kinase activity resulted in recruitment of the regulatory phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) subunit p85 to rafts where the catalytical PI3-K subunit p110 constitutively resides. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin prevented Kit-mediated activation of the PI3-K downstream target Akt and inhibited cellular proliferation by KL-activated or oncogenic Kit, including mutants resistant to the Kit inhibitor imatinib-mesylate. Our data are consistent with the notion that Kit recruitment to lipid rafts is required for efficient activation of the PI3-K/Akt pathway and Kit-mediated proliferation. PMID:17554062

  15. Concerted diffusion of lipids in raft-like membranes.

    PubMed

    Apajalahti, Touko; Niemelä, Perttu; Govindan, Praveen Nedumpully; Miettinen, Markus S; Salonen, Emppu; Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there is no comprehensive model for the dynamics of cellular membranes. The understanding of even the basic dynamic processes, such as lateral diffusion of lipids, is still quite limited. Recent studies of one-component membrane systems have shown that instead of single-particle motions, the lateral diffusion is driven by a more complex, concerted mechanism for lipid diffusion (E. Falck et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2008, 130, 44-45), where a lipid and its neighbors move in unison in terms of loosely defined clusters. In this work, we extend the previous study by considering the concerted lipid diffusion phenomena in many-component raft-like membranes. This nature of diffusion phenomena emerge in all the cases we have considered, including both atom-scale simulations of lateral diffusion within rafts and coarse-grained MARTINI simulations of diffusion in membranes characterized by coexistence of raft and non-raft domains. The data allows us to identify characteristic time scales for the concerted lipid motions, which turn out to range from hundreds of nanoseconds to several microseconds. Further, we characterize typical length scales associated with the correlated lipid diffusion patterns and find them to be about 10 nm, or even larger if weak correlations are taken into account. Finally, the concerted nature of lipid motions is also found in dissipative particle dynamics simulations of lipid membranes, clarifying the role of hydrodynamics (local momentum conservation) in membrane diffusion phenomena. PMID:20158041

  16. Synthesis and conformational characterization of functional di-block copolymer brushes for microarray technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Carlo, Gabriele; Damin, Francesco; Armelao, Lidia; Maccato, Chiara; Unlu, Selim; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Chiari, Marcella

    2012-02-01

    Surface initiated polymerization (SIP) coupled with reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) was used to functionalize microarray glass slides with block polymer brushes. N,N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA) and N-acryloyloxysuccinimide (NAS) (graft-poly[DMA-b-(DMA-co-NAS)]) brushes, with di-block architecture, were prepared from a novel RAFT chain transfer agent bearing a silanating moiety (RAFT silane) directly anchored onto the glass surfaces. Conformational characterization of the coatings was performed by Self Spectral Interference Fluorescence Microscopy (SSFM), an innovative technique that describes the location of a fluorescent DNA molecule relative to a surface with sub-nanometer accuracy. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) were used to characterize the coatings composition and morphology.

  17. Pacific Ocean Disasters - Enhanced Detection and Monitoring of Pumice Rafts Using NASA EOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, L. M.; Chojnacki, P. R.; Coady, C.; Geddes, Q.; Honaker, L. B.; Lyddane, W.; McGilloway, J.; Scott, J.

    2011-12-01

    Pumice rafts are an occasional byproduct of explosive volcanic eruptions that occur near bodies of water. Though these rafts may be infrequent, their substantial size, typically tens of kilometers across, means they pose a serious hazard to shipping interests by blocking the seawater intake valves for ships' engine cooling systems. The focus of this research is on the pumice raft events associated with Tonga 2006, Yemen 2007, and Chile-Argentina border 2011 eruptions. False-color composite images were created with remotely sensed data from the Landsat 5 TM, Landsat 7 ETM+, and MODIS instruments to facilitate visual identification of pumice rafts in high resolution imagery. Additionally, a Material-Of-Interest subpixel classification was implemented to automatically demarcate the extent of the pumice rafts. MODIS was found to be the most useful sensor for tracking larger rafts in the open ocean, while Landsat 5 TM, Landsat 7 ETM+, and ALI were more effective in tracking smaller rafts in lakes and rivers. The pumice rafts generally took on a temperature between that of the ambient air and water temperatures, and this is theorized to be potentially related to characteristics unique to each raft like thickness. That data collected for this study has been compiled to provide an effective tool for further investigation of pumice rafts.

  18. Initiator and Photocatalyst-Free Visible Light Induced One-Pot Reaction: Concurrent RAFT Polymerization and CuAAC Click Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Xinbo; Xue, Wentao; Chen, Gaojian; Zhang, Weidong; Zhu, Xiulin

    2016-05-01

    A new, visible light-catalyzed, one-pot and one-step reaction is successfully employed to design well-controlled side-chain functionalized polymers, by the combination of ambient temperature revisible addtion-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and click chemistry. Polymerizations are well controlled in a living way under the irradiation of visible light-emitting diode (LED) light without photocatalyst and initiator, using the trithiocarbonate agent as iniferter (initiator-transfer agent-terminator) agent at ambient temperature. Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), NMR, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) data confirm the successful one-pot reaction. Compared to the reported zero-valent metal-catalyzed one-pot reaction, the polymerization rate is much faster than that of the click reaction, and the visible light-catalyzed one-pot reaction can be freely and easily regulated by turning on and off the light. PMID:27029002

  19. Raft lipids as common components of human extracellular amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Gellermann, Gerald P.; Appel, Thomas R.; Tannert, Astrid; Radestock, Anja; Hortschansky, Peter; Schroeckh, Volker; Leisner, Christian; Lütkepohl, Tim; Shtrasburg, Shmuel; Röcken, Christoph; Pras, Mordechai; Linke, Reinhold P.; Diekmann, Stephan; Fändrich, Marcus

    2005-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are fibrillar polypeptide aggregates from several degenerative human conditions, including Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob diseases. Analysis of amyloid fibrils derived from various human diseases (AA, ATTR, Aβ2M, ALλ, and ALκ amyloidosis) shows that these are associated with a common lipid component that has a conserved chemical composition and that is specifically rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids, the major components of cellular lipid rafts. This pattern is not notably affected by the purification procedure, and no tight lipid interactions can be detected when preformed fibrils are mixed with lipids. By contrast, the early and prefibrillar aggregates formed in an AA amyloid-producing cell system interact with the raft marker ganglioside-1, and amyloid formation is impaired by addition of cholesterol-reducing agents. These data suggest the existence of common cellular mechanisms in the generation of different types of clinical amyloid deposits. PMID:15851687

  20. Removal of silica from Raft River geothermal water

    SciTech Connect

    Suciu, D.F.; Miller, R.L.

    1980-06-01

    Lack of sufficient quantities of clean surface or near-surface water at Raft River for cooling purposes dictates that cooled geothermal fluid, effluent from the Raft River 5 MW(e) Pilot Power Plant, must also be used as condenser coolant. Prior testing revealed that a water-treatment system would be required to reduce silica and calcium concentrations of the cooling fluid. The water-treatment system specified was to use dolomitic lime for both pH adjustment and source of magnesium. The dolomitic lime treatment was investigated and found to be inadequate. Subsequent testing was done to find chemical systems that would adequately reduce silica concentrations. Three magnesium and two iron compounds were found which reduced silica to acceptable concentration levels. They are magnesium bicarbonate, magnesium chloride, magnesium sulfate, iron sulfate, and iron chloride. Magnesium oxide, using a two-stage countercurrent process, will also reduce silica to adequate levels.

  1. Lipid rafts direct macrophage motility in the tissue microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Previtera, Michelle L; Peterman, Kimberly; Shah, Smit; Luzuriaga, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Infiltrating leukocytes are exposed to a wide range of tissue elasticities. While we know the effects of substrate elasticity on acute inflammation via the study of neutrophil migration, we do not know its effects on leukocytes that direct chronic inflammatory events. Here, we studied morphology and motility of macrophages, the innate immune cells that orchestrate acute and chronic inflammation, on polyacrylamide hydrogels that mimicked a wide range of tissue elasticities. As expected, we found that macrophage spreading area increased as substrate elasticity increased. Unexpectedly, we found that morphology did not inversely correlate with motility. In fact, velocity of steady-state macrophages remained unaffected by substrate elasticity, while velocity of biologically stimulated macrophages was limited on stiff substrates. We also found that the lack of motility on stiff substrates was due to a lack of lipid rafts on the leading edge of the macrophages. This study implicates lipid rafts in the mechanosensory mechanism of innate immune cell infiltration. PMID:25269613

  2. Apollo-Era Life Rafts Save Hundreds of Sailors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The space shuttle is unique among spacecraft in that it glides back to Earth and lands like an airplane, usually touching ground near where it launched at Kennedy Space Center, but sometimes, in poor weather, gliding into the back-up landing site at Dryden Flight Research Center and then catching a ride back to the Cape on the back of a modified Boeing 747. Before NASA began flying the shuttle, though, astronauts had a longer, more involved trip back to base after a mission. Their capsule, called the command module, would plunge through the atmosphere before releasing a series of parachutes that would slow the craft enough for it to land on the water without too significant of an impact. Called a splashdown, this type of landing put the astronauts out in the ocean, where a specially designated U.S. Navy ship would then deploy a helicopter to retrieve the space travelers. Waiting for the rescue, the astronauts would release a highly visible marker dye into the water, then leave the command module and climb aboard a life raft. These early space pioneers had traveled thousands of miles and then landed safely back on Earth. The journey s end was in sight, but they had one more obstacle. The rotor downdraft from the helicopter coming to retrieve them, reaching sometimes as much as 100 knots per hour, was enough to flip a typical flat-bottomed life raft. Not willing to be thwarted after coming so far, NASA engineers began devising a solution. They knew they needed a highly stable inflatable raft capable of riding out the rough winds, and the solution was to make use of the most abundant resource available: water. Engineers at NASA s Johnson Space Center went to work designing and patenting a hydrodynamically stabilized ballast system that would prevent a life raft from tipping in choppy seas and fierce winds.

  3. Early Cretaceous ice rafting and climate zonation in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Frakes, L.A.; Alley, N.F.; Deynoux, M.

    1995-07-01

    Lower Cretaceous (Valanginian to Albian) strata of the southwestern Eromanga and Carpentaria basins of central and northern Australia, respectively, provide evidence of strongly seasonal climates at high paleolatitudes. These include dispersed clasts (lonestones) in fine sediments and pseudomorphs of calcite after ikaite (glendonites), the latter being known to form only at temperatures below about 7{degrees}C. Rafting is regarded as the transport mechanism for clasts up to boulder size (lonestones) enclosed within dark mudrocks; this interpretation rests on rare occurrences of penetration by clasts into substrate layers. Driftwood and large floating algae are eliminated as possible rafts because fossil wood is found mainly concentrated in nearshore areas of the basins and large algal masses have not been observed. Rafting by icebergs is considered unlikely in view of the global lack of tillites and related glacial deposits of this age. Our interpretation is that seasonal ice, formed in winter along stream courses and strandlines, incorporated clasts which, during the melt season, were dropped into muddy sediments in both basins. Eromanga fine-sediment and concentrations of large clasts and associated sand lenses, both lying above local erosion surfaces. In the Carpentaria Basin, local dumping of sediment from raft surfaces resulted in accumulation of pods of small clasts. Three zones can be identified for the Early Cretaceous climate of eastern Australia: (1) a very cold southern region, at latitudes above about 72{degrees} S, characterized by meteoric waters possibly originating as Antarctic glacial meltwaters; (2) a zone of strongly seasonal climates, with freezing winters and warm summers, between about 72{degrees} and 53{degrees} S.Lat.; and (3) a mid-latitude zone (below about 50{degrees} S. Lat.), where freezing temperatures were not common. 60 refs., 7 figs.

  4. On the fate of pumice rafts formed during the 2012 Havre submarine eruption

    PubMed Central

    Jutzeler, Martin; Marsh, Robert; Carey, Rebecca J.; White, James D. L.; Talling, Peter J.; Karlstrom, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Pumice rafts are floating mobile accumulations of low-density pumice clasts generated by silicic volcanic eruptions. Pumice in rafts can drift for years, become waterlogged and sink, or become stranded on shorelines. Here we show that the pumice raft formed by the impressive, deep submarine eruption of the Havre caldera volcano (Southwest Pacific) in July 2012 can be mapped by satellite imagery augmented by sailing crew observations. Far from coastal interference, the eruption produced a single >400 km2 raft in 1 day, thus initiating a gigantic, high-precision, natural experiment relevant to both modern and prehistoric oceanic surface dispersal dynamics. Observed raft dispersal can be accurately reproduced by simulating drift and dispersal patterns using currents from an eddy-resolving ocean model hindcast. For future eruptions that produce potentially hazardous pumice rafts, our technique allows real-time forecasts of dispersal routes, in addition to inference of ash/pumice deposit distribution in the deep ocean. PMID:24755668

  5. On the fate of pumice rafts formed during the 2012 Havre submarine eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jutzeler, Martin; Marsh, Robert; Carey, Rebecca J.; White, James D. L.; Talling, Peter J.; Karlstrom, Leif

    2014-04-01

    Pumice rafts are floating mobile accumulations of low-density pumice clasts generated by silicic volcanic eruptions. Pumice in rafts can drift for years, become waterlogged and sink, or become stranded on shorelines. Here we show that the pumice raft formed by the impressive, deep submarine eruption of the Havre caldera volcano (Southwest Pacific) in July 2012 can be mapped by satellite imagery augmented by sailing crew observations. Far from coastal interference, the eruption produced a single >400 km2 raft in 1 day, thus initiating a gigantic, high-precision, natural experiment relevant to both modern and prehistoric oceanic surface dispersal dynamics. Observed raft dispersal can be accurately reproduced by simulating drift and dispersal patterns using currents from an eddy-resolving ocean model hindcast. For future eruptions that produce potentially hazardous pumice rafts, our technique allows real-time forecasts of dispersal routes, in addition to inference of ash/pumice deposit distribution in the deep ocean.

  6. On the fate of pumice rafts formed during the 2012 Havre submarine eruption.

    PubMed

    Jutzeler, Martin; Marsh, Robert; Carey, Rebecca J; White, James D L; Talling, Peter J; Karlstrom, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Pumice rafts are floating mobile accumulations of low-density pumice clasts generated by silicic volcanic eruptions. Pumice in rafts can drift for years, become waterlogged and sink, or become stranded on shorelines. Here we show that the pumice raft formed by the impressive, deep submarine eruption of the Havre caldera volcano (Southwest Pacific) in July 2012 can be mapped by satellite imagery augmented by sailing crew observations. Far from coastal interference, the eruption produced a single >400 km(2) raft in 1 day, thus initiating a gigantic, high-precision, natural experiment relevant to both modern and prehistoric oceanic surface dispersal dynamics. Observed raft dispersal can be accurately reproduced by simulating drift and dispersal patterns using currents from an eddy-resolving ocean model hindcast. For future eruptions that produce potentially hazardous pumice rafts, our technique allows real-time forecasts of dispersal routes, in addition to inference of ash/pumice deposit distribution in the deep ocean. PMID:24755668

  7. Probing Lipid Membrane Rafts (Microdomains) with Fluorescent Phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Mitchel, Drake

    2011-10-01

    Membrane rafts are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, they exist in a more ordered state (the liquid-ordered phase; lo) than the bulk membrane (the liquid-disordered phase; ld). Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form membrane rafts over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes, NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions into the lo phase, and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions into the ld phase, to detect these two phases. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the size and stability of POPC/SPM/Chol membrane rafts. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of two fluorescent probes. Data were acquired via frequency-domain measurements from 5 to 250 MHz.

  8. Wrinkles and folds in a compressed granular raft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Josserand, Christophe; Protiere, Suzie

    Wrinkles and folds occur in a wide variety of situations, we find them in Nature but also in man-made products. They typically appear when a thin sheet bound to a foundation is compressed. Here we demonstrate that particle ladden interfaces, despite being made of discrete very hard particles, can form wrinkles and folds like a soft elastic solid. We call granular raft a close packed monolayer of heavy, athermal particles at the interface between two fluids. We use beads of different materials with diameters ranging from 30 μm to 0 . 8 mm dispersed at a planar oil/water interface. Upon uniaxial compression the raft buckles out of plane like a soft elastic solid and forms a periodic wrinkling pattern, then the deformation localizes in a large unique fold/crease. This behavior is reminiscent of a compressed elastic sheet floating on water. We will highlight similarities and differences between the mechanical properties of our discrete heavy granular raft and a continuous elastic floating film. Finally we will show how elasticity and gravity contribute to rationalize the original shape of the fold we observe.

  9. Functional role of lipid rafts in CD20 activity?

    PubMed

    Janas, Eva; Priest, Richard; Malhotra, Rajneesh

    2005-01-01

    CD20 is a B-lymphocyte-specific integral membrane protein, implicated in the regulation of transmembrane calcium conductance, cell-cycle progression and B-lymphocyte proliferation. CD20 is proposed to function as a SOCC (store-operated calcium channel). SOCCs are activated by receptor-stimulated calcium depletion of intracellular stores. Sustained calcium conductivity across the plasma membrane mediated by SOCC activity is required for long-term calcium-dependent processes, such as transcriptional control and gene expression. Cross-linking of CD20 by antibodies (e.g. Rituxan) has been reported to induce a rapid redistribution of CD20 into specialized microdomains at the plasma membrane, known as lipid rafts. Recruitment of CD20 into lipid rafts and its homo-oligomerization are suggested to be crucial for CD20 activity and regulation. This review outlines recent biochemical studies characterizing the role of CD20 in calcium signalling in B-lymphocytes and evaluates an engagement of lipid rafts in the regulation of CD20-mediated calcium conductivity. PMID:15649140

  10. Plasma membrane rafts of rainbow trout are subject to thermal acclimation.

    PubMed

    Zehmer, John K; Hazel, Jeffrey R

    2003-05-01

    Rafts are cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched microdomains of the plasma membrane (PM) that organize many signal transduction pathways. Interactions between cholesterol and saturated lipids lead to patches of liquid-ordered membrane (rafts) phase-separating from the remaining PM. Phase behavior is temperature sensitive, and acute changes in temperature experienced by poikilotherms would be expected to perturb raft structure, necessitating an acclimatory response. Therefore, with thermal acclimation, we would expect compositional changes in the raft directed to offset this perturbation. Using differential and density gradient centrifugation, we separated PM from the livers of rainbow trout acclimated to 5 degrees C and 20 degrees C into raft-enriched (raft) and raft-depleted PM (RDPM). Compared with RDPM, the raft fractions were enriched in cholesterol, the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor and adenylyl cyclase, which are commonly used markers for this microdomain. Furthermore, cholesterol was enriched in all fractions from warm-compared with cold-acclimated animals, but this increase was 3.4 times greater in raft than in PM. We developed a novel approach for measuring membrane molecular interaction strength (and thus the tendency to stabilize raft structure) based on the susceptibility of membranes to detergent. Specifically, studies with model vesicles demonstrated that the capacity of a membrane to accommodate detergent prior to solubilization (saturation point) was a good index of this property. The saturation point of the isolated membrane preparations was temperature sensitive and was significantly different in 5 degrees C- and 20 degrees C-acclimated RDPM when assayed at 5 degrees C and 20 degrees C, respectively. By contrast, this comparison in rafts was not significantly different, suggesting compensation of this property. These data suggest that compositional changes made in the PM during thermal acclimation act to offset thermal perturbation of the raft but

  11. Proteome scale characterization of human S-acylated proteins in lipid raft-enriched and non-raft membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Di Vizio, Dolores; Kirchner, Marc; Steen, Hanno; Freeman, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    Protein S-acylation (palmitoylation), a reversible post-translational modification, is critically involved in regulating protein subcellular localization, activity, stability, and multimeric complex assembly. However, proteome scale characterization of S-acylation has lagged far behind that of phosphorylation, and global analysis of the localization of S-acylated proteins within different membrane domains has not been reported. Here we describe a novel proteomics approach, designated palmitoyl protein identification and site characterization (PalmPISC), for proteome scale enrichment and characterization of S-acylated proteins extracted from lipid raft-enriched and non-raft membranes. In combination with label-free spectral counting quantitation, PalmPISC led to the identification of 67 known and 331 novel candidate S-acylated proteins as well as the localization of 25 known and 143 novel candidate S-acylation sites. Palmitoyl acyltransferases DHHC5, DHHC6, and DHHC8 appear to be S-acylated on three cysteine residues within a novel CCX(7-13)C(S/T) motif downstream of a conserved Asp-His-His-Cys cysteine-rich domain, which may be a potential mechanism for regulating acyltransferase specificity and/or activity. S-Acylation may tether cytoplasmic acyl-protein thioesterase-1 to membranes, thus facilitating its interaction with and deacylation of membrane-associated S-acylated proteins. Our findings also suggest that certain ribosomal proteins may be targeted to lipid rafts via S-acylation, possibly to facilitate regulation of ribosomal protein activity and/or dynamic synthesis of lipid raft proteins in situ. In addition, bioinformatics analysis suggested that S-acylated proteins are highly enriched within core complexes of caveolae and tetraspanin-enriched microdomains, both cholesterol-rich membrane structures. The PalmPISC approach and the large scale human S-acylated protein data set are expected to provide powerful tools to facilitate our understanding of the

  12. Lipid rafts regulate cellular CD40 receptor localization in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Min; Wang Qing; Zhu Huilian; Ma Jing; Hou Mengjun; Tang Zhihong; Li Juanjuan; Ling Wenhua

    2007-09-28

    Cholesterol enriched lipid rafts are considered to function as platforms involved in the regulation of membrane receptor signaling complex through the clustering of signaling molecules. In this study, we tested whether these specialized membrane microdomains affect CD40 localization in vitro and in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that upon CD40 ligand stimulation, endogenous and exogenous CD40 receptor is rapidly mobilized into lipid rafts compared with unstimulated HAECs. Efficient binding between CD40L and CD40 receptor also increases amounts of CD40 protein levels in lipid rafts. Deficiency of intracellular conserved C terminus of the CD40 cytoplasmic tail impairs CD40 partitioning in raft. Raft disorganization after methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin treatment diminishes CD40 localization into rafts. In vivo studies show that elevation of circulating cholesterol in high-cholesterol fed rabbits increases the cholesterol content and CD40 receptor localization in lipid rafts. These findings identify a physiological role for membrane lipid rafts as a critical regulator of CD40-mediated signal transduction and raise the possibility that certain pathologic conditions may be treated by altering CD40 signaling with drugs affecting its raft localization.

  13. Unbiased quantitative proteomics of lipid rafts reveals high specificity for signaling factors

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Leonard J.; de Hoog, Carmen L.; Mann, Matthias

    2003-01-01

    Membrane lipids were once thought to be homogenously distributed in the 2D surface of a membrane, but the lipid raft theory suggests that cholesterol and sphingolipids partition away from other membrane lipids. Lipid raft theory further implicates these cholesterol-rich domains in many processes such as signaling and vesicle traffic. However, direct characterization of rafts has been difficult, because they cannot be isolated in pure form. In the first functional proteomic analysis of rafts, we use quantitative high-resolution MS to specifically detect proteins depleted from rafts by cholesterol-disrupting drugs, resulting in a set of 241 authentic lipid raft components. We detect a large proportion of signaling molecules, highly enriched versus total membranes and detergent-resistant fractions, which thus far biochemically defined rafts. Our results provide the first large-scale and unbiased evidence, to our knowledge, for the connection of rafts with signaling and place limits on the fraction of plasma membrane composed by rafts. PMID:12724530

  14. Raft River Geothermal Area Data Models - Conceptual, Logical and Fact Models

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cuyler, David

    2012-07-19

    Conceptual and Logical Data Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses at Raft River a. Logical Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses, David Cuyler 2010 b. Fact Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses, David Cuyler 2010 Derived from Tables, Figures and other Content in Reports from the Raft River Geothermal Project: "Technical Report on the Raft River Geothermal Resource, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx, Inc., August 2002. "Results from the Short-Term Well Testing Program at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx, Inc., October 2004.

  15. Neuronal membranes are key to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: the role of both raft and non-raft membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Williamson, R; Sutherland, C

    2011-03-01

    Membrane rafts are sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched domains that compartmentalize cellular processes. Membrane rafts isolated from post-mortem AD brain are enriched in both β-amyloid and phosphorylated tau. Proteolytic processing of APP to generate β-amyloid, the principle component of amyloid plaques, can occur in membrane rafts, implicating them in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Secondary to their role in β-amyloid generation, membrane rafts have more recently been implicated in the accumulation, aggregation and degradation of β-amyloid, with evidence supporting a specific role for membrane raft gangliosides in the binding and aggregation of β-amyloid. In addition, membrane domain composition has a direct impact on both the generation of β-amyloid and its subsequent toxic actions and as such is a key target for the development of therapeutic strategies. This mini-review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of the relevance of membrane composition, of both raft and non-raft domains, to AD progression in models and in human disease. We will discuss how manipulation of membrane composition can alter both the proteolytic processing of APP and the subsequent binding and aggregation of β-amyloid peptide. PMID:21222605

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Raft-Like Detergent-Resistant Membranes of Lens Fiber Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Plasma membranes of lens fiber cells have high levels of long-chain saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and sphingolipids—key components of lipid rafts. Thus, lipid rafts are expected to constitute a significant portion of fiber cell membranes and play important roles in lens biology. The purpose of this study was to characterize the lens lipid raft proteome. Methods Quantitative proteomics, both label-free and iTRAQ methods, were used to characterize lens fiber cell lipid raft proteins. Detergent-resistant, lipid raft membrane (DRM) fractions were isolated by sucrose gradient centrifugation. To confirm protein localization to lipid rafts, protein sensitivity to cholesterol removal by methyl-β-cyclodextrin was quantified by iTRAQ analysis. Results A total of 506 proteins were identified in raft-like detergent-resistant membranes. Proteins identified support important functions of raft domains in fiber cells, including trafficking, signal transduction, and cytoskeletal organization. In cholesterol-sensitivity studies, 200 proteins were quantified and 71 proteins were strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Lipid raft markers flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 and a significant fraction of AQP0, MP20, and AQP5 were found in the DRM fraction and were highly sensitive to cholesterol removal. Connexins 46 and 50 were more abundant in nonraft fractions, but a small fraction of each was found in the DRM fraction and was strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Quantification of modified AQP0 confirmed that fatty acylation targeted this protein to membrane raft domains. Conclusions These data represent the first comprehensive profile of the lipid raft proteome of lens fiber cells and provide information on membrane protein organization in these cells. PMID:26747763

  17. Bending modulus of bidisperse particle rafts: Local and collective contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petit, Pauline; Biance, Anne-Laure; Lorenceau, Elise; Planchette, Carole

    2016-04-01

    The bending modulus of air-water interfaces covered by a monolayer of bidisperse particles is probed experimentally under quasistatic conditions via the compression of the monolayer, and under dynamical conditions studying capillary-wave propagation. Simple averaging of the modulus obtained solely with small or large particles fails to describe our data. Indeed, as observed in other configurations for monodisperse systems, bidisperse rafts have both a granular and an elastic character: chain forces and collective effects must be taken into account to fully understand our results.

  18. Bubble-raft model for a paraboloidal crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowick, Mark J.; Giomi, Luca; Shin, Homin; Thomas, Creighton K.

    2008-02-01

    We investigate crystalline order on a two-dimensional paraboloid of revolution by assembling a single layer of millimeter-sized soap bubbles on the surface of a rotating liquid, thus extending the classic work of Bragg and Nye on planar soap bubble rafts. Topological constraints require crystalline configurations to contain a certain minimum number of topological defects such as disclinations or grain boundary scars whose structure is analyzed as a function of the aspect ratio of the paraboloid. We find the defect structure to agree with theoretical predictions and propose a mechanism for scar nucleation in the presence of large Gaussian curvature.

  19. Finger rafting: a generic instability of floating elastic sheets.

    PubMed

    Vella, Dominic; Wettlaufer, J S

    2007-02-23

    Colliding ice floes are often observed to form a series of interlocking fingers. We show that this striking phenomenon is not a result of some peculiar property of ice but rather a general and robust mechanical phenomenon reproducible in the laboratory with other floating materials. We determine the theoretical relationship between the width of the resulting fingers and the material's mechanical properties and present experimental results along with field observations to support the theory. The generality of this "finger rafting" suggests that analogous processes may be responsible for creating the large-scale structures observed at the boundaries between Earth's convergent tectonic plates. PMID:17359135

  20. Hydrothermal injection experiments at the Raft River KGRA, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, W.F.; McAtee, R.E.; Capuano, R.M.; Sill, W.

    1982-12-14

    The optimal development and management of a geothermal resource requires a knowledge of the hydrological characteristics of the reservoir. Reservoir engineering analysis techniques for permeable aquifers have been undergoing development for several decades but little attention has been paid to fracture-dominated systems. A program to test the ability of Huff-Puff tests to help characterize a fracture-dominated reservoir is presented. Several series of these injection (Huff)-backflow (Puff) tests were conducted at the Raft River KGRA in Southern Idaho. These test series are described and preliminary results and interpretations are discussed.

  1. Characterizing Crystalline-Vitreous Structures: From Atomically Resolved Silica to Macroscopic Bubble Rafts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burson, Kristen M.; Schlexer, Philomena; Bu¨chner, Christin; Lichtenstein, Leonid; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    A two-part experiment using bubble rafts to analyze amorphous structures is presented. In the first part, the distinctions between crystalline and vitreous structures are examined. In the second part, the interface between crystalline and amorphous regions is considered. Bubble rafts are easy to produce and provide excellent analogy to recent…

  2. Impact of Lipid Raft Integrity on 5-HT3 Receptor Function and its Modulation by Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Nothdurfter, Caroline; Tanasic, Sascha; Di Benedetto, Barbara; Rammes, Gerhard; Wagner, Eva-Maria; Kirmeier, Thomas; Ganal, Vanessa; Kessler, Julia S; Rein, Theo; Holsboer, Florian; Rupprecht, Rainer

    2010-01-01

    Because of the biochemical colocalization of the 5-HT3 receptor and antidepressants within raft-like domains and their antagonistic effects at this ligand-gated ion channel, we investigated the impact of lipid raft integrity for 5-HT3 receptor function and its modulation by antidepressants. Treatment with methyl-β-cyclodextrine (MβCD) markedly reduced membrane cholesterol levels and caused a more diffuse membrane distribution of the lipid raft marker protein flotillin-1 indicating lipid raft impairment. Both amplitude and charge of serotonin evoked cation currents were diminished following cholesterol depletion by either MβCD or simvastatin (Sim), whereas the functional antagonistic properties of the antidepressants desipramine (DMI) and fluoxetine (Fluox) at the 5-HT3 receptor were retained. Although both the 5-HT3 receptor and flotillin-1 were predominantly found in raft-like domains in western blots following sucrose density gradient centrifugation, immunocytochemistry revealed only a coincidental degree of colocalization of these two proteins. These findings and the persistence of the antagonistic effects of DMI and Fluox against 5-HT3 receptors after lipid raft impairment indicate that their modulatory effects are likely mediated through non-raft 5-HT3 receptors, which are not sufficiently detected by means of sucrose density gradient centrifugation. In conclusion, lipid raft integrity appears to be important for 5-HT3 receptor function in general, whereas it is not a prerequisite for the antagonistic properties of antidepressants such as DMI and Fluox at this ligand-gated ion channel. PMID:20200506

  3. RAFTing with Raptors: Connecting Science, English Language Arts, and the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senn, Gary J.; McMurtrie, Deborah H.; Coleman, Bridget K.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores using the RAFT strategy (Role, Audience, Format, Topic) for writing in science classes. The framework of the RAFT strategy will be explained, and connections with Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for ELA/Literacy will be discussed. Finally, there will be a discussion of a professional learning experience for teachers in…

  4. Opposite effect of membrane raft perturbation on transport activity of KCC2 and NKCC1.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Anna-Maria; Blaesse, Peter; Kranz, Thorsten; Wenz, Meike; Schindler, Jens; Kaila, Kai; Friauf, Eckhard; Nothwang, Hans Gerd

    2009-10-01

    In the majority of neurons, the intracellular Cl(-) concentration is set by the activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) cotransporter (NKCC1) and the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter (KCC2). Here, we investigated the cotransporters' functional dependence on membrane rafts. In the mature rat brain, NKCC1 was mainly insoluble in Brij 58 and co-distributed with the membrane raft marker flotillin-1 in sucrose density flotation experiments. In contrast, KCC2 was found in the insoluble fraction as well as in the soluble fraction, where it co-distributed with the non-raft marker transferrin receptor. Both KCC2 populations displayed a mature glycosylation pattern. Disrupting membrane rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MbetaCD) increased the solubility of KCC2, yet had no effect on NKCC1. In human embryonic kidney-293 cells, KCC2 was strongly activated by a combined treatment with MbetaCD and sphingomyelinase, while NKCC1 was inhibited. These data indicate that membrane rafts render KCC2 inactive and NKCC1 active. In agreement with this, inactive KCC2 of the perinatal rat brainstem largely partitioned into membrane rafts. In addition, the exposure of the transporters to MbetaCD and sphingomyelinase showed that the two transporters differentially interact with the membrane rafts. Taken together, membrane raft association appears to represent a mechanism for co-ordinated regulation of chloride transporter function. PMID:19686239

  5. Sphingolipid–Cholesterol Rafts Diffuse as Small Entities in the Plasma Membrane of Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pralle, A.; Keller, P.; Florin, E.-L.; Simons, K.; Hörber, J.K.H.

    2000-01-01

    To probe the dynamics and size of lipid rafts in the membrane of living cells, the local diffusion of single membrane proteins was measured. A laser trap was used to confine the motion of a bead bound to a raft protein to a small area (diam ≤ 100 nm) and to measure its local diffusion by high resolution single particle tracking. Using protein constructs with identical ectodomains and different membrane regions and vice versa, we demonstrate that this method provides the viscous damping of the membrane domain in the lipid bilayer. When glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) -anchored and transmembrane proteins are raft-associated, their diffusion becomes independent of the type of membrane anchor and is significantly reduced compared with that of nonraft transmembrane proteins. Cholesterol depletion accelerates the diffusion of raft-associated proteins for transmembrane raft proteins to the level of transmembrane nonraft proteins and for GPI-anchored proteins even further. Raft-associated GPI-anchored proteins were never observed to dissociate from the raft within the measurement intervals of up to 10 min. The measurements agree with lipid rafts being cholesterol-stabilized complexes of 26 ± 13 nm in size diffusing as one entity for minutes. PMID:10704449

  6. Segregation of leading-edge and uropod components into specific lipid rafts during T cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Moutón, Concepción; Abad, Jose Luis; Mira, Emilia; Lacalle, Rosa Ana; Gallardo, Eduard; Jiménez-Baranda, Sonia; Illa, Isabel; Bernad, Antonio; Mañes, Santos; Martínez-A., Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Redistribution of specialized molecules in migrating cells develops asymmetry between two opposite cell poles, the leading edge and the uropod. We show that acquisition of a motile phenotype in T lymphocytes results in the asymmetric redistribution of ganglioside GM3- and GM1-enriched raft domains to the leading edge and to the uropod, respectively. This segregation to each cell pole parallels the specific redistribution of membrane proteins associated to each raft subfraction. Our data suggest that raft partitioning is a major determinant for protein redistribution in polarized T cells, as ectopic expression of raft-associated proteins results in their asymmetric redistribution, whereas non-raft-partitioned mutants of these proteins are distributed homogeneously in the polarized cell membrane. Both acquisition of a migratory phenotype and SDF-1α-induced chemotaxis are cholesterol depletion-sensitive. Finally, GM3 and GM1 raft redistribution requires an intact actin cytoskeleton, but is insensitive to microtubule disruption. We propose that membrane protein segregation not only between raft and nonraft domains but also between distinct raft subdomains may be an organizational principle that mediates redistribution of specialized molecules needed for T cell migration. PMID:11493690

  7. Echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging of Gaviscon alginate rafts in-vivo.

    PubMed

    Marciani, Luca; Little, Sarah L; Snee, Janice; Coleman, Nicholas S; Tyler, Damian J; Sykes, John; Jolliffe, Ian G; Dettmar, Peter W; Spiller, Robin C; Gowland, Penny A

    2002-10-01

    Liquid Gaviscon and Gaviscon Advance are established reflux suppressant formulations. This study describes the use of echo-planar magnetic resonance imaging (EPI) to visualise non-invasively intragastric alginate rafts of Liquid Gaviscon and Gaviscon Advance in healthy subjects. Secondly, the feasibility of using relaxation rate (T2(-1)) measurements to monitor changes in the physicochemical properties of the rafts in-vivo is evaluated. Six subjects ingested 500 mL of a liquid meal and received a single dose of 20 mL Liquid Gaviscon or 10 mL Gaviscon Advance on 2 separate visits each and were imaged every 15 min. An alginate raft was observed in the stomach for all subjects and both treatments. The raft was observed to consist of a few large fragments on the majority of the scans for both products. At t = 60 min a raft was still present in all cases. Three-dimensional volume reconstructions showed, for the first time, the spatial distribution of the rafts within the gastric lumen. The T2(-1) data showed potential for assessment of dynamic changes in the physicochemical properties of the alginate rafts in-vivo. We conclude that EPI shows great potential in assessing alginate rafts formation in-vivo. PMID:12396296

  8. An Analysis of Whitewater Rafting Safety Data: Risk Management for Programme Organizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, I. Roy

    2007-01-01

    Many outdoor organizations integrate whitewater rafting into their programmes. Often this is accomplished by contracting with a whitewater outfitter. This paper analyses rafting accident data collected by the American Canoe Association in an effort to suggest ways in which programmes can better manage risk while contracting with outfitters for…

  9. Dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to fusion competence of myogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Kurisaki, Tomohiro; Sato, Satoshi B.; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kondoh, Gen; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2009-10-15

    Recent research indicates that the leading edge of lamellipodia of myogenic cells (myoblasts and myotubes) contains presumptive fusion sites, yet the mechanisms that render the plasma membrane fusion-competent remain largely unknown. Here we show that dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to both cell adhesion and plasma membrane union during myogenic cell fusion. Adhesion-complex proteins including M-cadherin, {beta}-catenin, and p120-catenin accumulated at the leading edge of lamellipodia, which contains the presumptive fusion sites of the plasma membrane, in a lipid raft-dependent fashion prior to cell contact. In addition, disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depletion directly prevented the membrane union of myogenic cell fusion. Time-lapse recording showed that lipid rafts were laterally dispersed from the center of the lamellipodia prior to membrane fusion. Adhesion proteins that had accumulated at lipid rafts were also removed from the presumptive fusion sites when lipid rafts were laterally dispersed. The resultant lipid raft- and adhesion complex-free area at the leading edge fused with the opposing plasma membrane. These results demonstrate a key role for dynamic clustering/dispersion of lipid rafts in establishing fusion-competent sites of the myogenic cell membrane, providing a novel mechanistic insight into the regulation of myogenic cell fusion.

  10. In Situ Visualization of Lipid Raft Domains by Fluorescent Glycol Chitosan Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yao-Wen; Guo, Hao-Yue; Chen, Zhan; Yu, Zhi-Wu; Wang, Zhifei; Wu, Fu-Gen

    2016-07-01

    Lipid rafts are highly ordered small microdomains mainly composed of glycosphingolipids, cholesterol, and protein receptors. Optically distinguishing lipid raft domains in cell membranes would greatly facilitate the investigations on the structure and dynamics of raft-related cellular behaviors, such as signal transduction, membrane transport (endocytosis), adhesion, and motility. However, current strategies about the visualization of lipid raft domains usually suffer from the low biocompatibility of the probes, invasive detection, or ex situ observation. At the same time, naturally derived biomacromolecules have been extensively used in biomedical field and their interaction with cells remains a long-standing topic since it is closely related to various fundamental studies and potential applications. Herein, noninvasive visualization of lipid raft domains in model lipid bilayers (supported lipid bilayers and giant unilamellar vesicles) and live cells was successfully realized in situ using fluorescent biomacromolecules: the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled glycol chitosan molecules. We found that the lipid raft domains in model or real membranes could be specifically stained by the FITC-labeled glycol chitosan molecules, which could be attributed to the electrostatic attractive interaction and/or hydrophobic interaction between the probes and the lipid raft domains. Since the FITC-labeled glycol chitosan molecules do not need to completely insert into the lipid bilayer and will not disturb the organization of lipids, they can more accurately visualize the raft domains as compared with other fluorescent dyes that need to be premixed with the various lipid molecules prior to the fabrication of model membranes. Furthermore, the FITC-labeled glycol chitosan molecules were found to be able to resist cellular internalization and could successfully visualize rafts in live cells. The present work provides a new way to achieve the imaging of lipid rafts and also

  11. The molecular face of lipid rafts in model membranes

    PubMed Central

    Risselada, H. Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2008-01-01

    Cell membranes contain a large number of different lipid species. Such a multicomponent mixture exhibits a complex phase behavior with regions of structural and compositional heterogeneity. Especially domains formed in ternary mixtures, composed of saturated and unsaturated lipids together with cholesterol, have received a lot of attention as they may resemble raft formation in real cells. Here we apply a simulation model to assess the molecular nature of these domains at the nanoscale, information that has thus far eluded experimental determination. We are able to show the spontaneous separation of a saturated phosphatidylcholine (PC)/unsaturated PC/cholesterol mixture into a liquid-ordered and a liquid-disordered phase with structural and dynamic properties closely matching experimental data. The near-atomic resolution of the simulations reveals remarkable features of both domains and the boundary domain interface. Furthermore, we predict the existence of a small surface tension between the monolayer leaflets that drives registration of the domains. At the level of molecular detail, raft-like lipid mixtures show a surprising face with possible implications for many cell membrane processes. PMID:18987307

  12. Elasticity of interfacial rafts of hard particles with soft shells.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-05-19

    We study an elasticity model for compressed protein monolayers or particle rafts at a liquid interface. Based on the microscopic view of hard-core particles with soft shells, a bead-spring model is formulated and analyzed in terms of continuum elasticity theory. The theory can be applied, for example, to hydrophobin-coated air-water interfaces or, more generally, to liquid interfaces coated with an adsorbed monolayer of interacting hard-core particles. We derive constitutive relations for such particle rafts and describe the buckling of compressed planar liquid interfaces as well as their apparent Poisson ratio. We also use the constitutive relations to obtain shape equations for pendant or buoyant capsules attached to a capillary, and to compute deflated shapes of such capsules. A comparison with capsules obeying the usual Hookean elasticity (without hard cores) reveals that the hard cores trigger capsule wrinkling. Furthermore, it is shown that a shape analysis of deflated capsules with hard-core/soft-shell elasticity gives apparent elastic moduli which can be much higher than the original values if Hookean elasticity is assumed. PMID:25901364

  13. The thermodynamic driving force for rafting in superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N.; Cress, C.M. |; Kotschy

    1996-08-01

    Eshelby`s energy-momentum tensor is used to provide an analytical expression for the driving force for rafting in the elastic regime in a superalloy with a high volume fraction of {gamma}{prime}. The structure is modelled as a simple cubic array of {gamma}{prime} cubes separated by thin sheets of {gamma}. During rafting, the {gamma}{prime} particles are constrained to remain tetragonal prisms. For tension along a cube axis, the driving force is proportional to the product of the tension {sigma}, the fractional difference {delta} of lattice parameters of {gamma}{prime} and {gamma} and the fractional difference m of their elastic constants c{sub 11} {minus} c{sub 12}. As in the calculation of Pineau for an isolated spheroid, needles are formed when this product {sigma}{delta}m is positive. Two- and three-dimensional systems behave similarly. The initial plastic strain in {gamma} is anelastic and in principle reversible. When the plastic strain exceeds m{delta}, platelets perpendicular to the stress axis are formed if the product {sigma}{delta} is negative.

  14. Salt roller growth as a controlling factors of the Albian rafts on Espírito Santo Basin, SE Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedade, Aldina; Alves, Tiago

    2014-05-01

    The SE Brazil continental margin is dominated by continental-slope embankment, incision of submarine channel system and significant mass-gravitational processes, with salt tectonics playing a significant role in upper-crust deformation. It is known to comprise a margin rich in oil and gas, in which raft tectonics plays an important role in their migration and accumulation. A combination of 3D pre-stack and post-stack time-migrated (PSTM) data was used to interpret the evolution of the Albian rafts in Espírito Santo Basin, SE Brazil was used in this work to: a) investigate the impact of continuing halokinesis in raft movement and, b) critically assess the parameters considered to control raft tectonics. In the study area Albian rafts, which are laterally constrained by salt rollers that were reactivated during the Late Cretaceous-Cenozoic, are seen to be ramped over triangular salt structures, and rotated by growing salt pillows. As a result, we observe complex compartmentalization styles in the rafts, with three main types of faults being recognised in four distinct rafts: a) rollover faults formed axially to large N-S rafts, b) radial faults to segments of rafts that record torsion and enhanced downslope movement, c) reactivated crestal and keystone faults formed on the flanks of growing salt diapirs onto which rafts are ramped upon. The space between the rafts was also analysed and quantified and show to be influenced by the weight of the sediments overburden. This work shows that slope gradient and overburden thickness had little control on raft segmentation. We interpret these data as a proof that underlying salt was a primary control on raft tectonics in the study area, overriding the effect of overburden thickness and variable slope gradients on the rafts' internal compartmentalisation. This study will show different styles of compartmentalization observed in Albian rafts from SE Brazil.

  15. Fabrication of Functional Nano-objects through RAFT Dispersion Polymerization and Influences of Morphology on Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Liang; Xu, Chao-Ran; Zhong, Feng; Hong, Chun-Yan; Pan, Cai-Yuan

    2016-07-20

    To study the influence of self-assembled morphologies on drug delivery, four different nano-objects, spheres, nanorods, nanowires, and vesicles having aldehdye-based polymer as core, were successfully prepared via alcoholic RAFT dispersion polymerization of p-(methacryloxyethoxy)benzaldehyde (MAEBA) using poly((N,N'-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) as a macro chain transfer agent (macro-CTA) for the first time. The morphologies and sizes of the four nano-objects were characterized by TEM and DLS, and the spheres with average diameter (D) of 70 nm, the nanorods with D of 19 nm and length of 140 nm, and the vesicles with D of 137 nm were used in the subsequent cellular internalization, in vitro release, and intracellular release of the drug. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was conjugated onto the core polymers of nano-objects through condensation reaction between aldehyde groups of the PMAEBA with primary amine groups in the DOX. Because the aromatic imine is stable under neutral conditions, but is decomposed in a weakly acidic solution, in vitro release of the DOX from the DOX-loaded nano-objects was investigated in the different acidic solutions. All of the block copolymer nano-objects show very low cytotoxicity to HeLa cells up to the concentration of 1.2 mg/mL, but the DOX-loaded nano-objects reveal different cell viability and their IC50s increase as the following order: nanorods-DOX < vesicles-DOX < spheres-DOX. The IC50 of nanowires-DOX is the biggest among the four nano-objects owing to their too large size to be internalized. Endocytosis tests demonstrate that the internalization of vesicles-DOX by the HeLa cells is faster than that of the nanorods-DOX, and the spheres-DOX are the slowest to internalize among the studied nano-objects. Relatively more nanorods localized in the acidic organelles of the HeLa cells lead to faster intracellular release of the DOX, so the IC50 of nanorods is lower than that of the vesicles-DOX. PMID:27399846

  16. RAFT: A simulator for ReActive Flow and Transport of groundwater contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Chilakapati, A

    1995-07-01

    This report documents the use of the simulator RAFT for the ReActive flow and Transport of groundwater contaminants. RAFT can be used as a predictive tool in the design and analysis of laboratory and field experiments or it can be used for the estimation of model/process parameters from experiments. RAFT simulates the reactive transport of groundwater contaminants in one, two-, or three-dimensions and it can model user specified source/link configurations and arbitrary injection strategies. A suite of solvers for transport, reactions and regression are employed so that a combination of numerical methods best suited for a problem can be chosen. User specified coupled equilibrium and kinetic reaction systems can be incorporated into RAFT. RAFT is integrated with a symbolic computational language MAPLE, to automate code generation for arbitrary reaction systems. RAFT is expected to be used as a simulator for engineering design for field experiments in groundwater remediation including bioremediation, reactive barriers and redox manipulation. As an integrated tool with both the predictive ability and the ability to analyze experimental data, RAFT can help in the development of remediation technologies, from laboratory to field.

  17. Influence of coarsened and rafted microstructures on the thermomechanical fatigue of a Ni-base superalloy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kirka, M. M.; Brindley, K. A.; Neu, R. W.; Antolovich, S. D.; Shinde, S. R.; Gravett, P. W.

    2015-08-17

    The aging of the microstructure of Ni-base superalloys during service is mainly characterized by coarsening and rafting of the γ' precipitates. The influence of these different aged microstructures on thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) under either continuously cycled (CC) and creep-fatigue (CF) was investigated. Three different aged microstructures, generated through accelerated aging and pre-creep treatments, were studied: stress-free coarsened γ', rafted with orientation perpendicular to loading direction (N-raft), and rafted with orientation parallel to loading direction (P-raft). Under most conditions, the aged microstructures were less resistant to TMF than the virgin microstructure; however, there were exceptions. Both stress-free coarsened and N-raft microstructuresmore » resulted in a reduction in TMF life under both CC and CF conditions in comparison to the virgin material. P-raft microstructure also resulted in reduction in TMF life under CC conditions; however, an increase in life over that of the virgin material was observed under CF conditions. Finally, these differences are discussed and hypothesized to be related to the interactions of the dislocations in the γ channels with γ' precipitates.« less

  18. Influence of coarsened and rafted microstructures on the thermomechanical fatigue of a Ni-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirka, M. M.; Brindley, K. A.; Neu, R. W.; Antolovich, S. D.; Shinde, S. R.; Gravett, P. W.

    2015-08-17

    The aging of the microstructure of Ni-base superalloys during service is mainly characterized by coarsening and rafting of the γ' precipitates. The influence of these different aged microstructures on thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) under either continuously cycled (CC) and creep-fatigue (CF) was investigated. Three different aged microstructures, generated through accelerated aging and pre-creep treatments, were studied: stress-free coarsened γ', rafted with orientation perpendicular to loading direction (N-raft), and rafted with orientation parallel to loading direction (P-raft). Under most conditions, the aged microstructures were less resistant to TMF than the virgin microstructure; however, there were exceptions. Both stress-free coarsened and N-raft microstructures resulted in a reduction in TMF life under both CC and CF conditions in comparison to the virgin material. P-raft microstructure also resulted in reduction in TMF life under CC conditions; however, an increase in life over that of the virgin material was observed under CF conditions. Finally, these differences are discussed and hypothesized to be related to the interactions of the dislocations in the γ channels with γ' precipitates.

  19. Ginsenoside Rh2 induces ligand-independent Fas activation via lipid raft disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Jae-Sung; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Cho, Bong-Rae; Kim, Hwan-Myung; Kim, Yong-Nyun; Ham, Young-Mi; Ko, Young-Gyu

    2009-07-24

    Lipid rafts are plasma membrane platforms mediating signal transduction pathways for cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Here, we show that membrane fluidity was increased in HeLa cells following treatment with ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2), as determined by cell staining with carboxy-laurdan (C-laurdan), a two-photon dye designed for measuring membrane hydrophobicity. In the presence of Rh2, caveolin-1 appeared in non-raft fractions after sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. In addition, caveolin-1 and GM1, lipid raft landmarkers, were internalized within cells after exposure to Rh2, indicating that Rh2 might disrupt lipid rafts. Since cholesterol overloading, which fortifies lipid rafts, prevented an increase in Rh2-induced membrane fluidity, caveolin-1 internalization and apoptosis, lipid rafts appear to be essential for Rh2-induced apoptosis. Moreover, Rh2-induced Fas oligomerization was abolished following cholesterol overloading, and Rh2-induced apoptosis was inhibited following treatment with siRNA for Fas. This result suggests that Rh2 is a novel lipid raft disruptor leading to Fas oligomerization and apoptosis.

  20. Lipid rafts in epithelial brush borders: atypical membrane microdomains with specialized functions.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2003-10-31

    Epithelial cells that fulfil high-throughput digestive/absorptive functions, such as small intestinal enterocytes and kidney proximal tubule cells, are endowed with a dense apical brush border. It has long been recognized that the microvillar surface of the brush border is organized in cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains commonly known as lipid rafts. More recent studies indicate that microvillar rafts, in particular those of enterocytes, have some unusual properties in comparison with rafts present on the surface of other cell types. Thus, microvillar rafts are stable rather than transient/dynamic, and their core components include glycolipids and the divalent lectin galectin-4, which together can be isolated as "superrafts", i.e., membrane microdomains resisting solubilization with Triton X-100 at physiological temperature. These glycolipid/lectin-based rafts serve as platforms for recruitment of GPI-linked and transmembrane digestive enzymes, most likely as an economizing effort to secure and prolong their digestive capability at the microvillar surface. However, in addition to microvilli, the brush border surface also consists of membrane invaginations between adjacent microvilli, which are the only part of the apical surface sterically accessible for membrane fusion/budding events. Many of these invaginations appear as pleiomorphic, deep apical tubules that extend up to 0.5-1 microm into the underlying terminal web region. Their sensitivity to methyl-beta-cyclodextrin suggests them to contain cholesterol-dependent lipid rafts of a different type from the glycolipid-based rafts at the microvillar surface. The brush border is thus an example of a complex membrane system that harbours at least two different types of lipid raft microdomains, each suited to fulfil specialized functions. This conclusion is in line with an emerging, more varied view of lipid rafts being pluripotent microdomains capable of adapting in size, shape, and content to

  1. STS-46 MS PLC Hoffman floats in life raft during water egress training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander Jeffrey A. Hoffman floats in a one-person life raft during launch emergency egress (bailout) simulation conducted in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. Hoffman, who has just tumbled out a side hatch mockup, waits for his life raft to fully inflate as a SCUBA-equipped diver looks on. The long cylindrical object in the foreground serves as a prop for the crew escape system (CES) pole. In the background MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz floats in a fully inflated life raft.

  2. Surface modification of silica nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Rajesh

    Surface modification of nanosized silica particles by polymer grafting is gaining attention. This can be attributed to the fact that it provides a unique opportunity to engineer the interfacial properties of these modified particles; at the same time the mechanical and thermal properties of the polymers can be improved. Controlled free radical polymerization is a versatile technique which affords control over molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, architecture and functionalities of the resulting polymer. Three commonly used controlled free radical polymerizations include nitroxide-mediated polymerization (NMP), atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization. ATRP and RAFT polymerization were explored in order to modify the silica surface with well-defined polymer brushes. A novel click-functionalized RAFT chain transfer agent (RAFT CTA) was synthesized which opened up the possibility of using RAFT polymerization and click chemistry together in surface modification. Using this RAFT CTA, the surface of silica nanoparticles was modified with polystyrene and polyacrylamide brushes via the "grafting to" approach. Both tethered polystyrene and polyacrylamide chains were found in the brush regime. The combination of ATRP and click chemistry was also explored for surface modification. A combination of RAFT polymerization and click chemistry was also studied to modify the surface via the "grafting from" approach. Our strategy included the (1) "grafting from" approach for brush formation (2) facile click reaction to immobilize the RAFT agent (3) synthesis of R-supported chain transfer agent and (4) use of the more active trithiocarbonate RAFT agent. Grafting density obtained by this method was significantly higher than reported values in the literature. Polystyrene (PS) grafted silica nanoparticles were also prepared by a tandem process that simultaneously employs reversible addition fragmentation

  3. Prion Protein Accumulation in Lipid Rafts of Mouse Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G.; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrPC. In old mice, this change favors PrPC accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrPC translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrPC compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrPC in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases. PMID:24040215

  4. Impact of boundaries on velocity profiles in bubble rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuhong; Krishan, Kapilanjan; Dennin, Michael

    2006-03-01

    Under conditions of sufficiently slow flow, foams, colloids, granular matter, and various pastes have been observed to exhibit shear localization, i.e., regions of flow coexisting with regions of solidlike behavior. The details of such shear localization can vary depending on the system being studied. A number of the systems of interest are confined so as to be quasi two-dimensional, and an important issue in these systems is the role of the confining boundaries. For foams, three basic systems have been studied with very different boundary conditions: Hele-Shaw cells (bubbles confined between two solid plates); bubble rafts (a single layer of bubbles freely floating on a surface of water); and confined bubble rafts (bubbles confined between the surface of water below and a glass plate on top). Often, it is assumed that the impact of the boundaries is not significant in the “quasistatic limit,” i.e., when externally imposed rates of strain are sufficiently smaller than internal kinematic relaxation times. In this paper, we directly test this assumption for rates of strain ranging from 10-3to10-2s-1 . This corresponds to the quoted rate of strain that had been used in a number of previous experiments. It is found that the top plate dramatically alters both the velocity profile and the distribution of nonlinear rearrangements, even at these slow rates of strain. When a top is present, the flow is localized to a narrow band near the wall, and without a top, there is flow throughout the system.

  5. Transmembrane Protein (Perfringolysin O) Association with Ordered Membrane Domains (Rafts) Depends Upon the Raft-Associating Properties of Protein-Bound Sterol

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Qingqing; London, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Because transmembrane (TM) protein localization, or nonlocalization, in ordered membrane domains (rafts) is a key to understanding membrane domain function, it is important to define the origin of protein-raft interaction. One hypothesis is that a tight noncovalent attachment of TM proteins to lipids that have a strong affinity for ordered domains can be sufficient to induce raft-protein interaction. The sterol-binding protein perfringolysin O (PFO) was used to test this hypothesis. PFO binds both to sterols that tend to localize in ordered domains (e.g., cholesterol), and to those that do not (e.g., coprostanol), but it does not bind to epicholesterol, a raft-promoting 3α-OH sterol. Using a fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay in model membrane vesicles containing coexisting ordered and disordered lipid domains, both TM and non-TM forms of PFO were found to concentrate in ordered domains in vesicles containing high and low-Tm lipids plus cholesterol or 1:1 (mol/mol) cholesterol/epicholesterol, whereas they concentrate in disordered domains in vesicles containing high-Tm and low-Tm lipids plus 1:1 (mol/mol) coprostanol/epicholesterol. Combined with previous studies this behavior indicates that TM protein association with ordered domains is dependent upon both the association of the protein-bound sterol with ordered domains and hydrophobic match between TM segments and rafts. PMID:24359745

  6. Isolation of nano-meso scale detergent resistant membrane that has properties expected of lipid 'rafts'.

    PubMed

    Morris, Roger J; Jen, Angela; Warley, Alice

    2011-03-01

    This review assesses problems that confound attempts to isolate 'raft' domains from cell membranes, focusing in particular upon the isolation of detergent resistant membrane (DRM). Despite its widespread use, this technique is rightly viewed with skepticism by many membrane biochemists and biophysics for reasons that include the inability to isolate DRMs at 37°C, the temperature at which their lipids are supposed to be ordered and so exclude detergents. If solubilization is done in an ionic buffer that preserves the lamellar phase of the metastable inner leaflet lipids, DRMs can readily be isolated at 37°C, and these have many properties expected of lipid rafts. However, to date these DRMs have remained somewhat larger than current concepts of rafts. We describe an adaptation of this method that purifies nano-meso scale DRMs, and could be a significant step towards purifying the membrane of individual 'rafts'. PMID:21214574

  7. Fire ants self-assemble into waterproof rafts to survive floods

    PubMed Central

    Mlot, Nathan J.; Tovey, Craig A.; Hu, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Why does a single fire ant Solenopsis invicta struggle in water, whereas a group can float effortlessly for days? We use time-lapse photography to investigate how fire ants S. invicta link their bodies together to build waterproof rafts. Although water repellency in nature has been previously viewed as a static material property of plant leaves and insect cuticles, we here demonstrate a self-assembled hydrophobic surface. We find that ants can considerably enhance their water repellency by linking their bodies together, a process analogous to the weaving of a waterproof fabric. We present a model for the rate of raft construction based on observations of ant trajectories atop the raft. Central to the construction process is the trapping of ants at the raft edge by their neighbors, suggesting that some “cooperative” behaviors may rely upon coercion. PMID:21518911

  8. The Effect of Hydrophile Topology in RAFT-Mediated Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly.

    PubMed

    Lesage de la Haye, Jennifer; Zhang, Xuewei; Chaduc, Isabelle; Brunel, Fabrice; Lansalot, Muriel; D'Agosto, Franck

    2016-03-01

    Polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) was employed to compare the self-assembly of different amphiphilic block copolymers. They were obtained by emulsion polymerization of styrene in water using hydrophilic poly(N-acryloylmorpholine) (PNAM)-based macromolecular RAFT agents with different structures. An average of three poly (ethylene glycol acrylate) (PEGA) units were introduced either at the beginning, statistically, or at the end of a PNAM backbone, resulting in formation of nanometric vesicles and spheres from the two former macroRAFT architectures, and large vesicles from the latter. Compared to the spheres obtained with a pure PNAM macroRAFT agent, composite macroRAFT architectures promoted a dramatic morphological change. The change was induced by the presence of PEGA hydrophilic side-chains close to the hydrophobic polystyrene segment. PMID:26880016

  9. Herpes simplex virus protein UL11 but not UL51 is associated with lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Kawaguchi, Yasushi; Nozawa, Naoki; Mori, Isamu; Nishiyama, Yukihiro

    2007-12-01

    The UL11 and UL51 gene products of herpes simplex virus (HSV) are membrane-associated tegument proteins that are incorporated into the HSV virion. UL11 and UL51 are conserved throughout the herpesvirus family. Both UL11 and UL51, either singly or in combination, are involved in virion envelopment and/or egress. Both proteins are fatty acylated: UL11 is both acylated by myristoic and palmitoic acids and UL51 is monoacylated by palmitoic acid. Using confocal microscopy and sucrose gradient fractionations in transfected or HSV-infected cells, we found that HSV-2 UL11 but not UL51 was associated with lipid rafts. The dual acylation of UL11 was necessary for lipid raft association, as mutations in the myristoylation or palmitoylation sites prevented lipid raft association. These differences in lipid raft association may contribute to the functional differences between UL11 and UL51. PMID:17694428

  10. Function of Membrane Rafts in Viral Lifecycles and Host Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Membrane rafts are small (10–200 nm) sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched domains that compartmentalize cellular processes. Membrane rafts play an important role in viral infection cycles and viral virulence. Viruses are divided into four main classes, enveloped DNA virus, enveloped RNA virus, nonenveloped DNA virus, and nonenveloped RNA virus. General virus infection cycle is also classified into two sections, the early stage (entry process) and the late stage (assembly, budding, and release processes of virus particles). In the viral cycle, membrane rafts act as a scaffold of many cellular signal transductions, which are associated with symptoms caused by viral infections. In this paper, we describe the functions of membrane rafts in viral lifecycles and host cellular response according to each virus classification, each stage of the virus lifecycle, and each virus-induced signal transduction. PMID:22191032

  11. Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Glaspey, Douglas J.

    2008-01-30

    Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield.

  12. Study of Raft Domains in Model Membrane of DPPC/PE/Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda

    2010-10-01

    Raft domains in bilayer membrane are thought to play an important role in many cell functions such as cell signaling or trans-membrane protein activation. Here we use a model membrane consisting of DPPC/PE/cholesterol to examine the structure of membrane rafts and phase interactions. In particular we are interested in lipids containing the highly polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA. We use both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy to obtain information on the structural properties of raft regions and track cholesterol. As expected, we find phase separation of raft regions between saturated and unsaturated lipids. Moreover, we find that the roughness of the domains change with varying cholesterol concentration possibly due to overpacking. This model study provides further understanding of the role of cholesterol in bilayer membrane leading towards a better knowledge of cell membranes.

  13. Lipid Peroxides Promote Large Rafts: Effects of Excitation of Probes in Fluorescence Microscopy and Electrochemical Reactions during Vesicle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ayuyan, Artem G.; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2006-01-01

    Raft formation and enlargement was investigated in liposomes and supported bilayers prepared from sphingomyelin (SM), cholesterol, and unsaturated phospholipids; NBD-DPPE and rhodamine-(DOPE) were employed as fluorescent probes. Rafts were created by lowering temperature. Maintaining 20 mol % SM, fluorescence microscopy showed that, in the absence of photooxidation, large rafts did not form in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) containing 20 or more mol % cholesterol. But if photooxidation was allowed to proceed, large rafts were readily observed. In population, cuvette experiments, small rafts formed without photooxidation at high cholesterol concentrations. Thus, photooxidation was the cause of raft enlargement during microscopy experiments. Because photooxidation results in peroxidation at lipid double bonds, photosensitization experiments were performed to explicitly produce peroxides of SM and an unsaturated phospholipid. GUVs of high cholesterol content containing the breakdown products of SM-peroxide, but not phospholipid-peroxide, resulted in large rafts after lowering temperature. In addition, GUV production by electroswelling can result in peroxides that cause large raft formation. The use of titanium electrodes eliminates this problem. In conclusion, lipid peroxides and their breakdown products are the cause of large raft formation in GUVs containing biological levels of cholesterol. It is critical that experiments investigating rafts in bilayer membranes avoid the production of peroxides. PMID:16815906

  14. Seaweed raft and farm design in the United States and China

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in this report: pilot-scale mariculture of seaweeds in Washington; experimental-scale raft culture of marine macroalgae in inland marine waters; macroalgal culture in California and China; land-based cultivation of seaweeds: an assessment of their potential yields for 'energy farming'; a design for energy-independent seaweed raft culture in tidal creeks and rivers; and the New York State marine biomass program.

  15. Selective Association of Outer Surface Lipoproteins with the Lipid Rafts of Borrelia burgdorferi

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Alvaro; Crowley, Jameson T.; Coleman, James L.; LaRocca, Timothy J.; Chiantia, Salvatore; London, Erwin; Benach, Jorge L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Borrelia burgdorferi contains unique cholesterol-glycolipid-rich lipid rafts that are associated with lipoproteins. These complexes suggest the existence of macromolecular structures that have not been reported for prokaryotes. Outer surface lipoproteins OspA, OspB, and OspC were studied for their participation in the formation of lipid rafts. Single-gene deletion mutants with deletions of ∆ospA, ∆ospB, and ∆ospC and a spontaneous gene mutant, strain B313, which does not express OspA and OspB, were used to establish their structural roles in the lipid rafts. All mutant strains used in this study produced detergent-resistant membranes, a common characteristic of lipid rafts, and had similar lipid and protein slot blot profiles. Lipoproteins OspA and OspB but not OspC were shown to be associated with lipid rafts by transmission electron microscopy. When the ability to form lipid rafts in live B. burgdorferi spirochetes was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), strain B313 showed a statistically significant lower level of segregation into ordered and disordered membrane domains than did the wild-type and the other single-deletion mutants. The transformation of a B313 strain with a shuttle plasmid containing ospA restored the phenotype shared by the wild type and the single-deletion mutants, demonstrating that OspA and OspB have redundant functions. In contrast, a transformed B313 overexpressing OspC neither rescued the FRET nor colocalized with the lipid rafts. Because these lipoproteins are expressed at different stages of the life cycle of B. burgdorferi, their selective association is likely to have an important role in the structure of prokaryotic lipid rafts and in the organism’s adaptation to changing environments. PMID:24618252

  16. Pile Spacing Optimization of Short Piled Raft Foundation System for Obtaining Minimum Settlement on Peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suro, S. M.; Bakar, I.; Sulaeman, A.

    2016-07-01

    Short Piled Raft is a modified piled raft foundation system, which represents combination between raft foundation and pile foundation, but the length of pile is relatively shorter. The basic concept of the Short Piled Raft foundation system considers the passive soil pressure creating a stiff condition of slab-pile system. This means that the thin concrete slab floats on the supporting soil, while the piles serve as stiffeners concrete slab and also to reduce settlement of the foundation. Slab to pile ratio of such system has been mentioned by several researchers, however the optimum pile spacing of stability performance for obtaining minimum settlement on peat haven't been clearly discussed. In this study, finite element method to simulate the stability performance related to settlement of Short Piled Raft foundation system was used. Short Piled Raft foundation system with concrete slab of 7.0 m x 7.0 m square was assumed to be built on peat with the thickness of 3.5 m. The material properties of pile and raft were constant. The outer diameter of galvanized steel pipe as pile was 0.30 m; raft thickness was considered to be constant of 0.15 m and the length of pile was 3.0 m, while the pile spacing varied from 0.50 to 3.00 m. Point load varied from 0 to 100 kN with increment of 20 kN was also considered as a static load, acted on the centre of the concrete slab. Optimization was done by comparing each numerical result of simulations, thus conclusion can easily be drawn. The optimum pile spacing was 1.00 m which produced minimum settlement of 30.11 mm under the load of 100 kN.

  17. Castaways can't be choosers - Homogenization of rafting assemblages on floating seaweeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutow, Lars; Beermann, Jan; Buschbaum, Christian; Rivadeneira, Marcelo M.; Thiel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    After detachment from benthic habitats, the epibiont assemblages on floating seaweeds undergo substantial changes, but little is known regarding whether succession varies among different seaweed species. Given that floating algae may represent a limiting habitat in many regions, rafting organisms may be unselective and colonize any available seaweed patch at the sea surface. This process may homogenize rafting assemblages on different seaweed species, which our study examined by comparing the assemblages on benthic and floating individuals of the fucoid seaweeds Fucus vesiculosus and Sargassum muticum in the northern Wadden Sea (North Sea). Species richness was about twice as high on S. muticum as on F. vesiculosus, both on benthic and floating individuals. In both seaweed species benthic samples were more diverse than floating samples. However, the species composition differed significantly only between benthic thalli, but not between floating thalli of the two seaweed species. Separate analyses of sessile and mobile epibionts showed that the homogenization of rafting assemblages was mainly caused by mobile species. Among these, grazing isopods from the genus Idotea reached extraordinarily high densities on the floating samples from the northern Wadden Sea, suggesting that the availability of seaweed rafts was indeed limiting. Enhanced break-up of algal rafts associated with intense feeding by abundant herbivores might force rafters to recolonize benthic habitats. These colonization processes may enhance successful dispersal of rafting organisms and thereby contribute to population connectivity between sink populations in the Wadden Sea and source populations from up-current regions.

  18. Sphingomyelin distribution in lipid rafts of artificial monolayer membranes visualized by Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ando, Jun; Kinoshita, Masanao; Cui, Jin; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Fujita, Katsumasa; Murata, Michio; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-04-14

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (chol)-rich domains in cell membranes, called lipid rafts, are thought to have important biological functions related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking. To visualize the distribution of SM in lipid rafts by means of Raman microscopy, we designed and synthesized an SM analog tagged with a Raman-active diyne moiety (diyne-SM). Diyne-SM showed a strong peak in a Raman silent region that is free of interference from intrinsic vibrational modes of lipids and did not appear to alter the properties of SM-containing monolayers. Therefore, we used Raman microscopy to directly visualize the distribution of diyne-SM in raft-mimicking domains formed in SM/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/chol ternary monolayers. Raman images visualized a heterogeneous distribution of diyne-SM, which showed marked variation, even within a single ordered domain. Specifically, diyne-SM was enriched in the central area of raft domains compared with the peripheral area. These results seem incompatible with the generally accepted raft model, in which the raft and nonraft phases show a clear biphasic separation. One of the possible reasons is that gradual changes of SM concentration occur between SM-rich and -poor regions to minimize hydrophobic mismatch. We believe that our technique of hyperspectral Raman imaging of a single lipid monolayer opens the door to quantitative analysis of lipid membranes by providing both chemical information and spatial distribution with high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution. PMID:25825736

  19. Sphingomyelin distribution in lipid rafts of artificial monolayer membranes visualized by Raman microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Jun; Kinoshita, Masanao; Cui, Jin; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Fujita, Katsumasa; Murata, Michio; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (chol)-rich domains in cell membranes, called lipid rafts, are thought to have important biological functions related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking. To visualize the distribution of SM in lipid rafts by means of Raman microscopy, we designed and synthesized an SM analog tagged with a Raman-active diyne moiety (diyne-SM). Diyne-SM showed a strong peak in a Raman silent region that is free of interference from intrinsic vibrational modes of lipids and did not appear to alter the properties of SM-containing monolayers. Therefore, we used Raman microscopy to directly visualize the distribution of diyne-SM in raft-mimicking domains formed in SM/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/chol ternary monolayers. Raman images visualized a heterogeneous distribution of diyne-SM, which showed marked variation, even within a single ordered domain. Specifically, diyne-SM was enriched in the central area of raft domains compared with the peripheral area. These results seem incompatible with the generally accepted raft model, in which the raft and nonraft phases show a clear biphasic separation. One of the possible reasons is that gradual changes of SM concentration occur between SM-rich and -poor regions to minimize hydrophobic mismatch. We believe that our technique of hyperspectral Raman imaging of a single lipid monolayer opens the door to quantitative analysis of lipid membranes by providing both chemical information and spatial distribution with high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution. PMID:25825736

  20. Simvastatin Attenuates Astrogliosis after Traumatic Brain Injury through the Modulation of EGFR in Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hongtao; Mahmood, Asim; Lu, Dunyue; Jiang, Hao; Xiong, Ye; Zhou, Dong; Chopp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective Our previous studies demonstrated that simvastatin treatment promotes neuronal survival and reduces inflammatory cytokine release from astrocytes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Since reactive astrocytes produce inflammation mediators, in the current study we investigated the effect of simvastatin on astrocyte activation after TBI and its underlying signaling mechanisms. Methods Saline or simvastatin (1 mg/kg) was orally administered to rats starting at Day 1 after TBI and then daily for 14 days. Rats were sacrificed at 1, 3, 7, 14 days after treatment. Brain sections and tissues were prepared for immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis, respectively. Cultured astrocytes were subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and followed by immunocytochemical staining with GFAP/caveolin-1 and Western blot analysis. Lipid rafts were isolated from the cell lysate and Western blot was carried out to detect the changes in epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) expression and phosphorylation in the lipid rafts. Results Simvastatin significantly promoted neuronal survival after TBI and attenuated activation of astrocytes. Simvastatin modified the caveolin-1 expression in lipid rafts in astrocyte cell membrane, suppressed the phosphorylation of EGFR in lipid rafts of astrocytes after OGD, and inhibited the OGD-induced interleukin-1 (IL-1) production. Conclusions These data suggest that simvastatin reduces reactive astrogliosis and rescues neuronal cells after TBI. These beneficial effects of simvastatin may be mediated by inhibiting astrocyte activation after TBI through modifying the caveolin-1 expression in lipid rafts and the subsequent modulation of EGFR phosphorylation in lipid rafts. PMID:19895202

  1. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin listeriolysin O aggregates rafts via oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Gekara, Nelson O; Jacobs, Thomas; Chakraborty, Trinad; Weiss, Siegfried

    2005-09-01

    The pore-forming toxin listeriolysin O (LLO) is the main virulence factor of Listeria monocytogenes. LLO is known to act as a pseudo cytokine/chemokine, which induces a broad spectrum of host responses that ultimately influences the outcome of listeriosis. In the present study we demonstrate that LLO is a potent aggregator of lipid rafts. LLO was found to aggregate the raft associated molecules GM1, the GPI-anchored proteins CD14 and CD16 as well as the tyrosine kinase Lyn. Abrogation of the cytolytic activity of LLO by cholesterol pretreatment was found not to interfere with LLO's ability to aggregate rafts or trigger tyrosine phosphorylation in cells. However, a monoclonal antibody that blocks the oligomerization of LLO was found to inhibit rafts' aggregation as well as the induction of tyrosine phosphorylation. This implies that rafts aggregation by LLO which is independent of cytolytic activity, is due to the oligomerization of its membrane bound toxin monomers. Thus, LLO most likely induces signalling through the coaggregation of rafts' associated receptors, kinases and adaptors. PMID:16098221

  2. Structure and dynamics of nano-sized raft-like domains on the plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Fernando E.; Pantano, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes are constitutively composed of thousands of different lipidic species, whose specific organization leads to functional heterogeneities. In particular, sphingolipids, cholesterol and some proteins associate among them to form stable nanoscale domains involved in recognition, signaling, membrane trafficking, etc. Atomic-detail information in the nanometer/second scale is still elusive to experimental techniques. In this context, molecular simulations on membrane systems have provided useful insights contributing to bridge this gap. Here we present the results of a series of simulations of biomembranes representing non-raft and raft-like nano-sized domains in order to analyze the particular structural and dynamical properties of these domains. Our results indicate that the smallest (5 nm) raft domains are able to preserve their distinctive structural and dynamical features, such as an increased thickness, higher ordering, lower lateral diffusion, and specific lipid-ion interactions. The insertion of a transmembrane protein helix into non-raft, extended raft-like, and raft-like nanodomain environments result in markedly different protein orientations, highlighting the interplay between the lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions.

  3. The shedding activity of ADAM17 is sequestered in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Tellier, Edwige; Canault, Matthias; Rebsomen, Laure; Bonardo, Bernadette; Juhan-Vague, Irene; Nalbone, Gilles; Peiretti, Franck . E-mail: Franck.Peiretti@medecine.univ-mrs.fr

    2006-12-10

    The tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) converting enzyme (ADAM17) is a metalloprotease-disintegrin responsible for the cleavage of several biologically active transmembrane proteins. However, the substrate specificity of ADAM17 and the regulation of its shedding activity are still poorly understood. Here, we report that during its transport through the Golgi apparatus, ADAM17 is included in cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) where its prodomain is cleaved by furin. Consequently, ADAM17 shedding activity is sequestered in lipid rafts, which is confirmed by the fact that metalloproteinase inhibition increases the proportion of ADAM17 substrates (TNF and its receptors TNFR1 and TNFR2) in lipid rafts. Membrane cholesterol depletion increases the ADAM17-dependent shedding of these substrates demonstrating the importance of lipid rafts in the control of this process. Furthermore, ADAM17 substrates are present in different proportions in lipid rafts, suggesting that the entry of each of these substrates in these particular membrane microdomains is specifically regulated. Our data support the idea that one of the mechanisms regulating ADAM17 substrate cleavage involves protein partitioning in lipid rafts.

  4. Differential Association of the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor (NHERF) Family of Adaptor Proteins with the Raft-and the Non-Raft Brush Border Membrane Fractions of NHE3

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Ayesha; Luo, Min; Yu, Qin; Riederer, Brigitte; Xia, Weiliang; Chen, Mingmin; Lissner, Simone; Gessner, Johannes E.; Donowitz, Mark; Yun, C. Chris; deJonge, Hugo; Lamprecht, Georg; Seidler, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Trafficking, brush border membrane (BBM) retention, and signal-specific regulation of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3 is regulated by the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor (NHERF) family of PDZ-adaptor proteins, which enable the formation of multiprotein complexes. It is unclear, however, what determines signal specificity of these NHERFs. Thus, we studied the association of NHE3, NHERF1 (EBP50), NHERF2 (E3KARP), and NHERF3 (PDZK1) with lipid rafts in murine small intestinal BBM. Methods Detergent resistant membranes (“lipid rafts”) were isolated by floatation of Triton X-incubated small intestinal BBM from a variety of knockout mouse strains in an Optiprep step gradient. Acid-activated NHE3 activity was measured fluorometrically in BCECF-loaded microdissected villi, or by assessment of CO2/HCO3− mediated increase in fluid absorption in perfused jejunal loops of anethetized mice. Results NHE3 was found to partially associate with lipid rafts in the native BBM, and NHE3 raft association had an impact on NHE3 transport activity and regulation in vivo. NHERF1, 2 and 3 were differentially distributed to rafts and non-rafts, with NHERF2 being most raft-associated and NHERF3 entirely non-raft associated. NHERF2 expression enhanced the localization of NHE3 to membrane rafts. The use of acid sphingomyelinase-deficient mice, which have altered membrane lipid as well as lipid raft composition, allowed us to test the validity of the lipid raft concept in vivo. Conclusions The differential association of the NHERFs with the raft-associated and the non-raft fraction of NHE3 in the brush border membrane is one component of the differential and signal-specific NHE3 regulation by the different NHERFs. PMID:24297041

  5. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Food Chain Transfer Studies for Phytoremediation Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.

    2009-04-01

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water standards for groundwater (8 picocuries/L) by as much as a factor of 1000 at several locations within the Hanford 100-N Area and along the 100-N Area Columbia River shoreline). Phytoextraction, a managed remediation technology in which plants or integrated plant/rhizosphere systems are employed to phytoextract and/or sequester 90Sr, is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River as part of a treatment train that includes an apatite barrier to immobilize groundwater transport of 90Sr. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua) to extract 90Sr from the vadose zone soil and aquifer sediments (phytoextraction) and filter 90Sr (rhizofiltration) from the shallow groundwater along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. The stem and foliage of coyote willows accumulating 90Sr may present not only a mechanism to remove the contaminant but also can be viewed as a source of nutrition for natural herbivores, therefore becoming a potential pathway for the isotope to enter the riparian food chain. Engineered barriers such as large and small animal fencing constructed around the field plot will control the intrusion of deer, rodents, birds, and humans. These efforts, however, will have limited effect on mobile phytophagous insects. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the potential for food chain transfer by insects prior to placement of the remediation technology at 100-N. Insect types include direct consumers of the sap or liquid content of the plants vascular system (xylem and phloem) by aphids as well as those that would directly consume the plant foliage such as the larvae (caterpillars) of Lepidoptera species. Heavy infestations of aphids feeding on the stems and leaves of willows growing in 90Sr-contaminated soil can accumulate a small amount (~0.15 ± 0.06%) of the total label removed from the soil by

  6. Lipid raft regulates the initial spreading of melanoma A375 cells by modulating β1 integrin clustering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruifei; Bi, Jiajia; Ampah, Khamal Kwesi; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Ziyi; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Xiaoru; Ba, Xueqing; Zeng, Xianlu

    2013-08-01

    Cell adhesion and spreading require integrins-mediated cell-extracellular matrix interaction. Integrins function through binding to extracellular matrix and subsequent clustering to initiate focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. Lipid raft, a liquid ordered plasma membrane microdomain, has been reported to play major roles in membrane motility by regulating cell surface receptor function. Here, we identified that lipid raft integrity was required for β1 integrin-mediated initial spreading of melanoma A375 cells on fibronectin. We found that lipid raft disruption with methyl-β-cyclodextrin led to the inability of focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement by preventing β1 integrin clustering. Furthermore, we explored the possible mechanism by which lipid raft regulates β1 integrin clustering and demonstrated that intact lipid raft could recruit and modify some adaptor proteins, such as talin, α-actinin, vinculin, paxillin and FAK. Lipid raft could regulate the location of these proteins in lipid raft fractions and facilitate their binding to β1 integrin, which may be crucial for β1 integrin clustering. We also showed that lipid raft disruption impaired A375 cell migration in both transwell and wound healing models. Together, these findings provide a new insight for the relationship between lipid raft and the regulation of integrins. PMID:23665237

  7. High spatial resolution spectrometry of rafting macroalgae (Sargassum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekielda, Karl H.; Marmorino, George O.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.; Gillis, David

    2010-04-01

    Data with 0.4-m spatial resolution acquired ~2 km off the southeast Florida coast using the airborne Portable Hyperspectral Imager for Low-Light Spectroscopy (PHILLS) have been analyzed with the objective of identifying drifting surface macroalgae (Sargassum) through its spectral signature in at-sensor radiance. The observed spectral features of Sargassum include a peak at a wavelength of ~0.570 μm and a photosynthetic 'red edge' between 0.673 and 0.699 μm. Sargassum also exhibits high radiance in the reflected near-infrared but is impacted by the atmospheric absorption bands of water vapor at 0.720 μm and oxygen at 0.756 μm. The spectral signature is clearest and largest in amplitude where the Sargassum occurs as small surface aggregations, or rafts, which tend to lie at the downwind ends of narrow Sargassum windrows. The quantity of floating Sargassum was estimated within a single pixel by linearly mixing a spectrum of Sargassum-free water with varying percentages of a spectrum from a pixel assumed completely filled with floating plants. For our study site about 2.3% of the ocean area is classified as having some Sargassum coverage, with pixels completely filled with Sargassum being rare (only 0.2% of the classified Sargassum pixels) and pixels with the least-resolvable amount of Sargassum (~10% filled) being the most common.

  8. Composition of Eocene Ice-Rafted Debris, Central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstad, C.; St. John, K.

    2007-12-01

    IODP Expedition 302 drilled a 400-m sediment record which contains physical evidence of ice-rafting in the Eocene and Neogene in the Arctic (Backman et al., 2006; Moran et al., 2006, St. John, in press). An increase in the terrigenous sand abundance occurs above 246 mcd (~46 Ma), with a flux similar to that in the Neogene. Higher resolution sampling in an interval of good recovery from 246-236 mcd shows evidence of cyclic input of IRD and biogenic components that fits with Milankovitch forcing at the obliquity period (Sangiorgi et al., in press). The question remains - what areas of the Arctic were ice-covered at this early stage in the Cenozoic? To address this provenance issue the composition of the terrigenous sands (250 micron fraction) in cores 55-56X is being quantified. Grains in 75 samples are being point-counted and their compositions categorized. Quartz grains are the dominant component (greater than 10,000 grains per gram), with some being hematite-stained, and there are lesser amounts of mafic minerals. No carbonate grains are identified so far in this study. Possible sources areas for Eocene IRD are the Eastern European and Russian Arctic margins. Tracking compositional variations of the IRD over the interval of cyclic deposition, should indicate whether the cyclic IRD deposition was consistently derived from one source region or multiple regions during this time.

  9. Amyloid Oligomer Neurotoxicity, Calcium Dysregulation, and Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Paradisi, Silvia; Matteucci, Andrea; Frank, Claudio; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid proteins constitute a chemically heterogeneous group of proteins, which share some biophysical and biological characteristics, the principal of which are the high propensity to acquire an incorrect folding and the tendency to aggregate. A number of diseases are associated with misfolding and aggregation of proteins, although only in some of them—most notably Alzheimer's disease (AD) and transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs)—a pathogenetic link with misfolded proteins is now widely recognized. Lipid rafts (LRs) have been involved in the pathophysiology of diseases associated with protein misfolding at several levels, including aggregation of misfolded proteins, amyloidogenic processing, and neurotoxicity. Among the pathogenic misfolded proteins, the AD-related protein amyloid β (Aβ) is by far the most studied protein, and a large body of evidence has been gathered on the role played by LRs in Aβ pathogenicity. However, significant amount of data has also been collected for several other amyloid proteins, so that their ability to interact with LRs can be considered an additional, shared feature characterizing the amyloid protein family. In this paper, we will review the evidence on the role of LRs in the neurotoxicity of huntingtin, α-synuclein, prion protein, and calcitonin. PMID:21331330

  10. Omega-3 fatty acids, lipid rafts, and T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-08-15

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown in many clinical studies to attenuate inflammatory responses. Although inflammatory responses are orchestrated by a wide spectrum of cells, CD4(+) T cells play an important role in the etiology of many chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. In light of recent concerns over the safety profiles of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), alternatives such as bioactive nutraceuticals are becoming more attractive. In order for these agents to be accepted into mainstream medicine, however, the mechanisms by which nutraceuticals such as n-3 PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects must be fully elucidated. Lipid rafts are nanoscale, dynamic domains in the plasma membrane that are formed through favorable lipid-lipid (cholesterol, sphingolipids, and saturated fatty acids) and lipid-protein (membrane-actin cytoskeleton) interactions. These domains optimize the clustering of signaling proteins at the membrane to facilitate efficient cell signaling which is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation. This review summarizes novel emerging data documenting the ability of n-3 PUFA to perturb membrane-cytoskeletal structure and function in CD4(+) T cells. An understanding of these underlying mechanisms will provide a rationale for the use of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of chronic inflammation. PMID:26001374

  11. Lipid Rafts Alter the Stability and Activity of the Cholera Toxin A1 Subunit*

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Supriyo; Taylor, Michael; Banerjee, Tuhina; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) travels from the cell surface to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as an AB holotoxin. ER-specific conditions then promote the dissociation of the catalytic CTA1 subunit from the rest of the toxin. CTA1 is held in a stable conformation by its assembly in the CT holotoxin, but the dissociated CTA1 subunit is an unstable protein that spontaneously assumes a disordered state at physiological temperature. This unfolding event triggers the ER-to-cytosol translocation of CTA1 through the quality control mechanism of ER-associated degradation. The translocated pool of CTA1 must regain a folded, active structure to modify its G protein target which is located in lipid rafts at the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane. Here, we report that lipid rafts place disordered CTA1 in a functional conformation. The hydrophobic C-terminal domain of CTA1 is essential for binding to the plasma membrane and lipid rafts. These interactions inhibit the temperature-induced unfolding of CTA1. Moreover, lipid rafts could promote a gain of structure in the disordered, 37 °C conformation of CTA1. This gain of structure corresponded to a gain of function: whereas CTA1 by itself exhibited minimal in vitro activity at 37 °C, exposure to lipid rafts resulted in substantial toxin activity at 37 °C. In vivo, the disruption of lipid rafts with filipin substantially reduced the activity of cytosolic CTA1. Lipid rafts thus exhibit a chaperone-like function that returns disordered CTA1 to an active state and is required for the optimal in vivo activity of CTA1. PMID:22787142

  12. Partitioning, diffusion, and ligand binding of raft lipid analogs in model and cellular plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Levental, Ilya; Grzybek, Michal; Schwarzmann, Günter; Mueller, Veronika; Honigmann, Alf; Belov, Vladimir N; Eggeling, Christian; Coskun, Unal; Simons, Kai; Schwille, Petra

    2012-07-01

    Several simplified membrane models featuring coexisting liquid disordered (Ld) and ordered (Lo) lipid phases have been developed to mimic the heterogeneous organization of cellular membranes, and thus, aid our understanding of the nature and functional role of ordered lipid-protein nanodomains, termed "rafts". In spite of their greatly reduced complexity, quantitative characterization of local lipid environments using model membranes is not trivial, and the parallels that can be drawn to cellular membranes are not always evident. Similarly, various fluorescently labeled lipid analogs have been used to study membrane organization and function in vitro, although the biological activity of these probes in relation to their native counterparts often remains uncharacterized. This is particularly true for raft-preferring lipids ("raft lipids", e.g. sphingolipids and sterols), whose domain preference is a strict function of their molecular architecture, and is thus susceptible to disruption by fluorescence labeling. Here, we analyze the phase partitioning of a multitude of fluorescent raft lipid analogs in synthetic Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) and cell-derived Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles (GPMVs). We observe complex partitioning behavior dependent on label size, polarity, charge and position, lipid headgroup, and membrane composition. Several of the raft lipid analogs partitioned into the ordered phase in GPMVs, in contrast to fully synthetic GUVs, in which most raft lipid analogs mis-partitioned to the disordered phase. This behavior correlates with the greatly enhanced order difference between coexisting phases in the synthetic system. In addition, not only partitioning, but also ligand binding of the lipids is perturbed upon labeling: while cholera toxin B binds unlabeled GM1 in the Lo phase, it binds fluorescently labeled GMI exclusively in the Ld phase. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) by stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy on intact

  13. Review article: alginate-raft formulations in the treatment of heartburn and acid reflux.

    PubMed

    Mandel, K G; Daggy, B P; Brodie, D A; Jacoby, H I

    2000-06-01

    Alginate-based raft-forming formulations have been marketed word-wide for over 30 years under various brand names, including Gaviscon. They are used for the symptomatic treatment of heartburn and oesophagitis, and appear to act by a unique mechanism which differs from that of traditional antacids. In the presence of gastric acid, alginates precipitate, forming a gel. Alginate-based raft-forming formulations usually contain sodium or potassium bicarbonate; in the presence of gastric acid, the bicarbonate is converted to carbon dioxide which becomes entrapped within the gel precipitate, converting it into a foam which floats on the surface of the gastric contents, much like a raft on water. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that alginate-based rafts can entrap carbon dioxide, as well as antacid components contained in some formulations, thus providing a relatively pH-neutral barrier. Several studies have demonstrated that the alginate raft can preferentially move into the oesophagus in place, or ahead, of acidic gastric contents during episodes of gastro-oesophageal reflux; some studies further suggest that the raft can act as a physical barrier to reduce reflux episodes. Although some alginate-based formulations also contain antacid components which can provide significant acid neutralization capacity, the efficacy of these formulations to reduce heartburn symptoms does not appear to be totally dependent on the neutralization of bulk gastric contents. The strength of the alginate raft is dependant on several factors, including the amount of carbon dioxide generated and entrapped in the raft, the molecular properties of the alginate, and the presence of aluminium or calcium in the antacid components of the formulation. Raft formation occurs rapidly, often within a few seconds of dosing; hence alginate-containing antacids are comparable to traditional antacids for speed of onset of relief. Since the raft can be retained in the stomach for several

  14. Identification of Novel Raft Marker Protein, FlotP in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Somani, Vikas K; Aggarwal, Somya; Singh, Damini; Prasad, Tulika; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are dynamic, nanoscale assemblies of specific proteins and lipids, distributed heterogeneously on eukaryotic membrane. Flotillin-1, a conserved eukaryotic raft marker protein (RMP) harbor SPFH (Stomatin, Prohibitin, Flotillin, and HflK/C) and oligomerization domains to regulate various cellular processes through its interactions with other signaling or transport proteins. Rafts were thought to be absent in prokaryotes hitherto, but recent report of its presence and significance in physiology of Bacillus subtilis prompted us to investigate the same in pathogenic bacteria (PB) also. In prokaryotes, proteins of SPFH2a subfamily show highest identity to SPFH domain of Flotillin-1. Moreover, bacterial genome organization revealed that Flotillin homolog harboring SPFH2a domain exists in an operon with an upstream gene containing NFeD domain. Here, presence of RMP in PB was initially investigated in silico by analyzing the presence of SPFH2a, oligomerization domains in the concerned gene and NfeD domain in the adjacent upstream gene. After investigating 300 PB, four were found to harbor RMP. Among them, domains of Bas0525 (FlotP) of Bacillus anthracis (BA) showed highest identity with characteristic domains of RMP. Considering the global threat of BA as the bioterror agent, it was selected as a model for further in vitro characterization of rafts in PB. In silico and in vitro analysis showed significant similarity of FlotP with numerous attributes of Flotillin-1. Its punctate distribution on membrane with exclusive localization in detergent resistant membrane fraction; strongly favors presence of raft with RMP FlotP in BA. Furthermore, significant effect of Zaragozic acid (ZA), a raft associated lipid biosynthesis inhibitor, on several patho-physiological attributes of BA such as growth, morphology, membrane rigidity etc., were also observed. Specifically, a considerable decrease in membrane rigidity, strongly recommended presence of an unknown raft associated

  15. Identification of Novel Raft Marker Protein, FlotP in Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Vikas K.; Aggarwal, Somya; Singh, Damini; Prasad, Tulika; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are dynamic, nanoscale assemblies of specific proteins and lipids, distributed heterogeneously on eukaryotic membrane. Flotillin-1, a conserved eukaryotic raft marker protein (RMP) harbor SPFH (Stomatin, Prohibitin, Flotillin, and HflK/C) and oligomerization domains to regulate various cellular processes through its interactions with other signaling or transport proteins. Rafts were thought to be absent in prokaryotes hitherto, but recent report of its presence and significance in physiology of Bacillus subtilis prompted us to investigate the same in pathogenic bacteria (PB) also. In prokaryotes, proteins of SPFH2a subfamily show highest identity to SPFH domain of Flotillin-1. Moreover, bacterial genome organization revealed that Flotillin homolog harboring SPFH2a domain exists in an operon with an upstream gene containing NFeD domain. Here, presence of RMP in PB was initially investigated in silico by analyzing the presence of SPFH2a, oligomerization domains in the concerned gene and NfeD domain in the adjacent upstream gene. After investigating 300 PB, four were found to harbor RMP. Among them, domains of Bas0525 (FlotP) of Bacillus anthracis (BA) showed highest identity with characteristic domains of RMP. Considering the global threat of BA as the bioterror agent, it was selected as a model for further in vitro characterization of rafts in PB. In silico and in vitro analysis showed significant similarity of FlotP with numerous attributes of Flotillin-1. Its punctate distribution on membrane with exclusive localization in detergent resistant membrane fraction; strongly favors presence of raft with RMP FlotP in BA. Furthermore, significant effect of Zaragozic acid (ZA), a raft associated lipid biosynthesis inhibitor, on several patho-physiological attributes of BA such as growth, morphology, membrane rigidity etc., were also observed. Specifically, a considerable decrease in membrane rigidity, strongly recommended presence of an unknown raft associated

  16. Lipid Raft Is Required for PSGL-1 Ligation Induced HL-60 Cell Adhesion on ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingshuang; Liu, Wenai; Luo, Jixian; Li, Chunfeng; Ba, Xueqing; Ampah, Khamal Kwesi; Wang, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong; Zeng, Xianlu

    2013-01-01

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and integrins are adhesion molecules that play critical roles in host defense and innate immunity. PSGL-1 mediates leukocyte rolling and primes leukocytes for integrin-mediated adhesion. However, the mechanism that PSGL-1 as a rolling receptor in regulating integrin activation has not been well characterized. Here, we investigate the function of lipid raft in regulating PSGL-1 induced β2 integrin-mediated HL-60 cells adhesion. PSGL-1 ligation with antibody enhances the β2 integrin activation and β2 integrin-dependent adhesion to ICAM-1. Importantly, with the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), we confirm the role of lipid raft in regulating the activation of β2 integrin. Furthermore, we find that the protein level of PSGL-1 decreased in raft fractions in MβCD treated cells. PSGL-1 ligation induces the recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a tyrosine kinase and Vav1 (the pivotal downstream effector of Syk signaling pathway involved in cytoskeleton regulation) to lipid raft. Inhibition of Syk activity with pharmacologic inhibitor strongly reduces HL-60 cells adhesion, implicating Syk is crucial for PSGL-1 mediated β2 integrin activation. Taken together, we report that ligation of PSGL-1 on HL-60 cells activates β2 integrin, for which lipid raft integrity and Syk activation are responsible. These findings have shed new light on the mechanisms that connect leukocyte initial rolling with subsequent adhesion. PMID:24312591

  17. Two-photon imaging of collagen remodeling in RAFT tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Vincent P.; Coleno, Mariah L.; Yomo, Tatsuro; Sun, Chung-Ho; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2001-04-01

    Tissue remodeling is associated with both normal and abnormal processes including wound healing, fibrosis and cancer. In skin, abnormal remodeling causes permanent structural changes that can lead to hypertropic scarring and keloid formation. Normal remodeling, although fast and efficient in skin, is still imperfect, and a connective tissue scar remains at the wound site1. As a result, methods are needed to optimize tissue remodeling in vivo in all cases of wound repair. Since fibroblast-mediated contraction of engineered 3-D collagen based tissues (RAFTs) represents an in vitro model of the tissue contraction and collagen remodeling that occurs in vivo, RAFT tissue contraction studies combined with two-photon microscopy (TPM) studies are used to provide information on ways to improve tissue remodeling in vivo. In the RAFT models discussed here, tissue contraction is modulated either by application of exogenous growth factors or photodynamic therapy. During tissue contraction, TPM is used to image changes in Collagen Type I fibers in the RAFT skin models. Tissues are imaged at depth at day 15 after modulation. TPM signal analysis shows that RAFT tissues having the highest collagen density have the fastest rate of decay of fluorescent signal with depth.

  18. On the kinetics of rafting in CMSX-4 superalloy single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Matan, N.; Cox, D.C.; Rae, C.M.F.; Reed, R.C.

    1999-05-28

    The kinetics of {gamma}{prime} rafting in CMSX-4 single crystals at 950 C has been studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The crept material was subjected to further heat treatment in the absence of applied stress, in order to deduce the threshold strain {epsilon}{sub th} for rafting to continue; this is shown to be 0.10 {+-} 0.03%. For strains smaller than {epsilon}{sub th}, rafting occurs exceedingly slowly; once {epsilon}{sub th} is exceeded the kinetics are largely unaffected by the absence of applied stress. The magnitude of {epsilon}{sub th} confers a reduction in {gamma}/{gamma}{prime} interfacial coherency and a relaxation of interfacial misfit stresses. It is concluded that the threshold strain is a quantity suitable for distinguishing between rafting occurring in the ``elastic`` and ``plastic`` regimes. The results confirm conclusively that plasticization of the horizontal {gamma}-channels by (a/2){l_angle}1{bar 1}0{r_angle}{l_brace}111{r_brace} creep dislocations and their subsequent adsorption at the {gamma}/{gamma}{prime} interfaces, with a concomitant loss of perfect coherency and reduction in elastic misfit strains, is responsible for providing the kinetic path which enables rafting to occur at a reasonable speed. An argument is put forward to explain the magnitude of {epsilon}{sub th}.

  19. An arm-first approach to cleavable mikto-arm star polymers by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohu; Moad, Graeme; Muir, Benjamin W; Rizzardo, Ezio; Rosselgong, Julien; Yang, Wantai; Thang, San H

    2014-04-01

    Redox-cleavable mikto-arm star polymers are prepared by an "arm-first" approach involving copolymerization of a dimethacrylate mediated by a mixture of macroRAFT agents. Thus, RAFT copolymerization of the monomers BMA, DMAEMA, and OEGMA, with the disulfide dimethacrylate cross-linker (DSDMA), bis(2-methacryloyl)oxyethyl disulfide, mediated by a 1:1:1 mixture of three macroRAFT agents with markedly different properties [hydrophilic, poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate]-P(OEGMA)8-9 ; cationizable, poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate]-P(DMAEMA); hydrophobic, poly(n-butyl methacrylate)-P(BMA)] provides low dispersity mikto-arm star polymers. Good control (Đ < 1.3) is observed for the target P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA)/P(BMA) (3:3:1) mikto-arm star, a double hydrophilic P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA) (3:3) mikto-arm star and a hydrophobic P(BMA) homo-arm star. However, Đ for the target mikto-arm stars increases with an increase in either the ratio [DSDMA]:[total macroRAFT] or the fraction of hydrophobic P(BMA) macroRAFT agent. The quaternized mikto-arm star in dilute aqueous solution shows a monomodal particle size distribution and an average size of ≈145 nm. PMID:24504709

  20. Raft forming system-an upcoming approach of gastroretentive drug delivery system.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Vipul D; Jani, Girish K; Khutliwala, Tohra A; Zala, Bhumi S

    2013-06-10

    In recent era various technologies have been made in research and development of controlled release oral drug delivery system to overcome various physiological difficulties such as variation in gastric retention and emptying time. To overcome this drawback and to maximize the oral absorption of various drugs, novel drug delivery systems have been developed. Gastroretentive drug delivery system is facing many challenges which can be overcome by upcoming newly emerging approach i.e. raft forming system. The purpose of writing this review is to focus on recent development of stomach specific floating drug delivery system to circumvent the difficulties associated with formulation design. Various gastroretentive approaches that have been developed till now are also discussed. The present study provides valuable information & highlights advances in this raft forming system. This review attempts to discuss various factors like physiological factors, physicochemical factors and formulation factors to be considered in the development of the raft forming system. Different types of smart polymers used for their formulation have also been summarized. The review focuses on the mechanism, formulation and development of the raft forming system. This review also summarizes the studies to evaluate the performance and application of these systems. The study finally highlights advantages, disadvantages, and marketed preparation of the raft forming system. PMID:23500062

  1. Numerical modeling of fluid flow with rafts: An application to lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsepelev, Igor; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Although volcanic lava flows do not significantly affect the life of people, its hazard is not negligible as hot lava kills vegetation, destroys infrastructure, and may trigger a flood due to melting of snow/ice. The lava flow hazard can be reduced if the flow patterns are known, and the complexity of the flow with debris is analyzed to assist in disaster risk mitigation. In this paper we develop three-dimensional numerical models of a gravitational flow of multi-phase fluid with rafts (mimicking rigid lava-crust fragments) on a horizontal and topographic surfaces to explore the dynamics and the interaction of lava flows. We have obtained various flow patterns and spatial distribution of rafts depending on conditions at the surface of fluid spreading, obstacles on the way of a fluid flow, raft landing scenarios, and the size of rafts. Furthermore, we analyze two numerical models related to specific lava flows: (i) a model of fluid flow with rafts inside an inclined channel, and (ii) a model of fluid flow from a single vent on an artificial topography, when the fluid density, its viscosity, and the effusion rate vary with time. Although the studied models do not account for lava solidification, crust formation, and its rupture, the results of the modeling may be used for understanding of flows with breccias before a significant lava cooling.

  2. Compartmentalization of the exocyst complex in lipid rafts controls Glut4 vesicle tethering.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Mayumi; Chiang, Shian-Huey; Chang, Louise; Chen, Xiao-Wei; Saltiel, Alan R

    2006-05-01

    Lipid raft microdomains act as organizing centers for signal transduction. We report here that the exocyst complex, consisting of Exo70, Sec6, and Sec8, regulates the compartmentalization of Glut4-containing vesicles at lipid raft domains in adipocytes. Exo70 is recruited by the G protein TC10 after activation by insulin and brings with it Sec6 and Sec8. Knockdowns of these proteins block insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Moreover, their targeting to lipid rafts is required for glucose uptake and Glut4 docking at the plasma membrane. The assembly of this complex also requires the PDZ domain protein SAP97, a member of the MAGUKs family, which binds to Sec8 upon its translocation to the lipid raft. Exocyst assembly at lipid rafts sets up targeting sites for Glut4 vesicles, which transiently associate with these microdomains upon stimulation of cells with insulin. These results suggest that the TC10/exocyst complex/SAP97 axis plays an important role in the tethering of Glut4 vesicles to the plasma membrane in adipocytes. PMID:16525015

  3. Raft-based interactions of gangliosides with a GPI-anchored receptor.

    PubMed

    Komura, Naoko; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Ando, Hiromune; Konishi, Miku; Koikeda, Machi; Imamura, Akihiro; Chadda, Rahul; Fujiwara, Takahiro K; Tsuboi, Hisae; Sheng, Ren; Cho, Wonhwa; Furukawa, Koichi; Furukawa, Keiko; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Ishida, Hideharu; Kusumi, Akihiro; Kiso, Makoto

    2016-06-01

    Gangliosides, glycosphingolipids containing one or more sialic acid(s) in the glyco-chain, are involved in various important physiological and pathological processes in the plasma membrane. However, their exact functions are poorly understood, primarily because of the scarcity of suitable fluorescent ganglioside analogs. Here, we developed methods for systematically synthesizing analogs that behave like their native counterparts in regard to partitioning into raft-related membrane domains or preparations. Single-fluorescent-molecule imaging in the live-cell plasma membrane revealed the clear but transient colocalization and codiffusion of fluorescent ganglioside analogs with a fluorescently labeled glycosylphosphatidylinisotol (GPI)-anchored protein, human CD59, with lifetimes of 12 ms for CD59 monomers, 40 ms for CD59's transient homodimer rafts in quiescent cells, and 48 ms for engaged-CD59-cluster rafts, in cholesterol- and GPI-anchoring-dependent manners. The ganglioside molecules were always mobile in quiescent cells. These results show that gangliosides continually and dynamically exchange between raft domains and the bulk domain, indicating that raft domains are dynamic entities. PMID:27043189

  4. The effect of omeprazole pre-treatment on rafts formed by reflux suppressant tablets containing alginate.

    PubMed

    Dettmar, P W; Little, S L; Baxter, T

    2005-01-01

    Alginate-based reflux suppressant preparations provide symptom relief by forming a physical barrier on top of the stomach contents in the form of a neutral floating gel or raft. This study investigated whether reduced acidity in the stomach brought about by omeprazole pre-treatment affected the formation and gastric residence time of alginate rafts. It was a balanced, cross-over study in 12 healthy non-patient volunteers following a single dose of two indium-111-labelled alginate tablets in the presence or absence of 3 days' pre-treatment with omeprazole. Raft formation and gastric residence, in the presence of a technetium-99m-labelled meal, were assessed by gamma scintigraphy for 3 h after alginate tablet administration. The relative raft-forming ability of alginate tablets after omeprazole compared with alginate tablets alone was 0.950 with 95% confidence intervals of 0.882 and 1.018. Pre-treatment and co-administration with omeprazole has no significant effect on the raft-forming ability of alginate tablets. PMID:15938591

  5. Juvenile-onset loss of lipid-raft domains in attractin-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Azouz, Abdallah; Gunn, Teresa M.; Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S. . E-mail: Jonathan_Duke-Cohan@dfci.harvard.edu

    2007-02-15

    Mutations at the attractin (Atrn) locus in mice result in altered pigmentation on an agouti background, higher basal metabolic rate and juvenile-onset hypomyelination leading to neurodegeneration, while studies on human immune cells indicate a chemotaxis regulatory function. The underlying biochemical defect remains elusive. In this report we identify a role for attractin in plasma membrane maintenance. In attractin's absence there is a decline in plasma membrane glycolipid-enriched rafts from normal levels at 8 weeks to a complete absence by 24 weeks. The structural integrity of lipid rafts depends upon cholesterol and sphingomyelin, and can be identified by partitioning within of ganglioside GM{sub 1}. Despite a significant fall in cellular cholesterol with maturity, and a lesser fall in both membrane and total cellular GM{sub 1}, these parameters lag behind raft loss, and are normal when hypomyelination/neurodegeneration has already begun thus supporting consequence rather than cause. These findings can be recapitulated in Atrn-deficient cell lines propagated in vitro. Further, signal transduction through complex membrane receptor assemblies is not grossly disturbed despite the complete absence of lipid rafts. We find these results compatible with a role for attractin in plasma membrane maintenance and consistent with the proposal that the juvenile-onset hypomyelination and neurodegeneration represent a defect in attractin-mediated raft-dependent myelin biogenesis.

  6. Toward atomic force microscopy and mass spectrometry to visualize and identify lipid rafts in plasmodesmata

    PubMed Central

    Naulin, Pamela A.; Alveal, Natalia A.; Barrera, Nelson P.

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell-to-cell communication is mediated by nanopores called plasmodesmata (PDs) which are complex structures comprising plasma membrane (PM), highly packed endoplasmic reticulum and numerous membrane proteins. Although recent advances on proteomics have led to insights into mechanisms of transport, there is still an inadequate characterization of the lipidic composition of the PM where membrane proteins are inserted. It has been postulated that PDs could be formed by lipid rafts, however no structural evidence has shown to visualize and analyse their lipid components. In this perspective article, we discuss proposed experiments to characterize lipid rafts and proteins in the PDs. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and mass spectrometry (MS) of purified PD vesicles it is possible to determine the presence of lipid rafts, specific bound proteins and the lipidomic profile of the PD under physiological conditions and after changing transport permeability. In addition, MS can determine the stoichiometry of intact membrane proteins inserted in lipid rafts. This will give novel insights into the role of membrane proteins and lipid rafts on the PD structure. PMID:24910637

  7. Autoimmunoreactive IgGs Against Cardiac Lipid Raft-Associated Proteins in Patients with POTS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Li; Ling, Tian-You; Charlesworth, M. Cristine; Figueroa, Juan J.; Low, Phillip; Shen, Win-Kuang; Lee, Hon-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Lipid rafts are specialized plasma membrane microdomains that serve as platforms for integrating cellular signal transductions. We have recently reported that autoantibodies against cardiac membrane proteins are present in patients with postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS). In this study, we examined the presence of autoimmunoreactive IgGs against lipid raft proteins in these patients. IgGs were purified from the sera of 10 patients and 7 normal controls. Cardiac lipid raft preparations were isolated from normal human heart tissue. The lipid raft-associated proteins were resolved by 2DE and immunoblotted against IgGs from each subject. Protein spots that reacted specifically with patient IgGs were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS. Thirty-four such protein spots, and 72 unique proteins were identified. The targets of autoimmunoreactive IgGs include proteins associated with caveolae structure, adrenergic signaling, calcium signaling, cytostructures, chaperone and energy metabolism. Multiple pathways were involved including those that regulate caveolae-mediated signaling, oxidative phosphorylation, fatty acid metabolism, protein ubiquitination, and cardiac β-adrenergic signaling. Our results suggest that cardiac lipid raft-associated proteins are targets of autoimmunoreactive IgGs from patients with POTS. Autoimmunity may play a role in the pathogenesis of POTS. PMID:23562385

  8. The epidemiology of injury in canoeing, kayaking and rafting.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Richard C; Leggat, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    The aquatic environment is a complex mix of waterways with varying uses and hazards. It is the intersection of the use of the water and the hazards which provides enjoyment to those who use them as well as risk to a person's health. Canoeing, kayaking and rafting have and continue to be popular recreation sports in aquatic environments. This chapter explores participation in, risks associated with and prevention strategies for keeping canoeists, kayakers and rafters safe and healthy. There is a dearth of good quality descriptive studies exploring these issues, particularly around the risks involved and the effectiveness of proposed prevention strategies. According to Outdoor Foundation, there are 23.9 million people in the USA who undertake paddling activities per annum, with canoeing (10.1 million) being the most popular activity followed by recreational kayaking (6.2 million). There were 141 deaths of canoeists (89) and kayakers (52) identified by the US Coast Guard in their recreational boating statistics data for 2009. The crude rate of death per 100,000 participants for canoeing ranges between 0.72 and 0.92 and for kayaking between 0.37 and 0.41 per annum. Although death is the most severe consequence of a misadventure while paddling, there are a range of other hazards faced such as hitting objects, waterborne diseases, hypothermia from unintended submersion, blisters, muscle strain, cuts and abrasions. There are a range of prevention strategies which have been proposed and provided in this chapter. However, there is very little evidence of their effectiveness. Further research is required in understanding the risk associated with paddling activities, the effectiveness of prevention strategies and how these strategies might be delivered. PMID:22824841

  9. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V.

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease. PMID:27014089

  10. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease. PMID:27014089

  11. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes. PMID:26861908

  12. Identification of nucleolin as a lipid-raft-dependent β1-integrin-interacting protein in A375 cell migration.

    PubMed

    Bi, Jiajia; Wang, Ruifei; Zhang, Yue; Han, Xiaoqing; Ampah, Khamal Kwesi; Liu, Wenguang; Zeng, Xianlu

    2013-12-01

    Lipid rafts are related to cell surface receptor function. Integrin is a major surface receptor protein in cell adhesion and migration on the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we showed that lipid rafts played a critical role in human melanoma A375 cell spreading and migration on fibronectin; an important component of the ECM that interacts with β1 integrin. We found that the disruption of lipid rafts did not markedly inhibit the expression and activation of β1 integrin. By coimmunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry, we investigated the influence of lipid rafts on the β1 integrin complex and identified nucleolin as a potential lipid-raft-dependent β1-integrin-interacting protein. Upon confirmation of the interaction between β1 integrin and nucleolin, further studies revealed that nucleolin colocalized with β1 integrin in lipid rafts and raft disruption interrupted their association. In addition, knockdown of nucleolin markedly attenuated A375 cell spreading and migration on fibronectin. Taken together, we demonstrated that nucleolin is a critical lipid-raft-dependent β1-integrin-interacting protein in A375 cell spreading and migration on fibronectin. PMID:24292944

  13. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes. PMID:26861908

  14. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-02-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes.

  15. Guided self-assembly of block-copolymer for CMOS technology: a comparative study between grapho-epitaxy and surface chemical modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oria, Lorea; Ruiz de Luzuriaga, Alaitz; Chevalier, Xavier; Alduncin, Juan A.; Mecerreyes, David; Tiron, Raluca; Gaugiran, Stephanie; Perez-Murano, Francesc

    2011-04-01

    Recent progress in Block Copolymer lithography has shown that guided self-assembly is a viable alternative for pushing forward the resolution limits of optical lithography. The main two self assembly methods considered so far have been the surface chemical modification, which is based on the chemical modification of a brush grafted to the silicon, and the grapho-epitaxy, which is based on creating topographic patterns on the surface. We have tested these two approaches for the 22 nm node and beyond CMOS technology, using PS-PMMA block copolymers synthesized by RAFT (Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer) polymerization.

  16. “Smart” Diblock Copolymers as Templates for Magnetic-Core Gold-Shell Nanoparticle Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Michael A.; Lai, James J.; Hoffman, Allan S.; Yager, Paul; Stayton, Partick S.

    2010-01-13

    We report a new strategy for synthesizing temperature-responsive γ-Fe2O3-core/Au-shell nanoparticles (Au-mNPs) from diblock copolymer micelles. The amphiphilic diblock copolymer chains were synthesized using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) with a thermally responsive “smart” poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) block and an amine-containing poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethylacrylamide) (DMAEAm) block that acted as a reducing agent during gold shell formation. The Au-mNPs reversibly aggregated upon heating the solution above the transition temperature of pNIPAAm, resulting in a red-shifted localized surface plasmon resonance.

  17. Non-immunogenic, hydrophilic/cationic block copolymers and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Scales, Charles W.; Huang, Faqing; McCormick, Charles L.

    2010-05-18

    The present invention provides novel non-immunogenic, hydrophilic/cationic block copolymers comprising a neutral-hydrophilic polymer and a cationic polymer, wherein both polymers have well-defined chain-end functionality. A representative example of such a block copolymer comprises poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) (PHPMA) and poly(N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]methacrylamide) (PDMAPMA). Also provided is a synthesis method thereof in aqueous media via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Further provided are uses of these block copolymers as drug delivery vehicles and protection agents.

  18. Highly efficient ring-opening reaction of azlactone-based copolymer platforms for the design of functionalized materials.

    PubMed

    Laquièvre, Aurélie; Allaway, Naomi S; Lyskawa, Joël; Woisel, Patrice; Lefebvre, Jean-Marc; Fournier, David

    2012-05-14

    Azlactone-based homopolymers and copolymers were successfully synthesized using the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) process. The functional monomer 2-styryl-4,4-dimethylazlactone (SDA) was first homopolymerized in bulk then copolymerized with styrene, leading to (co)polymers with low polydispersity indices (PDI = 1.10-1.20). The reactive azlactone rings, located along the backbone of the copolymers were subjected to highly efficient ring-opening reactions with functionalized primary amine derivatives incorporating a fluorescent (naphthalene) or an electrochemical (ferrocene) probes, a biological fragment (glutathione), a sugar unit (β-cyclodextrin), or an oligomeric fluorinated moiety, leading to materials with various interesting properties. PMID:22508541

  19. Association of γ-Secretase with Lipid Rafts in Post-Golgi and Endosome Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Vetrivel, Kulandaivelu S.; Cheng, Haipeng; Lin, William; Sakurai, Takashi; Li, Tong; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Wong, Philip C.; Xu, Huaxi; Thinakaran, Gopal

    2005-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease-associated β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) are generated by the sequential proteolytic processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) by β- and γ-secretases. There is growing evidence that cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich membrane microdomains are involved in regulating trafficking and processing of APP. BACE1, the major γ-secretase in neurons is a palmi-toylated transmembrane protein that resides in lipid rafts. A subset of APP is subject to amyloidogenic processing by BACE1 in lipid rafts, and this process depends on the integrity of lipid rafts. Here we describe the association of all four components of the γ-secretase complex, namely presenilin 1 (PS1)-derived fragments, mature nicastrin, APH-1, and PEN-2, with cholesterol-rich detergent insoluble membrane (DIM) domains of non-neuronal cells and neurons that fulfill the criteria of lipid rafts. In PS1−/−/PS2−/− and NCT−/− fibroblasts, γ-secretase components that still remain fail to become detergent-resistant, suggesting that raft association requires γ-secretase complex assembly. Biochemical evidence shows that subunits of the γ-secretase complex and three TGN/endosome-resident SNAREs cofractionate in sucrose density gradients, and show similar solubility or insolubility characteristics in distinct non-ionic and zwitterionic detergents, indicative of their co-residence in membrane microdomains with similar protein-lipid composition. This notion is confirmed using magnetic immunoisolation of PS1- or syntaxin 6-positive membrane patches from a mixture of membranes with similar buoyant densities following Lubrol WX extraction or sonication, and gradient centrifugation. These findings are consistent with the localization of γ-secretase in lipid raft microdomains of post-Golgi and endosomes, organelles previously implicated in amyloidogenic processing of APP. PMID:15322084

  20. Molecular targets of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG): specificity and interaction with membrane lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Patra, S K; Rizzi, F; Silva, A; Rugina, D O; Bettuzzi, S

    2008-12-01

    Proteomic studies on anticancer activity of Green Tea Catechins (specifically EGCG) are suggesting a large set of protein targets that may directly interact with EGCG and alter the physiology of diseased cells, including cancer. Of notice, benign cells are usually left untouched. Lipid rafts have been recently recognized as signal processing hubs and suggested to be involved in drug uptake by means of endocytosis. These findings are suggesting new insights on the molecular mechanisms of anticancer drugs action. In the membrane, EGCG is hijacked by the laminin receptor (LamR), a lipid raft protein. Similar to aplidin and edelfosin, EGCG alters membrane domains composition also preventing EGF binding to EGFR, imerization of EGFR and relocation of phosphorylated EGFR to lipid rafts. In vitro studies have recently shown that EGCG also binds both DNA and RNA in GpC-rich regions. This event may importantly affect genes function. Moreover, EGCG was shown to inhibit telomerase, topoisomerase II and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), thus ultimately affecting chromatin maintenance and remodeling. But another important alternative pathway besides interaction with specific proteins may play an important role in EGCG action: direct targeting of bioactive membrane platforms, lipid rafts. Structural alteration of the platforms deeply impact (and often inactivates) important pathways involving MAP kinases. The key issue is that, important and specific differences in lipid rafts composition have been found in transformed versus benign cells and apoptotic versus non-apoptotic cells. We suggest here that the anticancer activity of Green Tea Catechins against different kind of cancers may find an explanation in direct targeting of lipid rafts by EGCG. PMID:19261982

  1. Detergent-Based Isolation of Yeast Membrane Rafts: An Inquiry-Based Laboratory Series for the Undergraduate Cell Biology or Biochemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willhite, D. Grant; Wright, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts have been implicated in numerous cellular processes including cell signaling, endocytosis, and even viral infection. Isolation of these lipid rafts often involves detergent treatment of the membrane to dissolve nonraft components followed by separation of raft regions in a density gradient. We present here an inquiry-based lab series…

  2. The geological significance of kelp-rafted rock along the west coast of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodborne, M. W.; Rogers, J.; Jarman, N.

    1989-06-01

    Angular to well-rounded pebbles and cobbles have been observed along the southwest coast of South Africa, attached to holdfasts of three species of kelp: Ecklonia maxima, Laminaria pallida, and Laminaria schinzii. A kelp-rafted clast has been dredged from the outer shelf and other clasts have been observed in situ in up to 5 m of water near Cape Town. The clasts have been found on both rocky and sandy shores as well as in a large backshore lagoon on the exposed Atlantic coast of the Cape Peninsula. Isolated clasts in a mid-Holocene lagoon were probably rafted ashore during winter storms in the mid-Holocene.

  3. Gravity-induced encapsulation of liquids by destabilization of granular rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Protière, Suzie; Aristoff, Jeffrey M.; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-05-01

    Droplets and bubbles coated by a protective armour of particles find numerous applications in encapsulation, stabilization of emulsions and foams, and flotation techniques. Here we study the role of a body force, such as in flotation, as a means of continuous encapsulation by particles. We use dense particles, which self-assemble into rafts, at oil-water interfaces. We show that these rafts can be spontaneously or controllably destabilized into armoured oil-in-water droplets, which highlights a possible role for common granular materials in environmental remediation. We further present a method for continuous production and discuss the generalization of our approach towards colloidal scales.

  4. Europa 'Ice Rafts' in local and color context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This image of Jupiter's icy satellite Europa shows surface features such as domes and ridges, as well as a region of disrupted terrain including crustal plates which are thought to have broken apart and 'rafted' into new positions. The image covers an area of Europa's surface about 250 by 200 kilometer (km) and is centered at 10 degrees latitude, 271 degrees longitude. The color information allows the surface to be divided into three distinct spectral units. The bright white areas are ejecta rays from the relatively young crater Pwyll, which is located about 1000 km to the south (bottom) of this image. These patchy deposits appear to be superposed on other areas of the surface, and thus are thought to be the youngest features present. Also visible are reddish areas which correspond to locations where non-ice components are present. This coloring can be seen along the ridges, in the region of disrupted terrain in the center of the image, and near the dome-like features where the surface may have been thermally altered. Thus, areas associated with internal geologic activity appear reddish. The third distinct color unit is bright blue, and corresponds to the relatively old icy plains.

    This product combines data taken by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft during three separate flybys of Europa. Low resolution color data (violet, green, and 1 micron) acquired in September 1996 were combined with medium resolution images from December 1996, to produce synthetic color images. These were then combined with a high resolution mosaic of images acquired in February 1997.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http

  5. Endocytosis of Gene Delivery Vectors: From Clathrin-dependent to Lipid Raft-mediated Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    El-Sayed, Ayman; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2013-01-01

    The ideal nonviral vector delivers its nucleic acid cargo to a specific intracellular target. Vectors enter cells mainly through endocytosis and are distributed to various intracellular organelles. Recent advances in microscopy, lipidomics, and proteomics confirm that the cell membrane is composed of clusters of lipids, organized in the form of lipid raft domains, together with non-raft domains that comprise a generally disordered lipid milieu. The binding of a nonviral vector to either region can determine the pathway for its endocytic uptake and subsequent intracellular itinerary. Given this model of the cell membrane structure, endocytic pathways should be reclassified in relation to lipid rafts. In this review, we attempt to assess the currently recognized endocytic pathways in mammalian cells. The endocytic pathways are classified in relation to the membrane regions that make up the primary endocytic vesicles. This review covers the well-recognized clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME), phagocytosis, and macropinocytosis in addition to the less addressed pathways that take place in lipid rafts. These include caveolae-mediated, flotillin-dependent, GTPase regulator associated with focal adhesion kinase-1 (GRAF1)-dependent, adenosine diphosphate-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6)-dependent, and RhoA-dependent endocytic pathways. We summarize the regulators associated with each uptake pathway and methods for interfering with these regulators are discussed. The fate of endocytic vesicles resulting from each endocytic uptake pathway is highlighted. PMID:23587924

  6. 33 CFR 100.102 - Great Connecticut River Raft Race, Middletown, CT.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Great Connecticut River Raft Race, Middletown, CT. 100.102 Section 100.102 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.102 Great Connecticut...

  7. 33 CFR 100.102 - Great Connecticut River Raft Race, Middletown, CT.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Great Connecticut River Raft Race, Middletown, CT. 100.102 Section 100.102 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.102 Great Connecticut...

  8. Astronauts Borman and Lovell sit in life raft while awaiting pickup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronauts Frank Borman, command pilot, and James A. Lovell Jr., pilot, sit in life raft while awaiting pickup by a helicopter from the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp. The three man Navy frogman team attached the flotation collar to increase the spacecraft's buoyancy prior to recovery.

  9. Squalene synthase, a determinant of Raft-associated cholesterol and modulator of cancer cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Brusselmans, Koen; Timmermans, Leen; Van de Sande, Tine; Van Veldhoven, Paul P; Guan, Guimin; Shechter, Ishaiahu; Claessens, Frank; Verhoeven, Guido; Swinnen, Johannes V

    2007-06-29

    Several cues for cell proliferation, migration, and survival are transmitted through lipid rafts, membrane microdomains enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol. Cells obtain cholesterol from the circulation but can also synthesize cholesterol de novo through the mevalonate/isoprenoid pathway. This pathway, however, has several branches and also produces non-sterol isoprenoids. Squalene synthase (SQS) is the enzyme that determines the switch toward sterol biosynthesis. Here we demonstrate that in prostate cancer cells SQS expression is enhanced by androgens, channeling intermediates of the mevalonate/isoprenoid pathway toward cholesterol synthesis. Interestingly, the resulting increase in de novo synthesis of cholesterol mainly affects the cholesterol content of lipid rafts, while leaving non-raft cholesterol levels unaffected. Conversely, RNA interference-mediated SQS inhibition results in a decrease of raft-associated cholesterol. These data show that SQS activity and de novo cholesterol synthesis are determinants of membrane microdomain-associated cholesterol in cancer cells. Remarkably, SQS knock down also attenuates proliferation and induces death of prostate cancer cells. Similar effects are observed when cancer cells are treated with the chemical SQS inhibitor zaragozic acid A. Importantly, although the anti-tumor effect of statins has previously been attributed to inhibition of protein isoprenylation, the present study shows that specific inhibition of the cholesterol biosynthesis branch of the mevalonate/isoprenoid pathway also induces cancer cell death. These findings significantly underscore the importance of de novo cholesterol synthesis for cancer cell biology and suggest that SQS is a potential novel target for antineoplastic intervention. PMID:17483544

  10. 78 FR 17087 - Special Local Regulation; New River Raft Race, New River; Fort Lauderdale, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; New River Raft Race, New River... establishing a special local regulation on the New River in Fort Lauderdale, Florida during the Rotary Club...

  11. Synthesis of hollow polymeric nanoparticles for protein delivery via inverse miniemulsion periphery RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Utama, Robert H; Guo, Yi; Zetterlund, Per B; Stenzel, Martina H

    2012-11-21

    Hollow polymeric nanoparticles with a hydrophilic liquid core have been synthesized in a one-pot approach via a novel inverse miniemulsion periphery RAFT polymerization process. Successful encapsulation and release of a model protein is reported as a potential application. PMID:23041953

  12. Creep of CMSX-4 superalloy single crystals: Effects of rafting at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.C.; Matan, N.; Cox, D.C.; Rist, M.A.; Rae, C.M.F.

    1999-09-29

    The creep performance of (001)-orientated CMSX-4 superalloy single crystals at temperatures beyond 1000 C is analyzed. Rafting of the {gamma}{prime} structure occurs rapidly, e.g., for the 1150 C/100 MPa tests rafting is completed within the first 10 h. At this stage and for a considerable time thereafter the creep strain rate decreases with increasing strain, implying a creep hardening effect which is absent at lower temperatures when the kinetics of rafting is less rapid. Once a critical strain {epsilon}* of (0.7 {+-} 0.3)% is reached, the creep strain increases dramatically and failure occurs within a few tens of hours. It is demonstrated that methods of interpretation which, assume a proportionality between the creep strain rate and creep strain, are unable to account for creep hardening which occurs as a consequence of rafting. A modification is proposed which accounts for the blocking of the glide/climb of {l{underscore}brace}111{r{underscore}brace}{l{underscore}angle}1{bar 1}0{r{underscore}angle} creep dislocations which occurs as the number of vertical {gamma} channels is reduced and cellular dislocation networks become stabilized. Consequently, failure must be taken to be associated with creep cavitation, which occurs predominantly around casting porosity. It is emphasized that more work is required to quantify the interaction between the various creep damage mechanisms.

  13. Synthesis of hetero-polymer functionalized nanocarriers by combining surface-initiated ATRP and RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Hauptmann, Nicole; Appelhans, Dietmar; Formanek, Petr; Frank, Simon; Kaskel, Stefan; Temme, Achim; Voit, Brigitte

    2012-12-01

    Smart nanocarriers are created based on a bi-functional hetero-initiator for RAFT and ATRP technique, bi-functionalizing mesoporous silica nanoparticles with two polymer types. The pH-dependent behavior of PDEAEMA as the gatekeeper polymer is verified by electrokinetic measurements and a controlled release behavior is demonstrated using doxorubicin as the drug. PMID:22911545

  14. Human corneal stromal stem cells support limbal epithelial cells cultured on RAFT tissue equivalents

    PubMed Central

    Kureshi, Alvena K; Dziasko, Marc; Funderburgh, James L; Daniels, Julie T

    2015-01-01

    Human limbal epithelial cells (HLE) and corneal stromal stem cells (CSSC) reside in close proximity in vivo in the corneal limbal stem cell niche. However, HLE are typically cultured in vitro without supporting niche cells. Here, we re-create the cell-cell juxtaposition of the native environment in vitro, to provide a tool for investigation of epithelial-stromal cell interactions and to optimize HLE culture conditions for potential therapeutic application. RAFT (Real Architecture For 3D Tissue) tissue equivalents (TEs) were used as a 3-dimensional substrate for co-culturing HLE and CSSC. Our results demonstrate that a monolayer of HLE that maintained expression of p63α, ABCB5, CK8 and CK15 (HLE markers), formed on the surface of RAFT TEs within 13 days of culture. CSSC remained in close proximity to HLE and maintained expression of mesenchymal stem cell markers. This simple technique has a short preparation time of only 15 days with the onset of HLE layering and differentiation observed. Furthermore, co-cultivation of HLE with another niche cell type (CSSC) directly on RAFT TEs, eliminates the requirement for animal-derived feeder cells. RAFT TEs may be useful for future therapeutic delivery of multiple cell types to restore the limbal niche following ocular surface injury or disease. PMID:26531048

  15. Recombinant VSV G proteins reveal a novel raft-dependent endocytic pathway in resorbing osteoclasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mulari, Mika T.K. Nars, Martin; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Kaisto, Tuula; Metsikkoe, Kalervo; Sun Yi; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo

    2008-05-01

    Transcytotic membrane flow delivers degraded bone fragments from the ruffled border to the functional secretory domain, FSD, in bone resorbing osteoclasts. Here we show that there is also a FSD-to-ruffled border trafficking pathway that compensates for the membrane loss during the matrix uptake process and that rafts are essential for this ruffled border-targeted endosomal pathway. Replacing the cytoplasmic tail of the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein with that of CD4 resulted in partial insolubility in Triton X-100 and retargeting from the peripheral non-bone facing plasma membrane to the FSD. Recombinant G proteins were subsequently endosytosed and delivered from the FSD to the peripheral fusion zone of the ruffled border, which were both rich in lipid rafts as suggested by viral protein transport analysis and visualizing the rafts with fluorescent recombinant cholera toxin. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin impaired the ruffled border-targeted vesicle trafficking pathway and inhibited bone resorption dose-dependently as quantified by measuring the CTX and TRACP 5b secreted to the culture medium and by measuring the resorbed area visualized with a bi-phasic labeling method using sulpho-NHS-biotin and WGA-lectin. Thus, rafts are vital for membrane recycling from the FSD to the late endosomal/lysosomal ruffled border and bone resorption.

  16. Astronauts McMonagle and Brown float in one-man life rafts during training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In separate life rafts, astronauts Donald R. McMonagle (right), STS-66 mission commander, and Curtis L. Brown, STS-66 pilot, are assisted by several SCUBA-equipped divers during an emergency bailout training exercise in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF).

  17. Passages: Rafting the Green River as an Analogy to the Mid-Life Transition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isenhart, Myra W.

    To help adults develop an awareness of midlife issues, to encourage personal acceptance of the transition, and to introduce appropriate coping skills, a speech communication course was designed that relied on river trip activities to develop insights about this passage. The vehicle for the seminar was a four-day raft trip down the Green River,…

  18. Ethanol alters cellular activation and CD14 partitioning in lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Dai Qun; Zhang Jun; Pruett, Stephen B. . E-mail: spruet@lsuhsc.edu

    2005-06-24

    Alcohol consumption interferes with innate immunity. In vivo EtOH administration suppresses cytokine responses induced through Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and inhibits TLR4 signaling. Actually, EtOH exhibits a generalized suppressive effect on signaling and cytokine responses induced by through most TLRs. However, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. RAW264.7 cells were treated with LPS or co-treated with EtOH or with lipid raft-disrupting drugs. TNF-{alpha} production, IRAK-1 activation, and CD14 partition were evaluated. EtOH or nystatin, a lipid raft-disrupting drug, suppressed LPS-induced production of TNF-{alpha}. The suppressive effect of EtOH on LPS-induced TNF-{alpha} production was additive with that of methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin (MCD), another lipid raft-disrupting drug. EtOH interfered with IRAK-1 activation, an early TLR4 intracellular signaling event. Cell fractionation analyses show that acute EtOH altered LPS-related partition of CD14, a critical component of the LPS receptor complex. These results suggest a novel mechanism of EtOH action that involves interference with lipid raft clustering induced by LPS. This membrane action of EtOH might be one of the mechanisms by which EtOH acts as a generalized suppressor for TLR signaling.

  19. Quantitative Profiling of Brain Lipid Raft Proteome in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Castillo, Catherine; Francesconi, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome, a leading cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism, arises from transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene encoding an RNA-binding protein, Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). FMRP can regulate the expression of approximately 4% of brain transcripts through its role in regulation of mRNA transport, stability and translation, thus providing a molecular rationale for its potential pleiotropic effects on neuronal and brain circuitry function. Several intracellular signaling pathways are dysregulated in the absence of FMRP suggesting that cellular deficits may be broad and could result in homeostatic changes. Lipid rafts are specialized regions of the plasma membrane, enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids, involved in regulation of intracellular signaling. Among transcripts targeted by FMRP, a subset encodes proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis and homeostasis, dysregulation of which could affect the integrity and function of lipid rafts. Using a quantitative mass spectrometry-based approach we analyzed the lipid raft proteome of Fmr1 knockout mice, an animal model of Fragile X syndrome, and identified candidate proteins that are differentially represented in Fmr1 knockout mice lipid rafts. Furthermore, network analysis of these candidate proteins reveals connectivity between them and predicts functional connectivity with genes encoding components of myelin sheath, axonal processes and growth cones. Our findings provide insight to aid identification of molecular and cellular dysfunctions arising from Fmr1 silencing and for uncovering shared pathologies between Fragile X syndrome and other autism spectrum disorders. PMID:25849048

  20. 7-Ketocholesterol Incorporation into Sphingolipid/Cholesterol-enriched (Lipid Raft) Domains Is Impaired by Vitamin E

    PubMed Central

    Royer, Marie-Charlotte; Lemaire-Ewing, Stéphanie; Desrumaux, Catherine; Monier, Serge; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Athias, Anne; Néel, Dominique; Lagrost, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    Cholesterol oxides, in particular 7-ketocholesterol, are proatherogenic compounds that induce cell death in the vascular wall when localized in lipid raft domains of the cell membrane. Deleterious effects of 7-ketocholesterol can be prevented by vitamin E, but the molecular mechanism involved is unclear. In this study, unlike γ-tocopherol, the α-tocopherol vitamin E form was found to prevent 7-ketocholesterol-mediated apoptosis of A7R5 smooth muscle cells. To be operative, α-tocopherol needed to be added to the cells before 7-ketocholesterol, and its anti-apoptotic effect was reduced and even suppressed when added together or after 7-ketocholesterol, respectively. Both pre- and co-treatment of the cells with α-tocopherol resulted in the redistribution of 7-ketocholesterol out of the sphingolipid/cholesterol-enriched (lipid raft) domains. In turn, fewer amounts of α-tocopherol associated with lipid rafts on 7-ketocholesterol-pretreated cells compared with untreated cells, with no prevention of cell death in this case. In further support of the implication of lipid raft domains, the dephosphorylation/inactivation of Akt-PKB was involved in the 7-ketocholesterol-induced apoptosis. Akt-PKB dephosphorylation was prevented by α-tocopherol, but not γ-tocopherol pretreatment. PMID:19351882

  1. Astronaut Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, works with his life raft during emergency bailout training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 TRAINING VIEW --- Astronaut Curtis L. Brown, Jr., pilot, works with his life raft during emergency bailout training for crew members in the Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). Brown will join five other astronauts for nine days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour next month.

  2. Bubble-raft collapse and the nonequilibrium dynamics of two-state elastica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Chin-Chang; Kachan, Devin; Levine, Alex J.; Dennin, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We report on the collapse of bubble rafts under compression in a closed rectangular geometry. A bubble raft is a single layer of bubbles at the air-water interface. A collapse event occurs when bubbles submerge beneath the neighboring bubbles under compression, causing the structure of the bubble raft to go from single-layer to multilayer. We studied the collapse dynamics as a function of compression velocity. At higher compression velocity we observe a more uniform distribution of collapse events, whereas at lower compression velocities the collapse events accumulate at the system boundaries. We propose that this system can be understood in terms of a linear elastic sheet coupled to a local internal (Ising) degree of freedom. The two internal states, which represent one bubble layer versus two, couple to the elasticity of the sheet by locally changing the reference state of the material. By exploring the collapse dynamics of the bubble raft, one may address the basic nonlinear mechanics of a number of complex systems in which elastic stress is coupled to local internal variables.

  3. Ethanol Enhances TGF-β Activity by Recruiting TGF-β Receptors From Intracellular Vesicles/Lipid Rafts/Caveolae to Non-Lipid Raft Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Franklin W; Johnson, Frank E; Huang, Jung San

    2016-04-01

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of ethanol has important health benefits on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Overindulgence can cause many diseases, particularly alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The mechanisms by which ethanol causes both beneficial and harmful effects on human health are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ethanol enhances TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity with a maximum of 0.5-1% (v/v) in Mv1Lu cells stably expressing a luciferase reporter gene containing Smad2-dependent elements. In Mv1Lu cells, 0.5% ethanol increases the level of P-Smad2, a canonical TGF-β signaling sensor, by ∼2-3-fold. Ethanol (0.5%) increases cell-surface expression of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβR-II) by ∼2-3-fold from its intracellular pool, as determined by I(125) -TGF-β-cross-linking/Western blot analysis. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and indirect immunofluorescence staining analyses reveal that ethanol (0.5% and 1%) also displaces cell-surface TβR-I and TβR-II from lipid rafts/caveolae and facilitates translocation of these receptors to non-lipid raft microdomains where canonical signaling occurs. These results suggest that ethanol enhances canonical TGF-β signaling by increasing non-lipid raft microdomain localization of the TGF-β receptors. Since TGF-β plays a protective role in ASCVD but can also cause ALD, the TGF-β enhancer activity of ethanol at low and high doses appears to be responsible for both beneficial and harmful effects. Ethanol also disrupts the location of lipid raft/caveolae of other membrane proteins (e.g., neurotransmitter, growth factor/cytokine, and G protein-coupled receptors) which utilize lipid rafts/caveolae as signaling platforms. Displacement of these membrane proteins induced by ethanol may result in a variety of pathologies in nerve, heart and other tissues. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 860-871, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26419316

  4. Rheological investigation of the shear strength, durability, and recovery of alginate rafts formed by antacid medication in varying pH environments.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Brooke M; Steckbeck, Kathleen E; Murray, Lisa R; Erk, Kendra A

    2013-11-30

    The mechanical response of alginate rafts formed by mixing liquid alginate antacid medication (Gaviscon Extra Strength Liquid Antacid) with acidic solutions was investigated by deforming isolated rafts in a shear rheometer. As rafts were deformed to varying magnitudes of applied strain, rheological parameters were identified and related to the overall strength, durability, and recoverability of rafts formed at different pH (1.1-1.7) and aging conditions (0.5-4 h). Rafts formed in the lowest acidity solutions (pH 1.4, 1.7) were elastically weak ( G'₀ = 60 , 42 Pa for un-aged raft) yet maintained their elasticity during applied shear deformation to large values of strain (γc∼90%, 50%, where G'≈G″), and displayed a low-to-moderate level of elastic recovery following large-strain deformation. Rafts formed in the highest acidity solution had the greatest strength ( G'₀ = 500 Pa for un-aged raft and 21.5 kPa for rafts after 0.5 h of aging), reduced durability (γc∼2.5%, independent of aging), and displayed the greatest recoverability. A trade-off existed between un-aged raft strength and durability while recovery was dependent on durability, solution pH, and age. Rheometry-based evaluations of alginate rafts could be used for the informed design of future gastric retention and antacid products. PMID:24095816

  5. Cholesterol accumulation in Niemann Pick type C (NPC) model cells causes a shift in APP localization to lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Kosicek, Marko; Malnar, Martina; Goate, Alison; Hecimovic, Silva

    2010-03-12

    It has been suggested that cholesterol may modulate amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) formation, a causative factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), by regulating distribution of the three key proteins in the pathogenesis of AD ({beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP), {beta}-secretase (BACE1) and/or presenilin 1 (PS1)) within lipid rafts. In this work we tested whether cholesterol accumulation upon NPC1 dysfunction, which causes Niemann Pick type C disease (NPC), causes increased partitioning of APP into lipid rafts leading to increased CTF/A{beta} formation in these cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. To test this we used CHO NPC1{sup -/-} cells (NPC cells) and parental CHOwt cells. By sucrose density gradient centrifugation we observed a shift in fl-APP/CTF compartmentalization into lipid raft fractions upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC vs. wt cells. Furthermore, {gamma}-secretase inhibitor treatment significantly increased fl-APP/CTF distribution in raft fractions in NPC vs. wt cells, suggesting that upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC1-null cells increased formation of APP-CTF and its increased processing towards A{beta} occurs in lipid rafts. Our results support that cholesterol overload, such as in NPC disease, leads to increased partitioning of APP/CTF into lipid rafts resulting in increased amyloidogenic processing of APP in these cholesterol-rich membranes. This work adds to the mechanism of the cholesterol-effect on APP processing and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and supports the role of lipid rafts in these processes.

  6. Epstein-Barr virus LMP1 modulates lipid raft microdomains and the vimentin cytoskeleton for signal transduction and transformation.

    PubMed

    Meckes, David G; Menaker, Nathan F; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2013-02-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an important human pathogen that is associated with multiple cancers. The major oncoprotein of the virus, latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1), is essential for EBV B-cell immortalization and is sufficient to transform rodent fibroblasts. This viral transmembrane protein activates multiple cellular signaling pathways by engaging critical effector molecules and thus acts as a ligand-independent growth factor receptor. LMP1 is thought to signal from internal lipid raft containing membranes; however, the mechanisms through which these events occur remain largely unknown. Lipid rafts are microdomains within membranes that are rich in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts act as organization centers for biological processes, including signal transduction, protein trafficking, and pathogen entry and egress. In this study, the recruitment of key signaling components to lipid raft microdomains by LMP1 was analyzed. LMP1 increased the localization of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and its activated downstream target, Akt, to lipid rafts. In addition, mass spectrometry analyses identified elevated vimentin in rafts isolated from LMP1 expressing NPC cells. Disruption of lipid rafts through cholesterol depletion inhibited PI3K localization to membranes and decreased both Akt and ERK activation. Reduction of vimentin levels or disruption of its organization also decreased LMP1-mediated Akt and ERK activation and inhibited transformation of rodent fibroblasts. These findings indicate that LMP1 reorganizes membrane and cytoskeleton microdomains to modulate signal transduction. PMID:23152522

  7. Reducible poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate): synthesis, cytotoxicity, and gene delivery activity.

    PubMed

    You, Ye-Zi; Manickam, Devika Soundara; Zhou, Qing-Hui; Oupický, David

    2007-10-01

    Reducible polycations represent promising carriers of therapeutic nucleic acids. Oligomers of 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) containing terminal thiol groups were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using difunctional chain transfer agent. Reducible poly(DMAEMA) (rPDMAEMA) was synthesized by oxidation of the terminal thiol groups, forming a polymer with disulfide bonds in the backbone. Physico-chemical properties of DNA polyplexes of rPDMAEMA were evaluated by dynamic and static light scattering methods, revealing lower structural density and DNA content than control PDMAEMA polyplexes. Cytotoxicity and transfection activity of rPDMAEMA-based DNA polyplexes were evaluated in vitro. In comparison with control PDMAEMA, only minimum toxic effects of rPDMAEMA were observed in a panel of cell lines. Transfection activity was tested in B16F10 mouse melanoma and six human pancreatic cancer cell lines. rPDMAEMA polyplexes showed a comparable or better activity than control PDMAEMA polyplexes. PMID:17574292

  8. Reducible poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate): Synthesis, cytotoxicity, and gene delivery activity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing-Hui; Oupický, David

    2007-01-01

    Reducible polycations represent promising carriers of therapeutic nucleic acids. Oligomers of 2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) containing terminal thiol groups were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using difunctional chain transfer agent. Reducible poly(DMAEMA) (rPDMAEMA) was synthesized by oxidation of the terminal thiol groups, forming a polymer with disulfide bonds in the backbone. Physico-chemical properties of DNA polyplexes of rPDMAEMA were evaluated by dynamic and light scattering methods, revealing lower structural density and DNA content than control PDMAEMA polyplexes. Cytotoxicity and transfection activity of rPDMAEMA-based DNA polyplexes were evaluated in vitro. In comparison with control PDMAEMA, only minimum toxic effects of rPDMAEMA were observed in a panel of cell lines. Transfection activity was tested in B16F10 mouse melanoma and six human pancreatic cancer cell lines. rPDMAEMA polyplexes showed a comparable or better activity than control PDMAEMA polyplexes. PMID:17574292

  9. Thermoresponse improvement of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) hydrogels via formation of poly(sodium p-styrenesulfonate) nanophases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingang; Cong, Houluo; Li, Lei; Zheng, Sixun

    2014-08-27

    The block copolymer networks composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) and poly(sodium p-styrenesulfonate) were synthesized via sequential reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization with α,ω-didithiobenzoate-terminated poly(sodium p-styrenesulfonate) (PSSNa) as the macromolecular chain transfer agent. It was found that the block copolymer networks were microphase-separated as evidenced by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). In the block copolymer networks, spherical or cylindrical PSSNa microdomains were finely dispersed into continuous PNIPAM matrixes. In comparison with unmodified PNIPAM hydrogel, the nanostructured hydrogels displayed improved thermoresponsive properties. In addition, the swelling ratios of the PSSNa-modified PNIPAM hydrogels were significantly higher than that of plain PNIPAM hydrogel. The improvement of thermoresponse was attributable to the formation of the PSSNa nanophases, which promoted the transportation of water molecules in the cross-linked networks. PMID:25036696

  10. Initial steps of Shigella infection depend on the cholesterol/sphingolipid raft-mediated CD44-IpaB interaction.

    PubMed

    Lafont, Frank; Tran Van Nhieu, Guy; Hanada, Kentaro; Sansonetti, Philippe; van der Goot, F Gisou

    2002-09-01

    Shigellosis is an acute inflammatory bowel disease caused by the enteroinvasive bacterium SHIGELLA: Upon host cell-Shigella interaction, major host cell signalling responses are activated. Deciphering the initial molecular events is crucial to understanding the infectious process. We identified a molecular complex involving proteins of both the host, CD44 the hyaluronan receptor, and Shigella, the invasin IpaB, which partitions during infection within specialized membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, called rafts. We also document accumulation of cholesterol and raft-associated proteins at Shigella entry foci. Moreover, we report that Shigella entry is impaired after cholesterol depletion using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. Finally, we find that Shigella is less invasive in sphingosid-based lipid-deficient cell lines, demonstrating the involvement of sphingolipids. Our results show that rafts are implicated in Shigella binding and entry, suggesting that raft-associated molecular machineries are engaged in mediating the cell signalling response required for the invasion process. PMID:12198147

  11. Lipid rafts participate in aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Chun; Liu, Yufeng; Li, Peng; Yang, Huiying; Dai, Jingxing; Qu, Rongmei; Yuan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide is the main component of amyloid plaques, which are found in Alzheimer's disease. The generation and deposition of amyloid-beta is one of the crucial factors for the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Lipid rafts are glycolipid-rich liquid domains of the plasma membrane, where certain types of protein tend to aggregate and intercalate. Lipid rafts are involved in the generation of amyloid-beta oligomers and the formation of amyloid-beta peptides. In this paper, we review the mechanism by which lipid rafts disturb the aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta, which plays an important role in the pathological process of Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, we describe this mechanism from the view of the Two-system Theory of fasciology and thus, suggest that lipid rafts may be a new target of Alzheimer's disease treatment. PMID:25206748

  12. Euphol from Euphorbia tirucalli Negatively Modulates TGF-β Responsiveness via TGF-β Receptor Segregation inside Membrane Rafts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Lin; Chen, Ying-Pin; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Chang, Fang-Rong; Duh, Tsai-Hui; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Wu, Wei-Chiang; Kao, Yu-Chen; Yang, Pei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) responsiveness in cultured cells can be modulated by TGF-β partitioning between lipid raft/caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathways. Lipid rafts are plasma membrane microdomains with an important role in cell survival signaling, and cholesterol is necessary for the lipid rafts' structure and function. Euphol is a euphane-type triterpene alcohol that is structurally similar to cholesterol and has a wide range of pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In the present study, euphol suppressed TGF-β signaling by inducing TGF-β receptor movement into lipid-raft microdomains and degrading TGF-β receptors. PMID:26448474

  13. Raft-mediated Src homology 2 domain-containing proteintyrosine phosphatase 2 (SHP-2) regulation in microglia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Young; Park, Soo Jung; Joe, Eun-hye; Jou, Ilo

    2006-04-28

    Janus kinase-signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signals play important roles in cell proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation, and they recently have been considered as therapeutic targets for suppressing oncogenesis and inflammatory process. Phosphatases including Src homology 2 domain-containing protein-tyrosine phosphatases (SHPs), are well known as negative regulators of the JAK-STAT pathway, but their precise mechanisms are largely unknown. Based on our previous finding that in cultured rat brain microglia, gangliosides induce rapid and transient activation of the JAK-STAT pathway, we hypothesized that raft-mediated SHP-2 activation is involved in transient activation of JAK-STAT signaling by gangliosides. We first used Western blot analysis to confirm that gangliosides rapidly induce the phosphorylation of SHP-2. This was inhibited by pretreatment with the lipid raft disrupter filipin and was restored following filipin removal. Immunostaining using antibodies directed against p-SHP-2 and flotillin-1 revealed ganglioside-induced clustering and polarization of p-SHP-2 in membrane rafts. Raft-associated regulation of SHP-2 was further demonstrated in fractionation experiments using detergent and detergent-free sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. Rapid SHP-2 recruitment to detergent-insoluble raft fractions by gangliosides was inhibited by filipin, further indicating the involvement of rafts. We also confirmed by immunoprecipitation that SHP-2 rapidly binds in a raft-dependent manner to JAK2 in response to gangliosides. Our study therefore showed that transient activation of the JAK-STAT pathway by gangliosides is accomplished by SHP-2 in a raft-dependent manner in brain microglia. PMID:16507579

  14. Interleukin-1-induced gene expression requires the membrane-raft-dependent internalization of the interleukin-1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Windheim, Mark

    2016-10-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) binding to its receptor triggers signaling events at the plasma membrane that are essential but not sufficient for the induction of the IL-1-dependent gene expression. In addition, the ligand-induced endocytosis of the IL-1 receptor and signaling events that are initiated after the internalization of the IL-1 receptor presumably involving signaling endosomes are critical for the IL-1-induced gene expression. In this study, we investigate the role of membrane domains, commonly denoted as lipid rafts, in the IL-1-induced signal transduction. We demonstrate that the internalization of the IL-1 receptor depends on the integrity of lipid rafts and that the disruption of lipid rafts strongly reduces the IL-1-induced gene expression. Interestingly, the IL-1-dependent signaling events activated at the plasma membrane are not influenced by the disruption of lipid rafts suggesting that IL-1 signaling is initiated in a non-raft domain of the plasma membrane. Subsequently, the IL-1 receptor is translocated to lipid rafts where receptor endocytosis occurs to enable the internalization-dependent IL-1 signaling to activate the IL-1-induced gene expression. PMID:27327966

  15. HIV-1 Vpu's lipid raft association is dispensable for counteraction of the particle release restriction imposed by CD317/Tetherin

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Joeelle V. Tibroni, Nadine Keppler, Oliver T. Fackler, Oliver T.

    2012-03-01

    HIV-1 Vpu antagonizes the block to particle release mediated by CD317 (BST-2/HM1.24/Tetherin) via incompletely understood mechanisms. Vpu and CD317 partially reside in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts where HIV-1 budding preferentially occurs. Here we find that lipid raft association of ectopically expressed or endogenous CD317 was unaltered upon co-expression with Vpu or following HIV-1 infection. Similarly, Vpu's lipid raft association remained unchanged upon expression of CD317. We identify amino acids V25 and Y29 of Vpu as crucial for microdomain partitioning and single substitution of these amino acids resulted in Vpu variants with markedly reduced or undetectable lipid raft association. These mutations did not affect Vpu's subcellular distribution and binding capacity to CD317, nor its ability to downmodulate cell surface CD317 and promote HIV-1 release from CD317-positive cells. We conclude that (i) lipid raft incorporation is dispensable for Vpu-mediated CD317 antagonism and (ii) Vpu does not antagonize CD317 by extraction from lipid rafts.

  16. Alterations in cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Ke; Tan, Liang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Cao, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the protein, cholesterol, and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and identify potential blood biomarkers of the disease. A total of 31 Chinese patients with AD and 31 aged-matched control subjects were selected. Lipid rafts were isolated from platelets using Optiprep gradient centrifugation. The protein content of lipid rafts was evaluated using Micro BCA assay, the cholesterol content using molecular probes, ganglioside GM1 content using colorimetry and dot-blotting analysis. The results showed that the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from platelets was significantly higher in patients with AD than aged-matched control subjects, whereas the protein content of lipid rafts did not show any differences between the 2 groups. These results indicate that the increases in the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from the platelets of patients with AD might serve as a biochemical adjunct to the clinical diagnosis of AD. PMID:24759545

  17. Evidence for multiphase water-escape during rafting of shelly marine sediments at Clava, Inverness-shire, NE Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Emrys; Merritt, Jon

    2008-05-01

    The Pleistocene shelly glaciomarine sediments exposed at Clava, near Inverness, northeast Scotland, occur in a series of thrust-bound rafts accreted at on the up-ice side of a bedrock high (150 m above OD) on the SE side of the valley of the River Nairn. These sediments originally formed part of a coarsening upwards deltaic or subaqueous fan sequence deposited in the marine fjord of the Loch Ness basin, located some 50 km to the SW. The geometry of these allochthonous rafts, coupled with the associated thrusting and large-scale folding of these bodies, are typical of many glacially transported rafts described in literature. However, at Clava, macro- and microscopic evidence indicates that these ice-rafted sediments were not frozen, with liquefaction, hydrofracturing and water-escape occurring repeatedly during their transport and accretion. The presence of large-scale detachments within the sequence has led to the development of a purely glacitectonic model for rafting at Clava. The detachments acted as a focus for fluid flow which lubricated these décollement surfaces, aiding in the subglacial transport of the rafts.

  18. Complex and Multidimensional Lipid Raft Alterations in a Murine Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Wayne; Brenneman, Randall; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Various animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been created to assist our appreciation of AD pathophysiology, as well as aid development of novel therapeutic strategies. Despite the discovery of mutated proteins that predict the development of AD, there are likely to be many other proteins also involved in this disorder. Complex physiological processes are mediated by coherent interactions of clusters of functionally related proteins. Synaptic dysfunction is one of the hallmarks of AD. Synaptic proteins are organized into multiprotein complexes in high-density membrane structures, known as lipid rafts. These microdomains enable coherent clustering of synergistic signaling proteins. We have used mass analytical techniques and multiple bioinformatic approaches to better appreciate the intricate interactions of these multifunctional proteins in the 3xTgAD murine model of AD. Our results show that there are significant alterations in numerous receptor/cell signaling proteins in cortical lipid rafts isolated from 3xTgAD mice. PMID:21151659

  19. Remorin, a solanaceae protein resident in membrane rafts and plasmodesmata, impairs potato virus X movement.

    PubMed

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Bayer, Emmanuelle; Lafarge, David; Cluzet, Stéphanie; German Retana, Sylvie; Boubekeur, Tamy; Leborgne-Castel, Nathalie; Carde, Jean-Pierre; Lherminier, Jeannine; Noirot, Elodie; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Laroche-Traineau, Jeanny; Moreau, Patrick; Ott, Thomas; Maule, Andrew J; Reymond, Philippe; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Farmer, Edward E; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2009-05-01

    Remorins (REMs) are proteins of unknown function specific to vascular plants. We have used imaging and biochemical approaches and in situ labeling to demonstrate that REM clusters at plasmodesmata and in approximately 70-nm membrane domains, similar to lipid rafts, in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane. From a manipulation of REM levels in transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants, we show that Potato virus X (PVX) movement is inversely related to REM accumulation. We show that REM can interact physically with the movement protein TRIPLE GENE BLOCK PROTEIN1 from PVX. Based on the localization of REM and its impact on virus macromolecular trafficking, we discuss the potential for lipid rafts to act as functional components in plasmodesmata and the plasma membrane. PMID:19470590

  20. Xenon and Other Volatile Anesthetics Change Domain Structure in Model Lipid Raft Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Weinrich, Michael; Worcester, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Inhalation anesthetics have been in clinical use for over 160 years, but the molecular mechanisms of action continue to be investigated. Direct interactions with ion channels received much attention after it was found that anesthetics do not change the structure of homogeneous model membranes. However, it was recently found that halothane, a prototypical anesthetic, changes domain structure of a binary lipid membrane. The noble gas xenon is an excellent anesthetic and provides a pivotal test of the generality of this finding, extended to ternary lipid raft mixtures. We report that xenon and conventional anesthetics change the domain equilibrium in two canonical ternary lipid raft mixtures. These findings demonstrate a membrane-mediated mechanism whereby inhalation anesthetics can affect the lipid environment of trans-membrane proteins. PMID:24299622

  1. Stability and chaotification of vibration isolation floating raft systems with time-delayed feedback control.

    PubMed

    Li, Y L; Xu, D L; Fu, Y M; Zhou, J X

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a systematic study on the stability of a two-dimensional vibration isolation floating raft system with a time-delayed feedback control. Based on the generalized Sturm criterion, the critical control gain for the delay-independent stability region and critical time delays for the stability switches are derived. The critical conditions can provide a theoretical guidance of chaotification design for line spectra reduction. Numerical simulations verify the correctness of the approach. Bifurcation analyses reveal that chaotification is more likely to occur in unstable region defined by these critical conditions, and the stiffness of the floating raft and mass ratio are the sensitive parameters to reduce critical control gain. PMID:21974650

  2. Coupling phase field and viscoplasticity to study rafting in Ni-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubert, A.; Le Bouar, Y.; Finel, A.

    2010-01-01

    An elasto-viscoplastic model is developed to study the microstructural evolution during creep loading in a model AM1 superalloy. Elastic anisotropy and inhomogeneity, as well as the description of long-range order in the γ ‧ phase, are included in the model. Plastic activity is introduced using a continuum crystal plasticity framework at the mesoscale. Special attention is paid to the corresponding parameter identification from experiments. Two-dimensional simulations of creep in the [100] direction are performed, and the results are compared to the predictions of an elastic phase field model, in order to characterize the influence of plastic activity on the microstructural evolution. In particular, our simulations show that plastic activity in the γ channels significantly increases the rafting kinetics and allows misalignments of rafts with respect to cubic directions. The simulation results are critically discussed and improvements to the model are proposed.

  3. Effects of irrigation on crops and soils with Raft River geothermal water

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, N.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    The Raft River Irrigation Experiment investigated the suitability of using energy-expended geothermal water for irrigation of selected field-grown crops. Crop and soil behavior on plots sprinkled or surface irrigated with geothermal water was compared to crop and soil behavior on plots receiving water from shallow irrigation wells and the Raft River. In addition, selected crops were produced, using both geothermal irrigation water and special management techniques. Crops irrigated with geothermal water exhibited growth rates, yields, and nutritional values similar to comparison crops. Cereal grains and surface-irrigated forage crops did not exhibit elevated fluoride levels or accumulations of heavy metals. However, forage crops sprinkled with geothermal water did accumulate fluorides, and leaching experiments indicate that new soils receiving geothermal water may experience increased salinity, exchangeable sodium, and decreased permeability. Soil productivity may be maintained by leaching irrigations.

  4. Disruption of Lipid Rafts Interferes with the Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Karla Dias; Cruz, Thayana Araújo; Veras de Moraes, Gabriela; Paredes-Santos, Tatiana Christina; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii can penetrate any warm-blooded animal cell. Conserved molecular assemblies of host cell plasma membranes should be involved in the parasite-host cell recognition. Lipid rafts are well-conserved membrane microdomains that contain high concentrations of cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycosylphosphatidylinositol, GPI-anchored proteins, and dually acylated proteins such as members of the Src family of tyrosine kinases. Disturbing lipid rafts of mouse peritoneal macrophages and epithelial cells of the lineage LLC-MK2 with methyl-beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) and filipin, which interfere with cholesterol or lidocaine, significantly inhibited internalization of T. gondii in both cell types, although adhesion remained unaffected in macrophages and decreased only in LLC-MK2 cells. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed these observations. Results are discussed in terms of the original role of macrophages as professional phagocytes versus the LLC-MK2 cell lineage originated from kidney epithelial cells. PMID:24734239

  5. Ice rafting of fine-grained sediment, a sorting and transport mechanism, Beaufort Sea, Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnes, P.W.; Reimnitz, E.; Fox, D.

    1982-01-01

    The presence of turbid, sediment-rich fast ice in the Arctic is a major factor affecting transport of fine-grained sediment. Observers have documented the widespread, sporadic occurrence of sediment- rich fast ice in both the Beaufort and Bering Seas. The occurrence of sediment in only the upper part of the seasonal fast ice indicates that sediment-rich ice forms early during ice growth. The most likely mechanism requires resuspension of nearshore bottom sediment during storms, accompanied by formation of frazil ice and subsequent lateral advection before the fast ice is stabilized. We estimate that the sediment incorporated in the Beaufort ice canopy formed a significant proportion of the seasonal influx of terrigenous fine-grained sediment. The dominance of fine-grained sediment suggests that in the Arctic and sub-Arctic these size fractions may be ice rafted in greater volumes than the coarse fraction of traditionally recognized ice-rafted sediment. -from Authors

  6. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (CO) polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, III, Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2006-10-25

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surface modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a collidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as fuctionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  7. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (co)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, III, Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2011-12-27

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  8. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (CO)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, III., Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2006-11-21

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thio-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the stops of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  9. Dynamical Clustering and a Mechanism for Raft-like Structures in a Model Lipid Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Starr, Francis W.; Hartmann, Benedikt; Douglas, Jack F.

    2014-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. This model qualitatively reproduces the known phase transitions between disordered, ordered, and gel membrane phases, and the phase transitions are accompanied by significant changes in the nature of the lipid dynamics. In particular, lipid diffusion in the liquid-ordered phase is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, similar to the dynamics of a liquid approaching its glass transition. This transient molecular caging gives rise to two distinct mobility groups within a single-component membrane: lipids that are transiently trapped, and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. Most significantly, lipids within these distinct mobility states spatially segregate, creating transient “islands” of enhanced mobility having a size and time scale compatible with lipid “rafts,” dynamical structures thought to be important for cell membrane function. Although the dynamic lipid clusters that we observe do not themselves correspond to rafts (which are more complex, multicomponent structures), we hypothesize that such rafts may develop from the same universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. Further examination shows that mobile lipid clusters can be dissected into smaller clusters of cooperatively rearranging molecules. The geometry of these clusters can be understood in the context of branched equilibrium polymers, related to the statistics percolation theory. We discuss how these dynamical structures relate to a range observations on the dynamics of lipid membranes. PMID:24695573

  10. Proteomic Characterization of Lipid Raft Proteins in ALS Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Jianjun; Ström, Anna-Lena; Kilty, Renee; Venkatakrishnan, Priya; White, James; Everson, William V.; Smart, Eric J.; Zhu, Haining

    2009-01-01

    Summary Familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been linked to mutations in the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene. The mutant SOD1 protein exhibits a toxic gain-of-function that adversely affects the function of neurons. However, the mechanism of how mutant SOD1 initiates ALS is unclear. Lipid rafts are specialized microdomains of the plasma membrane that act as platforms for the organization and interaction of proteins involved in multiple functions including vesicular trafficking, neurotransmitter signaling and cytoskeletal rearrangements. In this study, we report a proteomic analysis using a widely used ALS mouse model to identify differences in spinal cord lipid raft proteomes between mice over-expressing wild-type (WT) and G93A mutant SOD1. A total of 413 and 421 proteins were identified in the lipid rafts isolated from WT and G93A mice, respectively. Further quantitative analysis revealed a consortium of proteins with altered levels between the WT and G93A samples. Functional classification of the 67 altered proteins revealed that the three most impacted subsets of proteins were involved in vesicular transport, neurotransmitter synthesis and release; cytoskeleton organization and linkage to plasma membrane; and metabolism. Other protein changes are correlated with alterations in microglia activation and inflammation; astrocyte and oligodendrocyte function; cell signaling; cellular stress response and apoptosis; and neuronal ion channels and neurotransmitter receptor functions. Changes of selected proteins were independently validated by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The significance of the lipid raft protein changes in motor neuron function and degeneration in ALS is discussed, particularly those involved in vesicular trafficking and neurotransmitter signaling, and the dynamics and regulation of plasma membrane-anchored cytoskeleton. PMID:19438725

  11. Primary Human Leukocyte Subsets Differentially Express Vaccinia Virus Receptors Enriched in Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, Daniel; Amet, Tohti; Hu, Ningjie; Lan, Jie; Hu, Sishun

    2013-01-01

    Poxviruses, including vaccinia virus (VV) and canarypox virus (ALVAC), do not indiscriminately infect all cell types of the primary human leukocytes (PHLs) that they encounter but instead demonstrate an extremely strong bias toward infection of monocytes and monocyte lineage cells. We studied the specific molecular events that determine the VV tropism for major PHL subsets including monocytes, B cells, neutrophils, NK cells, and T cells. We found that VV exhibited an extremely strong bias of cell surface protein-dependent binding to monocytes, B cells, and activated T cells to a similar degree and to neutrophils to a much lesser extent. Resting T cells and resting NK cells exhibited only trace amounts of VV binding. Activated T cells, however, became permissive to VV binding, infection, and replication, while activated NK cells still resisted VV binding. VV binding strongly colocalized with lipid rafts on the surfaces of all VV binding-susceptible PHL subsets, even when lipid rafts were relocated to cell uropods upon cell polarization. Immunosera raised against detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) from monocytes or activated T cells, but not resting T cells, effectively cross-blocked VV binding to and infection of PHL subsets. CD29 and CD98, two lipid raft-associated membrane proteins that had been found to be important for VV entry into HeLa cells, had no effect on VV binding to and infection of primary activated T cells. Our data indicate that PHL subsets express VV protein receptors enriched in lipid rafts and that receptors are cross-presented on all susceptible PHLs. PMID:23785200

  12. Further evidence that paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria is a disorder of defective cell membrane lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Borkowska, Sylwia; Mierzejewska, Kasia; Kucia, Magda; Mendek-Czajkowska, Ewa; Suszynska, Malwina; Sharma, Vivek A; Deptala, Andrzej; Song, Wechao; Platzbecker, Uwe; Larratt, Loree; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Maciejewski, Jarek; Ratajczak, Janina

    2015-01-01

    The glycolipid glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor (GPI-A) plays an important role in lipid raft formation, which is required for proper expression on the cell surface of two inhibitors of the complement cascade, CD55 and CD59. The absence of these markers from the surface of blood cells, including erythrocytes, makes the cells susceptible to complement lysis, as seen in patients suffering from paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH). However, the explanation for why PNH-affected hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) expand over time in BM is still unclear. Here, we propose an explanation for this phenomenon and provide evidence that a defect in lipid raft formation in HSPCs leads to defective CXCR4- and VLA-4-mediated retention of these cells in BM. In support of this possibility, BM-isolated CD34+ cells from PNH patients show a defect in the incorporation of CXCR4 and VLA-4 into membrane lipid rafts, respond weakly to SDF-1 stimulation, and show defective adhesion to fibronectin. Similar data were obtained with the GPI-A− Jurkat cell line. Moreover, we also report that chimeric mice transplanted with CD55−/− CD59−/− BM cells but with proper GPI-A expression do not expand over time in transplanted hosts. On the basis of these findings, we propose that a defect in lipid raft formation in PNH-mutated HSPCs makes these cells more mobile, so that they expand and out-compete normal HSPCs from their BM niches over time. PMID:26033571

  13. Wind load analysis of tall chimneys with piled raft foundation considering the flexibility of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayalekshmi, B. R.; Jisha, S. V.; Shivashankar, R.

    2015-06-01

    Soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis was carried out for tall reinforced concrete chimneys with piled raft foundation subjected to wind loads. To understand the significance of SSI, four types of soil were considered based on different material properties. Chimneys of different elevations and different ratios of height to base diameter of chimney were selected for the parametric study. The thickness of raft of piled raft foundation was also varied based on different ratios of outer diameter to thickness of raft. The chimneys were assumed to be located in open terrain and subjected to a maximum wind speed of 50 m/s. The along-wind and across-wind loads were computed according to IS: 4998 (Part 1)-1992 and applied along the height of the chimney. The analysis was carried out using three-dimensional finite element technique based on the direct method of SSI. The linear elastic material behaviour was assumed for the integrated chimney-foundation-soil system. The radial and tangential moments, lateral deflection and base moment of chimney were evaluated through SSI analysis and compared with the response obtained from chimney with fixed base. The base moment of chimney considerably reduces due to the effect of SSI. It is found that the variation of different responses in chimney due to the effect of SSI depends significantly on the geometrical properties of chimney and foundations. The response variation at base for a distance of 1/40th of the height of chimney should be considered for a safe design.

  14. The F0F1 ATP Synthase Complex Localizes to Membrane Rafts in Gonadotrope Cells.

    PubMed

    Allen-Worthington, Krystal; Xie, Jianjun; Brown, Jessica L; Edmunson, Alexa M; Dowling, Abigail; Navratil, Amy M; Scavelli, Kurt; Yoon, Hojean; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S; Clarke, Iain; Roberson, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    Fertility in mammals requires appropriate communication within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) is a central conduit for this communication. The GnRHR resides in discrete membrane rafts and raft occupancy is required for signaling by GnRH. The present studies use immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define peptides present within the raft associated with the GnRHR and flotillin-1, a key raft marker. These studies revealed peptides from the F0F1 ATP synthase complex. The catalytic subunits of the F1 domain were validated by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry, and cell surface biotinylation studies demonstrating that this complex was present at the plasma membrane associated with the GnRHR. The F1 catalytic domain faces the extracellular space and catalyzes ATP synthesis when presented with ADP in normal mouse pituitary explants and a gonadotrope cell line. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was blunted by coadministration of inhibitory factor 1, limiting inorganic phosphate in the media, and by chronic stimulation of the GnRHR. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases. Kisspeptin administration induced coincident GnRH and ATP release from the median eminence into the hypophyseal-portal vasculature in ovariectomized sheep. Elevated levels of extracellular ATP augmented GnRH-induced secretion of LH from pituitary cells in primary culture, which was blocked in media containing low inorganic phosphate supporting the importance of extracellular ATP levels to gonadotrope cell function. These studies indicate that gonadotropes have intrinsic ability to metabolize ATP in the extracellular space and extracellular ATP may serve as a modulator of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:27482602

  15. Proteomic characterization of lipid raft proteins in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mouse spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jianjun; Ström, Anna-Lena; Kilty, Renee; Venkatakrishnan, Priya; White, James; Everson, William V; Smart, Eric J; Zhu, Haining

    2009-06-01

    Familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been linked to mutations in the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene. The mutant SOD1 protein exhibits a toxic gain-of-function that adversely affects the function of neurons. However, the mechanism by which mutant SOD1 initiates ALS is unclear. Lipid rafts are specialized microdomains of the plasma membrane that act as platforms for the organization and interaction of proteins involved in multiple functions, including vesicular trafficking, neurotransmitter signaling, and cytoskeletal rearrangements. In this article, we report a proteomic analysis using a widely used ALS mouse model to identify differences in spinal cord lipid raft proteomes between mice overexpressing wild-type (WT) and G93A mutant SOD1. In total, 413 and 421 proteins were identified in the lipid rafts isolated from WT and G93A mice, respectively. Further quantitative analysis revealed a consortium of proteins with altered levels between the WT and G93A samples. Functional classification of the 67 altered proteins revealed that the three most affected subsets of proteins were involved in: vesicular transport, and neurotransmitter synthesis and release; cytoskeletal organization and linkage to the plasma membrane; and metabolism. Other protein changes were correlated with alterations in: microglia activation and inflammation; astrocyte and oligodendrocyte function; cell signaling; cellular stress response and apoptosis; and neuronal ion channels and neurotransmitter receptor functions. Changes of selected proteins were independently validated by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The significance of the lipid raft protein changes in motor neuron function and degeneration in ALS is discussed, particularly for proteins involved in vesicular trafficking and neurotransmitter signaling, and the dynamics and regulation of the plasma membrane-anchored cytoskeleton. PMID:19438725

  16. STS-52 Mission Specialist Veach in life raft during JSC bailout exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-52 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Mission Specialist (MS) Charles Lacy Veach, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), floats in a single person life raft during emergency egress (bailout) training exercises in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. SCUBA-equipped divers look on. The bailout exercises utilize the WETF's 25-foot deep pool as the ocean for this water landing simulation.

  17. Tumor exosomes induce tunneling nanotubes in lipid raft-enriched regions of human mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Babatunde, Victor; Dickson, Elizabeth L.; Wong, Phillip; Oh, Sanghoon; Ke, Xu; Barlas, Afsar; Fujisawa, Sho; Romin, Yevgeniy; Moreira, André L.; Downey, Robert J.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Lou, Emil

    2014-04-15

    Tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) are long, non-adherent, actin-based cellular extensions that act as conduits for transport of cellular cargo between connected cells. The mechanisms of nanotube formation and the effects of the tumor microenvironment and cellular signals on TnT formation are unknown. In the present study, we explored exosomes as potential mediators of TnT formation in mesothelioma and the potential relationship of lipid rafts to TnT formation. Mesothelioma cells co-cultured with exogenous mesothelioma-derived exosomes formed more TnTs than cells cultured without exosomes within 24–48 h; and this effect was most prominent in media conditions (low-serum, hyperglycemic medium) that support TnT formation (1.3–1.9-fold difference). Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed the purity of isolated exosomes and revealed that they localized predominantly at the base of and within TnTs, in addition to the extracellular environment. Time-lapse microscopic imaging demonstrated uptake of tumor exosomes by TnTs, which facilitated intercellular transfer of these exosomes between connected cells. Mesothelioma cells connected via TnTs were also significantly enriched for lipid rafts at nearly a 2-fold higher number compared with cells not connected by TnTs. Our findings provide supportive evidence of exosomes as potential chemotactic stimuli for TnT formation, and also lipid raft formation as a potential biomarker for TnT-forming cells. - Highlights: • Exosomes derived from malignant cells can stimulate an increased rate in the formation of tunneling nanotubes. • Tunneling nanotubes can serve as conduits for intercellular transfer of these exosomes. • Most notably, exosomes derived from benign mesothelial cells had no effect on nanotube formation. • Cells forming nanotubes were enriched in lipid rafts at a greater number compared with cells not forming nanotubes. • Our findings suggest causal and potentially synergistic association of exosomes and

  18. ASCAN Precourt floats on life raft during Elgin AFB water survival training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Charles J. Precourt, wearing helmet and flight suit, floats in pool using an underarm flotation device and a single person life raft at Elgin Air Force Base (AFB) in Pensacola, Florida, during water survival exercises. The training familiarized the candidates with survival techniques necessary in the event of a water landing. ASCANs participated in the exercises from 08-14-90 through 08-17-90.

  19. Expressed Glycosylphosphatidylinositol-Anchored Horseradish Peroxidase Identifies Co-Clustering Molecules in Individual Lipid Raft Domains

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa-Yamaguchi, Arisa; Kotani, Norihiro; Honke, Koichi

    2014-01-01

    Lipid rafts that are enriched in glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins serve as a platform for important biological events. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of these events, identification of co-clustering molecules in individual raft domains is required. Here we describe an approach to this issue using the recently developed method termed enzyme-mediated activation of radical source (EMARS), by which molecules in the vicinity within 300 nm from horseradish peroxidase (HRP) set on the probed molecule are labeled. GPI-anchored HRP fusion proteins (HRP-GPIs), in which the GPI attachment signals derived from human decay accelerating factor and Thy-1 were separately connected to the C-terminus of HRP, were expressed in HeLa S3 cells, and the EMARS reaction was catalyzed by these expressed HRP-GPIs under a living condition. As a result, these different HRP-GPIs had differences in glycosylation and localization and formed distinct clusters. This novel approach distinguished molecular clusters associated with individual GPI-anchored proteins, suggesting that it can identify co-clustering molecules in individual raft domains. PMID:24671047

  20. Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D.L.; Ralston, D.R.; Allman, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    Low to moderate temperature (< 150/sup 0/C) geothermal fluids are being developed in the southern Raft River Valley of Idaho. Five deep geothermal wells ranging in depth from 4911 feet to 6543 feet (1490 to 1980 meters) and two intermediate depth (3858 feet or 1170 meters) injection wells have been drilled within the Raft River KGRA. Several shallower (1423-500 feet or 430-150 meters) wells have also been constructed to monitor the environmental effects of geothermal development of the shallower aquifer systems. Sampling of water from wells within the KGRA has been conducted since the onset of the project in 1974. Five analytical laboratories have conducted analyses on waters from the KGRA. Charge-balance error calculations conducted on the data produced from these laboratories indicated that data from three laboratories were reliable while two were not. A method of equating all data was established by using linear regression analyses on sets of paired data from various laboratories. The chemical data collected from the deep geothermal wells indicates that a two reservoir system exists within the Raft River KGRA. Each reservoir is associated with a major structural feature. These features are known as the Bridge Fault System (BFS) and the Narrows Structure (NS).

  1. Role of rafting in the mechanical redistribution of sea ice thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babko, O.; Rothrock, D. A.; Maykut, G. A.

    2002-08-01

    Ice draft data derived from upward looking sonar observations collected during a Scientific Ice Expeditions (SCICEX) submarine cruise in the Arctic Ocean have been used to test the ice thickness distribution theory of Thorndike et al. [1975]. Two separate ice draft surveys, 40 days apart, were made during the fall of 1996 in a circular Lagrangian region ~180 km across. Air temperature and deformation data from buoys in the region were used to force an ice thickness distribution model in an effort to reproduce the changes observed over the 40 day interval. Initial tests with an elementary ridging treatment were unsuccessful in predicting the observed change in the ice thickness distribution. The shape of the distribution suggested that both ridging and rafting of ice were involved in the redistribution process. Modifying the theory to include rafting along with ridging resulted in much improved agreement between the modeled and observed ice thickness distributions. This result, taken together with many other field observations, leads us to believe that rafting is an important component of the mechanical redistribution of ice thickness during the fall.

  2. CD82 endocytosis and cholesterol-dependent reorganization of tetraspanin webs and lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Congfeng; Zhang, Yanhui H.; Thangavel, Muthusamy; Richardson, Mekel M.; Liu, Li; Zhou, Bin; Zheng, Yi; Ostrom, Rennolds S.; Zhang, Xin A.

    2009-01-01

    Tetraspanin CD82 suppresses cell migration, tumor invasion, and tumor metastasis. To determine the mechanism by which CD82 inhibits motility, most studies have focused on the cell surface CD82, which forms tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs) with other transmembrane proteins, such as integrins. In this study, we found that CD82 undergoes endocytosis and traffics to endosomes and lysosomes. To determine the endocytic mechanism of CD82, we demonstrated that dynamin and clathrin are not essential for CD82 internalization. Depletion or sequestration of sterol in the plasma membrane markedly inhibited the endocytosis of CD82. Despite the demand on Cdc42 activity, CD82 endocytosis is distinct from macropinocytosis and the documented dynamin-independent pinocytosis. As a TEM component, CD82 reorganizes TEMs and lipid rafts by redistributing cholesterol into these membrane microdomains. CD82-containing TEMs are characterized by the cholesterol-containing microdomains in the extreme light- and intermediate-density fractions. Moreover, the endocytosis of CD82 appears to alleviate CD82-mediated inhibition of cell migration. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that lipid-dependent endocytosis drives CD82 trafficking to late endosomes and lysosomes, and CD82 reorganizes TEMs and lipid rafts through redistribution of cholesterol.—Xu, C., Zhang, Y. H., Thangavel, M., Richardson, M. M., Liu, L., Zhou, B., Zheng, Y., Ostrom, R. S., Zhang, X. A. CD82 endocytosis and cholesterol-dependent reorganization of tetraspanin webs and lipid rafts. PMID:19497983

  3. HTLV-1 Tax deregulates autophagy by recruiting autophagic molecules into lipid raft microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tong; Takahashi, Yoshinori; Liu, Xin; Loughran, Thomas P.; Sun, Shao-Cong; Wang, Hong-Gang; Cheng, Hua

    2014-01-01

    The retroviral oncoprotein Tax from Human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological factor that causes adult T cell leukemia and lymphoma, plays a crucial role in initiating T lymphocyte transformation by inducing oncogenic signaling activation. We here report that Tax is a determining factor for dysregulation of autophagy in HTLV-1-transformed T cells and Tax-immortalized CD4 memory T cells. Tax facilitated autophagic process by activating IκB kinase complex, which subsequently recruited an autophagy molecular complex containing Beclin1 and Bif-1 to the lipid raft microdomains. Tax engaged a crosstalk between IκB kinase complex and autophagic molecule complex by directly interacting with both complexes, promoting assembly of LC3+ autophagosomes. Moreover, expression of lipid raft-targeted Bif-1 or Beclin1 was sufficient to induce formation of LC3+ autophagosomes, suggesting that Tax recruitment of autophagic molecules to lipid rafts is a dominant strategy to deregulate autophagy in the context of HTLV-1 transformation of T cells. Furthermore, depletion of autophagy molecules such as Beclin1 and PI3 kinase class III resulted in impaired growth of HTLV-1-transformed T cells, indicating a critical role of Tax-deregulated autophagy in promoting survival and transformation of virally infected T cells. PMID:24362528

  4. Sphingomyelin/Phosphatidylcholine/Cholesterol Phase Diagram: Boundaries and Composition of Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Rodrigo F. M.; Fedorov, Aleksandre; Prieto, Manuel

    2003-01-01

    The ternary system palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM)/palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC)/cholesterol is used to model lipid rafts. The phase behavior of the three binary systems PSM/POPC, PSM/cholesterol, and POPC/cholesterol is first experimentally determined. Phase coexistence boundaries are then determined for ternary mixtures at room temperature (23°C) and the ternary phase diagram at that temperature is obtained. From the diagram at 23°C and the binary phase diagrams, a reasonable expectation is drawn for the ternary phase diagram at 37°C. Several photophysical methodologies are employed that do not involve detergent extraction, in addition to literature data (e.g., differential scanning calorimetry) and thermodynamic rules. For the ternary phase diagrams, some tie-lines are calculated, including the one that contains the PSM/POPC/ cholesterol 1:1:1 mixture, which is often used in model raft studies. The diagrams here described are used to rationalize literature results, some of them apparently discrepant, and to discuss lipid rafts within the framework of liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered phase coexistence. PMID:14507704

  5. Bio-Based Polyketones by Selective Ring-Opening Radical Polymerization of α-Pinene-Derived Pinocarvone.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Hisanari; Satoh, Kotaro; Kamigaito, Masami

    2016-01-22

    The most abundant naturally occurring terpene, α-pinene, which cannot be directly polymerized into high polymers by any polymerization method, was quantitatively converted under visible-light irradiation into pinocarvone, which possesses a reactive exo methylene group. The bicyclic vinyl ketone was quantitatively polymerized in fluoroalcohols by selective (99%) ring-opening radical polymerization of the four-membered ring, which results in unique polymers containing chiral six-membered rings with conjugated ketone units in the main chain. These polymers display good thermal properties, optical activities, and contain reactive conjugated ketone units. Reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was successfully accomplished by using appropriate trithiocarbonate RAFT agents, enabling the synthesis of thermoplastic elastomers based on controlled macromolecular architectures. PMID:26663490

  6. Recyclable magnetic nanocluster crosslinked with poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone) copolymer for adsorption with antibody.

    PubMed

    Prai-In, Yingrak; Boonthip, Chatchai; Rutnakornpituk, Boonjira; Wichai, Uthai; Montembault, Véronique; Pascual, Sagrario; Fontaine, Laurent; Rutnakornpituk, Metha

    2016-10-01

    Surface modification of magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) with poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone) (PEO-b-PVDM) diblock copolymers and its application as recyclable magnetic nano-support for adsorption with antibody were reported herein. PEO-b-PVDM copolymers were first synthesized via a reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization using poly(ethylene oxide) chain-transfer agent as a macromolecular chain transfer agent to mediate the RAFT polymerization of VDM. They were then grafted on amino-functionalized MNP by coupling with some azlactone rings of the PVDM block to form magnetic nanoclusters with tunable cluster size. The nanocluster size could be tuned by adjusting the chain length of the PVDM block. The nanoclusters were successfully used as efficient and recyclable nano-supports for adsorption with anti-rabbit IgG antibody. They retained higher than 95% adsorption of the antibody during eight adsorption-separation-desorption cycles, indicating the potential feasibility in using this novel hybrid nanocluster as recyclable support in cell separation applications. PMID:27287124

  7. Induction of apoptosis by the ginsenoside Rh2 by internalization of lipid rafts and caveolae and inactivation of Akt

    PubMed Central

    Park, E-K; Lee, EJ; Lee, S-H; Koo, KH; Sung, JY; Hwang, EH; Park, JH; Kim, C-W; Jeong, K-C; Park, B-K; Kim, Y-N

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Lipid rafts and caveolae are membrane microdomains with important roles in cell survival signalling involving the Akt pathway. Cholesterol is important for the structure and function of these microdomains. The ginsenoside Rh2 exhibits anti-tumour activity. Because Rh2 is structurally similar to cholesterol, we investigated the possibility that Rh2 exerted its anti-tumour effect by modulating rafts and caveolae. Experimental approach: A431 cells (human epidermoid carcinoma cell line) were treated with Rh2 and the effects on cell apoptosis, raft localization and Akt activation measured. We also examined the effects of over-expression of Akt and active-Akt on Rh2-induced cell death. Key results: Rh2 induced apoptosis concentration- and time-dependently. Rh2 reduced the levels of rafts and caveolae in the plasma membrane and increased their internalization. Furthermore, Akt activity was decreased and consequently, Akt-dependent phosphorylation of Bad, a pro-survival protein, was decreased whereas the pro-apoptotic proteins, Bim and Bax, were increased upon Rh2 treatment. Unlike microdomain internalization induce by cholesterol depletion, Rh2-mediated internalization of rafts and caveolae was not reversed by cholesterol addition. Also, cholesterol addition did not restore Akt activation or rescue cells from Rh2-induced cell death. Rh2-induced cell death was attenuated in MDA-MB-231 cells over-expressing either wild-type or dominant-active Akt. Conclusions and implications: Rh2 induced internalization of rafts and caveolae, leading to Akt inactivation, and ultimately apoptosis. Because elevated levels of membrane rafts and caveolae, and Akt activation have been correlated with cancer development, internalization of these microdomains by Rh2 could potentially be used as an anti-cancer therapy. PMID:20590613

  8. Development and evaluation of gastroretentive raft forming systems incorporating curcumin-Eudragit® EPO solid dispersions for gastric ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kerdsakundee, Nattha; Mahattanadul, Sirima; Wiwattanapatapee, Ruedeekorn

    2015-08-01

    Novel raft forming systems incorporating curcumin-Eudragit® EPO solid dispersions were developed to prolong the gastric residence time and provide for a controlled release therapy of curcumin to treat gastric ulcers. The solid dispersions of curcumin with Eudragit® EPO were prepared by the solvent evaporation method at various ratios to improve the solubility and the dissolution of curcumin. The optimum weight ratio of 1:5 for curcumin to Eudragit® EPO was used to incorporate into the raft forming systems. The raft forming formulations were composed of curcumin-Eudragit® EPO solid dispersions, sodium alginate as a gelling polymer and calcium carbonate for generating divalent Ca(2+) ions and carbon dioxide to form a floating raft. All formulations formed a gelled raft in 1min and sustained buoyancy on the 0.1N hydrochloric acid (pH 1.2) surface with a 60-85% release of curcumin within 8h. The curative effect on the acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer in rats was determined. The curcumin raft forming formulations at 40mg/kg once daily showed a superior curative effect on the gastric ulcer in terms of the ulcer index and healing index than the standard antisecretory agent: lansoprazole (1mg/kg, twice daily) and a curcumin suspension (40mg/kg, twice daily). These studies demonstrated that the new raft forming systems containing curcumin solid dispersions are promising carriers for a stomach-specific delivery of poorly soluble lipophilic compounds. PMID:26143367

  9. Antiproliferative effects of γ-tocotrienol are associated with lipid raft disruption in HER2-positive human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Alawin, Osama A; Ahmed, Rayan A; Ibrahim, Baher A; Briski, Karen P; Sylvester, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    A large percentage of human breast cancers are characterized by excessive or aberrant HER2 activity. Lipid rafts are specialized microdomains within the plasma membrane that are required for HER2 activation and signal transduction. Since the anticancer activity of γ-tocotrienol is associated with suppression in HER2 signaling, studies were conducted to examine the effects of γ-tocotrienol on HER2 activation within the lipid raft microdomain in HER2-positive SKBR3 and BT474 human breast cancer cells. Treatment with 0-5μM γ-tocotrienol induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition in cancer cell growth after a 5-day culture period, and these growth inhibitory effects were associated with a reduction in HER2 dimerization and phosphorylation (activation). Phosphorylated HER2 was found to be primarily located in the lipid raft microdomain of the plasma membrane in vehicle-treated control groups, whereas γ-tocotrienol treatment significantly inhibited this effect. Assay of plasma membrane subcellular fractions showed that γ-tocotrienol also accumulates exclusively within the lipid raft microdomain. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) is an agent that disrupts lipid raft integrity. Acute exposure to 3mM HPβCD alone had no effect, whereas an acute 24-h exposure to 20μM γ-tocotrienol alone significantly decreased SKBR3 and BT474 cell viability. However, combined treatment with these agents greatly reduced γ-tocotrienol accumulation in the lipid raft microdomain and cytotoxicity. In summary, these findings demonstrate that the anticancer effects of γ-tocotrienol are associated with its accumulation in the lipid raft microdomain and subsequent interference with HER2 dimerization and activation in SKBR3 and BT474 human breast cancer cells. PMID:26507543

  10. A novel mechanism of regulating breast cancer cell migration via palmitoylation-dependent alterations in the lipid raft affiliation of CD44

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Most breast cancer-related deaths result from metastasis, a process involving dynamic regulation of tumour cell adhesion and migration. The adhesion protein CD44, a key regulator of cell migration, is enriched in cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains termed lipid rafts. We recently reported that raft affiliation of CD44 negatively regulates interactions with its migratory binding partner ezrin. Since raft affiliation is regulated by post-translational modifications including palmitoylation, we sought to establish the contribution of CD44 palmitoylation and lipid raft affiliation to cell migration. Methods Recovery of CD44 and its binding partners from raft versus non-raft membrane microdomains was profiled in non-migrating and migrating breast cancer cell lines. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce single or double point mutations into both CD44 palmitoylation sites (Cys286 and Cys295), whereupon the implications for lipid raft recovery, phenotype, ezrin co-precipitation and migratory behaviour was assessed. Finally CD44 palmitoylation status and lipid raft affiliation was assessed in primary cultures from a small panel of breast cancer patients. Results CD44 raft affiliation was increased during migration of non-invasive breast cell lines, but decreased during migration of highly-invasive breast cells. The latter was paralleled by increased CD44 recovery in non-raft fractions, and exclusive non-raft recovery of its binding partners. Point mutation of CD44 palmitoylation sites reduced CD44 raft affiliation in invasive MDA-MB-231 cells, increased CD44-ezrin co-precipitation and accordingly enhanced cell migration. Expression of palmitoylation-impaired (raft-excluded) CD44 mutants in non-invasive MCF-10a cells was sufficient to reversibly induce the phenotypic appearance of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and to increase cell motility. Interestingly, cell migration was associated with temporal reductions in CD44 palmitoylation in

  11. Fish oil increases raft size and membrane order of B cells accompanied by differential effects on function[S

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Melton, Mark; Williams, Justin; Wassall, Stephen R.; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2012-01-01

    Fish oil (FO) targets lipid microdomain organization to suppress T-cell and macrophage function; however, little is known about this relationship with B cells, especially at the animal level. We previously established that a high FO dose diminished mouse B-cell lipid raft microdomain clustering induced by cross-linking GM1. To establish relevance, here we tested a FO dose modeling human intake on B-cell raft organization relative to a control. Biochemical analysis revealed more docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) incorporated into phosphatidylcholines than phosphatidylethanolamines of detergent-resistant membranes, consistent with supporting studies with model membranes. Subsequent imaging experiments demonstrated that FO increased raft size, GM1 expression, and membrane order upon cross-linking GM1 relative to no cross-linking. Comparative in vitro studies showed some biochemical differences from in vivo measurements but overall revealed that DHA, but not eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), increased membrane order. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that disrupting rafts with FO would suppress B-cell responses ex vivo. FO enhanced LPS-induced B-cell activation but suppressed B-cell stimulation of transgenic naive CD4+ T cells. Altogether, our studies with B cells support an emerging model that FO increases raft size and membrane order accompanied by functional changes; furthermore, the results highlight differences in EPA and DHA bioactivity. PMID:22315394

  12. Alterations in lipid raft composition and dynamics contribute to abnormal T cell responses in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Sandeep; Nambiar, Madhusoodana P; Warke, Vishal G; Fisher, Carolyn U; Mitchell, Jeanne; Delaney, Nancy; Tsokos, George C

    2004-06-15

    In response to appropriate stimulation, T lymphocytes from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients exhibit increased and faster intracellular tyrosine phosphorylation and free calcium responses. We have explored whether the composition and dynamics of lipid rafts are responsible for the abnormal T cell responses in SLE. SLE T cells generate and possess higher amounts of ganglioside-containing lipid rafts and, unlike normal T cells, SLE T cell lipid rafts include FcRgamma and activated Syk kinase. IgM anti-CD3 Ab-mediated capping of TCR complexes occurs more rapidly in SLE T cells and concomitant with dramatic acceleration of actin polymerization kinetics. The significance of these findings is evident from the observation that cross-linking of lipid rafts evokes earlier and higher calcium responses in SLE T cells. Thus, we propose that alterations in the lipid raft signaling machinery represent an important mechanism that is responsible for the heightened and accelerated T cell responses in SLE. PMID:15187166

  13. Multimerization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag Promotes Its Localization to Barges, Raft-Like Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Lindwasser, O. Wolf; Resh, Marilyn D.

    2001-01-01

    The Gag polyprotein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) organizes the assembly of nascent virions at the plasma membrane of infected cells. Here we demonstrate that a population of Gag is present in distinct raft-like membrane microdomains that we have termed “barges.” Barges have a higher density than standard rafts, most likely due to the presence of oligomeric Gag-Gag assembly complexes. The regions of the Gag protein responsible for barge targeting were mapped by examining the flotation behavior of wild-type and mutant proteins on Optiprep density gradients. N-myristoylation of Gag was necessary for association with barges. Removal of the NC and p6 domains shifted much of the Gag from barges into typical raft fractions. These data are consistent with a model in which multimerization of myristoylated Gag proteins drives association of Gag oligomers into raft-like barges. The functional significance of barge association was revealed by several lines of evidence. First, Gag isolated from virus-like particles was almost entirely localized in barges. Moreover, a comparison of wild-type Gag with Fyn(10)Gag, a chimeric protein containing the N-terminal sequence of Fyn, revealed that Fyn(10)Gag exhibited increased affinity for barges and a two- to fourfold increase in particle production. These results imply that association of Gag with raft-like barge membrane microdomains plays an important role in the HIV-1 assembly process. PMID:11483736

  14. Unexpectedly high radioactivity burdens in ice-rafted sediments from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Cota, Glenn F; Cooper, Lee W; Darby, Dennis A; Larsen, I L

    2006-07-31

    Unexpectedly high specific activities of (137)Cs (1800-2000 Bq kg(-1) dry weight) have been detected in fine-grained sediments entrained in multi-year sea ice floes grounded in Resolute Bay near the center of the Northwest Passage through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. These results are remarkable because: (1) the specific activities are about two orders of magnitude higher than average specific activities detected in previous studies of sea ice rafted sediments from the Arctic Ocean, (2) two independent observations of these unexpectedly high specific activities were made several years apart, (3) the sampling site is on the opposite side of the Arctic basin from potential radioactive sources such as disposal and weapons testing sites of the former Soviet Union and nuclear fuel reprocessing sites in western Europe, and (4) the closest compositional match to known geologic source regions is Banks Island, on the western edge of the Arctic Archipelago, although a smaller number of grains from one of the two samples were mineralogically matched to sediments in the Laptev Sea. Consequently, the sediments are probably not from a single distinct source and were likely mixed during sea ice transport. Coupled with previous observations of higher radionuclide specific activities in some sea ice rafted sediments relative to bottom sediments, these new observations indicate that comparatively high as well as variable radioactive contaminant burdens in ice rafted sediments must be common and geographically independent of proximity to known contaminant sources. The mechanisms that would facilitate these unexpected high radionuclide burdens in sea ice are not known and require additional study, as well as investigations of the implications for the transport and fate of contaminants in Arctic sea ice. PMID:16197983

  15. Ligand Binding Alters Dimerization and Sequestering of Urokinase Receptors in Raft-Mimicking Lipid Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yifan; Siegel, Amanda P.; Jordan, Rainer; Naumann, Christoph A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid heterogeneities, such as lipid rafts, are widely considered to be important for the sequestering of membrane proteins in plasma membranes, thereby influencing membrane protein functionality. However, the underlying mechanisms of such sequestration processes remain elusive, in part, due to the small size and often transient nature of these functional membrane heterogeneities in cellular membranes. To overcome these challenges, here we report the sequestration behavior of urokinase receptor (uPAR), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, in a planar model membrane platform with raft-mimicking lipid mixtures of well-defined compositions using a powerful optical imaging platform consisting of confocal spectroscopy XY-scans, photon counting histogram, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy analyses. This methodology provides parallel information about receptor sequestration, oligomerization state, and lateral mobility with single molecule sensitivity. Most notably, our experiments demonstrate that moderate changes in uPAR sequestration are not only associated with modifications in uPAR dimerization levels, but may also be linked to ligand-mediated allosteric changes of these membrane receptors. Our data show that these modifications in uPAR sequestration can be induced by exposure to specific ligands (urokinase plasminogen activator, vitronectin), but not via adjustment of the cholesterol level in the planar model membrane system. Good agreement of our key findings with published results on cell membranes confirms the validity of our model membrane approach. We hypothesize that the observed mechanism of receptor translocation in the presence of raft-mimicking lipid mixtures is also applicable to other glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. PMID:25418095

  16. Spatial segregation of transport and signalling functions between human endothelial caveolae and lipid raft proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger, Richard R.; Fontijn, Ruud D.; van Marle, Jan; Pannekoek, Hans; Horrevoets, Anton J. G.

    2006-01-01

    Lipid rafts and caveolae are biochemically similar, specialized domains of the PM (plasma membrane) that cluster specific proteins. However, they are morphologically distinct, implying different, possibly complementary functions. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis preceding identification of proteins by MS was used to compare the relative abundance of proteins in DRMs (detergent-resistant membranes) isolated from HUVEC (human umbilical-vein endothelial cells), and caveolae immunopurified from DRM fractions. Various signalling and transport proteins were identified and additional cell-surface biotinylation revealed the majority to be exposed, demonstrating their presence at the PM. In resting endothelial cells, the scaffold of immunoisolated caveolae consists of only few resident proteins, related to structure [CAV1 (caveolin-1), vimentin] and transport (V-ATPase), as well as the GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol)-linked, surface-exposed protein CD59. Further quantitative characterization by immunoblotting and confocal microscopy of well-known [eNOS (endothelial nitric oxide synthase) and CAV1], less known [SNAP-23 (23 kDa synaptosome-associated protein) and BASP1 (brain acid soluble protein 1)] and novel [C8ORF2 (chromosome 8 open reading frame 2)] proteins showed different subcellular distributions with none of these proteins being exclusive to either caveolae or DRM. However, the DRM-associated fraction of the novel protein C8ORF2 (∼5% of total protein) associated with immunoseparated caveolae, in contrast with the raft protein SNAP-23. The segregation of caveolae from lipid rafts was visually confirmed in proliferating cells, where CAV1 was spatially separated from eNOS, SNAP-23 and BASP1. These results provide direct evidence for the previously suggested segregation of transport and signalling functions between specialized domains of the endothelial plasma membrane. PMID:16886909

  17. Bordetella parapertussis Survives inside Human Macrophages in Lipid Raft-Enriched Phagosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gorgojo, Juan; Harvill, Eric T.

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella parapertussis is a human pathogen that causes whooping cough. The increasing incidence of B. parapertussis has been attributed to the lack of cross protection induced by pertussis vaccines. It was previously shown that B. parapertussis is able to avoid bacterial killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) if specific opsonic antibodies are not present at the site of interaction. Here, we evaluated the outcome of B. parapertussis innate interaction with human macrophages, a less aggressive type of cell and a known reservoir of many persistent pathogens. The results showed that in the absence of opsonins, O antigen allows B. parapertussis to inhibit phagolysosomal fusion and to remain alive inside macrophages. The O antigen targets B. parapertussis to lipid rafts that are retained in the membrane of phagosomes that do not undergo lysosomal maturation. Forty-eight hours after infection, wild-type B. parapertussis bacteria but not the O antigen-deficient mutants were found colocalizing with lipid rafts and alive in nonacidic compartments. Taken together, our data suggest that in the absence of opsonic antibodies, B. parapertussis survives inside macrophages by preventing phagolysosomal maturation in a lipid raft- and O antigen-dependent manner. Two days after infection, about 15% of macrophages were found loaded with live bacteria inside flotillin-enriched phagosomes that had access to nutrients provided by the host cell recycling pathway, suggesting the development of an intracellular infection. IgG opsonization drastically changed this interaction, inducing efficient bacterial killing. These results highlight the need for B. parapertussis opsonic antibodies to induce bacterial clearance and prevent the eventual establishment of cellular reservoirs of this pathogen. PMID:25267839

  18. Euphol from Euphorbia tirucalli Negatively Modulates TGF-β Responsiveness via TGF-β Receptor Segregation inside Membrane Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Lin; Chen, Ying-Pin; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Chang, Fang-Rong; Duh, Tsai-Hui; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Wu, Wei-Chiang; Kao, Yu-Chen; Yang, Pei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) responsiveness in cultured cells can be modulated by TGF-β partitioning between lipid raft/caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathways. Lipid rafts are plasma membrane microdomains with an important role in cell survival signaling, and cholesterol is necessary for the lipid rafts’ structure and function. Euphol is a euphane-type triterpene alcohol that is structurally similar to cholesterol and has a wide range of pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In the present study, euphol suppressed TGF-β signaling by inducing TGF-β receptor movement into lipid-raft microdomains and degrading TGF-β receptors. PMID:26448474

  19. Overview of engineering and agricultural design considerations of the Raft River soil-warming and heat-dissipation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, N.E.; Engen, I.A.; Yrene, C.S.

    1982-04-01

    The engineering and agricultural considerations of the Raft River soil-warming and heat-dissipation experiment are presented. The experiment is designed to investigate the thermal characteristics of a subsurface pipe network for cooling power-plant condenser effluent, and crop responses to soil warming in an open-field plot. The subsurface soil-warming system is designed to dissipate approximately 100 kW of heat from circulating, 38/sup 0/C geothermal water. Summer operating conditions in the Raft River area, located on the Intermountain Plateau are emphasized. Design is based on the thermal characteristics of the local soil, the climate of the Raft River Valley, management practices for normal agriculture, and the need for an unheated control plot. The resultant design calls for 38-mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe in a grid composed of parallel loops, for dissipating heat into a 0.8-hectare experimental plot.

  20. On scattered waves and lipid domains: detecting membrane rafts with X-rays and neutrons.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Drew; Heberle, Frederick A; Nickels, Jonathan D; Pabst, Georg; Katsaras, John

    2015-12-21

    In order to understand the biological role of lipids in cell membranes, it is necessary to determine the mesoscopic structure of well-defined model membrane systems. Neutron and X-ray scattering are non-invasive, probe-free techniques that have been used extensively in such systems to probe length scales ranging from angstroms to microns, and dynamics occurring over picosecond to millisecond time scales. Recent developments in the area of phase separated lipid systems mimicking membrane rafts will be presented, and the underlying concepts of the different scattering techniques used to study them will be discussed in detail. PMID:26428538

  1. Perceived psychosocial benefits associated with perceived restorative potential of wilderness river-rafting trips.

    PubMed

    Garg, R; Couture, R T; Ogryzlo, T; Schinke, R

    2010-08-01

    Analysis of the restorative experiences and psychosocial benefits of wilderness river rafting trips of varying difficulty with 186 Canadian participants of different ages supported the restorative potential of natural settings for all age groups as measured by the Perceived Restorativeness Scale. The two-factor structure (General Restorativeness and Coherence) was confirmed. Significant associations were found between scores on the General Restorative subscale and perceived psychosocial benefits (relaxation, nature appreciation or kinship, and physical fitness or achievement) and positive affect. However, the findings associated with the Coherence subscale were not conclusive. PMID:20923066

  2. Amine functionalization of cellulose surface grafted with glycidyl methacrylate by γ-initiated RAFT polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsbay, Murat; Güven, Olgun; Kodama, Yasko

    2016-07-01

    This study presents the functionalization of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) grafted cellulose filter paper by a model compound, ethylenediamine (EDA), through the epoxy groups of PGMA. Cellulose based copolymers were prepared via the radiation-induced and RAFT-mediated graft polymerization. The samples were characterized by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), elemental analysis, contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). An efficient modification density of around 1 mmol EDA/mg copolymer was attained within ca. 8 h, indicating that chemical composition of well-defined copolymers may further be tuned by appropriately selecting the reactive agents for use in many emerging fields.

  3. On scattered waves and lipid domains: detecting membrane rafts with X-rays and neutrons

    PubMed Central

    Marquardt, Drew; Heberle, Frederick A.; Nickels, Jonathan D.

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the biological role of lipids in cell membranes, it is necessary to determine the mesoscopic structure of well-defined model membrane systems. Neutron and X-ray scattering are non-invasive, probe-free techniques that have been used extensively in such systems to probe length scales ranging from angstroms to microns, and dynamics occurring over picosecond to millisecond time scales. Recent developments in the area of phase separated lipid systems mimicking membrane rafts will be presented, and the underlying concepts of the different scattering techniques used to study them will be discussed in detail. PMID:26428538

  4. STS-32 MS Dunbar wearing LES floats in life raft during water egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-32 Mission Specialist (MS) Bonnie J. Dunbar, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and lauch and entry helmet (LEH), in a single-occupant (one man) lift raft enlists the aid of two SCUBA-equipped divers as she floats in 25 ft deep pool located in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. During the exercises the crew practiced the procedures to follow in the event of an emergency aboard the Space Shuttle and familiarized themselves with post-Challenger pole system of emergency egress.

  5. STS-65 Pilot Halsell floats in a life raft during WETF bailout exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Pilot James D. Halsell, Jr, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), floats in a single person life raft while he is assisted by a SCUBA-equipped diver during an emergency egress bailout rehearsal. The STS-65 crew used the 25-feet deep pool in Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 to simulate a water landing during the launch emergency egress (bailout) exercise. Halsell will join five other NASA astronauts and a Japanese payload specialist for the International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) mission aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, later this year.

  6. STS-55 MS2 Precourt in life raft during egress exercises at JSC's WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Using a small single person life raft, STS-55 Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Charles J. Precourt floats in the pool located in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Precourt, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), operates the Space Shuttle Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking (SARSAT) portable locating beacon (PLC) as SCUBA-equipped diver looks on. Precourt, along with other crewmembers, practiced launch emergency egress (bailout). STS-55 with the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) payload will fly aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, in 1993.

  7. Deep-apical tubules: dynamic lipid-raft microdomains in the brush-border region of enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Gert H; Pedersen, Jens; Niels-Christiansen, Lise-Lotte; Immerdal, Lissi; Danielsen, E Michael

    2003-07-01

    The brush border of small intestinal enterocytes is highly enriched in cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-containing membrane microdomains, commonly termed as lipid 'rafts'. Functionally, transcytosis of IgA and exocytosis of newly made brush-border proteins in enterocytes occur through apical lipid raft-containing compartments, but little is otherwise known about these raft microdomains. We therefore studied in closer detail apical lipid-raft compartments in enterocytes by immunogold electron microscopy and biochemical analyses. Novel membrane structures, deep-apical tubules, were visualized by the non-permeable surface marker Ruthenium Red in the brush-border region of the cells. The surface-connected tubules were labelled by antibodies to caveolin-1 and the glycolipid asialo G(M1), and they were sensitive to cholesterol depletion by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin, indicating the presence of raft microdomains. Deep-apical tubules were positioned close to the actin rootlets of adjacent microvilli in the terminal web region, which had a diameter of 50-100 nm, and penetrated up to 1 microm into the cytoplasm. Markers for transcytosis, IgA and the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, as well as the resident brush-border enzyme aminopeptidase N, were present in these deep-apical tubules. We propose that deep-apical tubules are a specialized lipid-raft microdomain in the brush-border region functioning as a hub in membrane trafficking at the brush border. In addition, the sensitivity to cholesterol depletion suggests that deep-apical tubules function as a cell-surface membrane reservoir for cholesterol and for rapid adaptive changes in the size of microvilli at the brush border. PMID:12689332

  8. Modulation of ileal bile acid transporter (ASBT) activity by depletion of plasma membrane cholesterol: association with lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Annaba, Fadi; Sarwar, Zaheer; Kumar, Pradeep; Saksena, Seema; Turner, Jerrold R.; Dudeja, Pradeep K.; Gill, Ravinder K.; Alrefai, Waddah A.

    2016-01-01

    Apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) represents a highly efficient conservation mechanism of bile acids via mediation of their active transport across the luminal membrane of terminal ileum. To gain insight into the cellular regulation of ASBT, we investigated the association of ASBT with cholesterol and sphingolipid-enriched specialized plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts and examined the role of membrane cholesterol in maintaining ASBT function. Human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells stably transfected with human ASBT, human ileal brush-border membrane vesicles, and human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells were utilized for these studies. Floatation experiments on Optiprep density gradients demonstrated the association of ASBT protein with lipid rafts. Disruption of lipid rafts by depletion of membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) significantly reduced the association of ASBT with lipid rafts, which was paralleled by a decrease in ASBT activity in Caco-2 and HEK-293 cells treated with MβCD. The inhibition in ASBT activity by MβCD was blocked in the cells treated with MβCD-cholesterol complexes. Kinetic analysis revealed that MβCD treatment decreased the Vmax of the transporter, which was not associated with alteration in the plasma membrane expression of ASBT. Our study illustrates that cholesterol content of lipid rafts is essential for the optimal activity of ASBT and support the association of ASBT with lipid rafts. These findings suggest a novel mechanism by which ASBT activity may be rapidly modulated by alterations in cholesterol content of plasma membrane and thus have important implications in processes related to maintenance of bile acid and cholesterol homeostasis. PMID:18063707

  9. Lipid rafts association and anti-apoptotic function of prohibitin in ultraviolet B light-irradiated HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-08-01

    Upon UVB irradiation, an alternation of major lipid raft components can lead to the recruitment/activation of rafts-associated proteins and initiation of downstream apoptotic signalling pathways. We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to identify potential regulators of UVB-induced apoptosis and mass spectrometry fingerprint analysis to identify proteins that are altered in the rafts after UVB irradiation. Our data show that levels of several proteins, including prohibitin (PHB), were changed in lipid rafts after UVB irradiation. We also demonstrate that while total PHB expression was not changed, the protein was enriched in lipid rafts after UVB irradiation. Reduced expression of PHB using siRNA knockdown resulted in an increase in cellular apoptosis after UVB irradiation. Based on these results, we propose that PHB protects keratinocytes from UVB-induced apoptosis. PMID:22776003

  10. Radiation-induced and RAFT-mediated grafting of poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) from cellulose surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Yasko; Barsbay, Murat; Güven, Olgun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of RAFT mediated free-radical graft copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) onto cellulose fibers in a "grafting-from" approach under γ-irradiation. The effects of absorbed dose and monomer concentration on the graft ratios were investigated at different monomer (HEMA) to RAFT agent (cumyl dithiobenzoate, CDB) ratios. Cellulose-g-PHEMA copolymers with various graft ratios up to 92% (w/w) have been synthesized. The synthesized copolymers were characterized by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results of various techniques confirmed the existence of PHEMA in the copolymer composition.

  11. Preparation of a Two-Dimensional Ion-Imprinted Polymer Based on a Graphene Oxide/SiO₂ Composite for the Selective Adsorption of Nickel Ions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Meng, Xiangguo; Liu, Zhanchao; Meng, Minjia; Jiang, Fangping; Luo, Min; Ni, Liang; Qiu, Jian; Liu, Fangfang; Zhong, Guoxing

    2015-08-18

    In the present work, a novel two-dimensional (2D) nickel ion-imprinted polymer (RAFT-IIP) has been successfully synthesized based on the graphene oxide/SiO2 composite by reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The imprinted materials obtained are characterized by Fourier transmission infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results show that the thermal stability of the graphene oxide/SiO2 composite is obviously higher than that of graphene oxide. RAFT-IIP possesses an excellent 2D homogeneous imprinted polymer layer, which is a well-preserved unique structure of graphene oxide/SiO2. Owing to the intrinsic advantages of RAFT polymerization and 2D imprinted material, RAFT-IIP demonstrate a superior specific adsorption capacity (81.73 mg/g) and faster adsorption kinetics (30 min) for Ni(II) in comparison to the ion-imprinted polymer prepared by traditional radical polymerization and based on the common carbon material. Furthermore, the adsorption isotherm and selectivity toward Ni(II) onto RAFT-IIP and nonimprinted polymer (NIP) are investigated, indicating that RAFT-IIP has splendid recognizing ability and a nearly 3 times larger adsorption capacity than that of NIP (30.94 mg/g). Moreover, a three-level Box-Behnken experimental design with three factors combining the response surface method is utilized to optimize the desorption process. The optimal conditions for the desorption of Ni(II) from RAFT-IIP are as follows: an HCl-type eluent, an eluent concentration of 2.0 mol/L, and an eluent volume of 10 mL. PMID:26204060

  12. Norepinephrine and endothelin activate diacylglycerol kinases in caveolae/rafts of rat mesenteric arteries: agonist-specific role of PI3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Christopher J; Ohanian, Vasken; Ohanian, Jacqueline

    2007-05-01

    The phosphatidylinositol (PI) signaling pathway mediates norepinephrine (NE)- and endothelin-1 (ET-1)-stimulated vascular smooth muscle contraction through an inositol-trisphosphate-induced rise in intracellular calcium and diacylglycerol (DG) activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Subsequent activation of DG kinases (DGKs) metabolizes DG to phosphatidic acid (PA), potentially regulating PKC activity. Because precise regulation and spatial restriction of the PI pathway is necessary for specificity, we have investigated whether this occurs within caveolae/rafts, specialized plasma membrane microdomains implicated in vascular smooth muscle contraction. We show that components of the PI signaling cascade-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)), PA, and DGK-theta are present in caveolae/rafts prepared from rat mesenteric small arteries. Stimulation with NE or ET-1 induced [(33)P]PIP(2) hydrolysis solely within caveolae/rafts. NE stimulated an increase in DGK activity in caveolae/rafts alone, whereas ET-1 activated DGK in caveolae/rafts and noncaveolae/rafts; however, [(33)P]PA increased in all fractions with both agonists. Previously, we reported that NE activated DGK-theta in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-dependent manner; here, we describe PI3-kinase-dependent DGK activation and [(33)P]PA production in caveolae/rafts in response to NE but not ET-1. Additionally, PKB, a potential activator of DGK-theta, translocated to caveolae/rafts in response to NE but not ET-1, and PI3-kinase inhibition prevented this. Furthermore, PI3-kinase inhibition reduced the sensitivity of contraction to NE but not ET-1. Our study shows that caveolae/rafts are major sites of vasoconstrictor hormone activation of the PI pathway in intact small arteries and suggest a link between lipid signaling events within caveolae/rafts and contraction. PMID:17208990

  13. Uptake of granulysin via lipid rafts leads to lysis of intracellular Listeria innocua.

    PubMed

    Walch, Michael; Eppler, Elisabeth; Dumrese, Claudia; Barman, Hanna; Groscurth, Peter; Ziegler, Urs

    2005-04-01

    The bacteriolytic activity of CTL is mediated by granulysin, which has been reported to kill intracellular Mycobacterium tuberculosis in dendritic cells (DC) with high efficiency. Despite that crucial effector function, the killing mechanism and uptake of granulysin into target cells have not been well investigated. To this end we analyzed granulysin binding, uptake, and the subsequent lysis of intracellular Listeria innocua in human DC. Recombinant granulysin was found to be actively taken up by DC into early endosomal Ag 1-labeled endosomes, as detected by immunofluorescence. Further transfer to L. innocua-containing phagosomes was indicated by colocalization of bacterial DNA with granulysin. After uptake of granulysin by DC, lysis of L. innocua was found in a dose-dependent manner. Uptake as well as lysis of Listeria were inhibited after blocking endocytosis by lowering the temperature and by cholesterol depletion of DC. Colocalization of granulysin with cholera toxin during uptake showed binding to and internalization via lipid rafts. In contrast to cholera toxin, which was targeted to the perinuclear compartment, granulysin was found exclusively in endosomal-phagosomal vesicles. Lipid raft microdomains, enriched in the immunological synapse, may thus enhance uptake and transfer of granulysin into bacterial infected host cells. PMID:15778384

  14. Hybrid and Nonhybrid Lipids Exert Common Effects on Membrane Raft Size and Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A; Doktorova, Milka; Goh, Shih Lin; Standaert, Robert F; Katsaras, John; Feigenson, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer-scale domains in cholesterolrich model membranes emulate lipid rafts in cell plasma membranes (PMs). The physicochemical mechanisms that maintain a finite, small domain size are, however, not well understood. A special role has been postulated for chainasymmetric or hybrid lipids having a saturated sn-1 chain and an unsaturated sn-2 chain. Hybrid lipids generate nanodomains in some model membranes and are also abundant in the PM. It was proposed that they align in a preferred orientation at the boundary of ordered and disordered phases, lowering the interfacial energy and thus reducing domain size. We used small-angle neutron scattering and fluorescence techniques to detect nanoscopic and modulated liquid phase domains in a mixture composed entirely of nonhybrid lipids and cholesterol. Our results are indistinguishable from those obtained previously for mixtures containing hybrid lipids, conclusively showing that hybrid lipids are not required for the formation of nanoscopic liquid domains and strongly implying a common mechanism for the overall control of raft size and morphology. We discuss implications of these findings for theoretical descriptions of nanodomains.

  15. High efficiency motility of bacteria-driven liposome with raft domain binding method.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Masaru; Zhang, Zhenhai; Nakajima, Masahiro; Fukuda, Toshio

    2012-12-01

    From the viewpoint of energy efficiency and size reduction, many people have proposed the use of microbes as actuators. Some bacteria can swim in an aqueous environment. Therefore, flagellated chemotactic bacteria have been utilized as actuators for the propulsion of micro-objects by randomly attaching several bacteria to their surface. A liposome is a well-known component used for drug delivery that can contain biologically active compounds. In the present study, we used an antibody and biotin-streptavidin binding technique to combine bacteria and liposomes and create bacteria-driven liposomes. Furthermore, a novel raft domain binding technique was developed and used to limit the attachment of bacteria to small areas of the liposome surface. The effect of the number and configuration of the attached bacteria on propulsion speed was then studied experimentally. The motility of the raft domain liposome with bacteria was higher than that of the normal liposome with bacteria. This method could be used to create bacteria-driven liposomes with highly efficient motility and could lead to the development of microrobots as drug delivery systems. PMID:23053448

  16. Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinase β Controls Recruitment of Lipid Rafts into the Immunological Synapse.

    PubMed

    Kallikourdis, Marinos; Trovato, Anna Elisa; Roselli, Giuliana; Muscolini, Michela; Porciello, Nicla; Tuosto, Loretta; Viola, Antonella

    2016-02-15

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) is critical for T lymphocyte activation serving as a substrate for the generation of second messengers and the remodeling of actin cytoskeleton necessary for the clustering of lipid rafts, TCR, and costimulatory receptors toward the T:APC interface. Spatiotemporal analysis of PIP2 synthesis in T lymphocytes suggested that distinct isoforms of the main PIP2-generating enzyme, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K), play a differential role on the basis of their distinct localization. In this study, we analyze the contribution of PIP5Kβ to T cell activation and show that CD28 induces the recruitment of PIP5Kβ to the immunological synapse, where it regulates filamin A and lipid raft accumulation, as well as T cell activation, in a nonredundant manner. Finally, we found that Vav1 and the C-terminal 83 aa of PIP5Kβ are pivotal for the PIP5Kβ regulatory functions in response to CD28 stimulation. PMID:26773155

  17. Analysis of the response of the Raft River monitor wells to the 1979 injection tests

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, S.G.; Callan, D.M.

    1980-09-01

    The geothermal resource for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Raft River Geothermal 5 MWe Power Project is located in a closed ground water basin in southcentral Idaho. Chemical analyses indicate the existence of natural communication along fractures between the geothermal reservoir and the shallower aquifers developed for irrigation. Much of the ground water that is presently used for irrigation is of poor quality. Injection of geothermal fluids at intermediate depths may increase communication between the reservoir and the aquifer, resulting in further degradation of shallow ground water quality over time. Seven monitor wells, ranging in depth from 150 m to 400 m, were drilled to evaluate the potential for this degradation. Monitoring of these wells during two 21-day injection tests at the Raft River Geothermal Injection Well-6 (RRGI-6) indicates two types of response in the shallow aquifer system. First, the water level in Monitor Well-4 (MW-4) increased an average of 0.4 m/week during injection, indicating direct fracture connection between the injection zone and the aquifer penetrated by MW-4. Second, water levels in MW-5, MW-6, and MW-7 showed a step function decrease which coincided with the period of the injection tests. Analyses indicate that this response may be caused by elastic deformation in the aquifer matrix.

  18. Enhancing Protein Stability by Adsorption onto Raft-like Lipid Domains

    PubMed Central

    Litt, Jeffrey; Padala, Chakradhar; Asuri, Prashanth; Vutukuru, Srinavya; Athmakuri, Krishna; Kumar, Sanat; Dordick, Jonathan; Kane, Ravi S.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that the stability of adsorbed proteins can be enhanced by controlling the heterogeneity of the surface – by creating raft-like domains in a soft liposomal membrane. Recent work has shown that enzymes adsorbed onto highly curved nanoscale supports can be more stable than those adsorbed on flat surfaces with nominally the same chemical structure. This effect has been attributed to a decrease in lateral inter-enzyme interactions on a curved surface. Exploiting this idea, we asked if adsorbing enzymes onto “patchy” surfaces composed of adsorbing and non-adsorbing regions can be used to reduce lateral interactions even on relatively flat surfaces. We demonstrate that creating domains on which an enzyme can adsorb enhances the stability of that enzyme under denaturing conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the size of these domains has a considerable effect on the degree of stability imparted by adsorption. Such biomimetic raft-inspired systems may find use in applications ranging from biorecognition to the design of novel strategies for the separation of biomolecules, and controlling the interaction of multi-component membrane-bound enzymes. PMID:19385631

  19. Gel-Phase Microdomains and Lipid Rafts in Monolayers Affect the Redox Properties of Ubiquinone-10

    PubMed Central

    Becucci, Lucia; Scaletti, Federica; Guidelli, Rolando

    2011-01-01

    The redox properties of ubiquinone-10 (UQ) were examined in monolayers of mixtures of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine, palmitoylsphingomyelin, and cholesterol of different compositions, self-assembled on a mercury electrode, over the pH range from 7.5 to 9.5. A detailed analysis of the cyclic voltammograms of UQ in the above lipid environments points to a mechanism consisting of an elementary electron transfer step followed by two protonation (or deprotonation) steps in quasiequilibrium and by a further electron transfer step. In a lipid environment of solid-ordered (so) microdomains in a liquid-disordered (ld) matrix, electron transport across the lipid monolayer takes place in the ld phase. In a pure so phase, UQ tends to segregate into UQ-rich pools, exhibiting reversible electron transfer steps. In a lipid environment consisting of liquid-ordered (lo) microdomains (lipid rafts) in an ld matrix, UQ molecules tend to localize along the edge of the lipid rafts. However, in a lipid environment consisting exclusively of lo and so microdomains, UQ molecules tend to segregate into UQ-rich pools. In all lipid environments, electron transport by UQ occurs with the quinone moiety localized on the solution side with respect to the ester linkages of the dioleoylphosphatidylcholine molecules. PMID:21723823

  20. Influence of dynamic soil-pile raft-structure interaction: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Rajib; Haldar, Sumanta; Dutta, Sekhar Chandra

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally seismic design of structures supported on piled raft foundation is performed by considering fixed base conditions, while the pile head is also considered to be fixed for the design of the pile foundation. Major drawback of this assumption is that it cannot capture soil-foundation-structure interaction due to flexibility of soil or the inertial interaction involving heavy foundation masses. Previous studies on this subject addressed mainly the intricacy in modelling of dynamic soil structure interaction (DSSI) but not the implication of such interaction on the distribution of forces at various elements of the pile foundation and supported structure. A recent numerical study by the authors showed significant change in response at different elements of the piled raft supported structure when DSSI effects are considered. The present study is a limited attempt in this direction, and it examines such observations through shake table tests. The effect of DSSI is examined by comparing dynamic responses from fixed base scaled down model structures and the overall systems. This study indicates the possibility of significant underestimation in design forces for both the column and pile if designed under fixed base assumption. Such underestimation in the design forces may have serious implication in the design of a foundation or structural element.

  1. Hybrid and nonhybrid lipids exert common effects on membrane raft size and morphology.

    PubMed

    Heberle, Frederick A; Doktorova, Milka; Goh, Shih Lin; Standaert, Robert F; Katsaras, John; Feigenson, Gerald W

    2013-10-01

    Nanometer-scale domains in cholesterol-rich model membranes emulate lipid rafts in cell plasma membranes (PMs). The physicochemical mechanisms that maintain a finite, small domain size are, however, not well understood. A special role has been postulated for chain-asymmetric or hybrid lipids having a saturated sn-1 chain and an unsaturated sn-2 chain. Hybrid lipids generate nanodomains in some model membranes and are also abundant in the PM. It was proposed that they align in a preferred orientation at the boundary of ordered and disordered phases, lowering the interfacial energy and thus reducing domain size. We used small-angle neutron scattering and fluorescence techniques to detect nanoscopic and modulated liquid phase domains in a mixture composed entirely of nonhybrid lipids and cholesterol. Our results are indistinguishable from those obtained previously for mixtures containing hybrid lipids, conclusively showing that hybrid lipids are not required for the formation of nanoscopic liquid domains and strongly implying a common mechanism for the overall control of raft size and morphology. We discuss implications of these findings for theoretical descriptions of nanodomains. PMID:24041024

  2. CD82 Restrains Angiogenesis by Altering Lipid Raft Clustering and CD44 Trafficking in Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Quan; Zhang, Feng; Richardson, Mekel M.; Roy, Nathan H.; Rodgers, William; Liu, Yuechueng; Zhao, Wenyuan; Fu, Chenying; Ding, Yingjun; Huang, Chao; Chen, Yuanjian; Sun, Yao; Ding, Lexi; Hu, Yang; Ma, Jianxing; Boulton, Michael E.; Pasula, Satish; Wren, Jonathan D.; Tanaka, Satoshi; Huang, Xiaolin; Thali, Markus; Hämmerling, Günter J.; Zhang, Xin A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis is crucial for many pathological processes and becomes a therapeutic strategy against diseases ranging from inflammation to cancer. The regulatory mechanism of angiogenesis remains unclear. Although tetraspanin CD82 is widely expressed in various endothelial cells (ECs), its vascular function is unknown. Methods and Results Angiogenesis was examined in Cd82-null mice with in vivo and ex vivo morphogenesis assays. Cellular functions, molecular interactions, and signaling were analyzed in Cd82-null ECs. Angiogenic responses to various stimuli became markedly increased upon Cd82 ablation. Major changes of Cd82-null ECs were enhanced migration and invasion, likely resulting from the upregulated expression of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) such as CD44 and integrins at the cell surface and subsequently elevated outside-in signaling. Gangliosides, lipid raft clustering, and CD44-membrane microdomain interactions were increased in the plasma membrane of Cd82-null ECs, leading to less clathrin-independent endocytosis and then more surface presence of CD44. Conclusions Our study reveals that CD82 restrains pathological angiogenesis by inhibiting EC movement, lipid raft clustering and CAM trafficking modulate angiogenic potential, and the perturbation of CD82-ganglioside-CD44 signaling attenuates angiogenesis. PMID:25149363

  3. In-vivo anti-reflux and raft properties of alginates.

    PubMed

    Lambert, J R; Korman, M G; Nicholson, L; Chan, J G

    1990-12-01

    The comparative efficacy of two alginate-containing anti-reflux preparations (Gaviscon, Algicon) was assessed in a single blind crossover study of 20 patients with gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. The clinical efficacy study was preceded by two studies in healthy volunteers to assess the intragastric effects of Algicon and Gaviscon by pH measurement, endoscopic visualization and gamma scintigraphy. Algicon and Gaviscon were shown to form a raft in the fasting and fed human stomach, with Algicon alone having a potent antacid effect below and within the raft. Both Algicon and Gaviscon liquids significantly reduced the frequency and severity of reflux symptoms from baseline when given at their recommended doses (10 ml and 20 ml four times daily, respectively). There were no significant differences between Algicon and Gaviscon, although 12 patients preferred Algicon (vs 5 for Gaviscon) for control of reflux symptoms. It was concluded that both Algicon and Gaviscon were effective for the symptomatic control of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease. PMID:2129648

  4. Enhancement of a hybrid petroleum system by raft tectonics: Example of onshore Angola

    SciTech Connect

    Cramez, C.; DeJanvry, G.C.; Duval, B.C.; Plittion, J.L.

    1996-08-01

    Northern Angola shelf area is part of the western Lower Congo basin. The Pinda formation, containing most of the area oil and gas reserves, belongs to a generally transgressive carbonate sequence with a marked backstripping configuration. Three main sources were identified, the lacustrine Pre-salt Bucomazi formation, largely present in the gas window, the rich marine Upper labe formation (Senonian and Paleocene), and the Tertiary Malembo, of lower quality. Integrated geochemical studies and basin modeling showed an early generation from Pre-salt rocks in the deepest grabens, while generation from the labe and Malembo, and the final mixed charging of traps, is very recent. This hybrid petroleum system is strongly enhanced by salt tectonics. Firstly, a combination of large open windows in the Aptian salt and intense faulting in the updip ends of fault blocks facilitated early vertical migration from the Bucomazi source rock. Secondly, hydrocarbons are trapped in Pinda structures related to early halokinesis due to Aptian salt. These salt movements caused the segmentation of the Pinda platform and the development of allochthonous blocks or rafts. Thirdly, the main reservoir developments of the Pinda formation are related to high energy carbonates accumulated on structural positive features. Fourthly, the respective roles of vertical and lateral migration are controlled by the degree of separation of the rafts, with more lateral migration taking place in the preraft more {open_quotes}connected{close_quotes} easternmost domain. Finally, hydrocarbons of Tertiary origin are linked to depocenters, where lateral space was created to accommodate the extension.

  5. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis and physiology-based cell membrane traffic models of doxorubicin liposomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghuan; Gao, Lei; Tan, Xi; Li, Feiyang; Zhao, Ming; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-08-01

    The clathrin-mediated endocytosis is likely a major mechanism of liposomes' internalization. A kinetic approach was used to assess the internalization mechanism of doxorubicin (Dox) loaded cationic liposomes and to establish physiology-based cell membrane traffic mathematic models. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis, including dynamin-dependent or -independent endocytosis of noncaveolar structure, was a dominant process. The mathematic models divided Dox loaded liposomes binding lipid rafts (B) into saturable binding (SB) and nonsaturable binding (NSB) followed by energy-driven endocytosis. The intracellular trafficking demonstrated early endosome-late endosome-lysosome or early/late endosome-cytoplasm-nucleus pathways. The three properties of liposome structures, i.e., cationic lipid, fusogenic lipid, and pegylation, were investigated to compare their contributions to cell membrane and intracellular traffic. The results revealed great contribution of cationic lipid DOTAP and fusogenic lipid DOPE to cell membrane binding and internalization. The valid Dox in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with cationic liposomes containing 40mol% of DOPE were 1.2-fold and 1.5-fold higher than that in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with liposomes containing 20mol% of DOPE, respectively, suggesting the dependence of cell type. This tendency was proportional to the increase of cell-associated total liposomal Dox. The mathematic models would be useful to predict intracellular trafficking of liposomal Dox. PMID:27117641

  6. Glacitectonic rafting and associated deformation of mid-Pleistocene glacigenic sediments, near Central Graben, central North Sea; results of a 2D High-Resolution Geophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan-Hirsch, David

    2013-04-01

    Glacitectonic rafts are defined as dislocated slabs of bedrock or unconsolidated sediments, transported from their original position by glacial action. These relatively thin, slab-like bodies feature transport distances ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers. They occur as either single rafts, or multiple stacked bodies associated with a variety of ice-pushed landforms. Internally, rafts frequently appear undeformed although at a larger scale, they may be folded or cut by shear zones and brittle faults. However, the processes leading to the detachment, transport and subsequent emplacement of the rafts remain uncertain. This work describes the results of a geophysical 2D seismic survey of thrust-bound glacitectonic rafts and associated deformation structures, occurring within mid-Pleistocene glacigenic sediments of the Central Graben, central North Sea. The total shortened length of the rafted section is 2.4km, comprising a series of nine discrete rafts which individually range from 235m to 1018m in length. The principle basal detachment occurs at the erosive contact between Aberdeen Ground Formation and overlying Ling Bank Formation. The ice-proximal (northern) limit of rafting is defined by the presence of a large-scale palaeo-channel oriented perpendicular to the direction of rafting, composed of sediments of the Ling Bank Formation and the Forth Formation. The observed deformation structures infer a mean tectonic direction of 178°, indicating that they are associated with an active glacial advance from the north. The resulting deformation creates a minimum lateral shortening throughout the observed sequence of 35%, typifying a strongly compressional regieme associated with rafting. Throughout the surveyed area, structurally younger rafts are found to be emplaced towards the south, compared to the structurally older rafts which are emplaced towards the south-east. This distinction is suggested to be caused by early rafts creating an obstacle to

  7. Nucleolin-mediated cellular trafficking of DNA nanoparticle is lipid raft and microtubule dependent and can be modulated by glucocorticoid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuguang; Shank, Samuel; Davis, Pamela B; Ziady, Assem G

    2011-01-01

    DNA nanoparticles (DNPs) are nonviral gene transfer vectors with excellent in vivo potential. Previously, we reported that cell surface nucleolin directly binds DNPs, and functions as an important receptor for DNPs. However, the fate of the nucleolin-DNP complex following cellular uptake remains elusive. In this study, we examined the role of lipid rafts in the uptake of DNPs, and found that both nucleolin and DNPs are recovered from the low-density raft fractions of the sucrose gradient. Furthermore, nucleolin colocalizes with, and coimmunoprecipitates with a raft protein, flotillin. Disruption of lipid rafts by depleting membrane cholesterol significantly inhibited DNP transfection, while inhibition of other endocytic pathways had little effect. Following the uptake, the nuclear import of the DNPs required microtubules but not F-actin. By coimmunoprecipitation in conjunction with tandem mass spectrometry, we identified glucocorticoid receptor (GCR) as a nucleolin-associated protein, and confirmed this result by western blot. Cortisone or dexamethasone increased nucleolin's association with GCR, and transfection by DNPs. Finally, we detected the expression of nucleolin on the surface of airway epithelia in vivo. Taken together, our findings shed light on important determinants of DNP trafficking in cells and support the notion that nucleolin is a good target for nonviral gene delivery. PMID:20959809

  8. RAFT copolymerization of itaconic anhydride and 2-methoxyethyl acrylate: a multifunctional scaffold for preparation of "clickable" gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Kasama, Takeshi; Jankova, Katja; Hvilsted, Søren

    2013-05-25

    RAFT copolymerization of 2-methoxyethyl acrylate and itaconic anhydride - a monomer derived from renewable resources - is carried out in a controlled fashion. The copolymer allows preparation of gold nanoparticles with abundant surficial carboxyl and alkyne functional groups that are dendronized via Cu(I)-mediated "click" reaction. PMID:23588100

  9. A facile one pot strategy for the synthesis of well-defined polyacrylates from acrylic acid via RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianbiao; Wang, Taisheng; Dai, Jingwen; Ma, Chao; Jin, Bangkun; Bai, Ruke

    2014-03-28

    A facile one pot strategy for the preparation of linear and hyperbranched polyacrylates has been successfully developed by the combination of in situ esterification of acrylic acid with halogenated compounds promoted by 1,1,3,3-tetramethylguanidine (TMG) and RAFT polymerization. PMID:24534953

  10. Probing Membrane Protein Interactions with Their Lipid Raft Environment Using Single-Molecule Tracking and Bayesian Inference Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Türkcan, Silvan; Richly, Maximilian U.; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Masson, Jean-Baptiste

    2013-01-01

    The statistical properties of membrane protein random walks reveal information on the interactions between the proteins and their environments. These interactions can be included in an overdamped Langevin equation framework where they are injected in either or both the friction field and the potential field. Using a Bayesian inference scheme, both the friction and potential fields acting on the ε-toxin receptor in its lipid raft have been measured. Two types of events were used to probe these interactions. First, active events, the removal of cholesterol and sphingolipid molecules, were used to measure the time evolution of confining potentials and diffusion fields. Second, passive rare events, de-confinement of the receptors from one raft and transition to an adjacent one, were used to measure hopping energies. Lipid interactions with the ε-toxin receptor are found to be an essential source of confinement. ε-toxin receptor confinement is due to both the friction and potential field induced by cholesterol and sphingolipids. Finally, the statistics of hopping energies reveal sub-structures of potentials in the rafts, characterized by small hopping energies, and the difference of solubilization energy between the inner and outer raft area, characterized by higher hopping energies. PMID:23301023

  11. Targeting of Pseudorabies Virus Structural Proteins to Axons Requires Association of the Viral Us9 Protein with Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, Mathew G.; Curanovic, Dusica; Enquist, Lynn W.

    2008-01-01

    The pseudorabies virus (PRV) Us9 protein plays a central role in targeting viral capsids and glycoproteins to axons of dissociated sympathetic neurons. As a result, Us9 null mutants are defective in anterograde transmission of infection in vivo. However, it is unclear how Us9 promotes axonal sorting of so many viral proteins. It is known that the glycoproteins gB, gC, gD and gE are associated with lipid raft microdomains on the surface of infected swine kidney cells and monocytes, and are directed into the axon in a Us9-dependent manner. In this report, we determined that Us9 is associated with lipid rafts, and that this association is critical to Us9-mediated sorting of viral structural proteins. We used infected non-polarized and polarized PC12 cells, a rat pheochromocytoma cell line that acquires many of the characteristics of sympathetic neurons in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). In these cells, Us9 is highly enriched in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). Moreover, reducing the affinity of Us9 for lipid rafts inhibited anterograde transmission of infection from sympathetic neurons to epithelial cells in vitro. We conclude that association of Us9 with lipid rafts is key for efficient targeting of structural proteins to axons and, as a consequence, for directional spread of PRV from pre-synaptic to post-synaptic neurons and cells of the mammalian nervous system. PMID:18483549

  12. Evidence for the involvement of lipid rafts localized at the ER-mitochondria associated membranes in autophagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Tina; Matarrese, Paola; Manganelli, Valeria; Marconi, Matteo; Tinari, Antonella; Gambardella, Lucrezia; Faggioni, Alberto; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Malorni, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) are subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria. This membrane scrambling between ER and mitochondria appears to play a critical role in the earliest steps of autophagy. Recently, lipid microdomains, i.e. lipid rafts, have been identified as further actors of the autophagic process. In the present work, a series of biochemical and molecular analyses has been carried out in human fibroblasts with the specific aim of characterizing lipid rafts in MAMs and to decipher their possible implication in the autophagosome formation. In fact, the presence of lipid microdomains in MAMs has been detected and, in these structures, a molecular interaction of the ganglioside GD3, a paradigmatic "brick" of lipid rafts, with core-initiator proteins of autophagy, such as AMBRA1 and WIPI1, was revealed. This association seems thus to take place in the early phases of autophagic process in which MAMs have been hypothesized to play a key role. The functional activity of GD3 was suggested by the experiments carried out by knocking down ST8SIA1 gene expression, i.e., the synthase that leads to the ganglioside formation. This experimental condition results in fact in the impairment of the ER-mitochondria crosstalk and the subsequent hindering of autophagosome nucleation. We thus hypothesize that MAM raft-like microdomains could be pivotal in the initial organelle scrambling activity that finally leads to the formation of autophagosome. PMID:27123544

  13. L-plastin is involved in NKG2D recruitment into lipid rafts and NKG2D-mediated NK cell migration.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pertierra, Esther; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Brdička, Tomáš; Hoøejši, Václav; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Membrane rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane that have multiple biological functions. The involvement of these structures in the biology of T cells, namely in signal transduction by the TCR, has been widely studied. However, the role of membrane rafts in immunoreceptor signaling in NK cells is less well known. We studied the distribution of the activating NKG2D receptor in lipid rafts by isolating DRMs in a sucrose density gradient or by raft fractionation by β-OG-selective solubility in the NKL cell line. We found that the NKG2D-DAP10 complex and pVav are recruited into rafts upon receptor stimulation. Qualitative proteomic analysis of these fractions showed that the actin cytoskeleton is involved in this process. In particular, we found that the actin-bundling protein L-plastin plays an important role in the clustering of NKG2D into lipid rafts. Moreover, coengagement of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A partially disrupted NKG2D recruitment into rafts. Furthermore, we demonstrated that L-plastin participates in NKG2D-mediated inhibition of NK cell chemotaxis. PMID:24803550

  14. The effect of size on trace metal levels in raft cultivated mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis).

    PubMed

    Saavedra, Y; González, A; Fernández, P; Blanco, J

    2004-01-01

    Mussels are farmed in the coastal inlets of Galicia by means of floating raft culture. The growth of these bivalves is due to their great capacity to filter the water column, which unfortunately, also exposes them to dangerous contaminants, including heavy metals. Thus, it is imperative that mussels be monitored for metals. Size has sometimes been shown to be an important variable, but contradictory results have been found. In order to monitor metals in raft mussels, it is necessary to compile information regarding the number of size classes according to shell length, which must be taken into account to obtain a representative sampling, as well as the number of sample replicates that must be included. Also, to be considered is the cost incurred by carrying out the collection, preparation and analysis per sample. The purpose of this study is to provide information about the effect of size, indicated by shell length on the metal content of raft mussels. The ability of 10 mussel-pooled samples to discriminate real differences in metal concentration was also studied. In general, a positive relationship between metal content and shell length was observed; a similar relation was found between the weight of soft tissues and shell length. As expected from the similarity encountered between relationships of metal content and dry weight-length, the concentrations of the different metals in the soft tissues would not seem to depend on the shell length. Metal concentrations, in this study, were found to be approximately 45 ppm of Hg, 0.5 ppm of Cd, 0.7 ppm of Pb, 0.5 ppm of Cr, 0.6 ppm of Ni, 8 ppm of As, 5 ppm of Cu and 122 ppm of Zn; on a dry weight basis. No significant differences between metal concentrations at different shell lengths were detected. Another important observation was the high variability observed within one size, indicating poor homogeneity in subgroups of similar size, which must be minimized if the number of samples is not enhanced as indicated by power

  15. Evaluation of a programme for ‘Rapid Assessment of Febrile Travelers’ (RAFT): a clinic-based quality improvement initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jazuli, Farah; Lynd, Terence; Mah, Jordan; Klowak, Michael; Jechel, Dale; Klowak, Stefanie; Ovens, Howard; Sabbah, Sam; Boggild, Andrea K

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever in the returned traveller is a potential medical emergency warranting prompt attention to exclude life-threatening illnesses. However, prolonged evaluation in the emergency department (ED) may not be required for all patients. As a quality improvement initiative, we implemented an algorithm for rapid assessment of febrile travelers (RAFT) in an ambulatory setting. Methods Criteria for RAFT referral include: presentation to the ED, reported fever and travel to the tropics or subtropics within the past year. Exclusion criteria include Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and fulfilment of admission criteria such as unstable vital signs or significant laboratory derangements. We performed a time series analysis preimplementation and postimplementation, with primary outcome of wait time to tropical medicine consultation. Secondary outcomes included number of ED visits averted for repeat malaria testing, and algorithm adherence. Results From February 2014 to December 2015, 154 patients were seen in the RAFT clinic: 68 men and 86 women. Median age was 36 years (range 16–78 years). Mean time to RAFT clinic assessment was 1.2±0.07 days (range 0–4 days) postimplementation, compared to 5.4±1.8 days (range 0–26 days) prior to implementation (p<0.0001). The RAFT clinic averted 132 repeat malaria screens in the ED over the study period (average 6 per month). Common diagnoses were: traveller's diarrhoea (n=27, 17.5%), dengue (n=12, 8%), viral upper respiratory tract infection (n=11, 7%), chikungunya (n=10, 6.5%), laboratory-confirmed influenza (n=8, 5%) and lobar pneumonia (n=8, 5%). Conclusions In addition to provision of more timely care to ambulatory febrile returned travellers, we reduced ED bed-usage by providing an alternate setting for follow-up malaria screening, and treatment of infectious diseases manageable in an outpatient setting, but requiring specific therapy. PMID:27473947

  16. Self-assembled molecular rafts at liquid|liquid interfaces for four-electron oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Olaya, Astrid J; Schaming, Delphine; Brevet, Pierre-Francois; Nagatani, Hirohisa; Zimmermann, Tomas; Vanicek, Jiri; Xu, Hai-Jun; Gros, Claude P; Barbe, Jean-Michel; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-01-11

    The self-assembly of the oppositely charged water-soluble porphyrins, cobalt tetramethylpyridinium porphyrin (CoTMPyP(4+)) and cobalt tetrasulphonatophenyl porphyrin (CoTPPS(4-)), at the interface with an organic solvent to form molecular "rafts", provides an excellent catalyst to perform the interfacial four-electron reduction of oxygen by lipophilic electron donors such as tetrathiafulvalene (TTF). The catalytic activity and selectivity of the self-assembled catalyst toward the four-electron pathway was found to be as good as that of the Pacman type cofacial cobalt porphyrins. The assembly has been characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, Surface Second Harmonic Generation, and Scanning Electron Microscopy. Density functional theory calculations confirm the possibility of formation of the catalytic CoTMPyP(4+)/ CoTPPS(4-) complex and its capability to bind oxygen. PMID:22107335

  17. LIPID RAFTS, FLUID/FLUID PHASE SEPARATION, AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO PLASMA MEMBRANE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Prabuddha; Baird, Barbara; Holowka, David

    2007-01-01

    Novel biophysical approaches combined with modeling and new biochemical data have helped to recharge the lipid raft field and have contributed to the generation of a refined model of plasma membrane organization. In this review, we summarize new information in the context of previous literature to provide new insights into the spatial organization and dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells. Recent findings of large-scale separation of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases in plasma membrane vesicles demonstrate this capacity within the complex milieu of plasma membrane proteins and lipids. Roles for membrane heterogeneity and reorganization in immune cell activation are discussed in light of this new information. PMID:17764993

  18. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets - protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores.

    PubMed

    Arbor, Sage C; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  19. Reconstituting ring-rafts in bud-mimicking topography of model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Lee, In-Ho; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Park, Seung Chul; Oh, Soojung; Jordan, Luke R.; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Byoungho; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2014-07-01

    During vesicular trafficking and release of enveloped viruses, the budding and fission processes dynamically remodel the donor cell membrane in a protein- or a lipid-mediated manner. In all cases, in addition to the generation or relief of the curvature stress, the buds recruit specific lipids and proteins from the donor membrane through restricted diffusion for the development of a ring-type raft domain of closed topology. Here, by reconstituting the bud topography in a model membrane, we demonstrate the preferential localization of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains in the collar band of the bud-neck interfaced with the donor membrane. The geometrical approach to the recapitulation of the dynamic membrane reorganization, resulting from the local radii of curvatures from nanometre-to-micrometre scales, offers important clues for understanding the active roles of the bud topography in the sorting and migration machinery of key signalling proteins involved in membrane budding.

  20. The structural role of cholesterol in cell membranes: from condensed bilayers to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin R; Regen, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Defining the two-dimensional structure of cell membranes represents one of the most daunting challenges currently facing chemists, biochemists, and biophysicists. In particular, the time-averaged lateral organization of the lipids and proteins that make up these natural enclosures has yet to be established. As the classic Singer-Nicolson model of cell membranes has evolved over the past 40 years, special attention has focused on the structural role played by cholesterol, a key component that represents ca. 30% of the total lipids that are present. Despite extensive studies with model membranes, two fundamental issues have remained a mystery: (i) the mechanism by which cholesterol condenses low-melting lipids by uncoiling their acyl chains and (ii) the thermodynamics of the interaction between cholesterol and high- and low-melting lipids. The latter bears directly on one of the most popular notions in modern cell biology, that is, the lipid raft hypothesis, whereby cholesterol is thought to combine with high-melting lipids to form "lipid rafts" that float in a "sea" of low-melting lipids. In this Account, we first describe a chemical approach that we have developed in our laboratories that has allowed us to quantify the interactions between exchangeable mimics of cholesterol and low- and high-melting lipids in model membranes. In essence, this "nearest-neighbor recognition" (NNR) method involves the synthesis of dimeric forms of these lipids that contain a disulfide moiety as a linker. By means of thiolate-disulfide interchange reactions, equilibrium mixtures of dimers are then formed. These exchange reactions are initiated either by adding dithiothreitol to a liposomal dispersion to generate a small amount of thiol monomer or by including a small amount of thiol monomer in the liposomes at pH 5.0 and then raising the pH to 7.4. We then show how such NNR measurements have allowed us to distinguish between two very different mechanisms that have been

  1. Truncated PrP(c) in mammalian brain: interspecies variation and location in membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Laffont-Proust, Isabelle; Hässig, Raymonde; Haïk, Stéphane; Simon, Stéphanie; Grassi, Jacques; Fonta, Caroline; Faucheux, Baptiste A; Moya, Kenneth L

    2006-03-01

    A key molecular event in prion diseases is the conversion of cellular prion protein (PrP(c)) into an abnormal misfolded conformer (PrP(sc)). The PrP(c) N-terminal domain plays a central role in PrP(c) functions and in prion propagation. Because mammalian PrP(c) is found as a full-length and N-terminally truncated form, we examined the presence and amount of PrP(c) C-terminal fragment in the brain of different species. We found important variations between primates and rodents. In addition, our data show that the PrP(c) fragment is present in detergent-resistant raft domains, a membrane domain of critical importance for PrP(c) functions and its conversion into PrP(sc). PMID:16542151

  2. Preparation of Surfactant-Resistant Polymersomes with Ultrathick Membranes through RAFT Dispersion Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Song, Ziyuan; Huang, Yinzhao; Prasad, Vikram; Baumgartner, Ryan; Zhang, Siyi; Harris, Keith; Katz, Joshua S; Cheng, Jianjun

    2016-07-13

    Surfactant-resistant polymersomes have substantial potential to be used as delivery vehicles in industrial applications. Herein, we report the preparation of poly(ethylene oxide)-block-polystyrene copolymers with ultrahigh hydrophobic-block molecular weights through RAFT dispersion polymerization, which allows the polymerization-induced self-assembly into well-defined polymersomes with ultrathick membranes up to ∼47 nm. These ultrathick membranes significantly enhance the resistance against surfactant solubilization of the vesicles, improving the vesicles' potential for use in industrial encapsulations. Vesicle-encapsulated actives are well retained in the presence of up to 40 wt % of various anionic and nonionic surfactants, with less than 7% active leakage being observed after 30 days. PMID:27367934

  3. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets — protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores

    PubMed Central

    Arbor, Sage C.; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  4. Reconstituting ring-rafts in bud-mimicking topography of model membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Lee, In-Ho; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Park, Seung Chul; Oh, Soojung; Jordan, Luke R.; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Byoungho; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2014-01-01

    During vesicular trafficking and release of enveloped viruses, the budding and fission processes dynamically remodel the donor cell membrane in a protein- or a lipid-mediated manner. In all cases, in addition to the generation or relief of the curvature stress, the buds recruit specific lipids and proteins from the donor membrane through restricted diffusion for the development of a ring-type raft domain of closed topology. Here, by reconstituting the bud topography in a model membrane, we demonstrate the preferential localization of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains in the collar band of the bud-neck interfaced with the donor membrane. The geometrical approach to the recapitulation of the dynamic membrane reorganization, resulting from the local radii of curvatures from nanometre-to-micrometre scales, offers important clues for understanding the active roles of the bud topography in the sorting and migration machinery of key signalling proteins involved in membrane budding. PMID:25058275

  5. Reconstituting ring-rafts in bud-mimicking topography of model membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Lee, In-Ho; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Park, Seung Chul; Oh, Soojung; Jordan, Luke R; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Byoungho; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2014-01-01

    During vesicular trafficking and release of enveloped viruses, the budding and fission processes dynamically remodel the donor cell membrane in a protein- or a lipid-mediated manner. In all cases, in addition to the generation or relief of the curvature stress, the buds recruit specific lipids and proteins from the donor membrane through restricted diffusion for the development of a ring-type raft domain of closed topology. Here, by reconstituting the bud topography in a model membrane, we demonstrate the preferential localization of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains in the collar band of the bud-neck interfaced with the donor membrane. The geometrical approach to the recapitulation of the dynamic membrane reorganization, resulting from the local radii of curvatures from nanometre-to-micrometre scales, offers important clues for understanding the active roles of the bud topography in the sorting and migration machinery of key signalling proteins involved in membrane budding. PMID:25058275

  6. Antidepressants and antipsychotic drugs colocalize with 5-HT3 receptors in raft-like domains.

    PubMed

    Eisensamer, Brigitte; Uhr, Manfred; Meyr, Sabrina; Gimpl, Gerald; Deiml, Tobias; Rammes, Gerhard; Lambert, Jeremy J; Zieglgänsberger, Walter; Holsboer, Florian; Rupprecht, Rainer

    2005-11-01

    Despite different chemical structure and pharmacodynamic signaling pathways, a variety of antidepressants and antipsychotics inhibit ion fluxes through 5-HT3 receptors in a noncompetitive manner with the exception of the known competitive antagonists mirtazapine and clozapine. To further investigate the mechanisms underlying the noncompetitive inhibition of the serotonin-evoked cation current, we quantified the concentrations of different types of antidepressants and antipsychotics in fractions of sucrose flotation gradients isolated from HEK293 (human embryonic kidney 293) cells stably transfected with the 5-HT3A receptor and of N1E-115 neuroblastoma cells in relation to the localization of the 5-HT3 receptor protein within the cell membrane. Western blots revealed a localization of the 5-HT3 receptor protein exclusively in the low buoyant density (LBD) fractions compatible with a localization within raft-like domains. Also, the antidepressants desipramine, fluoxetine, and reboxetine and the antipsychotics fluphenazine, haloperidol, and clozapine were markedly enriched in LBD fractions, whereas no accumulation occurs for mirtazapine, carbamazepine, moclobemide, and risperidone. The concentrations of psychopharmacological drugs within LBD fractions was strongly associated with their inhibitory potency against serotonin-induced cation currents. The noncompetitive antagonism of antidepressants at the 5-HT3 receptor was not conferred by an enhancement of receptor internalization as shown by immunofluorescence studies, assessment of receptor density in clathrin-coated vesicles, and electrophysiological recordings after coexpression of a dominant-negative mutant of dynamin I, which inhibits receptor internalization. In conclusion, enrichment of antidepressants and antipsychotics in raft-like domains within the cell membrane appears to be crucial for their antagonistic effects at ligand-gated ion channels such as 5-HT3 receptors. PMID:16267227

  7. Seismic baseline and induction studies: Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Zandt, G.; McPherson, L.; Schaff, S.; Olsen, S.

    1982-05-01

    Local seismic networks were established at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area, utah and at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho to monitor the background seismicity prior to initiation of geothermal power production. The Raft River study area is currently seismically quiet down to the level of approximately magnitude one. The Roosevelt Hot Springs area has low-level seismic activity for M/sub L/ greater than about two; however, microearthquake (M/sub L/ less than or equal to 2) swarms appear to be relatively common. One swarm occurred adjacent to the Roosevelt geothermal area during the summer of 1981. From June 27 to August 28, 1044 microearthquakes (M/sub L/ less than or equal to 1.5) were recorded from which 686 earthquakes were located and analysed. The main cluster of microearthquakes was located about 2 km east of the production field at a depth of about 5 km. A few small events were located in the production field at shallow depths (< 2 km). Three of the four largest earthquakes in the swarm (M/sub L/ 1.5-2.0) were located 4 to 5 km further east along a n-NW trend beneath the flank of the adjacent Mineral Mountains. Focal mechanism solutions indicate primarily normal faulting due to the regional E-W extension which characterizes this portion of the eastern Basin and Range province. Hence, the Mineral Mountain swarm appears to be a natural release of tectonic stress in this area. Nevertheless, the occurrence of natural earthquake swarms indicates a potential for induced seismicity at Roosevelt Hot Springs after major production operations are initiated.

  8. The Lipid Raft-Associated Protein CD98 Is Required for Vaccinia Virus Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, Nina; Chung, Che-Sheng; Chen, Chein-Hung; Liao, Chung-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Mature vaccinia virus (vaccinia MV) infects a broad range of animals in vivo and cell cultures in vitro; however, the cellular receptors that determine vaccinia MV tropism and entry pathways are poorly characterized. Here, we performed quantitative proteomic analyses of lipid raft-associated proteins upon vaccinia MV entry into HeLa cells. We found that a type II membrane glycoprotein, CD98, is enriched in lipid rafts upon vaccinia MV infection compared to mock-infected HeLa cells. The knockdown of CD98 expression in HeLa cells significantly reduced vaccinia MV entry. Furthermore, CD98 knockout (KO) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) also exhibited reduced vaccinia MV infectivity without affecting MV attachment to cells, suggesting a role for CD98 in the postbinding step of virus entry. Further characterization with inhibitors and dominant negative proteins that block different endocytic pathways revealed that vaccinia MV entry into MEFs occurs through a clathrin-independent, caveolin-independent, dynamin-dependent, fluid-phase endocytic pathway, implying that CD98 plays a specific role in the vaccinia MV endocytic pathway. Infections of wild-type and CD98 KO MEF cells with different strains of vaccinia MV provided further evidence that CD98 plays a specific role in MV endocytosis but not in plasma membrane fusion. Finally, different CD98-C69 chimeric proteins were expressed in CD98 KO MEFs, but none were able to reconstitute MV infectivity, suggesting that the overall structure of the CD98 protein is required for vaccinia MV endocytosis. PMID:22345471

  9. Proteomic profiling of lipid rafts in a human breast cancer model of tumorigenic progression

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, Joseph A.; Stemmer, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor biomarkers assist in the early detection of cancer, act as therapeutic targets for intervention, and function as diagnostic indicators for the evaluation of therapeutic responses. To identify novel human breast cancer biomarkers, we have analyzed the protein content of lipid rafts isolated from a series of human mammary epithelial cell lines with increasing tumorigenic potential. Since lipid rafts function as platforms for protein interaction critical to several biological processes, we hypothesized that the abundance of proteins associated with proliferation, invasion and metastasis would be dysregulated in highly transformed cells. For this purpose, the MCF10A epithelial lineage, which include benign MCF10A cells, premalignant AT and TG3B cells, and malignant CA1a tumor cells, was utilized. Detergent-resistant membranes were isolated from each line and proteins were identified and relatively quantitated using iTRAQ™ reagents and tandem mass spectrometry. 57 proteins were identified, and 1667 peptide identifications, mapping to 49 proteins, contained sufficient information for semi-quantitative analysis. When comparing malignant to benign cells, we observed consistent alterations in groups of proteins, such as a 5.7-fold average decrease in G protein content (n=5), 2.7-fold decrease glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked proteins (n=7) and 3.3-fold increase in intermediate filaments (n=9). Several of the identified proteins, including caveolin-1, filamin A, keratins 5,6 & 17, and vimentin, are bona fide or candidate biomarkers in clinical studies, underscoring the usefulness of the MCF10A series as a model to better understand the biological mechanisms underlying cancer progression. PMID:21533873

  10. Heparin suppresses lipid raft-mediated signaling and ligand-independent EGF receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Tao; Song, Lifang; Templeton, Douglas M

    2007-04-01

    Heparin is well known to suppress vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation, and attempts to exploit this therapeutically have led to recognition of multiple pathways for heparin's anti-mitogenic actions. At low concentrations (ca. 1 microg.ml(-1)), these suppressive effects may reflect physiological activities of endogenous heparan sulfates, and appear to be rapid responses to extracellular or cell surface-associated heparin. Because heparin has been shown to influence expression of caveolin proteins, and caveolae/lipid rafts are critical structures modulating cell signaling, we examined the effect of heparin on signaling involving cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. The VSMC line PAC-1 activates the MAP kinase Erk in response to the cholesterol-sequestering agents methyl-beta-cyclodextrin and nystatin. This follows a temporal sequence that involves Ras-GTP activation of MEK, and is independent of PKC, Src, and PI3 kinase. However, ligand-independent phosphorylation of the EGF receptor (EGFR) by removal of cholesterol precedes Ras activation, and the EGFR kinase inhibitor AG1478 blocks Erk phosphorylation, supporting occurrence of the signaling sequence EGFR-Ras-MEK-Erk. Phosphorylation of EGFR occurs predominantly in caveolin-rich microdomains as identified by Western blotting of fractions from density gradient centrifugation of membranes prepared under detergent-free conditions. In these situations, heparin inhibits phosphorylation of EGFR on the Src-dependent site Tyr(845), but not the autophosphorylation of Tyr(1173), and decreases Ras activation and Erk phosphorylation. We conclude that heparin can suppress Erk signaling in VSMC with effects on site-specific phosphorylation of EGFR localized in caveolin-enriched lipid rafts. PMID:17226785

  11. A Novel Protein Complex in Membrane Rafts Linking the NR2B Glutamate Receptor and Autophagy Is Disrupted following Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Bigford, Gregory E.; Alonso, Ofelia F.; Dietrich, W. Dalton

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Hyperactivation of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NRs) is associated with neuronal cell death induced by traumatic brain injury (TBI) and many neurodegenerative conditions. NR signaling efficiency is dependent on receptor localization in membrane raft microdomains. Recently, excitotoxicity has been linked to autophagy, but mechanisms governing signal transduction remain unclear. Here we have identified protein interactions between NR2B signaling intermediates and the autophagic protein Beclin-1 in membrane rafts of the normal rat cerebral cortex. Moderate TBI induced rapid recruitment and association of NR2B and pCaMKII to membrane rafts, and translocation of Beclin-1 out of membrane microdomains. Furthermore, TBI caused significant increases in expression of key autophagic proteins and morphological hallmarks of autophagy that were significantly attenuated by treatment with the NR2B antagonist Ro 25-6981. Thus, stimulation of autophagy by NR2B signaling may be regulated by redistribution of Beclin-1 in membrane rafts after TBI. PMID:19335206

  12. Lipid rafts, KCa/ClCa/Ca2+ channel complexes and EGFR signaling: Novel targets to reduce tumor development by lipids?

    PubMed

    Guéguinou, Maxime; Gambade, Audrey; Félix, Romain; Chantôme, Aurélie; Fourbon, Yann; Bougnoux, Philippe; Weber, Günther; Potier-Cartereau, Marie; Vandier, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    Membrane lipid rafts are distinct plasma membrane nanodomains that are enriched with cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides, with occasional presence of saturated fatty acids and phospholipids containing saturated acyl chains. It is well known that they organize receptors (such as Epithelial Growth Factor Receptor), ion channels and their downstream acting molecules to regulate intracellular signaling pathways. Among them are Ca2+ signaling pathways, which are modified in tumor cells and inhibited upon membrane raft disruption. In addition to protein components, lipids from rafts also contribute to the organization and function of Ca2+ signaling microdomains. This article aims to focus on the lipid raft KCa/ClCa/Ca2+ channel complexes that regulate Ca2+ and EGFR signaling in cancer cells, and discusses the potential modification of these complexes by lipids as a novel therapeutic approach in tumor development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. PMID:25450343

  13. Predicting the movement of pumice rafts in the South Pacific using GNOME for enhanced navigational warnings and coastal hazard management policies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J.; Bender, M.; Kelly, M.; Walters, C.

    2013-12-01

    Pumice rafts formed from explosive shallow submarine eruptions in the South Pacific pose a significant hazard to local maritime transportation and global coastal communities. Local concerns include the possibility of individual pumice clasts blocking seawater intake valves of ships, damaging the hull of smaller vessels, and inundating harbors bringing fishing and transport to a standstill. Additionally, pumice rafts can introduce harmful invasive species to delicate coastal communities around the world as they dramatically increase dispersal distances for otherwise benthic or relatively sedentary organisms. Two volcanoes in this region have recently formed pumice rafts: Home Reef volcano (Tonga) in 2006 and Havre Seamount (Kermadec Islands) in 2012. These raft events were used as case studies to test a trajectory prediction model since they occurred during times at which high spatial and temporal resolution satellite data were being collected and/or have been described in peer reviewed literature, both of which were necessary for providing model validation. The model was created using the General NOAA Observational Modeling Environment (GNOME), which utilizes sea surface winds and sea surface height (SSH) datasets to predict the possible trajectory a pollutant might follow on a body of water. Wind and ocean current data were acquired from the SeaWinds and Poseidon-3 sensors on board the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites QuikSCAT and Jason-2. Model outputs showed the 2012 Havre Seamount raft rapidly disperse as it drifted in an ENE direction and the 2006 Home Reef raft drifted quickly in a NW direction towards Papua New Guinea. The 2006 Home Reef prediction model was validated by comparing it to another published model that was based on an integrated surface velocity field in addition to in situ observations. The 2012 Havre Seamount prediction model was validated by spatially and temporally correlating the GNOME trajectory output with moderate

  14. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2

    SciTech Connect

    Eum, Sung Yong Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E.; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2′,4,4′,5,5′-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1 h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24 h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. - Highlights: • PCB153 disturbed human brain endothelial barrier through disruption of occludin. • Lipid raft-associated PP

  15. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis. PMID:25313007

  16. Differential uPAR recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts by GM1 and GM3 gangliosides regulates endothelial progenitor cells angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Margheri, Francesca; Papucci, Laura; Schiavone, Nicola; D'Agostino, Riccardo; Trigari, Silvana; Serratì, Simona; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Luciani, Cristina; Chillà, Anastasia; Andreucci, Elena; Del Rosso, Tommaso; Margheri, Giancarlo; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2015-01-01

    Gangliosides and the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) tipically partition in specialized membrane microdomains called lipid-rafts. uPAR becomes functionally important in fostering angiogenesis in endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) upon recruitment in caveolar-lipid rafts. Moreover, cell membrane enrichment with exogenous GM1 ganglioside is pro-angiogenic and opposite to the activity of GM3 ganglioside. On these basis, we first checked the interaction of uPAR with membrane models enriched with GM1 or GM3, relying on the adoption of solid-supported mobile bilayer lipid membranes with raft-like composition formed onto solid hydrophilic surfaces, and evaluated by surface plasmon resonance (SPR) the extent of uPAR recruitment. We estimated the apparent dissociation constants of uPAR-GM1/GM3 complexes. These preliminary observations, indicating that uPAR binds preferentially to GM1-enriched biomimetic membranes, were validated by identifying a pro-angiogenic activity of GM1-enriched EPCs, based on GM1-dependent uPAR recruitment in caveolar rafts. We have observed that addition of GM1 to EPCs culture medium promotes matrigel invasion and capillary morphogenesis, as opposed to the anti-angiogenesis activity of GM3. Moreover, GM1 also stimulates MAPKinases signalling pathways, typically associated with an angiogenesis program. Caveolar-raft isolation and Western blotting of uPAR showed that GM1 promotes caveolar-raft partitioning of uPAR, as opposed to control and GM3-challenged EPCs. By confocal microscopy, we have shown that in EPCs uPAR is present on the surface in at least three compartments, respectively, associated to GM1, GM3 and caveolar rafts. Following GM1 exogenous addition, the GM3 compartment is depleted of uPAR which is recruited within caveolar rafts thereby triggering angiogenesis. PMID:25313007

  17. Lipid rafts regulate PCB153-induced disruption of occludin and brain endothelial barrier function through protein phosphatase 2A and matrix metalloproteinase-2.

    PubMed

    Eum, Sung Yong; Jaraki, Dima; András, Ibolya E; Toborek, Michal

    2015-09-15

    Occludin is an essential integral transmembrane protein regulating tight junction (TJ) integrity in brain endothelial cells. Phosphorylation of occludin is associated with its localization to TJ sites and incorporation into intact TJ assembly. The present study is focused on the role of lipid rafts in polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-induced disruption of occludin and endothelial barrier function. Exposure of human brain endothelial cells to 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexachlorobiphenyl (PCB153) induced dephosphorylation of threonine residues of occludin and displacement of occludin from detergent-resistant membrane (DRM)/lipid raft fractions within 1h. Moreover, lipid rafts modulated the reduction of occludin level through activation of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) after 24h PCB153 treatment. Inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity by okadaic acid or fostriecin markedly protected against PCB153-induced displacement of occludin and increased permeability of endothelial cells. The implication of lipid rafts and PP2A signaling in these processes was further defined by co-immunoprecipitation of occludin with PP2A and caveolin-1, a marker protein of lipid rafts. Indeed, a significant MMP-2 activity was observed in lipid rafts and was increased by exposure to PCB153. The pretreatment of MMP-2 inhibitors protected against PCB153-induced loss of occludin and disruption of lipid raft structure prevented the increase of endothelial permeability. Overall, these results indicate that lipid raft-associated processes, such as PP2A and MMP-2 activation, participate in PCB153-induced disruption of occludin function in brain endothelial barrier. This study contributes to a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to brain endothelial barrier dysfunction in response to exposure to environmental pollutants, such as ortho-substituted PCBs. PMID:26080028

  18. Metabolic labelling of membrane microdomains/rafts in Jurkat cells indicates the presence of glycerophospholipids implicated in signal transduction by the CD3 T-cell receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Rouquette-Jazdanian, Alexandre K; Pelassy, Claudette; Breittmayer, Jean-Philippe; Cousin, Jean-Louis; Aussel, Claude

    2002-01-01

    Cell membranes contain sphingolipids and cholesterol, which cluster together in distinct domains called rafts. The outer-membrane leaflet of these peculiar membrane domains contains glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins, while the inner leaflet contains proteins implicated in signalling, such as the acylated protein kinase p56(lck) and the palmitoylated adaptator LAT (linker for activation of T-cells). We present here an approach to study the lipid composition of rafts and its change upon T-cell activation. Our method is based on metabolic labelling of Jurkat T-cells with different precursors of glycerophospholipid synthesis, including glycerol and fatty acids with different lengths and degrees of saturation as well as phospholipid polar head groups. The results obtained indicate that lipid rafts isolated by the use of sucrose density-gradient centrifugation after Triton X-100 extraction in the cold, besides sphingolipids and cholesterol, contain unambiguously all classes of glycerophospholipids: phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Fatty acid labelling shows that lipid rafts are labelled preferentially with saturated fatty acids while the rest of the plasma membrane incorporates mostly long-chained polyunsaturated fatty acids. To see whether the raft composition as measured by metabolic labelling of phospholipids is involved in T-cell activation, we investigated the production of sn-1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) in CD3-activated cells. DAG production occurs within rafts, confirming previous demonstration of protein kinase C translocation into membrane microdomains. Our data demonstrate that raft disorganization by methyl-beta-cyclodextrin impairs both CD3-induced DAG production and changes in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration. These lines of evidence support the conclusion that the major events in T-cell activation occur within or due to lipid rafts. PMID:11964165

  19. Water flows through mussel rafts and their relationship with wind speed in a coastal embayment (Ría de Ares-Betanzos, NW Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piedracoba, S.; Álvarez-Salgado, X. A.; Labarta, U.; Fernández-Reiriz, M. J.; Gómez, B.; Balseiro, C.

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of water flows through mussel rafts and their controlling factors is required for an ecosystem approach to the sustainable management of this culture in the Galician rías. With this aim, 4 acoustic 2D-ACM current meters were hung from the bow of 4 rafts located in the mussel cultivation areas of the Ría de Ares-Betanzos (NW Spain) during autumn 2007. Simultaneously, an Aanderaa DCM12 Doppler profiler was moored in an area free of rafts in the middle ría. There were differences in the subtidal and tidal dynamics of the middle channel and mussel farm areas. The tide explained 51.5% of the total variance of the surface current in the middle ría. The explained variance in the seed collection areas of Redes (inner ría) and Miranda (outer ría), where only 2-3 rafts are anchored, were 64.1% and 16.8%, respectively. In the cultivation areas of Arnela (inner ría) and Lorbé (middle ría), where 101 and 40 rafts are anchored, 14.3% and 53.4% of the total variance was explained by the tide. These disparities in the contribution of the tide are likely due to a combination of topographic and bathymetric differences among sites and distortions of the natural flow by the rafts and their hanging ropes. Furthermore, there was a marked influence of winds on the subtidal currents within the rafts; contrasting correlation coefficients and lag times between wind speed and currents were observed for the outer and inner sides of the embayment. The filtration rate of the growing mussels and the number of mussels per raft allow an efficient clearing of the particles transported across the hanging ropes by the measured subtidal currents of 2-3 cm s-1 characteristic of the cultivation areas of Arnela and Lorbé.

  20. Keratin impact on PKCδ- and ASMase-mediated regulation of hepatocyte lipid raft size - implication for FasR-associated apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, Stéphane; Loranger, Anne; Omary, M Bishr; Marceau, Normand

    2016-09-01

    Keratins are epithelial cell intermediate filament (IF) proteins that are expressed as pairs in a cell-differentiation-regulated manner. Hepatocytes express the keratin 8 and 18 pair (denoted K8/K18) of IFs, and a loss of K8 or K18, as in K8-null mice, leads to degradation of the keratin partner. We have previously reported that a K8/K18 loss in hepatocytes leads to altered cell surface lipid raft distribution and more efficient Fas receptor (FasR, also known as TNFRSF6)-mediated apoptosis. We demonstrate here that the absence of K8 or transgenic expression of the K8 G62C mutant in mouse hepatocytes reduces lipid raft size. Mechanistically, we find that the lipid raft size is dependent on acid sphingomyelinase (ASMase, also known as SMPD1) enzyme activity, which is reduced in absence of K8/K18. Notably, the reduction of ASMase activity appears to be caused by a less efficient redistribution of surface membrane PKCδ toward lysosomes. Moreover, we delineate the lipid raft volume range that is required for an optimal FasR-mediated apoptosis. Hence, K8/K18-dependent PKCδ- and ASMase-mediated modulation of lipid raft size can explain the more prominent FasR-mediated signaling resulting from K8/K18 loss. The fine-tuning of ASMase-mediated regulation of lipid rafts might provide a therapeutic target for death-receptor-related liver diseases. PMID:27422101

  1. Abiotic factors influencing biomass accumulation of green tide causing Ulva spp. on Pyropia culture rafts in the Yellow Sea, China.

    PubMed

    Keesing, John K; Liu, Dongyan; Shi, Yajun; Wang, Yujue

    2016-04-15

    Annually recurrent green-tides in the Yellow Sea have been shown to result from direct disposal into the sea of fouling Ulva from Pyropia aquaculture. The role abiotic factors play in Ulva biomass accumulation on rafts was studied to find ways to mitigate this problem. Dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) was very high at all sites, but the highest Ulva biomass was associated with the lowest DIN and anthropogenic N. Under luxuriant background nutrient conditions, variability in temperature and periods of emersion, rather than pH, light and salinity determined Ulva biomass. Two dominant species of Ulva displayed differing tolerances to temperature and desiccation which helped explain why Ulva prolifera dominates floating green-tides. Rather than trying to mitigate green-tides only by reducing nutrient pollution, an earlier harvest of Pyropia in southern Jiangsu Province especially before temperatures increase greatly above 10°C during April, could reduce the biomass of U. prolifera disposed from rafts. PMID:26936121

  2. Antarctic ice-rafted detritus (IRD) in the South Atlantic: Indicators of iceshelf dynamics or ocean surface conditions?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nielsen, Simon H.H.; Hodell, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Ocean sediment core TN057-13PC4/ODP1094, from the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean, contains elevated lithogenic material in sections representing the last glacial period compared to the Holocene. This ice-rafted detritus is mainly comprised of volcanic glass and ash, but has a significant input of what was previously interpreted as quartz during peak intervals (Kanfoush et al., 2000, 2002). Our analysis of these clear mineral grains indicates that most are plagioclase, and that South Sandwich Islands is the predominant source, similar to that inferred for the volcanic glass (Nielsen et al., in review). In addition, quartz and feldspar with possible Antarctic origin occur in conjunction with postulated episodes of Antarctic deglaciation. We conclude that while sea ice was the dominant ice rafting agent in the Polar Frontal Zone of the South Atlantic during the last glacial period, the Holocene IRD variability may reflect Antarctic ice sheet dynamics.

  3. Remorin, a Solanaceae Protein Resident in Membrane Rafts and Plasmodesmata, Impairs Potato virus X Movement[W

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Bayer, Emmanuelle; Lafarge, David; Cluzet, Stéphanie; German Retana, Sylvie; Boubekeur, Tamy; Leborgne-Castel, Nathalie; Carde, Jean-Pierre; Lherminier, Jeannine; Noirot, Elodie; Satiat-Jeunemaître, Béatrice; Laroche-Traineau, Jeanny; Moreau, Patrick; Ott, Thomas; Maule, Andrew J.; Reymond, Philippe; Simon-Plas, Françoise; Farmer, Edward E.; Bessoule, Jean-Jacques; Mongrand, Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    Remorins (REMs) are proteins of unknown function specific to vascular plants. We have used imaging and biochemical approaches and in situ labeling to demonstrate that REM clusters at plasmodesmata and in ∼70-nm membrane domains, similar to lipid rafts, in the cytosolic leaflet of the plasma membrane. From a manipulation of REM levels in transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants, we show that Potato virus X (PVX) movement is inversely related to REM accumulation. We show that REM can interact physically with the movement protein TRIPLE GENE BLOCK PROTEIN1 from PVX. Based on the localization of REM and its impact on virus macromolecular trafficking, we discuss the potential for lipid rafts to act as functional components in plasmodesmata and the plasma membrane. PMID:19470590

  4. Oxygen isotope calibration of the onset of ice-rafting and history of glaciation in the North Atlantic region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shackleton, N.J.; Backman, J.; Zimmerman, H.; Kent, D.V.; Hall, M.A.; Roberts, David G.; Schnitker, D.; Baldauf, J.G.; Desprairies, A.; Homrighausen, R.; Huddlestun, P.; Keene, J.B.; Kaltenback, A.J.; Krumsiek, K.A.O.; Morton, A.C.; Murray, J.W.; Westberg-Smith, J.

    1984-01-01

    We report here that DSDP Site 552A, cored with the hydraulic piston corer on the west flank of Rockall Bank, recovered an undisturbed sequence of alternating white deep-sea carbonate oozes and dark-coloured layers that are rich in glacial debris. Oxygen isotope analysis of the sequence together with detailed nannofossil and palaeomagnetic stratigraphy shows that the first major horizon of ice-rafting occurred at about 2.4 Myr, and was preceded by a minor pulse of ice-rafting at about 2.5 Myr. The carbon isotope record shows that the site has been bathed by a water mass of similar characteristics to present-day North Atlantic deep water at least since 3.5 Myr. ?? 1984 Nature Publishing Group.

  5. Raft River monitor well potentiometric head responses and water quality as related to the conceptual ground-water flow system

    SciTech Connect

    Allman, D.W.; Tullis, J.A.; Dolenc, M.R.; Thurow, T.L.; Skiba, P.A.

    1982-09-01

    Ground-water monitoring near the Raft River site was initiated in 1974 by the IDWR. This effort consisted of semiannual chemical sampling of 22 irrigation wells near the Raft River geothermal development area. This program yielded useful baseline chemical data; however, several problems were inherent. For example, access to water pumped from the wells is limited to the irrigation season (April through September). All the wells are not continuously pumped; thus, some wells that are sampled one season cannot be sampled the next. In addition, information on well construction, completion, and production is often unreliable or not available. These data are to be supplemented by establishing a series of monitor wells in the proposed geothermal withdrawal and injection area. These wells were to be located and designed to provide data necessary for evaluating and predicting the impact of geothermal development on the Shallow Aquifer system.

  6. Contribution of PIP-5 kinase I{alpha} to raft-based Fc{gamma}RIIA signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Szymanska, Ewelina; Korzeniowski, Marek; Raynal, Patrick; Sobota, Andrzej; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna

    2009-04-01

    Receptor Fc{gamma}IIA (Fc{gamma}RIIA) associates with plasma membrane rafts upon activation to trigger signaling cascades leading to actin polymerization. We examined whether compartmentalization of PI(4,5)P{sub 2} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2}-synthesizing PIP5-kinase I{alpha} to rafts contributes to Fc{gamma}RIIA signaling. A fraction of PIP5-kinase I{alpha} was detected in raft-originating detergent-resistant membranes (DRM) isolated from U937 monocytes and other cells. The DRM of U937 monocytes contained also a major fraction of PI(4,5)P{sub 2}. PIP5-kinase I{alpha} bound PI(4,5)P{sub 2}, and depletion of the lipid displaced PIP5-kinase I{alpha} from the DRM. Activation of Fc{gamma}RIIA in BHK transfectants led to recruitment of the kinase to the plasma membrane and enrichment of DRM in PI(4,5)P{sub 2}. Immunofluorescence studies revealed that in resting cells the kinase was associated with the plasma membrane, cytoplasmic vesicles and the nucleus. After Fc{gamma}RIIA activation, PIP5-kinase I{alpha} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2} co-localized transiently with the activated receptor at distinct cellular locations. Immunoelectron microscopy studies revealed that PIP5-kinase I{alpha} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2} were present at the edges of electron-dense assemblies containing activated Fc{gamma}RIIA in their core. The data suggest that activation of Fc{gamma}RIIA leads to membrane rafts coalescing into signaling platforms containing PIP5-kinase I{alpha} and PI(4,5)P{sub 2}.

  7. Raft endocytosis of AMF regulates mitochondrial dynamics through Rac1 signaling and the Gp78 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Jay; Kojic, Liliana D; St-Pierre, Pascal; Wang, Peter T C; Fu, Min; Joshi, Bharat; Nabi, Ivan R

    2013-08-01

    Gp78 is a cell surface receptor that also functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. The Gp78 ligand, the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI; also called autocrine motility factor, AMF), functions as a cytokine upon secretion by tumor cells. AMF is internalized through a PI3K- and dynamin-dependent raft endocytic pathway to the smooth ER; however, the relationship between AMF and Gp78 ubiquitin ligase activity remains unclear. AMF uptake to the smooth ER is inhibited by the dynamin inhibitor, dynasore, is reduced in Gp78 knockdown cells and induces the dynamin-dependent downregulation of its cell surface receptor. AMF uptake is Rac1-dependent and is inhibited by expression of dominant-negative Rac1 and the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766, and is therefore distinct from Cdc42- and RhoA-dependent raft endocytic pathways. AMF stimulates Rac1 activation, but this is reduced by dynasore treatment and is absent in Gp78-knockdown cells; therefore, AMF activities require Gp78-mediated endocytosis. AMF also prevents Gp78-induced degradation of the mitochondrial fusion proteins, mitofusin 1 and 2 in a dynamin-, Rac1- and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-dependent manner. Gp78 induces mitochondrial clustering and fission in a manner dependent on GP78 ubiquitin ligase activity, and this is also reversed by uptake of AMF. The raft-dependent endocytosis of AMF, therefore, promotes Rac1-PI3K signaling that feeds back to promote AMF endocytosis and also inhibits the ability of Gp78 to target the mitofusins for degradation, thereby preventing Gp78-dependent mitochondrial fission. Through regulation of an ER-localized ubiquitin ligase, the raft-dependent endocytosis of AMF represents an extracellular regulator of mitochondrial fusion and dynamics. PMID:23690547

  8. Non-genomic inhibitory effect of glucocorticoids on activated peripheral blood basophils through suppression of lipid raft formation.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, S; Tomita, K; Sano, H; Itoh, Y; Fukai, Y; Okimoto, N; Watatani, N; Inbe, S; Miyajima, H; Tsukamoto, K; Santoh, H; Ichihashi, H; Sano, A; Sato, R; Tohda, Y

    2012-10-01

    We investigated the non-genomic effects of glucocorticoids (GCs) on inhibition of plasma membrane lipid raft formation in activated human basophils. Human basophils obtained from house dust mite (HDM)-sensitive volunteers were pretreated with hydrocortisone (CORT) or dexamethasone (Dex) for 30 min and then primed with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, 10 ng/ml) or HDM (10 µg/ml). The expression of CD63, a basophil activation marker, was assessed by flow cytometry. Membrane-bound GC receptors (mGCRs) were analysed by flow cytometry and confocal laser microscopy. Lipid rafts were assessed using a GM1 ganglioside probe and visualization by confocal laser microscopy. Pretreatment of basophils with CORT (10(-4) M and 10(-5) M) and Dex (10(-7) M) significantly inhibited CD63 expression 20 min after addition of PMA or HDM. The inhibitory effects of GCs were not altered by the nuclear GC receptor (GCR) antagonist RU486 (10(-5) M) or the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide (10(-4) M) (P < 0·05). CORT coupled to bovine serum albumin (BSA-CORT) mimicked the rapid inhibitory effects of CORT, suggesting the involvement of mGCRs. mGCRs were detectable on the plasma membrane of resting basophils and formed nanoclusters following treatment with PMA or HDM. Pretreatment of cells with BSA-CORT inhibited the expression of mGCRs and nanoclustering of ganglioside GM1 in lipid rafts. The study provides evidence that non-genomic mechanisms are involved in the rapid inhibitory effect of GCs on the formation of lipid raft nanoclusters, through binding to mGCRs on the plasma membrane of activated basophils. PMID:22943204

  9. Lipid rafts are required for signal transduction by angiotensin II receptor type 1 in neonatal glomerular mesangial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adebiyi, Adebowale Soni, Hitesh; John, Theresa A.; Yang, Fen

    2014-05-15

    Angiotensin II (ANG-II) receptors (AGTRs) contribute to renal physiology and pathophysiology, but the underlying mechanisms that regulate AGTR function in glomerular mesangium are poorly understood. Here, we show that AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal pig glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Cyclodextrin (CDX)-mediated cholesterol depletion attenuated cell surface AGTR1 protein expression and ANG-II-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) elevation in the cells. The COOH-terminus of porcine AGTR1 contains a caveolin (CAV)-binding motif. However, neonatal GMCs express CAV-1, but not CAV-2 and CAV-3. Colocalization and in situ proximity ligation assay detected an association between endogenous AGTR1 and CAV-1 in the cells. A synthetic peptide corresponding to the CAV-1 scaffolding domain (CSD) sequence also reduced ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in the cells. Real-time imaging of cell growth revealed that ANG-II stimulates neonatal GMC proliferation. ANG-II-induced GMC growth was attenuated by EMD 66684, an AGTR1 antagonist; BAPTA, a [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} chelator; KN-93, a Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II inhibitor; CDX; and a CSD peptide, but not PD 123319, a selective AGTR2 antagonist. Collectively, our data demonstrate [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}-dependent proliferative effect of ANG-II and highlight a critical role for lipid raft microdomains in AGTR1-mediated signal transduction in neonatal GMCs. - Highlights: • AGTR1 is the functional AGTR subtype expressed in neonatal mesangial cells. • Endogenous AGTR1 associates with CAV-1 in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption attenuates cell surface AGTR1 protein expression. • Lipid raft disruption reduces ANG-II-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation in neonatal mesangial cells. • Lipid raft disruption inhibits ANG-II-induced neonatal mesangial cell growth.

  10. Shiga toxin glycosphingolipid receptors in microvascular and macrovascular endothelial cells: differential association with membrane lipid raft microdomains[S

    PubMed Central

    Betz, Josefine; Bielaszewska, Martina; Thies, Andrea; Humpf, Hans-Ulrich; Dreisewerd, Klaus; Karch, Helge; Kim, Kwang S.; Friedrich, Alexander W.; Müthing, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    Vascular damage caused by Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli is largely mediated by Stxs, which in particular, injure microvascular endothelial cells in the kidneys and brain. The majority of Stxs preferentially bind to the glycosphingolipid (GSL) globotriaosylceramide (Gb3Cer) and, to a lesser extent, to globotetraosylceramide (Gb4Cer). As clustering of receptor GSLs in lipid rafts is a functional requirement for Stxs, we analyzed the distribution of Gb3Cer and Gb4Cer to membrane microdomains of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) and macrovascular EA.hy 926 endothelial cells by means of anti-Gb3Cer and anti-Gb4Cer antibodies. TLC immunostaining coupled with infrared matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (IR-MALDI) mass spectrometry revealed structural details of various lipoforms of Stx receptors and demonstrated their major distribution in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) compared with nonDRM fractions of HBMECs and EA.hy 926 cells. A significant preferential partition of different receptor lipoforms carrying C24:0/C24:1 or C16:0 fatty acid and sphingosine to DRMs was not detected in either cell type. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD)-mediated cholesterol depletion resulted in only partial destruction of lipid rafts, accompanied by minor loss of GSLs in HBMECs. In contrast, almost entire disintegration of lipid rafts accompanied by roughly complete loss of GSLs was detected in EA.hy 926 cells after removal of cholesterol, indicating more stable microdomains in HBMECs. Our findings provide first evidence for differently stable microdomains in human endothelial cells from different vascular beds and should serve as the basis for further exploring the functional role of lipid raft-associated Stx receptors in different cell types. PMID:21252262

  11. Investigating lipid interactions and the process of raft formation in cellular membranes using ToF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McQuaw, Carolyn M.; Sostarecz, Audra G.; Zheng, Leiliang; Ewing, Andrew G.; Winograd, Nicholas

    2006-07-01

    There is an increased interest in how lipids interact with each other, especially in the lateral separation of lipids into coexisting liquid phases as this is believed to be an attribute of raft formation in cell membranes. ToF-SIMS has shown itself to be an excellent tool for investigating cellular and model membrane systems and will be perhaps the most powerful one for investigating raft formation. Results from our laboratory show the capability of ToF-SIMS at identifying unequivocally the content of coexisting liquid lipid phases. Using supported lipid monolayers we find that the inclusion of dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) to a homogeneous dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC)/cholesterol phase results in the formation of cholesterol-rich domains [A.G. Sostarecz, C.M. McQuaw, A.G. Ewing, N. Winograd, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 126 (2004) 13882]. Also, for DPPE/cholesterol systems a single homogeneous DPPE/cholesterol phase is formed at ˜50 mol% cholesterol, whereas DPPC/cholesterol systems form a single phase at 30 mol% cholesterol [C.M. McQuaw, A. Sostarecz, L. Zheng, A.G. Ewing, N. Winograd, Langmuir 21 (2005) 807]. Currently we are exploring the incorporation of sphingomyelin into phospholipid-cholesterol mixtures in an effort to gain a better understanding of its role in raft formation.

  12. Economic evaluation of four types of dry/wet cooling applied to the 5-MWe Raft River geothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, J.A.; Allemann, R.T.

    1982-07-01

    A cost study is described which compared the economics of four dry/wet cooling systems to use at the existing Raft River Geothermal Plant. The results apply only at this site and should not be generalized without due consideration of the complete geothermal cycle. These systems are: the Binary Cooling Tower, evaporative condenser, Combin-aire, and a metal fin-tube dry cooling tower with deluge augmentation. The systems were evaluated using cooled, treated geothermal fluid instead of ground or surface water in the cooling loops. All comparisons were performed on the basis of a common plant site - the Raft River 5 MWe geothermal plant in Idaho. The Binary Cooling Tower and the Combin-aire cooling system were designed assuming the use of the isobutane/water surface condenser currently installed at the Raft River Plant. The other two systems had the isobutane ducted to the evaporative condensers. Capital credit was not given to the system employing the direct condensing process. The cost of the systems were estimated from designs provided by the vendors. The levelized energy cost range for each cooling system is listed below. The levelized energy cost reflects the incremental cost of the cooling system for the life of the plant. The estimates are presented in 1981 dollars.

  13. Rafts and the battleships of defense: the multifaceted microdomains for positive and negative signals in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Szöor, Arpád; Szöllosi, János; Vereb, György

    2010-05-01

    Recognition of the heterogeneity of the cell membrane was one of the most important scientific achievements in the last decades. Since coining the term "lipid rafts", continuous development of advanced microscopic and spectroscopic techniques has vastly expanded our view on these cell membrane microdomains that appear to have almost as many faces as researchers that look at them; they are variable in stability, size and composition that can change in a highly dynamic manner both by recruiting and expelling components as well as by coalescing and breaking up into smaller units. They have, however, one common feature: all eukaryotic cells present some variation of lipid rafts. Cells of the immune system are not exception to this, regardless of their lymphoid or myeloid origin their membranes show a domain structure and these domains serve to condense or reject particular transmembrane, GPI-linked and intracellularly membrane-anchored proteins as function requires. Here we provide a concise overview about the various weapons and shields that immune cells concentrate into their rafts, which have come into sight during the past years. The positive and negative regulatory roles of these microdomains are essential both in the functions of innate immunity and processes concatenated in the adaptive immune response. PMID:20026358

  14. CHOLINE PARTIALLY PREVENTS THE IMPACT OF ETHANOL ON THE LIPID RAFT DEPENDENT FUNCTIONS OF L1 CELL ADHESION MOLECULE

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ningfeng; Bamford, Penny; Jones, Jace; He, Min; Kane, Maureen A.; Mooney, Sandra M.; Bearer, Cynthia F.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder, the leading known cause of mental retardation, is caused by alcohol exposure during pregnancy. One mechanism of ethanol teratogenicity is the disruption of the function of L1 cell adhesion molecule (L1). These functions include enhancement of neurite outgrowth, trafficking through lipid rafts, and signal transduction. Recent data have shown that choline supplementation of rat pups reduces the effects of ethanol on neurobehavior. We sought to determine if choline could prevent the effect of ethanol on L1 function using a simple experimental system. Methods Cerebellar granule neurons (CGN) from postnatal day 6 rat pups were cultured with and without supplemental choline, and the effects on L1 signaling, lipid raft distribution and neurite outgrowth were measured in the presence or absence of ethanol. Results Choline significantly reduced the effect of ethanol on L1 signaling, the distribution of L1 in lipid rafts and L1 mediated neurite outgrowth. However, choline supplemented ethanol exposed cultures remained significantly different than controls. Conclusions Choline pretreatment of CGN significantly reduces the disruption of L1 function by ethanol, but does not completely return L1 function to baseline. This experimental system will enable discovery of the mechanism of the neuroprotective effect of choline. PMID:25421509

  15. Anchorage of HIV on permissive cells leads to coaggregation of viral particles with surface nucleolin at membrane raft microdomains.

    PubMed

    Nisole, Sébastien; Krust, Bernard; Hovanessian, Ara G

    2002-06-10

    The cross-linking of HIV on permissive cells results aggregation of HIV particles with surface nucleolin, CD4, and CXCR4, but without affecting the organization of CD45. In addition, HIV particles and nucleolin coaggregate with glycolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (GEMs) containing ganglioside, and glycosylphosphatidylinositol-linked proteins CD90 and CD59, pointing out that HIV anchorage induces lateral assemblies of specific membrane components into lipid rafts in which surface nucleolin is also incorporated. Consequently, equilibrium density fractionation of extracts from infected cells revealed that HIV proteins and nucleolin copurify with Triton X-100-resistant GEM-associated proteins. After HIV entry, nucleolin is recovered also in fractions containing HIV DNA, viral matrix, and reverse transcriptase, thus suggesting that it could accompany viral entry. We show that surface nucleolin is markedly down-regulated a few hours following HIV entry into permissive cells; an effect that appears to be the consequence of its translocation into the cytoplasm. Our findings demonstrate that anchorage of HIV particles on permissive cells induces aggegation of surface nucleolin and its association with detergent-insoluble lipid raft components. Moreover, they support the suggestion that surface nucleolin and lipid rafts are implicated in early events in the HIV entry process. PMID:12027446

  16. Caspase-8 and c-FLIPL Associate in Lipid Rafts with NF-κB Adaptors during T Cell Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Ravi S.; Russell, Jennifer Q.; Koenig, Andreas; Hinshaw-Makepeace, Jennifer A.; Wen, Renren; Wang, Demin; Huo, Hairong; Littman, Dan R.; Ferch, Uta; Ruland, Jurgen; Thome, Margot; Budd, Ralph C.

    2015-01-01

    Humans and mice lacking functional caspase-8 in T cells manifest a profound immunodeficiency syndrome due to defective T cell antigen receptor (TCR)-induced NF-κB signaling and proliferation. It is unknown how caspase-8 is activated following T cell stimulation, and what is the caspase-8 substrate(s) that is necessary to initiate T cell cycling. We observe that following TCR ligation, a small portion of total cellular caspase-8 and c-FLIPL rapidly migrate to lipid rafts where they associate in an active caspase complex. Activation of caspase-8 in lipid rafts is followed by rapid cleavage of c-FLIPL at a known caspase-8 cleavage site. The active caspase·c-FLIP complex forms in the absence of Fas (CD95/APO1) and associates with the NF-κB signaling molecules RIP1, TRAF2, and TRAF6, as well as upstream NF-κB regulators PKCθ, CARMA1, Bcl-10, and MALT1, which connect to the TCR. The lack of caspase-8 results in the absence of MALT1 and Bcl-10 in the active caspase complex. Consistent with this observation, inhibition of caspase activity attenuates NF-κB activation. The current findings define a link among TCR, caspases, and the NF-κB pathway that occurs in a sequestered lipid raft environment in T cells. PMID:17462996

  17. Designing Functionality and Stimuli-Responsiveness into Azlactone-Based Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Messman, Jamie M; Lokitz, Bradley S; Ankner, John Francis; Kilbey, II, S Michael

    2008-01-01

    There continues to be considerable interest in stimuli-responsive and reactive polymers for drug delivery vehicles or gene therapy agents, as well as soft interfaces capable of being patterned or chemically modified to serve as a biomaterial coating. One class of materials with particularly interesting potential are polymers based on 2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone (VDMA), which react rapidly with various nucleophiles without producing a leaving group or requiring a catalyst. In this contribution we describe the synthesis and characterization of polymers and copolymers incorporating VDMA, and their conjugation with biomolecules. By using reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization we are able to produce well-defined VDMA-containing homopolymers and block copolymers having tailored molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions. The conversion of these materials into polyelectrolytes and bioconjugates can be monitored in real time using infrared spectroscopy. Poly(VDMA)-based brushes can be synthesized by RAFT polyermization using surface-tethered chain transfer agents, and these brushes can be modified in situ and structural changes monitored using neutron reflectometry.

  18. Assessment of Internet-based tele-medicine in Africa (the RAFT project).

    PubMed

    Bagayoko, Cheick Oumar; Müller, Henning; Geissbuhler, Antoine

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this paper on the Réseau Afrique Francophone de Télémédecine (RAFT) project are the evaluation of feasibility, potential, problems and risks of an Internet-based tele-medicine network in developing countries of Africa. The RAFT project was started in Western African countries 5 years ago and has now extended to other regions of Africa as well (i.e. Madagascar, Rwanda). A project for the development of a national tele-medicine network in Mali was initiated in 2001, extended to Mauritania in 2002 and to Morocco in 2003. By 2006, a total of nine countries are connected. The entire technical infrastructure is based on Internet technologies for medical distance learning and tele-consultations. The results are a tele-medicine network that has been in productive use for over 5 years and has enabled various collaboration channels, including North-to-South (from Europe to Africa), South-to-South (within Africa), and South-to-North (from Africa to Europe) distance learning and tele-consultations, plus many personal exchanges between the participating hospitals and Universities. It has also unveiled a set of potential problems: (a) the limited importance of North-to-South collaborations when there are major differences in the available resources or the socio-cultural contexts between the collaborating parties; (b) the risk of an induced digital divide if the periphery of the health system in developing countries is not involved in the development of the network; and (c) the need for the development of local medical content management skills. Particularly point (c) is improved through the collaboration between the various countries as professionals from the medical and the computer science field are sharing courses and resources. Personal exchanges between partners in the project are frequent, and several persons received an education at one of the partner Universities. As conclusion, we can say that the identified risks have to be taken into account when

  19. Facile Synthesis of Worm-like Micelles by Visible Light Mediated Dispersion Polymerization Using Photoredox Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Jonathan; Xu, Jiangtao; Boyer, Cyrille

    2016-01-01

    Presented herein is a protocol for the facile synthesis of worm-like micelles by visible light mediated dispersion polymerization. This approach begins with the synthesis of a hydrophilic poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (POEGMA) homopolymer using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Under mild visible light irradiation (λ = 460 nm, 0.7 mW/cm(2)), this macro-chain transfer agent (macro-CTA) in the presence of a ruthenium based photoredox catalyst, Ru(bpy)3Cl2 can be chain extended with a second monomer to form a well-defined block copolymer in a process known as Photoinduced Electron Transfer RAFT (PET-RAFT). When PET-RAFT is used to chain extend POEGMA with benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) in ethanol (EtOH), polymeric nanoparticles with different morphologies are formed in situ according to a polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) mechanism. Self-assembly into nanoparticles presenting POEGMA chains at the corona and poly(benzyl methacrylate) (PBzMA) chains in the core occurs in situ due to the growing insolubility of the PBzMA block in ethanol. Interestingly, the formation of highly pure worm-like micelles can be readily monitored by observing the onset of a highly viscous gel in situ due to nanoparticle entanglements occurring during the polymerization. This process thereby allows for a more reproducible synthesis of worm-like micelles simply by monitoring the solution viscosity during the course of the polymerization. In addition, the light stimulus can be intermittently applied in an ON/OFF manner demonstrating temporal control over the nanoparticle morphology. PMID:27340940

  20. Second-Hand Cigarette Smoke Impairs Bacterial Phagocytosis in Macrophages by Modulating CFTR Dependent Lipid-Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Inzer; Ji, Changhoon; Vij, Neeraj

    2015-01-01

    Introduction First/Second-hand cigarette-smoke (FHS/SHS) exposure weakens immune defenses inducing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Hence, we evaluated if SHS induced changes in membrane/lipid-raft (m-/r)-CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) expression/activity is a potential mechanism for impaired bacterial phagocytosis in COPD. Methods RAW264.7 murine macrophages were exposed to freshly prepared CS-extract (CSE) containing culture media and/or Pseudomonas-aeruginosa-PA01-GFP for phagocytosis (fluorescence-microscopy), bacterial survival (colony-forming-units-CFU), and immunoblotting assays. The CFTR-expression/activity and lipid-rafts were modulated by transient-transfection or inhibitors/inducers. Next, mice were exposed to acute/sub-chronic-SHS or room-air (5-days/3-weeks) and infected with PA01-GFP, followed by quantification of bacterial survival by CFU-assay. Results We investigated the effect of CSE treatment on RAW264.7 cells infected by PA01-GFP and observed that CSE treatment significantly (p<0.01) inhibits PA01-GFP phagocytosis as compared to the controls. We also verified this in murine model, exposed to acute/sub-chronic-SHS and found significant (p<0.05, p<0.02) increase in bacterial survival in the SHS-exposed lungs as compared to the room-air controls. Next, we examined the effect of impaired CFTR ion-channel-activity on PA01-GFP infection of RAW264.7 cells using CFTR172-inhibitor and found no significant change in phagocytosis. We also similarly evaluated the effect of a CFTR corrector-potentiator compound, VRT-532, and observed no significant rescue of CSE impaired PA01-GFP phagocytosis although it significantly (p<0.05) decreases CSE induced bacterial survival. Moreover, induction of CFTR expression in macrophages significantly (p<0.03) improves CSE impaired PA01-GFP phagocytosis as compared to the control. Next, we verified the link between m

  1. Kinematics of a growth fault/raft system on the West African margin using 3-D restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouby, Delphine; Raillard, Stéphane; Guillocheau, François; Bouroullec, Renaud; Nalpas, Thierry

    2002-04-01

    The ability to quantify the movement history associated with growth structures is crucial in the understanding of fundamental processes such as the growth of folds or faults in 3-D. In this paper, we present an application of an original approach to restore in 3-D a listric growth fault system resulting from gravity-induced extension located on the West African margin. Our goal is to establish the 3-D structural framework and kinematics of the study area. We construct a 3-D geometrical model of the fault system (from 3-D seismic data), then restore six stratigraphic surfaces and reconstruct the 3-D geometry of the system at six incremental steps of its history. The evolution of the growth fault/raft system corresponds to the progressive separation of two rafts by regional extension, resulting in the development of an intervening basin located between them that evolved in three main stages: (1) the rise of an evaporite wall, (2) the development of a symmetric basin as the elevation of the diapir is reduced and buried, and (3) the development of asymmetric basins related to two systems of listric faults (the main fault F1 and the graben located between the rollovers and the lower raft). Important features of the growth fault/raft system could only be observed in 3-D and with increments of deformation restored. The rollover anticline (associated with the listric fault F1) is composed of two sub-units separated by an E-W oriented transverse graben indicating that the displacement field was divergent in map view. The rollover units are located within the overlap area of two fault systems and displays a 'mock-turtle' anticline structure. The seaward translation of the lower raft is associated with two successive vertical axis rotations in the opposite sense (clockwise then counter-clockwise by about 10°). This results from the fact that the two main fault systems developed successively. Fault system F1 formed during the Upper Albian, and the graben during the Cenomanian

  2. Ceramide inhibits PKCθ by regulating its phosphorylation and translocation to lipid rafts in Jurkat cells.

    PubMed

    Hage-Sleiman, Rouba; Hamze, Asmaa B; El-Hed, Aimée F; Attieh, Randa; Kozhaya, Lina; Kabbani, Sarah; Dbaibo, Ghassan

    2016-08-01

    Protein kinase C theta (PKCθ) is a novel, calcium-independent member of the PKC family of kinases that was identified as a central player in T cell signaling and proliferation. Upon T cell activation by antigen-presenting cells, PKCθ gets phosphorylated and activated prior to its translocation to the immunological synapse where it couples with downstream effectors. PKCθ may be regulated by ceramide, a crucial sphingolipid that is known to promote differentiation, growth arrest, and apoptosis. To further investigate the mechanism, we stimulated human Jurkat T cells with either PMA or anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies following induction of ceramide accumulation by adding exogenous ceramide, bacterial sphingomyelinase, or Fas ligation. Our results suggest that ceramide regulates the PKCθ pathway through preventing its critical threonine 538 (Thr538) phosphorylation and subsequent activation, thereby inhibiting the kinase's translocation to lipid rafts. Moreover, this inhibition is not likely to be a generic effect of ceramide on membrane reorganization. Other lipids, namely dihydroceramide, palmitate, and sphingosine, did not produce similar effects on PKCθ. Addition of the phosphatase inhibitors okadaic acid and calyculin A reversed the inhibition exerted by ceramide, and this suggests involvement of a ceramide-activated protein phosphatase. Such previously undescribed mechanism of regulation of PKCθ raises the possibility that ceramide, or one of its derivatives, and may prove valuable in novel therapeutic approaches for disorders involving autoimmunity or excessive inflammation-where PKCθ plays a critical role. PMID:26798039

  3. Raft River 5MW power plant: A small binary power plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitbeck, J. F.; Dibello, E. G.; Walrath, L. F.

    1982-06-01

    The Raft River 5MW power plant is a binary cycle pilot plant. The system uses isobutane in a dual boiling cycle. This cycle was selected because the well field and temperatures were not well known at the time of cycle selection, and therefore, a boiling cycle was desirable. The dual boiling features provides about 15 to 20% more power and makes the output less sensitive to changes in geothermal temperature changes than a single boiler system. The plant design was based upon a 290F geothermal fluid temperature at the inlet to the plant and has a gross nominal generator rating of 5MW; however, actual output will vary according to ambient wet bulb temperatures over a range from 4.4MW to 6.2MW with the actual plant inlet temperature of 278F being obtained. The plant is supplied by three production wells. Geothermal fluid boost pumps within the plant inlet provide the pressure necessary to overcome plant pressure drop and return the fluid to the two injection sites.

  4. Antimicrobial Peptide Mimicking Primary Amine and Guanidine Containing Methacrylamide Copolymers Prepared by Raft Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Exley, Sarah E.; Paslay, Lea C.; Sahukhal, Gyan S.; Abel, Brooks A.; Brown, Tyler D.; McCormick, Charles L.; Heinhorst, Sabine; Koul, Veena; Choudhary, Veena; Elasri, Mohamed O.; Morgan, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) display the ability to eliminate a wide variety of bacteria, without toxicity to the host eukaryotic cells. Synthetic polymers containing moieties mimicking lysine and arginine components found in AMPs have been reported to show effectiveness against specific bacteria, with the mechanism of activity purported to depend on the nature of the amino acid mimic. In an attempt to incorporate the antimicrobial activity of both amino acids into a single water-soluble copolymer, a series of copolymers containing lysine mimicking aminopropyl methacrylamide (APMA) and arginine mimicking guanadinopropyl methacrylamide (GPMA) were prepared via aqueous RAFT polymerization. Copolymers were prepared with varying ratios of the comonomers, with degree of polymerization of 35–40 and narrow molecular weight distribution to simulate naturally occurring AMPs. Antimicrobial activity was determined against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria under conditions with varying salt concentration. Toxicity to mammalian cells was assessed by hemolysis of red blood cells and MTT assays of MCF-7 cells. Antimicrobial activity was observed for APMA homopolymer and copolymers with low concentrations of GPMA against all bacteria tested, with low toxicity toward mammalian cells. PMID:26558609

  5. Amyloidβ Peptides in interaction with raft-mime model membranes: a neutron reflectivity insight

    PubMed Central

    Rondelli, Valeria; Brocca, Paola; Motta, Simona; Messa, Massimo; Colombo, Laura; Salmona, Mario; Fragneto, Giovanna; Cantù, Laura; Del Favero, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The role of first-stage β–amyloid aggregation in the development of the Alzheimer disease, is widely accepted but still unclear. Intimate interaction with the cell membrane is invoked. We designed Neutron Reflectometry experiments to reveal the existence and extent of the interaction between β–amyloid (Aβ) peptides and a lone customized biomimetic membrane, and their dependence on the aggregation state of the peptide. The membrane, asymmetrically containing phospholipids, GM1 and cholesterol in biosimilar proportion, is a model for a raft, a putative site for amyloid-cell membrane interaction. We found that the structured-oligomer of Aβ(1-42), its most acknowledged membrane-active state, is embedded as such into the external leaflet of the membrane. Conversely, the Aβ(1-42) unstructured early-oligomers deeply penetrate the membrane, likely mimicking the interaction at neuronal cell surfaces, when the Aβ(1-42) is cleaved from APP protein and the membrane constitutes a template for its further structural evolution. Moreover, the smaller Aβ(1-6) fragment, the N-terminal portion of Aβ, was also used. Aβ N-terminal is usually considered as involved in oligomer stabilization but not in the peptide-membrane interaction. Instead, it was seen to remove lipids from the bilayer, thus suggesting its role, once in the whole peptide, in membrane leakage, favouring peptide recruitment. PMID:26880066

  6. Development of gastroretentive metronidazole floating raft system for targeting Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Abou Youssef, Nancy Abdel Hamid; Kassem, Abeer Ahmed; El-Massik, Magda Abd Elsamea; Boraie, Nabila Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The study demonstrates the feasibility of prolonging gastric residence time and release rate of metronidazole (Mz) by preparing floating raft system (FRS) using ion-sensitive in situ gel forming polymers. FRSs contained 3, 4, 5 and 0.5, 0.75, 1% w/v sodium alginate (Alg) and gellan gum (G), respectively, 0.25% w/v sodium citrate and calcium carbonate (C). Lipids: glyceryl mono stearate (GMS), Precirol(®) and Compritol(®) were incorporated into G-based formulations (G1%C1%). Mz:lipid ratio was 1:1, except for Mz:GMS, ratios of 1:1.5 and 1:2 were also investigated. Buoyancy, gelation capacity and viscosity parameters were evaluated. Drug release and kinetics for selected formulae were examined. The selected lipid containing formula was subjected to an accelerated stability testing. Alg4%C2% FRS exhibited short gelation lag time (3s), long duration (>24h), floating lag time 1m in and duration >24h, and a reliable sustained drug release (MDT 6h). Gellan gum FRSs achieved successful floating gastroretention, but failed to achieve the required gelation capacity. Incorporation of GMS (Mz:GMS 1:1) enhanced the gelation lag time and duration (6s and >24h, respectively), keeping sustained drug release and formulation stability. The improved characteristics of the selected FRS make them excellent candidates for gastric targeting to eradicate Helicobacter pylori. PMID:25843757

  7. Ice-rafted debris associated with binge/purge oscillations of the Laurentide Ice Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alley, R. B.; Macayeal, D. R.

    1994-08-01

    The North Atlantic sediment record suggests quasi-periodic (7000- to 12,000-year period) ice-rafted debris (IRD) depositions during at least the last glacial period. The cause of these Heinrich events, as they are commonly known, is not fully understood; however, they may point to surges of the ice stream that drained the Hudson Bay/Hudson Strait region of the Laurentide Ice Sheet. We investigate a simple conceptual model of ice stream instability (the binge/purge model) to suggest ways in which the ice stream could have entrained sufficient debris to account for the estimated mass of IRD associated with a typical Heinrich IRD layer in the North Atlantic (1.0 ± 0.3 × 1015 kg). We find that freezing of debris-laden ice at the bed of the ice stream during the brief (≈ 750 years) surge phase of the ice stream's hypothesized binge/purge cycle can incorporate up to 5.1 × 1015 kg. This amount is sufficient to meet the constraints of the North Atlantic sediment record but by no means verifies the binge/purge model as the cause of Heinrich events.

  8. Geology and geophysics of the southern Raft River Valley geothermal area, Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Paul L.; Mabey, Don R.; Zohdy, Adel A.R.; Hans, Ackerman; Hoover, Donald B.; Pierce, Kenneth L.; Oriel, Steven S.

    1976-01-01

    The Raft River valley, near the boundary of the Snake River plain with the Basin and Range province, is a north-trending late Cenozoic downwarp bounded by faults on the west, south, and east. Pleistocene alluvium and Miocene-Pliocene tuffaceous sediments, conglomerate, and felsic volcanic rocks aggregate 2 km in thickness. Large gravity, magnetic, and total field resistivity highs probably indicate a buried igneous mass that is too old to serve as a heat source. Differing seismic velocities relate to known or inferred structures and to a suspected shallow zone of warm water. Resistivity anomalies reflect differences of both composition and degree of alteration of Cenozoic rocks. Resistivity soundings show a 2 to 5 ohm·m unit with a thickness of 1 km beneath a large part of the valley, and the unit may indicate partly hot water and partly clayey sediments. Observed self-potential anomalies are believed to indicate zones where warm water rises toward the surface. Boiling wells at Bridge, Idaho are near the intersection of north-northeast normal faults which have moved as recently as the late (?) Pleistocene, and an east-northeast structure, probably a right-lateral fault. Deep circulation of ground water in this region of relatively high heat flow and upwelling along faults is the probable cause of the thermal anomaly.

  9. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  10. REEP2 Enhances Sweet Receptor Function by Recruitment to Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Ilegems, Erwin; Iwatsuki, Ken; Kokrashvili, Zaza; Benard, Outhiriaradjou; Ninomiya, Yuzo; Margolskee, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    Heterologously expressed sensory receptors generally do not achieve the ligand sensitivity observed in vivo, and may require specific accessory proteins to ensure optimal function. We searched for taste cell-expressed receptor transporting protein (RTP) and receptor expression enhancing protein (REEP) family members that might serve as accessory molecules to enhance gustatory receptor function. We determined that REEP2 is an integral membrane protein expressed in taste cells, physically associates with both subunits of the type 1 taste receptor 2 and type 1 taste receptor 3 sweet receptor and specifically enhances responses to tastants of heterologously expressed sweet and bitter taste receptors. Downregulation of endogenously expressed REEP2 in the chemosensory enteroendocrine GLUTag cell line dramatically reduced sensitivity of endogenous sweet receptors. In contrast to the observation that RTP1, RTP2, and REEP1 enhance function of olfactory receptors by promoting their transit to the cell surface, we found that REEP2 does not increase cell surface expression of sweet receptors but instead alters their spatial organization. REEP2 recruits sweet receptors into lipid raft microdomains localized near the taste cell’s apical region, thereby improving G-protein-coupled receptor signaling and promoting receptor access to tastants arriving through the apical taste pore. PMID:20943918

  11. Continuity of monolayer-bilayer junctions for localization of lipid raft microdomains in model membranes

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ryu, Yong -Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng -Hun; Lee, Sang -Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang -Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin -Doo

    2016-05-27

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed betweenmore » the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Furthermore, our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates.« less

  12. Bilayer Asymmetry Influences Integrin Sequestering in Raft-Mimicking Lipid Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Noor F.; Siegel, Amanda P.; Ge, Yifan; Jordan, Rainer; Naumann, Christoph A.

    2013-01-01

    There is growing recognition that lipid heterogeneities in cellular membranes play an important role in the distribution and functionality of membrane proteins. However, the detection and characterization of such heterogeneities at the cellular level remains challenging. Here we report on the poorly understood relationship between lipid bilayer asymmetry and membrane protein sequestering in raft-mimicking model membrane mixtures using a powerful experimental platform comprised of confocal spectroscopy XY-scan and photon-counting histogram analyses. This experimental approach is utilized to probe the domain-specific sequestering and oligomerization state of αvβ3 and α5β1 integrins in bilayers, which contain coexisting liquid-disordered/liquid-ordered (ld/lo) phase regions exclusively in the top leaflet of the bilayer (bottom leaflet contains ld phase). Comparison with previously reported integrin sequestering data in bilayer-spanning lo-ld phase separations demonstrates that bilayer asymmetry has a profound influence on αvβ3 and α5β1 sequestering behavior. For example, both integrins sequester preferentially to the lo phase in asymmetric bilayers, but to the ld phase in their symmetric counterparts. Furthermore, our data show that bilayer asymmetry significantly influences the role of native ligands in integrin sequestering. PMID:23708361

  13. Structure of Cholesterol/Ceramide Monolayer Mixtures: Implications to the Molecular Organization of Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Luana; Solomonov, Inna; Weygand, Markus Jan; Kjaer, Kristian; Leiserowitz, Leslie; Addadi, Lia

    2005-01-01

    The structure of monolayers of cholesterol/ceramide mixtures was investigated using grazing incidence x-ray diffraction, immunofluorescence, and atomic force microscopy techniques. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements showed the existence of a crystalline mixed phase of the two components within a range of compositions of cholesterol/ceramide between 100:0 and 67:33. The mixed phase coexists with the ceramide crystalline phase in the range of compositions between 50:50 and 30:70; between 30:70 and 0:100 only the highly crystalline phase of ceramide was detected. The latter was determined and modeled. Immunolabeling was performed with an antibody specific to the cholesterol monohydrate crystalline arrangement. The antibody recognizes crystalline cholesterol monolayers, but does not interact with crystalline ceramide. Immunofluorescence and atomic force microscopy data show that in uncompressed ceramide monolayers, the highly crystalline phase coexists with a disordered loosely packed phase. In contrast, no disordered phase coexists with the new crystalline mixed phase. We conclude that the new mixed phase represents a stable homogeneous arrangement of cholesterol with ceramide. As ceramide incorporates the lipid backbone common to all sphingolipids, this arrangement may be relevant to the understanding of the molecular organization of lipid rafts. PMID:15722431

  14. The Structure of Gold-Nanoparticle Networks Cross-Linked by Di- and Multifunctional RAFT Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Rossner, Christian; Glatter, Otto; Saldanha, Oliva; Köster, Sarah; Vana, Philipp

    2015-09-29

    Gold nanoparticle (AuNP) network structures featuring particles from the two-phase Brust-Schiffrin synthesis and linear RAFT oligomers of styrene with two and multiple trithiocarbonate (TTC) groups along their backbone have been investigated in detail. Insights into the internal structures of these particle networks could be obtained from small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, showing that primary AuNPs are cross-linked by the employed molecular linker. The extent of AuNP network formation was investigated by means of dynamic light scattering and UV/visible extinction spectroscopy, showing an abrupt attenuation of network formation after a critical degree of polymerization of the cross-linker is exceeded. Analysis of transmission electron micrographs indicated a three-dimensional shape of the particle superstructures, which is evenly filled with the primary AuNPs. From the results obtained in this study, guidelines for the fabrication of nanoparticle networks from the self-assembly with macromolecular cross-linkers are suggested. PMID:26340689

  15. Continuity of Monolayer-Bilayer Junctions for Localization of Lipid Raft Microdomains in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Lee, Sang-Wook; Sohn, Youngjoo; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2016-01-01

    We show that the selective localization of cholesterol-rich domains and associated ganglioside receptors prefer to occur in the monolayer across continuous monolayer-bilayer junctions (MBJs) in supported lipid membranes. For the MBJs, glass substrates were patterned with poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) oligomers by thermally-assisted contact printing, leaving behind 3 nm-thick PDMS patterns. The hydrophobicity of the transferred PDMS patterns was precisely tuned by the stamping temperature. Lipid monolayers were formed on the PDMS patterned surface while lipid bilayers were on the bare glass surface. Due to the continuity of the lipid membranes over the MBJs, essentially free diffusion of lipids was allowed between the monolayer on the PDMS surface and the upper leaflet of the bilayer on the glass substrate. The preferential localization of sphingomyelin, ganglioside GM1 and cholesterol in the monolayer region enabled to develop raft microdomains through coarsening of nanorafts. Our methodology provides a simple and effective scheme of non-disruptive manipulation of the chemical landscape associated with lipid phase separations, which leads to more sophisticated applications in biosensors and as cell culture substrates. PMID:27230411

  16. Bermuda as an evolutionary life raft for an ancient lineage of endangered lizards.

    PubMed

    Brandley, Matthew C; Wang, Yuezhao; Guo, Xianguang; Nieto Montes de Oca, Adrián; Fería Ortíz, Manuel; Hikida, Tsutomu; Ota, Hidetoshi

    2010-01-01

    Oceanic islands are well known for harboring diverse species assemblages and are frequently the basis of research on adaptive radiation and neoendemism. However, a commonly overlooked role of some islands is their function in preserving ancient lineages that have become extinct everywhere else (paleoendemism). The island archipelago of Bermuda is home to a single species of extant terrestrial vertebrate, the endemic skink Plestiodon (formerly Eumeces) longirostris. The presence of this species is surprising because Bermuda is an isolated, relatively young oceanic island approximately 1000 km from the eastern United States. Here, we apply Bayesian phylogenetic analyses using a relaxed molecular clock to demonstrate that the island of Bermuda, although no older than two million years, is home to the only extant representative of one of the earliest mainland North American Plestiodon lineages, which diverged from its closest living relatives 11.5 to 19.8 million years ago. This implies that, within a short geological time frame, mainland North American ancestors of P. longirostris colonized the recently emergent Bermuda and the entire lineage subsequently vanished from the mainland. Thus, our analyses reveal that Bermuda is an example of a "life raft" preserving millions of years of unique evolutionary history, now at the brink of extinction. Threats such as habitat destruction, littering, and non-native species have severely reduced the population size of this highly endangered lizard. PMID:20614024

  17. Amyloid-β peptides in interaction with raft-mime model membranes: a neutron reflectivity insight.

    PubMed

    Rondelli, Valeria; Brocca, Paola; Motta, Simona; Messa, Massimo; Colombo, Laura; Salmona, Mario; Fragneto, Giovanna; Cantù, Laura; Del Favero, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The role of first-stage β-amyloid aggregation in the development of the Alzheimer disease, is widely accepted but still unclear. Intimate interaction with the cell membrane is invoked. We designed Neutron Reflectometry experiments to reveal the existence and extent of the interaction between β-amyloid (Aβ) peptides and a lone customized biomimetic membrane, and their dependence on the aggregation state of the peptide. The membrane, asymmetrically containing phospholipids, GM1 and cholesterol in biosimilar proportion, is a model for a raft, a putative site for amyloid-cell membrane interaction. We found that the structured-oligomer of Aβ(1-42), its most acknowledged membrane-active state, is embedded as such into the external leaflet of the membrane. Conversely, the Aβ(1-42) unstructured early-oligomers deeply penetrate the membrane, likely mimicking the interaction at neuronal cell surfaces, when the Aβ(1-42) is cleaved from APP protein and the membrane constitutes a template for its further structural evolution. Moreover, the smaller Aβ(1-6) fragment, the N-terminal portion of Aβ, was also used. Aβ N-terminal is usually considered as involved in oligomer stabilization but not in the peptide-membrane interaction. Instead, it was seen to remove lipids from the bilayer, thus suggesting its role, once in the whole peptide, in membrane leakage, favouring peptide recruitment. PMID:26880066

  18. Resistance to alkyl-lysophospholipid-induced apoptosis due to downregulated sphingomyelin synthase 1 expression with consequent sphingomyelin- and cholesterol-deficiency in lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Van der Luit, Arnold H.; Budde, Marianne; Zerp, Shuraila; Caan, Wendy; Klarenbeek, Jeffrey B.; Verheij, Marcel; van Blitterswijk, Wim J.

    2006-01-01

    The ALP (alkyl-lysophospholipid) edelfosine (1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine; Et-18-OCH3) induces apoptosis in S49 mouse lymphoma cells. To this end, ALP is internalized by lipid raft-dependent endocytosis and inhibits phosphatidylcholine synthesis. A variant cell-line, S49AR, which is resistant to ALP, was shown previously to be unable to internalize ALP via this lipid raft pathway. The reason for this uptake failure is not understood. In the present study, we show that S49AR cells are unable to synthesize SM (sphingomyelin) due to down-regulated SMS1 (SM synthase 1) expression. In parental S49 cells, resistance to ALP could be mimicked by small interfering RNA-induced SMS1 suppression, resulting in SM deficiency and blockage of raft-dependent internalization of ALP and induction of apoptosis. Similar results were obtained by treatment of the cells with myriocin/ISP-1, an inhibitor of general sphingolipid synthesis, or with U18666A, a cholesterol homoeostasis perturbing agent. U18666A is known to inhibit Niemann–Pick C1 protein-dependent vesicular transport of cholesterol from endosomal compartments to the trans-Golgi network and the plasma membrane. U18666A reduced cholesterol partitioning in detergent-resistant lipid rafts and inhibited SM synthesis in S49 cells, causing ALP resistance similar to that observed in S49AR cells. The results are explained by the strong physical interaction between (newly synthesized) SM and available cholesterol at the Golgi, where they facilitate lipid raft formation. We propose that ALP internalization by lipid-raft-dependent endocytosis represents the retrograde route of a constitutive SMS1- and lipid-raft-dependent membrane vesicular recycling process. PMID:17049047

  19. Lipid Rafts Are Physiologic Membrane Microdomains Necessary for the Morphogenic and Developmental Functions of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Tsui, Cynthia C; Gabreski, Nicole A; Hein, Sarah J; Pierchala, Brian A

    2015-09-23

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes PNS development and kidney morphogenesis via a receptor complex consisting of the glycerophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored, ligand binding receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Although Ret signal transduction in vitro is augmented by translocation into lipid rafts via GFRα1, the existence and importance of lipid rafts in GDNF-Ret signaling under physiologic conditions is unresolved. A knock-in mouse was produced that replaced GFRα1 with GFRα1-TM, which contains a transmembrane (TM) domain instead of the GPI anchor. GFRα1-TM still binds GDNF and promotes Ret activation but does not translocate into rafts. In Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice, GFRα1-TM is expressed, trafficked, and processed at levels identical to GFRα1. Although Gfrα1(+/TM) mice are viable, Gfrα1(TM/TM) mice display bilateral renal agenesis, lack enteric neurons in the intestines, and have motor axon guidance deficits, similar to Gfrα1(-/-) mice. Therefore, the recruitment of Ret into lipid rafts by GFRα1 is required for the physiologic functions of GDNF in vertebrates. Significance statement: Membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts have been proposed to be unique subdomains in the plasma membrane that are critical for the signaling functions of multiple receptor complexes. Their existence and physiologic relevance has been debated. Based on in vitro studies, lipid rafts have been reported to be necessary for the function of the Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of neurotrophic factors. The receptor for GDNF comprises the lipid raft-resident, glycerophosphatidylinositol-anchored receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Here we demonstrate, using a knock-in mouse model in which GFRα1 is no longer located in lipid rafts, that the developmental functions of GDNF in the periphery require the translocation of the GDNF receptor complex

  20. Lipid Rafts Are Physiologic Membrane Microdomains Necessary for the Morphogenic and Developmental Functions of Glial Cell Line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tsui, Cynthia C.; Gabreski, Nicole A.; Hein, Sarah J.

    2015-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) promotes PNS development and kidney morphogenesis via a receptor complex consisting of the glycerophosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored, ligand binding receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Although Ret signal transduction in vitro is augmented by translocation into lipid rafts via GFRα1, the existence and importance of lipid rafts in GDNF–Ret signaling under physiologic conditions is unresolved. A knock-in mouse was produced that replaced GFRα1 with GFRα1–TM, which contains a transmembrane (TM) domain instead of the GPI anchor. GFRα1–TM still binds GDNF and promotes Ret activation but does not translocate into rafts. In Gfrα1TM/TM mice, GFRα1–TM is expressed, trafficked, and processed at levels identical to GFRα1. Although Gfrα1+/TM mice are viable, Gfrα1TM/TM mice display bilateral renal agenesis, lack enteric neurons in the intestines, and have motor axon guidance deficits, similar to Gfrα1−/− mice. Therefore, the recruitment of Ret into lipid rafts by GFRα1 is required for the physiologic functions of GDNF in vertebrates. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts have been proposed to be unique subdomains in the plasma membrane that are critical for the signaling functions of multiple receptor complexes. Their existence and physiologic relevance has been debated. Based on in vitro studies, lipid rafts have been reported to be necessary for the function of the Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family of neurotrophic factors. The receptor for GDNF comprises the lipid raft-resident, glycerophosphatidylinositol-anchored receptor GDNF family receptor α1 (GFRα1) and the receptor tyrosine kinase Ret. Here we demonstrate, using a knock-in mouse model in which GFRα1 is no longer located in lipid rafts, that the developmental functions of GDNF in the periphery require the translocation of the GDNF receptor complex

  1. Functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with thermo-responsive azide-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) via click reactions.

    PubMed

    Su, Xin; Shuai, Ya; Guo, Zanru; Feng, Yujun

    2013-01-01

    Covalently functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were prepared by grafting well-defined thermo-responsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) via click reactions. First, azide-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (N3-PNIPAM) was synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and then the N₃-PNIPAM moiety was connected onto MWNTs by click chemistry. The products were characterized by means of FT-IR, TGA and TEM. The results show that the modification of MWNTs is very successful and MWNTs functionalized by N₃-PNIPAM (MWNTs-PNIPAM) have good solubility and stability in water. TEM images show the functionalized MWNTs are dispersed individually, indicating that the bundles of original MWNTs are separated into individual tubes by surface modification with polymer chains. These MWNTs modified with PNIPAM represent a potential nano-material for preparation of hydrophilic composite materials. PMID:23599017

  2. Engineering biodegradable and multifunctional peptide-based polymers for gene delivery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The complex nature of in vivo gene transfer establishes the need for multifunctional delivery vectors capable of meeting these challenges. An additional consideration for clinical translation of synthetic delivery formulations is reproducibility and scale-up of materials. In this review, we summarize our work over the last five years in developing a modular approach for synthesizing peptide-based polymers. In these materials, bioactive peptides that address various barriers to gene delivery are copolymerized with a hydrophilic backbone of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) using reversible-addition fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization. We demonstrate that this synthetic approach results in well-defined, narrowly-disperse polymers with controllable composition and molecular weight. To date, we have investigated the effectiveness of various bioactive peptides for DNA condensation, endosomal escape, cell targeting, and degradability on gene transfer, as well as the impact of multivalency and polymer architecture on peptide bioactivity. PMID:24156736

  3. Vinyl Dimethyl Azlactone-Containing Copolymers: Towards Bio-Inspired Surfaces/Polymer-Protein Conjugates

    SciTech Connect

    Messman, Jamie M; Banaszak, Abigail; Barrninger, Joshua; Mays, Jimmy; Kilbey, II, S Michael

    2007-01-01

    Stimuli-responsive, vinyl dimethyl azlactone/vinyl pyrrolidone (VDMA/VP) copolymers have been prepared using free radical polymerization techniques. These copolymers are subsequently the basis for the design of polymer brushes where the system is composed of a polystyrene (PS) block and a VDMA/VP copolymer block. Copolymers have been prepared using reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization technique. Using a solvent that is selective for the VDMA/VP block, these PS-block-P[VDMA/VP] copolymers can be preferentially adsorbed at the solid-fluid interface through the PS block to form a polymer "brush". Because VDMA is known to quantitatively react with amines, exposure of the copolymer to a solution containing amino acids (e.g. glycine) yields a bio-functionalized polymer brush. In this paper we will report on the synthesis and characterization of VDMA/VP copolymers including compositional analysis using FTIR and NMR spectroscopies.

  4. An electrochemical immunosensor to minimize the nonspecific adsorption and to improve sensitivity of protein assays in human serum.

    PubMed

    Shiddiky, Muhammad J A; Kithva, Prakash H; Kozak, Darby; Trau, Matt

    2012-01-01

    An electrochemical immunoassay which minimizes nonspecific protein adsorption and improves detection sensitivity of proteomic cancer biomarker is described. Our technique comprises two novel features: (i) a high density terminally functionalized poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide) 'brush' layer is grown by surface initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization method from the electrode surface in order to minimize nonspecific adsorption of serum proteins and other biomolecules, and (ii) a signal amplifying 'bionanoconjugate' comprised of graphene oxide nanosheets decorated with CdSe quantum dots and recombinant single-chain variable fragments towards MSLN, is used to 'physically' amplify the anodic stripping voltammetric signal. This method enabled a detection limit of ca. 1 pg/mL MSLN (RSD=4.6%, n=4) spiked in serum samples. Because of the simple, specific and sensitive nature of this methodology, we feel that it may find potential use in serum-based protein diagnostics. PMID:22705407

  5. Oral PEG 15-20 protects the intestine against radiation : role of lipid rafts.

    SciTech Connect

    Valuckaite, V.; Zaborina, O.; Long, J.; Hauer-Jensen, M.; Wang, J.; Holbrook, C.; Zaborin, A.; Drabik, K.; Katdare, M.; Mauceri, H.; Weichselbaum, R.; Firestone, M. A.; Lee, K. Y.; Chang, E. B.; Matthews, J.; Alverdy, J. C.; Materials Science Division; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Arkansas

    2009-12-01

    Intestinal injury following abdominal radiation therapy or accidental exposure remains a significant clinical problem that can result in varying degrees of mucosal destruction such as ulceration, vascular sclerosis, intestinal wall fibrosis, loss of barrier function, and even lethal gut-derived sepsis. We determined the ability of a high-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol-based copolymer, PEG 15-20, to protect the intestine against the early and late effects of radiation in mice and rats and to determine its mechanism of action by examining cultured rat intestinal epithelia. Rats were exposed to fractionated radiation in an established model of intestinal injury, whereby an intestinal segment is surgically placed into the scrotum and radiated daily. Radiation injury score was decreased in a dose-dependent manner in rats gavaged with 0.5 or 2.0 g/kg per day of PEG 15-20 (n = 9-13/group, P < 0.005). Complementary studies were performed in a novel mouse model of abdominal radiation followed by intestinal inoculation with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), a common pathogen that causes lethal gut-derived sepsis following radiation. Mice mortality was decreased by 40% in mice drinking 1% PEG 15-20 (n = 10/group, P < 0.001). Parallel studies were performed in cultured rat intestinal epithelial cells treated with PEG 15-20 before radiation. Results demonstrated that PEG 15-20 prevented radiation-induced intestinal injury in rats, prevented apoptosis and lethal sepsis attributable to P. aeruginosa in mice, and protected cultured intestinal epithelial cells from apoptosis and microbial adherence and possible invasion. PEG 15-20 appeared to exert its protective effect via its binding to lipid rafts by preventing their coalescence, a hallmark feature in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to radiation.

  6. Using organotypic (raft) epithelial tissue cultures for the biosynthesis and isolation of infectious human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ozbun, Michelle A.; Patterson, Nicole A.

    2014-01-01

    Papillomaviruses have a strict tropism for epithelial cells and they are fully reliant on cellular differentiation for completion of their life cycles, resulting in the production of progeny virions. Thus, a permissive environment for full viral replication in vitro wherein virion morphogenesis occurs under cooperative viral and cellular cues requires the cultivation of epithelium. Presented in the first section of this unit is a protocol for growing differentiating epithelial tissues, whose structure and function mimics many important morphological and biochemical aspects of normal skin. The technique, pioneered by Asslineau and Pruniéras (Asselineau and Prunieras 1984) and modified by Kopan et al. (Kopan et al. 1987), involves growing epidermal cells atop a dermal equivalent consisting of live fibroblasts and a collagen lattice. Epithelial stratification and differentiation ensues when the keratinocyte-dermal equivalent is placed at the air-liquid interface. The apparent floating nature of the cell-matrix in this method led to the nickname “raft” cultures. The general technique can be applied to normal low passage keratinocytes, to cells stably transfected with papillomavirus genes or genomes, as well as keratinocytes established from neoplastic lesions. However, infectious papillomavirus particles have only been isolated from organotypic epithelial cultures initiated with cells that maintain oncogenic human papillomavirus genomes in an extrachomosomal replicative form. The second section of this unit is dedicated to a virion isolation method that minimizes aerosol and skin exposure to these human carcinogens. Although the focus of the protocols is on the growth of tissues that yields infectious papillomavirus progeny, this culture system facilitates the investigation of these fastidious viruses during their complex replicative cycles, and raft tissues can be manipulated and harvested at any point during the process. Importantly, a single step virus growth

  7. COMPARISON OF THREE TRACER TESTS AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SITE

    SciTech Connect

    Earl D Mattson; Mitchell Plummer; Carl Palmer; Larry Hull; Samantha Miller; Randy Nye

    2011-02-01

    Three conservative tracer tests have been conducted through the Bridge Fault fracture zone at the Raft River Geothermal (RRG) site. All three tests were conducted between injection well RRG-5 and production wells RRG-1 (790 m distance) and RRG-4 (740 m distance). The injection well is used during the summer months to provide pressure support to the production wells. The first test was conducted in 2008 using 136 kg of fluorescein tracer. Two additional tracers were injected in 2010. The first 2010 tracer injected was 100 kg fluorescein disodium hydrate salt on June, 21. The second tracer (100 kg 2,6-naphthalene disulfonic acid sodium salt) was injected one month later on July 21. Sampling of the two productions wells is still being performed to obtain the tail end of the second 2010 tracer test. Tracer concentrations were measured using HPLC with a fluorescence detector. Results for the 2008 test, suggest 80% tracer recover at the two production wells. Of the tracer recovered, 85% of tracer mass was recovered in well RRG-4 indicating a greater flow pathway connection between injection well and RRG-4 than RRG-1. Fluorescein tracer results appear to be similar between the 2008 and 2010 tests for well RRG-4 with peak concentrations arriving approximately 20 days after injection despite the differences between the injection rates for the two tests (~950 gpm to 475 gpm) between the 2008 and 2010. The two 2010 tracer tests will be compared to determine if the results support the hypothesis that rock contraction along the flow pathway due to the 55 oC cooler water injection alters the flow through the ~140 oC reservoir.

  8. Clustering of Neuronal K+-Cl− Cotransporters in Lipid Rafts by Tyrosine Phosphorylation*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Miho; Wake, Hiroaki; Moorhouse, Andrew J.; Nabekura, Junichi

    2009-01-01

    The neuronal K+-Cl− cotransporter (KCC2) is a membrane transport protein that extrudes Cl− from neurons and helps maintain low intracellular [Cl−] and hyperpolarizing GABAergic synaptic potentials. Depolarizing γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) responses in neonatal neurons and following various forms of neuronal injury are associated with reduced levels of KCC2 expression. Despite the importance for plasticity of inhibitory transmission, less is known about cellular mechanisms involved in more dynamic changes in KCC2 function. In this study, we investigated the role of tyrosine phosphorylation in KCC2 localization and function in hippocampal neurons and in cultured GT1-7 cells. Mutation to the putative tyrosine phosphorylation site within the long intracellular carboxyl terminus of KCC2(Y1087D) or application of the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein shifted the GABA reversal potential (EGABA) to more depolarized values, indicating reduced KCC2 function. This was associated with a change in the expression pattern of KCC2 from a punctate distribution to a more uniform distribution, suggesting that functional tyrosine-phosphorylated KCC2 forms clusters in restricted membrane domains. Sodium vanadate, a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, increased the proportion of KCC2 associated with lipid rafts membrane domains. Loss of tyrosine phosphorylation also reduced oligomerization of KCC2. A loss of the punctuate distribution and oligomerization of KCC2 and a more depolarized EGABA were seen when the 28-amino-acid carboxyl terminus of KCC2 was deleted. These results indicate that direct tyrosine phosphorylation of KCC2 results in membrane clusters and functional transport activity, suggesting a mechanism by which intracellular Cl− concentrations and GABA responses can be rapidly modulated. PMID:19679663

  9. RAFT - I. Discovery of new planetary candidates and updated orbits from archival FEROS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, M. G.; Jenkins, J. S.; Jones, M. I.

    2015-08-01

    A recent reanalysis of archival data has lead several authors to arrive at strikingly different conclusions for a number of planet-hosting candidate stars. In particular, some radial velocities (RVs) measured using Fiber-fed Extended Range Optical Spectrograph (FEROS) spectra have been shown to be inaccurate, throwing some doubt on the validity of a number of planet detections. Motivated by these results, we have begun the Reanalysis of Archival FEROS specTra (RAFT) programme and here we discuss the first results from this work. We have reanalyzed FEROS data for the stars HD 11977, HD 47536, HD 70573, HD 110014 and HD 122430, all of which are claimed to have at least one planetary companion. We have reduced the raw data and computed the radial velocity variations of these stars, achieving a long-term precision of ˜10 m s-1 on the known stable star τ Ceti, and in good agreement with the residuals to our fits. We confirm the existence of planets around HD 11977, HD 47536 and HD 110014, but with different orbital parameters than those previously published. In addition, we found no evidence of the second planet candidate around HD 47536, nor any companions orbiting HD 122430 and HD 70573. Finally, we report the discovery of a second planet around HD 110014, with a minimum mass of 3.1 MJup and a orbital period of 130 d. Analysis of activity indicators allows us to confirm the reality of our results and also to measure the impact of magnetic activity on our RV measurements. These results confirm that very metal poor stars down to [Fe/H] ˜ -0.7 dex, can indeed form giant planets given the right conditions.

  10. Visfatin-Induced Lipid Raft Redox Signaling Platforms and Dysfunction in Glomerular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boini, Krishna M.; Zhang, Chun; Xia, Min; Han, Wei-Qing; Brimson, Christopher; Poklis, Justin L.; Li, Pin-Lan

    2010-01-01

    Adipokines have been reported to contribute to glomerular injury during obesity or diabetes mellitus. However, the mechanisms mediating the actions of various adipokines on the kidney remained elusive. The present study was performed to determine whether acid sphingomyelinase (ASM)-ceramide associated lipid raft (LR) clustering is involved in local oxidative stress in glomerular endothelial cells (GECs) induced by adipokines such as visfatin and adiponectin. Using confocal microscopy, visfatin but not adiponectin was found to increase LRs clustering in the membrane of GECs in a dose and time dependent manner. Upon visfatin stimulation ASMase activity was increased, and an aggregation of ASMase product, ceramide and NADPH oxidase subunits, gp91phox and p47phox were observed in the LR clusters, forming a LR redox signaling platform. The formation of this signaling platform was blocked by prior treatment with LR disruptor filipin, ASMase inhibitor amitriptyline, ASMase siRNA, gp91phox siRNA and adiponectin. Corresponding to LR clustering and aggregation of NADPH subunits, superoxide (O2•−) production was significantly increased (2.7 folds) upon visfatin stimulation, as measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. Functionally, visfatin significantly increased the permeability of GEC layer in culture and disrupted microtubular networks, which were blocked by inhibition of LR redox signaling platform formation. In conclusion, the injurious effect of visfatin, but not adiponectin on the glomerular endothelium is associated with the formation of LR redox signaling platforms via LR clustering, which produces local oxidative stress resulting in the disruption of microtubular networks in GECs and increases the glomerular permeability. PMID:20858552

  11. Attenuation by Statins of Membrane Raft-Redox Signaling in Coronary Arterial EndotheliumS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yu-Miao; Li, Xiang; Xiong, Jing; Abais, Justine M.; Xia, Min; Boini, Krishna M.; Li, Pin-Lan

    2013-01-01

    Membrane raft (MR)–redox signaling platforms associated with NADPH oxidase are involved in coronary endothelial dysfunction. Here, we studied whether statins interfere with the formation of MR-redox signaling platforms to protect the coronary arterial endothelium from oxidized low-density lipoprotein (OxLDL)–induced injury and from acute hypercholesterolemia. In cultured human coronary arterial endothelial cells, confocal microscopy detected the formation of an MRs clustering when they were exposed to OxLDL, and such MR platform formation was inhibited markedly by statins, including pravastatin and simvastatin. In these MR clusters, NADPH oxidase subunits gp91phox and p47phox were aggregated and were markedly blocked by both statins. In addition, colocalization of acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) and ceramide was induced by OxLDL, which was blocked by statins. Electron spin resonance spectrometry showed that OxLDL-induced superoxide (O2.−) production in the MR fractions was substantially reduced by statins. In coronary artery intima of mice with acute hypercholesterolemia, confocal microscopy revealed a colocalization of gp91phox, p47phox, ASM, or ceramide in MR clusters. Such colocalization was rarely observed in the arteries of normal mice or significantly reduced by pretreatment of hypercholesterolemic mice with statins. Furthermore, O2.− production in situ was 3-fold higher in the coronary arteries from hypercholesterolemic mice than in those from normal mice, and such increase was inhibited by statins. Our results indicate that blockade of MR-redox signaling platform formation in endothelial cell membrane may be another important therapeutic mechanism of statins in preventing endothelial injury and atherosclerosis and may be associated with their direct action on membrane cholesterol structure and function. PMID:23435541

  12. The novel chlamydial adhesin CPn0473 mediates the lipid raft-dependent uptake of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Fechtner, Tim; Galle, Jan N; Hegemann, Johannes H

    2016-08-01

    Chlamydiae are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular pathogens that pose a serious threat to public health worldwide. Chlamydial surface molecules are essential for host cell invasion. The first interaction with the host cell is thereby accomplished by the Outer membrane complex protein B (OmcB) binding to heparan sulfate moieties on the host cell surface, followed by the interaction of the chlamydial polymorphic membrane proteins (Pmps) with host cell receptors. Specifically, the interaction of the Pmp21 adhesin and invasin with its human interaction partner, the epidermal growth factor receptor, results in receptor activation, down-stream signalling and finally internalization of the bacteria. Blocking both, the OmcB and Pmp21 adhesion pathways, did not completely abolish infection, suggesting the presence of additional factors relevant for host cell invasion. Here, we show that the novel surface protein CPn0473 of Chlamydia pneumoniae contributes to the binding and invasion of infectious chlamydial particles. CPn0473 is expressed late in the infection cycle and located on the infectious chlamydial cell surface. Soluble recombinant CPn0473 as well as rCPn0473-coupled fluorescent latex beads adhere to human epithelial HEp-2 cells. Interestingly, in classical infection blocking experiments pretreatment of HEp-2 cells with rCPn0473 does not attenuate adhesion but promotes dose-dependently internalization by C. pneumoniae suggesting an unusual mode of action for this adhesin. This CPn0473-dependent promotion of infection by C. pneumoniae depends on two different domains within the protein and requires intact lipid rafts. Thus, inhibition of the interaction of CPn0473 with the host cell could provide a way to reduce the virulence of C. pneumoniae. PMID:26780295

  13. Redox signaling via lipid raft clustering in homocysteine-induced injury of podocytes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun; Hu, Jun-Jun; Xia, Min; Boini, Krishna M.; Brimson, Christopher; Li, Pin-Lan

    2010-01-01

    Our recent studies have indicated that hyperhomocysteinemia (hHcys) may induce podocyte damage, resulting in glomerulosclerosis. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating hHcys-induced podocyte injury are still poorly understood. In the present study, we first demonstrated that an intact NADPH oxidase system is present in podocytes as shown by detection of its membrane subunit (gp91phox) and cytosolic subunit (p47phox). Then, confocal microscopy showed that gp91phox and p47phox could be aggregated in lipid raft (LR) clusters in podocytes treated with homocysteine (Hcys), which were illustrated by their co-localization with cholera toxin B, a common LR marker. Different mechanistic LR disruptors, either methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MCD) or filipin abolished such Hcys-induced formation of LR-gp91phox or LR-p47phox transmembrane signaling complexes. By flotation of detergent-resistant membrane fractions we found that gp91phox and p47phox were enriched in LR fractions upon Hcys stimulation, and such enrichment of NADPH oxidase subunits and increase in its enzyme activity were blocked by MCD or filipin. Functionally, disruption of LR clustering significantly attenuated Hcys-induced podocyte injury, as shown by their inhibitory effects on Hcys-decreased expression of slit diaphragm molecules such as nephrin and podocin. Similarly, Hcys-increased expression of desmin was also reduced by disruption of LR clustering. In addition, inhibition of such LR-associated redox signaling prevented cytoskeleton disarrangement and apoptosis induced by Hcys. It is concluded that NADPH oxidase subunits aggregation and consequent activation of this enzyme through LR clustering is an important molecular mechanism triggering oxidative injury of podocytes induced by Hcys. PMID:20036696

  14. RAFT-mediated Control of Nanogel Structure and Reactivity: Chemical, Physical and Mechanical Properties of Monomer-dispersed Nanogel Compositions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, JianCheng; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study examines how nanogel structure correlates with photopolymerization and key polymer properties upon addition of nanogels with latent reactivity into a monomer dispersant to produce polymer/polymer composites. Methods Two nanogels that retained RAFT functionality based on the synthetic approach were prepared to have different branching densities. These reactive nanogels were dispersed in triethylene glycol dimethacrylate at 0–40 wt%. Reaction kinetics, volumetric shrinkage and shrinkage stress associated with the photopolymerization of nanogel-modified formulations were measured in real time with mechanical properties of the polymers also evaluated. The basic structure of RAFT-derived nanogel particles was examined by the preparation of a separate nanogel constructed with degradable disulfide crosslinking groups. The model nanogel molecular weight and polydispersity were compared before and after degradation. Results Despite the controlled radical synthetic approach, the nanogels, which are composed of multiple interconnected, short primary chains presented relatively high polydispersity. Through addition of the reactive nanogels to a monomer that both infiltrates and disperses the nanogels, the photopolymerization rate was moderately reduced with the increase of nanogel loading levels. Volumetric shrinkage decreased proportionally with nanogel concentration; however, a greater than proportional reduction of polymerization-induced stress was observed. Mechanical properties, such as flexural strength, storage modulus were maintained at the same levels as the control resin for nanogel systems up to 40 wt%. Significance This study demonstrated that beyond the use of RAFT functionality to produce discrete nano-polymeric structures, the residual chain end groups are important to maintain reactivity and mechanical properties of nanogel-modified resin materials. PMID:25205366

  15. Is Ice-Rafted Sediment in a North Pole Marine Record Evidence for Perennial Sea-ice Cover?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tremblay, L.B.; Schmidt, G.A.; Pfirman, S.; Newton, R.; DeRepentigny, P.

    2015-01-01

    Ice-rafted sediments of Eurasian and North American origin are found consistently in the upper part (13 Ma BP to present) of the Arctic Coring Expedition (ACEX) ocean core from the Lomonosov Ridge, near the North Pole (approximately 88 degrees N). Based on modern sea-ice drift trajectories and speeds, this has been taken as evidence of the presence of a perennial sea-ice cover in the Arctic Ocean from the middle Miocene onwards. However, other high latitude land and marine records indicate a long-term trend towards cooling broken by periods of extensive warming suggestive of a seasonally ice-free Arctic between the Miocene and the present. We use a coupled sea-ice slab-ocean model including sediment transport tracers to map the spatial distribution of ice-rafted deposits in the Arctic Ocean. We use 6 hourly wind forcing and surface heat fluxes for two different climates: one with a perennial sea-ice cover similar to that of the present day and one with seasonally ice-free conditions, similar to that simulated in future projections. Model results confirm that in the present-day climate, sea ice takes more than 1 year to transport sediment from all its peripheral seas to the North Pole. However, in a warmer climate, sea-ice speeds are significantly faster (for the same wind forcing) and can deposit sediments of Laptev, East Siberian and perhaps also Beaufort Sea origin at the North Pole. This is primarily because of the fact that sea-ice interactions are much weaker with a thinner ice cover and there is less resistance to drift. We conclude that the presence of ice-rafted sediment of Eurasian and North American origin at the North Pole does not imply a perennial sea-ice cover in the Arctic Ocean, reconciling the ACEX ocean core data with other land and marine records.

  16. Modulation of cell surface transport and lipid raft localization by the cytoplasmic tail of the influenza virus hemagglutinin.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Silvia; Imkeller, Katharina; Jolmes, Fabian; Veit, Michael; Herrmann, Andreas; Schwarzer, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Viral glycoproteins are highly variable in their primary structure, but on the other hand feature a high functional conservation to fulfil their versatile tasks during the pathogenic life cycle. Typically, all protein domains are optimized in that indispensable functions can be assigned to small conserved motifs or even individual amino acids. The cytoplasmic tail of many viral spike proteins, although of particular relevance for the virus biology, is often only insufficiently characterized. Hemagglutinin (HA), the receptor-binding protein of the influenza virus comprises a short cytoplasmic tail of 13 amino acids that exhibits three highly conserved palmitoylation sites. However, the particular importance of these modifications and the tail in general for intracellular trafficking and lateral membrane organization remains elusive. In this study, we generated HA core proteins consisting of transmembrane domain, cytoplasmic tail and a minor part of the ectodomain, tagged with a yellow fluorescent protein. Different mutation and truncation variants of these chimeric proteins were investigated using confocal microscopy, to characterize the role of cytoplasmic tail and palmitoylation for the intracellular trafficking to plasma membrane and Golgi apparatus. In addition, we assessed raft partitioning of the variants by Foerster resonance energy transfer with an established raft marker. We revealed a substantial influence of the cytoplasmic tail length on the intracellular distribution and surface exposure of the proteins. A complete removal of the tail hampers a physiological trafficking of the protein, whereas a partial truncation can be compensated by cytoplasmic palmitoylations. Plasma membrane raft partitioning on the other hand was found to imperatively require palmitoylations, and the cysteine at position 551 turned out to be of most relevance. Our data shed further light on the tight interconnection between cytoplasmic elements and intracellular trafficking and

  17. Anti-Bioadhesive Coating Based on Easy to Make Pseudozwitterionic RAFT Block Copolymers for Blood-Contacting Applications.

    PubMed

    Nehache, Sabrina; Yeh, Chin-Cheng; Semsarilar, Mona; Deratani, André; Chang, Yung; Quemener, Damien

    2016-01-01

    Amphiphilic diblock copolymer containing randomly distributed positive and negative charged monomers are synthesized using RAFT polymerization technique to be used as anti-bioadhesion coatings for hydrophobic surfaces. Quaternized 2-(dimethylamino) ethyl methacrylate and potassium 3-sulfopropyl methacrylate (P[qDMAEMA-co-KSPMA]) are randomly polymerized to yield an anti-bioadhesion block which is, in one pot, copolymerized with styrene as an anchoring block. This copolymer has demonstrated high anti-bioadhesion properties to avoid the blood clotting in medical devices through a simple and facile approach to preparation of pseudozwitterionic copolymers. PMID:26222768

  18. Internal Technical Report, 1981 Annual Report, An Analysis of the Response of the Raft River Geothermal Site Monitor Wells

    SciTech Connect

    Thurow, T.L.; Large, R.M.; Allman, D.W.; Tullis, J.A.; Skiba, P.A.

    1982-04-01

    A groundwater monitoring program has been established on the Raft River Geothermal Site since 1978. The objective of this program is to document possible impacts that may be caused by geothermal production and injection on the shallow aquifers used for culinary and irrigation purposes. This annual progress report summarizes data from 12 monitor wells during 1981. These data are compared with long-term trends and are correlated with seasonal patterns, irrigation water use and geothermal production and testing. These results provide a basis for predicting long-term impacts of sustained geothermal production and testing. To date, there has been no effect on the water quality of the shallow aquifers.

  19. Raft-Dependent Endocytosis of Autocrine Motility Factor/Phosphoglucose Isomerase: A Potential Drug Delivery Route for Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, Liliana D.; Wiseman, Sam M.; Ghaidi, Fariba; Joshi, Bharat; Nedev, Hinyu; Saragovi, H. Uri; Nabi, Ivan R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Autocrine motility factor/phosphoglucose isomerase (AMF/PGI) is the extracellular ligand for the gp78/AMFR receptor overexpressed in a variety of human cancers. We showed previously that raft-dependent internalization of AMF/PGI is elevated in metastatic MDA-435 cells, but not metastatic, caveolin-1-expressing MDA-231 cells, relative to non-metastatic MCF7 and dysplastic MCF10A cells suggesting that it might represent a tumor cell-specific endocytic pathway. Methodology/Principal Findings Similarly, using flow cytometry, we demonstrate that raft-dependent endocytosis of AMF/PGI is increased in metastatic HT29 cancer cells expressing low levels of caveolin-1 relative to metastatic, caveolin-1-expressing, HCT116 colon cells and non-metastatic Caco-2 cells. Therefore, we exploited the raft-dependent internalization of AMF/PGI as a potential tumor-cell specific targeting mechanism. We synthesized an AMF/PGI-paclitaxel conjugate and found it to be as efficient as free paclitaxel in inducing cytotoxicity and apoptosis in tumor cells that readily internalize AMF/PGI compared to tumor cells that poorly internalize AMF/PGI. Murine K1735-M1 and B16-F1 melanoma cells internalize FITC-conjugated AMF/PGI and are acutely sensitive to AMF/PGI-paclitaxel mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. Moreover, following in vivo intratumoral injection, FITC-conjugated AMF/PGI is internalized in K1735-M1 tumors. Intratumoral injection of AMF/PGI-paclitaxel induced significantly higher tumor regression compared to free paclitaxel, even in B16-F1 cells, known to be resistant to taxol treatment. Treatment with AMF/PGI-paclitaxel significantly prolonged the median survival time of tumor bearing mice. Free AMF/PGI exhibited a pro-survival role, reducing the cytotoxic effect of both AMF/PGI-paclitaxel and free paclitaxel suggesting that AMF/PGI-paclitaxel targets a pathway associated with resistance to chemotherapeutic agents. AMF/PGI-FITC uptake by normal murine spleen and thymus cells was

  20. Saikosaponin a inhibits lipopolysaccharide-oxidative stress and inflammation in Human umbilical vein endothelial cells via preventing TLR4 translocation into lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yunhe; Hu, Xiaoyu; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Zecai; Zhang, Naisheng

    2015-12-01

    Saikosaponin a (SSa), the major triterpenoid saponin derivatives from Radix bupleuri (RB), has been reported to have anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of SSa on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced oxidative stress and inflammatory response in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). HUVECs were stimulated with LPS in the presence or absence of SSa. The levels of TNF-α and IL-8 were detected by ELISA. The expression of COX-2 and iNOS, NF-κB and IκB protein were determined by Western blotting. To investigate the protective mechanisms of SSa, TLR4 expression was detected by Western blotting and membrane lipid rafts were separated by density gradient ultracentrifugation and analyzed by immunoblotting with anti-TLR4 antibody. The results showed that SSa dose-dependently inhibited the production of ROS, TNF-α, IL-8, COX-2 and iNOS in LPS-stimulated HUVECs. Western blot analysis showed that SSa suppressed LPS-induced NF-κB activation. SSa did not affect the expression of TLR4 induced by LPS. However, translocation of TLR4 into lipid rafts and oligomerization of TLR4 induce by LPS was inhibited by SSa. Furthermore, SSa disrupted the formation of lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol. Moreover, SSa activated LXRα-ABCA1 signaling pathway, which could induce cholesterol efflux from lipid rafts. Knockdown of LXRα abrogated the anti-inflammatory effects of SSa. In conclusion, the effects of SSa is associated with activating LXRα-ABCA1 signaling pathway which results in disrupting lipid rafts by depleting cholesterol and reducing translocation of TLR4 to lipid rafts and oligomerization of TLR4, thereby attenuating LPS mediated oxidative and inflammatory responses. PMID:26475038

  1. Lateral diffusion of Gαs in the plasma membrane is decreased after chronic but not acute antidepressant treatment: role of lipid raft and non-raft membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Czysz, Andrew H; Schappi, Jeffrey M; Rasenick, Mark M

    2015-02-01

    GPCR signaling is modified both in major depressive disorder and by chronic antidepressant treatment. Endogenous Gαs redistributes from raft- to nonraft-membrane fractions after chronic antidepressant treatment. Modification of G protein anchoring may participate in this process. Regulation of Gαs signaling by antidepressants was studied using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of GFP-Gαs. Here we find that extended antidepressant treatment both increases the half-time of maximum recovery of GFP-Gαs and decreases the extent of recovery. Furthermore, this effect parallels the movement of Gαs out of lipid rafts as determined by cold detergent membrane extraction with respect to both dose and duration of drug treatment. This effect was observed for several classes of compounds with antidepressant activity, whereas closely related molecules lacking antidepressant activity (eg, R-citalopram) did not produce the effect. These results are consistent with previously observed antidepressant-induced translocation of Gαs, but also suggest an alternate membrane attachment site for this G protein. Furthermore, FRAP analysis provides the possibility of a relatively high-throughput screening tool for compounds with putative antidepressant activity. PMID:25249058

  2. Lateral Diffusion of Gαs in the Plasma Membrane Is Decreased after Chronic but not Acute Antidepressant Treatment: Role of Lipid Raft and Non-Raft Membrane Microdomains

    PubMed Central

    Czysz, Andrew H; Schappi, Jeffrey M; Rasenick, Mark M

    2015-01-01

    GPCR signaling is modified both in major depressive disorder and by chronic antidepressant treatment. Endogenous Gαs redistributes from raft- to nonraft-membrane fractions after chronic antidepressant treatment. Modification of G protein anchoring may participate in this process. Regulation of Gαs signaling by antidepressants was studied using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) of GFP-Gαs. Here we find that extended antidepressant treatment both increases the half-time of maximum recovery of GFP-Gαs and decreases the extent of recovery. Furthermore, this effect parallels the movement of Gαs out of lipid rafts as determined by cold detergent membrane extraction with respect to both dose and duration of drug treatment. This effect was observed for several classes of compounds with antidepressant activity, whereas closely related molecules lacking antidepressant activity (eg, R-citalopram) did not produce the effect. These results are consistent with previously observed antidepressant-induced translocation of Gαs, but also suggest an alternate membrane attachment site for this G protein. Furthermore, FRAP analysis provides the possibility of a relatively high-throughput screening tool for compounds with putative antidepressant activity. PMID:25249058

  3. Dynamic intracellular delivery of antibiotics via pH-responsive polymersomes

    PubMed Central

    Lane, D.D.; Su, F.Y.; Chiu, D.Y.; Srinivasan, S.; Wilson, J.T.; Ratner, D.M.; Stayton, P.S.; Convertine, A.J.

    2014-01-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was employed to prepare a series of copolymers consisting of 2-hdroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (FWavg ~ 950 Da) (O950) with variable comonomer compositions and molecular weights for use as polymeric scaffolds. Reactivity ratios for the monomer pair were determined to be 1.37 and 0.290 respectively. To these scaffolds trithiocarbonate-based RAFT chain transfer agents (CTAs) were grafted using carbodiimide chemistry. The resultant graft chain transfer agents (gCTA) were subsequently employed to polymerize dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) and (HPMA) between degrees of polymerization (DP) of 25 and 200. Kinetic analysis for the polymerization of DMAEMA targeting a DP of 100 from a 34 arm graft gCTA show linear Mn conversion and pseudo first order rate plots with narrow molecular weight distributions that move toward lower elution volumes with monomer conversion. Đ values for these polymerizations remain low at around 1.20 at monomer conversions as high as 70 %. pH-responsive endosomalytic brushes capable of spontaneously self-assembling into polymersomes were synthesized and a combination of dynamic light scattering (DLS), cryoTEM, and red blood cell hemolysis were employed to evaluate the aqueous solution properties of the polymeric brush as a function of pH. Successful encapsulation of ceftazidime and pH-dependent drug release properties were confirmed by HPLC. Intracellular antibiotic activity of the drug-loaded polymersomes was confirmed in a macrophage coculture model of infection with B. thailandensis and RAW 264.7 cells. PMID:26097513

  4. The insecticide 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl) ethane (DDT) alters the membrane raft location of the TSH receptor stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    De Gregorio, Francesca; Pellegrino, Mario; Picchietti, Simona; Belardinelli, Maria C.; Taddei, Anna Rita; Fausto, Anna Maria; Rossi, Mario; Maggio, Roberto; Giorgi, Franco

    2011-06-01

    DDT is a highly lipophilic molecule known to deplete membrane rafts of their phosphoglycolipid and cholesterol contents. However, we have recently shown that DDT can also alter the thyroid homeostasis by inhibiting TSH receptor (TSHr) internalization. The present study was undertaken to verify whether DDT goitrogenic effects are due to the insecticide acting directly on TSHr or via alteration of the membrane rafts hosting the receptor itself. Our results demonstrate that, in CHO-TSHr transfected cells, TSHr is activated in the presence of TSH, while it is inhibited following DDT exposure. DDT can also reduce the endocytic vesicular traffic, alter the extension of multi-branched microvilli along their plasma membranes and induce TSHr shedding in vesicular forms. To verify whether TSHr displacement might depend on DDT altering the raft constitution of CHO-TSHr cell membranes the extent of TSHr and lipid raft co-localization was examined by confocal microscopy. Evidence shows that receptor/raft co-localization increased significantly upon exposure to TSH, while receptors and lipid rafts become dislodged on opposite cell poles in DDT-exposed CHO-TSHr cells. As a control, under similar culturing conditions, diphenylethylene, which is known to be a lipophilic substance that is structurally related to DDT, did not affect the extent of TSHr and lipid raft co-localization in CHO-TSHr cells treated with TSH. These findings corroborate and extend our view that, in CHO cells, the DDT disrupting action on TSHr is primarily due to the insecticide acting on membranes to deplete their raft cholesterol content, and that the resulting inhibition on TSHr internalization is due to receptor dislodgement from altered raft microdomains of the plasma membrane. - Highlights: >DDT is a pesticide with a severe environmental impact >Epidemiologic correlation exists between exposition to DDT and thyroid dysfunction >DDT is a lipophilic molecule that has been shown to inhibit TSH receptor

  5. Nondestructive chemical functionalization of MWNTs by poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) and their conjugation with CdSe quantum dots: Synthesis, properties, and cytotoxicity studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Rafiqul; Bach, Long Giang; Vo, Thanh-Sang; Tran, Thi-Nga; Lim, Kwon Taek

    2013-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were functionalized with poly(2-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) in a nondestructive manner by UV-driven surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The RAFT agent having benzophenone groups was initially synthesized, and anchored to MWNTs through UV-triggered photoreaction. The subsequent RAFT polymerization of DMAEMA from the surface of MWNTs afforded PDMAEMA grafted MWNTs (MWNTs-g-PDMAEMA). The successful grafting of PDMAEMA on MWNTs via chemical linkage was confirmed by FT-IR, 1H NMR, XPS, EDX, TGA, TEM, and SEM analyses. A reversible dispersion phenomenon was observed in an aqueous solution of MWNTs-g-PDMAEMA as induced either by temperature or pH. The CdSe quantum dots (CdSe QDs) were attached to quaternized MWNTs-g-PDMAEMA to produce MWNTs-g-PDMAEMA-MeI/CdSe nanohybrids via electrostatic self-assembly. The formation of the nanohybrids was elucidated by EDS, TEM, and XRD. The cell viability assessment of the nanohybrids suggested their biocompatible character. The photoluminescence spectra of the nanohybrids indicated that the CdSe QDs significantly preserved its optical property after conjugation with MWNTs-g-PDMAEMA.

  6. High-intensity gas seepage causes rafting of shallow gas hydrates in the southeastern Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, Thomas; Bahr, André; Klapp, Stephan A.; Abegg, Friedrich; Bohrmann, Gerhard

    2011-07-01

    Submarine gas hydrates are a major global reservoir of the potent greenhouse gas methane. Since current assessments of worldwide hydrate-bound carbon vary by one order of magnitude, new technical efforts are required for improved and accurate hydrate quantifications. Here we present hydrate abundances determined for surface sediments at the high-flux Batumi seep area in the southeastern Black Sea at 840 m water depth using state-of-the art autoclave technology. Pressure sediment cores of up to 2.65 m in length were recovered with an autoclave piston corer backed by conventional gravity cores. Quantitative core degassing yielded volumetric gas/bulk sediment ratios of up to 20.3 proving hydrate presence. The cores represented late glacial to Holocene hemipelagic sediments with the shallowest hydrates found at 90 cmbsf. Calculated methane concentrations in the different cores surpassed methane equilibrium concentrations in the two lowermost lithological Black Sea units sampled. The results indicated hydrate fractions of 5.2% of pore volume in the sapropelic Unit 2 and mean values of 21% pore volume in the lacustrine Unit 3. We calculate that the studied area of ~ 0.5 km 2 currently contains about 11.3 kt of methane bound in shallow hydrates. Episodic detachment and rafting of such hydrates is suggested by a rugged seafloor topography along with variable thicknesses in lithologies. We propose that sealing by hydrate precipitation in coarse-grained deposits and gas accumulation beneath induces detachment of hydrate/sediment chunks. Floating hydrates will rapidly transport methane into shallower waters and potentially to the sea-atmosphere boundary. In contrast, persistent in situ dissociation of shallow hydrates appears unlikely in the near future as deep water warming by about 1.6 °C and/or decrease in hydrostatic pressure corresponding to a sea level drop of about 130 m would be required. Because hydrate detachment should be primarily controlled by internal factors

  7. Lipid raft components cholesterol and sphingomyelin increase H+/OH− permeability of phosphatidylcholine membranes

    PubMed Central

    Gensure, Rebekah H.; Zeidel, Mark L.; Hill, Warren G.

    2006-01-01

    H+/OH− permeation through lipid bilayers occurs at anomalously high rates and the determinants of proton flux through membranes are poorly understood. Since all life depends on proton gradients, it is important to develop a greater understanding of proton leak phenomena. We have used stopped-flow fluorimetry to probe the influence of two lipid raft components, chol (cholesterol) and SM (sphingomyelin), on H+/OH− and water permeability. Increasing the concentrations of both lipids in POPC (palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine) liposomes decreased water permeability in a concentration-dependent manner, an effect that correlated with increased lipid order. Surprisingly, proton flux was increased by increasing the concentration of chol and SM. The chol effect was complex with molar concentrations of 17.9, 33 and 45.7% giving 2.8-fold (P<0.01), 2.2-fold (P<0.001) and 5.1-fold (P<0.001) increases in H+/OH− permeability from a baseline of 2.4×10−2 cm/s. SM at 10 mole% effected a 2.8-fold increase (P<0.01), whereas 20 and 30 mole% enhanced permeability by 3.6-fold (P<0.05) and 4.1-fold respectively (P<0.05). Supplementing membranes containing chol with SM did not enhance H+/OH− permeability. Of interest was the finding that chol addition to soya-bean lipids decreased H+/OH− permeability, consistent with an earlier report [Ira and Krishnamoorthy (2001) J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 1484–1488]. We speculate that the presence of proton carriers in crude lipid extracts might contribute to this result. We conclude that (i) chol and SM specifically and independently increase rates of proton permeation in POPC bilayers, (ii) domains enriched in these lipids or domain interfaces may represent regions with high H+/OH− conductivity, (iii) H+/OH− fluxes are not governed by lipid order and (iv) chol can inhibit or promote H+/OH− permeability depending on the total lipid environment. Theories of proton permeation are discussed in the light of these results. PMID

  8. Geographical distribution and time trends of polychlorinated biphenyls in raft mussel from Galician coast (1998-2013).

    PubMed

    Carro, Nieves; García, Isabel; Ignacio, María; Mouteira, Ana

    2015-12-15

    PCBs were analyzed in raft mussels cultured in several polygons from Galician Rías (Rías of Ares-Betanzos, Muros-Noia, Arousa, Pontevedra and Vigo) during the period 1998-2013. The main aim of this work is study the quality of culture marine environment in relation to PCBs compounds. We report the results of a monitoring. The mean levels of ΣPCBs (ten congeners) ranged from 7.41 to 59.50ngg(-1)dw. The isomer concentrations in the Mytilus galloprovincialis cultured in raft were in the order hexachlorobiphenyls>pentachlorobiphenyls>tetrachlorbiphenyls>trichlorobiphenyls. Some biological parameters of mussel were also investigated (shell length, lipid content and condition index) in order to know their influence on ability of PCBs accumulation. ANOVA analysis confirms that levels of most of congeners had a significant relation (p<0.05) with shell length. The geographical patterns and temporal variations of PCBs were also investigated. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) showed differences between geographic areas (Rías) in the distribution of PCBs levels. Samples coming from Rías of Vigo and Ares-Betanzos presented the highest levels of PCBs and samples from Rías of Arousa and Muros-Noia had the lowest levels of these compounds. Time trends (linear regressions) showed a decline of levels of PCB congeners along the period 1998-2013. PMID:26318808

  9. Dataset of differential lipid raft and global proteomes of SILAC-labeled cystic fibrosis cells upon TNF -α stimulation.

    PubMed

    Chhuon, C; Pranke, I; Borot, F; Tondelier, D; Lipecka, J; Fritsch, J; Chanson, M; Edelman, A; Ollero, M; Guerrera, I C

    2016-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disease due to mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR), F508del-CFTR being the most frequent. Lipid raft-like microdomains (LRM) are regions of the plasma membrane that present a high cholesterol content and are insoluble to non-ionic detergents. LRM are essential functional and structural platforms that play an important role in the inflammatory response. CFTR is a known modulator of inflammation in LRM. Here we provide mass spectrometry data on the global impact of CFTR mutation and TNF-a stimulation on the LRM proteome. We used the Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) approach to quantify and identify 332 proteins in LRM upon TNF-a stimulation in CF cells and 1381 for the global proteome. We report two detailed tables containing lists of proteins obtained by mass spectrometry and the immunofluorescence validation results for one of these proteins, the G-protein coupled receptor 5A. These results are associated with the article "Changes in lipid raft proteome upon TNF-α stimulation of cystic fibrosis cells" (Chhuon et al., in press [1]). PMID:27626054

  10. Live imaging of prions reveals nascent PrPSc in cell-surface, raft-associated amyloid strings and webs

    PubMed Central

    Rouvinski, Alexander; Karniely, Sharon; Kounin, Maria; Moussa, Sanaa; Goldberg, Miri D.; Warburg, Gabriela; Lyakhovetsky, Roman; Papy-Garcia, Dulce; Kutzsche, Janine; Korth, Carsten; Carlson, George A.; Godsave, Susan F.; Peters, Peter J.; Luhr, Katarina; Kristensson, Krister

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian prions refold host glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored PrPC into β-sheet–rich PrPSc. PrPSc is rapidly truncated into a C-terminal PrP27-30 core that is stable for days in endolysosomes. The nature of cell-associated prions, their attachment to membranes and rafts, and their subcellular locations are poorly understood; live prion visualization has not previously been achieved. A key obstacle has been the inaccessibility of PrP27-30 epitopes. We overcame this hurdle by focusing on nascent full-length PrPSc rather than on its truncated PrP27-30 product. We show that N-terminal PrPSc epitopes are exposed in their physiological context and visualize, for the first time, PrPSc in living cells. PrPSc resides for hours in unexpected cell-surface, slow moving strings and webs, sheltered from endocytosis. Prion strings observed by light and scanning electron microscopy were thin, micrometer-long structures. They were firmly cell associated, resisted phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C, aligned with raft markers, fluoresced with thioflavin, and were rapidly abolished by anti-prion glycans. Prion strings and webs are the first demonstration of membrane-anchored PrPSc amyloids. PMID:24493590

  11. Alemtuzumab induces caspase-independent cell death in human chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells through a lipid raft-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

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