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Sample records for addition-fragmentation chain-transfer raft

  1. 'Green' reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semsarilar, Mona; Perrier, Sébastien

    2010-10-01

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization has revolutionized the field of polymer synthesis as a versatile tool for the production of complex polymeric architectures. As for all chemical processes, research and development in RAFT have to focus on the design and application of chemical products and processes that have a minimum environmental impact, and follow the principles of 'green' chemistry. In this Review, we summarize some of the green features of the RAFT process, and review the recent advances in the production of degradable polymers obtained from RAFT polymerization. Its use to modify biodegradable and renewable inorganic and organic materials to yield more functional products with enhanced applications is also covered. RAFT is a promising candidate for answering both the increasing need of modern society to employ highly functional polymeric materials and the global requirements for developing sustainable chemicals and processes.

  2. Biomedical applications of polymers derived by reversible addition - fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT).

    PubMed

    Fairbanks, Benjamin D; Gunatillake, Pathiraja A; Meagher, Laurence

    2015-08-30

    RAFT- mediated polymerization, providing control over polymer length and architecture as well as facilitating post polymerization modification of end groups, has been applied to virtually every facet of biomedical materials research. RAFT polymers have seen particularly extensive use in drug delivery research. Facile generation of functional and telechelic polymers permits straightforward conjugation to many therapeutic compounds while synthesis of amphiphilic block copolymers via RAFT allows for the generation of self-assembled structures capable of carrying therapeutic payloads. With the large and growing body of literature employing RAFT polymers as drug delivery aids and vehicles, concern over the potential toxicity of RAFT derived polymers has been raised. While literature exploring this complication is relatively limited, the emerging consensus may be summed up in three parts: toxicity of polymers generated with dithiobenzoate RAFT agents is observed at high concentrations but not with polymers generated with trithiocarbonate RAFT agents; even for polymers generated with dithiobenzoate RAFT agents, most reported applications call for concentrations well below the toxicity threshold; and RAFT end-groups may be easily removed via any of a variety of techniques that leave the polymer with no intrinsic toxicity attributable to the mechanism of polymerization. The low toxicity of RAFT-derived polymers and the ability to remove end groups via straightforward and scalable processes make RAFT technology a valuable tool for practically any application in which a polymer of defined molecular weight and architecture is desired.

  3. Study on the performance of polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Binbin; Zeng, Zhong; Ren, Qinyu; Chen, Yang; Liang, Mei; Zou, Huawei

    2016-09-01

    A series of block type polycarboxylate-based superplasticizers (PCs) with different molecular architectures were synthesized with macromonomer butenyl alkylene polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene ether (BAPP) and acrylic acid (AA) by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Fourier-Transformed Infrared (FTIR) Spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS) were applied to investigate the PCs' molecular structure. The dispersion capacity of the PCs in cement were also measured, and the results showed that the polycarboxylic dispersing agents prepared by this method were suitable for portlant cement. It was found that the PCs could affect the hydration process, which was performed through retarding the generation of ettringite in the hydrated product. Our studies with X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compressive strength measurement of hydrated production were all supporting this conclusion.

  4. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization in microemulsion.

    PubMed

    O'Donnell, Jennifer M

    2012-04-21

    This tutorial review first details the uncontrolled microemulsion polymerization mechanism, and the RAFT polymerization mechanism to provide the necessary background for examining the RAFT microemulsion polymerization mechanism. The effect of the chain transfer agent per micelle ratio and the chain transfer agent aqueous solubility on the RAFT microemulsion polymerization kinetics, polymer molecular weight and polydispersity, and polymer nanoparticle size are discussed with a focus on oil-in-water microemulsions. Modeling of RAFT microemulsion polymerization kinetics and the resulting final polymer molecular weight are presented to assist with the analysis of observed experimental trends. Lastly, the current significance of RAFT microemulsion polymerization and the future directions are discussed. PMID:22246214

  5. Surface-imprinted magnetic particles for highly selective sulfonamides recognition prepared by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Liu, Xia; Pan, Xiaoyan; Chen, Liang; Wang, Sicen

    2016-01-01

    In this work, novel magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) were prepared by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using sulfamerazine as the template. With the controlled/living property of RAFT polymerization, the resulting MMIPs showed high selectivity for sulfonamides recognition. The MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared, vibrating sample magnetometer, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The static and selectivity binding experiments demonstrated the desirable adsorption capacity and high selectivity of the MMIPs. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four sulfonamides from aqueous solution. The recoveries of the spiked pond water ranged from 61.2 to 94.1% with RSD lower than 6.5%. This work demonstrated a versatile approach for the preparation of well-constructed MMIPs for application in the field of solid-phase extraction. PMID:26637219

  6. Polymer-grafted lignin surfactants prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Chetali; Washburn, Newell R

    2014-08-12

    Kraft lignin grafted with hydrophilic polymers has been prepared using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization and investigated for use as a surfactant. In this preliminary study, polyacrylamide and poly(acrylic acid) were grafted from a lignin RAFT macroinitiator at average initiator site densities estimated to be 2 per particle and 17 per particle. The target degrees of polymerization were 50 and 100, but analysis of cleaved polyacrylamide was consistent with a higher average molecular weight, suggesting not all sites were able to participate in the polymerization. All materials were readily soluble in water, and dynamic light scattering data indicate polymer-grafted lignin coexisted in isolated and aggregated forms in aqueous media. The characteristic size was 15-20 nm at low concentrations, and aggregation appeared to be a stronger function of degree of polymerization than graft density. These species were surface active, reducing the surface tension to as low as 60 dyn/cm at 1 mg/mL, and a greater decrease was observed than for polymer-grafted silica nanoparticles, suggesting that the lignin core was also surface active. While these lignin surfactants were soluble in water, they were not soluble in hexanes. Thus, it was unexpected that water-in-oil emulsions formed in all surfactant compositions and solvent ratios tested, with average droplet sizes of 10-20 μm. However, although polymer-grafted lignin has structural features similar to nanoparticles used in Pickering emulsions, its interfacial behavior was qualitatively different. While at air-water interfaces, the hydrophilic grafts promote effective reductions in surface tension, we hypothesize that the low grafting density in these lignin surfactants favors partitioning into the hexanes side of the oil-water interface because collapsed conformations of the polymer grafts improve interfacial coverage and reduce water-hexanes interactions. We propose that polymer-grafted lignin

  7. RAFT microemulsion polymerization with surface-active chain transfer agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hedok, Ibrahim Adnan

    The work described in this dissertation focuses on enhancing the polymer nanoparticle synthesis using RAFT (reversible-addition fragmentation chain transfer) in microemulsion polymerization in order to achieve predetermined molecular weight with narrow molecular weight polydispersity. The hypothesis is that the use of an amphiphilic chain transfer agent (surface-active CTA) will confine the CTA to the surface of the particle and thermodynamically favor partitioning of the CTA between micelles and particles throughout the polymerization. Thus, the CTA diffusion from micelles to polymer particles would be minimized and the breadth of the CTA per particle distribution would remain low. We report the successful improved synthesis of poly(butyl acrylate), poly(ethyl acrylate), and poly(styrene) nanoparticles using the RAFT microemulsion polymerization with surface-active CTA. The polymerization kinetics, polymer characteristics and latex size experimental data are presented. The data analysis indicates that the CTA remains partitioned between the micelles and particles by the end of the polymerization, as expected. We also report the synthesis of well-defined core/shell poly(styrene)/poly(butyl acrylate) nanoparticle, having polydispersity index value of 1.1, using semi-continuous microemulsion polymerization with the surface-active CTA. The surface-active CTA restricts the polymerization growth to the surface of the particle, which facilitates the formation of a shell block co-polymers with each subsequent second monomer addition instead of discrete homopolymers. This synthesis method can be used to create a wide range of core/shell polymer nanoparticles with well-defined morphology, given the right feeding conditions.

  8. The Potential of Poly[N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide] via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerization as Safe Nanocarrier.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanhong; Guo, Chunhua; Li, Shuo; Luo, Kui; Hu, Jiani; Gu, Zhongwei

    2016-06-01

    N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers have been presented as nanoscale drug/gene delivery systems and imaging probes, and the well-defined HPMA copolymers prepared via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization promote their to clinical trials, as the significant enhanced anticancer efficacy. The biosafety is another issue associated with the carriers. In this study, we prepared the linear and branched HPMA copolymers labeled with Cy5.5 via RAFT polymerization and click chemistry, and their potential biosafety was studied. The linear copolymer was prepared via RAFT polymerization mediated by the ends-functionalized peptide chain transfer agent (peptide2CTA), resulting in well-defined and block linear HPMA copolymer with molecular weight (MW) of 98 kDa. Additionally, the branched HPMA copolymer was also prepared via RAFT polymerization. Followed by Cy5.5 labeling, the two copolymers showed negative zeta potential and their accumulation into tumor was studied by in vivo optical fluorescence imaging in the nude mice with breast tumors. The biosafety studies on in vitro cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility studies, including hemolysis tests, plasma coagulation and thromboelastography assay were carried out well, demonstrating that the linear HPMA copolymer-Cy5.5 with MW around 100 kDa and biodegradable moiety in the main chain might be utilized as safe nanoscale carrier. PMID:27427626

  9. Grafting of molecularly imprinted polymers from the surface of silica gel particles via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization: a selective sorbent for theophylline.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zhou, Wen-Hui; Yang, Huang-Hao; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2009-07-15

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) were grafted successfully from the surface of silica gel particles via surface initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using RAFT agent functionalized silica gel as the chain transfer agent. The intrinsic characteristics of the controlled/living polymerization mechanism of RAFT allowed for the effective control of the grafting process. Thus the grafting copolymerization of methacrylic acid and divinyl benzene in the presence of template theophylline led to thin MIP film coating silica gel (MIP-Silica). The thickness of MIP film prepared in this study is about 1.98 nm, which was calculated from the nitrogen sorption analysis results. Measured binding kinetics for theophylline to the MIP-Silica and MIPs prepared by conventional bulk polymerization demonstrated that MIP-Silica had improved mass-transfer properties. In addition, the theophylline-imprinted MIP-Silica was used as the sorbent in solid-phase extraction to determine theophylline in blood serum with satisfactory recovery higher than 90%. Nonspecific adsorption of interfering compounds can be eliminated by a simple elution with acetonitrile, without sacrificing the selective binding of theophylline.

  10. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer strategy and its application in the Sudan dyes residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liang; Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Sicen

    2015-07-31

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have become a hotspot owing to the dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the MMIPs were obtained by the surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using Sudan I as the template. The resultant MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and X-ray diffraction. Benefiting from the controlled/living property of the RAFT strategy, the uniform MIP layer was successfully grafted on the surface of RAFT agent-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, favoring the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four Sudan dyes (Sudan I, II, III, and IV) from chili powder samples. The recoveries of the spiked samples in chili powder samples ranged from 74.1 to 93.3% with RSD lower than 6.4% and the relative standard uncertainty lower than 0.029. This work provided a good platform for the extraction and removal of Sudan dyes in complicated matrixes and demonstrated a bright future for the application of the well-constructed MMIPs in the field of solid-phase extraction. PMID:26077971

  11. Synthesis of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer strategy and its application in the Sudan dyes residue analysis.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiaoyu; Chen, Liang; Pan, Xiaoyan; Wang, Sicen

    2015-07-31

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers (MMIPs) have become a hotspot owing to the dual functions of target recognition and magnetic separation. In this study, the MMIPs were obtained by the surface-initiated reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization using Sudan I as the template. The resultant MMIPs were characterized by transmission electron microscope, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, vibrating sample magnetometer, and X-ray diffraction. Benefiting from the controlled/living property of the RAFT strategy, the uniform MIP layer was successfully grafted on the surface of RAFT agent-modified Fe3O4@SiO2 nanoparticles, favoring the fast mass transfer and rapid binding kinetics. The developed MMIPs were used as the solid-phase extraction sorbents to selectively extract four Sudan dyes (Sudan I, II, III, and IV) from chili powder samples. The recoveries of the spiked samples in chili powder samples ranged from 74.1 to 93.3% with RSD lower than 6.4% and the relative standard uncertainty lower than 0.029. This work provided a good platform for the extraction and removal of Sudan dyes in complicated matrixes and demonstrated a bright future for the application of the well-constructed MMIPs in the field of solid-phase extraction.

  12. Z-Group ketone chain transfer agents for RAFT polymer nanoparticle modification via hydrazone conjugation

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Saibal; Xia, Xin; Maiseiyeu, Andrei; Mihai, Georgeta; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    A ketal-containing trithiocarbonyl compound has been synthesized and characterized as a chain transfer agent (CTA) in Reversible Addition Fragmentation Transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The ketal functionality does not interfere with RAFT polymerization of acrylate monomers, which proceeds as previously reported to yield macro-CTA polymers and block co-polymers. Post-polymerization ketal cleavage revealed ketone functionality at the polar terminus of an amphiphilic block co-polymer. Hydrazone-formation was facile in both organic solution as well as in aqueous buffer where polymer nanoparticle assemblies were formed, indicating a conjugation/end-functionalization yield of 40–50%. Conjugation was verified with fluorescein, biotin and Gd-DOTA derivatives, and though the trithiocarbonate linkage is hydrolytically labile, we observed stable conjugation for several days at pH 7.4. and 37°C. As expected, streptavidin binding to biotinylated polymer micelles was observed, and size-change based relaxivity increases were observed when Gd-DOTA hydrazide was conjugated to polymer micelles. Cell-uptake of fluorescently labeled polymer micelles was also readily tracked by FACS and fluorescence microscopy. These polymer derivatives demonstrate a range of potential theranostic/biotechnological applications for this conveniently accessible keto-CTA, which include ligand-based nanoparticle targeting and fluorescent/MR nanoparticle contrast agents. PMID:23148126

  13. Reversible Addition Fragmentation Chain Transfer (RAFT) Polymerization in Undergraduate Polymer Science Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nguyen, T. L. U.; Bennet, Francesca; Stenzel, Martina H.; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    This 8-hour experiment (spread over two 4-hour sessions) is designed to equip students with essential skills in polymer synthesis, particularly in synthesizing polymers of well-defined molecular weight. The experiment involves the synthesis and characterization of poly(vinyl neodecanoate) via living free radical polymerization, specifically the…

  14. Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers synthesized by surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization for the enrichment and determination of synthetic estrogens in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Fangfang; Zhang, Jingjing; Wang, Minjun; Kong, Jie

    2015-08-01

    Magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers have attracted significant interest because of their multifunctionality of selective recognition of target molecules and rapid magnetic response. In this contribution, magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were synthesized via surface-initiated reversible addition addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization using diethylstilbestrol as the template for the enrichment of synthetic estrogens. The uniform imprinted surface layer and the magnetic property of the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers favored a fast binding kinetics and rapid analysis of target molecules. The static and selective binding experiments demonstrated a desirable adsorption capacity and good selectivity of the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers in comparison to magnetic non-molecularly imprinted polymers. Accordingly, a corresponding analytical method was developed in which magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers were employed as magnetic solid-phase extraction materials for the concentration and determination of four synthetic estrogens (diethylstilbestrol, hexestrol, dienestrol, and bisphenol A) in fish pond water. The recoveries of these synthetic estrogens in spiked fish pond water samples ranged from 61.2 to 99.1% with a relative standard deviation of lower than 6.3%. This study provides a versatile approach to prepare well-defined magnetic molecularly imprinted polymers sorbents for the analysis of synthetic estrogens in water solution. PMID:25989155

  15. Surface molecular imprinting onto fluorescein-coated magnetic nanoparticlesvia reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization: A facile three-in-one system for recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Dong, Cunku; Chu, Jia; Qi, Jingyao; Li, Xin

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we present a general protocol for the making of surface-imprinted magnetic fluorescence beads viareversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The resulting composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized beads exhibited homogeneous polymer films (thickness of about 5.7 nm), spherical shape, high fluorescence intensity and magnetic property (Magnetization (Ms) = 3.67 emu g-1). The hybrids bind the original template 17β-estradiol with an appreciable selectivity over structurally related compounds. In addition, the resulting hybrids performed without obvious deterioration after five repeated cycles. This study therefore demonstrates the potential of molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals.In this study, we present a general protocol for the making of surface-imprinted magnetic fluorescence beads viareversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The resulting composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The as-synthesized beads exhibited homogeneous polymer films (thickness of about 5.7 nm), spherical shape, high fluorescence intensity and magnetic property (Magnetization (Ms) = 3.67 emu g-1). The hybrids bind the original template 17β-estradiol with an appreciable selectivity over structurally related compounds. In addition, the resulting hybrids performed without obvious deterioration after five repeated cycles. This study therefore demonstrates the potential of molecularly imprinted polymers for the recognition and separation of endocrine disrupting chemicals. Electronic

  16. Facile Fabrication of Water Dispersible Latex Particles with Homogeneous or Chain-Segregated Surface from RAFT Polymerization Using a Mixture of Two Macromolecular Chain Transfer Agents.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Hong, Liangzhi; Wang, Chaoyang

    2016-04-01

    Water dispersible latex particles with randomly mixed shells or chain segregated surface are synthesized from one-pot reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer heterogeneous polymerization of benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) using a mixture of poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PGMA) and poly(2,3-bis(succinyloxy)propyl methacrylate) (PBSPMA) macromolecular chain transfer agents. In methanol, the two in situ synthesized PGMA-b-PBzMA and PBSPMA-b-PBzMA diblock copolymers coaggregate into spherical micelles, which contain PBzMA core and discrete PGMA and PBSPMA nanodomains on the shell. In contrast, in water-methanol mixture (V/V = 9/1), latex particles with homogeneous distribution of PGMA and PBSPMA polymer chains on the shell are obtained. The reasons leading to formation of latex particles with homogenous or chain-segregated surface are discussed, and polymerization kinetics and physical state of PBSPMA in methanol and water-methanol mixtures are ascribed. These polymeric micelles with patterned functional group on the surface are potentially important for application in supracolloidal hierarchical assemblies and catalysis.

  17. Facile Fabrication of Water Dispersible Latex Particles with Homogeneous or Chain-Segregated Surface from RAFT Polymerization Using a Mixture of Two Macromolecular Chain Transfer Agents.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Hong, Liangzhi; Wang, Chaoyang

    2016-04-01

    Water dispersible latex particles with randomly mixed shells or chain segregated surface are synthesized from one-pot reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer heterogeneous polymerization of benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) using a mixture of poly(glycerol monomethacrylate) (PGMA) and poly(2,3-bis(succinyloxy)propyl methacrylate) (PBSPMA) macromolecular chain transfer agents. In methanol, the two in situ synthesized PGMA-b-PBzMA and PBSPMA-b-PBzMA diblock copolymers coaggregate into spherical micelles, which contain PBzMA core and discrete PGMA and PBSPMA nanodomains on the shell. In contrast, in water-methanol mixture (V/V = 9/1), latex particles with homogeneous distribution of PGMA and PBSPMA polymer chains on the shell are obtained. The reasons leading to formation of latex particles with homogenous or chain-segregated surface are discussed, and polymerization kinetics and physical state of PBSPMA in methanol and water-methanol mixtures are ascribed. These polymeric micelles with patterned functional group on the surface are potentially important for application in supracolloidal hierarchical assemblies and catalysis. PMID:26954075

  18. Novel one pot synthesis of silver nanoparticle-polymer composites by supercritical CO2 polymerisation in the presence of a RAFT agent.

    PubMed

    Hasell, Tom; Thurecht, Kristofer J; Jones, Rhys D W; Brown, Paul D; Howdle, Steven M

    2007-10-14

    We report the one pot synthesis of a silver-polymer nanocomposite in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) whereby an organometallic silver complex is thermally decomposed in the presence of a reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) agent during a polymerisation reaction in which the RAFT agent simultaneously stabilises the growing polymer microparticles and the formation of surface located silver nanoparticles.

  19. Well-Defined Macromolecules Using Horseradish Peroxidase as a RAFT Initiase.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Alex P; Bailey-Van Kuren, Dylan; Lucius, Melissa E; Makaroff, Katherine; Williams, Cameron; Page, Richard C; Berberich, Jason A; Konkolewicz, Dominik

    2016-02-01

    Enzymatic catalysis and control over macromolecular architectures from reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) are combined to give a new method of making polymers. Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) is used to catalytically generate radicals using hydrogen peroxide and acetylacetone as a mediator. RAFT is used to control the polymer structure. HRP catalyzed RAFT polymerization gives acrylate and acrylamide polymers with relatively narrow molecular weight distributions. The polymerization is rapid, typically exceeding 90% monomer conversion in 30 min. Complex macromolecular architectures including a block copolymer and a protein-polymer conjugate are synthesized using HRP to catalytically initiate RAFT polymerization. PMID:26748786

  20. Molecular Imprinting of Silica Nanoparticle Surfaces via Reversible Addition-Fragmentation Polymerization for Optical Biosensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oluz, Zehra; Nayab, Sana; Kursun, Talya Tugana; Caykara, Tuncer; Yameen, Basit; Duran, Hatice

    Azo initiator modified surface of silica nanoparticles were coated via reversible addition-fragmentation polymerization (RAFT) of methacrylic acid and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate using 2-phenylprop 2-yl dithobenzoate as chain transfer agent. Using L-phenylalanine anilide as template during polymerization led molecularly imprinted nanoparticles. RAFT polymerization offers an efficient control of grafting process, while molecularly imprinted polymers shows enhanced capacity as sensor. L-phenylalanine anilide imprinted silica particles were characterized by X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM). Performances of the particles were followed by surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) after coating the final product on gold deposited glass substrate against four different analogous of analyte molecules: D-henylalanine anilide, L-tyrosine, L-tryptophan and L-phenylalanine. Characterizations indicated that silica particles coated with polymer layer do contain binding sites for L-phenylalanine anilide, and are highly selective for the molecule of interest. This project was supported by TUBITAK (Project No:112M804).

  1. Addition-fragmentation reaction of thionoesters compounds in free-radical polymerisation (methyl, cyanomethyl and styryl): a theoretical interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannachi, Douniazed; Ouddai, Nadia; Arotçaréna, Michel; Chermette, Henry

    2015-07-01

    A joint experimental and theoretical study has been carried out on reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerisation (RAFT). We have performed density functional theory calculations at the (Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof) PBE/triple zeta plus polarisation level to analyse the RAFT mechanisms corresponding to these compounds. Global and local reactivity indices have been calculated to investigate the effect of the addition of methyl, cyanomethyl and styryl radicals on the double bond C=S of thionoester compounds producing an adduct radical. This mechanism is shown to be difficult when the cyanomethyl is used contrarily to the methyl and styryl radicals, in agreement with experimental results. The activation barrier of fragmentation of adduct radicals does not correlate well with the length of fragmented bond (O-Cα). The bond topological analysis of radical adduct predicts that the distance between the oxygen and a critical point (O-CP) in the fragment bond is a good parameter to estimate the activation energy of the fragmentation mechanism. It is shown that the nature of the free radicals is more selective than that of the thionoester compounds. With an overall large agreement with experiments, these theoretical results afford an explanation of the efficiency for the RAFT mechanism.

  2. Templateless synthesis of polyacrylamide-based Nanogels via RAFT dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; Xu, Yuanyuan; An, Zesheng

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of well-defined polyacrylamide-based nanogels via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion polymerization, highlighting a templateless route for the efficient synthesis of nanogels based on water-soluble polymers. RAFT dispersion polymerization of acrylamide in co-nonsolvents of water-tert-butanol mixtures by chain extension from poly(dimethylacrylamide) shows well-controlled polymerization process, uniform nanogel size, and excellent colloidal stability. The versatility of this approach is further demonstrated by introducing a hydrophobic co-monomer (butyl acrylate) without disturbing the dispersion polymerization process.

  3. Templateless synthesis of polyacrylamide-based Nanogels via RAFT dispersion polymerization.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kai; Xu, Yuanyuan; An, Zesheng

    2015-03-01

    This paper reports on the synthesis of well-defined polyacrylamide-based nanogels via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion polymerization, highlighting a templateless route for the efficient synthesis of nanogels based on water-soluble polymers. RAFT dispersion polymerization of acrylamide in co-nonsolvents of water-tert-butanol mixtures by chain extension from poly(dimethylacrylamide) shows well-controlled polymerization process, uniform nanogel size, and excellent colloidal stability. The versatility of this approach is further demonstrated by introducing a hydrophobic co-monomer (butyl acrylate) without disturbing the dispersion polymerization process. PMID:25684634

  4. Poly(vinyl ester) Block Copolymers Synthesized by Reversible Addition−Fragmentation Chain Transfer Polymerizations

    SciTech Connect

    Lipscomb, Corinne E.; Mahanthappa, Mahesh K.

    2009-07-31

    Homopolymerizations and block copolymerizations of vinyl acetate (VAc), vinyl pivalate (VPv), and vinyl benzoate (VBz) by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization have been studied. Polymerizations of VAc initiated with 2,2{prime}-azobis(isobutyronitrile) (AIBN) at 60 C using two different xanthate RAFT agents C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OC(=S)SR (R = -CH(CH{sub 3})CO{sub 2}C{sub 2}H{sub 5} (1) and -CH(CH{sub 3})O{sub 2}CC(CH{sub 3}){sub 3} (2)) were examined to elucidate the dependence of the polydispersities of the resulting polymers on the RAFT agent leaving group R. RAFT agent 2, in which the leaving R-group mimics a growing vinyl ester polymer chain, consistently yields poly(vinyl acetates) having broader polydispersities than those synthesized using 1 (M{sub n} = 3.6-14 kg/mol and M{sub w}/M{sub n} = 1.15-1.33). While VPv exhibits similar controlled polymerization behavior to VAc, RAFT homopolymerizations of VBz mediated by 1 indicate this electron-deficient vinyl ester requires higher temperatures to effect controlled polymerizations to yield polymers having M{sub n} = 4-14 kg/mol and M{sub w}/M{sub n} = 1.29-1.53. Chain extension reactions from xanthate-terminated vinyl ester homopolymers with VAc, VPv, and VBz proceed with variable efficiencies to furnish block copolymers that microphase separate in the melt state as determined by small-angle X-ray scattering.

  5. Early career: Templating of liquid crystal microstructures by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Heinen, Jennifer M.

    2014-12-31

    This research has shown that the microstructure of self-assembled copolymers can be decoupled from the polymer chemistry. The simplest polymer architecture, linear block copolymers, is valuable for a broad range of applications, including adhesives and coatings, medical devices, electronics and energy storage, because these block copolymers reproducibly self-assemble into microphase separated nanoscale domains. Unfortunately, the self-assembled microstructure is tuned by polymer composition, thus limiting the potential to simultaneously optimize chemical, mechanical, and transport properties for desired applications. To this end, much work was been put into manipulating block copolymer self-assembly independently of polymer composition. These efforts have included the use of additives or solvents to alter polymer chain conformation, the addition of a third monomer to produce ABC triblock terpolymers, architectures with mixed blocks, such as tapered/gradient polymers, and the synthesis of other nonlinear molecular architectures. This work has shown that the microstructures formed by linear ABC terpolymers can be altered by controlling the architecture of the polymer molecules at a constant monomer composition, so that the microstructure is tuned independently from the chemical properties.

  6. Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) grafted polyethylene/polypropylene (PE/PP) nonwoven fabric by γ-initiation: Synthesis, characterization and benefits of RAFT mediation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Yasko; Barsbay, Murat; Güven, Olgun

    2014-12-01

    Polyethylene/polypropylene (PE/PP) nonwoven fabrics were functionalized by γ-initiated RAFT mediated grafting of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), and the characterization of the grafted samples was carried out using various techniques. FTIR and XPS analysis showed an increase in the oxygenated content till a certain degree of grafting. The results implied a grafting process following the concept of ‘front mechanism’. The initial grafting occurred on the topmost surface layer, and then moved further into the bulk of the polymer matrix. Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) mediated grafting yielded a better controlled grafting when compared to those obtained in conventional grafting.

  7. Rheology of Hyperbranched Poly(triglyceride)-Based Thermoplastic Elastomers via RAFT polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Mengguo; Cochran, Eric

    2014-03-01

    In this contribution we discuss how melt- and solid-state properties are influenced by the degree of branching and molecular weight in a family of hyperbranched thermoplastics derived from soybean oil. Acrylated epoxidized triglycerides from soybean oils have been polymerized to hyperbranched thermoplastic elastomers using reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. With the proper choice of chain transfer agent, both homopolymer and block copolymer can be synthesized. By changing the number of acrylic groups per triglycerides, the chain architectures can range from nearly linear to highly branched. We show how the fundamental viscoelastic properties (e.g. entanglement molecular weight, plateau modulus, etc.) are influenced by chain architecture and molecular weight.

  8. Synthesis of water-compatible surface-imprinted polymer via click chemistry and RAFT precipitation polymerization for highly selective and sensitive electrochemical assay of fenitrothion.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lijuan; Zhao, Faqiong; Zeng, Baizhao

    2014-12-15

    A novel water-compatible fenitrothion imprinted polymer was prepared on Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) by click chemistry and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) precipitation polymerization (RAFTPP). The RAFT chain-transfer agent was synthesized on the surface of AuNPs using click chemistry, then an imprinted polymer with hydrophilic polymer brushes was prepared on the RAFT chain-transfer agent modified AuNPs by RAFTPP, mediated by hydrophilic polyethylene glycol macromolecular cochain-transfer agent. The obtained molecularly imprinted material showed improved accessibility to fenitrothion and recognition property in water medium. When the material was immobilized on an ionic liquid functionalized graphene coated glassy carbon electrode for the electrochemical determination of fenitrothion, the resulting electrochemical sensor presented linear response in the range of 0.01-5 μM, with a sensitivity of 6.1 μA/μM mm(2). The low limit of detection was 8 nM (S/N=3). The sensor was successfully applied to the determination of real samples and the recovery for standard added was 95-108%.

  9. Controlled RAFT Polymerization of 2-Vinyl-4,4-Dimethylazlactone (VDMA): A Facile Route to Bio-Inspired Polymer Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Lokitz, Bradley S; Messman, Jamie M; Hinestrosa Salazar, Juan Pablo; Alonzo Calderon, Jose E; Verduzco, Rafael; Brown, Rebecca H; Osa, Masashi; Ankner, John Francis; Kilbey, II, S Michael

    2009-01-01

    We report the controlled radical polymerization of 2-vinyl-4,4-dimethyl azlactone (VDMA), a 2-alkenyl-2-oxazolin-5-one monomer that contains a polymerizable vinyl moiety as well as a highly reactive, pendant azlactone as well as solution characterizations and surface attachment and functionaliztion. Reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) was used to polymerize of VDMA in benzene at 65 C using either 2-(2-cyanopropyl) dithiobenzoate (CPDB) or 2-dodecylsulfanylthiocarbonyl-sulfanyl-2-methylpropionic acid (DMP) as RAFT chain transfer agents (CTAs). The pseudo first order kinetics and resultant well-defined polymers of low polydispersity indicate that both CTAs afford control over the RAFT polymerization of VDMA. Dynamic and static light scattering and small angle neutron scattering were performed to determine the dn/dc, weight-average molecular weight, radius of gyration, and second virial coefficient of VDMA homopolymers in THF. Additionally, well-defined polymers of VDMA containing carboxyl end groups were covalently attached to epoxy modified silicon wafers via esterification to produce polymeric scaffolds that could be subsequently functionalized for various bio-inspired applications.

  10. Tailor-made polyfluoroacrylate and its block copolymer by RAFT polymerization in miniemulsion; improved hydrophobicity in the core-shell block copolymer.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Arindam; Singha, Nikhil K

    2013-10-15

    Controlled/living radical polymerization (CRP) of a fluoroacrylate was successfully carried out in miniemulsion by Reversible Addition Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) process. In this case, 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (HFBA) was polymerized using 2-cyanopropyl dodecyl trithiocarbonate (CPDTC) as RAFT agent, Triton X-405 and sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) as surfactant, and potassium persulphate (KPS) or 2,2'-azobis isobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. Being compatible with hydrophobic fluoroacrylate, this RAFT agent offered very high conversion and good control over the molecular weight of the polymer. The miniemulsion was stable without any costabilizer. The long chain dodecyl group (-C12H25) (Z-group in the RAFT agent) had beneficial effect in stabilizing the miniemulsion. When 2-cyano 2-propyl benzodithioate (CPBD) (Z=-C6H5) was used as RAFT agent, the conversion was less and particle size distribution was very broad. Block copolymerization with butyl acrylate (BA) using PHFBA as macro-RAFT agent showed core-shell morphology with the aggregation of PHFBA segment in the shell. GPC as well as DSC analysis confirmed the formation of block copolymer. The core-shell morphology was confirmed by TEM analysis. The block copolymers (PHFBA-b-PBA) showed significantly higher water contact angle (WCA) showing much better hydrophobicity compared to PHFBA alone. PMID:23953650

  11. Tailor-made polyfluoroacrylate and its block copolymer by RAFT polymerization in miniemulsion; improved hydrophobicity in the core-shell block copolymer.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Arindam; Singha, Nikhil K

    2013-10-15

    Controlled/living radical polymerization (CRP) of a fluoroacrylate was successfully carried out in miniemulsion by Reversible Addition Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) process. In this case, 2,2,3,3,4,4,4-heptafluorobutyl acrylate (HFBA) was polymerized using 2-cyanopropyl dodecyl trithiocarbonate (CPDTC) as RAFT agent, Triton X-405 and sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) as surfactant, and potassium persulphate (KPS) or 2,2'-azobis isobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator. Being compatible with hydrophobic fluoroacrylate, this RAFT agent offered very high conversion and good control over the molecular weight of the polymer. The miniemulsion was stable without any costabilizer. The long chain dodecyl group (-C12H25) (Z-group in the RAFT agent) had beneficial effect in stabilizing the miniemulsion. When 2-cyano 2-propyl benzodithioate (CPBD) (Z=-C6H5) was used as RAFT agent, the conversion was less and particle size distribution was very broad. Block copolymerization with butyl acrylate (BA) using PHFBA as macro-RAFT agent showed core-shell morphology with the aggregation of PHFBA segment in the shell. GPC as well as DSC analysis confirmed the formation of block copolymer. The core-shell morphology was confirmed by TEM analysis. The block copolymers (PHFBA-b-PBA) showed significantly higher water contact angle (WCA) showing much better hydrophobicity compared to PHFBA alone.

  12. Tailor-Made Fluorinated Copolymer/Clay Nanocomposite by Cationic RAFT Assisted Pickering Miniemulsion Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarty, Arindam; Zhang, Longhe; Cavicchi, Kevin A; Weiss, R A; Singha, Nikhil K

    2015-11-17

    Fluorinated polymers in emulsion find enormous applications in hydrophobic surface coating. Currently, lots of efforts are being made to develop specialty polymer emulsions which are free from surfactants. This investigation reports the preparation of a fluorinated copolymer via Pickering miniemulsion polymerization. In this case, 2,2,3,3,3-pentafluoropropyl acrylate (PFPA), methyl methacrylate (MMA), and n-butyl acrylate (nBA) were copolymerized in miniemulsion using Laponite-RDS as the stabilizer. The copolymerization was carried out via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) process. Here, a cationic RAFT agent, S-1-dodecyl-S'-(methylbenzyltriethylammonium bromide) trithiocarbonate (DMTTC), was used to promote polymer-Laponite interaction by means of ionic attraction. The polymerization was much faster when Laponite content was 30 wt % or above with 1.2 wt % RAFT agent. The stability of the miniemulsion in terms of zeta potential was found to be dependent on the amount of both Laponite and RAFT agent. The miniemulsion had particle sizes in the range of 200-300 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses showed the formation of Laponite armored spherical copolymer particles. The fluorinated copolymer films had improved surface properties because of polymer-Laponite interaction. PMID:26492220

  13. Facile and Efficient Preparation of Tri-component Fluorescent Glycopolymers via RAFT-controlled Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Lester, John M.; Amorosa, Anthony E.; Chance, Deborah L.; Mossine, Valeri V.; Mawhinney, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic glycopolymers are instrumental and versatile tools used in various biochemical and biomedical research fields. An example of a facile and efficient synthesis of well-controlled fluorescent statistical glycopolymers using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT)-based polymerization is demonstrated. The synthesis starts with the preparation of β-galactose-containing glycomonomer 2-lactobionamidoethyl methacrylamide obtained by reaction of lactobionolactone and N-(2-aminoethyl) methacrylamide (AEMA). 2-Gluconamidoethyl methacrylamide (GAEMA) is used as a structural analog lacking a terminal β-galactoside. The following RAFT-mediated copolymerization reaction involves three different monomers: N-(2-hydroxyethyl) acrylamide as spacer, AEMA as target for further fluorescence labeling, and the glycomonomers. Tolerant of aqueous systems, the RAFT agent used in the reaction is (4-cyanopentanoic acid)-4-dithiobenzoate. Low dispersities (≤1.32), predictable copolymer compositions, and high reproducibility of the polymerizations were observed among the products. Fluorescent polymers are obtained by modifying the glycopolymers with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester targeting the primary amine functional groups on AEMA. Lectin-binding specificities of the resulting glycopolymers are verified by testing with corresponding agarose beads coated with specific glycoepitope recognizing lectins. Because of the ease of the synthesis, the tight control of the product compositions and the good reproducibility of the reaction, this protocol can be translated towards preparation of other RAFT-based glycopolymers with specific structures and compositions, as desired. PMID:26132587

  14. Thermoresponsive diblock glycopolymer by RAFT polymerization for lectin recognition.

    PubMed

    Sun, Kan; Xu, Muru; Zhou, Kaichun; Nie, Huali; Quan, Jing; Zhu, Limin

    2016-11-01

    A thermoresponsive double-hydrophilic diblock glycopolymer, poly(diethyl- eneglycol methacrylate)-block-poly(6-O-vinyladipoyl-d-glucose) (PDEGMA-b-POVAG), was successfully prepared by a combination of enzymatic synthesis and reversible addition-fragment chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization protocols using poly(diethyl- eneglycol methacrylate) (PDEGMA) as macro-RAFT agent. The block glycopolymer was characterized by (1)H NMR and GPC. UV-vis, DLS and TEM studies revealed that the glycopolymer PDEGMA-b-POVAG was thermoresponsive with LCST at 31.0°C, and was able to self-assemble into spherical micelles of various sizes in aqueous solution. The glucose pendants in the glycopolymer could interact with the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A), the average hydrodynamic diameters of glycopolymer micelles increased to 170nm from 110nm after recognizing Con A. The diblock glycopolymer micelles have excellent biocompatibility with pig iliac endothelial cells, as measured using the MTT assay, but micelles loaded with Con A could be used to induce apoptosis in human hepatoma SMMC-7721 cells. PMID:27524009

  15. Assessing the RAFT equilibrium constant via model systems: an EPR study.

    PubMed

    Meiser, Wibke; Buback, Michael

    2011-09-15

    Reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) equilibrium constants, K(eq), for the model system cyano-iso-propyl dithiobenzoate (CPDB) - cyano-iso-propyl radical (CIP) have been deduced via electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The CIP species is produced by thermal decomposition of azobis-iso-butyronitrile (AIBN). In solution of toluene at 70 °C, K(eq) has been determined to be (9 ± 1) L · mol(-1). Measurement of K(eq) = k(ad)/k(β) between 60 and 100 °C yields ΔE(a) = (-28 ± 4) kJ · mol(-1) as the difference in the activation energies of k(ad) and k(β). The data measured on the model system are indicative of fast fragmentation of the intermediate radical produced by addition of CIP to CPDB.

  16. RAFT "grafting-through" approach to surface-anchored polymers: Electrodeposition of an electroactive methacrylate monomer.

    PubMed

    Grande, C D; Tria, M C; Felipe, M J; Zuluaga, F; Advincula, R

    2011-02-01

    The synthesis of homopolymer and diblock copolymers on surfaces was demonstrated using electrodeposition of a methacrylate-functionalized carbazole dendron and subsequent reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) "grafting-through" polymerization. First, the anodically electroactive carbazole dendron with methacrylate moiety (G1CzMA) was electrodeposited over a conducting surface (i.e. gold or indium tin oxide (ITO)) using cyclic voltammetry (CV). The electrodeposition process formed a crosslinked layer of carbazole units bearing exposed methacrylate moieties. This film was then used as the surface for RAFT polymerization process of methyl methacrylate (MMA), styrene (S), and tert-butyl acrylate (TBA) in the presence of a free RAFT agent and a free radical initiator, resulting in grafted polymer chains. The molecular weights and the polydispersity indices (PDI) of the sacrificial polymers were determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The stages of surface modification were investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), ellipsometry, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to confirm the surface composition, thickness, and film morphology, respectively. UV-Vis spectroscopy also confirmed the formation of an electro-optically active crosslinked carbazole film with a [Formula: see text] - [Formula: see text] absorption band from 450-650nm. Static water contact angle measurements confirmed the changes in surface energy of the ultrathin films with each modification step. The controlled polymer growth from the conducting polymer-modified surface suggests the viability of combining electrodeposition and grafting-through approach to form functional polymer ultrathin films.

  17. Fabrication of luminescent hydroxyapatite nanorods through surface-initiated RAFT polymerization: Characterization, biological imaging and drug delivery applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heng, Chunning; Zheng, Xiaoyan; Liu, Meiying; Xu, Dazhuang; Huang, Hongye; Deng, Fengjie; Hui, Junfeng; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2016-11-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanomaterials as an important class of nanomaterials, have been widely applied for different biomedical applications for their excellent biocompatibility, biodegradation potential and low cost. In this work, hydroxyapatite nanorods with uniform size and morphology were prepared through hydrothermal synthesis. The surfaces of these hydroxyapatite nanorods are covered with hydrophobic oleic acid, making them poor dispersibility in aqueous solution and difficult for biomedical applications. To overcome this issue, a simple surface initiated polymerization strategy has been developed via combination of the surface ligand exchange and reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Hydroxyapatite nanorods were first modified with Riboflavin-5-phosphate sodium (RPSSD) via ligand exchange reaction between the phosphate group of RPSSD and oleic acid. Then hydroxyl group of nHAp-RPSSD was used to immobilize chain transfer agent, which was used as the initiator for surface-initiated RAFT polymerization. The nHAp-RPSSD-poly(IA-PEGMA) nanocomposites were characterized by means of 1H nuclear magnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis in detailed. The biocompatibility, biological imaging and drug delivery of nHAp-RPSSD-poly(IA-PEGMA) were also investigated. Results showed that nHAp-RPSSD-poly(IA-PEGMA) exhibited excellent water dispersibility, desirable optical properties, good biocompatibility and high drug loading capability, making them promising candidates for biological imaging and controlled drug delivery applications.

  18. Low-Temperature Synthesis of Thermoresponsive Diblock Copolymer Nano-Objects via Aqueous Photoinitiated Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly (Photo-PISA) using Thermoresponsive Macro-RAFT Agents.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jianbo; Bai, Yuhao; Zhang, Xuechao; Huang, Chundong; Liu, Dongdong; Zhang, Li

    2016-09-01

    Photoinitiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate is conducted in water at low temperature using thermoresponsive copolymers of 2-(2-methoxyethoxy) ethyl methacrylate and oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (Mn = 475 g mol(-1) ) as the macro-RAFT agent. Kinetic studies confirm that quantitative monomer conversion is achieved within 15 min of visible-light irradiation (405 nm, 0.5 mW cm(-2) ), and good control is maintained during the polymerization. The polymerization can be temporally controlled by a simple "ON/OFF" switch of the light source. Finally, thermoresponsive diblock copolymer nano-objects with a diverse set of complex morphologies (spheres, worms, and vesicles) are prepared using this particular formulation. PMID:27439569

  19. Polystyrene-graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite synthesized by interfacial interactions between RAFT modified GO and core-shell polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yeole, Niranjan; Kutcherlapati, S N Raju; Jana, Tushar

    2015-04-01

    Here we report simple and robust one-pot method for the preparation of polystyrene (PS)/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite using reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) modified GO in surfactant free emulsion polymerization (SFEP). The results suggested that ionic comonomer, styrene sulfonate sodium salt (SS-Na), concentration plays vital role in forming PS/GO nanocomposite. X-ray and electron diffraction studies suggest that there is no recombination of GO sheets when moderate SS-Na concentration is used, resulting complete exfoliation of GO sheets in the PS/GO nanocomposite. The formation of core-shell particles in which PS is the core and polystyrene sulfonate sodium salt (PSS-Na) is the shell, and the specific interactions between functional groups of GO and PSS-Na are attributed as the driving forces for the PS/GO nanocomposite formation.

  20. Electrochemical deposition and surface-initiated RAFT polymerization: protein and cell-resistant PPEGMEMA polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Tria, Maria Celeste R; Grande, Carlos David T; Ponnapati, Ramakrishna R; Advincula, Rigoberto C

    2010-12-13

    This paper introduces a novel and versatile method of grafting protein and cell-resistant poly(poly ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (PPEGMEMA) brushes on conducting Au surface. The process started with the electrochemical deposition and full characterization of an electro-active chain transfer agent (CTA) on the Au surface. The electrochemical behavior of the CTA was investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) while the deposition and stability of the CTA on the surface were confirmed by ellipsometry, contact angle, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The capability of the electrodeposited CTA to mediate surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (SI-RAFT) polymerization on both the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA; model polymer) and PPEGMEMA brushes was demonstrated by the increase in thicknesses of the films after polymerization. Contact angles also decreased with the incorporation of the more hydrophilic brushes. Significant changes in the morphologies of the films before and after polymerization were also observed with atomic force microscopy (AFM) analyses. Furthermore, XPS results showed an increase in the O 1s peak intensity relative to C 1s after polymerizations, which confirmed the grafting of polyethyleneglycol (PEG) bearing brushes. The ability of the PPEGMEMA-modified Au surface to resist nonspecific adhesion of proteins and cells was monitored and confirmed by XPS, ellipsometry, contact angle, AFM, and fluorescence imaging. The new method presented has potential application as robust protein and cell-resistant coatings for electrically conducting electrodes and biomedical devices.

  1. Novel Tertiary Amino Containing Blinding Composite Membranes via Raft Polymerization and Their Preliminary CO2 Permeation Performance

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Lifang; Zhou, Mali; Yang, Shanshan; Shen, Jiangnan

    2015-01-01

    Facile synthesis of poly (N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) star polymers on the basis of the prepolymer chains, PDMAEMA as the macro chain transfer agent and divinyl benzene (DVB) as the cross-linking reagent by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was described. The RAFT polymerizations of DMAEMA at 70 °C using four RAFT agents with different R and Z group were investigated. The RAFT agents used in these polymerizations were dibenzyl trithiocarbonate (DBTTC), s-1-dodecyl-s'-(α,α'-dimethyl-α-acetic acid) trithiocarbonate (MTTCD), s,s'-bis (2-hydroxyethyl-2'-dimethylacrylate) trithiocarbonate (BDATC) and s-(2-cyanoprop-2-yl)-s-dodecyltrithiocarbonate (CPTCD). The results indicated that the structure of the end-group of RAFT agents had significant effects on the ability to control polymerization. Compared with the above-mentioned RAFT agents, CPTCD provides better control over the molecular weight and molecular weight distribution. The polydispersity index (PDI) was determined to be within the scope of 1.26 to 1.36. The yields, molecular weight, and distribution of the star polymers can be tuned by changing the molar ratio of DVB/PDMAEMA-CPTCD. The chemical composition and structure of the linear and star polymers were characterized by GPC, FTIR, 1H NMR, XRD analysis. For the pure Chitosan membrane, a great improvement was observed for both CO2 permeation rate and ideal selectivity of the blending composite membrane upon increasing the content of SPDMAEMA-8. At a feed gas pressure of 37.5 cmHg and 30 °C, the blinding composite membrane (Cs: SPDMAEMA-8 = 4:4) has a CO2 permeation rate of 8.54 × 10−4 cm3 (STP) cm−2∙s−1∙cm∙Hg−1 and a N2 permeation rate of 6.76 × 10−5 cm3 (STP) cm−2∙s−1∙cm∙Hg−1, and an ideal CO2/N2 selectivity of 35.2. PMID:25915025

  2. Gel Point Suppression in RAFT Polymerization of Pure Acrylic Cross-Linker Derived from Soybean Oil.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mengguo; Huang, Yuerui; Lu, Mingjia; Lin, Fang-Yi; Hernández, Nacú B; Cochran, Eric W

    2016-08-01

    Here we report the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of acrylated epoxidized soybean oil (AESO), a cross-linker molecule, to high conversion (>50%) and molecular weight (>100 kDa) without macrogelation. Surprisingly, gelation is suppressed in this system far beyond the expectations predicated both on Flory-Stockmeyer theory and multiple other studies of RAFT polymerization featuring cross-linking moieties. By varying AESO and initiator concentrations, we show how intra- versus intermolecular cross-linking compete, yielding a trade-off between the degree of intramolecular linkages and conversion at gel point. We measured polymer chain characteristics, including molecular weight, chain dimensions, polydispersity, and intrinsic viscosity, using multidetector gel permeation chromatography and NMR to track polymerization kinetics. We show that not only the time and conversion at macrogelation, but also the chain architecture, is largely affected by these reaction conditions. At maximal AESO concentration, the gel point approaches that predicted by the Flory-Stockmeyer theory, and increases in an exponential fashion as the AESO concentration decreases. In the most dilute solutions, macrogelation cannot be detected throughout the entire reaction. Instead, cyclization/intramolecular cross-linking reactions dominate, leading to microgelation. This work is important, especially in that it demonstrates that thermoplastic rubbers could be produced based on multifunctional renewable feedstocks. PMID:27359245

  3. In vivo Targeting of Alveolar Macrophages via RAFT-Based Glycopolymers

    PubMed Central

    Song, Eun-Ho; Manganiello, Matthew J.; Chow, Yu-Hua; Ghosn, Bilal; Convertine, Anthony J.; Stayton, Partick S.; Schnapp, Lynn M.; Ratner, Daniel M.

    2012-01-01

    Targeting cell populations via endogenous carbohydrate receptors is an appealing approach for drug delivery. However, to be effective, this strategy requires the production of high affinity carbohydrate ligands capable of engaging with specific cell-surface lectins. To develop materials that exhibit high affinity towards these receptors, we synthesized glycopolymers displaying pendant carbohydrate moieties from carbohydrate-functionalized monomer precursors via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. These glycopolymers were fluorescently labeled and used to determine macrophage-specific targeting both in vitro and in vivo. Mannose- and N-acetylglucosamine-containing glycopolymers were shown to specifically target mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) in vitro in a dose-dependent manner as compared to a galactose-containing glycopolymer (30- and 19-fold higher uptake, respectively). In addition, upon macrophage differentiation, the mannose glycopolymer exhibited enhanced uptake in M2-polarized macrophages, an anti-inflammatory macrophage phenotype prevalent in injured tissue. This carbohydrate-specific uptake was retained in vivo, as alveolar macrophages demonstrated 6-fold higher internalization of mannose glycopolymer, as compared to galactose, following intratracheal administration in mice. We have shown the successful synthesis of a class of functional RAFT glycopolymers capable of macrophage-type specific uptake both in vitro and in vivo, with significant implications for the design of future targeted drug delivery systems. PMID:22770567

  4. Organic-inorganic random copolymers from methacrylate-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) with 3-methacryloxypropylheptaphenyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane: synthesis via RAFT polymerization and self-assembly behavior.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kun; Li, Lei; Zheng, Sixun; Wang, Ge; Liang, Qi

    2014-01-14

    In this contribution, we report the synthesis of organic-inorganic random polymers from methacrylate-terminated poly(ethylene oxide) (MAPEO) (Mn = 950) and 3-methacryloxypropylheptaphenyl polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (MAPOSS) macromers via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization with 4-cyano-4-(thiobenzoylthio) valeric acid (CTBTVA) as the chain transfer agent. The organic-inorganic random copolymers were characterized by means of (1)H NMR spectroscopy, gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results of GPC indicate that the polymerizations were carried out in a controlled fashion. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the organic-inorganic random copolymers in bulk were microphase-separated and the POSS microdomains were formed via POSS-POSS interactions. In aqueous solutions the organic-inorganic random copolymers were capable of self-assembling into spherical nanoobjects as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic laser scattering (DLS). The self-assembly behavior of the organic-inorganic random copolymers was also found to occur in the mixtures with the precursors of epoxy. The nanostructures were further fixed via subsequent curing reaction and thus the organic-inorganic nanocomposites were obtained. The formation of nanophases in epoxy thermosets was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The organic-inorganic nanocomposites displayed the enhanced surface hydrophobicity as evidenced by surface contact angle measurements.

  5. Functional and surface-active membranes from poly(vinylidene fluoride)-graft-poly(acrylic acid) prepared via RAFT-mediated graft copolymerization.

    PubMed

    Ying, L; Yu, W H; Kang, E T; Neoh, K G

    2004-07-01

    Poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) with "living" poly (acrylic acid) (PAAc) side chains (PVDF-g-PAAc) was prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT)-mediated graft copolymerization of acrylic acid (AAc) with the ozone-pretreated PVDF. The chemical composition and structure of the copolymers were characterized by elemental analysis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The copolymer could be readily cast into pH-sensitive microfiltration (MF) membranes with enriched living PAAc graft chains on the surface (including the pore surfaces) by phase inversion in an aqueous medium. The surface composition of the membranes was determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The morphology of the membranes was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The pore size distribution of the membranes was found to be much more uniform than that of the corresponding membranes cast from PVDF-g-PAAc prepared by the "conventional" free-radical graft copolymerization process. Most important of all, the MF membranes with surface-tethered PAAc macro chain transfer agents, or the living membrane surfaces, could be further functionalized via surface-initiated block copolymerization with N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAM) to obtain the PVDF-g-PAAc-b-PNIPAAM MF membranes, which exhibited both pH- and temperature-dependent permeability to aqueous media. PMID:16459627

  6. Synthesis of carboxylic block copolymers via reversible addition fragmentation transfer polymerization for tooth erosion prevention.

    PubMed

    Lei, Y; Wang, T; Mitchell, J W; Qiu, J; Kilpatrick-Liverman, L

    2014-12-01

    Dental professionals are seeing a growing population of patients with visible signs of dental erosion. The approach currently being used to address the problem typically leverages the enamel protection benefits of fluoride. In this report, an alternative new block copolymer with a hydrophilic polyacrylic acid (PAA) block and a hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block was developed to similarly reduce the mineral loss from enamel under acidic conditions. This series of PMMA-b-PAA block copolymers was synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Their structures were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and (1)H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. The molar fractions of acrylic acid (AA) in the final block copolymer were finely controlled from 0.25 to 0.94, and the molecular weight (Mn) of PMMA-b-PAA was controlled from 10 kDa to 90 kDa. The binding capability of the block copolymer with hydroxyapatite (HAP) was investigated by ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR spectra confirmed that the PMMA-b-PAA block copolymer could bind to HAP via bridging bidentate bonds. Both UV-Vis and FTIR spectra additionally indicated that a high polymer concentration and low solution pH favored the polymer binding to HAP. The erosion-preventing efficacy of the PMMA-b-PAA block copolymer in inhibiting HAP mineral loss was quantitatively evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Based on the results, polymer treatment reduced the amount of calcium released by 27% to 30% in comparison with the unprotected samples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations indicated that PMMA-b-PAA polymer treatment protected enamel from acid erosion. This new amphiphilic block copolymer has significant potential to be integrated into dentifrices or mouthrinses as an alternative non-fluoride ingredient to reduce tooth erosion.

  7. Synthesis of Carboxylic Block Copolymers via Reversible Addition Fragmentation Transfer Polymerization for Tooth Erosion Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Y.; Wang, T.; Mitchell, J.W.; Qiu, J.; Kilpatrick-Liverman, L.

    2014-01-01

    Dental professionals are seeing a growing population of patients with visible signs of dental erosion. The approach currently being used to address the problem typically leverages the enamel protection benefits of fluoride. In this report, an alternative new block copolymer with a hydrophilic polyacrylic acid (PAA) block and a hydrophobic poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) block was developed to similarly reduce the mineral loss from enamel under acidic conditions. This series of PMMA-b-PAA block copolymers was synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Their structures were characterized by gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra. The molar fractions of acrylic acid (AA) in the final block copolymer were finely controlled from 0.25 to 0.94, and the molecular weight (Mn) of PMMA-b-PAA was controlled from 10 kDa to 90 kDa. The binding capability of the block copolymer with hydroxyapatite (HAP) was investigated by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. FTIR spectra confirmed that the PMMA-b-PAA block copolymer could bind to HAP via bridging bidentate bonds. Both UV-Vis and FTIR spectra additionally indicated that a high polymer concentration and low solution pH favored the polymer binding to HAP. The erosion-preventing efficacy of the PMMA-b-PAA block copolymer in inhibiting HAP mineral loss was quantitatively evaluated by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Based on the results, polymer treatment reduced the amount of calcium released by 27% to 30% in comparison with the unprotected samples. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations indicated that PMMA-b-PAA polymer treatment protected enamel from acid erosion. This new amphiphilic block copolymer has significant potential to be integrated into dentifrices or mouthrinses as an alternative non-fluoride ingredient to reduce tooth erosion. PMID:25248611

  8. Facile fabrication of core cross-linked micelles by RAFT polymerization and enzyme-mediated reaction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yukun; Lai, Quanyong; Lai, Shuqi; Wu, Jing; Wang, Wei; Yuan, Zhi

    2014-06-01

    Polymeric micelles formed in aqueous solution by assembly of amphiphilic block copolymers have been extensively investigated due to their great potential as drug carriers. However, the stability of polymeric assembly is still one of the major challenges in delivering drugs to tissues and cells. Here, we report a facile route to fabricate core cross-linked (CCL) micelles using an enzymatic polymerization as the cross-linking method. We present synthesis of poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(N-isopropyl acrylamide-co-N-(4-hydroxyphenethyl) acrylamide) diblock copolymer PEG-b-P(NIPAAm-co-NHPAAm) via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The diblock copolymer was then self-assembled into non-cross-linked (NCL) micelles upon heating above the lower critical solution temperature (LCST), and subsequently cross-linked using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as enzyme and oxidant. The characterization of the diblock copolymer and micelles were studied by NMR, DLS, UV-vis, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence study reveals that the cross-linking process endows the micelles with much lower critical micelle concentration (CMC). In addition, the drug release study shows that the CCL micelles have lower release amount of doxorubicin (DOX) than the NCL micelles due to the enhanced stability of the CCL micelles by core cross-linking process. PMID:24768266

  9. An efficient approach to obtaining water-compatible and stimuli-responsive molecularly imprinted polymers by the facile surface-grafting of functional polymer brushes via RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Pan, Guoqing; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Xianzhi; Li, Chenxi; Zhang, Huiqi

    2010-11-15

    A new and efficient approach to obtaining molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with both pure water-compatible (i.e., applicable in the pure aqueous environments) and stimuli-responsive binding properties is described, whose proof-of-principle is demonstrated by the facile modification of the preformed MIP microspheres via surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAAm). The presence of poly(NIPAAm) (PNIPAAm) brushes on the obtained MIP microspheres was confirmed by FT-IR as well as the water dispersion and static contact angle experiments, and some quantitative information including the molecular weights and polydispersities of the grafted polymer brushes, the thickness of the polymer brush layers, and their grafting densities was provided. In addition, the binding properties of the ungrafted and grafted MIPs/NIPs in both methanol/water (4/1, v/v) and pure water solutions were also investigated. The introduction of PNIPAAm brushes onto the MIP microspheres has proven to significantly improve their surface hydrophilicity and impart stimuli-responsive properties to them, leading to their pure water-compatible and thermo-responsive binding properties. The application of the facile surface-grafting approach, together with the versatility of RAFT polymerization and the availability of many different functional monomers, makes the present methodology a general and promising way to prepare water-compatible and stimuli-responsive MIPs for a wide range of templates.

  10. Grafting of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate from PE/PP nonwoven fabric via radiation-induced RAFT polymerization and quaternization of the grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madrid, Jordan F.; Barsbay, Murat; Abad, Lucille; Güven, Olgun

    2016-07-01

    Radiation induced grafting method is one of the most promising grafting techniques and it works successfully together with the reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, one of the most prominent controlled free-radical polymerization (CRP) methods. This study reports grafting of N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA) from the surface of polyethylene/polypropylene nonwoven fabric (PE/PP NWF) by the combination of radiation-induced initiation and the RAFT polymerization technique. Effects of monomer concentration, absorbed dose and solvent choice on the grafting yield have been investigated. The grafted NWF's were characterized by ATR-FTIR, XPS, SEM, EDX and thermal analysis methods. The results indicated that surface properties were completely altered after grafting compared to pristine PE/PP even for those with very low degree of PDMAEMA grafting. Free homopolymers in solution have been analyzed by GPC in order to obtain information about the grafts. The PDMAEMA grafts on the fabric surfaces were later quaternized with dimethyl sulfate to yield positively charged surfaces that were tested for antibacterial properties.

  11. Poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) grafted halloysite nanotubes as a molecular host matrix for luminescent ions prepared by surface-initiated RAFT polymerization and coordination chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Md. Rafiqul; Bach, Long Giang; Lim, Kwon Taek

    2013-07-01

    A fluorescent nanohybrid complex comprising of halloysite nanotubes (HNTs), poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA), and europium ions (Eu3+) was synthesized by the combination of surface-initiated reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (SI-RAFT) polymerization and coordination chemistry. Initially, PHEMA was grafted from the HNTs by SI-RAFT and then reacted with succinic anhydride to provide carboxyl acid groups on the external layers of HNTs-g-PHEMA nanohybrids. The subsequent coordination of the nanohybrids with Eu3+ ions afforded photoluminescent Eu3+ tagged HNTs-g-PHEMA nanohybrid complexes (HNTs-g-PHEMA-Eu3+). The structure, morphology, and fluorescence properties of the Eu3+ coordinated nanohybrid complexes were investigated by respective physical and spectral studies. FT-IR, XPS, and EDS analyses suggested the formation of the HNTs-g-PHEMA-Eu3+ nanohybrids. FE-SEM images indicated the immobilization of polymer layers on HNTs. TGA scans further demonstrated the grafting of PHEMA onto HNTs surface. The optical properties of HNTs-g-PHEMA-Eu3+ nanohybrid complexes were investigated by photoluminescence spectroscopy.

  12. Precision synthesis of functional materials via RAFT polymerization and click-type chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, Joel Diez

    2011-12-01

    The need to tailor polymeric architectures with specific physico-chemical properties via the simplest, cleanest, and most efficient synthetic route possible has become the ultimate goal in polymer synthesis. Recent progress in macromolecular science, such as the discoveries of controlled/"living" free radical polymerization (CRP) methods, has brought about synthetic capabilities to prepare (co)polymers with advanced topologies, predetermined molecular weights, narrow molecular weight distributions, and precisely located functional groups. In addition, the establishment of click chemistry has redefined the selected few highly efficient chemical reactions that become highly useful in post-polymerization modification strategies. Hence, the ability to make well-defined topologies afforded by controlled polymerization techniques and the facile incorporation of functionalities along the chain via click-type reactions have yielded complex architectures, allowing the investigation of physical phenomena which otherwise could not be studied with systems prepared via conventional methods. The overarching theme of the research work described in this dissertation is the fusion of the excellent attributes of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization method, which is one of the CRP techniques, and click-type chemical reactions in the precision of synthesis of advanced functional materials. Chapter IV is divided into three sections. In Section I, the direct RAFT homopolymerization of 2-(acryloyloxy)ethyl isocyanate (AOI) and subsequent post-polymerization modifications are described. The polymerization conditions were optimized in terms of the choice of RAFT chain transfer agent (CTA), polymerization temperature and the reaction medium. Direct RAFT polymerization of AOI requires a neutral CTA, and relatively low reaction temperature to yield AOI homopolymers with low polydispersities. Efficient side-chain functionalization of PAOI homopolymers was

  13. RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization yields poly(ethylene glycol)-based diblock copolymer nano-objects with predictable single phase morphologies.

    PubMed

    Warren, Nicholas J; Mykhaylyk, Oleksandr O; Mahmood, Daniel; Ryan, Anthony J; Armes, Steven P

    2014-01-22

    A poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) macromolecular chain transfer agent (macro-CTA) is prepared in high yield (>95%) with 97% dithiobenzoate chain-end functionality in a three-step synthesis starting from a monohydroxy PEG113 precursor. This PEG113-dithiobenzoate is then used for the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) aqueous dispersion polymerization of 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate (HPMA). Polymerizations conducted under optimized conditions at 50 °C led to high conversions as judged by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and relatively low diblock copolymer polydispersities (M(w)/M(n) < 1.25) as judged by GPC. The latter technique also indicated good blocking efficiencies, since there was minimal PEG113 macro-CTA contamination. Systematic variation of the mean degree of polymerization of the core-forming PHPMA block allowed PEG113-PHPMA(x) diblock copolymer spheres, worms, or vesicles to be prepared at up to 17.5% w/w solids, as judged by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy studies. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis revealed that more exotic oligolamellar vesicles were observed at 20% w/w solids when targeting highly asymmetric diblock compositions. Detailed analysis of SAXS curves indicated that the mean number of membranes per oligolamellar vesicle is approximately three. A PEG113-PHPMA(x) phase diagram was constructed to enable the reproducible targeting of pure phases, as opposed to mixed morphologies (e.g., spheres plus worms or worms plus vesicles). This new RAFT PISA formulation is expected to be important for the rational and efficient synthesis of a wide range of biocompatible, thermo-responsive PEGylated diblock copolymer nano-objects for various biomedical applications. PMID:24400622

  14. Synthesis and Properties of Star HPMA Copolymer Nanocarriers Synthesised by RAFT Polymerisation Designed for Selective Anticancer Drug Delivery and Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chytil, Petr; Koziolová, Eva; Janoušková, Olga; Kostka, Libor; Ulbrich, Karel; Etrych, Tomáš

    2015-06-01

    High-molecular-weight star polymer drug nanocarriers intended for the treatment and/or visualisation of solid tumours were synthesised, and their physico-chemical and preliminary in vitro biological properties were determined. The water-soluble star polymer carriers were prepared by the grafting of poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers by hetero-telechelic N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers, synthesised by the controlled radical Reversible Addition Fragmentation chain Transfer (RAFT) polymerisation. The well-defined star copolymers with Mw values ranging from 2 · 10(5) to 6 · 10(5) showing a low dispersity (approximately 1.2) were prepared in a high yield. A model anticancer drug, doxorubicin, was bound to the star polymer through a hydrazone bond, enabling the pH-controlled drug release in the target tumour tissue. The activated polymer arm ends of the star copolymer carrier enable a one-point attachment for the targeting ligands and/or a labelling moiety. In this study, the model TAMRA fluorescent dye was used to prove the feasibility of the polymer carrier visualisation by optical imaging in vitro. The tailor-made structure of the star polymer carriers should facilitate the synthesis of targeted polymer-drug conjugates, even polymer theranostics, for simultaneous tumour drug delivery and imaging.

  15. Fabrication of Fluoropolymer Microtubes via RAFT Copolymerization of N,N'-Methylene Bisacrylamide Gel Fibers and Fluoromonomer.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Wang, Yi; Tang, Liming

    2015-06-01

    Fluoropolymer microtubes with a smooth surface were fabricated in more than 70 % yield via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) co-polymerization of N,N'-methylene bisacrylamide (MBA) gel fibers as both template and monomer, 2-(perfluoro-3-methylbutyl)ethyl acrylate (R-3420) as co-monomer, and pentaerythritol tetraacrylate (PET4A) as cross-linker. The resulting fluoropolymer microtubes were characterized fully by SEM, TEM, EDS, XPS, and FT-IR. The influence of the monomer composition on the yields and morphologies of the tubes were investigated in detail. The results indicated that polymer microtubes with a smooth surface were obtained at suitable amounts of R-3420 and PET4A. Because of the decreased solubility of MBA gel fibers, the wall thickness increased as more R-3420 was used. In the presence of PET4A, the solution polymerization could be facilitated and more R-3420 could be attached onto the tubes based on FT-IR analysis. The water contact angle and swelling ratio measurements both revealed the low hydrophilicity and high lipophilicity of the fluoropolymer microtubes, which made the sample able to absorb toluene selectively in a water/toluene two-phase system. PMID:25786386

  16. N-(2-Hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide-based polymer conjugates with pH-controlled activation of doxorubicin for cell-specific or passive tumour targeting. Synthesis by RAFT polymerisation and physicochemical characterisation.

    PubMed

    Chytil, Petr; Etrych, Tomáš; Kříž, Jaroslav; Subr, Vladimír; Ulbrich, Karel

    2010-11-20

    Controlled radical reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerisation was used to prepare water-soluble polymer-drug carriers based on copolymers of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) with a hydrazide group-containing monomer, showing well-defined structure with narrow molecular weight distribution (approx. 1.1-1.2). The anticancer therapeutic doxorubicin was bound to the polymeric carrier by a hydrazone bond, enabling pH-controlled release under mildly acid conditions that mimics the environment in endosomes/lysosomes of tumour cells. RAFT polymerisation facilitated the synthesis of semitelechelic copolymers, which were used in the synthesis of monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody-polymer-drug conjugate designed for cell-specific tumour targeting. They were also used for producing a biodegradable high-molecular-weight graft polymer-drug conjugate that degrade in the presence of glutathione, which is designed for passive targeting to solid tumours. The conjugates exhibited well-defined structures with narrow molecular weight distributions of approx. 1.3 and pH-controlled drug release.

  17. Chain Transfer of Vegetable Oil Macromonomers in Acrylic Solution Copolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Black, Micah; Messman, Jamie M; Rawlins, James

    2011-01-01

    Use of vegetable oil macromonomers (VOMMs) as comonomers in emulsion polymerization enables good film coalescence without the addition of solvents that constitute volatile organic compounds (VOCs). VOMMs are derived from renewable resources and offer the potential of post-application crosslinking via auto-oxidation. However, chain transfer reactions of VOMMs with initiator and/or polymer radicals during emulsion polymerization reduce the amount of allylic hydrogen atoms available for primary auto-oxidation during drying. Vegetable oils and derivatives were reacted in combination with butyl acrylate and methyl methacrylate via solution polymerization. The copolymerization was monitored using in situ infrared spectroscopy to determine the extent of chain transfer. 1H NMR spectroscopy was used to determine the loci of chain transfer and the molecular weight characteristics of the polymers were characterized by SEC. Solution polymerization was utilized to minimize temperature fluctuations and maintain polymer solubility during the initial characterization.

  18. Xyloglucan-Functional Latex Particles via RAFT-Mediated Emulsion Polymerization for the Biomimetic Modification of Cellulose.

    PubMed

    Hatton, Fiona L; Ruda, Marcus; Lansalot, Muriel; D'Agosto, Franck; Malmström, Eva; Carlmark, Anna

    2016-04-11

    Herein, we report a novel class of latex particles composed of a hemicellulose, xyloglucan (XG), and poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), specially designed to enable a biomimetic modification of cellulose. The formation of the latex particles was achieved utilizing reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) mediated surfactant-free emulsion polymerization employing XG as a hydrophilic macromolecular RAFT agent (macroRAFT). In an initial step, XG was functionalized at the reducing chain end to bear a dithioester. This XG macroRAFT was subsequently utilized in water and chain extended with methyl methacrylate (MMA) as hydrophobic monomer, inspired by a polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) process. This yielded latex nanoparticles with a hydrophobic PMMA core stabilized by the hydrophilic XG chains at the corona. The molar mass of PMMA targeted was varied, resulting in a series of stable latex particles with hydrophobic PMMA content between 22 and 68 wt % of the total solids content (5-10%). The XG-PMMA nanoparticles were subsequently adsorbed to a neutral cellulose substrate (filter paper), and the modified surfaces were analyzed by FT-IR and SEM analyses. The adsorption of the latex particles was also investigated by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D), where the nanoparticles were adsorbed to negatively charged model cellulose surfaces. The surfaces were analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle (CA) measurements. QCM-D experiments showed that more mass was adsorbed to the surfaces with increasing molar mass of the PMMA present. AFM of the surfaces after adsorption showed discrete particles, which were no longer present after annealing (160 °C, 1 h) and the roughness (Rq) of the surfaces had also decreased by at least half. Interestingly, after annealing, the surfaces did not all become more hydrophobic, as monitored by CA measurements, indicating that the surface roughness was an important factor to

  19. State of research: environmental pathways and food chain transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Vaughan, B E

    1984-01-01

    Data on the chemistry of biologically active components of petroleum, synthetic fuel oils, certain metal elements and pesticides provide valuable generic information needed for predicting the long-term fate of buried waste constituents and their likelihood of entering food chains. Components of such complex mixtures partition between solid and solution phases, influencing their mobility, volatility and susceptibility to microbial transformation. Estimating health hazards from indirect exposures to organic chemicals involves an ecosystem's approach to understanding the unique behavior of complex mixtures. Metabolism by microbial organisms fundamentally alters these complex mixtures as they move through food chains. Pathway modeling of organic chemicals must consider the nature and magnitude of food chain transfers to predict biological risk where metabolites may become more toxic than the parent compound. To obtain predictions, major areas are identified where data acquisition is essential to extend our radiological modeling experience to the field of organic chemical contamination. PMID:6428875

  20. Combining RAFT polymerization and thiol-ene click reaction for core-shell structured polymer@BaTiO3 nanodielectrics with high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss, and high energy storage capability.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ke; Huang, Xingyi; Zhu, Ming; Xie, Liyuan; Tanaka, Toshikatsu; Jiang, Pingkai

    2014-02-12

    Nanodielectric materials with high dielectric constant, low dielectric loss, and high energy storage capability are highly desirable in modern electric and electronics industries. It has been proved that the preparation of core-shell structured dielectric polymer nanocomposites via "grafting from" method is an effective approach to these materials. However, by using this approach, the deep understanding of the structure-dielectric property relationship of the core-shell structured nanodielectrics has been limited because of the lack of detailed information (e.g., molecular weight, grafting density) about the macromolecules grafted onto the nanoparticle surfaces. In this work, by the combination of reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and thiol-ene click reaction, two types of core-shell structured polymer@BaTiO3 (polymer@BT) nanocomposites with high dielectric constant and low dielectric loss were successfully prepared via a "grafting to" method. Compared with the "grafting from" method, this "grafting to" method has two merits: the molecular weight of the polymer chains in the shell layer can be easily controlled and the grafting density can be tailored by changing the molecular weight of the grafting polymer. Moreover, a clear insight into the relationship among the dielectric properties and energy storage capability of the core-shell structured polymer@BT nanocomposites, the molecular weight of the polymer chains, and the grafting density of the core-shell structured nanoparticles was achieved. The study provides new insights into the design and preparation of nanodielectric materials with desirable dielectric properties.

  1. The ant raft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlot, Nathan; Hu, David; Equabai, Solomon

    2009-11-01

    To survive floods, fire ants link their arms together to assemble a raft with their own bodies. Because ants are nearly as dense as water, this cooperative behavior requires that a portion of the ant colony must sacrifice itself by remaining underwater to support the colony's weight. Surprisingly, few ants drown during this process due to a striking metamorphosis of the raft: as we show using time-lapse photography, the raft morphs from a spherical to a pancake shape. This pancake configuration--a monolayer of floating ants supporting their dry counterparts--allows all ants to both breathe and remain united as a colony. Data is presented in the form of the dimensions and the rates of formation of the ant raft. We use the statics of small floating bodies to account for the equilibrium raft size as a function of the initial mass and density of the ants.

  2. Self Righting Life Raft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The Givens Buoy Raft was designed and manufactured for inventor Jim Givens of Givens Marine Survival Co. Inc., by RPR Industries, Inc. The Raft consists of a canopied topside and an underwater hemispheric ballast chamber. It has a heavy ballast stabilization system, adopted from NASA technology, which negates the capsizing problem. A "flapper valve" admits large amounts of water to the hemisphere chamber providing ballast to keep the center of gravity constant; stabilization system compensates for changes in wave angle and weight shifting of raft occupants. Mr. Givens has an exclusive patent license for use of the NASA technology. Produced in various sizes, capacities range from six to 20 persons. Raft is housed in a canister, available in several configurations. A pull on a line triggers the automatic inflation process, which takes 12 seconds. The raft has been credited with saving 230 lives in the last five years. It has found wide acceptance with operators of fishing boats, pleasure craft and other vessels. The Coast Guard is purchasing the rafts for use on its rescue helicopters and the Navy has a development program to adapt the system. The Coast Guard last year announced a proposed amendment of its regulations that would require large ballast chambers on inflatable life rafts.

  3. Mosquito, egg raft (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Mosquitoes of the Culex species lay their eggs in the form of egg rafts that float in ... feed on micro-organisms before developing into flying mosquitoes. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease Control ...

  4. Rafting in superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N.

    1996-03-01

    The phenomenon of rafting in superalloys is described, with particular reference to modern superalloys with a high volume fraction of the particulate {gamma}{prime} phase. It is shown that in the elastic regime, the thermodynamic driving force for rafting is proportional to the applied stress, to the difference between the lattice parameters of the {gamma} matrix and the {gamma}{prime} particles, and to the difference of their elastic constants. A qualitative argument gives the sign of this driving force, which agrees with that determined by Pineau for a single isolated particle. Drawing on the work of Pollock and Argon and of Socrate and Parks, it is shown that after a plastic strain of the sample of order 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, the driving force is proportional to the product of the applied stress and the lattice misfit, in agreement with the results of the calculations of Socrate and Parks. The rate of rafting is controlled by the diffusion of alloying elements. Here, the tendency of large atoms to move from regions of high hydrostatic pressure to those of low may outweigh the influence of concentration gradients. The deformation of the sample directly produced by rafting is small, of order 4.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}. The rafted structure is resistant to creep under low stresses at high temperatures. Under most experimental conditions at relatively high stresses, rafting accelerates creep; this effect may be less pronounced at the small strains acceptable under operational conditions.

  5. Rafting in Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabarro, Frank R. N.

    1996-03-01

    The phenomenon of rafting in superalloys is described, with particular reference to modern superalloys with a high volume fraction of the particulate γ’ phase. It is shown that in the elastic regime, the thermodynamic driving force for rafting is proportional to the applied stress, to the difference between the lattice parameters of the γ matrix and the γ’ particles, and to the difference of their elastic constants. A qualitative argument gives the sign of this driving force, which agrees with that determined by Pineau for a single isolated particle. Drawing on the work of Pollock and Argon and of Socrate and Parks, it is shown that after a plastic strain of the sample of order 2 × 10-4, the driving force is proportional to the product of the applied stress and the lattice misfit, in agreement with the results of the calculations of Socrate and Parks. The rate of rafting is controlled by the diffusion of alloying elements. Here, the tendency of large atoms to move from regions of high hydrostatic pressure to those of low may outweigh the influence of concentration gradients. The deformation of the sample directly produced by rafting is small, of order 4.5 × 10-4. The rafted structure is resistant to creep under low stresses at high temperatures. Under most experimental conditions at relatively high stresses, rafting accelerates creep; this effect may be less pronounced at the small strains acceptable under operational conditions.

  6. Novel RAFT amphiphilic brush copolymer steric stabilisers for cubosomes: poly(octadecyl acrylate)-block-poly(polyethylene glycol methyl ether acrylate).

    PubMed

    Chong, Josephine Y T; Mulet, Xavier; Postma, Almar; Keddie, Daniel J; Waddington, Lynne J; Boyd, Ben J; Drummond, Calum J

    2014-09-21

    Copolymers, particularly Pluronics®, are typically used to sterically stabilise colloidal nanostructured particles composed of a lyotropic liquid crystalline bicontinuous cubic phase (cubosomes). There is a need to design and assess new functionalisable stabilisers for these colloidal drug delivery systems. Six amphiphilic brush copolymers, poly(octadecyl acrylate)-block-poly(polyethylene glycol methyl ether acrylate) (P(ODA)-b-P(PEGA-OMe)), synthesised by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT), were assessed as novel steric stabilisers for cubosomes. It was found that increasing the density of PEG on the nanostructured particle surface by incorporating a PEG brush design (i.e., brush copolymer), provided comparable and/or increased stabilisation effectiveness compared to a linear PEG structure, Pluronic® F127, which is extensively used for steric stabilisation of cubosomes. Assessment was conducted both prior to and following the removal of the dodecyl trithiocarbonate end-group, by free radical-induced reduction. The reduced (P(ODA)-b-P(PEGA-OMe) copolymers were more effective steric stabilisers for phytantriol and monoolein colloidal particle dispersions than their non-reduced analogues. High throughput characterisation methodologies, including an accelerated stability assay (ASA) and synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), were implemented in this study for the rapid assessment of steric stabiliser effectiveness and lyotropic liquid crystalline phase identification. Phytantriol cubosomes stabilised with P(ODA)-b-P(PEGA-OMe) copolymers exhibited a double diamond cubic phase (Q(2)(D)), whilst monoolein cubosomes exhibited a primitive cubic phase (Q(2)(P)), analogous to those formed using Pluronic® F127. PMID:25058647

  7. RaftProt: mammalian lipid raft proteome database

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Anup; Chen, David; Boda, Akash R.; Foster, Leonard J.; Davis, Melissa J.; Hill, Michelle M.

    2015-01-01

    RaftProt (http://lipid-raft-database.di.uq.edu.au/) is a database of mammalian lipid raft-associated proteins as reported in high-throughput mass spectrometry studies. Lipid rafts are specialized membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids thought to act as dynamic signalling and sorting platforms. Given their fundamental roles in cellular regulation, there is a plethora of information on the size, composition and regulation of these membrane microdomains, including a large number of proteomics studies. To facilitate the mining and analysis of published lipid raft proteomics studies, we have developed a searchable database RaftProt. In addition to browsing the studies, performing basic queries by protein and gene names, searching experiments by cell, tissue and organisms; we have implemented several advanced features to facilitate data mining. To address the issue of potential bias due to biochemical preparation procedures used, we have captured the lipid raft preparation methods and implemented advanced search option for methodology and sample treatment conditions, such as cholesterol depletion. Furthermore, we have identified a list of high confidence proteins, and enabled searching only from this list of likely bona fide lipid raft proteins. Given the apparent biological importance of lipid raft and their associated proteins, this database would constitute a key resource for the scientific community. PMID:25392410

  8. RaftProt: mammalian lipid raft proteome database.

    PubMed

    Shah, Anup; Chen, David; Boda, Akash R; Foster, Leonard J; Davis, Melissa J; Hill, Michelle M

    2015-01-01

    RaftProt (http://lipid-raft-database.di.uq.edu.au/) is a database of mammalian lipid raft-associated proteins as reported in high-throughput mass spectrometry studies. Lipid rafts are specialized membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids thought to act as dynamic signalling and sorting platforms. Given their fundamental roles in cellular regulation, there is a plethora of information on the size, composition and regulation of these membrane microdomains, including a large number of proteomics studies. To facilitate the mining and analysis of published lipid raft proteomics studies, we have developed a searchable database RaftProt. In addition to browsing the studies, performing basic queries by protein and gene names, searching experiments by cell, tissue and organisms; we have implemented several advanced features to facilitate data mining. To address the issue of potential bias due to biochemical preparation procedures used, we have captured the lipid raft preparation methods and implemented advanced search option for methodology and sample treatment conditions, such as cholesterol depletion. Furthermore, we have identified a list of high confidence proteins, and enabled searching only from this list of likely bona fide lipid raft proteins. Given the apparent biological importance of lipid raft and their associated proteins, this database would constitute a key resource for the scientific community.

  9. Surface modification of electrospun cellulose acetate nanofibers via RAFT polymerization for DNA adsorption.

    PubMed

    Demirci, Serkan; Celebioglu, Asli; Uyar, Tamer

    2014-11-26

    We report on a facile and robust method by which surface of electrospun cellulose acetate (CA) nanofibers can be chemically modified with cationic polymer brushes for DNA adsorption. The surface of CA nanofibers was functionalized by growing poly[(ar-vinylbenzyl)trimethylammonium chloride)] [poly(VBTAC)] brushes through a multi-step chemical sequence that ensures retention of mechanically robust nanofibers. Initially, the surface of the CA nanofibers was modified with RAFT chain transfer agent. Poly(VBTAC) brushes were then prepared via RAFT-mediated polymerization from the nanofiber surface. DNA adsorption capacity of CA nanofibrous web surface functionalized with cationic poly(VBTAC) brushes was demonstrated. The reusability of these webs was investigated by measuring the adsorption capacity for target DNA in a cyclic manner. In brief, CA nanofibers surface-modified with cationic polymer brushes can be suitable as membrane materials for filtration, purification, and/or separation processes for DNA.

  10. Capillary rafts and their destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Abkarian, Manouk; Aristoff, Jeffrey; Stone, Howard

    2010-11-01

    Small objects trapped at an interface are very common in Nature (insects walking on water, ant rafts, bubbles or pollen at the water-air interface, membranes...) and are found in many multiphase industrial processes. The study of such particle-laden interfaces is therefore of practical as well as fundamental importance. Here we report experiments on the self-assembly of spherical particles into capillary rafts at an oil-water interface and elucidate how such rafts sink. We characterize different types of sinking behavior and show that it is possible to obtain "armored droplets," whereby the sinking oil is encapsulated within a shell of particles.

  11. The tension raft jacket concept

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, P.; Nygaard, C.; Greiner, W.; Johnson, B.; Datta, B.; Dove, P.G.S.; Souza, R.D.

    1995-05-01

    Concept level engineering has been performed for a promising new deepwater platform design. The tension raft jacket (TRJ) employs a fairly conventional fixed platform-type jacket and deck supported by a deeply submerged buoyant concrete raft. The raft is founded to the sea bottom by vertically tensioned tendons similar to conventional TLPs. Tensioned drilling and production risers are used. A TRJ design is discussed for a medium-size deck payload and a water depth of about 1,500 feet. Work to date includes preliminary sizing of the deck, jacket, raft and tendons; global response analysis; development of potential fabrication and installation methods; and development of preliminary schedules and costs. The TRJ concept is expected to compete with compliant tower platforms in shallow water depths and with large drilling TLPs in deep water. The primary benefits of the TRJ concept are simplicity of design, constructability with existing Gulf of Mexico (GOM) infrastructure, lower capital costs, and shorter development schedules.

  12. Polymerization-Induced Self-Assembly of Block Copolymer Nano-objects via RAFT Aqueous Dispersion Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this Perspective, we discuss the recent development of polymerization-induced self-assembly mediated by reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) aqueous dispersion polymerization. This approach has quickly become a powerful and versatile technique for the synthesis of a wide range of bespoke organic diblock copolymer nano-objects of controllable size, morphology, and surface functionality. Given its potential scalability, such environmentally-friendly formulations are expected to offer many potential applications, such as novel Pickering emulsifiers, efficient microencapsulation vehicles, and sterilizable thermo-responsive hydrogels for the cost-effective long-term storage of mammalian cells. PMID:24968281

  13. Lipid rafts: heterogeneity on the high seas.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Linda J

    2004-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that are enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. They have been implicated in processes as diverse as signal transduction, endocytosis and cholesterol trafficking. Recent evidence suggests that this diversity of function is accompanied by a diversity in the composition of lipid rafts. The rafts in cells appear to be heterogeneous both in terms of their protein and their lipid content, and can be localized to different regions of the cell. This review summarizes the data supporting the concept of heterogeneity among lipid rafts and outlines the evidence for cross-talk between raft components. Based on differences in the ways in which proteins interact with rafts, the Induced-Fit Model of Raft Heterogeneity is proposed to explain the establishment and maintenance of heterogeneity within raft populations. PMID:14662007

  14. Preparation of polystyrene brush film by radical chain-transfer polymerization and micromechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Chen, Miao; An, Yanqing; Liu, Jianxi; Yan, Fengyuan

    2008-12-01

    A radical chain-transfer polymerization technique has been applied to graft-polymerize brushes of polystyrene (PSt) on single-crystal silicon substrates. 3-Mercapto-propyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS), as a chain-transfer agent for grafting, was immobilized on the silicon surface by a self-assembling process. The structure and morphology of the graft-functionalized silicon surfaces were characterized by the means of contact-angle measurement, ellipsometric thickness measurement, Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The nanotribological and micromechanical properties of the as-prepared polymer brush films were investigated by frictional force microscopy (FFM), force-volume analysis and scratch test. The results indicate that the friction properties of the grafted polymer films can be improved significantly by the treatment of toluene, and the chemically bonded polystyrene film exhibits superior scratch resistance behavior compared with the spin-coated polystyrene film. The resultant polystyrene brush film is expected to develop as a potential lubrication coating for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS).

  15. The challenge of lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Pike, Linda J

    2009-04-01

    The Singer-Nicholson model of membranes postulated a uniform lipid bilayer randomly studded with floating proteins. However, it became clear almost immediately that membranes were not uniform and that clusters of lipids in a more ordered state existed within the generally disorder lipid milieu of the membrane. These clusters of ordered lipids are now referred to as lipid rafts. This review summarizes current thinking on the nature of lipid rafts focusing on the role of proteomics and lipidomics in understanding the structure of these domains. It also outlines the contribution of single-molecule methods in defining the forces that drive the formation and dynamics of these membrane domains. PMID:18955730

  16. Well-Defined High Molecular Weight Polystyrene with High Rates and High Livingness Synthesized via Two-Stage RAFT Emulsion Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Kun; Gao, Xiang; Luo, Yingwu

    2015-07-01

    A highly living polymer with over 100 kg mol(-1) molecular weight is very difficult to achieve by controlled radical polymerization since the unavoidable side reactions of irreversible radical termination and radical chain transfer to monomer reaction become significant. It is reported that over 500 kg mol(-1) polystyrene with high livingness and low dispersity could be synthesized by a facile two-stage reversible addition-fragmentation transfer emulsion polymerization. The monomer conversion reaches 90% within 10 h. High livingness of the product is ascribed to the extremely low initiator concentration and the chain transfer constant for monomer unexpectedly much lower than the well-accepted values in the conventional radical polymerization. The two-stage monomer feeding policy much decreases the dispersity of the product.

  17. Anti-Biofouling Effect of PEG-Grafted Block Copolymer Synthesized by RAFT Polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seon-Mi; Han, Sang Suk; Kim, A Young; Choi, Beom-Jin; Paik, Hyun-Jong; Lee, Inwon; Park, Hyun; Chun, Ho Hwan; Cho, Youngjin; Hwang, Do-Hoon

    2015-10-01

    Poly(glycidyl methadrylate-block-styrene) (PGMA-b-PS), a block copolymer consisting of glycidyl methacrylate and styrene, was synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer living polymerization. The synthesized PGMA-b-PS was then grafted with low-molecular-weight polyethylene glycol (PEG) via epoxy ring opening to give PGMA-g-PEG-b-PS, which was evaluated as an anti-biofouling coating material. As a preliminary test for the anti-biofouling effect, a protein adsorption experiment was performed on the synthesized block copolymer surface. The block copolymers were spin-coated onto silicon wafers, and protein adsorption experiments were carried out using fluorescein isothiocyanate conjugate-labeled bovine serum albumin. The fluorescence intensity of the protein adsorbed on the block copolymer surface was compared with that of a polystyrene film as a reference. The synthesized PGMA-g-PEG-b-PS film showed much lower fluorescence intensity than that of the PS film.

  18. You Sank My Lipid Rafts!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Tessa N.

    2009-01-01

    The plasma membrane is the membrane that serves as a boundary between the interior of a cell and its extracellular environment. Lipid rafts are microdomains within a cellular membrane that possess decreased fluidity due to the presence of cholesterol, glycolipids, and phospholipids containing longer fatty acids. These domains are involved in many…

  19. Grafting poly(ethylene glycol) monomethacrylate onto Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles to resist nonspecific protein adsorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shaoxiong; Wang, Linlin; Zhang, Xu; Su, Gaosheng

    2010-11-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles grafted with poly(poly(ethylene glycol) monomethacrylate) (P(PEGMA)) were prepared by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. In this approach, S-benzyl S'-trimethoxysilylpropyltrithiocarbonate, used as a chain transfer agent for RAFT, was first immobilized onto the magnetic nanoparticle surface, and then PEGMA was grafted onto the surface of magnetic nanoparticle via RAFT polymerization. The results showed that P(PEGMA) chains grew from magnetic nanoparticles by surface-induced RAFT polymerization. The grafted P(PEGMA) chains can decrease the nonspecific adsorption of proteins on the surface of Fe 3O 4 nanoparticles.

  20. Raft River geoscience case study

    SciTech Connect

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The Raft River Geothermal Site has been evaluated over the past eight years by the United States Geological Survey and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory as a moderate-temperature geothermal resource. The geoscience data gathered in the drilling and testing of seven geothermal wells suggest that the Raft River thermal reservoir is: (a) produced from fractures found at the contact metamorphic zone, apparently the base of detached normal faulting from the Bridge and Horse Well Fault zones of the Jim Sage Mountains; (b) anisotropic, with the major axis of hydraulic conductivity coincident to the Bridge Fault Zone; (c) hydraulically connected to the shallow thermal fluid of the Crook and BLM wells based upon both geochemistry and pressure response; (d) controlled by a mixture of diluted meteoric water recharging from the northwest and a saline sodium chloride water entering from the southwest. Although the hydrogeologic environment of the Raft River geothermal area is very complex and unique, it is typical of many Basin and Range systems.

  1. The nutritional significance of lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Yaqoob, Parveen

    2009-01-01

    The structure, size, stability, and functionality of lipid rafts are still in debate, but recent techniques allowing direct visualization have characterized them in a wide range of cell types. Lipid rafts are potentially modifiable by diet, particularly (but not exclusively) by dietary fatty acids. However, it is not clear whether dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are incorporated into raft lipids or whether their low affinity to cholesterol disallows this and causes phase separation from rafts and displacement of raft proteins. This review examines the potential for dietary modification of raft structure and function in the immune system, brain and retinal tissue, the gut, and in cancer cells. Although there is increasing evidence to suggest that membrane microdomains, and their modulation, have an impact in health and disease, it is too early to judge whether modulation of lipid rafts is responsible for the immunomodulatory effects of n-3 PUFA. In addition to dietary fatty acids, gangliosides and cholesterol may also modulate microdomains in a number of tissues, and recent work has highlighted sphingolipids in membrane microdomains as potential targets for inhibition of tumor growth by n-3 PUFA. The roles of fatty acids and gangliosides in cognitive development, age-related cognitive decline, psychiatric disorders, and Alzheimer's disease are poorly understood and require clarification, particularly with respect to the contribution of lipid rafts. The roles of lipid rafts in cancer, in microbial pathogenesis, and in insulin resistance are only just emerging, but compelling evidence indicates the growing importance of membrane microdomains in health and disease.

  2. The lipid raft proteome of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Alvaro; Pérez, Alberto; Coleman, James L; Benach, Jorge L

    2015-11-01

    Eukaryotic lipid rafts are membrane microdomains that have significant amounts of cholesterol and a selective set of proteins that have been associated with multiple biological functions. The Lyme disease agent, Borrelia burgdorferi, is one of an increasing number of bacterial pathogens that incorporates cholesterol onto its membrane, and form cholesterol glycolipid domains that possess all the hallmarks of eukaryotic lipid rafts. In this study, we isolated lipid rafts from cultured B. burgdorferi as a detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fraction on density gradients, and characterized those molecules that partitioned exclusively or are highly enriched in these domains. Cholesterol glycolipids, the previously known raft-associated lipoproteins OspA and OpsB, and cholera toxin partitioned into the lipid rafts fraction indicating compatibility with components of the DRM. The proteome of lipid rafts was analyzed by a combination of LC-MS/MS or MudPIT. Identified proteins were analyzed in silico for parameters that included localization, isoelectric point, molecular mass and biological function. The proteome provided a consistent pattern of lipoproteins, proteases and their substrates, sensing molecules and prokaryotic homologs of eukaryotic lipid rafts. This study provides the first analysis of a prokaryotic lipid raft and has relevance for the biology of Borrelia, other pathogenic bacteria, as well as for the evolution of these structures. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002365 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD002365).

  3. Lipid rafts, cholesterol, and the brain

    PubMed Central

    Korade, Zeljka; Kenworthy, Anne K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Lipid rafts are specialized membrane microdomains that serve as organizing centers for assembly of signaling molecules, influence membrane fluidity and trafficking of membrane proteins, and regulate different cellular processes such as neurotransmission and receptor trafficking. In this article, we provide an overview of current methods for studying lipid rafts and models for how lipid rafts might form and function. Next, we propose a potential mechanism for regulating lipid rafts in the brain via local control of cholesterol biosynthesis by neurotrophins and their receptors. Finally, we discuss evidence that altered cholesterol metabolism and/or lipid rafts play a critical role in the pathophysiology of multiple CNS disorders, including Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, Huntington, Alzheimer's, and Niemman-Pick Type C diseases. PMID:18402986

  4. Surface modification of carbon nanotubes via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Qing; Tian, Jianwen; Liu, Meiying; Zeng, Guangjian; Huang, Qiang; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Qingsong; Deng, Fengjie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Wei, Yen

    2015-08-01

    In this work, a novel strategy for surface modification of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was developed via combination of mussel inspired chemistry and chain transfer free radical polymerization. First, pristine CNTs were functionalized with polydopamine (PDA), which is formed via self-polymerization of dopamine in alkaline conditions. These PDA functionalized CNTs can be further reacted with amino-terminated polymers (named as PDMC), which was synthesized through chain transfer free radical polymerization using cysteamine hydrochloride as chain transfer agent and methacryloxyethyltrimethyl ammonium chloride as the monomer. PDMC perfectly conjugated with CNT-PDA was ascertained by a series of characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The dispersibility of obtained CNT nanocomposites (named as CNT-PDA-PDMC) was further examined. Results showed that the dispersibility of CNT-PDA-PDMC in aqueous and organic solutions was obviously enhanced. Apart from PDMC, many other amino-terminated polymers can also be used to functionalization of CNTs via similar strategy. Therefore, the method described in this work should be a general strategy for fabrication various polymer nanocomposites.

  5. Raft River geoscience case study: appendixes

    SciTech Connect

    Dolenc, M.R.; Hull, L.C.; Mizell, S.A.; Russell, B.F.; Skiba, P.A.; Strawn, J.A.; Tullis, J.A.

    1981-11-01

    The following are included in these appendices: lithology, x-ray analysis, and cores; well construction data; borehole geophysical logs; chemical analyses from wells at the Raft River geothermal site; and bibliography. (MHR)

  6. Drift of continental rafts with asymmetric heating.

    PubMed

    Knopoff, L; Poehls, K A; Smith, R C

    1972-06-01

    A laboratory model of a lithospheric raft is propelled through a viscous asthenospheric layer with constant velocity of scaled magnitude appropriate to continental drift. The propulsion is due to differential heat concentration in the model oceanic and continental crusts.

  7. Drop floating on a granular raft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Josserand, Christophe; Protiere, Suzie

    2015-11-01

    When a droplet comes in contact with a bath of the same liquid, it coalesces to minimize the surface energy. This phenomenon reduces emulsion stability and is usually fought with surfactant molecules. Another way to slow down coalescence is to use colloidal solid particles. In this case the particles spontaneously migrate to the interface to form ``Pickering'' emulsions and act as a barrier between droplets. Here we use dense, large particles (~ 500 μm) which form a monolayer at an oil/water interface that we call a granular raft. When a droplet is placed on top of such a raft, for a given set of particle properties (contact angle/size), the raft prevents coalescence indefinitely. However, in contrast to what happens when a droplet is placed on a hydrophobic surface and never wets the surface, here the droplet is strongly anchored to the raft and deforms it. We will use this specific configuration to probe the mechanical response of the granular raft: by controlling the droplet volume we can impose tensile or compressive stresses. Finally we will show that the drop, spherical at first, slowly takes a more complex shape as it's volume increases. This shape is not reversible as the drop volume is decreased. The drop can become oblate or prolate with wrinkling of the raft.

  8. Revealing model dependencies in "Assessing the RAFT equilibrium constant via model systems: an EPR study".

    PubMed

    Junkers, Thomas; Barner-Kowollik, Christopher; Coote, Michelle L

    2011-12-01

    In a recent article (W. Meiser, M. Buback, Assessing the RAFT Equilibrium Constant via Model Systems: An EPR Study, Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2011, 18, 1490-1494), it is claimed that evidence is found that unequivocally proves that quantum mechanical calculations assessing the equilibrium constant and fragmentation rate coefficients in dithiobenzoate-mediated reversible addition fragmentation transfer (RAFT) systems are beset with a considerable uncertainty. In the present work, we show that these claims made by Meiser and Buback are beset with a model dependency, as a critical key parameter in their data analysis - the addition rate coefficient of the radicals attacking the C=S double bond in the dithiobenzoate - induces a model insensitivity into the data analysis. Contrary to the claims made by Meiser and Buback, their experimental results can be brought into agreement with the quantum chemical calculations if a lower addition rate coefficient of cyanoisopropyl radicals (CIP) to the CIP dithiobenzoate (CPDB) is assumed. To resolve the model dependency, the addition rate coefficient of CIP radicals to CPDB needs to be determined as a matter of priority.

  9. Acceleration and selective monomer addition during aqueous RAFT copolymerization of ionic monomers at 25 °C.

    PubMed

    Li, Guangxiang; Xu, Na; Yu, Qiuping; Lu, Xinhua; Chen, Hong; Cai, Yuanli

    2014-08-01

    An acceleration effect and selective monomer addition during RAFT copolymerization of the oppositely-charged ionic monomers in dilute aqueous solution at 25 °C are reported. The reaction is conducted using a non-ionic water-soluble polymer as a macromolecular chain transfer agent under visible light irradiation. A fast iterative polymerization can be induced, even in dilute solution, by the favorable ionic interactions and in situ self-assembly of zwitterionic growing chains. Selelctive monomer addition is achieved in the statistical copolymerization due to the ion-pairing of the oppositely-charged monomers, such as precisely the same reaction rates at a 1:1 of monomer ratio, otherwise a faster reaction of the minor monomer component over the major one. These behaviors open up an avenue towards the rapid synthesis of sequence-controlled zwitterionic polyelectrolytes that can satisfy the demands of emerging biological applications. PMID:24889131

  10. Spatial and temporal control of signaling through lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Golub, Tamara; Wacha, Stefan; Caroni, Pico

    2004-10-01

    Sphingolipid- and cholesterol-dependent microdomains (rafts) order proteins at biological membranes and have been implicated in most signaling processes at the cell surface, but the principles and mechanisms through which lipid rafts influence signaling are not well understood. Recent studies have revealed how lipid rafts are rapidly redistributed and assembled locally in response to extracellular signals, and how components of raft-based signaling domains undergo rapid and regulated rearrangements influencing signal quality, duration, and strength. These findings highlight the exquisitely dynamic properties of signaling domains based on lipid rafts, and suggest that processes of raft trafficking and assembly take central roles in mediating spatial and temporal control of signaling.

  11. Microdomains Associated to Lipid Rafts.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Jonathan; Ramírez-Jarquín, Josué O; Vaca, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Store Operated Ca(2+) Entry (SOCE), the main Ca(2+) influx mechanism in non-excitable cells, is implicated in the immune response and has been reported to be affected in several pathologies including cancer. The basic molecular constituents of SOCE are Orai, the pore forming unit, and STIM, a multidomain protein with at least two principal functions: one is to sense the Ca(2+) content inside the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum(ER) and the second is to activate Orai channels upon depletion of the ER. The link between Ca(2+) depletion inside the ER and Ca(2+) influx from extracellular media is through a direct association of STIM and Orai, but for this to occur, both molecules have to interact and form clusters where ER and plasma membrane (PM) are intimately apposed. In recent years a great number of components have been identified as participants in SOCE regulation, including regions of plasma membrane enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, the so called lipid rafts, which recruit a complex platform of specialized microdomains, which cells use to regulate spatiotemporal Ca(2+) signals.

  12. Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene by surface chain transfer reaction based on mussel-inspired adhesion technology and thiol chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Zhijun; Zhao, Yang; Sun, Wei; Shi, Suqing; Gong, Yongkuan

    2016-11-01

    Biomimetic surface modification of polypropylene (PP) is conducted by surface chain transfer reaction based on the mussel-inspired versatile adhesion technology and thiol chemistry, using 2-methacryloyloxyethylphosphorylcholine (MPC) as a hydrophilic monomer mimicking the cell outer membrane structure and 2,2-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) as initiator in ethanol. A layer of polydopamine (PDA) is firstly deposited onto PP surface, which not only offers good interfacial adhesion with PP, but also supplies secondary reaction sites (-NH2) to covalently anchor thiol groups onto PP surface. Then the radical chain transfer to surface-bonded thiol groups and surface re-initiated polymerization of MPC lead to the formation of a thin layer of polymer brush (PMPC) with cell outer membrane mimetic structure on PP surface. X-ray photoelectron spectrophotometer (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water contact angle measurements are used to characterize the PP surfaces before and after modification. The protein adsorption and platelet adhesion experiments are also employed to evaluate the interactions of PP surface with biomolecules. The results show that PMPC is successfully grafted onto PP surface. In comparison with bare PP, the resultant PP-PMPC surface exhibits greatly improved protein and platelet resistance performance, which is the contribution of both increased surface hydrophilicity and zwitterionic structure. More importantly, the residue thiol groups on PP-PMPC surface create a new pathway to further functionalize such zwitterion modified PP surface.

  13. Lipid Raft: A Floating Island Of Death or Survival

    PubMed Central

    George, Kimberly S.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-01-01

    Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, and play an important role in the initiation of many pharmacological agent-induced signaling pathways and toxicological effects. The structure of lipid rafts is dynamic, resulting in an ever-changing content of both lipids and proteins. Cholesterol, as a major component of lipid rafts, is critical for the formation and configuration of lipid rafts microdomains, which provide signaling platforms capable of activating both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. A change of cholesterol level can result in lipid rafts disruption and activate or deactivate raft-associated proteins, such as death receptor proteins, protein kinases, and calcium channels. Several anti-cancer drugs are able to suppress growth and induce apoptosis of tumor cells through alteration of lipid raft contents via disrupting lipid raft integrity. PMID:22289360

  14. Oceanic rafting by a coastal community

    PubMed Central

    Fraser, Ceridwen I.; Nikula, Raisa; Waters, Jonathan M.

    2011-01-01

    Oceanic rafting is thought to play a fundamental role in assembling the biological communities of isolated coastal ecosystems. Direct observations of this key ecological and evolutionary process are, however, critically lacking. The importance of macroalgal rafting as a dispersal mechanism has remained uncertain, largely owing to lack of knowledge about the capacity of fauna to survive long voyages at sea and successfully make landfall and establish. Here, we directly document the rafting of a diverse assemblage of intertidal organisms across several hundred kilometres of open ocean, from the subantarctic to mainland New Zealand. Multispecies analyses using phylogeographic and ecological data indicate that 10 epifaunal invertebrate species rafted on six large bull kelp specimens for several weeks from the subantarctic Auckland and/or Snares Islands to the Otago coast of New Zealand, a minimum distance of some 400–600 km. These genetic data are the first to demonstrate that passive rafting can enable simultaneous trans-oceanic transport and landfall of numerous coastal taxa. PMID:20843850

  15. Assessing the Nature of Lipid Raft Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Niemelä, Perttu S; Ollila, Samuli; Hyvönen, Marja T; Karttunen, Mikko; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2007-01-01

    The paradigm of biological membranes has recently gone through a major update. Instead of being fluid and homogeneous, recent studies suggest that membranes are characterized by transient domains with varying fluidity. In particular, a number of experimental studies have revealed the existence of highly ordered lateral domains rich in sphingomyelin and cholesterol (CHOL). These domains, called functional lipid rafts, have been suggested to take part in a variety of dynamic cellular processes such as membrane trafficking, signal transduction, and regulation of the activity of membrane proteins. However, despite the proposed importance of these domains, their properties, and even the precise nature of the lipid phases, have remained open issues mainly because the associated short time and length scales have posed a major challenge to experiments. In this work, we employ extensive atom-scale simulations to elucidate the properties of ternary raft mixtures with CHOL, palmitoylsphingomyelin (PSM), and palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine. We simulate two bilayers of 1,024 lipids for 100 ns in the liquid-ordered phase and one system of the same size in the liquid-disordered phase. The studies provide evidence that the presence of PSM and CHOL in raft-like membranes leads to strongly packed and rigid bilayers. We also find that the simulated raft bilayers are characterized by nanoscale lateral heterogeneity, though the slow lateral diffusion renders the interpretation of the observed lateral heterogeneity more difficult. The findings reveal aspects of the role of favored (specific) lipid–lipid interactions within rafts and clarify the prominent role of CHOL in altering the properties of the membrane locally in its neighborhood. Also, we show that the presence of PSM and CHOL in rafts leads to intriguing lateral pressure profiles that are distinctly different from corresponding profiles in nonraft-like membranes. The results propose that the functioning of certain classes

  16. Erythrocytic vacuolar rafts induced by malaria parasites.

    PubMed

    Haldar, K; Samuel, B U; Mohandas, N; Harrison, T; Hiller, N L

    2001-03-01

    Studies in the past year displaced long-standing dogmas and provided many new molecular insights into how proteins and solutes move between the erythrocyte plasma membrane and the malarial vacuole. Highlights include a demonstration that (1) detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) rafts exist in the red cell membrane and their resident proteins are detected as rafts in the plasmodial vacuole, (2) a voltage-gated channel in the infected red cell membrane mediates uptake of extracellular nutrient solutes, and (3) intraerythrocytic membranes transport a parasite-encoded adherence antigen to the red cell surface.

  17. Dynamics of submersible mussel rafts in waves and current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin-xin; Swift, M. Robinson; Dewhurst, Tobias; Tsukrov, Igor; Celikkol, Barbaros; Newell, Carter

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the dynamics of submersible mussel rafts, the finite element program Aqua-FE™, developed by the University of New Hampshire (UNH), was applied to rafts moored at the surface and submerged. The submerged configuration is used to reduce wave forcing and to avoid contact with floating ice during winters in northern waters. Each raft consists of three pontoons connected by a grid framework. Rafts are intended to support densely spaced mussel ropes hung from the framework. When submerged, the pontoons are flooded, and the raft is held vertically by floats attached by lines. The computer models were developed in Aqua-FE™ to simulate the effects of waves and current. They were validated by comparison with wave tank results by use of a 1/10 scale raft physical model. Comparisons showed good agreement for the important heave (vertical) and pitch (rotational) motions, though there was a tendency towards conservative results for wave and current drag. Full-scale simulations of surface and submerged single raft and two rafts connected in tandem were performed. Submerged raft wave response was found to be reduced relative to that at the surface for both the single and two-raft configurations. In particular, the vertical motion of mussel rope connection points was significantly reduced by submergence, resulting in reduced potential for mussel drop-off. For example, the maximum vertical velocities of mussel rope attachment points in the submerged two raft case were 7%-20% of the corresponding velocities when at the surface.

  18. Lipid raft: A floating island of death or survival

    SciTech Connect

    George, Kimberly S.; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-03-15

    Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, and play an important role in the initiation of many pharmacological agent-induced signaling pathways and toxicological effects. The structure of lipid rafts is dynamic, resulting in an ever-changing content of both lipids and proteins. Cholesterol, as a major component of lipid rafts, is critical for the formation and configuration of lipid raft microdomains, which provide signaling platforms capable of activating both pro-apoptotic and anti-apoptotic signaling pathways. A change of cholesterol level can result in lipid raft disruption and activate or deactivate raft-associated proteins, such as death receptor proteins, protein kinases, and calcium channels. Several anti-cancer drugs are able to suppress growth and induce apoptosis of tumor cells through alteration of lipid raft contents via disrupting lipid raft integrity. -- Highlights: ► The role of lipid rafts in apoptosis ► The pro- and anti-apoptotic effects of lipid raft disruption ► Cancer treatments targeting lipid rafts.

  19. Using NK Cell Lipid Raft Fractionation to Understand the Role of Lipid Rafts in NK Cell Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pertierra, Esther; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts were first defined as detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs) due to their relative insolubility in non-ionic detergents. Although they should not be confused with lipid rafts, DRMs are a valuable starting point for the study of these membrane domains and the interactions of proteins with rafts.Here we describe the isolation of DRMs by ultracentrifugation on a sucrose gradient, a method we have used to study the role of lipid rafts in NKG2D-mediated signaling. We also describe raft fractionation of NK cells involving the selective solubility of β-octylglucoside (β-OG). OG is a non-ionic detergent that efficiently dissolves DRMs but does not disrupt protein associations with the cytoskeleton. Using these two techniques may yield useful information about the proteins involved in receptor recruitment into lipid rafts and the interactions of the actin cytoskeleton with lipid rafts.

  20. Beyond Traditional RAFT: Alternative Activation of Thiocarbonylthio Compounds for Controlled Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Thomas G.; Fu, Qiang; Uchiyama, Mineto; Satoh, Kotaro; Xu, Jiangtao

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in polymerization reactions utilizing thiocarbonylthio compounds have highlighted the surprising versatility of these unique molecules. The increasing popularity of reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) radical polymerization as a means of producing well‐defined, ‘controlled’ synthetic polymers is largely due to its simplicity of implementation and the availability of a wide range of compatible reagents. However, novel modes of thiocarbonylthio activation can expand the technique beyond the traditional system (i.e., employing a free radical initiator) pushing the applicability and use of thiocarbonylthio compounds even further than previously assumed. The primary advances seen in recent years are a revival in the direct photoactivation of thiocarbonylthio compounds, their activation via photoredox catalysis, and their use in cationic polymerizations. These synthetic approaches and their implications for the synthesis of controlled polymers represent a significant advance in polymer science, with potentially unforeseen benefits and possibilities for further developments still ahead. This Research News aims to highlight key works in this area while also clarifying the differences and similarities of each system. PMID:27711266

  1. Beyond Traditional RAFT: Alternative Activation of Thiocarbonylthio Compounds for Controlled Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Thomas G.; Fu, Qiang; Uchiyama, Mineto; Satoh, Kotaro; Xu, Jiangtao

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in polymerization reactions utilizing thiocarbonylthio compounds have highlighted the surprising versatility of these unique molecules. The increasing popularity of reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) radical polymerization as a means of producing well‐defined, ‘controlled’ synthetic polymers is largely due to its simplicity of implementation and the availability of a wide range of compatible reagents. However, novel modes of thiocarbonylthio activation can expand the technique beyond the traditional system (i.e., employing a free radical initiator) pushing the applicability and use of thiocarbonylthio compounds even further than previously assumed. The primary advances seen in recent years are a revival in the direct photoactivation of thiocarbonylthio compounds, their activation via photoredox catalysis, and their use in cationic polymerizations. These synthetic approaches and their implications for the synthesis of controlled polymers represent a significant advance in polymer science, with potentially unforeseen benefits and possibilities for further developments still ahead. This Research News aims to highlight key works in this area while also clarifying the differences and similarities of each system.

  2. Dynamics and shape of large fire ant rafts

    PubMed Central

    Mlot, Nathan J.; Tovey, Craig; Hu, David L.

    2012-01-01

    To survive floods, fire ants link their bodies together to build waterproof rafts. Such rafts can be quite large, exceeding 100,000 individuals in size. In this study, we make two improvements on a previously reported model on the construction rate of rafts numbering between 3,000 and 10,000 individuals. That model was based upon experimental observations of randomly-directed linear ant trajectories atop the raft. Here, we report anomalous behavior of ants atop larger rafts of up to 23,000 ants. As rafts increase in size, the behavior of ants approaches diffusion, which is in closer alignment with other studies on the foraging and scouting patterns of ants. We incorporate this ant behavior into the model. Our modified model predicts more accurately the growth of large rafts. Our previous model also relied on an assumption of raft circularity. We show that this assumption is not necessary for large rafts, because it follows from the random directionality of the ant trajectories. Our predicted relationship between raft size and circularity closely fits experimental data. PMID:23336030

  3. Raft River wellfield testing and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, B.F.

    1982-04-01

    The testing procedures and an overview of the expected performance of the Raft River wellfield during plant operation are presented. Four well-testing procedures were used to evaluate the seven geothermal wells: (1) artesian flow and airlift tests during and shortly after drilling; (2) short duration constant rate and variable-head artesian flow tests following drilling; (3) a series of pulse discharge and injection tests of short duration, with constant rate and variable head; and (4) pumping and injection tests of up to 30 days duration using permanently installed pumps. Productivity curves were plotted for each of the exploratory and production wells. It was concluded that the Raft River wellfield has the capability of supplying the necessary flow to operate the 5MW(e) facility. (MJF)

  4. Lipid Rafts in Mast Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Silveira e Souza, Adriana Maria Mariano; Mazucato, Vivian Marino; Jamur, Maria Célia; Oliver, Constance

    2011-01-01

    Mast cells have long been recognized to have a direct and critical role in allergic and inflammatory reactions. In allergic diseases, these cells exert both local and systemic responses, including allergic rhinitis and anaphylaxis. Mast cell mediators are also related to many chronic inflammatory conditions. Besides the roles in pathological conditions, the biological functions of mast cells include roles in innate immunity, involvement in host defense mechanisms against parasites, immunomodulation of the immune system, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Despite their growing significance in physiological and pathological conditions, much still remains to be learned about mast cell biology. This paper presents evidence that lipid rafts or raft components modulate many of the biological processes in mast cells, such as degranulation and endocytosis, play a role in mast cell development and recruitment, and contribute to the overall preservation of mast cell structure and organization. PMID:21490812

  5. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death.

    PubMed

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na(+), K(+), and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  6. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    PubMed Central

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+, and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23087902

  7. A superconducting raft in the Fermi sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Sajida; Latt, Kyaw-Zin; Chang, Hao; Hassanien, Abdou; Hla, Saw-Wai

    2014-03-01

    We report a new organization of nanoscale molecular clusters that exhibit superconducting properties on Ag(111) below 8K substrate temperature. These small two dimensional crystallites are composed of a few molecular chains formed by polymerized BETS (donors) and GaCl4 (acceptor). In STM images, these molecular clusters appear as ordered parallel chains resembling the `rafts'. Using scanning tunneling microscope (STM) manipulation, small molecular clusters having a few donor-acceptor chains are laterally manipulated to bare surface area. From the tip height signals, the dynamics of molecular clusters during their movements across the surface has been unveiled. Repeated manipulation experiments reveal that the rafts move only along [211] surface directions with single atomic site hops. Then by means of tunneling spectroscopy, interaction of two dimensional surface state electrons with these two dimensional clusters are investigated at the molecule-metal boundary regions. The results provide how electrons interact with the superconducting clusters in addition to the electronic and mechanical properties of these superconducting rafts. This work is financially supported by the US DOE, BES grant number: DE-FG02-02ER46012.

  8. Desmosome Assembly and Disassembly Are Membrane Raft-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Faundez, Victor; Koval, Michael; Mattheyses, Alexa L.; Kowalczyk, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Strong intercellular adhesion is critical for tissues that experience mechanical stress, such as the skin and heart. Desmosomes provide adhesive strength to tissues by anchoring desmosomal cadherins of neighboring cells to the intermediate filament cytoskeleton. Alterations in assembly and disassembly compromise desmosome function and may contribute to human diseases, such as the autoimmune skin blistering disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV). We previously demonstrated that PV auto-antibodies directed against the desmosomal cadherin desmoglein 3 (Dsg3) cause loss of adhesion by triggering membrane raft-mediated Dsg3 endocytosis. We hypothesized that raft membrane microdomains play a broader role in desmosome homeostasis by regulating the dynamics of desmosome assembly and disassembly. In human keratinocytes, Dsg3 is raft associated as determined by biochemical and super resolution immunofluorescence microscopy methods. Cholesterol depletion, which disrupts rafts, prevented desmosome assembly and adhesion, thus functionally linking rafts to desmosome formation. Interestingly, Dsg3 did not associate with rafts in cells lacking desmosomal proteins. Additionally, PV IgG-induced desmosome disassembly occurred by redistribution of Dsg3 into raft-containing endocytic membrane domains, resulting in cholesterol-dependent loss of adhesion. These findings demonstrate that membrane rafts are required for desmosome assembly and disassembly dynamics, suggesting therapeutic potential for raft targeting agents in desmosomal diseases such as PV. PMID:24498201

  9. Modeling Signal Transduction and Lipid Rafts in Immune Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Ashok

    2011-03-01

    Experimental evidence increasingly suggests that lipid rafts are nanometer sized cholesterol dependent dynamic assemblies enriched in sphingolipids and associated proteins. Lipid rafts are dynamic structures that break-up and reform on a relatively short time-scale, and are believed to facilitate the interactions of raft-associated proteins. The role of these rafts in signaling has been controversial, partly due to controversies regarding the existence and nature of the rafts themselves. Experimental evidence has indicated that in several cell types, especially T cells, rafts do influence signal transduction and T cell activation. Given the emerging consensus on the biophysical character of lipid rafts, the question can be asked as to what roles they possibly play in signal transduction. Here we carry out simulations of minimal models of the signal transduction network that regulates Src-family kinase dynamics in T cells and other cell types. By separately treating raft-based biochemical interactions, we find that rafts can indeed putatively play an important role in signal transduction, and in particular may affect the sensitivity of signal transduction. This illuminates possible functional consequences of membrane heterogeneities on signal transduction and points towards mechanisms for spatial control of signaling by cells.

  10. Planning and execution of Raft River stimulation treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Verity, R.V.; Crichlow, H.B.

    1980-02-07

    The following topics are discussed for two Raft River Valley wells: well characteristics and treatment objectives, treatment selection and design, treatment history, mechanical arrangements and job costs. (MHR)

  11. RAFT Aqueous Dispersion Polymerization of N-(2-(Methacryloyloxy)ethyl)pyrrolidone: A Convenient Low Viscosity Route to High Molecular Weight Water-Soluble Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    RAFT solution polymerization of N-(2-(methacryoyloxy)ethyl)pyrrolidone (NMEP) in ethanol at 70 °C was conducted to produce a series of PNMEP homopolymers with mean degrees of polymerization (DP) varying from 31 to 467. Turbidimetry was used to assess their inverse temperature solubility behavior in dilute aqueous solution, with an LCST of approximately 55 °C being observed in the high molecular weight limit. Then a poly(glycerol monomethacylate) (PGMA) macro-CTA with a mean DP of 63 was chain-extended with NMEP using a RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization formulation at 70 °C. The target PNMEP DP was systematically varied from 100 up to 6000 to generate a series of PGMA63–PNMEPx diblock copolymers. High conversions (≥92%) could be achieved when targeting up to x = 5000. GPC analysis confirmed high blocking efficiencies and a linear evolution in Mn with increasing PNMEP DP. A gradual increase in Mw/Mn was also observed when targeting higher DPs. However, this problem could be minimized (Mw/Mn < 1.50) by utilizing a higher purity grade of NMEP (98% vs 96%). This suggests that the broader molecular weight distributions observed at higher DPs are simply the result of a dimethacrylate impurity causing light branching, rather than an intrinsic side reaction such as chain transfer to polymer. Kinetic studies confirmed that the RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization of NMEP was approximately four times faster than the RAFT solution polymerization of NMEP in ethanol when targeting the same DP in each case. This is perhaps surprising because both 1H NMR and SAXS studies indicate that the core-forming PNMEP chains remain relatively solvated at 70 °C in the latter formulation. Moreover, dissolution of the initial PGMA63–PNMEPx particles occurs on cooling from 70 to 20 °C as the PNMEP block passes through its LCST. Hence this RAFT aqueous dispersion polymerization formulation offers an efficient route to a high molecular weight water-soluble polymer in a rather

  12. Exploring the Existence of Lipid Rafts in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY An interesting concept in the organization of cellular membranes is the proposed existence of lipid rafts. Membranes of eukaryotic cells organize signal transduction proteins into membrane rafts or lipid rafts that are enriched in particular lipids such as cholesterol and are important for the correct functionality of diverse cellular processes. The assembly of lipid rafts in eukaryotes has been considered a fundamental step during the evolution of cellular complexity, suggesting that bacteria and archaea were organisms too simple to require such a sophisticated organization of their cellular membranes. However, it was recently discovered that bacteria organize many signal transduction, protein secretion, and transport processes in functional membrane microdomains, which are equivalent to the lipid rafts of eukaryotic cells. This review contains the most significant advances during the last 4 years in understanding the structural and biological role of lipid rafts in bacteria. Furthermore, this review shows a detailed description of a number of molecular and genetic approaches related to the discovery of bacterial lipid rafts as well as an overview of the group of tentative lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions that give consistency to these sophisticated signaling platforms. Additional data suggesting that lipid rafts are widely distributed in bacteria are presented in this review. Therefore, we discuss the available techniques and optimized protocols for the purification and analysis of raft-associated proteins in various bacterial species to aid in the study of bacterial lipid rafts in other laboratories that could be interested in this topic. Overall, the discovery of lipid rafts in bacteria reveals a new level of sophistication in signal transduction and membrane organization that was unexpected for bacteria and shows that bacteria are more complex than previously appreciated. PMID:25652542

  13. How Do Spherical Diblock Copolymer Nanoparticles Grow during RAFT Alcoholic Dispersion Polymerization?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMA) chain transfer agent (CTA) is used for the reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) alcoholic dispersion polymerization of benzyl methacrylate (BzMA) in ethanol at 70 °C. THF GPC analysis indicated a well-controlled polymerization with molecular weight increasing linearly with conversion. GPC traces also showed high blocking efficiency with no homopolymer contamination apparent and Mw/Mn values below 1.35 in all cases. 1H NMR studies confirmed greater than 98% BzMA conversion for a target PBzMA degree of polymerization (DP) of up to 600. The PBzMA block becomes insoluble as it grows, leading to the in situ formation of sterically stabilized diblock copolymer nanoparticles via polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA). Fixing the mean DP of the PDMA stabilizer block at 94 units and systematically varying the DP of the PBzMA block enabled a series of spherical nanoparticles of tunable diameter to be obtained. These nanoparticles were characterized by TEM, DLS, MALLS, and SAXS, with mean diameters ranging from 35 to 100 nm. The latter technique was particularly informative: data fits to a spherical micelle model enabled calculation of the core diameter, surface area occupied per copolymer chain, and the mean aggregation number (Nagg). The scaling exponent derived from a double-logarithmic plot of core diameter vs PBzMA DP suggests that the conformation of the PBzMA chains is intermediate between the collapsed and fully extended state. This is in good agreement with 1H NMR studies, which suggest that only 5−13% of the BzMA residues of the core-forming chains are solvated. The Nagg values calculated from SAXS and MALLS are in good agreement and scale approximately linearly with PBzMA DP. This suggests that spherical micelles grow in size not only as a result of the increase in copolymer molecular weight during the PISA synthesis but also by exchange of individual copolymer chains between micelles

  14. Palladium(II)-catalyzed copolymerization of styrenes with carbon monoxide: mechanism of chain propagation and chain transfer.

    PubMed

    Rix, Francis C; Rachita, Michael J; Wagner, Mark I; Brookhart, Maurice; Milani, Barbara; Barborak, James C

    2009-11-01

    A mechanistic interpretation of the [(1,10-phenanthroline)Pd(CH(3))(CH(3)CN)](+)[BArF](-) (1a) and [(2,2'-bipyridine)Pd(CH(3))(CH(3)CN)](+)[BArF](-) (1b) (BArF = 3,5-(CF(3))(2)-C(6)H(3)) catalyzed perfectly alternating copolymerization of styrenes with CO is reported. The copolymerization in CH(2)Cl(2) or chlorobenzene has been found to be first order in styrene and inverse first order in CO concentrations. The microscopic steps involved in the catalytic cycle have been studied via low temperature NMR techniques. Palladium alkyl chelate complex [(2,2'-bipyridine)Pd(CHArCH(2)C(O)CH(3)](+)[BArF](-) (5b sigma) and [(2,2'-bipyridine)Pd(eta(3)-CH(CH(2)C(O)CH(3))Ar)](+)[BArF](-) (5b pi), existing in equilibrium, were prepared. Treatment of 5b sigma,pi with (13)CO followed by 4-tert-butylstyrene at -78 degrees C allowed for (13)C NMR monitoring of the alternating chain growth of a series of palladium acyl carbonyl complexes. The acyl carbonyl species, representing the catalyst resting state, is in equilibrium with a palladium acyl styrene complex. The equilibrium constant, K(4), measured between [(phen)Pd(CO)(C(O)CH(3)](+)[BArF](-) (3a) and [(phen)Pd(C(O)CH(3))-(C(6)H(5)C=CH(2))](+)[BArF](-) (8a), was determined to be 2.84 +/- 2.8 x 10(-7) at -66 degrees C. The barrier to migratory insertion in 8a was determined (DeltaG(double dagger) (-66 degrees C) = 15.6 +/- 0.1 kcal mol(-1)). From the experimentally determined kinetic and thermodynamic data for the copolymerization of styrene with CO a mechanistic model has been constructed. The ability of this model to predict catalyst turnover frequency (TOF) was used as a test of its validity. A series of para-substituted styrenes, p-XC(6)H(4)CH=CH(2) (X = -OCH(3), -CH(3), -H, -Cl), were copolymerized with CO. A Hammett treatment of TOF for the series showed that electron-donating groups increase the rate of copolymerization (rho p = -0.8). The ratio of chain transfer to chain propagation was found to increase with styrene

  15. Food chain transfer and potential renal toxicity of mercury to small mammals at a contaminated terrestrial field site.

    PubMed

    Talmage, S S; Walton, B T

    1993-12-01

    Mercury concentrations were determined in surface soil and biota at a contaminated terrestrial field site and were used to calculate transfer coefficients of mercury through various compartments of the ecosystem based on trophic relationships. Mercury concentrations in all compartments (soil, vegetation, invertebrates, and small mammals) were higher than mercury concentrations in corresponding samples at local reference sites. Nonetheless, mercury concentrations in biota did not exceed concentrations in the contaminated surface soil, which averaged 269 μg g(-1). Plant tissue concentrations of mercury were low (0.01 to 2.0 μg g(-1)) and yielded soil to plant transfer coefficients ranging from 3.7×10(-5) for seeds to 7.0×10(-3) for grass blades. Mercury concentrations in invertebrates ranged from 0.79 for harvestmen (Phalangida) to 15.5 μg g(-1) for undepurated earthworms (Oligochaeta). Mean food chain transfer coefficients for invertebrates were 0.88 for herbivores/omnivores and 2.35 for carnivores. Mean mercury concentrations in target tissue (kidney) were 1.16±1.16 μg g(-1) for the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), a granivore, and 38.8±24.6 μg g(-1) for the shorttail shrew (Blarina brevicauda), an insectivore. Transfer coefficients for diet to kidney were 0.75 and 4.40 for P. leucopus and B. brevicauda, respectively. A comparison of kidney mercury residues measured in this study with values from controlled laboratory feeding studies from the literature indicate that B. brevicauda but not P. leucopus may be ingesting mercury at levels that are nephrotoxic. PMID:24201735

  16. Simulation of radioactive cesium transfer in the southern Fukushima coastal biota using a dynamic food chain transfer model.

    PubMed

    Tateda, Yutaka; Tsumune, Daisuke; Tsubono, Takaki

    2013-10-01

    The Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (1F NPP) accident occurred on 11 March 2011. The accident introduced (137)Cs into the coastal waters which was subsequently transferred to the local coastal biota thereby elevating the concentration of this radionuclide in coastal organisms. In this study, the radioactive cesium levels in coastal biota from the southern Fukushima area were simulated using a dynamic biological compartment model. The simulation derived the possible maximum radioactive cesium levels in organisms, indicating that the maximum (137)Cs concentrations in invertebrates, benthic fish and predator fish occurred during late April, late May and late July, respectively in the studied area where the source was mainly the direct leakage of (137)Cs effluent from the 1F NPP. The delay of a (137)Cs increase in fish was explained by the gradual food chain transfer of (137)Cs introduced to the ecosystem from the initial contamination of the seawater. The model also provided the degree of radionuclide depuration in organisms, and it demonstrated the latest start of the decontamination phase in benthic fish. The ecological half-lives, derived both from model simulation and observation, were 1-4 months in invertebrates, and 2-9 months in plankton feeding fish and coastal predator fish from the studied area. In contrast, it was not possible to similarly calculate these parameters in benthic fish because of an unidentified additional radionuclide source which was deduced from the biological compartment model. To adequately reconstruct the in-situ depuration of radiocesium in benthic fish in the natural ecosystem, a contamination source associated with the bottom sediments is necessary.

  17. Food chain transfer and potential renal toxicity of mercury to small mammals at a contaminated terrestrial field site.

    PubMed

    Talmage, S S; Walton, B T

    1993-12-01

    Mercury concentrations were determined in surface soil and biota at a contaminated terrestrial field site and were used to calculate transfer coefficients of mercury through various compartments of the ecosystem based on trophic relationships. Mercury concentrations in all compartments (soil, vegetation, invertebrates, and small mammals) were higher than mercury concentrations in corresponding samples at local reference sites. Nonetheless, mercury concentrations in biota did not exceed concentrations in the contaminated surface soil, which averaged 269 μg g(-1). Plant tissue concentrations of mercury were low (0.01 to 2.0 μg g(-1)) and yielded soil to plant transfer coefficients ranging from 3.7×10(-5) for seeds to 7.0×10(-3) for grass blades. Mercury concentrations in invertebrates ranged from 0.79 for harvestmen (Phalangida) to 15.5 μg g(-1) for undepurated earthworms (Oligochaeta). Mean food chain transfer coefficients for invertebrates were 0.88 for herbivores/omnivores and 2.35 for carnivores. Mean mercury concentrations in target tissue (kidney) were 1.16±1.16 μg g(-1) for the white-footed mouse (Peromyscus leucopus), a granivore, and 38.8±24.6 μg g(-1) for the shorttail shrew (Blarina brevicauda), an insectivore. Transfer coefficients for diet to kidney were 0.75 and 4.40 for P. leucopus and B. brevicauda, respectively. A comparison of kidney mercury residues measured in this study with values from controlled laboratory feeding studies from the literature indicate that B. brevicauda but not P. leucopus may be ingesting mercury at levels that are nephrotoxic.

  18. Ant workers exhibit specialization and memory during raft formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avril, Amaury; Purcell, Jessica; Chapuisat, Michel

    2016-06-01

    By working together, social insects achieve tasks that are beyond the reach of single individuals. A striking example of collective behaviour is self-assembly, a process in which individuals link their bodies together to form structures such as chains, ladders, walls or rafts. To get insight into how individual behavioural variation affects the formation of self-assemblages, we investigated the presence of task specialization and the role of past experience in the construction of ant rafts. We subjected groups of Formica selysi workers to two consecutive floods and monitored the position of individuals in rafts. Workers showed specialization in their positions when rafting, with the same individuals consistently occupying the top, middle, base or side position in the raft. The presence of brood modified workers' position and raft shape. Surprisingly, workers' experience in the first rafting trial with brood influenced their behaviour and raft shape in the subsequent trial without brood. Overall, this study sheds light on the importance of workers' specialization and memory in the formation of self-assemblages.

  19. Ant workers exhibit specialization and memory during raft formation.

    PubMed

    Avril, Amaury; Purcell, Jessica; Chapuisat, Michel

    2016-06-01

    By working together, social insects achieve tasks that are beyond the reach of single individuals. A striking example of collective behaviour is self-assembly, a process in which individuals link their bodies together to form structures such as chains, ladders, walls or rafts. To get insight into how individual behavioural variation affects the formation of self-assemblages, we investigated the presence of task specialization and the role of past experience in the construction of ant rafts. We subjected groups of Formica selysi workers to two consecutive floods and monitored the position of individuals in rafts. Workers showed specialization in their positions when rafting, with the same individuals consistently occupying the top, middle, base or side position in the raft. The presence of brood modified workers' position and raft shape. Surprisingly, workers' experience in the first rafting trial with brood influenced their behaviour and raft shape in the subsequent trial without brood. Overall, this study sheds light on the importance of workers' specialization and memory in the formation of self-assemblages. PMID:27056046

  20. Lipid rafts mediate chemotropic guidance of nerve growth cones.

    PubMed

    Guirland, Carmine; Suzuki, Shingo; Kojima, Masami; Lu, Bai; Zheng, James Q

    2004-04-01

    Axon guidance requires signal transduction of extracellular cues through the plasma membrane for directional motility. Here we present evidence that cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains (lipid rafts) mediate specific guidance responses of nerve growth cones. Disruption of lipid rafts by various approaches targeting cholesterol or gangliosides selectively abolished growth cone attraction and repulsion in BDNF and netrin-1 gradients, respectively, without affecting glutamate-induced attraction. Interestingly, local raft disruption on one side of the growth cone in bath BDNF or netrin-1 produced opposite turning responses to that induced by the gradients. Raft manipulation also blocked Semaphorin 3A-induced growth cone repulsion, inhibition, and collapse. Finally, guidance responses appeared to involve raft-dependent activation of p42/p44 MAPK and ligand-induced receptor recruitment to lipid rafts. Together with the observation of asymmetric receptor-raft associations at the growth cone in guidance gradients, our findings indicate that localized signaling through membrane rafts plays a role in mediating guidance actions of extracellular cues on developing axons. PMID:15066264

  1. Insights on raft behavior from minimal phenomenological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbès Putzel, G.; Schick, M.

    2011-07-01

    We construct a simple phenomenological theory of phase separation in ternary mixtures of cholesterol and saturated and unsaturated lipids. Such separation is relevant to the formation of 'rafts' in the plasma membrane. We also show how simple cross-linking of proteins which prefer one form of lipid to the other can trigger raft-formation, the first step in a signaling pathway.

  2. Lipid rafts and detergent-resistant membranes in epithelial keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    McGuinn, Kathleen P; Mahoney, Mỹ G

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the plasma membrane has markedly increased since Singer and Nicolson proposed the fluid mosaic model in 1972. While their revolutionary theory of the lipid bilayer remains largely valid, it is now known that lipids and proteins are not randomly dispersed throughout the plasma membrane but instead may be organized within membrane microdomains, commonly referred to as lipid rafts. Lipid rafts are highly dynamic, detergent resistant, and enriched with both cholesterol and glycosphingolipids. The two main types are flotillin-rich planar lipid rafts and caveolin-rich caveolae. It is proposed that flotillin and caveolin proteins regulate cell communication by compartmentalizing and interacting with signal transduction proteins within their respective lipid microdomains. Consequently, membrane rafts play an important role in vital cellular functions including migration, invasion, and signaling; thus, alterations in their microenvironment can initiate signaling pathways that affect cellular function and behavior. Therefore, the identification of lipid rafts and their associated proteins is integral to the study of transmembrane signaling. Here, we review the current standard protocols and biochemical approaches used to isolate and define raft proteins from epithelial cells and tissues. Furthermore, in Section 3 of this chapter, detailed protocols are offered for isolating lipid rafts by subjection to detergent and sucrose density centrifugation, as well as an approach for selectively isolating caveolae. Methods to manipulate rafts with treatments such as methyl-β-cyclodextrin and flotillin III are also described.

  3. Lipid rafts in immune signalling: current progress and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Pallavi; Yadav, Vikas; Saini, Neeru

    2016-09-01

    Lipid rafts are dynamic assemblies of proteins and lipids that harbour many receptors and regulatory molecules and so act as a platform for signal transduction. They float freely within the liquid-disordered bilayer of cellular membranes and can cluster to form larger ordered domains. Alterations in lipid rafts are commonly found to be associated with the pathogenesis of several human diseases and recent reports have shown that the raft domains can also be perturbed by targeting raft proteins through microRNAs. Over the last few years, the importance of lipid rafts in modulating both innate and acquired immune responses has been elucidated. Various receptors present on immune cells like B cells, T cells, basophils and mast cells associate with lipid rafts on ligand binding and initiate signalling cascades leading to inflammation. Furthermore, disrupting lipid raft integrity alters lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine secretion, IgE signalling, and B-cell and T-cell activation. The objective of this review is to summarize the recent progress in understanding the role of lipid rafts in the modulation of immune signalling and its related therapeutic potential for autoimmune diseases and inflammatory disorders.

  4. Sphingolipid symmetry governs membrane lipid raft structure.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Peter J

    2014-07-01

    Lipid domain formation in membranes underlies the concept of rafts but their structure is controversial because the key role of cholesterol has been challenged. The configuration of glycosphingolipid receptors for agonists, bacterial toxins and enveloped viruses in plasma membrane rafts appears to be an important factor governing ligand binding and infectivity but the details are as yet unresolved. I have used X-ray diffraction methods to examine how cholesterol affects the distribution of glycosphingolipid in aqueous dispersions of an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and egg-sphingomyelin containing different proportions of glucosylceramide from human extracts. Three coexisting liquid-ordered bilayer structures are observed at 37°C in mixtures containing up to 20mol% glycosphingolipid. All the cholesterol was sequestered in one bilayer with the minimum amount of sphingomyelin (33mol%) to prevent formation of cholesterol crystals. The other two bilayers consisted of sphingomyelin and glucosylceramide. Asymmetric molecular species of glucosylceramide with N-acyl chains longer than 20 carbons form an equimolar complex with sphingomyelin in which the glycosidic residues are arranged in hexagonal array. Symmetric molecular species mix with sphingomyelin in proportions less than equimolar to form quasicrystalline bilayers. When the glycosphingolipid exceeds equimolar proportions with sphingomyelin cholesterol is incorporated into the structure and formation of a gel phase of glucosylceramide is prevented. The demonstration of particular structural features of ceramide molecular species combined with the diversity of sugar residues of glycosphingolipid classes paves the way for a rational approach to understanding the functional specificity of lipid rafts and how they are coupled across cell membranes.

  5. Lipid rafts as major platforms for signaling regulation in cancer.

    PubMed

    Mollinedo, Faustino; Gajate, Consuelo

    2015-01-01

    Cell signaling does not apparently occur randomly over the cell surface, but it seems to be integrated very often into cholesterol-rich membrane domains, termed lipid rafts. Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains that are enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides, and behave as major modulators of membrane geometry, lateral movement of molecules, traffic and signal transduction. Because the lipid and protein composition of membrane rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, they provide an additional level of compartmentalization, serving as sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction proteins. A wide number of signal transduction processes related to cell adhesion, migration, as well as to cell survival and proliferation, which play major roles in cancer development and progression, are dependent on lipid rafts. Despite lipid rafts harbor mainly critical survival signaling pathways, including insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I)/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling, recent evidence suggests that these membrane domains can also house death receptor-mediated apoptotic signaling. Recruitment of this death receptor signaling pathway in membrane rafts can be pharmacologically modulated, thus opening up the possibility to regulate cell demise with a therapeutic use. The synthetic ether phospholipid edelfosine shows a high affinity for cholesterol and accumulates in lipid rafts in a number of malignant hematological cells, leading to an efficient in vitro and in vivo antitumor activity by inducing translocation of death receptors and downstream signaling molecules to these membrane domains. Additional antitumor drugs have also been shown to act, at least in part, by recruiting death receptors in lipid rafts. The partition of death receptors together with downstream apoptotic signaling molecules in membrane rafts has led us to postulate the concept of a special liquid-ordered membrane platform coined as

  6. Lipid Rafts Disruption Increases Ochratoxin A Cytotoxicity to Hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Qi, Xiaozhe; Zheng, Juanjuan; Luo, Yunbo; Zhao, Changhui; Hao, Junran; Li, Xiaohong; Huang, Kunlun; Xu, Wentao

    2016-02-01

    Lipid rafts are microdomains in plasma membrane and can mediate cytotoxicity. In this study, the role of lipid rafts in ochratoxin A-induced toxicity was investigated using Hepatoblastoma Cell Line HepG-2 cells. Disruption of cholesterol-containing lipid rafts enhanced Ochratoxin A (OTA) toxicity, as shown by increased lactate dehydrogenase leakage, increased reactive oxygen species level and reduction of superoxide dismutase activity in a time-dependent manner. Isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation-based proteomics of the cell membranes showed that nearly 85.5% proteins were downregulated by OTA, indicating that OTA inhibited the membrane protein synthesis. Most of altered proteins were involved in Gene Ontology "transport", "cell adhesion" and "vesicle-mediated transport". In conclusion, lipid rafts play a key role in OTA-induced cytotoxicity. This study provides insight into how OTA toxicity is regulated by the plasma membrane, especially the lipid rafts.

  7. Dynamic Reorganization and Correlation among Lipid Raft Components.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Mónica M; Hovis, Jennifer S; Moss, Frank R; Boxer, Steven G

    2016-08-10

    Lipid rafts are widely believed to be an essential organizational motif in cell membranes. However, direct evidence for interactions among lipid and/or protein components believed to be associated with rafts is quite limited owing, in part, to the small size and intrinsically dynamic interactions that lead to raft formation. Here, we exploit the single negative charge on the monosialoganglioside GM1, commonly associated with rafts, to create a gradient of GM1 in response to an electric field applied parallel to a patterned supported lipid bilayer. The composition of this gradient is visualized by imaging mass spectrometry using a NanoSIMS. Using this analytical method, added cholesterol and sphingomyelin, both neutral and not themselves displaced by the electric field, are observed to reorganize with GM1. This dynamic reorganization provides direct evidence for an attractive interaction among these raft components into some sort of cluster. At steady state we obtain an estimate for the composition of this cluster.

  8. Raft River aquaculture project. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Beleau, M.H.; Woiwode, J.G.

    1980-07-01

    The commercial potential for geothermal aquaculture was evaluated for 2 years at the Department of Energy's Raft River geothermal site in southcentral Idaho. Common carp '(Cyprinus carpio) and channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) were selected as culture species. Objectives of the study included investigation of: (1) growth rates; (2) nutrition trials; (3) histological and physiological parameters; (4) bioaccumulation of heavy metals; and (5) reproductive capacity. The second year project efforts were primarily studying the effects of geothermal water on the reproductive capacity of common carp by: (1) determining the effects of geothermal water on gonadal development of common carp; and (2) determining the effects of geothermal water on common carp embryogenesis.

  9. Apollo 11 Crew in Raft before Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The Apollo 11 crew await pickup by a helicopter from the USS Hornet, prime recovery ship for the historic Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. The fourth man in the life raft is a United States Navy underwater demolition team swimmer. All four men are wearing Biological Isolation Garments (BIG). The Apollo 11 Command Module 'Columbia,' with astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. splashed down at 11:49 a.m. (CDT), July 24, 1969, about 812 nautical miles southwest of Hawaii and only 12 nautical miles from the USS Hornet.

  10. Highly protein-resistant coatings and suspension cell culture thereon from amphiphilic block copolymers prepared by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Kazutoshi; Kubota, Kazuomi; Takada, Tetsuo; Mahara, Saori

    2014-06-01

    Novel amphiphilic block copolymers composed of hydrophobic (poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate): M) and hydrophilic (poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide): D) segments were synthesized by living radical polymerization: a reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Two types of amphiphilic block copolymers, triblock (MDM) and 4-arm block ((MD)4) copolymers with specific compositions (D/M = (750-1500)/250), were prepared by a versatile one-pot synthesis. These copolymers show good adhesion to various types of substrates (e.g., polystyrene, polycarbonate, polypropylene, Ti, and glass), and the surface coating showed high protein repellency and a low contact angle for water, regardless of the substrate. The two opposing characteristics of high protein repellency and good substrate adhesion were achieved by the combined effects of the molecular architecture of the block copolymers, the high molecular weight, and the characteristics of each segment, that is, low protein adsorption capability of both segments and low glass transition temperature of the hydrophobic segment. Further, a polystyrene dish coated with the MDM block copolymer could be sterilized by γ-ray irradiation and used as a good substrate for a suspension cell culture that exhibits low cell adhesion and good cell growth. PMID:24773089

  11. Highly protein-resistant coatings and suspension cell culture thereon from amphiphilic block copolymers prepared by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Kazutoshi; Kubota, Kazuomi; Takada, Tetsuo; Mahara, Saori

    2014-06-01

    Novel amphiphilic block copolymers composed of hydrophobic (poly(2-methoxyethyl acrylate): M) and hydrophilic (poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide): D) segments were synthesized by living radical polymerization: a reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer polymerization. Two types of amphiphilic block copolymers, triblock (MDM) and 4-arm block ((MD)4) copolymers with specific compositions (D/M = (750-1500)/250), were prepared by a versatile one-pot synthesis. These copolymers show good adhesion to various types of substrates (e.g., polystyrene, polycarbonate, polypropylene, Ti, and glass), and the surface coating showed high protein repellency and a low contact angle for water, regardless of the substrate. The two opposing characteristics of high protein repellency and good substrate adhesion were achieved by the combined effects of the molecular architecture of the block copolymers, the high molecular weight, and the characteristics of each segment, that is, low protein adsorption capability of both segments and low glass transition temperature of the hydrophobic segment. Further, a polystyrene dish coated with the MDM block copolymer could be sterilized by γ-ray irradiation and used as a good substrate for a suspension cell culture that exhibits low cell adhesion and good cell growth.

  12. Evaluation of Isoprene Chain Extension from PEO Macromolecular Chain Transfer Agents for the Preparation of Dual, Invertible Block Copolymer Nanoassemblies

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Jeremy W.; Cauët, Solène I.; Billings, Peter L.; Lin, Lily Yun; Zhu, Jiahua; Fidge, Christopher; Pochan, Darrin J.; Wooley, Karen L.

    2010-01-01

    Two RAFT-capable PEO macro-CTAs, 2 and 5 kDa, were prepared and used for the polymerization of isoprene which yielded well-defined block copolymers of varied lengths and compositions. GPC analysis of the PEO macro-CTAs and block copolymers showed remaining unreacted PEO macro-CTA. Mathematical deconvolution of the GPC chromatograms allowed for the estimation of the blocking efficiency, about 50% for the 5 kDa PEO macro-CTA and 64% for the 2 kDa CTA. Self assembly of the block copolymers in both water and decane was investigated and the resulting regular and inverse assemblies, respectively, were analyzed with DLS, AFM, and TEM to ascertain their dimensions and properties. Assembly of PEO-b-PIp block copolymers in aqueous solution resulted in well-defined micelles of varying sizes while the assembly in hydrophobic, organic solvent resulted in the formation of different morphologies including large aggregates and well-defined cylindrical and spherical structures. PMID:21399721

  13. Lipid rafts and raft-mediated supramolecular entities in the regulation of CD95 death receptor apoptotic signaling.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2015-05-01

    Membrane lipid rafts are highly ordered membrane domains enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides that have the property to segregate and concentrate proteins. Lipid and protein composition of lipid rafts differs from that of the surrounding membrane, thus providing sorting platforms and hubs for signal transduction molecules, including CD95 death receptor-mediated signaling. CD95 can be recruited to rafts in a reversible way through S-palmitoylation following activation of cells with its physiological cognate ligand as well as with a wide variety of inducers, including several antitumor drugs through ligand-independent intracellular mechanisms. CD95 translocation to rafts can be modulated pharmacologically, thus becoming a target for the treatment of apoptosis-defective diseases, such as cancer. CD95-mediated signaling largely depends on protein-protein interactions, and the recruitment and concentration of CD95 and distinct downstream apoptotic molecules in membrane raft domains, forming raft-based supramolecular entities that act as hubs for apoptotic signaling molecules, favors the generation and amplification of apoptotic signals. Efficient CD95-mediated apoptosis involves CD95 and raft internalization, as well as the involvement of different subcellular organelles. In this review, we briefly summarize and discuss the involvement of lipid rafts in the regulation of CD95-mediated apoptosis that may provide a new avenue for cancer therapy.

  14. Development of the LSST raft tower modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connor, P.; Kotov, I.; Takacs, P. Z.; Frank, J. S.; Plate, S.; Van Berg, R.; Newcomer, M.; Antilogus, P.; Lebbolo, Hervé; Tocut, V.; Juramy, C.; Doherty, P.; Felt, N.

    2012-07-01

    The science focal plane of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope is made up of 21 modules designated "raft towers". Each raft tower module (RTM) is an autonomous, fully-testable and serviceable 144 Mpixel imager consisting of nine highly-segmented CCDs with complete readout electronics chain. To minimize noise and obscuration the RTM is housed in a compact enclosure fully contained within the camera cryostat. The RTM is required to meet strict performance goals for image plane flatness, readout speed, noise, and power dissipation. Key components include the 4K × 4K fully-depleted CCDs with 16 outputs each, ceramic CCD support structure, and ASIC electronics for video processing and clock/bias generation. In addition to CCD signal handling, the RTM electronics also includes monitoring for temperature, voltage, and current, makeup heater control, ASIC configuration and readback, powerdown modes, and specialized diagnostic outputs. Digitized data are transmitted out of the camera cryostat over a single 3Gb/s serial link.

  15. Disrupting membrane raft domains by alkylphospholipids.

    PubMed

    Gomide, A B; Thomé, C H; dos Santos, G A; Ferreira, G A; Faça, V M; Rego, E M; Greene, L J; Stabeli, R G; Ciancaglini, P; Itri, R

    2013-05-01

    Using phase contrast and fluorescence microscopy we study the influence of the alkylphospholipid, ALP, 10-(octyloxy) decyl-2-(trimethylammonium) ethyl phosphate, ODPC, in giant unilamellar vesicles, GUVs, composed of DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), brain sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol). The results show that adding 100μM ODPC (below CMC) to the outer solution of GUVs promotes DOPC membrane disruption over a period of 1h of continuous observation. On the other hand, the presence of SM and Chol in homogeneous fluid lipid bilayers protects the membrane from disruption. Interestingly, by adding 100μM ODPC to GUVs containing DOPC:SM:Chol (1:1:1), which display liquid ordered (Lo)-liquid disordered (Ld) phase coexistence, the domains rapidly disappear in less than 1min of ODPC contact with the membrane. The lipids are subsequently redistributed to liquid domains within a time course of 14-18min, reflecting that the homogenous phase was not thermodynamically stable, followed by rupture of the GUVs. A similar mechanism of action is also observed for perifosine, although to a larger extent. Therefore, the initial stage of lipid raft disruption by both ODPC and perifosine, and maybe other ALPS, by promoting lipid mixing, may be correlated with their toxicity upon neoplastic cells, since selective (dis)association of essential proteins within lipid raft microdomains must take place in the plasma membrane. PMID:23376656

  16. Localization and signaling of GPCRs in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Villar, Van Anthony M; Cuevas, Santiago; Zheng, Xiaoxu; Jose, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of how biological membranes are organized and how they function has evolved. Instead of just serving as a medium in which certain proteins are found, portions of the lipid bilayer have been demonstrated to form specialized platforms that foster the assembly of signaling complexes by providing a microenvironment that is conducive for effective protein-protein interactions. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and relevant signaling molecules, including the heterotrimeric G proteins, key enzymes such as kinases and phosphatases, trafficking proteins, and secondary messengers, preferentially partition to these highly organized cell membrane microdomains, called lipid rafts. As such, lipid rafts are crucial for the trafficking and signaling of GPCRs. The study of GPCR biology in the context of lipid rafts involves the localization of the GPCR of interest in lipid rafts, at the basal state and upon receptor agonism, and the evaluation of the biological functions of the GPCR in appropriate cell lines. The lack of standardized methodology to study lipid rafts, in general, and of the workings of GPCRs in lipid rafts, in particular, and the inherent drawbacks of current methods have hampered the complete understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Newer methodologies that allow the study of GPCRs in their native form are needed. The use of complementary approaches that produce mutually supportive results appear to be the best way for drawing conclusions with regards to the distribution and activity of GPCRs in lipid rafts. PMID:26928536

  17. Physics of Polymersomes: lateral segregation experiments and raft simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis

    2012-02-01

    Coupling between the inner and outer leaflets of a bilayer plays an important role in biomembrane function, particularly in inducing and registering rafts across leaflets for various cellular signals. However, mechanisms of raft registration remain elusive and several alternatives have been proposed, ranging from electrostatic coupling to chain interdigitation. A general mechanism has been suggested by recent experiments on Polymersomes in which binary mixtures of diblock copolymer amphiphiles exhibit domain registration upon ligand-induced segregation. Using coarse grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations rooted in atomistics, raft registration arises spontaneously in bilayers with a calcium- or ligand-crosslinked ordered phase segregating from a liquid disordered phase. When rafts are not registered, a thickness mismatch between phases induces a ``bump'' in the apposing liquid phase leaflet, and the associated localized curvature guides rafts together stabilizing the registered state. The absence of explicit charge in the model and the fact that domain size modulates transmembrane coupling demonstrate that collective interactions are sufficient for raft registration. References: (1) D.A. Christian, et al. Spotted vesicles, striped micelles, and Janus assemblies induced by ligand binding. Nature Materials 8: 843--849 (2009). (2) D. Pantano, P.B. Moore, M.L. Klein, D.E. Discher. Raft registration across bilayers in a molecularly detailed model. Soft Matter 7, 8182-8191 (2011).

  18. Deposition of DNA rafts on cationic SAMs on silicon [100].

    PubMed

    Sarveswaran, Koshala; Hu, Wenchuang; Huber, Paul W; Bernstein, Gary H; Lieberman, Marya

    2006-12-19

    We demonstrate a guided self-assembly approach to the fabrication of DNA nanostructures on silicon substrates. DNA oligonucleotides self-assemble into "rafts" 8 x 37 x 2 nm in size. The rafts bind to cationic SAMs on silicon wafers. Electron-beam lithography of a thin poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) resist layer was used to define trenches, and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), a cationic SAM precursor, was deposited from aqueous solution onto the exposed silicon dioxide at the trench bottoms. The remaining PMMA can be cleanly stripped off with dichloromethane, leaving APTES layers 0.7-1.2 nm in thickness and 110 nm in width. DNA rafts bind selectively to the resulting APTES stripes. The coverage of DNA rafts on adjacent areas of silicon dioxide is 20 times lower than on the APTES stripes. The topographic features of the rafts, measured by AFM, are identical to those of rafts deposited on wide-area SAMs. Binding to the APTES stripes appears to be very strong as indicated by "jamming" of the rafts at a saturation coverage of 42% and the stability to repeated AFM scanning in air.

  19. Localization and signaling of GPCRs in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Villar, Van Anthony M; Cuevas, Santiago; Zheng, Xiaoxu; Jose, Pedro A

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of how biological membranes are organized and how they function has evolved. Instead of just serving as a medium in which certain proteins are found, portions of the lipid bilayer have been demonstrated to form specialized platforms that foster the assembly of signaling complexes by providing a microenvironment that is conducive for effective protein-protein interactions. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and relevant signaling molecules, including the heterotrimeric G proteins, key enzymes such as kinases and phosphatases, trafficking proteins, and secondary messengers, preferentially partition to these highly organized cell membrane microdomains, called lipid rafts. As such, lipid rafts are crucial for the trafficking and signaling of GPCRs. The study of GPCR biology in the context of lipid rafts involves the localization of the GPCR of interest in lipid rafts, at the basal state and upon receptor agonism, and the evaluation of the biological functions of the GPCR in appropriate cell lines. The lack of standardized methodology to study lipid rafts, in general, and of the workings of GPCRs in lipid rafts, in particular, and the inherent drawbacks of current methods have hampered the complete understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Newer methodologies that allow the study of GPCRs in their native form are needed. The use of complementary approaches that produce mutually supportive results appear to be the best way for drawing conclusions with regards to the distribution and activity of GPCRs in lipid rafts.

  20. Generation of Stable Lipid Raft Microdomains in the Enterocyte Brush Border by Selective Endocytic Removal of Non-Raft Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Danielsen, E. Michael; Hansen, Gert H.

    2013-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border has an unusually high proportion of glycolipids which promote the formation of lipid raft microdomains, stabilized by various cross-linking lectins. This unique membrane organization acts to provide physical and chemical stability to the membrane that faces multiple deleterious agents present in the gut lumen, such as bile salts, digestive enzymes of the pancreas, and a plethora of pathogens. In the present work, we studied the constitutive endocytosis from the brush border of cultured jejunal explants of the pig, and the results indicate that this process functions to enrich the contents of lipid raft components in the brush border. The lipophilic fluorescent marker FM, taken up into early endosomes in the terminal web region (TWEEs), was absent from detergent resistant membranes (DRMs), implying an association with non-raft membrane. Furthermore, neither major lipid raft-associated brush border enzymes nor glycolipids were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in subapical punctae resembling TWEEs. Finally, two model raft lipids, BODIPY-lactosylceramide and BODIPY-GM1, were not endocytosed except when cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) was present. In conclusion, we propose that constitutive, selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane acts as a sorting mechanism to enrich the brush border contents of lipid raft components, such as glycolipids and the major digestive enzymes. This sorting may be energetically driven by changes in membrane curvature when molecules move from a microvillar surface to an endocytic invagination. PMID:24124585

  1. Generation of stable lipid raft microdomains in the enterocyte brush border by selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2013-01-01

    The small intestinal brush border has an unusually high proportion of glycolipids which promote the formation of lipid raft microdomains, stabilized by various cross-linking lectins. This unique membrane organization acts to provide physical and chemical stability to the membrane that faces multiple deleterious agents present in the gut lumen, such as bile salts, digestive enzymes of the pancreas, and a plethora of pathogens. In the present work, we studied the constitutive endocytosis from the brush border of cultured jejunal explants of the pig, and the results indicate that this process functions to enrich the contents of lipid raft components in the brush border. The lipophilic fluorescent marker FM, taken up into early endosomes in the terminal web region (TWEEs), was absent from detergent resistant membranes (DRMs), implying an association with non-raft membrane. Furthermore, neither major lipid raft-associated brush border enzymes nor glycolipids were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy in subapical punctae resembling TWEEs. Finally, two model raft lipids, BODIPY-lactosylceramide and BODIPY-GM1, were not endocytosed except when cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) was present. In conclusion, we propose that constitutive, selective endocytic removal of non-raft membrane acts as a sorting mechanism to enrich the brush border contents of lipid raft components, such as glycolipids and the major digestive enzymes. This sorting may be energetically driven by changes in membrane curvature when molecules move from a microvillar surface to an endocytic invagination.

  2. DJ-1 associates with lipid rafts by palmitoylation and regulates lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwang Soo; Kim, Jin Soo; Park, Ji-Young; Suh, Young Ho; Jou, Ilo; Joe, Eun-Hye; Park, Sang Myun

    2013-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common progressive neurodegenerative disease. Several genes have been associated with familial type PD, providing tremendous insights into the pathogenesis of PD. Gathering evidence supports the view that these gene products may operate through common molecular pathways. Recent reports suggest that many PD-associated gene products, such as α-synuclein, LRRK2, parkin and PINK1, associate with lipid rafts and lipid rafts may be associated with neurodegeneration. Here, we observed that DJ-1 protein also associated with lipid rafts. Palmitoylation of three cysteine residues (C46/53/106) and C-terminal region of DJ-1 were required for this association. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced the localization of DJ-1 into lipid rafts in astrocytes. The LPS-TLR4 signaling was more augmented in DJ-1 knock-out astrocytes by the impairment of TLR4 endocytosis. Furthermore, lipid rafts-dependent endocytosis including the endocytosis of CD14, which play a major role in regulating TLR4 endocytosis was also impaired, but clathrin-dependent endocytosis was not. This study provides a novel function of DJ-1 in lipid rafts, which may contribute the pathogenesis of PD. Moreover, it also provides the possibility that many PD-related proteins may operate through common molecular pathways in lipid rafts.

  3. Nanoparticles induce raft formation in phospholipid liposomes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bo; Zhang, Liangfang; Granick, Steve

    2007-03-01

    Motivated by general interests in endocytosis, virus transfection and utilization of nanoparticles as cargo for drug delivery, this study focuses on the binding of nanoparticles to model lipid bilayers and the interactions between them. Exploring not only on the ensemble level, with the help of calorimetry, but also on the single-molecule level using fluorescence probes and single-molecule detection, we conclude the following. First, adsorbates capture and slave dynamically the lipids underneath, which results in lipid packing fluctuations, thereby producing rafts in the bilayers. Second, competition between neighboring particles causes further recomposition of heterogeneous lipid distribution. Bearing this insight in mind, we expect coupled motions of lipid and nanoparticles to occur, and confirm this with direct measurements. Going further, collective responses of lipid molecules cast light on the crucial role of support membranes in determining how membrane-based sensors respond to an external stimulus.

  4. Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Tullis, J.A.; Dolenc, M.R.

    1982-02-01

    A discussion of the geology and the wellfield development at Raft River is presented. The geothermal resource is located in a downdropped and downwarped basin bordered on east, west, and south by mountain ranges that vary in both stratigraphy and structure. It is inferred that the geothermal resource occurs where hydrothermal water rises at the intersection of and along the Narrows Zone and the Bridge Fault. Three exploration wells, two development wells, and two injection wells were drilled. The basic strategy of field development was to drill deep production wells on the faulted northwest side of the field and injection wells to an intermediate depth on the southeast side of the field. Four wells are employed as production wells. Two are used to inject the spent fluid. One has never been connected to the nearby three miles of interconnected production pipelines because of low artesian flow rates. (MJF)

  5. Properties of glycolipid-enriched membrane rafts in antigen presentation.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, William; Smith, Kenneth

    2005-01-01

    Presentation of antigen to T cells represents one of the central events in the engagement of the immune system toward the defense of the host against pathogens. Accordingly, understanding the mechanisms by which antigen presentation occurs is critical toward our understanding the properties of host defense against foreign antigen, as well as insight into other features of the immune system, such as autoimmune disease. The entire antigen-presentation event is complex, and many features of it remain poorly understood. However, recent studies have provided evidence showing that glycolipid-enriched membrane rafts are important for efficient antigen presentation; the studies suggest that one such function of rafts is trafficking of antigen-MHC II complexes to the presentation site on the surface of the antigen-presenting cell. Here, we present a critical discussion of rafts and their proposed functions in antigen presentation. Emerging topics of rafts and antigen presentation that warrant further investigation are also highlighted.

  6. Lipid Raft Alterations in Aged-Associated Neuropathologies.

    PubMed

    Marin, Raquel; Fabelo, Noemí; Fernández-Echevarría, Cecilia; Canerina-Amaro, Ana; Rodríguez-Barreto, Deiene; Quinto-Alemany, David; Mesa-Herrera, Fátima; Díaz, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains particularly enriched in cholesterol, sphingolipids and saturated fatty acids. These microstructures play a key role in a plethora of mechanisms involved in cell signaling, synapsis, cell-cell communication and cell survival. In the last years, increasing evidence indicate that lipid rafts may be altered in age-related neuropathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson disease even at asymptomatic stages. In particular, important changes in raft lipid composition are observed with the progression of these diseases, then inducing alterations in their physicochemical properties. Furthermore, these phenomena contribute to neuropathological events related to amyloidogenesis, aberrant protein aggregation and toxic cell signalling. In this review, we discuss some relevant data on the age-related molecular changes occurring in lipid rafts since the first stages of these neurodegenerative diseases. Further characterization of specific parameters associated with alterations of these microdomains may provide potential tools of diagnosis and prediction of these neuropathologies.

  7. Proteomic Profiling of Detergent Resistant Membranes (Lipid Rafts) of Prostasomes.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Louise; Ronquist, Karl K Göran; Ek, Bo; Ronquist, Gunnar; Larsson, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Prostasomes are exosomes derived from prostate epithelial cells through exocytosis by multivesicular bodies. Prostasomes have a bilayered membrane and readily interact with sperm. The membrane lipid composition is unusual with a high contribution of sphingomyelin at the expense of phosphatidylcholine and saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids are dominant. Lipid rafts are liquid-ordered domains that are more tightly packed than the surrounding nonraft phase of the bilayer. Lipid rafts are proposed to be highly dynamic, submicroscopic assemblies that float freely within the liquid disordered membrane bilayer and some proteins preferentially partition into the ordered raft domains. We asked the question whether lipid rafts do exist in prostasomes and, if so, which proteins might be associated with them. Prostasomes of density range 1.13-1.19g/ml were subjected to density gradient ultracentrifugation in sucrose fabricated by phosphate buffered saline (PBS) containing 1% Triton X-100 with capacity for banding at 1.10 g/ml, i.e. the classical density of lipid rafts. Prepared prostasomal lipid rafts (by gradient ultracentrifugation) were analyzed by mass spectrometry. The clearly visible band on top of 1.10g/ml sucrose in the Triton X-100 containing gradient was subjected to liquid chromatography-tandem MS and more than 370 lipid raft associated proteins were identified. Several of them were involved in intraluminal vesicle formation, e.g. tetraspanins, ESCRTs, and Ras-related proteins. This is the first comprehensive liquid chromatography-tandem MS profiling of proteins in lipid rafts derived from exosomes. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002163.

  8. Lipid rafts both in cellular membrane and viral envelope are critical for PRRSV efficient infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qian; Zhang, Qiong; Tang, Jun; Feng, Wen-Hai

    2015-10-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) represents a significantly economical challenge to the swine industry worldwide. In this study, we investigated the importance of cellular and viral lipid rafts in PRRSV infection. First, we demonstrated that PRRSV glycoproteins, Gp3 and Gp4, were associated with lipid rafts during viral entry, and disruption of cellular lipid rafts inhibited PRRSV entry. We also showed the raft-location of CD163, which might contribute to the glycoproteins-raft association. Subsequently, raft disruption caused a significant reduction of viral RNA production. Moreover, Nsp9 was shown to be distributed in rafts, suggesting that rafts probably serve as a platform for PRRSV replication. Finally, we confirmed that disassembly of rafts on the virus envelope may affect the integrity of PRRSV particles and cause the leakage of viral proteins, which impaired PRRSV infectivity. These findings might provide insights on our understanding of the mechanism of PRRSV infection.

  9. Native low density lipoprotein promotes lipid raft formation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Ping, Ling-Yan; Duong, Duc M; Gao, Xiao-Yan; He, Chun-Yan; Wei, Lei; Wu, Jun-Zhu

    2016-03-01

    Oxidized low‑density lipoprotein (LDL) has an important role in atherogenesis; however, the mechanisms underlying cell‑mediated LDL oxidation remain to be elucidated. The present study investigated whether native‑LDL induced lipid raft formation, in order to gain further insight into LDL oxidation. Confocal microscopic analysis revealed that lipid rafts were aggregated or clustered in the membrane, which were colocalized with myeloperoxidase (MPO) upon native LDL stimulation; however, in the presence of methyl‑β‑cyclodextrin (MβCD), LDL‑stimulated aggregation, translocation, and colocalization of lipid rafts components was abolished.. In addition, lipid raft disruptors MβCD and filipin decreased malondialdehyde expression levels. Density gradient centrifugation coupled to label‑free quantitative proteomic analysis identified 1,449 individual proteins, of which 203 were significantly upregulated following native‑LDL stimulation. Functional classification of the proteins identified in the lipid rafts revealed that the expression levels of translocation proteins were upregulated. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that native‑LDL induced lipid raft clustering in macrophages, and the expression levels of several proteins were altered in the stimulated macrophages, which provided novel insights into the mechanism underlying LDL oxidation.

  10. Multifunctional Poly(N-vinylcarbazole)-Based Block Copolymers and their Nanofabrication and Photosensitizing Properties.

    PubMed

    Tam, Wing Yan; Mak, Chris S K; Ng, Alan Man Ching; Djurišić, Aleksandra B; Chan, Wai Kin

    2009-04-20

    The synthesis of poly(N-vinylcarbazole)-based block copolymers functionalized with rhenium diimine complexes or pendant terpyridine ligands is reported. The copolymers are synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and they exhibit interesting morphological properties as a result of the phase separation between different blocks. The rhenium complex polymer block may function as a photosensitizer, while the terpyridine-containing polymer block can be used as the template for nanofabrication by selective deposition of zinc complexes.

  11. Down-regulation of lipid raft-associated onco-proteins via cholesterol-dependent lipid raft internalization in docosahexaenoic acid-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun Jeong; Yun, Un-Jung; Koo, Kyung Hee; Sung, Jee Young; Shim, Jaegal; Ye, Sang-Kyu; Hong, Kyeong-Man; Kim, Yong-Nyun

    2014-01-01

    Lipid rafts, plasma membrane microdomains, are important for cell survival signaling and cholesterol is a critical lipid component for lipid raft integrity and function. DHA is known to have poor affinity for cholesterol and it influences lipid rafts. Here, we investigated a mechanism underlying the anti-cancer effects of DHA using a human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231. We found that DHA decreased cell surface levels of lipid rafts via their internalization, which was partially reversed by cholesterol addition. With DHA treatment, caveolin-1, a marker for rafts, and EGFR were colocalized with LAMP-1, a lysosomal marker, in a cholesterol-dependent manner, indicating that DHA induces raft fusion with lysosomes. DHA not only displaced several raft-associated onco-proteins, including EGFR, Hsp90, Akt, and Src, from the rafts but also decreased total levels of those proteins via multiple pathways, including the proteasomal and lysosomal pathways, thereby decreasing their activities. Hsp90 overexpression maintained its client proteins, EGFR and Akt, and attenuated DHA-induced cell death. In addition, overexpression of Akt or constitutively active Akt attenuated DHA-induced apoptosis. All these data indicate that the anti-proliferative effect of DHA is mediated by targeting of lipid rafts via decreasing cell surface lipid rafts by their internalization, thereby decreasing raft-associated onco-proteins via proteasomal and lysosomal pathways and decreasing Hsp90 chaperone function.

  12. Structure of Cholesterol in Lipid Rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toppozini, Laura; Meinhardt, Sebastian; Armstrong, Clare L.; Yamani, Zahra; Kučerka, Norbert; Schmid, Friederike; Rheinstädter, Maikel C.

    2014-11-01

    Rafts, or functional domains, are transient nano-or mesoscopic structures in the plasma membrane and are thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as signal transduction, adhesion, trafficking, and lipid or protein sorting. Observations of these membrane heterogeneities have proven challenging, as they are thought to be both small and short lived. With a combination of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations and neutron diffraction using deuterium labeled cholesterol molecules, we observe raftlike structures and determine the ordering of the cholesterol molecules in binary cholesterol-containing lipid membranes. From coarse-grained computer simulations, heterogenous membranes structures were observed and characterized as small, ordered domains. Neutron diffraction was used to study the lateral structure of the cholesterol molecules. We find pairs of strongly bound cholesterol molecules in the liquid-disordered phase, in accordance with the umbrella model. Bragg peaks corresponding to ordering of the cholesterol molecules in the raftlike structures were observed and indexed by two different structures: a monoclinic structure of ordered cholesterol pairs of alternating direction in equilibrium with cholesterol plaques, i.e., triclinic cholesterol bilayers.

  13. Amorphous to amorphous transition in particle rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varshney, Atul; Sane, A.; Ghosh, Shankar; Bhattacharya, S.

    2012-09-01

    Space-filling assemblies of athermal hydrophobic particles floating at an air-water interface, called particle rafts, are shown to undergo an unusual phase transition between two amorphous states, i.e., a low density “less-rigid” state and a high density “more-rigid” state, as a function of particulate number density (Φ). The former is shown to be a capillary bridged solid and the latter is shown to be a frictionally coupled one. Simultaneous studies involving direct imaging as well as measuring its mechanical response to longitudinal and shear stresses show that the transition is marked by a subtle structural anomaly and a weakening of the shear response. The structural anomaly is identified from the variation of the mean coordination number, mean area of the Voronoi cells, and spatial profile of the displacement field with Φ. The weakened shear response is related to local plastic instabilities caused by the depinning of the contact line of the underlying fluid on the rough surfaces of the particles.

  14. Amorphous to amorphous transition in particle rafts.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Atul; Sane, A; Ghosh, Shankar; Bhattacharya, S

    2012-09-01

    Space-filling assemblies of athermal hydrophobic particles floating at an air-water interface, called particle rafts, are shown to undergo an unusual phase transition between two amorphous states, i.e., a low density "less-rigid" state and a high density "more-rigid" state, as a function of particulate number density (Φ). The former is shown to be a capillary bridged solid and the latter is shown to be a frictionally coupled one. Simultaneous studies involving direct imaging as well as measuring its mechanical response to longitudinal and shear stresses show that the transition is marked by a subtle structural anomaly and a weakening of the shear response. The structural anomaly is identified from the variation of the mean coordination number, mean area of the Voronoi cells, and spatial profile of the displacement field with Φ. The weakened shear response is related to local plastic instabilities caused by the depinning of the contact line of the underlying fluid on the rough surfaces of the particles.

  15. Involvement of glycosphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts in inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are membrane components consisting of hydrophobic ceramide and hydrophilic sugar moieties. GSLs cluster with cholesterol in cell membranes to form GSL-enriched lipid rafts. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that GSL-enriched lipid rafts contain several kinds of transducer molecules, including Src family kinases. Among the GSLs, lactosylceramide (LacCer, CDw17) can bind to various microorganisms, is highly expressed on the plasma membranes of human phagocytes, and forms lipid rafts containing the Src family tyrosine kinase Lyn. LacCer-enriched lipid rafts mediate immunological and inflammatory reactions, including superoxide generation, chemotaxis, and non-opsonic phagocytosis. Therefore, LacCer-enriched membrane microdomains are thought to function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed on microorganisms. LacCer also serves as a signal transduction molecule for functions mediated by CD11b/CD18-integrin (αM/β2-integrin, CR3, Mac-1), as well as being associated with several key cellular processes. LacCer recruits PCKα/ε and phospholipase A2 to stimulate PECAM-1 expression in human monocytes and their adhesion to endothelial cells, as well as regulating β1-integrin clustering and endocytosis on cell surfaces. This review describes the organizational and inflammation-related functions of LacCer-enriched lipid rafts. PMID:25553454

  16. Interaction of chiral rafts in self-assembled colloidal membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Sheng; Hagan, Michael F.; Pelcovits, Robert A.

    2016-03-01

    Colloidal membranes are monolayer assemblies of rodlike particles that capture the long-wavelength properties of lipid bilayer membranes on the colloidal scale. Recent experiments on colloidal membranes formed by chiral rodlike viruses showed that introducing a second species of virus with different length and opposite chirality leads to the formation of rafts—micron-sized domains of one virus species floating in a background of the other viruses [Sharma et al., Nature (London) 513, 77 (2014), 10.1038/nature13694]. In this article we study the interaction of such rafts using liquid crystal elasticity theory. By numerically minimizing the director elastic free energy, we predict the tilt angle profile for both a single raft and two rafts in a background membrane, and the interaction between two rafts as a function of their separation. We find that the chiral penetration depth in the background membrane sets the scale for the range of the interaction. We compare our results with the experimental data and find good agreement for the strength and range of the interaction. Unlike the experiments, however, we do not observe a complete collapse of the data when rescaled by the tilt angle at the raft edge.

  17. Involvement of glycosphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts in inflammatory responses.

    PubMed

    Iwabuchi, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    Glycosphingolipids (GSLs) are membrane components consisting of hydrophobic ceramide and hydrophilic sugar moieties. GSLs cluster with cholesterol in cell membranes to form GSL-enriched lipid rafts. Biochemical analyses have demonstrated that GSL-enriched lipid rafts contain several kinds of transducer molecules, including Src family kinases. Among the GSLs, lactosylceramide (LacCer, CDw17) can bind to various microorganisms, is highly expressed on the plasma membranes of human phagocytes, and forms lipid rafts containing the Src family tyrosine kinase Lyn. LacCer-enriched lipid rafts mediate immunological and inflammatory reactions, including superoxide generation, chemotaxis, and non-opsonic phagocytosis. Therefore, LacCer-enriched membrane microdomains are thought to function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) expressed on microorganisms. LacCer also serves as a signal transduction molecule for functions mediated by CD11b/CD18-integrin (αM/β2-integrin, CR3, Mac-1), as well as being associated with several key cellular processes. LacCer recruits PCKα/ε and phospholipase A2 to stimulate PECAM-1 expression in human monocytes and their adhesion to endothelial cells, as well as regulating β1-integrin clustering and endocytosis on cell surfaces. This review describes the organizational and inflammation-related functions of LacCer-enriched lipid rafts.

  18. Myelin, DIGs, and membrane rafts in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dupree, Jeffrey L; Pomicter, Anthony D

    2010-04-01

    Over the past 40 years our understanding of the organization of cell membranes has changed dramatically. Membranes are no longer viewed as a homogenous sea of phospholipids studded with randomly positioned islands of proteins. Our current view of the membrane involves the formation of small lipid clusters, comprised mainly of cholesterol and sphingolipids, known as membrane rafts. These lipid clusters apparently include and exclude specific proteins leading to the hypothesis that these domains (1) regulate cellular polarity and compartmentalization through trafficking and sorting, (2) provide platforms for cellular signaling and adhesion, and (3) function as cellular gate keepers. Tremendous controversy surrounds the concept of membrane rafts primarily because these small, highly dynamic entities are too small to be observed with traditional microscopic methods and the most utilized approach for raft analysis relies on poorly quantified, inconsistent biochemical extractions. New analytical approaches are being developed and applied to the study of membrane rafts and these techniques provide great promise for furthering our understanding of these enigmatic domains. In this review we will provide a brief summary of the current understanding of membrane rafts, utilizing the CNS myelin literature for illustrative purposes, and present caveats that should be considered when studying these domains. PMID:19379822

  19. Phase Transition of Poly(acrylic acid-co-N-isopropylacrylamide) Core-shell Nanogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiao-bing; Zhou, Jian-feng; Ye, Xiao-dong

    2012-08-01

    A series of poly(acrylic acid) macromolecular chain transfer agents with different molecular weights were synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and characterized by 1H NMR and gel permeation chromatography. Multiresponsive core-shell nanogels were prepared by dispersion polymerization of N-isopropylacrylamide in water using these poly(potassium acrylate) macro-RAFT agents as the electrosteric stabilizer. The size of the nanogels decreases with the amount of the macro-RAFT agent, indicating that the surface area occupied by per polyelectrolyte group is a critical parameter for stabilizing the nanogels. The volume phase transition and the zeta potentials of the nanogels in aqueous solutions were studied by dynamic light scattering and zetasizer analyzer, respectively.

  20. Rapid, long-distance dispersal by pumice rafting.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Scott E; Cook, Alex G; Evans, Jason P; Hebden, Kerry; Hurrey, Lucy; Colls, Peter; Jell, John S; Weatherley, Dion; Firn, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Pumice is an extremely effective rafting agent that can dramatically increase the dispersal range of a variety of marine organisms and connect isolated shallow marine and coastal ecosystems. Here we report on a significant recent pumice rafting and long-distance dispersal event that occurred across the southwest Pacific following the 2006 explosive eruption of Home Reef Volcano in Tonga. We have constrained the trajectory, and rate, biomass and biodiversity of transfer, discovering more than 80 species and a substantial biomass underwent a >5000 km journey in 7-8 months. Differing microenvironmental conditions on the pumice, caused by relative stability of clasts at the sea surface, promoted diversity in biotic recruitment. Our findings emphasise pumice rafting as an important process facilitating the distribution of marine life, which have implications for colonisation processes and success, the management of sensitive marine environments, and invasive pest species. PMID:22815770

  1. The chemical driving force for rafting in superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N. |

    1997-08-15

    Until recently, all theories of the driving force for rafting have considered the compositions of the two phases to be fixed, although accepting that the rate of rafting might be controlled by diffusion. When plastic flow occurs, the difference in elastic constants becomes negligible. A high energy density builds up in the transverse {gamma} sheets, and rafting occurs by outward motion of the transverse interfaces, reducing the volume which has a high energy density. The analysis considers only the change in enthalpy between two states, one in which the two phases have the compositions which are in equilibrium in the absence of external stress, the external stress has been applied, but no diffusion has occurred, and one in which the two phases have the homogeneous compositions which are in equilibrium under the applied stress. The authors do not attempt to treat the intermediate configuration in which some diffusion has occurred, but the compositions of the phases are inhomogeneous.

  2. Rapid, long-distance dispersal by pumice rafting.

    PubMed

    Bryan, Scott E; Cook, Alex G; Evans, Jason P; Hebden, Kerry; Hurrey, Lucy; Colls, Peter; Jell, John S; Weatherley, Dion; Firn, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Pumice is an extremely effective rafting agent that can dramatically increase the dispersal range of a variety of marine organisms and connect isolated shallow marine and coastal ecosystems. Here we report on a significant recent pumice rafting and long-distance dispersal event that occurred across the southwest Pacific following the 2006 explosive eruption of Home Reef Volcano in Tonga. We have constrained the trajectory, and rate, biomass and biodiversity of transfer, discovering more than 80 species and a substantial biomass underwent a >5000 km journey in 7-8 months. Differing microenvironmental conditions on the pumice, caused by relative stability of clasts at the sea surface, promoted diversity in biotic recruitment. Our findings emphasise pumice rafting as an important process facilitating the distribution of marine life, which have implications for colonisation processes and success, the management of sensitive marine environments, and invasive pest species.

  3. With or without rafts? Alternative views on cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Sevcsik, Eva; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2016-02-01

    The fundamental mechanisms of protein and lipid organization at the plasma membrane have continued to engage researchers for decades. Among proposed models, one idea has been particularly successful which assumes that sterol-dependent nanoscopic phases of different lipid chain order compartmentalize proteins, thereby modulating protein functionality. This model of membrane rafts has sustainably sparked the fields of membrane biophysics and biology, and shifted membrane lipids into the spotlight of research; by now, rafts have become an integral part of our terminology to describe a variety of cell biological processes. But is the evidence clear enough to continue supporting a theoretical concept which has resisted direct proof by observation for nearly twenty years? In this essay, we revisit findings that gave rise to and substantiated the raft hypothesis, discuss its impact on recent studies, and present alternative mechanisms to account for plasma membrane heterogeneity.

  4. Lipid rafts and their possible involvements in neuroimmunological disorders.

    PubMed

    Asakura, Kunihiko; Ueda, Akihiro; Mutoh, Tatsuro

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) are presumed to be an autoimmune disease in the central nervous system (CNS). Although lipids are most abundant components in the nervous system, it has been believed that cellular and/or humoral immunity to various myelin proteins causes these neuroinflammatory diseases. Recent research advances enable us to study lipids in the membranes and some key molecules involved in various neurological disorders including Guillain-Barré syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and prion disease, are localized in lipid rafts. In MS and NMO, the key molecules for the pathogenesis or the target molecules for the treatments of MS and NMO are also localized in lipid rafts. Here in this article, we highlight on the possible involvement of lipid rafts in the pathogenesis and treatment of MS and NMO and introduce our recent observation of aquaporin 4 regarding NMO.

  5. Rapid, Long-Distance Dispersal by Pumice Rafting

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Scott E.; Cook, Alex G.; Evans, Jason P.; Hebden, Kerry; Hurrey, Lucy; Colls, Peter; Jell, John S.; Weatherley, Dion; Firn, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Pumice is an extremely effective rafting agent that can dramatically increase the dispersal range of a variety of marine organisms and connect isolated shallow marine and coastal ecosystems. Here we report on a significant recent pumice rafting and long-distance dispersal event that occurred across the southwest Pacific following the 2006 explosive eruption of Home Reef Volcano in Tonga. We have constrained the trajectory, and rate, biomass and biodiversity of transfer, discovering more than 80 species and a substantial biomass underwent a >5000 km journey in 7–8 months. Differing microenvironmental conditions on the pumice, caused by relative stability of clasts at the sea surface, promoted diversity in biotic recruitment. Our findings emphasise pumice rafting as an important process facilitating the distribution of marine life, which have implications for colonisation processes and success, the management of sensitive marine environments, and invasive pest species. PMID:22815770

  6. Wave rafting and the equilibrium pancake ice cover thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Mingrui; Shen, Hayley H.; Hopkins, Mark A.; Ackley, Stephen F.

    2004-07-01

    Pancake ice, the circular floes formed during ice growth in a wave field, forms in many polar and subpolar seas. Vertical thin sections of cores taken from the ice cover in these regions show distinct layering structure. These observations suggest wave rafting could play a significant role in defining the ice cover thickness, much more so than thermodynamic growth. Although wave rafting is intuitively apparent, no previous study relating the resulting ice cover to wave characteristics has been conducted. In this study we utilize both laboratory experiments and numerical simulations to determine the rafting process. We propose a theory that predicts a final equilibrium thickness, provided that the incoming wave is kept constant. The equilibrium thickness from the theory is proportional to the square of the wave amplitude and the square of the floe diameter and is inversely proportional to the cube of the wavelength. This theory relates the final ice cover thickness to the wave characteristics and the size and surface properties of the pancake ice floes. This theory also provides a way to calculate the speed with which the boundary between the single-layer pancake ice floes and the equilibrium rafted ice cover propagates. We conduct laboratory experiments with plastic model pancake ice to create rafting. We perform computer simulations with a three-dimensional discrete element model that simulates the movement of disc-shaped floes in the wave field. We compare the theoretical result with the laboratory experiments and a numerically simulated rafting process. Both the laboratory and the computer simulation results compare favorably with the theory.

  7. Raft River geothermal project groundwater monitoring program. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Skiba, P.; Goldman, D.; Spencer, S.; Hull, L.

    1981-07-01

    The Raft River 5 MWe geothermal power plant will use 150 L/s of geothermal fluid at 140/sup 0/C, and an estimated 130 L/s will be discharged to intermediate-depth injection wells during normal plant operation. A monitoring program has been established to investigate the effects of geothermal fluid disposal on shallow irrigation wells at Raft River. This annual progress report summarizes data collected from seven monitor wells during 1980 (including the first quarter of FY 1981) and discusses the potential effects on shallow aquifers of the production and injection of geothermal fluids.

  8. RAFT Dispersion Alternating Copolymerization of Styrene with N-Phenylmaleimide: Morphology Control and Application as an Aqueous Foam Stabilizer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report a new nonaqueous polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) formulation based on the reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion alternating copolymerization of styrene with N-phenylmaleimide using a nonionic poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) stabilizer in a 50/50 w/w ethanol/methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) mixture. The MEK cosolvent is significantly less toxic than the 1,4-dioxane cosolvent reported previously [YangP.; Macromolecules2013, 46, 8545−8556]. The core-forming alternating copolymer block has a relatively high glass transition temperature (Tg), which leads to vesicular morphologies being observed during PISA, as well as the more typical sphere and worm phases. Each of these copolymer morphologies has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies. TEM studies reveal micrometer-sized elliptical particles with internal structure, with SAXS analysis suggesting an oligolamellar vesicle morphology. This structure differs from that previously reported for a closely related PISA formulation utilizing a poly(methacrylic acid) stabilizer block for which unilamellar platelet-like particles are observed by TEM and SAXS. This suggests that interlamellar interactions are governed by the nature of the steric stabilizer layer. Moreover, using the MEK cosolvent also enables access to a unilamellar vesicular morphology, despite the high Tg of the alternating copolymer core-forming block. This was achieved by simply conducting the PISA synthesis at a higher temperature for a longer reaction time (80 °C for 24 h). Presumably, MEK solvates the core-forming block more than the previously utilized 1,4-dioxane cosolvent, which leads to greater chain mobility. Finally, preliminary experiments indicate that the worms are much more efficient stabilizers for aqueous foams than either the spheres or the oligolamellar elliptical vesicles.

  9. RAFT Dispersion Alternating Copolymerization of Styrene with N-Phenylmaleimide: Morphology Control and Application as an Aqueous Foam Stabilizer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report a new nonaqueous polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) formulation based on the reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion alternating copolymerization of styrene with N-phenylmaleimide using a nonionic poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) stabilizer in a 50/50 w/w ethanol/methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) mixture. The MEK cosolvent is significantly less toxic than the 1,4-dioxane cosolvent reported previously [YangP.; Macromolecules2013, 46, 8545−8556]. The core-forming alternating copolymer block has a relatively high glass transition temperature (Tg), which leads to vesicular morphologies being observed during PISA, as well as the more typical sphere and worm phases. Each of these copolymer morphologies has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies. TEM studies reveal micrometer-sized elliptical particles with internal structure, with SAXS analysis suggesting an oligolamellar vesicle morphology. This structure differs from that previously reported for a closely related PISA formulation utilizing a poly(methacrylic acid) stabilizer block for which unilamellar platelet-like particles are observed by TEM and SAXS. This suggests that interlamellar interactions are governed by the nature of the steric stabilizer layer. Moreover, using the MEK cosolvent also enables access to a unilamellar vesicular morphology, despite the high Tg of the alternating copolymer core-forming block. This was achieved by simply conducting the PISA synthesis at a higher temperature for a longer reaction time (80 °C for 24 h). Presumably, MEK solvates the core-forming block more than the previously utilized 1,4-dioxane cosolvent, which leads to greater chain mobility. Finally, preliminary experiments indicate that the worms are much more efficient stabilizers for aqueous foams than either the spheres or the oligolamellar elliptical vesicles. PMID:27708458

  10. Raft-Like Membrane Domains in Pathogenic Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Farnoud, Amir M.; Toledo, Alvaro M.; Konopka, James B.; Del Poeta, Maurizio; London, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The lipid bilayer of the plasma membrane is thought to be compartmentalized by the presence of lipid-protein microdomains. In eukaryotic cells, microdomains composed of sterols and sphingolipids packed in a liquid-ordered state, commonly known as lipid rafts, are believed to exist. While less studied in bacterial cells, reports on the presence of sterol or protein-mediated microdomains in bacterial cell membranes are also appearing with increasing frequency. Recent efforts have been focused on addressing the biophysical and biochemical properties of lipid rafts. However, most studies have been focused on synthetic membranes, mammalian cells, and/or model, non-pathogenic microorganisms. Much less is known about microdomains in the plasma membrane of pathogenic microorganisms. This review attempts to provide an overview of the current state of knowledge of lipid rafts in pathogenic fungi and the developing field of microdomains in pathogenic bacteria. The current literature on the structure and function and of microdomains is reviewed and the potential role of microdomains in growth, pathogenesis, and drug resistance of pathogens are discussed. Better insight into the structure and function of membrane microdomains in pathogenic microorganisms might lead to a better understanding of the process of pathogenesis and development of raft-mediated approaches for new methods of therapy. PMID:26015285

  11. Raft River well stimulation experiments: geothermal reservoir well stimulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-08-01

    The Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) performed two field experiments at the Raft River KGRA in 1979. Wells RRGP-4 and RRGP-5 were selected for the hydraulic fracture stimulation treatments. The well selection process, fracture treatment design, field execution, stimulation results, and pre- and post-job evaluations are presented.

  12. Cholesterol lipids and cholesterol-containing lipid rafts in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhen; London, Erwin

    2016-09-01

    Sterols are important components of eukaryotic membranes, but rare in bacteria. Some bacteria obtain sterols from their host or environment. In some cases, these sterols form membrane domains analogous the lipid rafts proposed to exist in eukaryotic membranes. This review describes the properties and roles of sterols in Borrelia and Helicobacter.

  13. Caveolin interaction governs Kv1.3 lipid raft targeting.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Verdaguer, Mireia; Capera, Jesusa; Martínez-Mármol, Ramón; Camps, Marta; Comes, Núria; Tamkun, Michael M; Felipe, Antonio

    2016-03-02

    The spatial localization of ion channels at the cell surface is crucial for their functional role. Many channels localize in lipid raft microdomains, which are enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Caveolae, specific lipid rafts which concentrate caveolins, harbor signaling molecules and their targets becoming signaling platforms crucial in cell physiology. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in such spatial localization are under debate. Kv1.3 localizes in lipid rafts and participates in the immunological response. We sought to elucidate the mechanisms of Kv1.3 surface targeting, which govern leukocyte physiology. Kv1 channels share a putative caveolin-binding domain located at the intracellular N-terminal of the channel. This motif, lying close to the S1 transmembrane segment, is situated near the T1 tetramerization domain and the determinants involved in the Kvβ subunit association. The highly hydrophobic domain (FQRQVWLLF) interacts with caveolin 1 targeting Kv1.3 to caveolar rafts. However, subtle variations of this cluster, putative ancillary associations and different structural conformations can impair the caveolin recognition, thereby altering channel's spatial localization. Our results identify a caveolin-binding domain in Kv1 channels and highlight the mechanisms that govern the regulation of channel surface localization during cellular processes.

  14. Modifying lipid rafts promotes regeneration and functional recovery.

    PubMed

    Tassew, Nardos G; Mothe, Andrea J; Shabanzadeh, Alireza P; Banerjee, Paromita; Koeberle, Paulo D; Bremner, Rod; Tator, Charles H; Monnier, Philippe P

    2014-08-21

    Ideal strategies to ameliorate CNS damage should promote both neuronal survival and axon regeneration. The receptor Neogenin promotes neuronal apoptosis. Its ligand prevents death, but the resulting repulsive guidance molecule a (RGMa)-Neogenin interaction also inhibits axonal growth, countering any prosurvival benefits. Here, we explore strategies to inhibit Neogenin, thus simultaneously enhancing survival and regeneration. We show that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and RGMa-dependent recruitment of Neogenin into lipid rafts requires an interaction between RGMa and Neogenin subdomains. RGMa or Neogenin peptides that prevent this interaction, BMP inhibition by Noggin, or reduction of membrane cholesterol all block Neogenin raft localization, promote axon outgrowth, and prevent neuronal apoptosis. Blocking Neogenin raft association influences axonal pathfinding, enhances survival in the developing CNS, and promotes survival and regeneration in the injured adult optic nerve and spinal cord. Moreover, lowering cholesterol disrupts rafts and restores locomotor function after spinal cord injury. These data reveal a unified strategy to promote both survival and regeneration in the CNS. PMID:25127134

  15. Rote or Raft? Science and Adventure at a Summer Camp.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Jenni

    1997-01-01

    Describes the group dynamics, science discovery processes, and activities involved in building a raft at camp. The project used recycled products and required group cooperation; critical thinking about density, buoyancy, and balance; use of familiar resources in creative ways; and application of previously learned facts. (SAS)

  16. Initiator and Photocatalyst-Free Visible Light Induced One-Pot Reaction: Concurrent RAFT Polymerization and CuAAC Click Reaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Xinbo; Xue, Wentao; Chen, Gaojian; Zhang, Weidong; Zhu, Xiulin

    2016-05-01

    A new, visible light-catalyzed, one-pot and one-step reaction is successfully employed to design well-controlled side-chain functionalized polymers, by the combination of ambient temperature revisible addtion-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and click chemistry. Polymerizations are well controlled in a living way under the irradiation of visible light-emitting diode (LED) light without photocatalyst and initiator, using the trithiocarbonate agent as iniferter (initiator-transfer agent-terminator) agent at ambient temperature. Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), NMR, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) data confirm the successful one-pot reaction. Compared to the reported zero-valent metal-catalyzed one-pot reaction, the polymerization rate is much faster than that of the click reaction, and the visible light-catalyzed one-pot reaction can be freely and easily regulated by turning on and off the light.

  17. Lipid raft association restricts CD44-ezrin interaction and promotion of breast cancer cell migration.

    PubMed

    Donatello, Simona; Babina, Irina S; Hazelwood, Lee D; Hill, Arnold D K; Nabi, Ivan R; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration.

  18. Pacific Ocean Disasters - Enhanced Detection and Monitoring of Pumice Rafts Using NASA EOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, L. M.; Chojnacki, P. R.; Coady, C.; Geddes, Q.; Honaker, L. B.; Lyddane, W.; McGilloway, J.; Scott, J.

    2011-12-01

    Pumice rafts are an occasional byproduct of explosive volcanic eruptions that occur near bodies of water. Though these rafts may be infrequent, their substantial size, typically tens of kilometers across, means they pose a serious hazard to shipping interests by blocking the seawater intake valves for ships' engine cooling systems. The focus of this research is on the pumice raft events associated with Tonga 2006, Yemen 2007, and Chile-Argentina border 2011 eruptions. False-color composite images were created with remotely sensed data from the Landsat 5 TM, Landsat 7 ETM+, and MODIS instruments to facilitate visual identification of pumice rafts in high resolution imagery. Additionally, a Material-Of-Interest subpixel classification was implemented to automatically demarcate the extent of the pumice rafts. MODIS was found to be the most useful sensor for tracking larger rafts in the open ocean, while Landsat 5 TM, Landsat 7 ETM+, and ALI were more effective in tracking smaller rafts in lakes and rivers. The pumice rafts generally took on a temperature between that of the ambient air and water temperatures, and this is theorized to be potentially related to characteristics unique to each raft like thickness. That data collected for this study has been compiled to provide an effective tool for further investigation of pumice rafts.

  19. Lenalidomide induces lipid raft assembly to enhance erythropoietin receptor signaling in myelodysplastic syndrome progenitors.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Kathy L; Basiorka, Ashley A; Johnson, Joseph O; Clark, Justine; Caceres, Gisela; Padron, Eric; Heaton, Ruth; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Wei, Sheng; Sokol, Lubomir; List, Alan F

    2014-01-01

    Anemia remains the principal management challenge for patients with lower risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes (MDS). Despite appropriate cytokine production and cellular receptor display, erythropoietin receptor (EpoR) signaling is impaired. We reported that EpoR signaling is dependent upon receptor localization within lipid raft microdomains, and that disruption of raft integrity abolishes signaling capacity. Here, we show that MDS erythroid progenitors display markedly diminished raft assembly and smaller raft aggregates compared to normal controls (p = 0.005, raft number; p = 0.023, raft size). Because lenalidomide triggers raft coalescence in T-lymphocytes promoting immune synapse formation, we assessed effects of lenalidomide on raft assembly in MDS erythroid precursors and UT7 cells. Lenalidomide treatment rapidly induced lipid raft formation accompanied by EpoR recruitment into raft fractions together with STAT5, JAK2, and Lyn kinase. The JAK2 phosphatase, CD45, a key negative regulator of EpoR signaling, was displaced from raft fractions. Lenalidomide treatment prior to Epo stimulation enhanced both JAK2 and STAT5 phosphorylation in UT7 and primary MDS erythroid progenitors, accompanied by increased STAT5 DNA binding in UT7 cells, and increased erythroid colony forming capacity in both UT7 and primary cells. Raft induction was associated with F-actin polymerization, which was blocked by Rho kinase inhibition. These data indicate that deficient raft integrity impairs EpoR signaling, and provides a novel strategy to enhance EpoR signal fidelity in non-del(5q) MDS.

  20. On the fate of pumice rafts formed during the 2012 Havre submarine eruption

    PubMed Central

    Jutzeler, Martin; Marsh, Robert; Carey, Rebecca J.; White, James D. L.; Talling, Peter J.; Karlstrom, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Pumice rafts are floating mobile accumulations of low-density pumice clasts generated by silicic volcanic eruptions. Pumice in rafts can drift for years, become waterlogged and sink, or become stranded on shorelines. Here we show that the pumice raft formed by the impressive, deep submarine eruption of the Havre caldera volcano (Southwest Pacific) in July 2012 can be mapped by satellite imagery augmented by sailing crew observations. Far from coastal interference, the eruption produced a single >400 km2 raft in 1 day, thus initiating a gigantic, high-precision, natural experiment relevant to both modern and prehistoric oceanic surface dispersal dynamics. Observed raft dispersal can be accurately reproduced by simulating drift and dispersal patterns using currents from an eddy-resolving ocean model hindcast. For future eruptions that produce potentially hazardous pumice rafts, our technique allows real-time forecasts of dispersal routes, in addition to inference of ash/pumice deposit distribution in the deep ocean. PMID:24755668

  1. On the fate of pumice rafts formed during the 2012 Havre submarine eruption.

    PubMed

    Jutzeler, Martin; Marsh, Robert; Carey, Rebecca J; White, James D L; Talling, Peter J; Karlstrom, Leif

    2014-04-22

    Pumice rafts are floating mobile accumulations of low-density pumice clasts generated by silicic volcanic eruptions. Pumice in rafts can drift for years, become waterlogged and sink, or become stranded on shorelines. Here we show that the pumice raft formed by the impressive, deep submarine eruption of the Havre caldera volcano (Southwest Pacific) in July 2012 can be mapped by satellite imagery augmented by sailing crew observations. Far from coastal interference, the eruption produced a single >400 km(2) raft in 1 day, thus initiating a gigantic, high-precision, natural experiment relevant to both modern and prehistoric oceanic surface dispersal dynamics. Observed raft dispersal can be accurately reproduced by simulating drift and dispersal patterns using currents from an eddy-resolving ocean model hindcast. For future eruptions that produce potentially hazardous pumice rafts, our technique allows real-time forecasts of dispersal routes, in addition to inference of ash/pumice deposit distribution in the deep ocean.

  2. On the fate of pumice rafts formed during the 2012 Havre submarine eruption.

    PubMed

    Jutzeler, Martin; Marsh, Robert; Carey, Rebecca J; White, James D L; Talling, Peter J; Karlstrom, Leif

    2014-01-01

    Pumice rafts are floating mobile accumulations of low-density pumice clasts generated by silicic volcanic eruptions. Pumice in rafts can drift for years, become waterlogged and sink, or become stranded on shorelines. Here we show that the pumice raft formed by the impressive, deep submarine eruption of the Havre caldera volcano (Southwest Pacific) in July 2012 can be mapped by satellite imagery augmented by sailing crew observations. Far from coastal interference, the eruption produced a single >400 km(2) raft in 1 day, thus initiating a gigantic, high-precision, natural experiment relevant to both modern and prehistoric oceanic surface dispersal dynamics. Observed raft dispersal can be accurately reproduced by simulating drift and dispersal patterns using currents from an eddy-resolving ocean model hindcast. For future eruptions that produce potentially hazardous pumice rafts, our technique allows real-time forecasts of dispersal routes, in addition to inference of ash/pumice deposit distribution in the deep ocean. PMID:24755668

  3. Amyloid beta-protein and lipid rafts: focused on biogenesis and catabolism.

    PubMed

    Araki, Wataru; Tamaoka, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral accumulation of amyloid β-protein (Aβ) is thought to play a key role in the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Three secretases (β-, γ-, and α-secretase) are proteases that control the production of Aβ from amyloid precursor protein. Increasing evidence suggests that cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains termed 'lipid rafts' are involved in the biogenesis and accumulation of Aβ as well as Aβ-mediated neurotoxicity. γ-Secretase is enriched in lipid rafts, which are considered an important site for Aβ generation. Additionally, Aβ-degrading peptidases located in lipid rafts, such as neprilysin, appear to play a role in Aβ catabolism. This mini-review focuses on the roles of lipid rafts in the biogenesis and catabolism of Aβ, covering recent research on the relationship between lipid rafts and the three secretases or Aβ-degrading peptidases. Furthermore, the significance of lipid rafts in Aβ aggregation and neurotoxicity is briefly summarized.

  4. Tissue Engineering the Cornea: The Evolution of RAFT

    PubMed Central

    Levis, Hannah J.; Kureshi, Alvena K.; Massie, Isobel; Morgan, Louise; Vernon, Amanda J.; Daniels, Julie T.

    2015-01-01

    Corneal blindness affects over 10 million people worldwide and current treatment strategies often involve replacement of the defective layer with healthy tissue. Due to a worldwide donor cornea shortage and the absence of suitable biological scaffolds, recent research has focused on the development of tissue engineering techniques to create alternative therapies. This review will detail how we have refined the simple engineering technique of plastic compression of collagen to a process we now call Real Architecture for 3D Tissues (RAFT). The RAFT production process has been standardised, and steps have been taken to consider Good Manufacturing Practice compliance. The evolution of this process has allowed us to create biomimetic epithelial and endothelial tissue equivalents suitable for transplantation and ideal for studying cell-cell interactions in vitro. PMID:25809689

  5. Removal of silica from Raft River geothermal water

    SciTech Connect

    Suciu, D.F.; Miller, R.L.

    1980-06-01

    Lack of sufficient quantities of clean surface or near-surface water at Raft River for cooling purposes dictates that cooled geothermal fluid, effluent from the Raft River 5 MW(e) Pilot Power Plant, must also be used as condenser coolant. Prior testing revealed that a water-treatment system would be required to reduce silica and calcium concentrations of the cooling fluid. The water-treatment system specified was to use dolomitic lime for both pH adjustment and source of magnesium. The dolomitic lime treatment was investigated and found to be inadequate. Subsequent testing was done to find chemical systems that would adequately reduce silica concentrations. Three magnesium and two iron compounds were found which reduced silica to acceptable concentration levels. They are magnesium bicarbonate, magnesium chloride, magnesium sulfate, iron sulfate, and iron chloride. Magnesium oxide, using a two-stage countercurrent process, will also reduce silica to adequate levels.

  6. Flagellar membranes are rich in raft-forming phospholipids

    PubMed Central

    Serricchio, Mauro; Schmid, Adrien W.; Steinmann, Michael E.; Sigel, Erwin; Rauch, Monika; Julkowska, Daria; Bonnefoy, Serge; Fort, Cécile; Bastin, Philippe; Bütikofer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The observation that the membranes of flagella are enriched in sterols and sphingolipids has led to the hypothesis that flagella might be enriched in raft-forming lipids. However, a detailed lipidomic analysis of flagellar membranes is not available. Novel protocols to detach and isolate intact flagella from Trypanosoma brucei procyclic forms in combination with reverse-phase liquid chromatography high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry allowed us to determine the phospholipid composition of flagellar membranes relative to whole cells. Our analyses revealed that phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, ceramide and the sphingolipids inositol phosphorylceramide and sphingomyelin are enriched in flagella relative to whole cells. In contrast, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol are strongly depleted in flagella. Within individual glycerophospholipid classes, we observed a preference for ether-type over diacyl-type molecular species in membranes of flagella. Our study provides direct evidence for a preferential presence of raft-forming phospholipids in flagellar membranes of T. brucei. PMID:26276100

  7. Lipid rafts direct macrophage motility in the tissue microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Previtera, Michelle L; Peterman, Kimberly; Shah, Smit; Luzuriaga, Juan

    2015-04-01

    Infiltrating leukocytes are exposed to a wide range of tissue elasticities. While we know the effects of substrate elasticity on acute inflammation via the study of neutrophil migration, we do not know its effects on leukocytes that direct chronic inflammatory events. Here, we studied morphology and motility of macrophages, the innate immune cells that orchestrate acute and chronic inflammation, on polyacrylamide hydrogels that mimicked a wide range of tissue elasticities. As expected, we found that macrophage spreading area increased as substrate elasticity increased. Unexpectedly, we found that morphology did not inversely correlate with motility. In fact, velocity of steady-state macrophages remained unaffected by substrate elasticity, while velocity of biologically stimulated macrophages was limited on stiff substrates. We also found that the lack of motility on stiff substrates was due to a lack of lipid rafts on the leading edge of the macrophages. This study implicates lipid rafts in the mechanosensory mechanism of innate immune cell infiltration. PMID:25269613

  8. Apollo-Era Life Rafts Save Hundreds of Sailors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    The space shuttle is unique among spacecraft in that it glides back to Earth and lands like an airplane, usually touching ground near where it launched at Kennedy Space Center, but sometimes, in poor weather, gliding into the back-up landing site at Dryden Flight Research Center and then catching a ride back to the Cape on the back of a modified Boeing 747. Before NASA began flying the shuttle, though, astronauts had a longer, more involved trip back to base after a mission. Their capsule, called the command module, would plunge through the atmosphere before releasing a series of parachutes that would slow the craft enough for it to land on the water without too significant of an impact. Called a splashdown, this type of landing put the astronauts out in the ocean, where a specially designated U.S. Navy ship would then deploy a helicopter to retrieve the space travelers. Waiting for the rescue, the astronauts would release a highly visible marker dye into the water, then leave the command module and climb aboard a life raft. These early space pioneers had traveled thousands of miles and then landed safely back on Earth. The journey s end was in sight, but they had one more obstacle. The rotor downdraft from the helicopter coming to retrieve them, reaching sometimes as much as 100 knots per hour, was enough to flip a typical flat-bottomed life raft. Not willing to be thwarted after coming so far, NASA engineers began devising a solution. They knew they needed a highly stable inflatable raft capable of riding out the rough winds, and the solution was to make use of the most abundant resource available: water. Engineers at NASA s Johnson Space Center went to work designing and patenting a hydrodynamically stabilized ballast system that would prevent a life raft from tipping in choppy seas and fierce winds.

  9. Early Cretaceous ice rafting and climate zonation in Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Frakes, L.A.; Alley, N.F.; Deynoux, M.

    1995-07-01

    Lower Cretaceous (Valanginian to Albian) strata of the southwestern Eromanga and Carpentaria basins of central and northern Australia, respectively, provide evidence of strongly seasonal climates at high paleolatitudes. These include dispersed clasts (lonestones) in fine sediments and pseudomorphs of calcite after ikaite (glendonites), the latter being known to form only at temperatures below about 7{degrees}C. Rafting is regarded as the transport mechanism for clasts up to boulder size (lonestones) enclosed within dark mudrocks; this interpretation rests on rare occurrences of penetration by clasts into substrate layers. Driftwood and large floating algae are eliminated as possible rafts because fossil wood is found mainly concentrated in nearshore areas of the basins and large algal masses have not been observed. Rafting by icebergs is considered unlikely in view of the global lack of tillites and related glacial deposits of this age. Our interpretation is that seasonal ice, formed in winter along stream courses and strandlines, incorporated clasts which, during the melt season, were dropped into muddy sediments in both basins. Eromanga fine-sediment and concentrations of large clasts and associated sand lenses, both lying above local erosion surfaces. In the Carpentaria Basin, local dumping of sediment from raft surfaces resulted in accumulation of pods of small clasts. Three zones can be identified for the Early Cretaceous climate of eastern Australia: (1) a very cold southern region, at latitudes above about 72{degrees} S, characterized by meteoric waters possibly originating as Antarctic glacial meltwaters; (2) a zone of strongly seasonal climates, with freezing winters and warm summers, between about 72{degrees} and 53{degrees} S.Lat.; and (3) a mid-latitude zone (below about 50{degrees} S. Lat.), where freezing temperatures were not common. 60 refs., 7 figs.

  10. Raft River 5-MW(e) geothermal pilot plant project

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, T.L.; Whitbeck, J.F.

    1980-01-01

    The Raft River 5-MW(e) Pilot Plant Project was started in 1976. Construction is scheduled for completion in July 1980, with three years of engineering and operational testing to follow. The plant utilized a 280/sup 0/F geothermal fluid energy source and a dual boiling isobutane cycle. Developmental efforts are in progress in the areas of down hole pumps and chemical treatment of geothermal fluid for cooling tower makeup.

  11. Lipid rafts are disrupted in mildly inflamed intestinal microenvironments without overt disruption of the epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Rachel V; Donatello, Simona; Lyes, Clíona; Owens, Mark B; Babina, Irina S; Hudson, Lance; Walsh, Shaun V; O'Donoghue, Diarmuid P; Amu, Sylvie; Barry, Sean P; Fallon, Padraic G; Hopkins, Ann M

    2012-04-15

    Intestinal epithelial barrier disruption is a feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but whether barrier disruption precedes or merely accompanies inflammation remains controversial. Tight junction (TJ) adhesion complexes control epithelial barrier integrity. Since some TJ proteins reside in cholesterol-enriched regions of the cell membrane termed lipid rafts, we sought to elucidate the relationship between rafts and intestinal epithelial barrier function. Lipid rafts were isolated from Caco-2 intestinal epithelial cells primed with the proinflammatory cytokine interferon-γ (IFN-γ) or treated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin as a positive control for raft disruption. Rafts were also isolated from the ilea of mice in which colitis had been induced in conjunction with in vivo intestinal permeability measurements, and lastly from intestinal biopsies of ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with predominantly mild or quiescent disease. Raft distribution was analyzed by measuring activity of the raft-associated enzyme alkaline phosphatase and by performing Western blot analysis for flotillin-1. Epithelial barrier integrity was estimated by measuring transepithelial resistance in cytokine-treated cells or in vivo permeability to fluorescent dextran in colitic mice. Raft and nonraft fractions were analyzed by Western blotting for the TJ proteins occludin and zonula occludens-1 (ZO-1). Our results revealed that lipid rafts were disrupted in IFN-γ-treated cells, in the ilea of mice with subclinical colitis, and in UC patients with quiescent inflammation. This was not associated with a clear pattern of occludin or ZO-1 relocalization from raft to nonraft fractions. Significantly, a time-course study in colitic mice revealed that disruption of lipid rafts preceded the onset of increased intestinal permeability. Our data suggest for the first time that lipid raft disruption occurs early in the inflammatory cascade in murine and human colitis and, we speculate, may contribute to

  12. Wrinkles and folds in a compressed granular raft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jambon-Puillet, Etienne; Josserand, Christophe; Protiere, Suzie

    Wrinkles and folds occur in a wide variety of situations, we find them in Nature but also in man-made products. They typically appear when a thin sheet bound to a foundation is compressed. Here we demonstrate that particle ladden interfaces, despite being made of discrete very hard particles, can form wrinkles and folds like a soft elastic solid. We call granular raft a close packed monolayer of heavy, athermal particles at the interface between two fluids. We use beads of different materials with diameters ranging from 30 μm to 0 . 8 mm dispersed at a planar oil/water interface. Upon uniaxial compression the raft buckles out of plane like a soft elastic solid and forms a periodic wrinkling pattern, then the deformation localizes in a large unique fold/crease. This behavior is reminiscent of a compressed elastic sheet floating on water. We will highlight similarities and differences between the mechanical properties of our discrete heavy granular raft and a continuous elastic floating film. Finally we will show how elasticity and gravity contribute to rationalize the original shape of the fold we observe.

  13. Functional role of lipid rafts in CD20 activity?

    PubMed

    Janas, Eva; Priest, Richard; Malhotra, Rajneesh

    2005-01-01

    CD20 is a B-lymphocyte-specific integral membrane protein, implicated in the regulation of transmembrane calcium conductance, cell-cycle progression and B-lymphocyte proliferation. CD20 is proposed to function as a SOCC (store-operated calcium channel). SOCCs are activated by receptor-stimulated calcium depletion of intracellular stores. Sustained calcium conductivity across the plasma membrane mediated by SOCC activity is required for long-term calcium-dependent processes, such as transcriptional control and gene expression. Cross-linking of CD20 by antibodies (e.g. Rituxan) has been reported to induce a rapid redistribution of CD20 into specialized microdomains at the plasma membrane, known as lipid rafts. Recruitment of CD20 into lipid rafts and its homo-oligomerization are suggested to be crucial for CD20 activity and regulation. This review outlines recent biochemical studies characterizing the role of CD20 in calcium signalling in B-lymphocytes and evaluates an engagement of lipid rafts in the regulation of CD20-mediated calcium conductivity.

  14. Probing Lipid Membrane Rafts (Microdomains) with Fluorescent Phospholipids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Yongwen; Mitchel, Drake

    2011-10-01

    Membrane rafts are enriched in sphingolipids and cholesterol, they exist in a more ordered state (the liquid-ordered phase; lo) than the bulk membrane (the liquid-disordered phase; ld). Ternary mixtures of palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphocholine (POPC; 16:0,18:1 PC), sphingomyelin (SPM), and cholesterol (Chol) form membrane rafts over a wide range of molar ratios. We are examining the ability of two fluorescent probes, NBD linked to di-16:0 PE which partitions into the lo phase, and NBD linked to di-18:1 PE which partitions into the ld phase, to detect these two phases. We are also examining the effect of the highly polyunsaturated phospholipid stearoyl-docosahexanoyl-phosphocholine (SDPC; 18:0, 22:6 PC) on the size and stability of POPC/SPM/Chol membrane rafts. We report on the fluorescence lifetime and anisotropy decay dynamics of two fluorescent probes. Data were acquired via frequency-domain measurements from 5 to 250 MHz.

  15. Aspirin inhibits formation of cholesterol rafts in fluid lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Alsop, Richard J; Toppozini, Laura; Marquardt, Drew; Kučerka, Norbert; Harroun, Thad A; Rheinstädter, Maikel C

    2015-03-01

    Aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a high affinity for phospholipid membranes, altering their structure and biophysical properties. Aspirin has been shown to partition into the lipid head groups, thereby increasing membrane fluidity. Cholesterol is another well known mediator of membrane fluidity, in turn increasing membrane stiffness. As well, cholesterol is believed to distribute unevenly within lipid membranes leading to the formation of lipid rafts or plaques. In many studies, aspirin has increased positive outcomes for patients with high cholesterol. We are interested if these effects may be, at least partially, the result of a non-specific interaction between aspirin and cholesterol in lipid membranes. We have studied the effect of aspirin on the organization of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) membranes containing cholesterol. Through Langmuir-Blodgett experiments we show that aspirin increases the area per lipid and decreases compressibility at 32.5 mol% cholesterol, leading to a significant increase of fluidity of the membranes. Differential scanning calorimetry provides evidence for the formation of meta-stable structures in the presence of aspirin. The molecular organization of lipids, cholesterol and aspirin was studied using neutron diffraction. While the formation of rafts has been reported in binary DPPC/cholesterol membranes, aspirin was found to locally disrupt membrane organization and lead to the frustration of raft formation. Our results suggest that aspirin is able to directly oppose the formation of cholesterol structures through non-specific interactions with lipid membranes.

  16. Properties of HIV-1 associated cholesterol in addition to raft formation are important for virus infection.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, David; Jones, Kate L; Smyth, Redmond P; Pereira, Cândida F; Bittman, Robert; Jaworowski, Anthony; Mak, Johnson

    2015-12-01

    The overall HIV-1 membrane lipid contents resemble lipid rafts, and we have previously demonstrated that raft-promoting properties of virus-associated cholesterol (with modifications in either the 3β-OH group or AB rings) are important for HIV-1 infectivity. As cholesterol is present in both rafts and non-rafts domains of HIV-1 membrane, we question whether the interpretation of rafts property of virus-associated cholesterol being an absolute requirement for HIV-1 function is too simplistic. The carbon side chain of cholesterol is the third component of cholesterol that can affect the fluidity of membrane depending on its context within the lipid membrane bilayers. In this work, we have used synthetic cholesterol analogues that have different lengths of carbon side chain for our investigation. In contrast to our previous report, we have found that cholesterol side chain analogues that lack in vitro defined raft promoting-property is able to support HIV-1 replication. More specifically, cholesterol analogues with side chains of intermediate length have greater capacity to support HIV-1 infection, suggesting HIV-1 is able to maintain function using cholesterol variants that promote a range of non-rafts- to rafts-properties. Our data demonstrate cholesterol properties other than raft-promoting function also contribute to the infectivity of HIV-1.

  17. Formulation and optimisation of raft-forming chewable tablets containing H2 antagonist

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Shailesh T; Mehta, Anant P; Modhia, Ishan P; Patel, Chhagan N

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research work was to formulate raft-forming chewable tablets of H2 antagonist (Famotidine) using a raft-forming agent along with an antacid- and gas-generating agent. Materials and Methods: Tablets were prepared by wet granulation and evaluated for raft strength, acid neutralisation capacity, weight variation, % drug content, thickness, hardness, friability and in vitro drug release. Various raft-forming agents were used in preliminary screening. A 23 full-factorial design was used in the present study for optimisation. The amount of sodium alginate, amount of calcium carbonate and amount sodium bicarbonate were selected as independent variables. Raft strength, acid neutralisation capacity and drug release at 30 min were selected as responses. Results: Tablets containing sodium alginate were having maximum raft strength as compared with other raft-forming agents. Acid neutralisation capacity and in vitro drug release of all factorial batches were found to be satisfactory. The F5 batch was optimised based on maximum raft strength and good acid neutralisation capacity. Drug–excipient compatibility study showed no interaction between the drug and excipients. Stability study of the optimised formulation showed that the tablets were stable at accelerated environmental conditions. Conclusion: It was concluded that raft-forming chewable tablets prepared using an optimum amount of sodium alginate, calcium carbonate and sodium bicarbonate could be an efficient dosage form in the treatment of gastro oesophageal reflux disease. PMID:23580933

  18. A simplified analysis method for piled raft and pile group foundations with batter piles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitiyodom, Pastsakorn; Matsumoto, Tatsunori

    2002-11-01

    A simplified method of numerical analysis has been developed to estimate the deformation and load distribution of piled raft foundations subjected to vertical, lateral, and moment loads, using a hybrid model in which the flexible raft is modelled as thin plates and the piles as elastic beams and the soil is treated as springs. Both the vertical and lateral resistances of the piles as well as the raft base are incorporated into the model. Pile-soil-pile, pile-soil-raft and raft-soil-raft interactions are taken into account based on Mindlin's solutions for both vertical and lateral forces. The validity of the proposed method is verified through comparisons with several existing methods for single piles, pile groups and piled rafts. Workable design charts are given for the estimation of the lateral displacement and the load distribution of piled rafts from the stiffnesses of the raft alone and the pile group alone. Additionally, parametric studies were carried out concerning batter pile foundations. It was found that the use of batter piles can efficiently improve the deformation characteristics of pile foundations subjected to lateral loads.

  19. Raft River Geothermal Area Data Models - Conceptual, Logical and Fact Models

    DOE Data Explorer

    Cuyler, David

    2012-07-19

    Conceptual and Logical Data Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses at Raft River a. Logical Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses, David Cuyler 2010 b. Fact Model for Geothermal Data Concerning Wells, Fields, Power Plants and Related Analyses, David Cuyler 2010 Derived from Tables, Figures and other Content in Reports from the Raft River Geothermal Project: "Technical Report on the Raft River Geothermal Resource, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx, Inc., August 2002. "Results from the Short-Term Well Testing Program at the Raft River Geothermal Field, Cassia County, Idaho," GeothermEx, Inc., October 2004.

  20. Lipid rafts regulate cellular CD40 receptor localization in vascular endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xia Min; Wang Qing; Zhu Huilian; Ma Jing; Hou Mengjun; Tang Zhihong; Li Juanjuan; Ling Wenhua

    2007-09-28

    Cholesterol enriched lipid rafts are considered to function as platforms involved in the regulation of membrane receptor signaling complex through the clustering of signaling molecules. In this study, we tested whether these specialized membrane microdomains affect CD40 localization in vitro and in vivo. Here, we provide evidence that upon CD40 ligand stimulation, endogenous and exogenous CD40 receptor is rapidly mobilized into lipid rafts compared with unstimulated HAECs. Efficient binding between CD40L and CD40 receptor also increases amounts of CD40 protein levels in lipid rafts. Deficiency of intracellular conserved C terminus of the CD40 cytoplasmic tail impairs CD40 partitioning in raft. Raft disorganization after methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin treatment diminishes CD40 localization into rafts. In vivo studies show that elevation of circulating cholesterol in high-cholesterol fed rabbits increases the cholesterol content and CD40 receptor localization in lipid rafts. These findings identify a physiological role for membrane lipid rafts as a critical regulator of CD40-mediated signal transduction and raise the possibility that certain pathologic conditions may be treated by altering CD40 signaling with drugs affecting its raft localization.

  1. Structural determinants of protein partitioning into ordered membrane domains and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Lorent, Joseph Helmuth; Levental, Ilya

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the existence of lateral nanoscopic lipid domains in plasma membranes, known as lipid rafts. These domains preferentially recruit membrane proteins and lipids to facilitate their interactions and thereby regulate transmembrane signaling and cellular homeostasis. The functionality of raft domains is intrinsically dependent on their selectivity for specific membrane components; however, while the physicochemical determinants of raft association for lipids are known, very few systematic studies have focused on the structural aspects that guide raft partitioning of proteins. In this review, we describe biophysical and thermodynamic aspects of raft-mimetic liquid ordered phases, focusing on those most relevant for protein partitioning. Further, we detail the variety of experimental models used to study protein-raft interactions. Finally, we review the existing literature on mechanisms for raft targeting, including lipid post-translational modifications, lipid binding, and transmembrane domain features. We conclude that while protein palmitoylation is a clear raft-targeting signal, few other general structural determinants for raft partitioning have been revealed, suggesting that many discoveries lie ahead in this burgeoning field.

  2. Abnormal lipid rafts related ganglioside expression and signaling in T lymphocytes in immune thrombocytopenia patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Zhang, Donglei; Liu, Wenjie; Li, Huiyuan; Fu, Rongfeng; Liu, Xiaofan; Xue, Feng; Yang, Renchi

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant T lymphocytes signaling is considered to play a crucial role in the abnormal immune state of primary immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Lipid raft has been verified to engage in the T cell receptor (TCR)-mediated T lymphocytes signal transduction. Whether lipid raft-associated T cells signal transduction has impact on the pathogenesis of ITP is still unconfirmed. In this study, we aimed to reveal the abnormality in structure and function of lipid rafts (LRs) in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes of patients with ITP. Our results showed that there was an increased lipid raft aggregation in ITP patients, while this kind of increase would not be influenced by platelet counts or therapeutic regimes. Stimulation by anti-CD3/CD28 monoclonal antibodies promoted enhanced lipid raft clustering in T lymphocytes of ITP patients compared with negative controls. Methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) could block the abnormal lipid raft aggregation and disrupt the TCR-mediated T cells proliferation and cytokines secretion, including both proinflammatory cytokines and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The spontaneous activation of T lymphocytes from ITP patients might be due to the elevated co-localization of protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) CD45 and lipid rafts in patients' CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes. These findings suggest that the autoactivation of T lymphocytes from ITP patients may lead to the abnormality in lipid raft structure and raft-anchored proteins, and the changes conversely promote the TCR-mediated T cells activation of ITP patients.

  3. Neuronal membranes are key to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease: the role of both raft and non-raft membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Williamson, R; Sutherland, C

    2011-03-01

    Membrane rafts are sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched domains that compartmentalize cellular processes. Membrane rafts isolated from post-mortem AD brain are enriched in both β-amyloid and phosphorylated tau. Proteolytic processing of APP to generate β-amyloid, the principle component of amyloid plaques, can occur in membrane rafts, implicating them in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Secondary to their role in β-amyloid generation, membrane rafts have more recently been implicated in the accumulation, aggregation and degradation of β-amyloid, with evidence supporting a specific role for membrane raft gangliosides in the binding and aggregation of β-amyloid. In addition, membrane domain composition has a direct impact on both the generation of β-amyloid and its subsequent toxic actions and as such is a key target for the development of therapeutic strategies. This mini-review will focus on recent advances in our understanding of the relevance of membrane composition, of both raft and non-raft domains, to AD progression in models and in human disease. We will discuss how manipulation of membrane composition can alter both the proteolytic processing of APP and the subsequent binding and aggregation of β-amyloid peptide. PMID:21222605

  4. Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Raft-Like Detergent-Resistant Membranes of Lens Fiber Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Plasma membranes of lens fiber cells have high levels of long-chain saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and sphingolipids—key components of lipid rafts. Thus, lipid rafts are expected to constitute a significant portion of fiber cell membranes and play important roles in lens biology. The purpose of this study was to characterize the lens lipid raft proteome. Methods Quantitative proteomics, both label-free and iTRAQ methods, were used to characterize lens fiber cell lipid raft proteins. Detergent-resistant, lipid raft membrane (DRM) fractions were isolated by sucrose gradient centrifugation. To confirm protein localization to lipid rafts, protein sensitivity to cholesterol removal by methyl-β-cyclodextrin was quantified by iTRAQ analysis. Results A total of 506 proteins were identified in raft-like detergent-resistant membranes. Proteins identified support important functions of raft domains in fiber cells, including trafficking, signal transduction, and cytoskeletal organization. In cholesterol-sensitivity studies, 200 proteins were quantified and 71 proteins were strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Lipid raft markers flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 and a significant fraction of AQP0, MP20, and AQP5 were found in the DRM fraction and were highly sensitive to cholesterol removal. Connexins 46 and 50 were more abundant in nonraft fractions, but a small fraction of each was found in the DRM fraction and was strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Quantification of modified AQP0 confirmed that fatty acylation targeted this protein to membrane raft domains. Conclusions These data represent the first comprehensive profile of the lipid raft proteome of lens fiber cells and provide information on membrane protein organization in these cells. PMID:26747763

  5. Well-Defined Polymer-Paclitaxel Prodrugs by a Grafting-from-Drug Approach.

    PubMed

    Louage, Benoit; Nuhn, Lutz; Risseeuw, Martijn D P; Vanparijs, Nane; De Coen, Ruben; Karalic, Izet; Van Calenbergh, Serge; De Geest, Bruno G

    2016-09-19

    We report on the design of a polymeric prodrug of the anticancer agent paclitaxel (PTX) by a grafting-from-drug approach. A chain transfer agent for reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization was efficiently and regioselectively linked to the C2' position of paclitaxel, which is crucial for its bioactivity. Subsequent RAFT polymerization of a hydrophilic monomer yielded well-defined paclitaxel-polymer conjugates with high drug loading, water solubility, and stability. The versatility of this approach was further demonstrated by ω-end post-functionalization with a fluorescent tracer. In vitro experiments showed that these conjugates are readily taken up into endosomes where native PTX is efficiently cleaved off and then reaches its subcellular target. This was confirmed by the cytotoxicity profile of the conjugate, which matches those of commercial PTX formulations based on mere physical encapsulation. PMID:27560940

  6. Dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to fusion competence of myogenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mukai, Atsushi; Kurisaki, Tomohiro; Sato, Satoshi B.; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Kondoh, Gen; Hashimoto, Naohiro

    2009-10-15

    Recent research indicates that the leading edge of lamellipodia of myogenic cells (myoblasts and myotubes) contains presumptive fusion sites, yet the mechanisms that render the plasma membrane fusion-competent remain largely unknown. Here we show that dynamic clustering and dispersion of lipid rafts contribute to both cell adhesion and plasma membrane union during myogenic cell fusion. Adhesion-complex proteins including M-cadherin, {beta}-catenin, and p120-catenin accumulated at the leading edge of lamellipodia, which contains the presumptive fusion sites of the plasma membrane, in a lipid raft-dependent fashion prior to cell contact. In addition, disruption of lipid rafts by cholesterol depletion directly prevented the membrane union of myogenic cell fusion. Time-lapse recording showed that lipid rafts were laterally dispersed from the center of the lamellipodia prior to membrane fusion. Adhesion proteins that had accumulated at lipid rafts were also removed from the presumptive fusion sites when lipid rafts were laterally dispersed. The resultant lipid raft- and adhesion complex-free area at the leading edge fused with the opposing plasma membrane. These results demonstrate a key role for dynamic clustering/dispersion of lipid rafts in establishing fusion-competent sites of the myogenic cell membrane, providing a novel mechanistic insight into the regulation of myogenic cell fusion.

  7. Characterizing Crystalline-Vitreous Structures: From Atomically Resolved Silica to Macroscopic Bubble Rafts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burson, Kristen M.; Schlexer, Philomena; Bu¨chner, Christin; Lichtenstein, Leonid; Heyde, Markus; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    A two-part experiment using bubble rafts to analyze amorphous structures is presented. In the first part, the distinctions between crystalline and vitreous structures are examined. In the second part, the interface between crystalline and amorphous regions is considered. Bubble rafts are easy to produce and provide excellent analogy to recent…

  8. An Analysis of Whitewater Rafting Safety Data: Risk Management for Programme Organizers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, I. Roy

    2007-01-01

    Many outdoor organizations integrate whitewater rafting into their programmes. Often this is accomplished by contracting with a whitewater outfitter. This paper analyses rafting accident data collected by the American Canoe Association in an effort to suggest ways in which programmes can better manage risk while contracting with outfitters for…

  9. Rafting seahorses: the presence of juvenile Hippocampus patagonicus in floating debris.

    PubMed

    Luzzatto, D C; Estalles, M L; Díaz de Astarloa, J M

    2013-09-01

    A total of 477 juvenile Hippocampus patagonicus recorded in 80 sampling events were detected rafting on the surface during high tide at San Antonio Bay, northern Patagonia, Argentina. If rafting juveniles drift long distances beyond their original populations, they have the potential to form new populations, which may explain the wide distribution of H. patagonicus.

  10. Lipid raft-dependent uptake, signaling, and intracellular fate of Porphyromonas gingivalis in mouse macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Min; Hajishengallis, George

    2009-01-01

    Summary Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains involved in cellular trafficking and implicated as portals for certain pathogens. We sought to determine whether the oral pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis enters macrophages via lipid rafts, and if so, to examine the impact of raft entry on its intracellular fate. Using J774A.1 mouse macrophages, we found that P. gingivalis colocalizes with lipid rafts in a cholesterol-dependent way. Depletion of cellular cholesterol using methyl-β-cyclodextrin resulted in about 50% inhibition of P. gingivalis uptake, although this effect was reversed by cholesterol reconstitution. The intracellular survival of P. gingivalis was dramatically inhibited in cholesterol-depleted cells relative to untreated or cholesterol-reconstituted cells, even when infections were adjusted to allow equilibration of the initial intracellular bacterial load. P. gingivalis thus appeared to exploit raft-mediated uptake for promoting its survival. Consistent with this, lipid raft disruption enhanced the colocalization of internalized P. gingivalis with lysosomes. In contrast, raft disruption did not affect the expression of host receptors interacting with P. gingivalis, although it significantly inhibited signal transduction. In summary, P. gingivalis uses macrophage lipid rafts as signaling and entry platforms, which determine its intracellular fate to the pathogen’s own advantage. PMID:18547335

  11. Segregation of leading-edge and uropod components into specific lipid rafts during T cell polarization

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Moutón, Concepción; Abad, Jose Luis; Mira, Emilia; Lacalle, Rosa Ana; Gallardo, Eduard; Jiménez-Baranda, Sonia; Illa, Isabel; Bernad, Antonio; Mañes, Santos; Martínez-A., Carlos

    2001-01-01

    Redistribution of specialized molecules in migrating cells develops asymmetry between two opposite cell poles, the leading edge and the uropod. We show that acquisition of a motile phenotype in T lymphocytes results in the asymmetric redistribution of ganglioside GM3- and GM1-enriched raft domains to the leading edge and to the uropod, respectively. This segregation to each cell pole parallels the specific redistribution of membrane proteins associated to each raft subfraction. Our data suggest that raft partitioning is a major determinant for protein redistribution in polarized T cells, as ectopic expression of raft-associated proteins results in their asymmetric redistribution, whereas non-raft-partitioned mutants of these proteins are distributed homogeneously in the polarized cell membrane. Both acquisition of a migratory phenotype and SDF-1α-induced chemotaxis are cholesterol depletion-sensitive. Finally, GM3 and GM1 raft redistribution requires an intact actin cytoskeleton, but is insensitive to microtubule disruption. We propose that membrane protein segregation not only between raft and nonraft domains but also between distinct raft subdomains may be an organizational principle that mediates redistribution of specialized molecules needed for T cell migration. PMID:11493690

  12. RAFTing with Raptors: Connecting Science, English Language Arts, and the Common Core State Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Senn, Gary J.; McMurtrie, Deborah H.; Coleman, Bridget K.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores using the RAFT strategy (Role, Audience, Format, Topic) for writing in science classes. The framework of the RAFT strategy will be explained, and connections with Common Core State Standards (CCSS) for ELA/Literacy will be discussed. Finally, there will be a discussion of a professional learning experience for teachers in…

  13. Interactive protein network of FXIII-A1 in lipid rafts of activated and non-activated platelets.

    PubMed

    Rabani, Vahideh; Montange, Damien; Davani, Siamak

    2016-09-01

    Lipid-rafts are defined as membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids within platelet plasma membrane. Lipid raft-mediated clot retraction requires factor XIII and other interacting proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the proteins that interact with factor XIII in raft and non-raft domains of activated and non-activated platelet plasma membrane. By lipidomics analysis, we identified cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched areas as lipid rafts. Platelets were activated by thrombin. Proteomics analysis provided an overview of the pathways in which proteins of rafts and non-rafts participated in the interaction network of FXIII-A1, a catalytic subunit of FXIII. "Platelet activation" was the principal pathway among KEGG pathways for proteins of rafts, both before and after activation. Network analysis showed four types of interactions (activation, binding, reaction, and catalysis) in raft and non-raft domains in interactive network of FXIII-A1. FXIII-A1 interactions with other proteins in raft domains and their role in homeostasis highlight the specialization of the raft domain in clot retraction via the Factor XIII protein network.

  14. Multiple Sources for Sea-Rafted Loisels Pumice, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shane, Phil; Froggatt, Paul; Smith, Ian; Gregory, Murray

    1998-05-01

    Sea-rafted Loisels Pumice is one of the few stratigraphic markers used to correlate late Holocene coastal deposits in New Zealand. Along with underlying sea-rafted products of the local Taupo eruption of ca. 1800 yr B.P., these events have been used to bracket the first arrival of humans at New Zealand. Loisels Pumice is dacitic to rhyolitic (SiO 263-78 wt%) in composition, but individual clasts are homogeneous (SiO 2range ± 1 wt%). Characteristics include very low K 2O (0.5-1.75 wt%) and Rb (<25 ppm) and a mineralogy dominated by calcic and mafic xenocrysts. Similar features are shared by pumices of the Tonga-Kermadec arc, suggesting a common tholeiitic oceanic source. Interclast diversity of Loisels Pumice suggests that it is the product of several eruptive events from different volcanoes. The differences in glass and mineral compositions found at various sites can be explained if the deposits are from different events. A multisource origin can also partially explain the discrepancy in reported 14C ages (ca. 1500-600 yr B.P.) from different localities. Therefore, the value of Loisels Pumice as a stratigraphic marker is questionable, and it does not constrain the arrival of humans. The predominant westward drift of historic Tonga-Kermadec arc pumices and prevailing ocean currents suggest a long anticlockwise semicircular transport route into the Tasman Sea before sea-rafted pumice arrival in New Zealand. The diversity of the pumices indicates that silicic eruptions frequently occur from the predominantly basic oceanic volcanoes.

  15. Oxysterols: Influence on plasma membrane rafts microdomains and development of ocular diseases.

    PubMed

    Filomenko, Rodolphe; Fourgeux, Cynthia; Bretillon, Lionel; Gambert-Nicot, Ségolène

    2015-07-01

    Oxidation of cholesterol into oxysterols is a major way of elimination of cholesterol from the liver and extrahepatic tissues, including the brain and the retina. Oxysterols are involved in various cellular processes. Numerous links have been established between oxysterols and several disorders such as neurodegenerative pathologies, retinopathies and atherosclerosis. Different components of the lipid layer such as sphingolipids, sterols and proteins participate to membrane fluidity and forme lipid rafts microdomains. Few data are available on the links between lipids rafts and oxysterols. The purpose of this review is to suggest the potential role of lipid rafts microdomains in the development of retinopathies with special emphasis and opening perspectives of their interactions with oxysterols. Actually cholesterol oxidation mechanism may have deleterious effect on its ability to support rafts formation .This review suggest that the effect of oxysterols of lipid rafts would probably depend on the oxysterol molecule and cell type.

  16. Bubble-raft model for a paraboloidal crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowick, Mark J.; Giomi, Luca; Shin, Homin; Thomas, Creighton K.

    2008-02-01

    We investigate crystalline order on a two-dimensional paraboloid of revolution by assembling a single layer of millimeter-sized soap bubbles on the surface of a rotating liquid, thus extending the classic work of Bragg and Nye on planar soap bubble rafts. Topological constraints require crystalline configurations to contain a certain minimum number of topological defects such as disclinations or grain boundary scars whose structure is analyzed as a function of the aspect ratio of the paraboloid. We find the defect structure to agree with theoretical predictions and propose a mechanism for scar nucleation in the presence of large Gaussian curvature.

  17. Bubble-raft model for a paraboloidal crystal.

    PubMed

    Bowick, Mark J; Giomi, Luca; Shin, Homin; Thomas, Creighton K

    2008-02-01

    We investigate crystalline order on a two-dimensional paraboloid of revolution by assembling a single layer of millimeter-sized soap bubbles on the surface of a rotating liquid, thus extending the classic work of Bragg and Nye on planar soap bubble rafts. Topological constraints require crystalline configurations to contain a certain minimum number of topological defects such as disclinations or grain boundary scars whose structure is analyzed as a function of the aspect ratio of the paraboloid. We find the defect structure to agree with theoretical predictions and propose a mechanism for scar nucleation in the presence of large Gaussian curvature. PMID:18352034

  18. A mechanism of raft formation on both plasma membrane layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sornbundit, Kan; Modchang, Charin; Triampo, Wannapong; Triampo, Darapond; Nuttavut, Narin

    2013-10-01

    A double-layered membrane model is proposed to explain raft formation and induction on extracellular (outer) and cytoplasmic (inner) leaflets of plasma membranes in a situation where only the outer layer has a tendency to phase-separate. In the model, lipid exchange with the surrounding medium is allowed on both layers, but lipid exchange between layers is not allowed. Simulations display domain stabilization on both layers. The effect of the lipid recycling frequencies on stationary domain sizes is also investigated. It is found that stationary domain sizes decrease when lipid recycling frequencies are stronger. Linear stability analysis is used to verify the results.

  19. Bending modulus of bidisperse particle rafts: Local and collective contributions.

    PubMed

    Petit, Pauline; Biance, Anne-Laure; Lorenceau, Elise; Planchette, Carole

    2016-04-01

    The bending modulus of air-water interfaces covered by a monolayer of bidisperse particles is probed experimentally under quasistatic conditions via the compression of the monolayer, and under dynamical conditions studying capillary-wave propagation. Simple averaging of the modulus obtained solely with small or large particles fails to describe our data. Indeed, as observed in other configurations for monodisperse systems, bidisperse rafts have both a granular and an elastic character: chain forces and collective effects must be taken into account to fully understand our results.

  20. Dependency of Lipid Raft Diffusion on System Size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Ryan

    2009-11-01

    An inherit limitation in molecular dynamics is a finite system size. Although periodic boundary conditions can be used to mimic an infinite space, minimizing the artificial effects created by the physical dimensions of the system still remains an issue. Here I will discuss the undesirable relationship between system properties and system size observed via a dissipative particle dynamics approach. In particular, results illustrate a strong dependence between the diffusion of a lipid raft along a membrane and the length of the axis perpendicular to it, even at relatively large system sizes. Methods for obtaining system properties independently of simulation size are crucial for accurate results.

  1. Finger rafting: a generic instability of floating elastic sheets.

    PubMed

    Vella, Dominic; Wettlaufer, J S

    2007-02-23

    Colliding ice floes are often observed to form a series of interlocking fingers. We show that this striking phenomenon is not a result of some peculiar property of ice but rather a general and robust mechanical phenomenon reproducible in the laboratory with other floating materials. We determine the theoretical relationship between the width of the resulting fingers and the material's mechanical properties and present experimental results along with field observations to support the theory. The generality of this "finger rafting" suggests that analogous processes may be responsible for creating the large-scale structures observed at the boundaries between Earth's convergent tectonic plates. PMID:17359135

  2. Lipid Raft Association Restricts CD44-Ezrin Interaction and Promotion of Breast Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Donatello, Simona; Babina, Irina S.; Hazelwood, Lee D.; Hill, Arnold D.K.; Nabi, Ivan R.; Hopkins, Ann M.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration. PMID:23031255

  3. In Situ Visualization of Lipid Raft Domains by Fluorescent Glycol Chitosan Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yao-Wen; Guo, Hao-Yue; Chen, Zhan; Yu, Zhi-Wu; Wang, Zhifei; Wu, Fu-Gen

    2016-07-01

    Lipid rafts are highly ordered small microdomains mainly composed of glycosphingolipids, cholesterol, and protein receptors. Optically distinguishing lipid raft domains in cell membranes would greatly facilitate the investigations on the structure and dynamics of raft-related cellular behaviors, such as signal transduction, membrane transport (endocytosis), adhesion, and motility. However, current strategies about the visualization of lipid raft domains usually suffer from the low biocompatibility of the probes, invasive detection, or ex situ observation. At the same time, naturally derived biomacromolecules have been extensively used in biomedical field and their interaction with cells remains a long-standing topic since it is closely related to various fundamental studies and potential applications. Herein, noninvasive visualization of lipid raft domains in model lipid bilayers (supported lipid bilayers and giant unilamellar vesicles) and live cells was successfully realized in situ using fluorescent biomacromolecules: the fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled glycol chitosan molecules. We found that the lipid raft domains in model or real membranes could be specifically stained by the FITC-labeled glycol chitosan molecules, which could be attributed to the electrostatic attractive interaction and/or hydrophobic interaction between the probes and the lipid raft domains. Since the FITC-labeled glycol chitosan molecules do not need to completely insert into the lipid bilayer and will not disturb the organization of lipids, they can more accurately visualize the raft domains as compared with other fluorescent dyes that need to be premixed with the various lipid molecules prior to the fabrication of model membranes. Furthermore, the FITC-labeled glycol chitosan molecules were found to be able to resist cellular internalization and could successfully visualize rafts in live cells. The present work provides a new way to achieve the imaging of lipid rafts and also

  4. Fabrication of Functional Nano-objects through RAFT Dispersion Polymerization and Influences of Morphology on Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Liang; Xu, Chao-Ran; Zhong, Feng; Hong, Chun-Yan; Pan, Cai-Yuan

    2016-07-20

    To study the influence of self-assembled morphologies on drug delivery, four different nano-objects, spheres, nanorods, nanowires, and vesicles having aldehdye-based polymer as core, were successfully prepared via alcoholic RAFT dispersion polymerization of p-(methacryloxyethoxy)benzaldehyde (MAEBA) using poly((N,N'-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) as a macro chain transfer agent (macro-CTA) for the first time. The morphologies and sizes of the four nano-objects were characterized by TEM and DLS, and the spheres with average diameter (D) of 70 nm, the nanorods with D of 19 nm and length of 140 nm, and the vesicles with D of 137 nm were used in the subsequent cellular internalization, in vitro release, and intracellular release of the drug. The anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) was conjugated onto the core polymers of nano-objects through condensation reaction between aldehyde groups of the PMAEBA with primary amine groups in the DOX. Because the aromatic imine is stable under neutral conditions, but is decomposed in a weakly acidic solution, in vitro release of the DOX from the DOX-loaded nano-objects was investigated in the different acidic solutions. All of the block copolymer nano-objects show very low cytotoxicity to HeLa cells up to the concentration of 1.2 mg/mL, but the DOX-loaded nano-objects reveal different cell viability and their IC50s increase as the following order: nanorods-DOX < vesicles-DOX < spheres-DOX. The IC50 of nanowires-DOX is the biggest among the four nano-objects owing to their too large size to be internalized. Endocytosis tests demonstrate that the internalization of vesicles-DOX by the HeLa cells is faster than that of the nanorods-DOX, and the spheres-DOX are the slowest to internalize among the studied nano-objects. Relatively more nanorods localized in the acidic organelles of the HeLa cells lead to faster intracellular release of the DOX, so the IC50 of nanorods is lower than that of the vesicles-DOX.

  5. Elasticity of interfacial rafts of hard particles with soft shells.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-05-19

    We study an elasticity model for compressed protein monolayers or particle rafts at a liquid interface. Based on the microscopic view of hard-core particles with soft shells, a bead-spring model is formulated and analyzed in terms of continuum elasticity theory. The theory can be applied, for example, to hydrophobin-coated air-water interfaces or, more generally, to liquid interfaces coated with an adsorbed monolayer of interacting hard-core particles. We derive constitutive relations for such particle rafts and describe the buckling of compressed planar liquid interfaces as well as their apparent Poisson ratio. We also use the constitutive relations to obtain shape equations for pendant or buoyant capsules attached to a capillary, and to compute deflated shapes of such capsules. A comparison with capsules obeying the usual Hookean elasticity (without hard cores) reveals that the hard cores trigger capsule wrinkling. Furthermore, it is shown that a shape analysis of deflated capsules with hard-core/soft-shell elasticity gives apparent elastic moduli which can be much higher than the original values if Hookean elasticity is assumed.

  6. The thermodynamic driving force for rafting in superalloys

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N.; Cress, C.M. |; Kotschy

    1996-08-01

    Eshelby`s energy-momentum tensor is used to provide an analytical expression for the driving force for rafting in the elastic regime in a superalloy with a high volume fraction of {gamma}{prime}. The structure is modelled as a simple cubic array of {gamma}{prime} cubes separated by thin sheets of {gamma}. During rafting, the {gamma}{prime} particles are constrained to remain tetragonal prisms. For tension along a cube axis, the driving force is proportional to the product of the tension {sigma}, the fractional difference {delta} of lattice parameters of {gamma}{prime} and {gamma} and the fractional difference m of their elastic constants c{sub 11} {minus} c{sub 12}. As in the calculation of Pineau for an isolated spheroid, needles are formed when this product {sigma}{delta}m is positive. Two- and three-dimensional systems behave similarly. The initial plastic strain in {gamma} is anelastic and in principle reversible. When the plastic strain exceeds m{delta}, platelets perpendicular to the stress axis are formed if the product {sigma}{delta} is negative.

  7. Elasticity of interfacial rafts of hard particles with soft shells.

    PubMed

    Knoche, Sebastian; Kierfeld, Jan

    2015-05-19

    We study an elasticity model for compressed protein monolayers or particle rafts at a liquid interface. Based on the microscopic view of hard-core particles with soft shells, a bead-spring model is formulated and analyzed in terms of continuum elasticity theory. The theory can be applied, for example, to hydrophobin-coated air-water interfaces or, more generally, to liquid interfaces coated with an adsorbed monolayer of interacting hard-core particles. We derive constitutive relations for such particle rafts and describe the buckling of compressed planar liquid interfaces as well as their apparent Poisson ratio. We also use the constitutive relations to obtain shape equations for pendant or buoyant capsules attached to a capillary, and to compute deflated shapes of such capsules. A comparison with capsules obeying the usual Hookean elasticity (without hard cores) reveals that the hard cores trigger capsule wrinkling. Furthermore, it is shown that a shape analysis of deflated capsules with hard-core/soft-shell elasticity gives apparent elastic moduli which can be much higher than the original values if Hookean elasticity is assumed. PMID:25901364

  8. The molecular face of lipid rafts in model membranes

    PubMed Central

    Risselada, H. Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2008-01-01

    Cell membranes contain a large number of different lipid species. Such a multicomponent mixture exhibits a complex phase behavior with regions of structural and compositional heterogeneity. Especially domains formed in ternary mixtures, composed of saturated and unsaturated lipids together with cholesterol, have received a lot of attention as they may resemble raft formation in real cells. Here we apply a simulation model to assess the molecular nature of these domains at the nanoscale, information that has thus far eluded experimental determination. We are able to show the spontaneous separation of a saturated phosphatidylcholine (PC)/unsaturated PC/cholesterol mixture into a liquid-ordered and a liquid-disordered phase with structural and dynamic properties closely matching experimental data. The near-atomic resolution of the simulations reveals remarkable features of both domains and the boundary domain interface. Furthermore, we predict the existence of a small surface tension between the monolayer leaflets that drives registration of the domains. At the level of molecular detail, raft-like lipid mixtures show a surprising face with possible implications for many cell membrane processes. PMID:18987307

  9. The molecular face of lipid rafts in model membranes.

    PubMed

    Risselada, H Jelger; Marrink, Siewert J

    2008-11-11

    Cell membranes contain a large number of different lipid species. Such a multicomponent mixture exhibits a complex phase behavior with regions of structural and compositional heterogeneity. Especially domains formed in ternary mixtures, composed of saturated and unsaturated lipids together with cholesterol, have received a lot of attention as they may resemble raft formation in real cells. Here we apply a simulation model to assess the molecular nature of these domains at the nanoscale, information that has thus far eluded experimental determination. We are able to show the spontaneous separation of a saturated phosphatidylcholine (PC)/unsaturated PC/cholesterol mixture into a liquid-ordered and a liquid-disordered phase with structural and dynamic properties closely matching experimental data. The near-atomic resolution of the simulations reveals remarkable features of both domains and the boundary domain interface. Furthermore, we predict the existence of a small surface tension between the monolayer leaflets that drives registration of the domains. At the level of molecular detail, raft-like lipid mixtures show a surprising face with possible implications for many cell membrane processes. PMID:18987307

  10. 100-N Area Strontium-90 Treatability Demonstration Project: Food Chain Transfer Studies for Phytoremediation Along the 100-N Columbia River Riparian Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Fellows, Robert J.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Driver, Crystal J.

    2009-04-01

    Strontium-90 (90Sr) exceeds the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s drinking water standards for groundwater (8 picocuries/L) by as much as a factor of 1000 at several locations within the Hanford 100-N Area and along the 100-N Area Columbia River shoreline). Phytoextraction, a managed remediation technology in which plants or integrated plant/rhizosphere systems are employed to phytoextract and/or sequester 90Sr, is being considered as a potential remediation system along the riparian zone of the Columbia River as part of a treatment train that includes an apatite barrier to immobilize groundwater transport of 90Sr. Phytoextraction would employ coyote willow (Salix exigua) to extract 90Sr from the vadose zone soil and aquifer sediments (phytoextraction) and filter 90Sr (rhizofiltration) from the shallow groundwater along the riparian zone of the Columbia River. The stem and foliage of coyote willows accumulating 90Sr may present not only a mechanism to remove the contaminant but also can be viewed as a source of nutrition for natural herbivores, therefore becoming a potential pathway for the isotope to enter the riparian food chain. Engineered barriers such as large and small animal fencing constructed around the field plot will control the intrusion of deer, rodents, birds, and humans. These efforts, however, will have limited effect on mobile phytophagous insects. Therefore, this study was undertaken to determine the potential for food chain transfer by insects prior to placement of the remediation technology at 100-N. Insect types include direct consumers of the sap or liquid content of the plants vascular system (xylem and phloem) by aphids as well as those that would directly consume the plant foliage such as the larvae (caterpillars) of Lepidoptera species. Heavy infestations of aphids feeding on the stems and leaves of willows growing in 90Sr-contaminated soil can accumulate a small amount (~0.15 ± 0.06%) of the total label removed from the soil by

  11. Ginsenoside Rh2 induces ligand-independent Fas activation via lipid raft disruption

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Jae-Sung; Choo, Hyo-Jung; Cho, Bong-Rae; Kim, Hwan-Myung; Kim, Yong-Nyun; Ham, Young-Mi; Ko, Young-Gyu

    2009-07-24

    Lipid rafts are plasma membrane platforms mediating signal transduction pathways for cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Here, we show that membrane fluidity was increased in HeLa cells following treatment with ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2), as determined by cell staining with carboxy-laurdan (C-laurdan), a two-photon dye designed for measuring membrane hydrophobicity. In the presence of Rh2, caveolin-1 appeared in non-raft fractions after sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. In addition, caveolin-1 and GM1, lipid raft landmarkers, were internalized within cells after exposure to Rh2, indicating that Rh2 might disrupt lipid rafts. Since cholesterol overloading, which fortifies lipid rafts, prevented an increase in Rh2-induced membrane fluidity, caveolin-1 internalization and apoptosis, lipid rafts appear to be essential for Rh2-induced apoptosis. Moreover, Rh2-induced Fas oligomerization was abolished following cholesterol overloading, and Rh2-induced apoptosis was inhibited following treatment with siRNA for Fas. This result suggests that Rh2 is a novel lipid raft disruptor leading to Fas oligomerization and apoptosis.

  12. RAFT: A simulator for ReActive Flow and Transport of groundwater contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    Chilakapati, A

    1995-07-01

    This report documents the use of the simulator RAFT for the ReActive flow and Transport of groundwater contaminants. RAFT can be used as a predictive tool in the design and analysis of laboratory and field experiments or it can be used for the estimation of model/process parameters from experiments. RAFT simulates the reactive transport of groundwater contaminants in one, two-, or three-dimensions and it can model user specified source/link configurations and arbitrary injection strategies. A suite of solvers for transport, reactions and regression are employed so that a combination of numerical methods best suited for a problem can be chosen. User specified coupled equilibrium and kinetic reaction systems can be incorporated into RAFT. RAFT is integrated with a symbolic computational language MAPLE, to automate code generation for arbitrary reaction systems. RAFT is expected to be used as a simulator for engineering design for field experiments in groundwater remediation including bioremediation, reactive barriers and redox manipulation. As an integrated tool with both the predictive ability and the ability to analyze experimental data, RAFT can help in the development of remediation technologies, from laboratory to field.

  13. Lipid rafts, caveolae, caveolin-1, and entry by Chlamydiae into host cells.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Elizabeth S; Webley, Wilmore C; Norkin, Leonard C

    2003-07-01

    Obligate intracellular bacterial pathogens of the genus Chlamydia are reported to enter host cells by both clathrin-dependent and clathrin-independent processes. C. trachomatis serovar K recently was shown to enter cells via caveolae-like lipid raft domains. We asked here how widespread raft-mediated entry might be among the Chlamydia. We show that C. pneumoniae, an important cause of respiratory infections in humans that additionally is associated with cardiovascular disease, and C. psittaci, an important pathogen in domestic mammals and birds that also infects humans, each enter host cells via cholesterol-rich lipid raft microdomains. Further, we show that C. trachomatis serovars E and F also use these domains to enter host cells. The involvement of these membrane domains in the entry of these organisms was indicated by the sensitivity of their entry to the raft-disrupting agents Nystatin and filipin, and by their intracellular association with caveolin-1, a 22-kDa protein associated with the formation of caveolae in rafts. In contrast, caveolin-marked lipid raft domains do not mediate entry of C. trachomatis serovars A, 36B, and C, nor of LGV serovar L2 and MoPn. Finally, we show that entry of each of these chlamydial strains is independent of cellular expression of caveolin-1. Thus, entry via the Nystatin and filipin-sensitive pathway is dependent on lipid rafts containing cholesterol, rather than invaginated caveolae per se.

  14. Monte Carlo study of receptor-lipid raft formation on a cell membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-Yang, Paul; Srinivas Reddy, A.; Raychaudhuri, Subhadip

    2012-02-01

    Receptors are cell surface molecules that bind with extracellular ligand molecules leading to propagation of downstream signals and cellular activation. Even though ligand binding-induced formation of receptor-lipid rafts has been implicated in such a process, the formation mechanism of such large stable rafts is not understood. We present findings from our Monte Carlo (MC) simulations involving (i) receptor interaction with the membrane lipids and (ii) lipid-lipid interactions between raft forming lipids. We have developed a hybrid MC simulation method that combines a probabilistic MC simulation with an explicit free energy-based MC scheme. Some of the lipid-mediated interactions, such as the cholesterol-lipid interactions, are simulated in an implicit way. We examine the effect of varying attractive interactions between raft forming lipids and ligand-bound receptors and show that strong coupling between receptor-receptor and receptor-sphingolipid molecules generate raft formation similar to that observed in recent biological experiments. We study the effect of variation of receptor affinity for ligands (as happens in adaptive immune cells) on raft formation. Such affinity dependence in receptor-lipid raft formation provides insight into important problems in B cell biology.

  15. Isolation and analysis of membrane lipids and lipid rafts in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.).

    PubMed

    Brogden, Graham; Propsting, Marcus; Adamek, Mikolaj; Naim, Hassan Y; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2014-03-01

    Cell membranes act as an interface between the interior of the cell and the exterior environment and facilitate a range of essential functions including cell signalling, cell structure, nutrient uptake and protection. It is composed of a lipid bilayer with integrated proteins, and the inner leaflet of the lipid bilayer comprises of liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains. Lo microdomains, also named as lipid rafts are enriched in cholesterol, sphingomyelin and certain types of proteins, which facilitate cell signalling and nutrient uptake. Lipid rafts have been extensively researched in mammals and the presence of functional lipid rafts was recently demonstrated in goldfish, but there is currently very little knowledge about their composition and function in fish. Therefore a protocol was established for the analysis of lipid rafts and membranous lipids in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) tissues. Twelve lipids were identified and analysed in the Ld domain of the membrane with the most predominant lipids found in all tissues being; triglycerides, cholesterol, phosphoethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Four lipids were identified in lipid rafts in all tissues analysed, triglycerides (33-62%) always found in the highest concentration followed by cholesterol (24-32%), phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin. Isolation of lipid rafts was confirmed by identifying the presence of the lipid raft associated protein flotillin, present at higher concentrations in the detergent resistant fraction. The data provided here build a lipid library of important carp tissues as a baseline for further studies into virus entry, protein trafficking or environmental stress analysis.

  16. Role of lipid rafts in neuronal differentiation of dental pulp-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Vincenzo; Santacroce, Costantino; Tasciotti, Vincenzo; Martellucci, Stefano; Santilli, Francesca; Manganelli, Valeria; Piccoli, Luca; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Garofalo, Tina

    2015-12-10

    Human dental pulp-derived stem cells (hDPSCs) are characterized by a typical fibroblast-like morphology. They express specific markers for mesenchymal stem cells and are capable of differentiation into osteoblasts, adipoblasts and neurons in vitro. Previous studies showed that gangliosides are involved in the induction of early neuronal differentiation of hDPSCs. This study was undertaken to investigate the role of lipid rafts in this process. Lipid rafts are signaling microdomains enriched in glycosphingolipids, cholesterol, tyrosine kinase receptors, mono- or heterotrimeric G proteins and GPI-anchored proteins. We preliminary showed that established cells expressed multipotent mesenchymal stromal-specific surface antigens. Then, we analyzed the distribution of lipid rafts, revealing plasma membrane microdomains with GM2 and EGF-R enrichment. Following stimulation with EGF/bFGF, neuronal differentiation was observed. To analyze the functional role of lipid rafts in EGF/bFGF-induced hDPSCs differentiation, cells were preincubated with lipid raft affecting agents, i.e. [D]-PDMP or methyl-β-cyclodextrin. These compounds significantly prevented neuronal-specific antigen expression, as well as Akt and ERK 1/2 phosphorylation, induced by EGF/bFGF, indicating that lipid raft integrity is essential for EGF/bFGF-induced hDPSCs differentiation. These results suggest that lipid rafts may represent specific chambers, where multimolecular signaling complexes, including lipids (gangliosides, cholesterol) and proteins (EGF-R), play a role in hDPSCs differentiation.

  17. Influence of coarsened and rafted microstructures on the thermomechanical fatigue of a Ni-base superalloy

    DOE PAGES

    Kirka, M. M.; Brindley, K. A.; Neu, R. W.; Antolovich, S. D.; Shinde, S. R.; Gravett, P. W.

    2015-08-17

    The aging of the microstructure of Ni-base superalloys during service is mainly characterized by coarsening and rafting of the γ' precipitates. The influence of these different aged microstructures on thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) under either continuously cycled (CC) and creep-fatigue (CF) was investigated. Three different aged microstructures, generated through accelerated aging and pre-creep treatments, were studied: stress-free coarsened γ', rafted with orientation perpendicular to loading direction (N-raft), and rafted with orientation parallel to loading direction (P-raft). Under most conditions, the aged microstructures were less resistant to TMF than the virgin microstructure; however, there were exceptions. Both stress-free coarsened and N-raft microstructuresmore » resulted in a reduction in TMF life under both CC and CF conditions in comparison to the virgin material. P-raft microstructure also resulted in reduction in TMF life under CC conditions; however, an increase in life over that of the virgin material was observed under CF conditions. Finally, these differences are discussed and hypothesized to be related to the interactions of the dislocations in the γ channels with γ' precipitates.« less

  18. CD40 signaling in human dendritic cells is initiated within membrane rafts

    PubMed Central

    Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Azocar, Olga; Servet-Delprat, Christine; Rabourdin-Combe, Chantal; Gerlier, Denis; Manié, Serge

    2000-01-01

    Despite CD40’s role in stimulating dendritic cells (DCs) for efficient specific T-cell stimulation, its signal transduction components in DCs are still poorly documented. We show that CD40 receptors on human monocyte-derived DCs associate with sphingolipid- and cholesterol-rich plasma membrane microdomains, termed membrane rafts. Following engagement, CD40 utilizes membrane raft-associated Lyn Src family kinase, and possibly other raft-associated Src family kinases, to initiate tyrosine phosphorylation of intracellular substrates. CD40 engagement also leads to a membrane raft-restricted recruitment of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor (TRAF) 3 and, to a lesser extent, TRAF2, to CD40’s cytoplasmic tail. Thus, the membrane raft structure plays an integral role in proximal events of CD40 signaling in DCs. We demonstrate that stimulation of Src family kinase within membrane rafts initiates a pathway implicating ERK activation, which leads to interleukin (IL)-1α/β and IL-1Ra mRNA production and contributes to p38-dependent IL-12 mRNA production. These results provide the first evidence that membrane rafts play a critical role in initiation of CD40 signaling in DCs, and delineate the outcome of CD40-mediated pathways on cytokine production. PMID:10880443

  19. Influence of coarsened and rafted microstructures on the thermomechanical fatigue of a Ni-base superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Kirka, M. M.; Brindley, K. A.; Neu, R. W.; Antolovich, S. D.; Shinde, S. R.; Gravett, P. W.

    2015-08-17

    The aging of the microstructure of Ni-base superalloys during service is mainly characterized by coarsening and rafting of the γ' precipitates. The influence of these different aged microstructures on thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) under either continuously cycled (CC) and creep-fatigue (CF) was investigated. Three different aged microstructures, generated through accelerated aging and pre-creep treatments, were studied: stress-free coarsened γ', rafted with orientation perpendicular to loading direction (N-raft), and rafted with orientation parallel to loading direction (P-raft). Under most conditions, the aged microstructures were less resistant to TMF than the virgin microstructure; however, there were exceptions. Both stress-free coarsened and N-raft microstructures resulted in a reduction in TMF life under both CC and CF conditions in comparison to the virgin material. P-raft microstructure also resulted in reduction in TMF life under CC conditions; however, an increase in life over that of the virgin material was observed under CF conditions. Finally, these differences are discussed and hypothesized to be related to the interactions of the dislocations in the γ channels with γ' precipitates.

  20. Lipid rafts in epithelial brush borders: atypical membrane microdomains with specialized functions.

    PubMed

    Danielsen, E Michael; Hansen, Gert H

    2003-10-31

    Epithelial cells that fulfil high-throughput digestive/absorptive functions, such as small intestinal enterocytes and kidney proximal tubule cells, are endowed with a dense apical brush border. It has long been recognized that the microvillar surface of the brush border is organized in cholesterol/sphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains commonly known as lipid rafts. More recent studies indicate that microvillar rafts, in particular those of enterocytes, have some unusual properties in comparison with rafts present on the surface of other cell types. Thus, microvillar rafts are stable rather than transient/dynamic, and their core components include glycolipids and the divalent lectin galectin-4, which together can be isolated as "superrafts", i.e., membrane microdomains resisting solubilization with Triton X-100 at physiological temperature. These glycolipid/lectin-based rafts serve as platforms for recruitment of GPI-linked and transmembrane digestive enzymes, most likely as an economizing effort to secure and prolong their digestive capability at the microvillar surface. However, in addition to microvilli, the brush border surface also consists of membrane invaginations between adjacent microvilli, which are the only part of the apical surface sterically accessible for membrane fusion/budding events. Many of these invaginations appear as pleiomorphic, deep apical tubules that extend up to 0.5-1 microm into the underlying terminal web region. Their sensitivity to methyl-beta-cyclodextrin suggests them to contain cholesterol-dependent lipid rafts of a different type from the glycolipid-based rafts at the microvillar surface. The brush border is thus an example of a complex membrane system that harbours at least two different types of lipid raft microdomains, each suited to fulfil specialized functions. This conclusion is in line with an emerging, more varied view of lipid rafts being pluripotent microdomains capable of adapting in size, shape, and content to

  1. Myo1c regulates lipid raft recycling to control cell spreading, migration and Salmonella invasion

    PubMed Central

    Brandstaetter, Hemma; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2012-01-01

    A balance between endocytosis and membrane recycling regulates the composition and dynamics of the plasma membrane. Internalization and recycling of cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched lipid rafts is an actin-dependent process that is mediated by a specialized Arf6-dependent recycling pathway. Here, we identify myosin1c (Myo1c) as the first motor protein that drives the formation of recycling tubules emanating from the perinuclear recycling compartment. We demonstrate that the single-headed Myo1c is a lipid-raft-associated motor protein that is specifically involved in recycling of lipid-raft-associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked cargo proteins and their delivery to the cell surface. Whereas Myo1c overexpression increases the levels of these raft proteins at the cell surface, in cells depleted of Myo1c function through RNA interference or overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant, these tubular transport carriers of the recycling pathway are lost and GPI-linked raft markers are trapped in the perinuclear recycling compartment. Intriguingly, Myo1c only selectively promotes delivery of lipid raft membranes back to the cell surface and is not required for recycling of cargo, such as the transferrin receptor, which is mediated by parallel pathways. The profound defect in lipid raft trafficking in Myo1c-knockdown cells has a dramatic impact on cell spreading, cell migration and cholesterol-dependent Salmonella invasion; processes that require lipid raft transport to the cell surface to deliver signaling components and the extra membrane essential for cell surface expansion and remodeling. Thus, Myo1c plays a crucial role in the recycling of lipid raft membrane and proteins that regulate plasma membrane plasticity, cell motility and pathogen entry. PMID:22328521

  2. Lipid raft disarrangement as a result of neuropathological progresses: a novel strategy for early diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Marin, R; Rojo, J A; Fabelo, N; Fernandez, C E; Diaz, M

    2013-08-15

    Lipid rafts are the preferential site of numerous membrane signaling proteins which are involved in neuronal functioning and survival. These proteins are organized in multiprotein complexes, or signalosomes, in close contact with lipid classes particularly represented in lipid rafts (i.e. cholesterol, sphingolipids and saturated fatty acids), which may contribute to physiological responses leading to neuroprotection. Increasing evidence indicates that alteration of lipid composition in raft structures as a consequence of neuropathologies, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), causes a dramatic increase in lipid raft order. These phenomena may correlate with perturbation of signalosome activities, likely contributing to neurodegenerative progression. Interestingly, significant disruption of stable raft microenvironments has been already observed in the first stages of either AD or PD, suggesting that these alterations may represent early events in the neuropathological development. In this regard, the search for biochemical markers, such as specific metabolic products altered in the brain at the first steps of the disease, presently represents an important challenge for early diagnostic strategies. Alterations of these biomarkers may be reflected in either plasma or cerebrospinal fluid, thus representing a potential strategy to predict an accurate diagnosis. We propose that pathologically-linked lipid raft markers may be interesting candidates to be explored at this level, although it has not been studied so far to what extent alteration of different signalosome components may be reflected in peripheral fluids. In this mini-review, we will discuss on relevant aspects of lipid rafts that contribute to the modulation of neuropathological events related to AD and PD. An interesting hypothesis is that anomalies on raft biomarkers measured at peripheral fluids might mirror the lipid raft pathology observed in early stages of AD and PD.

  3. O-glycans direct selectin ligands to lipid rafts on leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Shao, Bojing; Yago, Tadayuki; Setiadi, Hendra; Wang, Ying; Mehta-D'souza, Padmaja; Fu, Jianxin; Crocker, Paul R; Rodgers, William; Xia, Lijun; McEver, Rodger P

    2015-07-14

    Palmitoylated cysteines typically target transmembrane proteins to domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids (lipid rafts). P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), CD43, and CD44 are O-glycosylated proteins on leukocytes that associate with lipid rafts. During inflammation, they transduce signals by engaging selectins as leukocytes roll in venules, and they move to the raft-enriched uropods of polarized cells upon chemokine stimulation. It is not known how these glycoproteins associate with lipid rafts or whether this association is required for signaling or for translocation to uropods. Here, we found that loss of core 1-derived O-glycans in murine C1galt1(-/-) neutrophils blocked raft targeting of PSGL-1, CD43, and CD44, but not of other glycosylated proteins, as measured by resistance to solubilization in nonionic detergent and by copatching with a raft-resident sphingolipid on intact cells. Neuraminidase removal of sialic acids from wild-type neutrophils also blocked raft targeting. C1galt1(-/-) neutrophils or neuraminidase-treated neutrophils failed to activate tyrosine kinases when plated on immobilized anti-PSGL-1 or anti-CD44 F(ab')2. Furthermore, C1galt1(-/-) neutrophils incubated with anti-PSGL-1 F(ab')2 did not generate microparticles. In marked contrast, PSGL-1, CD43, and CD44 moved normally to the uropods of chemokine-stimulated C1galt1(-/-) neutrophils. These data define a role for core 1-derived O-glycans and terminal sialic acids in targeting glycoprotein ligands for selectins to lipid rafts of leukocytes. Preassociation of these glycoproteins with rafts is required for signaling but not for movement to uropods.

  4. STS-46 MS PLC Hoffman floats in life raft during water egress training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander Jeffrey A. Hoffman floats in a one-person life raft during launch emergency egress (bailout) simulation conducted in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. Hoffman, who has just tumbled out a side hatch mockup, waits for his life raft to fully inflate as a SCUBA-equipped diver looks on. The long cylindrical object in the foreground serves as a prop for the crew escape system (CES) pole. In the background MS Franklin R. Chang-Diaz floats in a fully inflated life raft.

  5. MHC Class II Association with Lipid Rafts on the Antigen Presenting Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Howard A.; Roche, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    MHC class II (MHC-II) molecules function by binding peptides derived from either self-or foreign proteins and expressing these peptides on the surface of antigen presenting cells (APCs) for recognition by CD4 T cells. MHC-II is known to exist on clusters on the surface of APCs, and a variety of biochemical and functional studies have suggested that these clusters represent lipid raft microdomain-associated MHC-II. This review will summarize data exploring the biosynthesis of raft-associated MHC-II and the role that lipid raft association plays in regulating T cell activation by APCs. PMID:25261705

  6. Lipid raft aggregation during the formation of the immunological synapse: quantitative mapping and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amador Kane, Suzanne; Adelman, Joshua; Lee, Mark; Punt, Jennifer; Ebert, Peter

    2002-03-01

    Lipid raft aggregation during formation of the immunological synapse in T-cells was explored using both experimental results from immunofluorescence imaging and computer simulations. Profiles of lipid raft distributions in the capping region relative to other protein species are presented, and compared for various experimental approaches. We also discuss a model for the dynamical formation of the synapse which incorporates different methods of transport for the lipid rafts themselves as well as other important species, including T-cell receptors and the major histocompatibility complex (MHC)/peptide complex, and we relate these to experimental findings.

  7. Selective association of outer surface lipoproteins with the lipid rafts of Borrelia burgdorferi.

    PubMed

    Toledo, Alvaro; Crowley, Jameson T; Coleman, James L; LaRocca, Timothy J; Chiantia, Salvatore; London, Erwin; Benach, Jorge L

    2014-03-11

    Borrelia burgdorferi contains unique cholesterol-glycolipid-rich lipid rafts that are associated with lipoproteins. These complexes suggest the existence of macromolecular structures that have not been reported for prokaryotes. Outer surface lipoproteins OspA, OspB, and OspC were studied for their participation in the formation of lipid rafts. Single-gene deletion mutants with deletions of ospA, ospB, and ospC and a spontaneous gene mutant, strain B313, which does not express OspA and OspB, were used to establish their structural roles in the lipid rafts. All mutant strains used in this study produced detergent-resistant membranes, a common characteristic of lipid rafts, and had similar lipid and protein slot blot profiles. Lipoproteins OspA and OspB but not OspC were shown to be associated with lipid rafts by transmission electron microscopy. When the ability to form lipid rafts in live B. burgdorferi spirochetes was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), strain B313 showed a statistically significant lower level of segregation into ordered and disordered membrane domains than did the wild-type and the other single-deletion mutants. The transformation of a B313 strain with a shuttle plasmid containing ospA restored the phenotype shared by the wild type and the single-deletion mutants, demonstrating that OspA and OspB have redundant functions. In contrast, a transformed B313 overexpressing OspC neither rescued the FRET nor colocalized with the lipid rafts. Because these lipoproteins are expressed at different stages of the life cycle of B. burgdorferi, their selective association is likely to have an important role in the structure of prokaryotic lipid rafts and in the organism's adaptation to changing environments. IMPORTANCE Lipid rafts are cholesterol-rich clusters within the membranes of cells. Lipid rafts contain proteins that have functions in sensing the cell environment and transmitting signals. Although selective proteins are present in

  8. Raft Formation in Lipid Bilayers Coupled to Curvature

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Sina; Müller, Marcus; Vink, Richard L.C.

    2014-01-01

    We present computer simulations of a membrane in which the local composition is coupled to the local membrane curvature. At high temperatures (i.e., above the temperature of macroscopic phase separation), finite-sized transient domains are observed, reminiscent of lipid rafts. The domain size is in the range of hundred nanometers, and set by the membrane elastic properties. These findings are in line with the notion of the membrane as a curvature-induced microemulsion. At low temperature, the membrane phase separates. The transition to the phase-separated regime is continuous and belongs to the two-dimensional Ising universality class when the coupling to curvature is weak, but becomes first-order for strong curvature-composition coupling. PMID:25296311

  9. Raft formation in lipid bilayers coupled to curvature.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Sina; Müller, Marcus; Vink, Richard L C

    2014-10-01

    We present computer simulations of a membrane in which the local composition is coupled to the local membrane curvature. At high temperatures (i.e., above the temperature of macroscopic phase separation), finite-sized transient domains are observed, reminiscent of lipid rafts. The domain size is in the range of hundred nanometers, and set by the membrane elastic properties. These findings are in line with the notion of the membrane as a curvature-induced microemulsion. At low temperature, the membrane phase separates. The transition to the phase-separated regime is continuous and belongs to the two-dimensional Ising universality class when the coupling to curvature is weak, but becomes first-order for strong curvature-composition coupling.

  10. Prion Protein Accumulation in Lipid Rafts of Mouse Aging Brain

    PubMed Central

    Agostini, Federica; Dotti, Carlos G.; Pérez-Cañamás, Azucena; Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Benetti, Federico; Legname, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The cellular form of the prion protein (PrPC) is a normal constituent of neuronal cell membranes. The protein misfolding causes rare neurodegenerative disorders known as transmissible spongiform encephalopathies or prion diseases. These maladies can be sporadic, genetic or infectious. Sporadic prion diseases are the most common form mainly affecting aging people. In this work, we investigate the biochemical environment in which sporadic prion diseases may develop, focusing our attention on the cell membrane of neurons in the aging brain. It is well established that with aging the ratio between the most abundant lipid components of rafts undergoes a major change: while cholesterol decreases, sphingomyelin content rises. Our results indicate that the aging process modifies the compartmentalization of PrPC. In old mice, this change favors PrPC accumulation in detergent-resistant membranes, particularly in hippocampi. To confirm the relationship between lipid content changes and PrPC translocation into detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs), we looked at PrPC compartmentalization in hippocampi from acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) knockout (KO) mice and synaptosomes enriched in sphingomyelin. In the presence of high sphingomyelin content, we observed a significant increase of PrPC in DRMS. This process is not due to higher levels of total protein and it could, in turn, favor the onset of sporadic prion diseases during aging as it increases the PrP intermolecular contacts into lipid rafts. We observed that lowering sphingomyelin in scrapie-infected cells by using fumonisin B1 led to a 50% decrease in protease-resistant PrP formation. This may suggest an involvement of PrP lipid environment in prion formation and consequently it may play a role in the onset or development of sporadic forms of prion diseases. PMID:24040215

  11. Monitor well responses at the Raft River, Idaho, Geothermal Site

    SciTech Connect

    Skiba, P.A.; Allman, D.W.

    1984-05-01

    Effects of geothermal fluid production and injection on overlying ground-water aquifers have been studied at the Raft River Geothermal Site in southcentral Idaho. Data collected from 13 monitor wells indicate a complex fractured and porous media controlled ground-water flow system affected by natural recharge and discharge, irrigation withdrawal, and geothermal withdrawal and injection. The monitor wells are completed in aquifers and aquitards overlying the principal geothermal aquifers. Potentiometric heads and water quality are significantly affected by natural upward geothermal leakage via faults and matrix seepage. No significant change in water quality data has been observed, but potentiometric head changes resulted due to geothermal resource testing and utilization. Long-term hydrographs for the wells exhibit three distinct patterns, with superimposed responses due to geothermal pumping and injection. Well hydrographs typical of the Shallow aquifer exhibit effects of natural recharge and irrigation withdrawals. For selected wells, pressure declines due to injection and pressure buildup associated with pumping are observed. The latter effect is presumably due to the elastic deformation of geologic material overlying the stressed aquifers. A second distinct pattern occurs in two wells believed to be hydraulically connected to the underlying Intermediate aquifer via faults. These wells exhibit marked buildup effects due to injection as well as responses typical of the Shallow aquifer. The third pattern is demonstrated by three monitor wells near the principal production wells. This group of wells exhibits no seasonal potentiometric head fluctuations. Fluctuations which do occur are due to injection and pumpage. The three distinct hydrograph patterns are composites of the potentiometric head responses occurring in the various aquifers underlying the Raft River Site.

  12. Lipid Peroxides Promote Large Rafts: Effects of Excitation of Probes in Fluorescence Microscopy and Electrochemical Reactions during Vesicle Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ayuyan, Artem G.; Cohen, Fredric S.

    2006-01-01

    Raft formation and enlargement was investigated in liposomes and supported bilayers prepared from sphingomyelin (SM), cholesterol, and unsaturated phospholipids; NBD-DPPE and rhodamine-(DOPE) were employed as fluorescent probes. Rafts were created by lowering temperature. Maintaining 20 mol % SM, fluorescence microscopy showed that, in the absence of photooxidation, large rafts did not form in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) containing 20 or more mol % cholesterol. But if photooxidation was allowed to proceed, large rafts were readily observed. In population, cuvette experiments, small rafts formed without photooxidation at high cholesterol concentrations. Thus, photooxidation was the cause of raft enlargement during microscopy experiments. Because photooxidation results in peroxidation at lipid double bonds, photosensitization experiments were performed to explicitly produce peroxides of SM and an unsaturated phospholipid. GUVs of high cholesterol content containing the breakdown products of SM-peroxide, but not phospholipid-peroxide, resulted in large rafts after lowering temperature. In addition, GUV production by electroswelling can result in peroxides that cause large raft formation. The use of titanium electrodes eliminates this problem. In conclusion, lipid peroxides and their breakdown products are the cause of large raft formation in GUVs containing biological levels of cholesterol. It is critical that experiments investigating rafts in bilayer membranes avoid the production of peroxides. PMID:16815906

  13. C-type lectin like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) signals independently of lipid raft microdomains in platelets.

    PubMed

    Manne, Bhanu Kanth; Badolia, Rachit; Dangelmaier, Carol A; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2015-01-15

    C-type lectin like receptor 2 (CLEC-2) has been reported to activate platelets through a lipid raft-dependent manner. Secreted ADP potentiates CLEC-2-mediated platelet aggregation. We have investigated whether the decrease in CLEC-2-mediated platelet aggregation, previously reported in platelets with disrupted rafts, is a result of the loss of agonist potentiation by ADP. We disrupted platelet lipid rafts with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and measured signaling events downstream of CLEC-2 activation. Lipid raft disruption decreases platelet aggregation induced by CLEC-2 agonists. The inhibition of platelet aggregation by the disruption of lipid rafts was rescued by the exogenous addition of epinephrine but not 2-methylthioadenosine diphosphate (2MeSADP), which suggests that lipid raft disruption effects P2Y12-mediated Gi activation but not Gz. Phosphorylation of Syk (Y525/526) and PLCγ2 (Y759), were not affected by raft disruption in CLEC-2 agonist-stimulated platelets. Furthermore, tyrosine phosphorylation of the CLEC-2 hemi-ITAM was not effected when MβCD disrupts lipid rafts. Lipid rafts do not directly contribute to CLEC-2 receptor activation in platelets. The effects of disruption of lipid rafts in in vitro assays can be attributed to inhibition of ADP feedback that potentiates CLEC-2 signaling.

  14. Lipid Rafts: Linking Alzheimer's Amyloid-β Production, Aggregation, and Toxicity at Neuronal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Rushworth, Jo V.; Hooper, Nigel M.

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains, enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, into which specific subsets of proteins and lipids partition, creating cell-signalling platforms that are vital for neuronal functions. Lipid rafts play at least three crucial roles in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), namely, in promoting the generation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide, facilitating its aggregation upon neuronal membranes to form toxic oligomers and hosting specific neuronal receptors through which the AD-related neurotoxicity and memory impairments of the Aβ oligomers are transduced. Recent evidence suggests that Aβ oligomers may exert their deleterious effects through binding to, and causing the aberrant clustering of, lipid raft proteins including the cellular prion protein and glutamate receptors. The formation of these pathogenic lipid raft-based platforms may be critical for the toxic signalling mechanisms that underlie synaptic dysfunction and neuropathology in AD. PMID:21234417

  15. Fire ants self-assemble into waterproof rafts to survive floods

    PubMed Central

    Mlot, Nathan J.; Tovey, Craig A.; Hu, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Why does a single fire ant Solenopsis invicta struggle in water, whereas a group can float effortlessly for days? We use time-lapse photography to investigate how fire ants S. invicta link their bodies together to build waterproof rafts. Although water repellency in nature has been previously viewed as a static material property of plant leaves and insect cuticles, we here demonstrate a self-assembled hydrophobic surface. We find that ants can considerably enhance their water repellency by linking their bodies together, a process analogous to the weaving of a waterproof fabric. We present a model for the rate of raft construction based on observations of ant trajectories atop the raft. Central to the construction process is the trapping of ants at the raft edge by their neighbors, suggesting that some “cooperative” behaviors may rely upon coercion. PMID:21518911

  16. Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Glaspey, Douglas J.

    2008-01-30

    Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield.

  17. Fire ants self-assemble into waterproof rafts to survive floods.

    PubMed

    Mlot, Nathan J; Tovey, Craig A; Hu, David L

    2011-05-10

    Why does a single fire ant Solenopsis invicta struggle in water, whereas a group can float effortlessly for days? We use time-lapse photography to investigate how fire ants S. invicta link their bodies together to build waterproof rafts. Although water repellency in nature has been previously viewed as a static material property of plant leaves and insect cuticles, we here demonstrate a self-assembled hydrophobic surface. We find that ants can considerably enhance their water repellency by linking their bodies together, a process analogous to the weaving of a waterproof fabric. We present a model for the rate of raft construction based on observations of ant trajectories atop the raft. Central to the construction process is the trapping of ants at the raft edge by their neighbors, suggesting that some "cooperative" behaviors may rely upon coercion. PMID:21518911

  18. Rapid multiplex analysis of lipid raft components with single-cell resolution.

    PubMed

    Schatzlmaier, Philipp; Supper, Verena; Göschl, Lisa; Zwirzitz, Alexander; Eckerstorfer, Paul; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Huppa, Johannes B; Stockinger, Hannes

    2015-09-22

    Lipid rafts, a distinct class of highly dynamic cell membrane microdomains, are integral to cell homeostasis, differentiation, and signaling. However, their quantitative examination is challenging when working with rare cells, developmentally heterogeneous cell populations, or molecules that only associate weakly with lipid rafts. We present a fast biochemical method, which is based on lipid raft components associating with the nucleus upon partial lysis during centrifugation through nonionic detergent. Requiring little starting material or effort, our protocol enabled the multidimensional flow cytometric quantitation of raft-resident proteins with single-cell resolution, thereby assessing the membrane components from a few cells in complex cell populations, as well as their dynamics resulting from cell signaling, differentiation, or genetic mutation.

  19. Study of Raft Domains in Model Membrane of DPPC/PE/Cholesterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lor, Chai; Hirst, Linda

    2010-10-01

    Raft domains in bilayer membrane are thought to play an important role in many cell functions such as cell signaling or trans-membrane protein activation. Here we use a model membrane consisting of DPPC/PE/cholesterol to examine the structure of membrane rafts and phase interactions. In particular we are interested in lipids containing the highly polyunsaturated fatty acid DHA. We use both atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy to obtain information on the structural properties of raft regions and track cholesterol. As expected, we find phase separation of raft regions between saturated and unsaturated lipids. Moreover, we find that the roughness of the domains change with varying cholesterol concentration possibly due to overpacking. This model study provides further understanding of the role of cholesterol in bilayer membrane leading towards a better knowledge of cell membranes.

  20. Astronaut Donald McMonagle checks drainage hose on his life raft in training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Donald R. McMonagle, STS-66 mission commander, checks the drainage hose on his rapidly fashioned life raft during an emergency bailout training exercise in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF).

  1. Raft disorganization leads to reduced plasmin activity in Alzheimer's disease brains.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Maria Dolores; Abad-Rodriguez, José; Galvan, Cristian; Biondi, Elisa; Navarro, Pilar; Delacourte, Andre; Dingwall, Colin; Dotti, Carlos G

    2003-12-01

    The serine protease plasmin can efficiently degrade amyloid peptide in vitro, and is found at low levels in the hippocampus of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). The cause of such paucity remains unknown. We show here that the levels of total brain plasminogen and plasminogen-binding molecules are normal in these brain samples, yet plasminogen membrane binding is greatly reduced. Biochemical analysis reveals that the membranes of these brains have a mild, still significant, cholesterol reduction compared to age-matched controls, and anomalous raft microdomains. This was reflected by the loss of raft-enriched proteins, including plasminogen-binding and -activating molecules. Using hippocampal neurons in culture, we demonstrate that removal of a similar amount of membrane cholesterol is sufficient to induce raft disorganization, leading to reduced plasminogen membrane binding and low plasmin activity. These results suggest that brain raft alterations may contribute to AD by rendering the plasminogen system inefficient.

  2. Function of Membrane Rafts in Viral Lifecycles and Host Cellular Response

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Membrane rafts are small (10–200 nm) sterol- and sphingolipid-enriched domains that compartmentalize cellular processes. Membrane rafts play an important role in viral infection cycles and viral virulence. Viruses are divided into four main classes, enveloped DNA virus, enveloped RNA virus, nonenveloped DNA virus, and nonenveloped RNA virus. General virus infection cycle is also classified into two sections, the early stage (entry process) and the late stage (assembly, budding, and release processes of virus particles). In the viral cycle, membrane rafts act as a scaffold of many cellular signal transductions, which are associated with symptoms caused by viral infections. In this paper, we describe the functions of membrane rafts in viral lifecycles and host cellular response according to each virus classification, each stage of the virus lifecycle, and each virus-induced signal transduction. PMID:22191032

  3. C-library raft : Reconstruction algorithms for tomography. Applications to X-ray fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miqueles, Eduardo X.; De Pierro, Alvaro R.

    2011-12-01

    There are many reconstruction algorithms for tomography, raft for short, and some of them are considered "classic" by researchers. The so-called raft library, provide a set of useful and basic tools, usually needed in many inverse problems that are related to medical imaging. The subroutines in raft are free software and written in C language; portable to any system with a working C compiler. This paper presents source codes written according to raft routines, applied to a new imaging modality called X-ray fluorescence tomography. Program summaryProgram title: raft Catalogue identifier: AEJY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEJY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence, version 2 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 218 844 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3 562 902 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Standard C. Computer: Any with a standard C compiler Operating system: Linux and Windows Classification: 2.4, 2.9, 3, 4.3, 4.7 External routines: raft: autoconf 2.60 or later - http://www.gnu.org/software/autoconf/ GSL scientific library - http://www.gnu.org/software/gsl/ Confuse parser library - http://www.nongnu.org/confuse/ raft-fun: gengetopt - http://www.gnu.org/software/gengetopt/gengetopt.html Nature of problem: Reconstruction algorithms for tomography, specially in X-ray fluorescence tomography. Solution method: As a library, raft covers the standard reconstruction algorithms like filtered backprojection, Novikov's inversion, Hogan's formula, among others. The input data set is represented by a complete sinogram covering a determined angular range. Users are allowed to set solid angle range for fluorescence emission at each algorithm. Running time: 1 second to 15 minutes, depending on the data size.

  4. Seaweed raft and farm design in the United States and China

    SciTech Connect

    McKay, L.B.

    1983-01-01

    The following topics are discussed in this report: pilot-scale mariculture of seaweeds in Washington; experimental-scale raft culture of marine macroalgae in inland marine waters; macroalgal culture in California and China; land-based cultivation of seaweeds: an assessment of their potential yields for 'energy farming'; a design for energy-independent seaweed raft culture in tidal creeks and rivers; and the New York State marine biomass program.

  5. Pile Spacing Optimization of Short Piled Raft Foundation System for Obtaining Minimum Settlement on Peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suro, S. M.; Bakar, I.; Sulaeman, A.

    2016-07-01

    Short Piled Raft is a modified piled raft foundation system, which represents combination between raft foundation and pile foundation, but the length of pile is relatively shorter. The basic concept of the Short Piled Raft foundation system considers the passive soil pressure creating a stiff condition of slab-pile system. This means that the thin concrete slab floats on the supporting soil, while the piles serve as stiffeners concrete slab and also to reduce settlement of the foundation. Slab to pile ratio of such system has been mentioned by several researchers, however the optimum pile spacing of stability performance for obtaining minimum settlement on peat haven't been clearly discussed. In this study, finite element method to simulate the stability performance related to settlement of Short Piled Raft foundation system was used. Short Piled Raft foundation system with concrete slab of 7.0 m x 7.0 m square was assumed to be built on peat with the thickness of 3.5 m. The material properties of pile and raft were constant. The outer diameter of galvanized steel pipe as pile was 0.30 m; raft thickness was considered to be constant of 0.15 m and the length of pile was 3.0 m, while the pile spacing varied from 0.50 to 3.00 m. Point load varied from 0 to 100 kN with increment of 20 kN was also considered as a static load, acted on the centre of the concrete slab. Optimization was done by comparing each numerical result of simulations, thus conclusion can easily be drawn. The optimum pile spacing was 1.00 m which produced minimum settlement of 30.11 mm under the load of 100 kN.

  6. STS-26 Commander Hauck floats in life raft during JSC WETF exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Frederick H. Hauck, wearing the newly designed launch and entry suit (LES), floats in single-occupant life raft in JSC Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. Removing water from his raft, Hauck awaits the assistance of SCUBA-equipped divers (one of whom is partially visible at bottom right). The simulation of the escape and rescue operations utilized the crew escape system (CES) pole method of egress from the Space Shuttle.

  7. STS-42 Commander Grabe in single person life raft during JSC egress exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Commander Ronald J. Grabe, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), floats in single person life raft during launch emergency egress (bailout) exercises conducted in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. The Space Shuttle Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking (SARSAT) portable locating beacon (PLB) antenna is extended through the life raft cover. SCUBA-equipped divers monitor egress exercises.

  8. Raft coalescence and FcγRIIA activation upon sphingomyelin clustering induced by lysenin.

    PubMed

    Kulma, Magdalena; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Sobota, Andrzej

    2012-08-01

    Activation of immunoreceptor FcγRIIA by cross-linking with antibodies is accompanied by coalescence of sphingolipid/cholesterol-rich membrane rafts leading to the formation of signaling platforms of the receptor. In this report we examined whether clustering of the raft lipid sphingomyelin can reciprocally induce partition of FcγRIIA to rafts. To induce sphingomyelin clustering, cells were exposed to non-lytic concentrations of GST-lysenin which specifically recognizes sphingomyelin. The lysenin/sphingomyelin complexes formed microscale assemblies composed of GST-lysenin oligomers engaging sphingomyelin of rafts. Upon sphingomyelin clustering, non-cross-linked FcγRIIA associated with raft-derived detergent-resistant membrane fractions as revealed by density gradient centrifugation. Pretreatment of cells with GST-lysenin also increased the size of detergent-insoluble molecular complexes of activated FcγRIIA. Sphingomyelin clustering triggered tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor and its accompanying proteins, Cbl and NTAL, in the absence of receptor ligands and enhanced phosphorylation of these proteins in the ligand presence. These data indicate that clustering of plasma membrane sphingomyelin induces coalescence of rafts and triggers signaling events analogous to those caused by FcγRIIA activation.

  9. Sphingomyelin distribution in lipid rafts of artificial monolayer membranes visualized by Raman microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ando, Jun; Kinoshita, Masanao; Cui, Jin; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Fujita, Katsumasa; Murata, Michio; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-01-01

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (chol)-rich domains in cell membranes, called lipid rafts, are thought to have important biological functions related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking. To visualize the distribution of SM in lipid rafts by means of Raman microscopy, we designed and synthesized an SM analog tagged with a Raman-active diyne moiety (diyne-SM). Diyne-SM showed a strong peak in a Raman silent region that is free of interference from intrinsic vibrational modes of lipids and did not appear to alter the properties of SM-containing monolayers. Therefore, we used Raman microscopy to directly visualize the distribution of diyne-SM in raft-mimicking domains formed in SM/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/chol ternary monolayers. Raman images visualized a heterogeneous distribution of diyne-SM, which showed marked variation, even within a single ordered domain. Specifically, diyne-SM was enriched in the central area of raft domains compared with the peripheral area. These results seem incompatible with the generally accepted raft model, in which the raft and nonraft phases show a clear biphasic separation. One of the possible reasons is that gradual changes of SM concentration occur between SM-rich and -poor regions to minimize hydrophobic mismatch. We believe that our technique of hyperspectral Raman imaging of a single lipid monolayer opens the door to quantitative analysis of lipid membranes by providing both chemical information and spatial distribution with high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution. PMID:25825736

  10. Castaways can't be choosers - Homogenization of rafting assemblages on floating seaweeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutow, Lars; Beermann, Jan; Buschbaum, Christian; Rivadeneira, Marcelo M.; Thiel, Martin

    2015-01-01

    After detachment from benthic habitats, the epibiont assemblages on floating seaweeds undergo substantial changes, but little is known regarding whether succession varies among different seaweed species. Given that floating algae may represent a limiting habitat in many regions, rafting organisms may be unselective and colonize any available seaweed patch at the sea surface. This process may homogenize rafting assemblages on different seaweed species, which our study examined by comparing the assemblages on benthic and floating individuals of the fucoid seaweeds Fucus vesiculosus and Sargassum muticum in the northern Wadden Sea (North Sea). Species richness was about twice as high on S. muticum as on F. vesiculosus, both on benthic and floating individuals. In both seaweed species benthic samples were more diverse than floating samples. However, the species composition differed significantly only between benthic thalli, but not between floating thalli of the two seaweed species. Separate analyses of sessile and mobile epibionts showed that the homogenization of rafting assemblages was mainly caused by mobile species. Among these, grazing isopods from the genus Idotea reached extraordinarily high densities on the floating samples from the northern Wadden Sea, suggesting that the availability of seaweed rafts was indeed limiting. Enhanced break-up of algal rafts associated with intense feeding by abundant herbivores might force rafters to recolonize benthic habitats. These colonization processes may enhance successful dispersal of rafting organisms and thereby contribute to population connectivity between sink populations in the Wadden Sea and source populations from up-current regions.

  11. Association of Membrane Rafts and Postsynaptic Density: Proteomics, Biochemical, and Ultrastructural Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tatsuo; Zhang, Jingping; Miyazawa, Shoko; Liu, Qian; Farzan, Michael R.; Yao, Wei-Dong

    2011-01-01

    Postsynaptic membrane rafts are believed to play important roles in synaptic signaling, plasticity, and maintenance. However, their molecular identities remain elusive. Further, how they interact with the well-established signaling specialization, the postsynaptic density (PSD), is poorly understood. We previously detected a number of conventional PSD proteins in detergent-resistant membranes (DRMs). Here, we have performed LC-MS/MS (liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry) analyses on postsynaptic membrane rafts and PSDs. Our comparative analysis identified an extensive overlap of protein components in the two structures. This overlapping could be explained, at least partly, by a physical association of the two structures. Meanwhile, a significant number of proteins displayed biased distributions to either rafts or PSDs, suggesting distinct roles for the two postsynaptic specializations. Using biochemical and electron microscopic methods, we directly detected membrane raft-PSD complexes. In vitro reconstitution experiments indicated that the formation of raft-PSD complexes was not due to the artificial reconstruction of once-solubilized membrane components and PSD structures, supporting that these complexes occurred in vivo. Taking together, our results provide evidence that postsynaptic membrane rafts and PSDs may be physically associated. Such association could be important in postsynaptic signal integration, synaptic function, and maintenance. PMID:21797867

  12. The platelet receptor for type III collagen (TIIICBP) is present in platelet membrane lipid microdomains (rafts).

    PubMed

    Maurice, Pascal; Waeckel, Ludovic; Pires, Viviane; Sonnet, Pascal; Lemesle, Monique; Arbeille, Brigitte; Vassy, Jany; Rochette, Jacques; Legrand, Chantal; Fauvel-Lafève, Françoise

    2006-04-01

    Platelet interactions with collagen are orchestrated by the presence or the migration of platelet receptor(s) for collagen into lipid rafts, which are specialized lipid microdomains from the platelet plasma membrane enriched in signalling proteins. Electron microscopy shows that in resting platelets, TIIICBP, a receptor specific for type III collagen, is present on the platelet membrane and associated with the open canalicular system, and redistributes to the platelet membrane upon platelet activation. After platelet lysis by 1% Triton X-100 and the separation of lipid rafts on a discontinuous sucrose gradient, TIIICBP is recovered in lipid raft-containing fractions and Triton X-100 insoluble fractions enriched in cytoskeleton proteins. Platelet aggregation, induced by type III collagen, was inhibited after disruption of the lipid rafts by cholesterol depletion, whereas platelet adhesion under static conditions did not require lipid raft integrity. These results indicate that TIIICBP, a platelet receptor involved in platelet interaction with type III collagen, is localized within platelet lipid rafts where it could interact with other platelet receptors for collagen (GP VI and alpha2beta1 integrin) for efficient platelet activation. PMID:16205938

  13. Lipid raft-dependent plasma membrane repair interferes with the activation of B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Miller, Heather; Castro-Gomes, Thiago; Corrotte, Matthias; Tam, Christina; Maugel, Timothy K; Andrews, Norma W; Song, Wenxia

    2015-12-21

    Cells rapidly repair plasma membrane (PM) damage by a process requiring Ca(2+)-dependent lysosome exocytosis. Acid sphingomyelinase (ASM) released from lysosomes induces endocytosis of injured membrane through caveolae, membrane invaginations from lipid rafts. How B lymphocytes, lacking any known form of caveolin, repair membrane injury is unknown. Here we show that B lymphocytes repair PM wounds in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Wounding induces lysosome exocytosis and endocytosis of dextran and the raft-binding cholera toxin subunit B (CTB). Resealing is reduced by ASM inhibitors and ASM deficiency and enhanced or restored by extracellular exposure to sphingomyelinase. B cell activation via B cell receptors (BCRs), a process requiring lipid rafts, interferes with PM repair. Conversely, wounding inhibits BCR signaling and internalization by disrupting BCR-lipid raft coclustering and by inducing the endocytosis of raft-bound CTB separately from BCR into tubular invaginations. Thus, PM repair and B cell activation interfere with one another because of competition for lipid rafts, revealing how frequent membrane injury and repair can impair B lymphocyte-mediated immune responses.

  14. The influence of an antitumor lipid - erucylphosphocholine - on artificial lipid raft system modeled as Langmuir monolayer.

    PubMed

    Wnętrzak, Anita; Łątka, Kazimierz; Makyła-Juzak, Katarzyna; Zemla, Joanna; Dynarowicz-Łątka, Patrycja

    2015-01-01

    Outer layer of cellular membrane contains ordered domains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids, called 'lipid rafts', which play various biological roles, i.e., are involved in the induction of cell death by apoptosis. Recent studies have shown that these domains may constitute binding sites for selected drugs. For example alkylphosphocholines (APCs), which are new-generation antitumor agents characterized by high selectivity and broad spectrum of activity, are known to have their molecular targets located at cellular membrane and their selective accumulation in tumor cells has been hypothesized to be linked with the alternation of biophysical properties of lipid rafts. To get a deeper insight into this issue, interactions between representative APC: erucylphosphocholine, and artificial lipid raft system, modeled as Langmuir monolayer (composed of cholesterol and sphingomyelin mixed in 1:2 proportion) were investigated. The Langmuir monolayer experiments, based on recording surface pressure-area isotherms, were complemented with Brewster angle microscopy results, which enabled direct visualization of the monolayers structure. In addition, the investigated monolayers were transferred onto solid supports and studied with AFM. The interactions between model raft system and erucylphosphocholine were analyzed qualitatively (with mean molecular area values) as well as quantitatively (with ΔG(exc) function). The obtained results indicate that erucylphosphocholine introduced to raft-mimicking model membrane causes fluidizing effect and weakens the interactions between cholesterol and sphingomyelin, which results in phase separation at high surface pressures. This leads to the redistribution of cholesterol molecules in model raft, which confirms the results observed in biological studies.

  15. Structure and dynamics of nano-sized raft-like domains on the plasma membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, Fernando E.; Pantano, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Cell membranes are constitutively composed of thousands of different lipidic species, whose specific organization leads to functional heterogeneities. In particular, sphingolipids, cholesterol and some proteins associate among them to form stable nanoscale domains involved in recognition, signaling, membrane trafficking, etc. Atomic-detail information in the nanometer/second scale is still elusive to experimental techniques. In this context, molecular simulations on membrane systems have provided useful insights contributing to bridge this gap. Here we present the results of a series of simulations of biomembranes representing non-raft and raft-like nano-sized domains in order to analyze the particular structural and dynamical properties of these domains. Our results indicate that the smallest (5 nm) raft domains are able to preserve their distinctive structural and dynamical features, such as an increased thickness, higher ordering, lower lateral diffusion, and specific lipid-ion interactions. The insertion of a transmembrane protein helix into non-raft, extended raft-like, and raft-like nanodomain environments result in markedly different protein orientations, highlighting the interplay between the lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions.

  16. Sphingomyelin distribution in lipid rafts of artificial monolayer membranes visualized by Raman microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ando, Jun; Kinoshita, Masanao; Cui, Jin; Yamakoshi, Hiroyuki; Dodo, Kosuke; Fujita, Katsumasa; Murata, Michio; Sodeoka, Mikiko

    2015-04-14

    Sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (chol)-rich domains in cell membranes, called lipid rafts, are thought to have important biological functions related to membrane signaling and protein trafficking. To visualize the distribution of SM in lipid rafts by means of Raman microscopy, we designed and synthesized an SM analog tagged with a Raman-active diyne moiety (diyne-SM). Diyne-SM showed a strong peak in a Raman silent region that is free of interference from intrinsic vibrational modes of lipids and did not appear to alter the properties of SM-containing monolayers. Therefore, we used Raman microscopy to directly visualize the distribution of diyne-SM in raft-mimicking domains formed in SM/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine/chol ternary monolayers. Raman images visualized a heterogeneous distribution of diyne-SM, which showed marked variation, even within a single ordered domain. Specifically, diyne-SM was enriched in the central area of raft domains compared with the peripheral area. These results seem incompatible with the generally accepted raft model, in which the raft and nonraft phases show a clear biphasic separation. One of the possible reasons is that gradual changes of SM concentration occur between SM-rich and -poor regions to minimize hydrophobic mismatch. We believe that our technique of hyperspectral Raman imaging of a single lipid monolayer opens the door to quantitative analysis of lipid membranes by providing both chemical information and spatial distribution with high (diffraction-limited) spatial resolution.

  17. Differential Association of the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor (NHERF) Family of Adaptor Proteins with the Raft-and the Non-Raft Brush Border Membrane Fractions of NHE3

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Ayesha; Luo, Min; Yu, Qin; Riederer, Brigitte; Xia, Weiliang; Chen, Mingmin; Lissner, Simone; Gessner, Johannes E.; Donowitz, Mark; Yun, C. Chris; deJonge, Hugo; Lamprecht, Georg; Seidler, Ursula

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Trafficking, brush border membrane (BBM) retention, and signal-specific regulation of the Na+/H+ exchanger NHE3 is regulated by the Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor (NHERF) family of PDZ-adaptor proteins, which enable the formation of multiprotein complexes. It is unclear, however, what determines signal specificity of these NHERFs. Thus, we studied the association of NHE3, NHERF1 (EBP50), NHERF2 (E3KARP), and NHERF3 (PDZK1) with lipid rafts in murine small intestinal BBM. Methods Detergent resistant membranes (“lipid rafts”) were isolated by floatation of Triton X-incubated small intestinal BBM from a variety of knockout mouse strains in an Optiprep step gradient. Acid-activated NHE3 activity was measured fluorometrically in BCECF-loaded microdissected villi, or by assessment of CO2/HCO3− mediated increase in fluid absorption in perfused jejunal loops of anethetized mice. Results NHE3 was found to partially associate with lipid rafts in the native BBM, and NHE3 raft association had an impact on NHE3 transport activity and regulation in vivo. NHERF1, 2 and 3 were differentially distributed to rafts and non-rafts, with NHERF2 being most raft-associated and NHERF3 entirely non-raft associated. NHERF2 expression enhanced the localization of NHE3 to membrane rafts. The use of acid sphingomyelinase-deficient mice, which have altered membrane lipid as well as lipid raft composition, allowed us to test the validity of the lipid raft concept in vivo. Conclusions The differential association of the NHERFs with the raft-associated and the non-raft fraction of NHE3 in the brush border membrane is one component of the differential and signal-specific NHE3 regulation by the different NHERFs. PMID:24297041

  18. Synthesis of long-circulating, backbone degradable HPMA copolymer-doxorubicin conjugates and evaluation of molecular-weight-dependent antitumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Pan, Huaizhong; Sima, Monika; Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2013-02-01

    Backbone degradable, linear, multiblock N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymer-doxorubicin (DOX) conjugates are synthesized by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization followed by chain extension via thiol-ene click reaction. The examination of molecular-weight-dependent antitumor activity toward human ovarian A2780/AD carcinoma in nude mice reveals enhanced activity of multiblock, second-generation, higher molecular weight conjugates when compared with traditional HPMA copolymer-DOX conjugates. The examination of body weight changes during treatment indicates the absence of non-specific adverse effects.

  19. “Smart” Diblock Copolymers as Templates for Magnetic-Core Gold-Shell Nanoparticle Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Michael A.; Lai, James J.; Hoffman, Allan S.; Yager, Paul; Stayton, Partick S.

    2010-01-13

    We report a new strategy for synthesizing temperature-responsive γ-Fe2O3-core/Au-shell nanoparticles (Au-mNPs) from diblock copolymer micelles. The amphiphilic diblock copolymer chains were synthesized using reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) with a thermally responsive “smart” poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAAm) block and an amine-containing poly(N,N-dimethylaminoethylacrylamide) (DMAEAm) block that acted as a reducing agent during gold shell formation. The Au-mNPs reversibly aggregated upon heating the solution above the transition temperature of pNIPAAm, resulting in a red-shifted localized surface plasmon resonance.

  20. Non-immunogenic, hydrophilic/cationic block copolymers and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Scales, Charles W.; Huang, Faqing; McCormick, Charles L.

    2010-05-18

    The present invention provides novel non-immunogenic, hydrophilic/cationic block copolymers comprising a neutral-hydrophilic polymer and a cationic polymer, wherein both polymers have well-defined chain-end functionality. A representative example of such a block copolymer comprises poly(N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) (PHPMA) and poly(N-[3-(dimethylamino)propyl]methacrylamide) (PDMAPMA). Also provided is a synthesis method thereof in aqueous media via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization. Further provided are uses of these block copolymers as drug delivery vehicles and protection agents.

  1. Proteome analysis of Cry4Ba toxin-interacting Aedes aegypti lipid rafts using geLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Bayyareddy, Krishnareddy; Zhu, Xiang; Orlando, Ron; Adang, Michael J

    2012-12-01

    Lipid rafts are microdomains in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells. Among their many functions, lipid rafts are involved in cell toxicity caused by pore forming bacterial toxins including Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cry toxins. We isolated lipid rafts from brush border membrane vesicles (BBMV) of Aedes aegypti larvae as a detergent resistant membrane (DRM) fraction on density gradients. Cholesterol, aminopeptidase (APN), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and the raft marker flotillin were preferentially partitioned into the lipid raft fraction. When mosquitocidal Cry4Ba toxin was preincubated with BBMV, Cry4Ba localized to lipid rafts. A proteomic approach based on one-dimensional gel electrophoresis, in-gel trypsin digestion, followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (geLC-MS/MS) identified a total of 386 proteins. Of which many are typical lipid raft marker proteins including flotillins and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored proteins. Identified raft proteins were annotated in silico for functional and physicochemical characteristics. Parameters such as distribution of isoelectric point, molecular mass, and predicted post-translational modifications relevant to lipid raft proteins (GPI anchorage and myristoylation or palmitoylation) were analyzed for identified proteins in the DRM fraction. From a functional point of view, this study identified proteins implicated in Cry toxin interactions as well as membrane-associated proteins expressed in the mosquito midgut that have potential relevance to mosquito biology and vector management.

  2. Roles of lipid rafts in integrin-dependent adhesion and gp130 signalling pathway in mouse embryonic neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Makoto; Nakamura, Kazuo; Taga, Tetsuya

    2004-09-01

    Neuronal and glial cells organizing the central nervous system are generated from common neural precursor cells present in the neuroepithelium during development. We tried to clarify functions of a cell surface microdomain, lipid raft, in neuroepithelial cells (NECs). NECs are suggested to adhere to fibronectin substratum dependently on integrin molecules. We found that beta1 integrin, a component of fibronectin receptors, was distributed in lipid rafts. Methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MBCD), an inhibitor of lipid raft formation, inhibited the integrin-fibronectin interaction-dependent adhesion of NECs. However, inhibition of synthesis of glycosphingolipids (GSL), components of lipid rafts, did not affect NEC adhesion. Leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF), an interleukin 6 type cytokine, induces astrocyte differentiation of NECs via activation of a transcription factor STAT3. We detected gp130, JAK1 and Ras but not STAT3 and ERK2 molecules in lipid rafts of NECs. Disruption of lipid rafts by MBCD inhibited LIF-induced ERK activation but not STAT3 activation. It is thus suggested that LIF-downstream molecules have differential lipid raft-dependency in terms of activation upon LIF-stimulation. In this study, we found functions of lipid rafts in cell adhesion and signal transduction in NECs. This is the first report that characterized functions of lipid rafts in embryonic neural precursor cells.

  3. Lipid raft regulates the initial spreading of melanoma A375 cells by modulating β1 integrin clustering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruifei; Bi, Jiajia; Ampah, Khamal Kwesi; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Ziyi; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Xiaoru; Ba, Xueqing; Zeng, Xianlu

    2013-08-01

    Cell adhesion and spreading require integrins-mediated cell-extracellular matrix interaction. Integrins function through binding to extracellular matrix and subsequent clustering to initiate focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. Lipid raft, a liquid ordered plasma membrane microdomain, has been reported to play major roles in membrane motility by regulating cell surface receptor function. Here, we identified that lipid raft integrity was required for β1 integrin-mediated initial spreading of melanoma A375 cells on fibronectin. We found that lipid raft disruption with methyl-β-cyclodextrin led to the inability of focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement by preventing β1 integrin clustering. Furthermore, we explored the possible mechanism by which lipid raft regulates β1 integrin clustering and demonstrated that intact lipid raft could recruit and modify some adaptor proteins, such as talin, α-actinin, vinculin, paxillin and FAK. Lipid raft could regulate the location of these proteins in lipid raft fractions and facilitate their binding to β1 integrin, which may be crucial for β1 integrin clustering. We also showed that lipid raft disruption impaired A375 cell migration in both transwell and wound healing models. Together, these findings provide a new insight for the relationship between lipid raft and the regulation of integrins.

  4. Antidepressants Accumulate in Lipid Rafts Independent of Monoamine Transporters to Modulate Redistribution of the G Protein, Gαs.

    PubMed

    Erb, Samuel J; Schappi, Jeffrey M; Rasenick, Mark M

    2016-09-16

    Depression is a significant public health problem for which currently available medications, if effective, require weeks to months of treatment before patients respond. Previous studies have shown that the G protein responsible for increasing cAMP (Gαs) is increasingly localized to lipid rafts in depressed subjects and that chronic antidepressant treatment translocates Gαs from lipid rafts. Translocation of Gαs, which shows delayed onset after chronic antidepressant treatment of rats or of C6 glioma cells, tracks with the delayed onset of therapeutic action of antidepressants. Because antidepressants appear to specifically modify Gαs localized to lipid rafts, we sought to determine whether structurally diverse antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts. Sustained treatment of C6 glioma cells, which lack 5-hydroxytryptamine transporters, showed marked concentration of several antidepressants in raft fractions, as revealed by increased absorbance and by mass fingerprint. Closely related molecules without antidepressant activity did not concentrate in raft fractions. Thus, at least two classes of antidepressants accumulate in lipid rafts and effect translocation of Gαs to the non-raft membrane fraction, where it activates the cAMP-signaling cascade. Analysis of the structural determinants of raft localization may both help to explain the hysteresis of antidepressant action and lead to design and development of novel substrates for depression therapeutics.

  5. A role for lipid rafts in the protection afforded by docosahexaenoic acid against ethanol toxicity in primary rat hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Aliche-Djoudi, Fatiha; Podechard, Normand; Collin, Aurore; Chevanne, Martine; Provost, Emilie; Poul, Martine; Le Hégarat, Ludovic; Catheline, Daniel; Legrand, Philippe; Dimanche-Boitrel, Marie-Thérèse; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique; Sergent, Odile

    2013-10-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that eicosapentaenoic acid enhanced ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death in primary rat hepatocytes via an increase in membrane fluidity and lipid raft clustering. In this context, another n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), was tested with a special emphasis on physical and chemical alteration of lipid rafts. Pretreatment of hepatocytes with DHA reduced significantly ethanol-induced oxidative stress and cell death. DHA protection could be related to an alteration of lipid rafts. Indeed, rafts exhibited a marked increase in membrane fluidity and packing defects leading to the exclusion of a raft protein marker, flotillin. Furthermore, DHA strongly inhibited disulfide bridge formation, even in control cells, thus suggesting a disruption of protein-protein interactions inside lipid rafts. This particular spatial organization of lipid rafts due to DHA subsequently prevented the ethanol-induced lipid raft clustering. Such a prevention was then responsible for the inhibition of phospholipase C-γ translocation into rafts, and consequently of both lysosome accumulation and elevation in cellular low-molecular-weight iron content, a prooxidant factor. In total, the present study suggests that DHA supplementation could represent a new preventive approach for patients with alcoholic liver disease based upon modulation of the membrane structures.

  6. Lipid raft regulates the initial spreading of melanoma A375 cells by modulating β1 integrin clustering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ruifei; Bi, Jiajia; Ampah, Khamal Kwesi; Zhang, Chunmei; Li, Ziyi; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Xiaoru; Ba, Xueqing; Zeng, Xianlu

    2013-08-01

    Cell adhesion and spreading require integrins-mediated cell-extracellular matrix interaction. Integrins function through binding to extracellular matrix and subsequent clustering to initiate focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement. Lipid raft, a liquid ordered plasma membrane microdomain, has been reported to play major roles in membrane motility by regulating cell surface receptor function. Here, we identified that lipid raft integrity was required for β1 integrin-mediated initial spreading of melanoma A375 cells on fibronectin. We found that lipid raft disruption with methyl-β-cyclodextrin led to the inability of focal adhesion formation and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement by preventing β1 integrin clustering. Furthermore, we explored the possible mechanism by which lipid raft regulates β1 integrin clustering and demonstrated that intact lipid raft could recruit and modify some adaptor proteins, such as talin, α-actinin, vinculin, paxillin and FAK. Lipid raft could regulate the location of these proteins in lipid raft fractions and facilitate their binding to β1 integrin, which may be crucial for β1 integrin clustering. We also showed that lipid raft disruption impaired A375 cell migration in both transwell and wound healing models. Together, these findings provide a new insight for the relationship between lipid raft and the regulation of integrins. PMID:23665237

  7. Association between tetrodotoxin resistant channels and lipid rafts regulates sensory neuron excitability.

    PubMed

    Pristerà, Alessandro; Baker, Mark D; Okuse, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) play a key role in the initiation and propagation of action potentials in neurons. Na(V)1.8 is a tetrodotoxin (TTX) resistant VGSC expressed in nociceptors, peripheral small-diameter neurons able to detect noxious stimuli. Na(V)1.8 underlies the vast majority of sodium currents during action potentials. Many studies have highlighted a key role for Na(V)1.8 in inflammatory and chronic pain models. Lipid rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane highly enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Lipid rafts tune the spatial and temporal organisation of proteins and lipids on the plasma membrane. They are thought to act as platforms on the membrane where proteins and lipids can be trafficked, compartmentalised and functionally clustered. In the present study we investigated Na(V)1.8 sub-cellular localisation and explored the idea that it is associated with lipid rafts in nociceptors. We found that Na(V)1.8 is distributed in clusters along the axons of DRG neurons in vitro and ex vivo. We also demonstrated, by biochemical and imaging studies, that Na(V)1.8 is associated with lipid rafts along the sciatic nerve ex vivo and in DRG neurons in vitro. Moreover, treatments with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and 7-ketocholesterol (7KC) led to the dissociation between rafts and Na(V)1.8. By calcium imaging we demonstrated that the lack of association between rafts and Na(V)1.8 correlated with impaired neuronal excitability, highlighted by a reduction in the number of neurons able to conduct mechanically- and chemically-evoked depolarisations. These findings reveal the sub-cellular localisation of Na(V)1.8 in nociceptors and highlight the importance of the association between Na(V)1.8 and lipid rafts in the control of nociceptor excitability. PMID:22870192

  8. Altered dynamics of a lipid raft associated protein in a kidney model of Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Labilloy, Anatália; Youker, Robert T; Bruns, Jennifer R; Kukic, Ira; Kiselyov, Kirill; Halfter, Willi; Finegold, David; do Monte, Semiramis Jamil Hadad; Weisz, Ora A

    2014-02-01

    Accumulation of globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) and other neutral glycosphingolipids with galactosyl residues is the hallmark of Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder caused by deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A (α-gal A). These lipids are incorporated into the plasma membrane and intracellular membranes, with a preference for lipid rafts. Disruption of raft mediated cell processes is implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases, but little is known about the effects of the accumulation of glycosphingolipids on raft dynamics in the context of Fabry disease. Using siRNA technology, we have generated a polarized renal epithelial cell model of Fabry disease in Madin-Darby canine kidney cells. These cells present increased levels of Gb3 and enlarged lysosomes, and progressively accumulate zebra bodies. The polarized delivery of both raft-associated and raft-independent proteins was unaffected by α-gal A knockdown, suggesting that accumulation of Gb3 does not disrupt biosynthetic trafficking pathways. To assess the effect of α-gal A silencing on lipid raft dynamics, we employed number and brightness (N&B) analysis to measure the oligomeric status and mobility of the model glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein GFP-GPI. We observed a significant increase in the oligomeric size of antibody-induced clusters of GFP-GPI at the plasma membrane of α-gal A silenced cells compared with control cells. Our results suggest that the interaction of GFP-GPI with lipid rafts may be altered in the presence of accumulated Gb3. The implications of our results with respect to the pathogenesis of Fabry disease are discussed.

  9. Partitioning, diffusion, and ligand binding of raft lipid analogs in model and cellular plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Sezgin, Erdinc; Levental, Ilya; Grzybek, Michal; Schwarzmann, Günter; Mueller, Veronika; Honigmann, Alf; Belov, Vladimir N; Eggeling, Christian; Coskun, Unal; Simons, Kai; Schwille, Petra

    2012-07-01

    Several simplified membrane models featuring coexisting liquid disordered (Ld) and ordered (Lo) lipid phases have been developed to mimic the heterogeneous organization of cellular membranes, and thus, aid our understanding of the nature and functional role of ordered lipid-protein nanodomains, termed "rafts". In spite of their greatly reduced complexity, quantitative characterization of local lipid environments using model membranes is not trivial, and the parallels that can be drawn to cellular membranes are not always evident. Similarly, various fluorescently labeled lipid analogs have been used to study membrane organization and function in vitro, although the biological activity of these probes in relation to their native counterparts often remains uncharacterized. This is particularly true for raft-preferring lipids ("raft lipids", e.g. sphingolipids and sterols), whose domain preference is a strict function of their molecular architecture, and is thus susceptible to disruption by fluorescence labeling. Here, we analyze the phase partitioning of a multitude of fluorescent raft lipid analogs in synthetic Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) and cell-derived Giant Plasma Membrane Vesicles (GPMVs). We observe complex partitioning behavior dependent on label size, polarity, charge and position, lipid headgroup, and membrane composition. Several of the raft lipid analogs partitioned into the ordered phase in GPMVs, in contrast to fully synthetic GUVs, in which most raft lipid analogs mis-partitioned to the disordered phase. This behavior correlates with the greatly enhanced order difference between coexisting phases in the synthetic system. In addition, not only partitioning, but also ligand binding of the lipids is perturbed upon labeling: while cholera toxin B binds unlabeled GM1 in the Lo phase, it binds fluorescently labeled GMI exclusively in the Ld phase. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) by stimulated emission depletion (STED) nanoscopy on intact

  10. Drug Uptake, Lipid Rafts, and Vesicle Trafficking Modulate Resistance to an Anticancer Lysophosphatidylcholine Analogue in Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta-Marbán, Álvaro; Botet, Javier; Czyz, Ola; Cacharro, Luis M.; Gajate, Consuelo; Hornillos, Valentín; Delgado, Javier; Zhang, Hui; Amat-Guerri, Francisco; Acuña, A. Ulises; McMaster, Christopher R.; Revuelta, José Luis; Zaremberg, Vanina; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2013-01-01

    The ether-phospholipid edelfosine, a prototype antitumor lipid (ATL), kills yeast cells and selectively kills several cancer cell types. To gain insight into its mechanism of action, we performed chemogenomic screens in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene-deletion strain collection, identifying edelfosine-resistant mutants. LEM3, AGP2, and DOC1 genes were required for drug uptake. Edelfosine displaced the essential proton pump Pma1p from rafts, inducing its internalization into the vacuole. Additional ATLs, including miltefosine and perifosine, also displaced Pma1p from rafts to the vacuole, suggesting that this process is a major hallmark of ATL cytotoxicity in yeast. Radioactive and synthetic fluorescent edelfosine analogues accumulated in yeast plasma membrane rafts and subsequently the endoplasmic reticulum. Although both edelfosine and Pma1p were initially located at membrane rafts, internalization of the drug toward endoplasmic reticulum and Pma1p to the vacuole followed different routes. Drug internalization was not dependent on endocytosis and was not critical for yeast cytotoxicity. However, mutants affecting endocytosis, vesicle sorting, or trafficking to the vacuole, including the retromer and ESCRT complexes, prevented Pma1p internalization and were edelfosine-resistant. Our data suggest that edelfosine-induced cytotoxicity involves raft reorganization and retromer- and ESCRT-mediated vesicular transport and degradation of essential raft proteins leading to cell death. Cytotoxicity of ATLs is mainly dependent on the changes they induce in plasma membrane raft-located proteins that lead to their internalization and subsequent degradation. Edelfosine toxicity can be circumvented by inactivating genes that then result in the recycling of internalized cell-surface proteins back to the plasma membrane. PMID:23335509

  11. Amyloid Oligomer Neurotoxicity, Calcium Dysregulation, and Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Paradisi, Silvia; Matteucci, Andrea; Frank, Claudio; Diociaiuti, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid proteins constitute a chemically heterogeneous group of proteins, which share some biophysical and biological characteristics, the principal of which are the high propensity to acquire an incorrect folding and the tendency to aggregate. A number of diseases are associated with misfolding and aggregation of proteins, although only in some of them—most notably Alzheimer's disease (AD) and transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs)—a pathogenetic link with misfolded proteins is now widely recognized. Lipid rafts (LRs) have been involved in the pathophysiology of diseases associated with protein misfolding at several levels, including aggregation of misfolded proteins, amyloidogenic processing, and neurotoxicity. Among the pathogenic misfolded proteins, the AD-related protein amyloid β (Aβ) is by far the most studied protein, and a large body of evidence has been gathered on the role played by LRs in Aβ pathogenicity. However, significant amount of data has also been collected for several other amyloid proteins, so that their ability to interact with LRs can be considered an additional, shared feature characterizing the amyloid protein family. In this paper, we will review the evidence on the role of LRs in the neurotoxicity of huntingtin, α-synuclein, prion protein, and calcitonin. PMID:21331330

  12. RAFT I: New planetary candidates from archival FEROS spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, Maritza Gabriela

    2015-12-01

    I will present initial results from our RAFT program (Reanalysis of Archival FEROS specTra) that was published in MNRAS (Soto et al. 2015, MNRAS, 451, 3131S). This project was motivated by the strikingly different conclusions several authors have arrived at after analyzing radial velocities measured using the FEROS spectrograph, throwing some doubt on the validity of a number of planet detections. We have reanalyzed the stars HD 11977, HD 47536, HD 70573, HD 110014 and HD 122430, all of which are claimed to have at least one planetary companion, and I will discuss the results from this work. In particular, we confirmed the existence of planets around HD 11977, HD 47536 and HD 110014, we found no evidence of the second planet candidate around HD 47536, nor any companions orbiting HD 122430 and HD 70573, and finally, we discovered a second planet orbiting HD 110014. These results confirm that very metal-poor stars down to [Fe/H] ~ -0.7 dex, can indeed form giant planets given the right conditions.

  13. Composition of Eocene Ice-Rafted Debris, Central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstad, C.; St. John, K.

    2007-12-01

    IODP Expedition 302 drilled a 400-m sediment record which contains physical evidence of ice-rafting in the Eocene and Neogene in the Arctic (Backman et al., 2006; Moran et al., 2006, St. John, in press). An increase in the terrigenous sand abundance occurs above 246 mcd (~46 Ma), with a flux similar to that in the Neogene. Higher resolution sampling in an interval of good recovery from 246-236 mcd shows evidence of cyclic input of IRD and biogenic components that fits with Milankovitch forcing at the obliquity period (Sangiorgi et al., in press). The question remains - what areas of the Arctic were ice-covered at this early stage in the Cenozoic? To address this provenance issue the composition of the terrigenous sands (250 micron fraction) in cores 55-56X is being quantified. Grains in 75 samples are being point-counted and their compositions categorized. Quartz grains are the dominant component (greater than 10,000 grains per gram), with some being hematite-stained, and there are lesser amounts of mafic minerals. No carbonate grains are identified so far in this study. Possible sources areas for Eocene IRD are the Eastern European and Russian Arctic margins. Tracking compositional variations of the IRD over the interval of cyclic deposition, should indicate whether the cyclic IRD deposition was consistently derived from one source region or multiple regions during this time.

  14. Omega-3 fatty acids, lipid rafts, and T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tim Y; McMurray, David N; Chapkin, Robert S

    2016-08-15

    n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) have been shown in many clinical studies to attenuate inflammatory responses. Although inflammatory responses are orchestrated by a wide spectrum of cells, CD4(+) T cells play an important role in the etiology of many chronic inflammatory diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease and obesity. In light of recent concerns over the safety profiles of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), alternatives such as bioactive nutraceuticals are becoming more attractive. In order for these agents to be accepted into mainstream medicine, however, the mechanisms by which nutraceuticals such as n-3 PUFA exert their anti-inflammatory effects must be fully elucidated. Lipid rafts are nanoscale, dynamic domains in the plasma membrane that are formed through favorable lipid-lipid (cholesterol, sphingolipids, and saturated fatty acids) and lipid-protein (membrane-actin cytoskeleton) interactions. These domains optimize the clustering of signaling proteins at the membrane to facilitate efficient cell signaling which is required for CD4(+) T cell activation and differentiation. This review summarizes novel emerging data documenting the ability of n-3 PUFA to perturb membrane-cytoskeletal structure and function in CD4(+) T cells. An understanding of these underlying mechanisms will provide a rationale for the use of n-3 PUFA in the treatment of chronic inflammation.

  15. High spatial resolution spectrometry of rafting macroalgae (Sargassum)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szekielda, Karl H.; Marmorino, George O.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.; Gillis, David

    2010-04-01

    Data with 0.4-m spatial resolution acquired ~2 km off the southeast Florida coast using the airborne Portable Hyperspectral Imager for Low-Light Spectroscopy (PHILLS) have been analyzed with the objective of identifying drifting surface macroalgae (Sargassum) through its spectral signature in at-sensor radiance. The observed spectral features of Sargassum include a peak at a wavelength of ~0.570 μm and a photosynthetic 'red edge' between 0.673 and 0.699 μm. Sargassum also exhibits high radiance in the reflected near-infrared but is impacted by the atmospheric absorption bands of water vapor at 0.720 μm and oxygen at 0.756 μm. The spectral signature is clearest and largest in amplitude where the Sargassum occurs as small surface aggregations, or rafts, which tend to lie at the downwind ends of narrow Sargassum windrows. The quantity of floating Sargassum was estimated within a single pixel by linearly mixing a spectrum of Sargassum-free water with varying percentages of a spectrum from a pixel assumed completely filled with floating plants. For our study site about 2.3% of the ocean area is classified as having some Sargassum coverage, with pixels completely filled with Sargassum being rare (only 0.2% of the classified Sargassum pixels) and pixels with the least-resolvable amount of Sargassum (~10% filled) being the most common.

  16. Ethanol Enhances TGF-β Activity by Recruiting TGF-β Receptors From Intracellular Vesicles/Lipid Rafts/Caveolae to Non-Lipid Raft Microdomains.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shuan Shian; Chen, Chun-Lin; Huang, Franklin W; Johnson, Frank E; Huang, Jung San

    2016-04-01

    Regular consumption of moderate amounts of ethanol has important health benefits on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD). Overindulgence can cause many diseases, particularly alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The mechanisms by which ethanol causes both beneficial and harmful effects on human health are poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that ethanol enhances TGF-β-stimulated luciferase activity with a maximum of 0.5-1% (v/v) in Mv1Lu cells stably expressing a luciferase reporter gene containing Smad2-dependent elements. In Mv1Lu cells, 0.5% ethanol increases the level of P-Smad2, a canonical TGF-β signaling sensor, by ∼ 2-3-fold. Ethanol (0.5%) increases cell-surface expression of the type II TGF-β receptor (TβR-II) by ∼ 2-3-fold from its intracellular pool, as determined by I(125) -TGF-β-cross-linking/Western blot analysis. Sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation and indirect immunofluorescence staining analyses reveal that ethanol (0.5% and 1%) also displaces cell-surface TβR-I and TβR-II from lipid rafts/caveolae and facilitates translocation of these receptors to non-lipid raft microdomains where canonical signaling occurs. These results suggest that ethanol enhances canonical TGF-β signaling by increasing non-lipid raft microdomain localization of the TGF-β receptors. Since TGF-β plays a protective role in ASCVD but can also cause ALD, the TGF-β enhancer activity of ethanol at low and high doses appears to be responsible for both beneficial and harmful effects. Ethanol also disrupts the location of lipid raft/caveolae of other membrane proteins (e.g., neurotransmitter, growth factor/cytokine, and G protein-coupled receptors) which utilize lipid rafts/caveolae as signaling platforms. Displacement of these membrane proteins induced by ethanol may result in a variety of pathologies in nerve, heart and other tissues.

  17. Lipid composition of membrane rafts, isolated with and without detergent, from the spleen of a mouse model of Gaucher disease.

    PubMed

    Hattersley, Kathryn J; Hein, Leanne K; Fuller, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Biological membranes are composed of functionally relevant liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered domains that coexist. Within the liquid-ordered domains are low-density microdomains known as rafts with a unique lipid composition that is crucial for their structure and function. Lipid raft composition is altered in sphingolipid storage disorders, and here we determined the lipid composition using a detergent and detergent-free method in spleen tissue, the primary site of pathology, in a mouse model of the sphingolipid storage disorder, Gaucher disease. The accumulating lipid, glucosylceramide, was 30- and 50-fold elevated in the rafts with the detergent and detergent-free method, respectively. Secondary accumulation of di- and trihexosylceramide resided primarily in the rafts with both methods. The phospholipids distributed differently with more than half residing in the rafts with the detergent-free method and less than 10% with the detergent method, with the exception of the fully saturated species that were primarily in the rafts. Individual isoforms of sphingomyelin correlated with detergent-free extraction and more than half resided in the raft fractions. However, this correlation was not seen with the detergent extraction method as sphingomyelin species were spread across both the raft and non-raft domains. Therefore caution must be exercised when interpreting phospholipid distribution in raft domains as it differs considerably depending on the method of isolation. Importantly, both methods revealed the same lipid alterations in the raft domains in the spleen of the Gaucher disease mouse model highlighting that either method is appropriate to determine membrane lipid changes in the diseased state.

  18. AFM of the ultrastructural and mechanical properties of lipid-raft-disrupted and/or cold-treated endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Li; Huang, Jie; Yu, Xiaoxue; Zhou, Xiaoqing; Gan, Chaoye; Li, Ming; Chen, Yong

    2014-02-01

    The nonionic detergent extraction at 4 °C and the cholesterol-depletion-induced lipid raft disruption are the two widely used experimental strategies for lipid raft research. However, the effects of raft disruption and/or cold treatment on the ultrastructural and mechanical properties of cells are still unclear. Here, we evaluated the effects of raft disruption and/or cold (4 °C) treatment on these properties of living human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). At first, the cholesterol-depletion-induced raft disruption was visualized by confocal microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in combination with fluorescent quantum dots. Next, the cold-induced cell contraction and the formation of end-branched filopodia were observed by confocal microscopy and AFM. Then, the cell-surface ultrastructures were imaged by AFM, and the data showed that raft disruption and cold treatment induced opposite effects on cell-surface roughness (a significant decrease and a significant increase, respectively). Moreover, the cell-surface mechanical properties (stiffness and adhesion force) of raft-disrupted- and/or cold-treated HUVECs were measured by the force measurement function of AFM. We found that raft disruption and cold treatment induced parallel effects on cell stiffness (increase) or adhesion force (decrease) and that the combination of the two treatments caused dramatically strengthened effects. Finally, raft disruption was found to significantly impair cell migration as previously reported, whereas temporary cold treatment only caused a slight but nonsignificant decrease in cell migration performed at physiological temperature. Although the mechanisms for causing these results might be complicated and more in-depth studies will be needed, our data may provide important information for better understanding the effects of raft disruption or cold treatment on cells and the two strategies for lipid raft research.

  19. Cold induces micro- and nano-scale reorganization of lipid raft markers at mounds of T-cell membrane fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Qin, Jie; Cai, Jiye; Chen, Zheng W

    2009-01-01

    Whether and how cold causes changes in cell-membrane or lipid rafts remain poorly characterized. Using the NSOM/QD and confocal imaging systems, we found that cold caused microscale redistribution of lipid raft markers, GM1 for lipid and CD59 for protein, from the peripheral part of microdomains to the central part on Jurkat T cells, and that cold also induced the nanoscale size-enlargement (1/3- to 2/3-fold) of the nanoclusters of lipid raft markers and even the colocalization of GM1 and CD59 nanoclusters. These findings indicate cold-induced lateral rearrangement/coalescence of raft-related membrane heterogeneity. The cold-induced re-distribution of lipid raft markers under a nearly-natural condition provide clues for their alternations, and help to propose a model in which raft lipids associate themselves or interact with protein components to generate functional membrane heterogeneity in response to stimulus. The data also underscore the possible cold-induced artifacts in early-described cold-related experiments and the detergent-resistance-based analyses of lipid rafts at 4 degrees C, and provide a biophysical explanation for recently-reported cold-induced activation of signaling pathways in T cells. Importantly, our fluorescence-topographic NSOM imaging demonstrated that GM1/CD59 raft markers distributed and re-distributed at mounds but not depressions of T-cell membrane fluctuations. Such mound-top distribution of lipid raft markers or lipid rafts provides spatial advantage for lipid rafts or contact molecules interacting readily with neighboring cells or free molecules.

  20. Identification of Novel Raft Marker Protein, FlotP in Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Somani, Vikas K.; Aggarwal, Somya; Singh, Damini; Prasad, Tulika; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are dynamic, nanoscale assemblies of specific proteins and lipids, distributed heterogeneously on eukaryotic membrane. Flotillin-1, a conserved eukaryotic raft marker protein (RMP) harbor SPFH (Stomatin, Prohibitin, Flotillin, and HflK/C) and oligomerization domains to regulate various cellular processes through its interactions with other signaling or transport proteins. Rafts were thought to be absent in prokaryotes hitherto, but recent report of its presence and significance in physiology of Bacillus subtilis prompted us to investigate the same in pathogenic bacteria (PB) also. In prokaryotes, proteins of SPFH2a subfamily show highest identity to SPFH domain of Flotillin-1. Moreover, bacterial genome organization revealed that Flotillin homolog harboring SPFH2a domain exists in an operon with an upstream gene containing NFeD domain. Here, presence of RMP in PB was initially investigated in silico by analyzing the presence of SPFH2a, oligomerization domains in the concerned gene and NfeD domain in the adjacent upstream gene. After investigating 300 PB, four were found to harbor RMP. Among them, domains of Bas0525 (FlotP) of Bacillus anthracis (BA) showed highest identity with characteristic domains of RMP. Considering the global threat of BA as the bioterror agent, it was selected as a model for further in vitro characterization of rafts in PB. In silico and in vitro analysis showed significant similarity of FlotP with numerous attributes of Flotillin-1. Its punctate distribution on membrane with exclusive localization in detergent resistant membrane fraction; strongly favors presence of raft with RMP FlotP in BA. Furthermore, significant effect of Zaragozic acid (ZA), a raft associated lipid biosynthesis inhibitor, on several patho-physiological attributes of BA such as growth, morphology, membrane rigidity etc., were also observed. Specifically, a considerable decrease in membrane rigidity, strongly recommended presence of an unknown raft associated

  1. Identification of Novel Raft Marker Protein, FlotP in Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Somani, Vikas K; Aggarwal, Somya; Singh, Damini; Prasad, Tulika; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are dynamic, nanoscale assemblies of specific proteins and lipids, distributed heterogeneously on eukaryotic membrane. Flotillin-1, a conserved eukaryotic raft marker protein (RMP) harbor SPFH (Stomatin, Prohibitin, Flotillin, and HflK/C) and oligomerization domains to regulate various cellular processes through its interactions with other signaling or transport proteins. Rafts were thought to be absent in prokaryotes hitherto, but recent report of its presence and significance in physiology of Bacillus subtilis prompted us to investigate the same in pathogenic bacteria (PB) also. In prokaryotes, proteins of SPFH2a subfamily show highest identity to SPFH domain of Flotillin-1. Moreover, bacterial genome organization revealed that Flotillin homolog harboring SPFH2a domain exists in an operon with an upstream gene containing NFeD domain. Here, presence of RMP in PB was initially investigated in silico by analyzing the presence of SPFH2a, oligomerization domains in the concerned gene and NfeD domain in the adjacent upstream gene. After investigating 300 PB, four were found to harbor RMP. Among them, domains of Bas0525 (FlotP) of Bacillus anthracis (BA) showed highest identity with characteristic domains of RMP. Considering the global threat of BA as the bioterror agent, it was selected as a model for further in vitro characterization of rafts in PB. In silico and in vitro analysis showed significant similarity of FlotP with numerous attributes of Flotillin-1. Its punctate distribution on membrane with exclusive localization in detergent resistant membrane fraction; strongly favors presence of raft with RMP FlotP in BA. Furthermore, significant effect of Zaragozic acid (ZA), a raft associated lipid biosynthesis inhibitor, on several patho-physiological attributes of BA such as growth, morphology, membrane rigidity etc., were also observed. Specifically, a considerable decrease in membrane rigidity, strongly recommended presence of an unknown raft associated

  2. Juvenile-onset loss of lipid-raft domains in attractin-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Azouz, Abdallah; Gunn, Teresa M.; Duke-Cohan, Jonathan S. . E-mail: Jonathan_Duke-Cohan@dfci.harvard.edu

    2007-02-15

    Mutations at the attractin (Atrn) locus in mice result in altered pigmentation on an agouti background, higher basal metabolic rate and juvenile-onset hypomyelination leading to neurodegeneration, while studies on human immune cells indicate a chemotaxis regulatory function. The underlying biochemical defect remains elusive. In this report we identify a role for attractin in plasma membrane maintenance. In attractin's absence there is a decline in plasma membrane glycolipid-enriched rafts from normal levels at 8 weeks to a complete absence by 24 weeks. The structural integrity of lipid rafts depends upon cholesterol and sphingomyelin, and can be identified by partitioning within of ganglioside GM{sub 1}. Despite a significant fall in cellular cholesterol with maturity, and a lesser fall in both membrane and total cellular GM{sub 1}, these parameters lag behind raft loss, and are normal when hypomyelination/neurodegeneration has already begun thus supporting consequence rather than cause. These findings can be recapitulated in Atrn-deficient cell lines propagated in vitro. Further, signal transduction through complex membrane receptor assemblies is not grossly disturbed despite the complete absence of lipid rafts. We find these results compatible with a role for attractin in plasma membrane maintenance and consistent with the proposal that the juvenile-onset hypomyelination and neurodegeneration represent a defect in attractin-mediated raft-dependent myelin biogenesis.

  3. Lipid Raft Is Required for PSGL-1 Ligation Induced HL-60 Cell Adhesion on ICAM-1

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tingshuang; Liu, Wenai; Luo, Jixian; Li, Chunfeng; Ba, Xueqing; Ampah, Khamal Kwesi; Wang, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong; Zeng, Xianlu

    2013-01-01

    P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and integrins are adhesion molecules that play critical roles in host defense and innate immunity. PSGL-1 mediates leukocyte rolling and primes leukocytes for integrin-mediated adhesion. However, the mechanism that PSGL-1 as a rolling receptor in regulating integrin activation has not been well characterized. Here, we investigate the function of lipid raft in regulating PSGL-1 induced β2 integrin-mediated HL-60 cells adhesion. PSGL-1 ligation with antibody enhances the β2 integrin activation and β2 integrin-dependent adhesion to ICAM-1. Importantly, with the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD), we confirm the role of lipid raft in regulating the activation of β2 integrin. Furthermore, we find that the protein level of PSGL-1 decreased in raft fractions in MβCD treated cells. PSGL-1 ligation induces the recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk), a tyrosine kinase and Vav1 (the pivotal downstream effector of Syk signaling pathway involved in cytoskeleton regulation) to lipid raft. Inhibition of Syk activity with pharmacologic inhibitor strongly reduces HL-60 cells adhesion, implicating Syk is crucial for PSGL-1 mediated β2 integrin activation. Taken together, we report that ligation of PSGL-1 on HL-60 cells activates β2 integrin, for which lipid raft integrity and Syk activation are responsible. These findings have shed new light on the mechanisms that connect leukocyte initial rolling with subsequent adhesion. PMID:24312591

  4. Two-photon imaging of collagen remodeling in RAFT tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Vincent P.; Coleno, Mariah L.; Yomo, Tatsuro; Sun, Chung-Ho; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2001-04-01

    Tissue remodeling is associated with both normal and abnormal processes including wound healing, fibrosis and cancer. In skin, abnormal remodeling causes permanent structural changes that can lead to hypertropic scarring and keloid formation. Normal remodeling, although fast and efficient in skin, is still imperfect, and a connective tissue scar remains at the wound site1. As a result, methods are needed to optimize tissue remodeling in vivo in all cases of wound repair. Since fibroblast-mediated contraction of engineered 3-D collagen based tissues (RAFTs) represents an in vitro model of the tissue contraction and collagen remodeling that occurs in vivo, RAFT tissue contraction studies combined with two-photon microscopy (TPM) studies are used to provide information on ways to improve tissue remodeling in vivo. In the RAFT models discussed here, tissue contraction is modulated either by application of exogenous growth factors or photodynamic therapy. During tissue contraction, TPM is used to image changes in Collagen Type I fibers in the RAFT skin models. Tissues are imaged at depth at day 15 after modulation. TPM signal analysis shows that RAFT tissues having the highest collagen density have the fastest rate of decay of fluorescent signal with depth.

  5. Toward atomic force microscopy and mass spectrometry to visualize and identify lipid rafts in plasmodesmata

    PubMed Central

    Naulin, Pamela A.; Alveal, Natalia A.; Barrera, Nelson P.

    2014-01-01

    Plant cell-to-cell communication is mediated by nanopores called plasmodesmata (PDs) which are complex structures comprising plasma membrane (PM), highly packed endoplasmic reticulum and numerous membrane proteins. Although recent advances on proteomics have led to insights into mechanisms of transport, there is still an inadequate characterization of the lipidic composition of the PM where membrane proteins are inserted. It has been postulated that PDs could be formed by lipid rafts, however no structural evidence has shown to visualize and analyse their lipid components. In this perspective article, we discuss proposed experiments to characterize lipid rafts and proteins in the PDs. By using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and mass spectrometry (MS) of purified PD vesicles it is possible to determine the presence of lipid rafts, specific bound proteins and the lipidomic profile of the PD under physiological conditions and after changing transport permeability. In addition, MS can determine the stoichiometry of intact membrane proteins inserted in lipid rafts. This will give novel insights into the role of membrane proteins and lipid rafts on the PD structure. PMID:24910637

  6. Clathrin to Lipid Raft-Endocytosis via Controlled Surface Chemistry and Efficient Perinuclear Targeting of Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Atanu; Jana, Nikhil R

    2015-09-17

    Nanoparticle interacts with live cells depending on their surface chemistry, enters into cell via endocytosis, and is commonly trafficked to an endosome/lysozome that restricts subcellular targeting options. Here we show that nanoparticle surface chemistry can be tuned to alter their cell uptake mechanism and subcellular trafficking. Quantum dot based nanoprobes of 20-30 nm hydrodynamic diameters have been synthesized with tunable surface charge (between +15 mV to -25 mV) and lipophilicity to influence their cellular uptake processes and subcellular trafficking. It is observed that cationic nanoprobe electrostatically interacts with cell membrane and enters into cell via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. At lower surface charge (between +10 mV to -10 mV), the electrostatic interaction with cell membrane becomes weaker, and additional lipid raft endocytosis is initiated. If a lipophilic functional group is introduced on a weakly anionic nanoparticle surface, the uptake mechanism shifts to predominant lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. In particular, the zwitterionic-lipophilic nanoprobe has the unique advantage as it weakly interacts with anionic cell membrane, migrates toward lipid rafts for interaction through lipophilic functional group, and induces lipid raft-mediated endocytosis. While predominate or partial clathrin-mediated entry traffics most of the nanoprobes to lysozome, predominate lipid raft-mediated entry traffics them to perinuclear region, particularly to the Golgi apparatus. This finding would guide in designing appropriate nanoprobe for subcellular targeting and delivery.

  7. An arm-first approach to cleavable mikto-arm star polymers by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohu; Moad, Graeme; Muir, Benjamin W; Rizzardo, Ezio; Rosselgong, Julien; Yang, Wantai; Thang, San H

    2014-04-01

    Redox-cleavable mikto-arm star polymers are prepared by an "arm-first" approach involving copolymerization of a dimethacrylate mediated by a mixture of macroRAFT agents. Thus, RAFT copolymerization of the monomers BMA, DMAEMA, and OEGMA, with the disulfide dimethacrylate cross-linker (DSDMA), bis(2-methacryloyl)oxyethyl disulfide, mediated by a 1:1:1 mixture of three macroRAFT agents with markedly different properties [hydrophilic, poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate]-P(OEGMA)8-9 ; cationizable, poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate]-P(DMAEMA); hydrophobic, poly(n-butyl methacrylate)-P(BMA)] provides low dispersity mikto-arm star polymers. Good control (Đ < 1.3) is observed for the target P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA)/P(BMA) (3:3:1) mikto-arm star, a double hydrophilic P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA) (3:3) mikto-arm star and a hydrophobic P(BMA) homo-arm star. However, Đ for the target mikto-arm stars increases with an increase in either the ratio [DSDMA]:[total macroRAFT] or the fraction of hydrophobic P(BMA) macroRAFT agent. The quaternized mikto-arm star in dilute aqueous solution shows a monomodal particle size distribution and an average size of ≈145 nm.

  8. Effects of acrylonitrile on lymphocyte lipid rafts and RAS/RAF/MAPK/ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, X J; Li, B; Huang, J S; Shi, J M; Wang, P; Fan, W; Zhou, Y L

    2014-09-26

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used chemical in the production of plastics, resins, nitriles, acrylic fibers, and synthetic rubber. Previous epidemiological investigations and animal studies have confirmed that ACN affects the lymphocytes and spleen. However, the immune toxicity mechanism is unknown. Lipid rafts are cell membrane structures that are rich in cholesterol and involved in cell signal transduction. The B cell lymophoma-10 (Bcl10) protein is a joint protein that is important in lymphocyte development and signal pathways. This study was conducted to examine the in vitro effects of ACN. We separated lipid rafts, and analyzed Bcl10 protein and caveolin. Western blotting was used to detect mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphorylated MAPK levels. The results indicated that with increasing ACN concentration, the total amount of Bcl10 remained stable, but was concentrated mainly in part 4 to part 11 in electrophoretic band district which is high density in gradient centrifugation. Caveolin-1 was evaluated as a lipid raft marker protein; caveolin-1 content and position were relatively unchanged. Western blotting showed that in a certain range, MAPK protein was secreted at a higher level. At some ACN exposure levels, MAPK protein secretion was significantly decreased compared to the control group (P < 0.05). These results indicate that ACN can cause immune toxicity by damaging lipid raft structures, causing Bcl10 protein and lipid raft separation and restraining Ras-Raf-MAPK-extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways.

  9. An arm-first approach to cleavable mikto-arm star polymers by RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaohu; Moad, Graeme; Muir, Benjamin W; Rizzardo, Ezio; Rosselgong, Julien; Yang, Wantai; Thang, San H

    2014-04-01

    Redox-cleavable mikto-arm star polymers are prepared by an "arm-first" approach involving copolymerization of a dimethacrylate mediated by a mixture of macroRAFT agents. Thus, RAFT copolymerization of the monomers BMA, DMAEMA, and OEGMA, with the disulfide dimethacrylate cross-linker (DSDMA), bis(2-methacryloyl)oxyethyl disulfide, mediated by a 1:1:1 mixture of three macroRAFT agents with markedly different properties [hydrophilic, poly[oligo(ethylene glycol) methacrylate]-P(OEGMA)8-9 ; cationizable, poly[2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate]-P(DMAEMA); hydrophobic, poly(n-butyl methacrylate)-P(BMA)] provides low dispersity mikto-arm star polymers. Good control (Đ < 1.3) is observed for the target P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA)/P(BMA) (3:3:1) mikto-arm star, a double hydrophilic P(DMAEMA)/P(OEGMA) (3:3) mikto-arm star and a hydrophobic P(BMA) homo-arm star. However, Đ for the target mikto-arm stars increases with an increase in either the ratio [DSDMA]:[total macroRAFT] or the fraction of hydrophobic P(BMA) macroRAFT agent. The quaternized mikto-arm star in dilute aqueous solution shows a monomodal particle size distribution and an average size of ≈145 nm. PMID:24504709

  10. On the kinetics of rafting in CMSX-4 superalloy single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Matan, N.; Cox, D.C.; Rae, C.M.F.; Reed, R.C.

    1999-05-28

    The kinetics of {gamma}{prime} rafting in CMSX-4 single crystals at 950 C has been studied using scanning and transmission electron microscopies. The crept material was subjected to further heat treatment in the absence of applied stress, in order to deduce the threshold strain {epsilon}{sub th} for rafting to continue; this is shown to be 0.10 {+-} 0.03%. For strains smaller than {epsilon}{sub th}, rafting occurs exceedingly slowly; once {epsilon}{sub th} is exceeded the kinetics are largely unaffected by the absence of applied stress. The magnitude of {epsilon}{sub th} confers a reduction in {gamma}/{gamma}{prime} interfacial coherency and a relaxation of interfacial misfit stresses. It is concluded that the threshold strain is a quantity suitable for distinguishing between rafting occurring in the ``elastic`` and ``plastic`` regimes. The results confirm conclusively that plasticization of the horizontal {gamma}-channels by (a/2){l_angle}1{bar 1}0{r_angle}{l_brace}111{r_brace} creep dislocations and their subsequent adsorption at the {gamma}/{gamma}{prime} interfaces, with a concomitant loss of perfect coherency and reduction in elastic misfit strains, is responsible for providing the kinetic path which enables rafting to occur at a reasonable speed. An argument is put forward to explain the magnitude of {epsilon}{sub th}.

  11. Uncoupling Neogenin association with lipid rafts promotes neuronal survival and functional recovery after stroke.

    PubMed

    Shabanzadeh, A P; Tassew, N G; Szydlowska, K; Tymianski, M; Banerjee, P; Vigouroux, R J; Eubanks, J H; Huang, L; Geraerts, M; Koeberle, P D; Mueller, B K; Monnier, P P

    2015-05-07

    The dependence receptor Neogenin and its ligand, the repulsive guidance molecule a (RGMa), regulate apoptosis and axonal growth in the developing and the adult central nervous system (CNS). Here, we show that this pathway has also a critical role in neuronal death following stroke, and that providing RGMa to neurons blocks Neogenin-induced death. Interestingly, the Neogenin pro-death function following ischemic insult depends on Neogenin association with lipid rafts. Thus, a peptide that prevents Neogenin association with lipid rafts increased neuronal survival in several in vitro stroke models. In rats, a pro-survival effect was also observed in a model of ocular ischemia, as well as after middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Treatments that prevented Neogenin association with lipid rafts improved neuronal survival and the complexity of the neuronal network following occlusion of the middle artery. Toward the development of a treatment for stroke, we developed a human anti-RGMa antibody that also prevents Neogenin association with lipid rafts. We show that this antibody also protected CNS tissue from ischemic damage and that its application resulted in a significant functional improvement even when administrated 6 h after artery occlusion. Thus, our results draw attention to the role of Neogenin and lipid rafts as potential targets following stroke.

  12. Effects of acrylonitrile on lymphocyte lipid rafts and RAS/RAF/MAPK/ERK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Li, X J; Li, B; Huang, J S; Shi, J M; Wang, P; Fan, W; Zhou, Y L

    2014-01-01

    Acrylonitrile (ACN) is a widely used chemical in the production of plastics, resins, nitriles, acrylic fibers, and synthetic rubber. Previous epidemiological investigations and animal studies have confirmed that ACN affects the lymphocytes and spleen. However, the immune toxicity mechanism is unknown. Lipid rafts are cell membrane structures that are rich in cholesterol and involved in cell signal transduction. The B cell lymophoma-10 (Bcl10) protein is a joint protein that is important in lymphocyte development and signal pathways. This study was conducted to examine the in vitro effects of ACN. We separated lipid rafts, and analyzed Bcl10 protein and caveolin. Western blotting was used to detect mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphorylated MAPK levels. The results indicated that with increasing ACN concentration, the total amount of Bcl10 remained stable, but was concentrated mainly in part 4 to part 11 in electrophoretic band district which is high density in gradient centrifugation. Caveolin-1 was evaluated as a lipid raft marker protein; caveolin-1 content and position were relatively unchanged. Western blotting showed that in a certain range, MAPK protein was secreted at a higher level. At some ACN exposure levels, MAPK protein secretion was significantly decreased compared to the control group (P < 0.05). These results indicate that ACN can cause immune toxicity by damaging lipid raft structures, causing Bcl10 protein and lipid raft separation and restraining Ras-Raf-MAPK-extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling pathways. PMID:25299088

  13. Numerical modeling of fluid flow with rafts: An application to lava flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsepelev, Igor; Ismail-Zadeh, Alik; Melnik, Oleg; Korotkii, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Although volcanic lava flows do not significantly affect the life of people, its hazard is not negligible as hot lava kills vegetation, destroys infrastructure, and may trigger a flood due to melting of snow/ice. The lava flow hazard can be reduced if the flow patterns are known, and the complexity of the flow with debris is analyzed to assist in disaster risk mitigation. In this paper we develop three-dimensional numerical models of a gravitational flow of multi-phase fluid with rafts (mimicking rigid lava-crust fragments) on a horizontal and topographic surfaces to explore the dynamics and the interaction of lava flows. We have obtained various flow patterns and spatial distribution of rafts depending on conditions at the surface of fluid spreading, obstacles on the way of a fluid flow, raft landing scenarios, and the size of rafts. Furthermore, we analyze two numerical models related to specific lava flows: (i) a model of fluid flow with rafts inside an inclined channel, and (ii) a model of fluid flow from a single vent on an artificial topography, when the fluid density, its viscosity, and the effusion rate vary with time. Although the studied models do not account for lava solidification, crust formation, and its rupture, the results of the modeling may be used for understanding of flows with breccias before a significant lava cooling.

  14. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease.

  15. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model.

    PubMed

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease. PMID:27014089

  16. Lipid Raft Size and Lipid Mobility in Non-raft Domains Increase during Aging and Are Exacerbated in APP/PS1 Mice Model of Alzheimer's Disease. Predictions from an Agent-Based Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Guido; Díaz, Mario; Torres, Néstor V.

    2016-01-01

    A connection between lipid rafts and Alzheimer's disease has been studied during the last decades. Mathematical modeling approaches have recently been used to correlate the effects of lipid composition changes in the physicochemical properties of raft-like membranes. Here we propose an agent based model to assess the effect of lipid changes in lipid rafts on the evolution and progression of Alzheimer's disease using lipid profile data obtained in an established model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We have observed that lipid raft size and lipid mobility in non-raft domains are two main factors that increase during age and are accelerated in the transgenic Alzheimer's disease mouse model. The consequences of these changes are discussed in the context of neurotoxic amyloid β production. Our agent based model predicts that increasing sterols (mainly cholesterol) and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) (mainly DHA, docosahexaenoic acid) proportions in the membrane composition might delay the onset and progression of the disease. PMID:27014089

  17. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes.

  18. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-01-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes. PMID:26861908

  19. Lipid raft-associated β-adducin is required for PSGL-1-mediated neutrophil rolling on P-selectin.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tingshuang; Liu, Wenai; Yang, Chen; Ba, Xueqing; Wang, Xiaoguang; Jiang, Yong; Zeng, Xianlu

    2015-02-01

    Lipid rafts, a liquid-ordered plasma membrane microdomain, are related to cell-surface receptor function. PSGL-1, a major surface receptor protein for leukocyte, also acts as a signaling receptor in leukocyte rolling. To investigate the role of lipid raft in PSGL-1 signaling in human neutrophils, we quantitatively analyzed lipid raft proteome of human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 cells and identified a lipid raft-associated protein β-adducin. PSGL-1 ligation induced dissociation of the raft-associated protein β-adducin from lipid rafts and actin, as well as phosphorylation of β-adducin, indicating a transient uncoupling of lipid rafts from the actin cytoskeleton. Knockdown of β-adducin greatly attenuated HL-60 cells rolling on P-selectin. We also showed that Src kinase is crucial for PSGL-1 ligation-induced β-adducin phosphorylation and relocation. Taken together, these results show that β-adducin is a pivotal lipid raft-associated protein in PSGL-1-mediated neutrophil rolling on P-selectin.

  20. Severe alterations in lipid composition of frontal cortex lipid rafts from Parkinson's disease and incidental Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Santpere, Gabriel; Marín, Raquel; Torrent, Laia; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains that provide a highly saturated and viscous physicochemical microenvironment to promote protein-lipid and protein-protein interactions. We purified lipid rafts from human frontal cortex from normal, early motor stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) and incidental Parkinson's disease (iPD) subjects and analyzed their lipid composition. We observed that lipid rafts from PD and iPD cortices exhibit dramatic reductions in their contents of n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (22:6-n3) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Also, saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were significantly higher than in control brains. Paralleling these findings, unsaturation and peroxidability indices were considerably reduced in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Lipid classes were also affected in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Thus, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were increased in PD and iPD, whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides and plasmalogen levels were considerably diminished. Our data pinpoint a dramatic increase in lipid raft order due to the aberrant biochemical structure in PD and iPD and indicate that these abnormalities of lipid rafts in the frontal cortex occur at early stages of PD pathology. The findings correlate with abnormal lipid raft signaling and cognitive decline observed during the development of these neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:21717034

  1. Nanoscopic substructures of raft-mimetic liquid-ordered membrane domains revealed by high-speed single-particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hsiao-Mei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Yen, Tzu-Chi; Hsieh, Chia-Lung

    2016-02-01

    Lipid rafts are membrane nanodomains that facilitate important cell functions. Despite recent advances in identifying the biological significance of rafts, nature and regulation mechanism of rafts are largely unknown due to the difficulty of resolving dynamic molecular interaction of rafts at the nanoscale. Here, we investigate organization and single-molecule dynamics of rafts by monitoring lateral diffusion of single molecules in raft-containing reconstituted membranes supported on mica substrates. Using high-speed interferometric scattering (iSCAT) optical microscopy and small gold nanoparticles as labels, motion of single lipids is recorded via single-particle tracking (SPT) with nanometer spatial precision and microsecond temporal resolution. Processes of single molecules partitioning into and escaping from the raft-mimetic liquid-ordered (Lo) domains are directly visualized in a continuous manner with unprecedented clarity. Importantly, we observe subdiffusion of saturated lipids in the Lo domain in microsecond timescale, indicating the nanoscopic heterogeneous molecular arrangement of the Lo domain. Further analysis of the diffusion trajectory shows the presence of nano-subdomains of the Lo phase, as small as 10 nm, which transiently trap the lipids. Our results provide the first experimental evidence of non-uniform molecular organization of the Lo phase, giving a new view of how rafts recruit and confine molecules in cell membranes.

  2. Detergent-Based Isolation of Yeast Membrane Rafts: An Inquiry-Based Laboratory Series for the Undergraduate Cell Biology or Biochemistry Lab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willhite, D. Grant; Wright, Stephen E.

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts have been implicated in numerous cellular processes including cell signaling, endocytosis, and even viral infection. Isolation of these lipid rafts often involves detergent treatment of the membrane to dissolve nonraft components followed by separation of raft regions in a density gradient. We present here an inquiry-based lab series…

  3. Formation of 7-dehydrocholesterol-containing membrane rafts in vitro and in vivo, with relevance to the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Keller, R. Kennedy; Arnold, Thomas P.; Fliesler, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome (SLOS) is a recessive disease typified by 7-dehydrocholesterol (7DHC) accumulation and depletion of cholesterol. Because cholesterol is a primary component of detergent-resistant membrane domains (“rafts”), we examined the compatibility of 7DHC with raft formation. Liposomes containing bovine brain phosphatidylcholine, sphingomyelin, cerebrosides, and either cholesterol, 7DHC, or coprostanol (the latter being incompatible with raft formation) were prepared. 7DHC was indistinguishable from cholesterol in its ability to become incorporated into membrane rafts, as judged by physical and chemical criteria, whereas coprostanol did not form rafts. The in vivo compatibility of 7DHC with raft formation was evaluated in brains of rats treated with trans-1,4-bis(2-dichlorobenzylamino-ethyl)cyclohexane dihydrochloride (AY9944), which mimics the SLOS biochemical defect. 7DHC/cholesterol ratios in rafts and whole brains from AY9944-treated rats were similar, indicating comparable efficiency of 7DHC and cholesterol incorporation into brain rafts. In contrast, dolichol (a nonsterol isoprenoid incompatible with raft formation) was greatly depleted in brain rafts relative to whole brain. Although brain raft fractions prepared from AY9944-treated and control rats yielded similar sterol-protein ratios, their gel electrophoresis profiles exhibited multiple differences, suggesting that altered raft sterol composition perturbs raft protein content. These results are discussed in the context of the SLOS phenotype, particularly with regard to the associated central nervous system defects. PMID:14594996

  4. The epidemiology of injury in canoeing, kayaking and rafting.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Richard C; Leggat, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    The aquatic environment is a complex mix of waterways with varying uses and hazards. It is the intersection of the use of the water and the hazards which provides enjoyment to those who use them as well as risk to a person's health. Canoeing, kayaking and rafting have and continue to be popular recreation sports in aquatic environments. This chapter explores participation in, risks associated with and prevention strategies for keeping canoeists, kayakers and rafters safe and healthy. There is a dearth of good quality descriptive studies exploring these issues, particularly around the risks involved and the effectiveness of proposed prevention strategies. According to Outdoor Foundation, there are 23.9 million people in the USA who undertake paddling activities per annum, with canoeing (10.1 million) being the most popular activity followed by recreational kayaking (6.2 million). There were 141 deaths of canoeists (89) and kayakers (52) identified by the US Coast Guard in their recreational boating statistics data for 2009. The crude rate of death per 100,000 participants for canoeing ranges between 0.72 and 0.92 and for kayaking between 0.37 and 0.41 per annum. Although death is the most severe consequence of a misadventure while paddling, there are a range of other hazards faced such as hitting objects, waterborne diseases, hypothermia from unintended submersion, blisters, muscle strain, cuts and abrasions. There are a range of prevention strategies which have been proposed and provided in this chapter. However, there is very little evidence of their effectiveness. Further research is required in understanding the risk associated with paddling activities, the effectiveness of prevention strategies and how these strategies might be delivered. PMID:22824841

  5. The epidemiology of injury in canoeing, kayaking and rafting.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Richard C; Leggat, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    The aquatic environment is a complex mix of waterways with varying uses and hazards. It is the intersection of the use of the water and the hazards which provides enjoyment to those who use them as well as risk to a person's health. Canoeing, kayaking and rafting have and continue to be popular recreation sports in aquatic environments. This chapter explores participation in, risks associated with and prevention strategies for keeping canoeists, kayakers and rafters safe and healthy. There is a dearth of good quality descriptive studies exploring these issues, particularly around the risks involved and the effectiveness of proposed prevention strategies. According to Outdoor Foundation, there are 23.9 million people in the USA who undertake paddling activities per annum, with canoeing (10.1 million) being the most popular activity followed by recreational kayaking (6.2 million). There were 141 deaths of canoeists (89) and kayakers (52) identified by the US Coast Guard in their recreational boating statistics data for 2009. The crude rate of death per 100,000 participants for canoeing ranges between 0.72 and 0.92 and for kayaking between 0.37 and 0.41 per annum. Although death is the most severe consequence of a misadventure while paddling, there are a range of other hazards faced such as hitting objects, waterborne diseases, hypothermia from unintended submersion, blisters, muscle strain, cuts and abrasions. There are a range of prevention strategies which have been proposed and provided in this chapter. However, there is very little evidence of their effectiveness. Further research is required in understanding the risk associated with paddling activities, the effectiveness of prevention strategies and how these strategies might be delivered.

  6. Molecular identification of green algae from the rafts based infrastructure of Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Li, Hongye; Li, Yan; Wang, Zongling; Liu, Jiesheng; Yang, Weidong

    2012-10-01

    To provide more information on the origin of the Ulva prolifera bloom in Qingdao sea area in China from 2007 to 2011, the diversity of green algae growing on the rafts of Porphyra yezoensis on the coast in Jiangsu Province was investigated based on ITS, rbcL and 5S sequences. Eighty-four of green algal samples from various sites and cruises in 2010 and 2011 were collected. According to ITS and rbcL sequences, samples from the rafts of P. yezoensis fell into four clades: Ulva linza-procera-prolifera (LPP) complex, Ulva flexuosa, Blidingia sp. and Urospora spp. However, based on the 5S rDNA, a more resolved DNA marker, only one of the 84 samples belonged to U. prolifera. Combined with the previous reports, it is likely that U. prolifera bloom in Qingdao sea area might consist of more than one origin, and Porphyra cultivation rafts might be one of the causes. PMID:22858010

  7. Membrane rafts in Alzheimer’s disease beta-amyloid production

    PubMed Central

    Thinakaran, Gopal

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD), the most common age-associated dementing disorder, is pathologically manifested by progressive cognitive dysfunction concomitant with the accumulation of senile plaques consisting of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide aggregates in the brain of affected individuals. Aβ is derived from a type I transmembrane protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP), by the sequential proteolytic events mediated by β-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) and γ-secretase. Multiple lines of evidence have implicated cholesterol and cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains, termed lipid rafts in the amyloidogenic processing of APP. In this review, we summarize the cell biology of APP, β- and γ-secretases and the data on their association with lipid rafts. Then, we will discuss potential raft targeting signals identified in the secretases and their importance on amyloidogenic processing of APP. PMID:20303415

  8. Lipid Raft-Mediated Regulation of Hyaluronan–CD44 Interactions in Inflammation and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murai, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan is a major component of the extracellular matrix and plays pivotal roles in inflammation and cancer. Hyaluronan oligomers are frequently found in these pathological conditions, in which they exert their effects via association with the transmembrane receptor CD44. Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-enriched membrane microdomains that may regulate membrane receptors while serving as platforms for transmembrane signaling at the cell surface. This article focuses on the recent discovery that lipid rafts regulate the interaction between CD44 and hyaluronan, which depends largely on hyaluronan’s size. Lipid rafts regulate CD44’s ability to bind hyaluronan in T cells, control the rolling adhesion of lymphocytes on vascular endothelial cells, and regulate hyaluronan- and CD44-mediated cancer cell migration. The implications of these findings for preventing inflammatory disorders and cancer are also discussed. PMID:26347743

  9. Molecular identification of green algae from the rafts based infrastructure of Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Li, Hongye; Li, Yan; Wang, Zongling; Liu, Jiesheng; Yang, Weidong

    2012-10-01

    To provide more information on the origin of the Ulva prolifera bloom in Qingdao sea area in China from 2007 to 2011, the diversity of green algae growing on the rafts of Porphyra yezoensis on the coast in Jiangsu Province was investigated based on ITS, rbcL and 5S sequences. Eighty-four of green algal samples from various sites and cruises in 2010 and 2011 were collected. According to ITS and rbcL sequences, samples from the rafts of P. yezoensis fell into four clades: Ulva linza-procera-prolifera (LPP) complex, Ulva flexuosa, Blidingia sp. and Urospora spp. However, based on the 5S rDNA, a more resolved DNA marker, only one of the 84 samples belonged to U. prolifera. Combined with the previous reports, it is likely that U. prolifera bloom in Qingdao sea area might consist of more than one origin, and Porphyra cultivation rafts might be one of the causes.

  10. Surface-imprinted core-shell nanoparticles for sorbent assays.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chun-Hua; Zhou, Wen-Hui; Han, Bing; Yang, Huang-Hao; Chen, Xi; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2007-07-15

    In this paper, we present a general protocol for the making of surface-imprinted core-shell nanoparticles via surface reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization using RAFT agent functionalized model silica nanoparticles as the chain-transfer agent. In this protocol, trichloro(4-chloromethylphenyl)silane was immobilized on the surface of SiO2 nanoparticles, forming chloromethylphenyl functionalized silica (silica-Cl). RAFT agent functionalized silica was subsequently produced by substitute reaction of silica-Cl with PhC(S)SMgBr. The grafting copolymerization of 4-vinylpyridine and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate using surface RAFT polymerization and in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid as the template led to the formation of surface-imprinted core-shell nanoparticles. The resulting surface-imprinted core-shell nanoparticles bind the original template 2,4-D with an appreciable selectivity over structurally related compounds. The potential use of the surface-imprinted core-shell nanoparticles as the recognition element in the competitive fluorescent binding assay for 2,4-D was also demonstrated. PMID:17563116

  11. The association of thromboxane A2 receptor with lipid rafts is a determinant for platelet functional responses.

    PubMed

    Moscardó, A; Vallés, J; Latorre, A; Santos, M T

    2014-08-25

    We have investigated the presence of thromboxane A2 (TXA2) receptor associated with lipid rafts in human platelets and the regulation of platelet function in response to TXA2 receptor agonists when lipid rafts are disrupted by cholesterol extraction. Platelet aggregation with TXA2 analogs U46619 and IBOP was almost blunted in cholesterol-depleted platelets, as well as αIIbβ3 integrin activation and P-selectin exposure. Raft disruption also inhibited TXA2-induced cytosolic calcium increase and nucleotide release, ruling out an implication of P2Y12 receptor. An important proportion of TXA2 receptor (40%) was colocalized at lipid rafts. The presence of the TXA2 receptor associated with lipid rafts in platelets is important for functional platelet responses to TXA2.

  12. Molecular targets of (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG): specificity and interaction with membrane lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Patra, S K; Rizzi, F; Silva, A; Rugina, D O; Bettuzzi, S

    2008-12-01

    Proteomic studies on anticancer activity of Green Tea Catechins (specifically EGCG) are suggesting a large set of protein targets that may directly interact with EGCG and alter the physiology of diseased cells, including cancer. Of notice, benign cells are usually left untouched. Lipid rafts have been recently recognized as signal processing hubs and suggested to be involved in drug uptake by means of endocytosis. These findings are suggesting new insights on the molecular mechanisms of anticancer drugs action. In the membrane, EGCG is hijacked by the laminin receptor (LamR), a lipid raft protein. Similar to aplidin and edelfosin, EGCG alters membrane domains composition also preventing EGF binding to EGFR, imerization of EGFR and relocation of phosphorylated EGFR to lipid rafts. In vitro studies have recently shown that EGCG also binds both DNA and RNA in GpC-rich regions. This event may importantly affect genes function. Moreover, EGCG was shown to inhibit telomerase, topoisomerase II and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1), thus ultimately affecting chromatin maintenance and remodeling. But another important alternative pathway besides interaction with specific proteins may play an important role in EGCG action: direct targeting of bioactive membrane platforms, lipid rafts. Structural alteration of the platforms deeply impact (and often inactivates) important pathways involving MAP kinases. The key issue is that, important and specific differences in lipid rafts composition have been found in transformed versus benign cells and apoptotic versus non-apoptotic cells. We suggest here that the anticancer activity of Green Tea Catechins against different kind of cancers may find an explanation in direct targeting of lipid rafts by EGCG. PMID:19261982

  13. Gravity-induced encapsulation of liquids by destabilization of granular rafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Protière, Suzie; Aristoff, Jeffrey M.; Stone, Howard A.

    2013-05-01

    Droplets and bubbles coated by a protective armour of particles find numerous applications in encapsulation, stabilization of emulsions and foams, and flotation techniques. Here we study the role of a body force, such as in flotation, as a means of continuous encapsulation by particles. We use dense particles, which self-assemble into rafts, at oil-water interfaces. We show that these rafts can be spontaneously or controllably destabilized into armoured oil-in-water droplets, which highlights a possible role for common granular materials in environmental remediation. We further present a method for continuous production and discuss the generalization of our approach towards colloidal scales.

  14. On ripples and rafts: Curvature induced nanoscale structures in lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Friederike; Dolezel, Stefan; Lenz, Olaf; Meinhardt, Sebastian

    2014-03-01

    We develop an elastic theory that predicts the spontaneous formation of nanoscale structures in lipid bilayers which locally phase separate between two phases with different spontaneous monolayer curvature. The theory rationalizes in a unified manner the observation of a variety of nanoscale structures in lipid membranes: Rippled states in one-component membranes, lipid rafts in multicomponent membranes. Furthermore, we report on recent observations of rippled states and rafts in simulations of a simple coarse-grained model for lipid bilayers, which are compatible with experimental observations and with our elastic model.

  15. Lipid raft-mediated Fas/CD95 apoptotic signaling in leukemic cells and normal leukocytes and therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Gajate, Consuelo; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2015-11-01

    Plasma membrane is now recognized to contain tightly packed cholesterol/sphingolipid-rich domains, known as lipid or membrane rafts, which are more ordered than the surrounding lipid bilayer. Lipid rafts are crucial for the compartmentalization of signaling processes in the membrane, mostly involved in cell survival and immune response. However, in the last 15 years, a large body of evidence has also identified raft platforms as scaffolds for the recruitment and clustering of death receptor Fas/CD95 and downstream signaling molecules, leading to the concept of death-promoting lipid rafts. This raft-Fas/CD95 coclustering was first described at the early 2000s as the underlying mechanism for the proapoptotic action of the alkylphospholipid analog edelfosine in leukemic cells, hence facilitating protein-protein interactions and conveying apoptotic signals independently of Fas/CD95 ligand. Edelfosine induces apoptosis in hematologic cancer cells and activated T-lymphocytes. Fas/CD95 raft coclustering is also promoted by Fas/CD95 ligand, agonistic Fas/CD95 antibodies, and additional antitumor drugs. Thus, death receptor recruitment in rafts is a physiologic process leading to cell demise that can be pharmacologically modulated. This redistribution and local accumulation of apoptotic molecules in membrane rafts, which are usually accompanied by displacement of survival signaling molecules, highlight how alterations in the apoptosis/survival signaling balance in specialized membrane regions modulate cell fate. Membrane rafts might also modulate apoptotic and nonapoptotic death receptor signaling. Here, we discuss the role of lipid rafts in Fas/CD95-mediated apoptotic cell signaling in hematologic cancer cells and normal leukocytes, with a special emphasis on their involvement as putative therapeutic targets in cancer and autoimmune diseases.

  16. Silver nanoparticles well-dispersed in amine-functionalized, one-pot made vesicles as an effective antibacterial agent.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuanming; Li, Jiefeng; Yu, Junyan; Zhao, Jinlai; Tang, Jiaoning

    2016-03-01

    We report a simple route to prepare silver nanoparticle (Ag NP) loaded amine functionalized poly-oligomeric (ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate block poly-glycidyl methacrylate (POEGMA-b-PGMA) vesicles as an effective antibacterial agent. Self-assemblies of POEGMA-b-PGMA were prepared from reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion polymerization mediated by a POEGMA macro-chain transfer agent (macro-CTA) in ethanol. Amine-functionalized self-assemblies were applied for Ag NP loading by using amine and hydroxyl groups as both the coordination agent and reductant under hydrothermal condition in high-pressure steam sterilization. 12.7 wt.% content of fine Ag NP well-dispersed in vesicles showed excellent antibacterial activities with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) below 5.0 and 10.0 mg/L against Escherichia coli and 2.5 and 80 mg/L against Staphylococcus aureus respectively.

  17. Cholera toxin is found in detergent-insoluble rafts/domains at the cell surface of hippocampal neurons but is internalized via a raft-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shogomori, H; Futerman, A H

    2001-03-23

    A number of studies have demonstrated that cholera toxin (CT) is found in detergent-insoluble, cholesterol-enriched domains (rafts) in various cells, including neurons. We now demonstrate that even though CT is associated with these domains at the cell surface of cultured hippocampal neurons, it is internalized via a raft-independent mechanism, at both early and late stages of neuronal development. CT transport to the Golgi apparatus, and its subsequent degradation, is inhibited by hypertonic medium (sucrose), and by chlorpromazine; the former blocks clathrin recruitment, and the latter causes aberrant endosomal accumulation of clathrin. Moreover, both internalization of the transferrin receptor (Tf-R), which occurs via a clathrin-dependent mechanism, and CT internalization, are inhibited to a similar extent by sucrose. In contrast, the cholesterol-binding agents filipin and methyl-beta-cyclodextrin have no effect on the rate of CT or Tf-R internalization. Finally, once internalized, CT becomes more detergent-soluble, and chlorpromazine treatment renders internalized CT completely detergent-soluble. We propose two models to explain how, despite being detergent-insoluble at the cell surface, CT is nevertheless internalized via a raft-independent mechanism in hippocampal neurons.

  18. Rheological investigation of the shear strength, durability, and recovery of alginate rafts formed by antacid medication in varying pH environments.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Brooke M; Steckbeck, Kathleen E; Murray, Lisa R; Erk, Kendra A

    2013-11-30

    The mechanical response of alginate rafts formed by mixing liquid alginate antacid medication (Gaviscon Extra Strength Liquid Antacid) with acidic solutions was investigated by deforming isolated rafts in a shear rheometer. As rafts were deformed to varying magnitudes of applied strain, rheological parameters were identified and related to the overall strength, durability, and recoverability of rafts formed at different pH (1.1-1.7) and aging conditions (0.5-4 h). Rafts formed in the lowest acidity solutions (pH 1.4, 1.7) were elastically weak ( G'₀ = 60 , 42 Pa for un-aged raft) yet maintained their elasticity during applied shear deformation to large values of strain (γc∼90%, 50%, where G'≈G″), and displayed a low-to-moderate level of elastic recovery following large-strain deformation. Rafts formed in the highest acidity solution had the greatest strength ( G'₀ = 500 Pa for un-aged raft and 21.5 kPa for rafts after 0.5 h of aging), reduced durability (γc∼2.5%, independent of aging), and displayed the greatest recoverability. A trade-off existed between un-aged raft strength and durability while recovery was dependent on durability, solution pH, and age. Rheometry-based evaluations of alginate rafts could be used for the informed design of future gastric retention and antacid products. PMID:24095816

  19. Internal Technical Report, Safety Analysis Report 5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, E.S.; Homer, G.B.; Shaber, C.R.; Thurow, T.L.

    1981-11-17

    The Raft River Geothermal Site is located in Southern Idaho's Raft River Valley, southwest of Malta, Idaho, in Cassia County. EG and G idaho, Inc., is the DOE's prime contractor for development of the Raft River geothermal field. Contract work has been progressing for several years towards creating a fully integrated utilization of geothermal water. Developmental progress has resulted in the drilling of seven major DOE wells. Four are producing geothermal water from reservoir temperatures measured to approximately 149 C (approximately 300 F). Closed-in well head pressures range from 69 to 102 kPa (100 to 175 psi). Two wells are scheduled for geothermal cold 60 C (140 F) water reinjection. The prime development effort is for a power plant designed to generate electricity using the heat from the geothermal hot water. The plant is designated as the ''5 MW(e) Raft River Research and Development Plant'' project. General site management assigned to EG and G has resulted in planning and development of many parts of the 5 MW program. Support and development activities have included: (1) engineering design, procurement, and construction support; (2) fluid supply and injection facilities, their study, and control; (3) development and installation of transfer piping systems for geothermal water collection and disposal by injection; and (4) heat exchanger fouling tests.

  20. Recombinant VSV G proteins reveal a novel raft-dependent endocytic pathway in resorbing osteoclasts

    SciTech Connect

    Mulari, Mika T.K. Nars, Martin; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina; Kaisto, Tuula; Metsikkoe, Kalervo; Sun Yi; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo

    2008-05-01

    Transcytotic membrane flow delivers degraded bone fragments from the ruffled border to the functional secretory domain, FSD, in bone resorbing osteoclasts. Here we show that there is also a FSD-to-ruffled border trafficking pathway that compensates for the membrane loss during the matrix uptake process and that rafts are essential for this ruffled border-targeted endosomal pathway. Replacing the cytoplasmic tail of the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein with that of CD4 resulted in partial insolubility in Triton X-100 and retargeting from the peripheral non-bone facing plasma membrane to the FSD. Recombinant G proteins were subsequently endosytosed and delivered from the FSD to the peripheral fusion zone of the ruffled border, which were both rich in lipid rafts as suggested by viral protein transport analysis and visualizing the rafts with fluorescent recombinant cholera toxin. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-{beta}-cyclodextrin impaired the ruffled border-targeted vesicle trafficking pathway and inhibited bone resorption dose-dependently as quantified by measuring the CTX and TRACP 5b secreted to the culture medium and by measuring the resorbed area visualized with a bi-phasic labeling method using sulpho-NHS-biotin and WGA-lectin. Thus, rafts are vital for membrane recycling from the FSD to the late endosomal/lysosomal ruffled border and bone resorption.

  1. Astronauts Borman and Lovell sit in life raft while awaiting pickup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Astronauts Frank Borman, command pilot, and James A. Lovell Jr., pilot, sit in life raft while awaiting pickup by a helicopter from the aircraft carrier U.S.S. Wasp. The three man Navy frogman team attached the flotation collar to increase the spacecraft's buoyancy prior to recovery.

  2. Membrane Rafts Are Involved in Intracellular Miconazole Accumulation in Yeast Cells*

    PubMed Central

    François, Isabelle E. J. A.; Bink, Anna; Vandercappellen, Jo; Ayscough, Kathryn R.; Toulmay, Alexandre; Schneiter, Roger; van Gyseghem, Elke; Van den Mooter, Guy; Borgers, Marcel; Vandenbosch, Davy; Coenye, Tom; Cammue, Bruno P. A.; Thevissen, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Azoles inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis, resulting in ergosterol depletion and accumulation of toxic 14α-methylated sterols in membranes of susceptible yeast. We demonstrated previously that miconazole induces actin cytoskeleton stabilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae prior to induction of reactive oxygen species, pointing to an ancillary mode of action. Using a genome-wide agar-based screening, we demonstrate in this study that S. cerevisiae mutants affected in sphingolipid and ergosterol biosynthesis, namely ipt1, sur1, skn1, and erg3 deletion mutants, are miconazole-resistant, suggesting an involvement of membrane rafts in its mode of action. This is supported by the antagonizing effect of membrane raft-disturbing compounds on miconazole antifungal activity as well as on miconazole-induced actin cytoskeleton stabilization and reactive oxygen species accumulation. These antagonizing effects point to a primary role for membrane rafts in miconazole antifungal activity. We further show that this primary role of membrane rafts in miconazole action consists of mediating intracellular accumulation of miconazole in yeast cells. PMID:19783660

  3. Membrane rafts are involved in intracellular miconazole accumulation in yeast cells.

    PubMed

    François, Isabelle E J A; Bink, Anna; Vandercappellen, Jo; Ayscough, Kathryn R; Toulmay, Alexandre; Schneiter, Roger; van Gyseghem, Elke; Van den Mooter, Guy; Borgers, Marcel; Vandenbosch, Davy; Coenye, Tom; Cammue, Bruno P A; Thevissen, Karin

    2009-11-20

    Azoles inhibit ergosterol biosynthesis, resulting in ergosterol depletion and accumulation of toxic 14alpha-methylated sterols in membranes of susceptible yeast. We demonstrated previously that miconazole induces actin cytoskeleton stabilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae prior to induction of reactive oxygen species, pointing to an ancillary mode of action. Using a genome-wide agar-based screening, we demonstrate in this study that S. cerevisiae mutants affected in sphingolipid and ergosterol biosynthesis, namely ipt1, sur1, skn1, and erg3 deletion mutants, are miconazole-resistant, suggesting an involvement of membrane rafts in its mode of action. This is supported by the antagonizing effect of membrane raft-disturbing compounds on miconazole antifungal activity as well as on miconazole-induced actin cytoskeleton stabilization and reactive oxygen species accumulation. These antagonizing effects point to a primary role for membrane rafts in miconazole antifungal activity. We further show that this primary role of membrane rafts in miconazole action consists of mediating intracellular accumulation of miconazole in yeast cells.

  4. 33 CFR 100.102 - Great Connecticut River Raft Race, Middletown, CT.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Great Connecticut River Raft Race, Middletown, CT. 100.102 Section 100.102 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.102 Great Connecticut...

  5. 33 CFR 100.102 - Great Connecticut River Raft Race, Middletown, CT.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Great Connecticut River Raft Race, Middletown, CT. 100.102 Section 100.102 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.102 Great Connecticut...

  6. Molecular mediators for raft-dependent endocytosis of syndecan-1, a highly conserved, multifunctional receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Keyang; Williams, Kevin Jon

    2013-05-17

    Endocytosis via rafts has attracted considerable recent interest, but the molecular mediators remain incompletely characterized. Here, we focused on the syndecan-1 heparan sulfate proteoglycan, a highly conserved, multifunctional receptor that we previously showed to undergo raft-dependent endocytosis upon clustering. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of three to five consecutive cytoplasmic residues at a time revealed that a conserved juxtamembrane motif, MKKK, was the only region required for efficient endocytosis after clustering. Endocytosis of clustered syndecan-1 occurs in two phases, each requiring a kinase and a corresponding cytoskeletal partner. In the initial phase, ligands trigger rapid MKKK-dependent activation of ERK and the localization of syndecan-1 into rafts. Activation of ERK drives the dissociation of syndecan-1 from α-tubulin, a molecule that may act as an anchor for syndecan-1 at the plasma membrane in the basal state. In the second phase, Src family kinases phosphorylate tyrosyl residues within the transmembrane and cytoplasmic regions of syndecan-1, a process that also requires MKKK. Tyrosine phosphorylation of syndecan-1 triggers the robust recruitment of cortactin, which we found to be an essential mediator of efficient actin-dependent endocytosis. These findings represent the first detailed characterization of the molecular events that drive endocytosis of a raft-dependent receptor and identify a novel endocytic motif, MKKK. Moreover, the results provide new tools to study syndecan function and regulation during uptake of its biologically and medically important ligands, such as HIV-1, atherogenic postprandial remnant lipoproteins, and molecules implicated in Alzheimer disease.

  7. STS-46 MS Chang-Diaz floats in life raft during water egress training at JSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Mission Specialist (MS) Franklin R. Chang-Diaz, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), relies on a one-person life raft to get him to 'safety' during a launch emergency egress (bailout) simulation conducted in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool.

  8. STS-52 Commander Wetherbee floats in life raft during JSC bailout exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-52 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, Commander James D. Wetherbee, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), floats in single person life raft during emergency egress (bailout) training exercises in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. The bailout exercises utilize the WETF's 25-foot deep pool as the ocean for this water landing simulation.

  9. Determination of homozygous susceptible strain in Culex quinquefasciatus (Say), using single raft sib-selection method.

    PubMed

    Hidayati, H; Nazni, W A; Mohd, S A

    2008-04-01

    The standard laboratory strain was found to be heterozygous for susceptibility. Hence, an attempt was made to obtain a homozygous susceptible strain in Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) using single raft sib-selection method. Lab-bred females of Cx. quinquefasciatus from insectariums, Unit of Medical Entomology were used in the experiment. After blood feeding Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes laid eggs in raft form, ten rafts selected randomly for the test. Each egg raft was introduced into a plastic tray from number one to number ten. Twenty-five third stage larvae from each tray were exposed to 17.5 microl from 500mg/l malathion in a paper cup label number 1 to number ten. In the bioassay, which had 100% mortality, the respective larva in that particular tray was bred to adult stage for the following generation. Less than 7days old female mosquitoes that emerged from F(0) were used in the test. The F(0) and the subsequent adult and larval stage generations were subjected to adult and larval bioassay. After selection for about 10 generations, a homozygous susceptible strain in Cx. quinquefasciatus was obtained.

  10. Creep of CMSX-4 superalloy single crystals: Effects of rafting at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, R.C.; Matan, N.; Cox, D.C.; Rist, M.A.; Rae, C.M.F.

    1999-09-29

    The creep performance of (001)-orientated CMSX-4 superalloy single crystals at temperatures beyond 1000 C is analyzed. Rafting of the {gamma}{prime} structure occurs rapidly, e.g., for the 1150 C/100 MPa tests rafting is completed within the first 10 h. At this stage and for a considerable time thereafter the creep strain rate decreases with increasing strain, implying a creep hardening effect which is absent at lower temperatures when the kinetics of rafting is less rapid. Once a critical strain {epsilon}* of (0.7 {+-} 0.3)% is reached, the creep strain increases dramatically and failure occurs within a few tens of hours. It is demonstrated that methods of interpretation which, assume a proportionality between the creep strain rate and creep strain, are unable to account for creep hardening which occurs as a consequence of rafting. A modification is proposed which accounts for the blocking of the glide/climb of {l{underscore}brace}111{r{underscore}brace}{l{underscore}angle}1{bar 1}0{r{underscore}angle} creep dislocations which occurs as the number of vertical {gamma} channels is reduced and cellular dislocation networks become stabilized. Consequently, failure must be taken to be associated with creep cavitation, which occurs predominantly around casting porosity. It is emphasized that more work is required to quantify the interaction between the various creep damage mechanisms.

  11. Membrane lipid rafts, master regulators of hematopoietic stem cell retention in bone marrow and their trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, M Z; Adamiak, M

    2015-07-01

    Cell outer membranes contain glycosphingolipids and protein receptors, which are integrated into glycoprotein microdomains, known as lipid rafts, which float freely in the membrane bilayer. These structures have an important role in assembling signaling molecules (e.g., Rac-1, RhoH and Lyn) together with surface receptors, such as the CXCR4 receptor for α-chemokine stromal-derived factor-1, the α4β1-integrin receptor (VLA-4) for vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and the c-kit receptor for stem cell factor, which together regulate several aspects of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell (HSPC) biology. Here, we discuss the role of lipid raft integrity in the retention and quiescence of normal HSPCs in bone marrow niches as well as in regulating HSPC mobilization and homing. We will also discuss the pathological consequences of the defect in lipid raft integrity seen in paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and the emerging evidence for the involvement of lipid rafts in hematological malignancies.

  12. Further evidence that paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria is a disorder of defective cell membrane lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Borkowska, Sylwia; Mierzejewska, Kasia; Kucia, Magda; Mendek-Czajkowska, Ewa; Suszynska, Malwina; Sharma, Vivek A; Deptala, Andrzej; Song, Wechao; Platzbecker, Uwe; Larratt, Loree; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Maciejewski, Jarek; Ratajczak, Janina

    2015-09-01

    The glycolipid glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor (GPI-A) plays an important role in lipid raft formation, which is required for proper expression on the cell surface of two inhibitors of the complement cascade, CD55 and CD59. The absence of these markers from the surface of blood cells, including erythrocytes, makes the cells susceptible to complement lysis, as seen in patients suffering from paroxysmal nocturnal haemoglobinuria (PNH). However, the explanation for why PNH-affected hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) expand over time in BM is still unclear. Here, we propose an explanation for this phenomenon and provide evidence that a defect in lipid raft formation in HSPCs leads to defective CXCR4- and VLA-4-mediated retention of these cells in BM. In support of this possibility, BM-isolated CD34(+) cells from PNH patients show a defect in the incorporation of CXCR4 and VLA-4 into membrane lipid rafts, respond weakly to SDF-1 stimulation, and show defective adhesion to fibronectin. Similar data were obtained with the GPI-A(-) Jurkat cell line. Moreover, we also report that chimeric mice transplanted with CD55(-/-)  CD59(-/-) BM cells but with proper GPI-A expression do not expand over time in transplanted hosts. On the basis of these findings, we propose that a defect in lipid raft formation in PNH-mutated HSPCs makes these cells more mobile, so that they expand and out-compete normal HSPCs from their BM niches over time.

  13. Quantitative Profiling of Brain Lipid Raft Proteome in a Mouse Model of Fragile X Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowska, Magdalena; Castillo, Catherine; Francesconi, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Fragile X Syndrome, a leading cause of inherited intellectual disability and autism, arises from transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene encoding an RNA-binding protein, Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP). FMRP can regulate the expression of approximately 4% of brain transcripts through its role in regulation of mRNA transport, stability and translation, thus providing a molecular rationale for its potential pleiotropic effects on neuronal and brain circuitry function. Several intracellular signaling pathways are dysregulated in the absence of FMRP suggesting that cellular deficits may be broad and could result in homeostatic changes. Lipid rafts are specialized regions of the plasma membrane, enriched in cholesterol and glycosphingolipids, involved in regulation of intracellular signaling. Among transcripts targeted by FMRP, a subset encodes proteins involved in lipid biosynthesis and homeostasis, dysregulation of which could affect the integrity and function of lipid rafts. Using a quantitative mass spectrometry-based approach we analyzed the lipid raft proteome of Fmr1 knockout mice, an animal model of Fragile X syndrome, and identified candidate proteins that are differentially represented in Fmr1 knockout mice lipid rafts. Furthermore, network analysis of these candidate proteins reveals connectivity between them and predicts functional connectivity with genes encoding components of myelin sheath, axonal processes and growth cones. Our findings provide insight to aid identification of molecular and cellular dysfunctions arising from Fmr1 silencing and for uncovering shared pathologies between Fragile X syndrome and other autism spectrum disorders. PMID:25849048

  14. Synthesis of hetero-polymer functionalized nanocarriers by combining surface-initiated ATRP and RAFT polymerization.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Hauptmann, Nicole; Appelhans, Dietmar; Formanek, Petr; Frank, Simon; Kaskel, Stefan; Temme, Achim; Voit, Brigitte

    2012-12-01

    Smart nanocarriers are created based on a bi-functional hetero-initiator for RAFT and ATRP technique, bi-functionalizing mesoporous silica nanoparticles with two polymer types. The pH-dependent behavior of PDEAEMA as the gatekeeper polymer is verified by electrokinetic measurements and a controlled release behavior is demonstrated using doxorubicin as the drug. PMID:22911545

  15. Astronauts McMonagle and Brown float in one-man life rafts during training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    In separate life rafts, astronauts Donald R. McMonagle (right), STS-66 mission commander, and Curtis L. Brown, STS-66 pilot, are assisted by several SCUBA-equipped divers during an emergency bailout training exercise in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF).

  16. STS-39 MS Hieb floats in single person life raft in JSC's WETF Bldg 29 pool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-39 Mission Specialist (MS) Richard J. Hieb, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), floats in single person life raft after landing in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. During emergency egress bailout procedures, Hieb practiced procedures necessary for a water landing. Divers monitor Hieb's activity.

  17. Cholesterol accumulation in Niemann Pick type C (NPC) model cells causes a shift in APP localization to lipid rafts

    SciTech Connect

    Kosicek, Marko; Malnar, Martina; Goate, Alison; Hecimovic, Silva

    2010-03-12

    It has been suggested that cholesterol may modulate amyloid-{beta} (A{beta}) formation, a causative factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD), by regulating distribution of the three key proteins in the pathogenesis of AD ({beta}-amyloid precursor protein (APP), {beta}-secretase (BACE1) and/or presenilin 1 (PS1)) within lipid rafts. In this work we tested whether cholesterol accumulation upon NPC1 dysfunction, which causes Niemann Pick type C disease (NPC), causes increased partitioning of APP into lipid rafts leading to increased CTF/A{beta} formation in these cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains. To test this we used CHO NPC1{sup -/-} cells (NPC cells) and parental CHOwt cells. By sucrose density gradient centrifugation we observed a shift in fl-APP/CTF compartmentalization into lipid raft fractions upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC vs. wt cells. Furthermore, {gamma}-secretase inhibitor treatment significantly increased fl-APP/CTF distribution in raft fractions in NPC vs. wt cells, suggesting that upon cholesterol accumulation in NPC1-null cells increased formation of APP-CTF and its increased processing towards A{beta} occurs in lipid rafts. Our results support that cholesterol overload, such as in NPC disease, leads to increased partitioning of APP/CTF into lipid rafts resulting in increased amyloidogenic processing of APP in these cholesterol-rich membranes. This work adds to the mechanism of the cholesterol-effect on APP processing and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease and supports the role of lipid rafts in these processes.

  18. New EMBO members' review: actin cytoskeleton regulation through modulation of PI(4,5)P(2) rafts.

    PubMed

    Caroni, P

    2001-08-15

    The phosphoinositide lipid PI(4,5)P(2) is now established as a key cofactor in signaling to the actin cytoskeleton and in vesicle trafficking. PI(4,5)P(2) accumulates at membrane rafts and promotes local co-recruitment and activation of specific signaling components at the cell membrane. PI(4,5)P(2) rafts may thus be platforms for local regulation of morphogenetic activity at the cell membrane. Raft PI(4,5)P(2) is regulated by lipid kinases (PI5-kinases) and lipid phosphatases (e.g. synaptojanin). In addition, GAP43-like proteins have recently emerged as a group of PI(4,5)P(2) raft-modulating proteins. These locally abundant proteins accumulate at inner leaflet plasmalemmal rafts where they bind to and co-distribute with PI(4,5)P(2), and promote actin cytoskeleton accumulation and dynamics. In keeping with their proposed role as positive modulators of PI(4,5)P(2) raft function, GAP43-like proteins confer competence for regulated morphogenetic activity on cells that express them. Their function has been investigated extensively in the nervous system, where their expression promotes neurite outgrowth, anatomical plasticity and nerve regeneration. Extrinsic signals and intrinsic factors may thus converge to modulate PI(4,5)P(2) rafts, upstream of regulated activity at the cell surface.

  19. The synaptic recruitment of lipid rafts is dependent on CD19-PI3K module and cytoskeleton remodeling molecules.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liling; Auzins, Arturs; Sun, Xiaolin; Xu, Yinsheng; Harnischfeger, Fiona; Lu, Yun; Li, Zhanguo; Chen, Ying-Hua; Zheng, Wenjie; Liu, Wanli

    2015-08-01

    Sphingolipid- and cholesterol-rich lipid raft microdomains are important in the initiation of BCR signaling. Although it is known that lipid rafts promote the coclustering of BCR and Lyn kinase microclusters within the B cell IS, the molecular mechanism of the recruitment of lipid rafts into the B cell IS is not understood completely. Here, we report that the synaptic recruitment of lipid rafts is dependent on the cytoskeleton-remodeling proteins, RhoA and Vav. Such an event is also efficiently regulated by motor proteins, myosin IIA and dynein. Further evidence suggests the synaptic recruitment of lipid rafts is, by principle, an event triggered by BCR signaling molecules and second messenger molecules. BCR-activating coreceptor CD19 potently enhances such an event depending on its cytoplasmic Tyr421 and Tyr482 residues. The enhancing function of the CD19-PI3K module in synaptic recruitment of lipid rafts is also confirmed in human peripheral blood B cells. Thus, these results improve our understanding of the molecular mechanism of the recruitment of lipid raft microdomains in B cell IS.

  20. Activation of integrin α5 mediated by flow requires its translocation to membrane lipid rafts in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoli; Fu, Yi; Gu, Mingxia; Zhang, Lu; Li, Dan; Li, Hongliang; Chien, Shu; Shyy, John Y-J; Zhu, Yi

    2016-01-19

    Local flow patterns determine the uneven distribution of atherosclerotic lesions. Membrane lipid rafts and integrins are crucial for shear stress-regulated endothelial function. In this study, we investigate the role of lipid rafts and integrin α5 in regulating the inflammatory response in endothelial cells (ECs) under atheroprone versus atheroprotective flow. Lipid raft proteins were isolated from ECs exposed to oscillatory shear stress (OS) or pulsatile shear stress, and then analyzed by quantitative proteomics. Among 396 proteins redistributed in lipid rafts, integrin α5 was the most significantly elevated in lipid rafts under OS. In addition, OS increased the level of activated integrin α5 in lipid rafts through the regulation of membrane cholesterol and fluidity. Disruption of F-actin-based cytoskeleton and knockdown of caveolin-1 prevented the OS-induced integrin α5 translocation and activation. In vivo, integrin α5 activation and EC dysfunction were observed in the atheroprone areas of low-density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (Ldlr(-/-)) mice, and knockdown of integrin α5 markedly attenuated EC dysfunction in partially ligated carotid arteries. Consistent with these findings, mice with haploinsufficency of integrin α5 exhibited a reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in the regions under atheroprone flow. The present study has revealed an integrin- and membrane lipid raft-dependent mechanotransduction mechanism by which atheroprone flow causes endothelial dysfunction.

  1. Development and evaluation of gastroretentive raft forming systems incorporating curcumin-Eudragit® EPO solid dispersions for gastric ulcer treatment.

    PubMed

    Kerdsakundee, Nattha; Mahattanadul, Sirima; Wiwattanapatapee, Ruedeekorn

    2015-08-01

    Novel raft forming systems incorporating curcumin-Eudragit® EPO solid dispersions were developed to prolong the gastric residence time and provide for a controlled release therapy of curcumin to treat gastric ulcers. The solid dispersions of curcumin with Eudragit® EPO were prepared by the solvent evaporation method at various ratios to improve the solubility and the dissolution of curcumin. The optimum weight ratio of 1:5 for curcumin to Eudragit® EPO was used to incorporate into the raft forming systems. The raft forming formulations were composed of curcumin-Eudragit® EPO solid dispersions, sodium alginate as a gelling polymer and calcium carbonate for generating divalent Ca(2+) ions and carbon dioxide to form a floating raft. All formulations formed a gelled raft in 1min and sustained buoyancy on the 0.1N hydrochloric acid (pH 1.2) surface with a 60-85% release of curcumin within 8h. The curative effect on the acetic acid-induced chronic gastric ulcer in rats was determined. The curcumin raft forming formulations at 40mg/kg once daily showed a superior curative effect on the gastric ulcer in terms of the ulcer index and healing index than the standard antisecretory agent: lansoprazole (1mg/kg, twice daily) and a curcumin suspension (40mg/kg, twice daily). These studies demonstrated that the new raft forming systems containing curcumin solid dispersions are promising carriers for a stomach-specific delivery of poorly soluble lipophilic compounds.

  2. Proteomics of MUC1-containing lipid rafts from plasma membranes and exosomes of human breast carcinoma cells MCF-7.

    PubMed

    Staubach, Simon; Razawi, Hanieh; Hanisch, Franz-Georg

    2009-05-01

    Apically expressed human MUC1 is known to become endocytosed and either to re-enter the secretory pathway for recycling to the plasma membrane or to be exported by the cells via the formation of multi-vesicular bodies and the release of exosomes. By using recombinant fusion-tagged MUC1 as a bait protein we followed an anti-myc affinity-based approach for isolating subpopulations of lipid rafts from the plasma membranes and exosomes of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. MUC1(+) lipid rafts were not only found to contain genuine raft proteins (flotillin-1, prohibitin, G protein, annexin A2), but also raft-associated proteins linking these to the cytoskeleton (ezrin/villin-2, profilin II, HSP27, gamma-actin, beta-actin) or proteins in complexes with raft proteins, including the bait protein (HSP60, HSP70). Major overlaps were revealed for the subproteomes of plasma membranous and exosomal lipid raft preparations, indicating that MUC1 is sorted into subpopulations of rafts for its trafficking via flotillin-dependent pathways and export via exosomes.

  3. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 7 regulates cAMP signal within lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Oshikawa, Jin; Toya, Yoshiyuki; Fujita, Takayuki; Egawa, Masato; Kawabe, Junichi; Umemura, Satoshi; Ishikawa, Yoshihiro

    2003-09-01

    Neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are made of multiple subunits with diversified functions. The nAChR alpha 7-subunit has a property of high Ca2+ permeability and may have specific functions and localization within the plasma membrane as a signal transduction molecule. In PC-12 cells, fractionation by sucrose gradient centrifugation revealed that nAChR alpha 7 existed in low-density, cholesterol-enriched plasma membrane microdomains known as lipid rafts where flotillin also exists. In contrast, nAChR alpha 5- and beta2-subunits were located in high-density fractions, out of the lipid rafts. Type 6 adenylyl cyclase (AC6), a calcium-inhibitable isoform, was also found in lipid rafts and was coimmunoprecipitated with nAChR alpha 7. Cholesterol depletion from plasma membranes with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin redistributed nAChR alpha 7 and AC6 diffusely within plasma membranes. Nicotine stimulation reduced forskolin-stimulated AC activity by 35%, and this inhibition was negated by either treatment with alpha-bungarotoxin, a specific antagonist of nAChR alpha 7, or cholesterol depletion from plasma membranes. The effect of cholesterol depletion was negated by the addition of cholesterol. These data suggest that nAChR alpha 7 has a specific membrane localization relative to other nAChR subunits and that lipid rafts are necessary to localize nAChR alpha 7 with AC within plasma membranes. In addition, nAChR alpha 7 may regulate the AC activity via Ca2+ within lipid rafts.

  4. Requirements for activation and RAFT localization of the T-lymphocyte kinase Rlk/Txk

    PubMed Central

    Chamorro, Mario; Czar, Michael J; Debnath, Jayanta; Cheng, Genhong; Lenardo, Michael J; Varmus, Harold E; Schwartzberg, Pamela L

    2001-01-01

    Background The Tec family kinases are implicated in signaling from lymphocyte antigen receptors and are activated following phosphorylation by Src kinases. For most Tec kinases, this activation requires an interaction between their pleckstrin homology (PH) domains and the products of phosphoinositide 3-Kinase, which localizes Tec kinases to membrane RAFTs. Rlk/Txk is a Tec related kinase expressed in T cells that lacks a pleckstrin homology domain, having instead a palmitoylated cysteine-string motif. To evaluate Rlk's function in T cell receptor signaling cascades, we examined the requirements for Rlk localization and activation by Src family kinases. Results We demonstrate that Rlk is also associated with RAFTs, despite its lack of a pleckstrin homology domain. Rlk RAFT association requires the cysteine-string motif and is independent of PI3 Kinase activity. We further demonstrate that Rlk can be phosphorylated and activated by Src kinases, leading to a decrease in its half-life. A specific tyrosine in the activation loop of Rlk, Y420, is required for phosphorylation and activation, as well as for decreased stability, but is not required for lipid RAFT association. Mutation of this tyrosine also prevents increased tyrosine phosphorylation of Rlk after stimulation of the T cell receptor, suggesting that Rlk is phosphorylated by Src family kinases in response to T cell receptor engagement. Conclusions Like the other related Tec kinases, Rlk is associated with lipid RAFTs and can be phosphorylated and activated by Src family kinases, supporting a role for Rlk in signaling downstream of Src kinases in T cell activation. PMID:11353545

  5. Effect of glycyrrhetinic acid on lipid raft model at the air/water interface.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Seiichi; Uto, Takuhiro; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2015-02-01

    To investigate an interfacial behavior of the aglycon of glycyrrhizin (GC), glycyrrhetinic acid (GA), with a lipid raft model consisting of equimolar ternary mixtures of N-palmitoyl sphingomyelin (PSM), dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), and cholesterol (CHOL), Langmuir monolayer techniques were systematically conducted. Surface pressure (π)-molecular area (A) and surface potential (ΔV)-A isotherms showed that the adsorbed GA at the air/water interface was desorbed into the bulk upon compression of the lipid monolayer. In situ morphological analysis by Brewster angle microscopy and fluorescence microscopy revealed that the raft domains became smaller as the concentrations of GA in the subphase (CGA) increased, suggesting that GA promotes the formation of fluid networks related to various cellular processes via lipid rafts. In addition, ex situ morphological analysis by atomic force microscopy revealed that GA interacts with lipid raft by lying down at the surface. Interestingly, the distinctive striped regions were formed at CGA=5.0 μM. This phenomenon was observed to be induced by the interaction of CHOL with adsorbed GA and is involved in the membrane-disrupting activity of saponin and its aglycon. A quantitative comparison of GA with GC (Sakamoto et al., 2013) revealed that GA interacts more strongly with the raft model than GC in the monolayer state. Various biological activities of GA are known to be stronger than those of GC. This fact allows us to hypothesize that differences in the interactions of GA/GC with the model monolayer correlate to their degree of exertion for numerous activities.

  6. Edelfosine and miltefosine effects on lipid raft properties: membrane biophysics in cell death by antitumor lipids.

    PubMed

    Castro, Bruno M; Fedorov, Aleksander; Hornillos, Valentin; Delgado, Javier; Acuña, A Ulises; Mollinedo, Faustino; Prieto, Manuel

    2013-07-01

    Edelfosine (1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-sn-glycero-phosphocholine) and miltefosine (hexadecylphosphocholine) are synthetic alkylphospholipids (ALPs) that are reported to selectively accumulate in tumor cell membranes, inducing Fas clustering and activation on lipid rafts, triggering apoptosis. However, the exact mechanism by which these lipids elicit these events is still not fully understood. Recent studies propose that their mode of action might be related with alterations of lipid rafts biophysical properties caused by these lipid drugs. To achieve a clear understanding of this mechanism, we studied the effects of pharmacologically relevant amounts of edelfosine and miltefosine in the properties of model and cellular membranes. The influence of these molecules on membrane order, lateral organization, and lipid rafts molar fraction and size were studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence methods, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET), confocal and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). We found that the global membrane and lipid rafts biophysical properties of both model and cellular membranes were not significantly affected by both the ALPs. Nonetheless, in model membranes, a mild increase in membrane fluidity induced by both alkyl lipids was detected, although this effect was more noticeable for edelfosine than miltefosine. This absence of drastic alterations shows for the first time that ALPs mode of action is unlikely to be directly linked to alterations of lipid rafts biophysical properties caused by these drugs. The biological implications of this result are discussed in the context of ALPs effects on lipid metabolism, mitochondria homeostasis modulation, and their relationship with tumor cell death.

  7. Syntaxin and VAMP association with lipid rafts depends on cholesterol depletion in capacitating sperm cells.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Shiue; De Vries, Klaas J; De Boer-Brouwer, Mieke; Garcia-Gil, Nuria; Van Gestel, Renske A; Colenbrander, Ben; Gadella, Bart M; Van Haeften, Theo

    2007-01-01

    Sperm cells represent a special exocytotic system since mature sperm cells contain only one large secretory vesicle, the acrosome, which fuses with the overlying plasma membrane during the fertilization process. Acrosomal exocytosis is believed to be regulated by activation of SNARE proteins. In this paper, we identified specific members of the SNARE protein family, i.e., the t-SNAREs syntaxin1 and 2, and the v-SNARE VAMP, present in boar sperm cells. Both syntaxins were predominantly found in the plasma membrane whereas v-SNAREs are mainly located in the outer acrosomal membrane of these cells. Under non-capacitating conditions both syntaxins and VAMP are scattered in well-defined punctate structures over the entire sperm head. Bicarbonate-induced in vitro activation in the presence of BSA causes a relocalization of these SNAREs to a more homogeneous distribution restricted to the apical ridge area of the sperm head, exactly matching the site of sperm zona binding and subsequent induced acrosomal exocytosis. This redistribution of syntaxin and VAMP depends on cholesterol depletion and closely resembles the previously reported redistribution of lipid raft marker proteins. Detergent-resistant membrane isolation and subsequent analysis shows that a significant proportion of syntaxin emerges in the detergent-resistant membrane (raft) fraction under such conditions, which is not the case under those conditions where cholesterol depletion is blocked. The v-SNARE VAMP displays a similar cholesterol depletion-dependent lateral and raft redistribution. Taken together, our results indicate that redistribution of syntaxin and VAMP during capacitation depends on association of these SNAREs with lipid rafts and that such a SNARE-raft association may be essential for spatial control of exocytosis and/or regulation of SNARE functioning.

  8. Irreversible heavy chain transfer to chondroitin.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Mark E; Hascall, Vincent C; Green, Dixy E; DeAngelis, Paul L; Calabro, Anthony

    2014-10-17

    We have recently demonstrated that the transfer of heavy chains (HCs) from inter-α-inhibitor, via the enzyme TSG-6 (tumor necrosis factor-stimulated gene 6), to hyaluronan (HA) oligosaccharides is an irreversible event in which subsequent swapping of HCs between HA molecules does not occur. We now describe our results of HC transfer experiments to chondroitin sulfate A, chemically desulfated chondroitin, chemoenzymatically synthesized chondroitin, unsulfated heparosan, heparan sulfate, and alginate. Of these potential HC acceptors, only chemically desulfated chondroitin and chemoenzymatically synthesized chondroitin were HC acceptors. The kinetics of HC transfer to chondroitin was similar to HA. At earlier time points, HCs were more widely distributed among the different sizes of chondroitin chains. As time progressed, the HCs migrated to lower molecular weight chains of chondroitin. Our interpretation is that TSG-6 swaps the HCs from the larger, reversible sites on chondroitin chains, which function as HC acceptors, onto smaller chondroitin chains, which function as irreversible HC acceptors. HCs transferred to smaller chondroitin chains were unable to be swapped off the smaller chondroitin chains and transferred to HA. HCs transferred to high molecular weight HA were unable to be swapped onto chondroitin. We also present data that although chondroitin was a HC acceptor, HA was the preferred acceptor when chondroitin and HA were in the same reaction mixture.

  9. Proteomic Analysis of ABCA1-Null Macrophages Reveals a Role for Stomatin-Like Protein-2 in Raft Composition and Toll-Like Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Saiful M; Zhu, Xuewei; Aloor, Jim J; Azzam, Kathleen M; Gabor, Kristin A; Ge, William; Addo, Kezia A; Tomer, Kenneth B; Parks, John S; Fessler, Michael B

    2015-07-01

    Lipid raft membrane microdomains organize signaling by many prototypical receptors, including the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system. Raft-localization of proteins is widely thought to be regulated by raft cholesterol levels, but this is largely on the basis of studies that have manipulated cell cholesterol using crude and poorly specific chemical tools, such as β-cyclodextrins. To date, there has been no proteome-scale investigation of whether endogenous regulators of intracellular cholesterol trafficking, such as the ATP binding cassette (ABC)A1 lipid efflux transporter, regulate targeting of proteins to rafts. Abca1(-/-) macrophages have cholesterol-laden rafts that have been reported to contain increased levels of select proteins, including TLR4, the lipopolysaccharide receptor. Here, using quantitative proteomic profiling, we identified 383 proteins in raft isolates from Abca1(+/+) and Abca1(-/-) macrophages. ABCA1 deletion induced wide-ranging changes to the raft proteome. Remarkably, many of these changes were similar to those seen in Abca1(+/+) macrophages after lipopolysaccharide exposure. Stomatin-like protein (SLP)-2, a member of the stomatin-prohibitin-flotillin-HflK/C family of membrane scaffolding proteins, was robustly and specifically increased in Abca1(-/-) rafts. Pursuing SLP-2 function, we found that rafts of SLP-2-silenced macrophages had markedly abnormal composition. SLP-2 silencing did not compromise ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux but reduced macrophage responsiveness to multiple TLR ligands. This was associated with reduced raft levels of the TLR co-receptor, CD14, and defective lipopolysaccharide-induced recruitment of the common TLR adaptor, MyD88, to rafts. Taken together, we show that the lipid transporter ABCA1 regulates the protein repertoire of rafts and identify SLP-2 as an ABCA1-dependent regulator of raft composition and of the innate immune response.

  10. Analysis of the interaction between respiratory syncytial virus and lipid-rafts in Hep2 cells during infection

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Gaie; Jeffree, Chris E.; McDonald, Terence; McL Rixon, Helen W.; Aitken, James D.; Sugrue, Richard J. . E-mail: r.sugrue@vir.gla.ac.uk

    2004-10-01

    The assembly of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in lipid-rafts was examined in Hep2 cells. Confocal and electron microscopy showed that during RSV assembly, the cellular distribution of the complement regulatory proteins, decay accelerating factor (CD55) and CD59, changes and high levels of these cellular proteins are incorporated into mature virus filaments. The detergent-solubility properties of CD55, CD59, and the RSV fusion (F) protein were found to be consistent with each protein being located predominantly within lipid-raft structures. The levels of these proteins in cell-released virus were examined by immunoelectronmicroscopy and found to account for between 5% and 15% of the virus attachment (G) glycoprotein levels. Collectively, our findings suggest that an intimate association exists between RSV and lipid-raft membranes and that significant levels of these host-derived raft proteins, such as those regulating complement activation, are subsequently incorporated into the envelope of mature virus particles.

  11. Lipid rafts participate in aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta peptide in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xin; Yang, Chun; Liu, Yufeng; Li, Peng; Yang, Huiying; Dai, Jingxing; Qu, Rongmei; Yuan, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Amyloid-beta peptide is the main component of amyloid plaques, which are found in Alzheimer's disease. The generation and deposition of amyloid-beta is one of the crucial factors for the onset and progression of Alzheimer's disease. Lipid rafts are glycolipid-rich liquid domains of the plasma membrane, where certain types of protein tend to aggregate and intercalate. Lipid rafts are involved in the generation of amyloid-beta oligomers and the formation of amyloid-beta peptides. In this paper, we review the mechanism by which lipid rafts disturb the aberrant degradative autophagic-lysosomal pathway of amyloid-beta, which plays an important role in the pathological process of Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, we describe this mechanism from the view of the Two-system Theory of fasciology and thus, suggest that lipid rafts may be a new target of Alzheimer's disease treatment. PMID:25206748

  12. GM1 improves neurofascin155 association with lipid rafts and prevents rat brain myelin injury after hypoxia-ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y P; Huang, Q L; Zhao, C M; Tang, J L; Wang, Y L

    2011-06-01

    White matter injury characterized by damage to myelin is an important process in hypoxic-ischemic brain damage (HIBD). Because the oligodendrocyte-specific isoform of neurofascin, neurofascin 155 (NF155), and its association with lipid rafts are essential for the establishment and stabilization of the paranodal junction, which is required for tight interaction between myelin and axons, we analyzed the effect of monosialotetrahexosyl ganglioside (GM1) on NF155 expression and its association with lipid rafts after HIBD in Sprague-Dawley rats, weighing 12-15 g, on day 7 post-partum (P7; N = 20 per group). HIBD was induced on P7 and the rats were divided into two groups: one group received an intraperitoneal injection of 50 mg/kg GM1 three times and the other group an injection of saline. There was also a group of 20 sham-operated rats. After sacrifice, the brains of the rats were removed on P30 and studied by immunochemistry, SDS-PAGE, Western blot analysis, and electron microscopy. Staining showed that the saline group had definite rarefaction and fragmentation of brain myelin sheaths, whereas the GM1 group had no obvious structural changes. The GM1 group had 1.9-2.9-fold more GM1 in lipid rafts than the saline group (fraction 3-6; all P < 0.05) and 0.5-2.4-fold higher expression of NF155 in lipid rafts (fraction 3-5; all P < 0.05). Injection of GM1 increased the content of GM1 in lipid rafts as well as NF155 expression and its lipid raft association in HIBD rat brains. GM1 may repair the structure of lipid rafts, promote the association of NF155 (or other important proteins) with lipid rafts, stabilize the structure of paranodes, and eventually prevent myelin sheath damage, suggesting a novel mechanism for its neuroprotective properties.

  13. HIV-1 Vpu's lipid raft association is dispensable for counteraction of the particle release restriction imposed by CD317/Tetherin

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Joeelle V. Tibroni, Nadine Keppler, Oliver T. Fackler, Oliver T.

    2012-03-01

    HIV-1 Vpu antagonizes the block to particle release mediated by CD317 (BST-2/HM1.24/Tetherin) via incompletely understood mechanisms. Vpu and CD317 partially reside in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts where HIV-1 budding preferentially occurs. Here we find that lipid raft association of ectopically expressed or endogenous CD317 was unaltered upon co-expression with Vpu or following HIV-1 infection. Similarly, Vpu's lipid raft association remained unchanged upon expression of CD317. We identify amino acids V25 and Y29 of Vpu as crucial for microdomain partitioning and single substitution of these amino acids resulted in Vpu variants with markedly reduced or undetectable lipid raft association. These mutations did not affect Vpu's subcellular distribution and binding capacity to CD317, nor its ability to downmodulate cell surface CD317 and promote HIV-1 release from CD317-positive cells. We conclude that (i) lipid raft incorporation is dispensable for Vpu-mediated CD317 antagonism and (ii) Vpu does not antagonize CD317 by extraction from lipid rafts.

  14. Alterations in cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Zhang, Ke; Tan, Liang; Chen, Yu-Hua; Cao, Yun-Peng

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in the protein, cholesterol, and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts in platelets from patients with Alzheimer disease (AD), and identify potential blood biomarkers of the disease. A total of 31 Chinese patients with AD and 31 aged-matched control subjects were selected. Lipid rafts were isolated from platelets using Optiprep gradient centrifugation. The protein content of lipid rafts was evaluated using Micro BCA assay, the cholesterol content using molecular probes, ganglioside GM1 content using colorimetry and dot-blotting analysis. The results showed that the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from platelets was significantly higher in patients with AD than aged-matched control subjects, whereas the protein content of lipid rafts did not show any differences between the 2 groups. These results indicate that the increases in the cholesterol and ganglioside GM1 content of lipid rafts from the platelets of patients with AD might serve as a biochemical adjunct to the clinical diagnosis of AD.

  15. Evidence for multiphase water-escape during rafting of shelly marine sediments at Clava, Inverness-shire, NE Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Emrys; Merritt, Jon

    2008-05-01

    The Pleistocene shelly glaciomarine sediments exposed at Clava, near Inverness, northeast Scotland, occur in a series of thrust-bound rafts accreted at on the up-ice side of a bedrock high (150 m above OD) on the SE side of the valley of the River Nairn. These sediments originally formed part of a coarsening upwards deltaic or subaqueous fan sequence deposited in the marine fjord of the Loch Ness basin, located some 50 km to the SW. The geometry of these allochthonous rafts, coupled with the associated thrusting and large-scale folding of these bodies, are typical of many glacially transported rafts described in literature. However, at Clava, macro- and microscopic evidence indicates that these ice-rafted sediments were not frozen, with liquefaction, hydrofracturing and water-escape occurring repeatedly during their transport and accretion. The presence of large-scale detachments within the sequence has led to the development of a purely glacitectonic model for rafting at Clava. The detachments acted as a focus for fluid flow which lubricated these décollement surfaces, aiding in the subglacial transport of the rafts.

  16. Evidence that the respiratory syncytial virus polymerase complex associates with lipid rafts in virus-infected cells: a proteomic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Terence P.; Pitt, Andrew R.; Brown, Gaie; Rixon, Helen W. McL.; Sugrue, Richard J. . E-mail: r.sugrue@vir.gla.ac.uk

    2004-12-05

    The interaction between the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) polymerase complex and lipid rafts was examined in HEp2 cells. Lipid-raft membranes were prepared from virus-infected cells and their protein content was analysed by Western blotting and mass spectrometry. This analysis revealed the presence of the N, P, L, M2-1 and M proteins. However, these proteins appeared to differ from one another in their association with these structures, with the M2-1 protein showing a greater partitioning into raft membranes compared to that of the N, P or M proteins. Determination of the polymerase activity profile of the gradient fractions revealed that 95% of the detectable viral enzyme activity was associated with lipid-raft membranes. Furthermore, analysis of virus-infected cells by confocal microscopy suggested an association between these proteins and the raft-lipid, GM1. Together, these results provide evidence that the RSV polymerase complex is able to associate with lipid rafts in virus-infected cells.

  17. The stromal cell-surface protease fibroblast activation protein-α localizes to lipid rafts and is recruited to invadopodia.

    PubMed

    Knopf, Julia D; Tholen, Stefan; Koczorowska, Maria M; De Wever, Olivier; Biniossek, Martin L; Schilling, Oliver

    2015-10-01

    Fibroblast activation protein alpha (FAPα) is a cell surface protease expressed by cancer-associated fibroblasts in the microenvironment of most solid tumors. As there is increasing evidence for proteases having non-catalytic functions, we determined the FAPα interactome in cancer-associated fibroblasts using the quantitative immunoprecipitation combined with knockdown (QUICK) method. Complex formation with adenosin deaminase, erlin-2, stomatin, prohibitin, Thy-1 membrane glycoprotein, and caveolin-1 was further validated by immunoblotting. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of the known stoichiometric FAPα binding partner dipeptidyl-peptidase IV (DPPIV) corroborated the proteomic strategy. Reverse co-IPs validated the FAPα interaction with caveolin-1, erlin-2, and stomatin while co-IP upon RNA-interference mediated knock-down of DPPIV excluded adenosin deaminase as a direct FAPα interaction partner. Many newly identified FAPα interaction partners localize to lipid rafts, including caveolin-1, a widely-used marker for lipid raft localization. We hypothesized that this indicates a recruitment of FAPα to lipid raft structures. In density gradient centrifugation, FAPα co-fractionates with caveolin-1. Immunofluorescence optical sectioning microscopy of FAPα and lipid raft markers further corroborates recruitment of FAPα to lipid rafts and invadopodia. FAPα is therefore an integral component of stromal lipid rafts in solid tumors. In essence, we provide one of the first interactome analyses of a cell surface protease and translate these results into novel biological aspects of a marker protein for cancer-associated fibroblasts.

  18. Host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa requires ceramide-rich membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Grassmé, H; Jendrossek, V; Riehle, A; von Kürthy, G; Berger, J; Schwarz, H; Weller, M; Kolesnick, R; Gulbins, E

    2003-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection is a serious complication in patients with cystic fibrosis and in immunocompromised individuals. Here we show that P. aeruginosa infection triggers activation of the acid sphingomyelinase and the release of ceramide in sphingolipid-rich rafts. Ceramide reorganizes these rafts into larger signaling platforms that are required to internalize P. aeruginosa, induce apoptosis and regulate the cytokine response in infected cells. Failure to generate ceramide-enriched membrane platforms in infected cells results in an unabated inflammatory response, massive release of interleukin (IL)-1 and septic death of mice. Our findings show that ceramide-enriched membrane platforms are central to the host defense against this potentially lethal pathogen. PMID:12563314

  19. Effects of irrigation on crops and soils with Raft River geothermal water

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, N.E.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    The Raft River Irrigation Experiment investigated the suitability of using energy-expended geothermal water for irrigation of selected field-grown crops. Crop and soil behavior on plots sprinkled or surface irrigated with geothermal water was compared to crop and soil behavior on plots receiving water from shallow irrigation wells and the Raft River. In addition, selected crops were produced, using both geothermal irrigation water and special management techniques. Crops irrigated with geothermal water exhibited growth rates, yields, and nutritional values similar to comparison crops. Cereal grains and surface-irrigated forage crops did not exhibit elevated fluoride levels or accumulations of heavy metals. However, forage crops sprinkled with geothermal water did accumulate fluorides, and leaching experiments indicate that new soils receiving geothermal water may experience increased salinity, exchangeable sodium, and decreased permeability. Soil productivity may be maintained by leaching irrigations.

  20. Complex and Multidimensional Lipid Raft Alterations in a Murine Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Wayne; Brenneman, Randall; Martin, Bronwen; Maudsley, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Various animal models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been created to assist our appreciation of AD pathophysiology, as well as aid development of novel therapeutic strategies. Despite the discovery of mutated proteins that predict the development of AD, there are likely to be many other proteins also involved in this disorder. Complex physiological processes are mediated by coherent interactions of clusters of functionally related proteins. Synaptic dysfunction is one of the hallmarks of AD. Synaptic proteins are organized into multiprotein complexes in high-density membrane structures, known as lipid rafts. These microdomains enable coherent clustering of synergistic signaling proteins. We have used mass analytical techniques and multiple bioinformatic approaches to better appreciate the intricate interactions of these multifunctional proteins in the 3xTgAD murine model of AD. Our results show that there are significant alterations in numerous receptor/cell signaling proteins in cortical lipid rafts isolated from 3xTgAD mice. PMID:21151659

  1. A phase field model incorporating strain gradient viscoplasticity: Application to rafting in Ni-base superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottura, M.; Le Bouar, Y.; Finel, A.; Appolaire, B.; Ammar, K.; Forest, S.

    2012-07-01

    The first formulation of a phase field model accounting for size-dependent viscoplasticity is developed to study materials in which microstructure evolution and viscoplastic behavior are strongly coupled. Plasticity is introduced using a continuum strain gradient formalism which captures the size effect of the viscoplastic behavior. First, the influence of this size effect on the mechanical behavior of the material is discussed in static microstructures. Then, the dynamic coupling between microstructure evolution and viscoplastic activity is addressed and illustrated by the rafting of the microstructure observed in Ni-base superalloys under creep conditions. It is found that the plastic size effect has only a moderate impact on the shape of the rafts but is crucial to reproduce the macroscopic mechanical behavior of that particular material.

  2. Coupling phase field and viscoplasticity to study rafting in Ni-based superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaubert, A.; Le Bouar, Y.; Finel, A.

    2010-01-01

    An elasto-viscoplastic model is developed to study the microstructural evolution during creep loading in a model AM1 superalloy. Elastic anisotropy and inhomogeneity, as well as the description of long-range order in the γ ‧ phase, are included in the model. Plastic activity is introduced using a continuum crystal plasticity framework at the mesoscale. Special attention is paid to the corresponding parameter identification from experiments. Two-dimensional simulations of creep in the [100] direction are performed, and the results are compared to the predictions of an elastic phase field model, in order to characterize the influence of plastic activity on the microstructural evolution. In particular, our simulations show that plastic activity in the γ channels significantly increases the rafting kinetics and allows misalignments of rafts with respect to cubic directions. The simulation results are critically discussed and improvements to the model are proposed.

  3. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (CO) polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, III, Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2006-10-25

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surface modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a collidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as fuctionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  4. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (co)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, III, Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2011-12-27

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thiol-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the steps of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  5. Preparation of transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified with (CO)polymers synthesized by RAFT

    DOEpatents

    McCormick, III., Charles L.; Lowe, Andrew B.; Sumerlin, Brent S.

    2006-11-21

    A new, facile, general one-phase method of generating thio-functionalized transition metal nanoparticles and surfaces modified by (co)polymers synthesized by the RAFT method is described. The method includes the stops of forming a (co)polymer in aqueous solution using the RAFT methodology, forming a colloidal transition metal precursor solution from an appropriate transition metal; adding the metal precursor solution or surface to the (co)polymer solution, adding a reducing agent into the solution to reduce the metal colloid in situ to produce the stabilized nanoparticles or surface, and isolating the stabilized nanoparticles or surface in a manner such that aggregation is minimized. The functionalized surfaces generated using these methods can further undergo planar surface modifications, such as functionalization with a variety of different chemical groups, expanding their utility and application.

  6. Sphingolipids, Lipid Rafts, and Giardial Encystation: The Show Must Go On

    PubMed Central

    Mendez, Tavis L.; De Chatterjee, Atasi; Duarte, Trevor; De Leon, Joaquin; Robles-Martinez, Leobarda

    2015-01-01

    Sphingolipids are sphingosine-based phospholipids, which are present in the plasma and endomembranes of many eukaryotic cells. These lipids are involved in various cellular functions, including cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. In addition, sphingolipid and cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains (also called “lipid rafts”) contain a set of proteins and lipids, which take part in the signaling process in response to intra- or extracellular stimuli. Recent findings suggest that sphingolipids, especially glucosylceramide, play a critical role in inducing encystation and maintaining the cyst viability in Giardia. Similarly, the assembly/disassembly of lipid rafts modulates the encystation and cyst production of this ubiquitous enteric parasite. In this review article, we discuss the overall progress in the field and examine whether sphingolipids and lipid rafts can be used as novel targets for designing therapies to control infection by Giardia, which is rampant in developing countries, where children are especially vulnerable. PMID:26587369

  7. Macroscopic Phase Separation, Modulated Phases, and Microemulsions: A Unified Picture of Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Shlomovitz, Roie; Maibaum, Lutz; Schick, M.

    2014-01-01

    We simulate a simple phenomenological model describing phase behavior in a multicomponent membrane, a model capable of producing macroscopic phase separation, modulated phases, and microemulsions, all of which have been discussed in terms of raft phenomena. We show that one effect of thermal fluctuations on the mean-field phase diagram is that it permits a direct transition between either one of the coexisting liquid phases to a microemulsion. This implies that one system exhibiting phase separation can be related to a similar system exhibiting the heterogeneities characteristic of a microemulsion. The two systems could differ in their average membrane composition or in the relative compositions of their exoplasmic and cytoplasmic leaves. The model provides a unified description of these raft-associated phenomena. PMID:24806930

  8. Disruption of lipid rafts interferes with the interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with macrophages and epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Karla Dias; Cruz, Thayana Araújo; Veras de Moraes, Gabriela; Paredes-Santos, Tatiana Christina; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii can penetrate any warm-blooded animal cell. Conserved molecular assemblies of host cell plasma membranes should be involved in the parasite-host cell recognition. Lipid rafts are well-conserved membrane microdomains that contain high concentrations of cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycosylphosphatidylinositol, GPI-anchored proteins, and dually acylated proteins such as members of the Src family of tyrosine kinases. Disturbing lipid rafts of mouse peritoneal macrophages and epithelial cells of the lineage LLC-MK2 with methyl-beta cyclodextrin (M β CD) and filipin, which interfere with cholesterol or lidocaine, significantly inhibited internalization of T. gondii in both cell types, although adhesion remained unaffected in macrophages and decreased only in LLC-MK2 cells. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed these observations. Results are discussed in terms of the original role of macrophages as professional phagocytes versus the LLC-MK2 cell lineage originated from kidney epithelial cells. PMID:24734239

  9. Disruption of Lipid Rafts Interferes with the Interaction of Toxoplasma gondii with Macrophages and Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Karla Dias; Cruz, Thayana Araújo; Veras de Moraes, Gabriela; Paredes-Santos, Tatiana Christina; Attias, Marcia; de Souza, Wanderley

    2014-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii can penetrate any warm-blooded animal cell. Conserved molecular assemblies of host cell plasma membranes should be involved in the parasite-host cell recognition. Lipid rafts are well-conserved membrane microdomains that contain high concentrations of cholesterol, sphingolipids, glycosylphosphatidylinositol, GPI-anchored proteins, and dually acylated proteins such as members of the Src family of tyrosine kinases. Disturbing lipid rafts of mouse peritoneal macrophages and epithelial cells of the lineage LLC-MK2 with methyl-beta cyclodextrin (MβCD) and filipin, which interfere with cholesterol or lidocaine, significantly inhibited internalization of T. gondii in both cell types, although adhesion remained unaffected in macrophages and decreased only in LLC-MK2 cells. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy confirmed these observations. Results are discussed in terms of the original role of macrophages as professional phagocytes versus the LLC-MK2 cell lineage originated from kidney epithelial cells. PMID:24734239

  10. "Assessing the RAFT equilibrium constant via model systems: an EPR study"--response to a comment.

    PubMed

    Meiser, Wibke; Buback, Michael

    2012-08-14

    We have presented an EPR-based approach for deducing the RAFT equilibrium constant, K(eq), of a dithiobenzoate-mediated system [Meiser, W. and Buback M. Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2011, 32, 1490]. Our value is by four orders of magnitude below K(eq) from ab initio calculations for the identical monomer-free system. Junkers et al. [Macromol. Rapid Commun. 2011, 32, 1891] claim that our EPR approach would be model dependent and our data could be equally well fitted by assuming slow addition of radicals to the RAFT agent and slow fragmentation of the so-obtained intermediate radical as well as high cross-termination rate. By identification of all side products, our EPR-based method is shown to be model independent and to provide reliable K(eq) values, which demonstrate the validity of the intermediate radical termination model.

  11. Tumor exosomes induce tunneling nanotubes in lipid raft-enriched regions of human mesothelioma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Babatunde, Victor; Dickson, Elizabeth L.; Wong, Phillip; Oh, Sanghoon; Ke, Xu; Barlas, Afsar; Fujisawa, Sho; Romin, Yevgeniy; Moreira, André L.; Downey, Robert J.; Steer, Clifford J.; Subramanian, Subbaya; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A.S.; Lou, Emil

    2014-04-15

    Tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) are long, non-adherent, actin-based cellular extensions that act as conduits for transport of cellular cargo between connected cells. The mechanisms of nanotube formation and the effects of the tumor microenvironment and cellular signals on TnT formation are unknown. In the present study, we explored exosomes as potential mediators of TnT formation in mesothelioma and the potential relationship of lipid rafts to TnT formation. Mesothelioma cells co-cultured with exogenous mesothelioma-derived exosomes formed more TnTs than cells cultured without exosomes within 24–48 h; and this effect was most prominent in media conditions (low-serum, hyperglycemic medium) that support TnT formation (1.3–1.9-fold difference). Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed the purity of isolated exosomes and revealed that they localized predominantly at the base of and within TnTs, in addition to the extracellular environment. Time-lapse microscopic imaging demonstrated uptake of tumor exosomes by TnTs, which facilitated intercellular transfer of these exosomes between connected cells. Mesothelioma cells connected via TnTs were also significantly enriched for lipid rafts at nearly a 2-fold higher number compared with cells not connected by TnTs. Our findings provide supportive evidence of exosomes as potential chemotactic stimuli for TnT formation, and also lipid raft formation as a potential biomarker for TnT-forming cells. - Highlights: • Exosomes derived from malignant cells can stimulate an increased rate in the formation of tunneling nanotubes. • Tunneling nanotubes can serve as conduits for intercellular transfer of these exosomes. • Most notably, exosomes derived from benign mesothelial cells had no effect on nanotube formation. • Cells forming nanotubes were enriched in lipid rafts at a greater number compared with cells not forming nanotubes. • Our findings suggest causal and potentially synergistic association of exosomes and

  12. Native ligands change integrin sequestering but not oligomerization in raft-mimicking lipid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Amanda P; Kimble-Hill, Ann; Garg, Sumit; Jordan, Rainer; Naumann, Christoph A

    2011-10-01

    Distinct lipid environments, including lipid rafts, are increasingly recognized as a crucial factor affecting membrane protein function in plasma membranes. Unfortunately, an understanding of their role in membrane protein activation and oligomerization has remained elusive due to the challenge of characterizing these often small and transient plasma membrane heterogeneities in live cells. To address this difficulty, we present an experimental model membrane platform based on polymer-supported lipid bilayers containing stable raft-mimicking domains (type I) and homogeneous cholesterol-lipid mixtures (type II) into which transmembrane proteins are incorporated (α(v)β(3) and α(5)β(1) integrins). These flexible lipid platforms enable the use of confocal fluorescence spectroscopy, including the photon counting histogram method, in tandem with epifluorescence microscopy to quantitatively probe the effect of the binding of native ligands from the extracellular matrix ligands (vitronectin and fibronectin for α(v)β(3) and α(5)β(1), respectively) on domain-specific protein sequestration and on protein oligomerization state. We found that both α(v)β(3) and α(5)β(1) sequester preferentially to nonraft domains in the absence of extracellular matrix ligands, but upon ligand addition, α(v)β(3) sequesters strongly into raft-like domains and α(5)β(1) loses preference for either raft-like or nonraft-like domains. A corresponding photon counting histogram analysis showed that integrins exist predominantly in a monomeric state. No change was detected in oligomerization state upon ligand binding in either type I or type II bilayers, but a moderate increase in oligomerization state was observed for increasing concentrations of cholesterol. The combined findings suggest a mechanism in which changes in integrin sequestering are caused by ligand-induced changes in integrin conformation and/or dynamics that affect integrin-lipid interactions without altering the integrin

  13. Lipid rafts are required for GLUT4 internalization in adipose cells.

    PubMed

    Ros-Baro, A; Lopez-Iglesias, C; Peiro, S; Bellido, D; Palacin, M; Zorzano, A; Camps, M

    2001-10-01

    It has been recently reported that insulin recruits a novel signaling machinery to lipid rafts required for insulin-stimulated GLUT4 translocation [Baumann, A., Ribon, V., Kanzaki, M., Thurmond, D. C., Mora, S., Shigematsu, S., Bickel, P. E., Pessin, J. E. & Saltiel, A. R. (2001) Nature 407, 202-207, 2000; Chiang, S. H., Baumann, C. A., Kanzaki, M., Thurmond, D. C., Watson, R. T., Neudauer, C. L., Macara, I. G., Pessin, J. E. & Saltiel, A. R. (2001) Nature 410, 944-948]. We have assessed the role of lipid rafts on GLUT4 traffic in adipose cells. High GLUT4 levels were detected in caveolae from adipocytes by two approaches, the mechanical isolation of purified caveolae from plasma membrane lawns and the immunogold analysis of plasma membrane lawns followed by freeze-drying. The role of lipid rafts in GLUT4 trafficking was studied by adding nystatin or filipin at concentrations that specifically disrupt caveolae morphology and inhibit caveolae function without altering clathrin-mediated endocytosis. These caveolae inhibitors did not affect the insulin-stimulated glucose transport. However, they blocked both the GLUT4 internalization and the down-regulation of glucose transport triggered by insulin removal in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Our data indicate that lipid rafts are crucial for GLUT4 internalization after insulin removal. Given that high levels of GLUT4 were detected in caveolae from insulin-treated adipose cells, this transporter may be internalized from caveolae or caveolae may operate as an obligatory transition station before internalization.

  14. The F0F1 ATP Synthase Complex Localizes to Membrane Rafts in Gonadotrope Cells.

    PubMed

    Allen-Worthington, Krystal; Xie, Jianjun; Brown, Jessica L; Edmunson, Alexa M; Dowling, Abigail; Navratil, Amy M; Scavelli, Kurt; Yoon, Hojean; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S; Clarke, Iain; Roberson, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    Fertility in mammals requires appropriate communication within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) is a central conduit for this communication. The GnRHR resides in discrete membrane rafts and raft occupancy is required for signaling by GnRH. The present studies use immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define peptides present within the raft associated with the GnRHR and flotillin-1, a key raft marker. These studies revealed peptides from the F0F1 ATP synthase complex. The catalytic subunits of the F1 domain were validated by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry, and cell surface biotinylation studies demonstrating that this complex was present at the plasma membrane associated with the GnRHR. The F1 catalytic domain faces the extracellular space and catalyzes ATP synthesis when presented with ADP in normal mouse pituitary explants and a gonadotrope cell line. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was blunted by coadministration of inhibitory factor 1, limiting inorganic phosphate in the media, and by chronic stimulation of the GnRHR. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases. Kisspeptin administration induced coincident GnRH and ATP release from the median eminence into the hypophyseal-portal vasculature in ovariectomized sheep. Elevated levels of extracellular ATP augmented GnRH-induced secretion of LH from pituitary cells in primary culture, which was blocked in media containing low inorganic phosphate supporting the importance of extracellular ATP levels to gonadotrope cell function. These studies indicate that gonadotropes have intrinsic ability to metabolize ATP in the extracellular space and extracellular ATP may serve as a modulator of GnRH-induced LH secretion. PMID:27482602

  15. ASCAN Precourt floats on life raft during Elgin AFB water survival training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Charles J. Precourt, wearing helmet and flight suit, floats in pool using an underarm flotation device and a single person life raft at Elgin Air Force Base (AFB) in Pensacola, Florida, during water survival exercises. The training familiarized the candidates with survival techniques necessary in the event of a water landing. ASCANs participated in the exercises from 08-14-90 through 08-17-90.

  16. Injection in basin and range-type reservoirs: the Raft River experience

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, S.; Spencer, S.

    1981-01-01

    Injection testing at the Raft River KGRA has yielded some interesting results which can be useful in planning injection systems in Basin and Range type reservoirs. Because of inhomogeneities and possible fracturing in basin fill sediment, rapid pressure response to injection has been observed in one shallow monitor well, but not others. In some monitor wells in the injection field, pressure drops are observed during injection suggesting plastic deformation of the sediments. Seismicity, however, has not accompanied these observed water level changes.

  17. Dynamical clustering and a mechanism for raft-like structures in a model lipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Starr, Francis W; Hartmann, Benedikt; Douglas, Jack F

    2014-05-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to examine the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. This model qualitatively reproduces the known phase transitions between disordered, ordered, and gel membrane phases, and the phase transitions are accompanied by significant changes in the nature of the lipid dynamics. In particular, lipid diffusion in the liquid-ordered phase is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, similar to the dynamics of a liquid approaching its glass transition. This transient molecular caging gives rise to two distinct mobility groups within a single-component membrane: lipids that are transiently trapped, and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. Most significantly, lipids within these distinct mobility states spatially segregate, creating transient "islands" of enhanced mobility having a size and time scale compatible with lipid "rafts," dynamical structures thought to be important for cell membrane function. Although the dynamic lipid clusters that we observe do not themselves correspond to rafts (which are more complex, multicomponent structures), we hypothesize that such rafts may develop from the same universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. We also show that mobile lipid clusters can be dissected into smaller clusters of cooperatively rearranging molecules. The geometry of these clusters can be understood in the context of branched equilibrium polymers, related to percolation theory. We discuss how these dynamical structures relate to a range observations on the dynamics of lipid membranes.

  18. Wind load analysis of tall chimneys with piled raft foundation considering the flexibility of soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayalekshmi, B. R.; Jisha, S. V.; Shivashankar, R.

    2015-06-01

    Soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis was carried out for tall reinforced concrete chimneys with piled raft foundation subjected to wind loads. To understand the significance of SSI, four types of soil were considered based on different material properties. Chimneys of different elevations and different ratios of height to base diameter of chimney were selected for the parametric study. The thickness of raft of piled raft foundation was also varied based on different ratios of outer diameter to thickness of raft. The chimneys were assumed to be located in open terrain and subjected to a maximum wind speed of 50 m/s. The along-wind and across-wind loads were computed according to IS: 4998 (Part 1)-1992 and applied along the height of the chimney. The analysis was carried out using three-dimensional finite element technique based on the direct method of SSI. The linear elastic material behaviour was assumed for the integrated chimney-foundation-soil system. The radial and tangential moments, lateral deflection and base moment of chimney were evaluated through SSI analysis and compared with the response obtained from chimney with fixed base. The base moment of chimney considerably reduces due to the effect of SSI. It is found that the variation of different responses in chimney due to the effect of SSI depends significantly on the geometrical properties of chimney and foundations. The response variation at base for a distance of 1/40th of the height of chimney should be considered for a safe design.

  19. The F0F1 ATP Synthase Complex Localizes to Membrane Rafts in Gonadotrope Cells.

    PubMed

    Allen-Worthington, Krystal; Xie, Jianjun; Brown, Jessica L; Edmunson, Alexa M; Dowling, Abigail; Navratil, Amy M; Scavelli, Kurt; Yoon, Hojean; Kim, Do-Geun; Bynoe, Margaret S; Clarke, Iain; Roberson, Mark S

    2016-09-01

    Fertility in mammals requires appropriate communication within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and the GnRH receptor (GnRHR) is a central conduit for this communication. The GnRHR resides in discrete membrane rafts and raft occupancy is required for signaling by GnRH. The present studies use immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to define peptides present within the raft associated with the GnRHR and flotillin-1, a key raft marker. These studies revealed peptides from the F0F1 ATP synthase complex. The catalytic subunits of the F1 domain were validated by immunoprecipitation, flow cytometry, and cell surface biotinylation studies demonstrating that this complex was present at the plasma membrane associated with the GnRHR. The F1 catalytic domain faces the extracellular space and catalyzes ATP synthesis when presented with ADP in normal mouse pituitary explants and a gonadotrope cell line. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was blunted by coadministration of inhibitory factor 1, limiting inorganic phosphate in the media, and by chronic stimulation of the GnRHR. Steady-state extracellular ATP accumulation was enhanced by pharmacological inhibition of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases. Kisspeptin administration induced coincident GnRH and ATP release from the median eminence into the hypophyseal-portal vasculature in ovariectomized sheep. Elevated levels of extracellular ATP augmented GnRH-induced secretion of LH from pituitary cells in primary culture, which was blocked in media containing low inorganic phosphate supporting the importance of extracellular ATP levels to gonadotrope cell function. These studies indicate that gonadotropes have intrinsic ability to metabolize ATP in the extracellular space and extracellular ATP may serve as a modulator of GnRH-induced LH secretion.

  20. Proteomic Characterization of Lipid Raft Proteins in ALS Mouse Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Jianjun; Ström, Anna-Lena; Kilty, Renee; Venkatakrishnan, Priya; White, James; Everson, William V.; Smart, Eric J.; Zhu, Haining

    2009-01-01

    Summary Familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been linked to mutations in the copper/zinc superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene. The mutant SOD1 protein exhibits a toxic gain-of-function that adversely affects the function of neurons. However, the mechanism of how mutant SOD1 initiates ALS is unclear. Lipid rafts are specialized microdomains of the plasma membrane that act as platforms for the organization and interaction of proteins involved in multiple functions including vesicular trafficking, neurotransmitter signaling and cytoskeletal rearrangements. In this study, we report a proteomic analysis using a widely used ALS mouse model to identify differences in spinal cord lipid raft proteomes between mice over-expressing wild-type (WT) and G93A mutant SOD1. A total of 413 and 421 proteins were identified in the lipid rafts isolated from WT and G93A mice, respectively. Further quantitative analysis revealed a consortium of proteins with altered levels between the WT and G93A samples. Functional classification of the 67 altered proteins revealed that the three most impacted subsets of proteins were involved in vesicular transport, neurotransmitter synthesis and release; cytoskeleton organization and linkage to plasma membrane; and metabolism. Other protein changes are correlated with alterations in microglia activation and inflammation; astrocyte and oligodendrocyte function; cell signaling; cellular stress response and apoptosis; and neuronal ion channels and neurotransmitter receptor functions. Changes of selected proteins were independently validated by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry. The significance of the lipid raft protein changes in motor neuron function and degeneration in ALS is discussed, particularly those involved in vesicular trafficking and neurotransmitter signaling, and the dynamics and regulation of plasma membrane-anchored cytoskeleton. PMID:19438725

  1. Hydrochemistry of selected parameters at the Raft River KGRA, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, D.L.; Ralston, D.R.; Allman, D.W.

    1981-01-01

    Low to moderate temperature (< 150/sup 0/C) geothermal fluids are being developed in the southern Raft River Valley of Idaho. Five deep geothermal wells ranging in depth from 4911 feet to 6543 feet (1490 to 1980 meters) and two intermediate depth (3858 feet or 1170 meters) injection wells have been drilled within the Raft River KGRA. Several shallower (1423-500 feet or 430-150 meters) wells have also been constructed to monitor the environmental effects of geothermal development of the shallower aquifer systems. Sampling of water from wells within the KGRA has been conducted since the onset of the project in 1974. Five analytical laboratories have conducted analyses on waters from the KGRA. Charge-balance error calculations conducted on the data produced from these laboratories indicated that data from three laboratories were reliable while two were not. A method of equating all data was established by using linear regression analyses on sets of paired data from various laboratories. The chemical data collected from the deep geothermal wells indicates that a two reservoir system exists within the Raft River KGRA. Each reservoir is associated with a major structural feature. These features are known as the Bridge Fault System (BFS) and the Narrows Structure (NS).

  2. Geophysical logging case history of the Raft River geothermal system, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, J.K.; Moens, T.A.

    1980-04-01

    Drilling to evaluate the geothermal resource in the Raft River Valley began in 1974 and resulted in the discovery of a geothermal reservoir at a depth of approximately 1523 m (500 ft). Several organizations and companies have been involved in the geophysical logging program. There is no comprehensive report on the geophysical logging, nor has there been a complete interpretation. The objectives of this study are to make an integrated interpretation of the available data and compile a case history. Emphasis has been on developing a simple interpretation scheme from a minimum of data sets. The Raft River geothermal system occurs in the Raft River Valley, which is a portion of the Basin and Range geomorphic province located in south central Idaho, south of the Snake River Plain. The valley is a late Cenozoic structural downwarp bounded by faults on the west, south, and east. The downwarp is filled with Tertiary and Paleozoic sediments, metasediments, and volcanics that overlie Precambrian rocks. The variety of rock types, the presence of alteration products, and the variability of fracturing make reliable interpretations difficult. However, the cross plotting of various parameters has allowed a determination of rock types and an analysis of the degree of alteration and the density of fractures. Thus, one can determine the relevant data necessary to assess a geothermal reservoir in similar rock types and use cross plots to potentially define the producing zones.

  3. Large-scale three-dimensional phase field simulation of γ '-rafting and creep deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ning; Shen, Chen; Mills, Michael; Wang, Yunzhi

    2010-01-01

    Three-dimensional phase field simulations of coupled γ/γ ‧ microstructural evolution and plastic deformation in single crystal Ni-Al are carried out at micrometer scales. Coherent γ/γ ‧ microstructures and plastic deformation in γ-channels are described using a single, consistent methodology based on Khachaturyan's phase field microelasticity approach to coherent precipitates and dislocations. In particular, a new set of phase fields is introduced to characterize local density of dislocations from individual active slip systems. To increase the length scale of the phase field simulations, the Kim-Kim-Suzuki (KKS) treatment of γ/γ ‧ interfaces was adopted. The rafting kinetics, precipitate-matrix inversion process and the corresponding creep deformation are characterized with respect to parameters such as applied stress and lattice misfit. The simulation results on γ ‧-rafting kinetics and morphological evolution of the γ/γ ‧ microstructures are compared with available experiment. The model can be used to carry out parametric studies of the effects of material and processing parameters such as alloy composition, external stress and working temperature on γ ‧-rafting kinetics, morphological evolution and the corresponding creep deformation.

  4. Multidrug resistance protein 1 localization in lipid raft domains and prostasomes in prostate cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Gomà, Alba; Mir, Roser; Martínez-Soler, Fina; Tortosa, Avelina; Vidal, August; Condom, Enric; Pérez–Tomás, Ricardo; Giménez-Bonafé, Pepita

    2014-01-01

    Background One of the problems in prostate cancer (CaP) treatment is the appearance of the multidrug resistance phenotype, in which ATP-binding cassette transporters such as multidrug resistance protein 1 (MRP1) play a role. Different localizations of the transporter have been reported, some of them related to the chemoresistant phenotype. Aim This study aimed to compare the localization of MRP1 in three prostate cell lines (normal, androgen-sensitive, and androgen-independent) in order to understand its possible role in CaP chemoresistance. Methods MRP1 and caveolae protein markers were detected using confocal microscopy, performing colocalization techniques. Lipid raft isolation made it possible to detect these proteins by Western blot analysis. Caveolae and prostasomes were identified by electron microscopy. Results We show that MRP1 is found in lipid raft fractions of tumor cells and that the number of caveolae increases with malignancy acquisition. MRP1 is found not only in the plasma membrane associated with lipid rafts but also in cytoplasmic accumulations colocalizing with the prostasome markers Caveolin-1 and CD59, suggesting that in CaP cells, MRP1 is localized in prostasomes. Conclusion We hypothesize that the presence of MRP1 in prostasomes could serve as a reservoir of MRP1; thus, taking advantage of the release of their content, MRP1 could be translocated to the plasma membrane contributing to the chemoresistant phenotype. The presence of MRP1 in prostasomes could serve as a predictor of malignancy in CaP. PMID:25525371

  5. Nanoarrays of tethered lipid bilayer rafts on poly(vinyl alcohol) hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bong Kuk; Lee, Hea Yeon; Kim, Pilnam; Suh, Kahp Y; Kawai, Tomoji

    2009-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingolipid-rich domains that function as platforms for signal transduction and other cellular processes. Tethered lipid bilayers have been proposed as a promising model to describe the structure and function of cell membranes. We report a nano(submicro) array of tethered lipid bilayer raft membranes (tLBRMs) comprising a biosensing platform. Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) hydrogel was directly patterned onto a solid substrate, using ultraviolet-nanoimprint lithography (UV-NIL), as an inert barrier to prevent biofouling. The robust structures of the nanopatterned PVA hydrogel were stable for up to three weeks in phosphate-buffered saline solution despite significant swelling (100% in height) by hydration. The PVA hydrogel strongly restricted the adhesion of vesicles, resulting in an array of highly selective hydrogel nanowells. tLBRMs were not formed by direct vesicle fusion, although raft vesicles containing poly(ethylene glycol) lipopolymer were selectively immobilized on gold substrates patterned with PVA hydrogel. The deposition of tLBRM nano(submicro) arrays was accomplished by a mixed, self-assembled monolayer-assisted vesicle fusion method. The monolayer was composed of a mixture of 2-mercaptoethanol and poly(ethylene glycol) lipopolymer, which promoted vesicle rupture. These results suggest that the fabrication of inert nanostructures and the site-selective modification of solid surfaces to induce vesicle rupture may be essential in the construction of tLBRM nano(submicro) arrays using stepwise self-assembly.

  6. HTLV-1 Tax deregulates autophagy by recruiting autophagic molecules into lipid raft microdomains.

    PubMed

    Ren, T; Takahashi, Y; Liu, X; Loughran, T P; Sun, S-C; Wang, H-G; Cheng, H

    2015-01-15

    The retroviral oncoprotein Tax from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1), an etiological factor that causes adult T-cell leukemia and lymphoma, has a crucial role in initiating T-lymphocyte transformation by inducing oncogenic signaling activation. We here report that Tax is a determining factor for dysregulation of autophagy in HTLV-1-transformed T cells and Tax-immortalized CD4 memory T cells. Tax facilitated autophagic process by activating inhibitor of κB (IκB) kinase (IKK) complex, which subsequently recruited an autophagy molecular complex containing Beclin1 and Bif-1 to the lipid raft microdomains. Tax engaged a crosstalk between IKK complex and autophagic molecule complex by directly interacting with both complexes, promoting assembly of LC3+ autophagosomes. Moreover, expression of lipid raft-targeted Bif-1 or Beclin1 was sufficient to induce formation of LC3+ autophagosomes, suggesting that Tax recruitment of autophagic molecules to lipid rafts is a dominant strategy to deregulate autophagy in the context of HTLV-1 transformation of T cells. Furthermore, depletion of autophagy molecules such as Beclin1 and PI3 kinase class III resulted in impaired growth of HTLV-1-transformed T cells, indicating a critical role of Tax-deregulated autophagy in promoting survival and transformation of virally infected T cells.

  7. Dynamical Clustering and the Origin of Raft-like Structures in a Model Lipid Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, Francis

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the dynamical heterogeneity of a model single-component lipid membrane using simulations of a coarse-grained representation of lipid molecules. In the liquid-ordered (LO) phase, lipid diffusion is hindered by the transient trapping of molecules by their neighbors, giving rise to two distinct mobility groups: low-mobility lipids which are temporarily ``caged'', and lipids with displacements on the scale of the intermolecular spacing. The lipid molecules within these distinct mobility states cluster, giving rise to transient ``islands'' of enhanced mobility having the size and time scale expected for lipid ``rafts''. These clusters are strikingly similar to the dynamical clusters found in glass-forming fluids, and distinct from phase-separation clusters. Such dynamic heterogeneity is ubiquitous in disordered condensed-phase systems. Thus, we hypothesize that rafts may originate from this universal mechanism, explaining why raft-like regions should arise, regardless of lipid structural or compositional details. This perspective provides a new approach to understand membrane transport.

  8. Enhancement of Lytic Activity by Leptin Is Independent From Lipid Rafts in Murine Primary Splenocytes.

    PubMed

    Collin, Aurore; Noacco, Audrey; Talvas, Jérémie; Caldefie-Chézet, Florence; Vasson, Marie-Paule; Farges, Marie-Chantal

    2017-01-01

    Leptin, a pleiotropic adipokine, is known as a regulator of food intake, but it is also involved in inflammation, immunity, cell proliferation, and survival. Leptin receptor is integrated inside cholesterol-rich microdomains called lipid rafts, which, if disrupted or destroyed, could lead to a perturbation of lytic mechanism. Previous studies also reported that leptin could induce membrane remodeling. In this context, we studied the effect of membrane remodeling in lytic activity modulation induced by leptin. Thus, primary mouse splenocytes were incubated with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (β-MCD), a lipid rafts disrupting agent, cholesterol, a major component of cell membranes, or ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), a membrane stabilizer agent for 1 h. These treatments were followed by splenocyte incubation with leptin (absence, 10 and 100 ng/ml). Unlike β-MCD or cholesterol, UDCA was able to block leptin lytic induction. This result suggests that leptin increased the lytic activity of primary spleen cells against syngenic EO771 mammary cancer cells independently from lipid rafts but may involve membrane fluidity. Furthermore, natural killer cells were shown to be involved in the splenocyte lytic activity. To our knowledge it is the first publication in primary culture that provides the link between leptin lytic modulation and membrane remodeling. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 101-109, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Hypoxia reduces the efficiency of elisidepsin by inhibiting hydroxylation and altering the structure of lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Király, Anna; Váradi, Tímea; Hajdu, Tímea; Rühl, Ralph; Galmarini, Carlos M; Szöllősi, János; Nagy, Peter

    2013-12-02

    The mechanism of action of elisidepsin (PM02734, Irvalec®) is assumed to involve membrane permeabilization via attacking lipid rafts and hydroxylated lipids. Here we investigate the role of hypoxia in the mechanism of action of elisidepsin. Culturing under hypoxic conditions increased the half-maximal inhibitory concentration and decreased the drug's binding to almost all cell lines which was reversed by incubation of cells with 2-hydroxy palmitic acid. The expression of fatty acid 2-hydroxylase was strongly correlated with the efficiency of the drug and inversely correlated with the effect of hypoxia. Number and brightness analysis and fluorescence anisotropy experiments showed that hypoxia decreased the clustering of lipid rafts and altered the structure of the plasma membrane. Although the binding of elisidepsin to the membrane is non-cooperative, its membrane permeabilizing effect is characterized by a Hill coefficient of ~3.3. The latter finding is in agreement with elisidepsin-induced clusters of lipid raft-anchored GFP visualized by confocal microscopy. We propose that the concentration of elisidepsin needs to reach a critical level in the membrane above which elisidepsin induces the disruption of the cell membrane. Testing for tumor hypoxia or the density of hydroxylated lipids could be an interesting strategy to increase the efficiency of elisidepsin.

  10. Cholesterol-rich lipid rafts play an important role in the Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 replication cycle.

    PubMed

    Brogden, Graham; Adamek, Mikołaj; Proepsting, Marcus J; Ulrich, Reiner; Naim, Hassan Y; Steinhagen, Dieter

    2015-09-30

    The Cyprinus herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is a member of the new Alloherpesviridae virus family in the Herpesvirales order. CyHV-3 has been implicated in a large number of disease outbreaks in carp populations causing up to 100% mortality. The aim of this study was to investigate the requirement of cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in CyHV-3 entry and replication in carp cells. Plasma membrane cholesterol was depleted from common carp brain (CCB) cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD). Treated and non-treated cells were infected with CyHV-3 and virus binding and infection parameters were assessed using RT-qPCR, immunocytochemistry and virus titration. The effect of cholesterol reduction severely stunted virus entry in vitro, however after cholesterol replenishment virus entry and subsequent replication rates were similar to the control infection. Furthermore, cholesterol depletion did not significantly influence virus binding and the subsequent post-entry replication stage, however had an impact on virus egress. Comparative analysis of the lipid compositions of CyHV-3 and CCB membrane fractions revealed strong similarities between the lipid composition of the CyHV-3 and CCB lipid rafts. The results presented here show that cholesterol-rich lipid rafts are important for the CyHV-3 replication cycle especially during entry and egress.

  11. Tumor exosomes induce tunneling nanotubes in lipid raft-enriched regions of human mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Thayanithy, Venugopal; Babatunde, Victor; Dickson, Elizabeth L; Wong, Phillip; Oh, Sanghoon; Ke, Xu; Barlas, Afsar; Fujisawa, Sho; Romin, Yevgeniy; Moreira, André L; Downey, Robert J; Steer, Clifford J; Subramanian, Subbaya; Manova-Todorova, Katia; Moore, Malcolm A S; Lou, Emil

    2014-04-15

    Tunneling nanotubes (TnTs) are long, non-adherent, actin-based cellular extensions that act as conduits for transport of cellular cargo between connected cells. The mechanisms of nanotube formation and the effects of the tumor microenvironment and cellular signals on TnT formation are unknown. In the present study, we explored exosomes as potential mediators of TnT formation in mesothelioma and the potential relationship of lipid rafts to TnT formation. Mesothelioma cells co-cultured with exogenous mesothelioma-derived exosomes formed more TnTs than cells cultured without exosomes within 24-48 h; and this effect was most prominent in media conditions (low-serum, hyperglycemic medium) that support TnT formation (1.3-1.9-fold difference). Fluorescence and electron microscopy confirmed the purity of isolated exosomes and revealed that they localized predominantly at the base of and within TnTs, in addition to the extracellular environment. Time-lapse microscopic imaging demonstrated uptake of tumor exosomes by TnTs, which facilitated intercellular transfer of these exosomes between connected cells. Mesothelioma cells connected via TnTs were also significantly enriched for lipid rafts at nearly a 2-fold higher number compared with cells not connected by TnTs. Our findings provide supportive evidence of exosomes as potential chemotactic stimuli for TnT formation, and also lipid raft formation as a potential biomarker for TnT-forming cells.

  12. The Bordetella type III secretion system effector BteA contains a conserved N-terminal motif that guides bacterial virulence factors to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    French, Christopher T; Panina, Ekaterina M; Yeh, Sylvia H; Griffith, Natasha; Arambula, Diego G; Miller, Jeff F

    2009-12-01

    The Bordetella type III secretion system (T3SS) effector protein BteA is necessary and sufficient for rapid cytotoxicity in a wide range of mammalian cells. We show that BteA is highly conserved and functionally interchangeable between Bordetella bronchiseptica, Bordetella pertussis and Bordetella parapertussis. The identification of BteA sequences required for cytotoxicity allowed the construction of non-cytotoxic mutants for localization studies. BteA derivatives were targeted to lipid rafts and showed clear colocalization with cortical actin, ezrin and the lipid raft marker GM1. We hypothesized that BteA associates with the cytoplasmic face of lipid rafts to locally modulate host cell responses to Bordetella attachment. B. bronchiseptica adhered to host cells almost exclusively to GM1-enriched lipid raft microdomains and BteA colocalized to these same sites following T3SS-mediated translocation. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin protected cells from T3SS-induced cytotoxicity. Localization to lipid rafts was mediated by a 130-amino-acid lipid raft targeting domain at the N-terminus of BteA, and homologous domains were identified in virulence factors from other bacterial species. Lipid raft targeting sequences from a T3SS effector (Plu4750) and an RTX-type toxin (Plu3217) from Photorhabdus luminescens directed fusion proteins to lipid rafts in a manner identical to the N-terminus of BteA. PMID:19650828

  13. Clot retraction is mediated by factor XIII-dependent fibrin-αIIbβ3-myosin axis in platelet sphingomyelin-rich membrane rafts.

    PubMed

    Kasahara, Kohji; Kaneda, Mizuho; Miki, Toshiaki; Iida, Kazuko; Sekino-Suzuki, Naoko; Kawashima, Ikuo; Suzuki, Hidenori; Shimonaka, Motoyuki; Arai, Morio; Ohno-Iwashita, Yoshiko; Kojima, Soichi; Abe, Mitsuhiro; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Okazaki, Toshiro; Souri, Masayoshi; Ichinose, Akitada; Yamamoto, Naomasa

    2013-11-01

    Membrane rafts are spatially and functionally heterogenous in the cell membrane. We observed that lysenin-positive sphingomyelin (SM)-rich rafts are identified histochemically in the central region of adhered platelets where fibrin and myosin are colocalized on activation by thrombin. The clot retraction of SM-depleted platelets from SM synthase knockout mouse was delayed significantly, suggesting that platelet SM-rich rafts are involved in clot retraction. We found that fibrin converted by thrombin translocated immediately in platelet detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) rafts but that from Glanzmann's thrombasthenic platelets failed. The fibrinogen γ-chain C-terminal (residues 144-411) fusion protein translocated to platelet DRM rafts on thrombin activation, but its mutant that was replaced by A398A399 at factor XIII crosslinking sites (Q398Q399) was inhibited. Furthermore, fibrin translocation to DRM rafts was impaired in factor XIII A subunit-deficient mouse platelets, which show impaired clot retraction. In the cytoplasm, myosin translocated concomitantly with fibrin translocation into the DRM raft of thrombin-stimulated platelets. Furthermore, the disruption of SM-rich rafts by methyl-β-cyclodextrin impaired myosin activation and clot retraction. Thus, we propose that clot retraction takes place in SM-rich rafts where a fibrin-αIIbβ3-myosin complex is formed as a primary axis to promote platelet contraction. PMID:24002447

  14. Antiproliferative effects of γ-tocotrienol are associated with lipid raft disruption in HER2-positive human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Alawin, Osama A; Ahmed, Rayan A; Ibrahim, Baher A; Briski, Karen P; Sylvester, Paul W

    2016-01-01

    A large percentage of human breast cancers are characterized by excessive or aberrant HER2 activity. Lipid rafts are specialized microdomains within the plasma membrane that are required for HER2 activation and signal transduction. Since the anticancer activity of γ-tocotrienol is associated with suppression in HER2 signaling, studies were conducted to examine the effects of γ-tocotrienol on HER2 activation within the lipid raft microdomain in HER2-positive SKBR3 and BT474 human breast cancer cells. Treatment with 0-5μM γ-tocotrienol induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition in cancer cell growth after a 5-day culture period, and these growth inhibitory effects were associated with a reduction in HER2 dimerization and phosphorylation (activation). Phosphorylated HER2 was found to be primarily located in the lipid raft microdomain of the plasma membrane in vehicle-treated control groups, whereas γ-tocotrienol treatment significantly inhibited this effect. Assay of plasma membrane subcellular fractions showed that γ-tocotrienol also accumulates exclusively within the lipid raft microdomain. Hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) is an agent that disrupts lipid raft integrity. Acute exposure to 3mM HPβCD alone had no effect, whereas an acute 24-h exposure to 20μM γ-tocotrienol alone significantly decreased SKBR3 and BT474 cell viability. However, combined treatment with these agents greatly reduced γ-tocotrienol accumulation in the lipid raft microdomain and cytotoxicity. In summary, these findings demonstrate that the anticancer effects of γ-tocotrienol are associated with its accumulation in the lipid raft microdomain and subsequent interference with HER2 dimerization and activation in SKBR3 and BT474 human breast cancer cells.

  15. Compartmentalisation of cAMP-dependent signalling in blood platelets: The role of lipid rafts and actin polymerisation.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Zaher; Naseem, Khalid M

    2015-01-01

    Prostacyclin (PGI2) inhibits blood platelets through the activation of membrane adenylyl cyclases (ACs) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP)-mediated signalling. However, the molecular mechanism controlling cAMP signalling in blood platelet remains unclear, and in particular how individual isoforms of AC and protein kinase A (PKA) are coordinated to target distinct substrates in order to modulate platelet activation. In this study, we demonstrate that lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton may play a key role in regulating platelet responses to cAMP downstream of PGI2. Disruption of lipid rafts with methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MβCD) increased platelet sensitivity to PGI2 and forskolin, a direct AC cyclase activator, resulting in greater inhibition of collagen-stimulated platelet aggregation. In contrast, platelet inhibition by the direct activator of PKA, 8-CPT-6-Phe-cAMP was unaffected by MβCD treatment. Consistent with the functional data, lipid raft disruption increased PGI2-stimulated cAMP formation and proximal PKA-mediated signalling events. Platelet inhibition, cAMP formation and phosphorylation of PKA substrates in response to PGI2 were also increased in the presence of cytochalasin D, indicating a role for actin cytoskeleton in signalling in response to PGI2. A potential role for lipid rafts in cAMP signalling is strengthened by our finding that a pool of ACV/VI and PKA was partitioned into lipid rafts. Our data demonstrate partial compartmentalisation of cAMP signalling machinery in platelets, where lipid rafts and the actin cytoskeleton regulate the inhibitory effects induced by PGI2. The increased platelet sensitivity to cAMP-elevating agents signalling upon raft and cytoskeleton disruption suggests that these compartments act to restrain basal cAMP signalling.

  16. Preparation of a Two-Dimensional Ion-Imprinted Polymer Based on a Graphene Oxide/SiO₂ Composite for the Selective Adsorption of Nickel Ions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Meng, Xiangguo; Liu, Zhanchao; Meng, Minjia; Jiang, Fangping; Luo, Min; Ni, Liang; Qiu, Jian; Liu, Fangfang; Zhong, Guoxing

    2015-08-18

    In the present work, a novel two-dimensional (2D) nickel ion-imprinted polymer (RAFT-IIP) has been successfully synthesized based on the graphene oxide/SiO2 composite by reversible addition-fragmentation chain-transfer (RAFT) polymerization. The imprinted materials obtained are characterized by Fourier transmission infrared spectrometry (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results show that the thermal stability of the graphene oxide/SiO2 composite is obviously higher than that of graphene oxide. RAFT-IIP possesses an excellent 2D homogeneous imprinted polymer layer, which is a well-preserved unique structure of graphene oxide/SiO2. Owing to the intrinsic advantages of RAFT polymerization and 2D imprinted material, RAFT-IIP demonstrate a superior specific adsorption capacity (81.73 mg/g) and faster adsorption kinetics (30 min) for Ni(II) in comparison to the ion-imprinted polymer prepared by traditional radical polymerization and based on the common carbon material. Furthermore, the adsorption isotherm and selectivity toward Ni(II) onto RAFT-IIP and nonimprinted polymer (NIP) are investigated, indicating that RAFT-IIP has splendid recognizing ability and a nearly 3 times larger adsorption capacity than that of NIP (30.94 mg/g). Moreover, a three-level Box-Behnken experimental design with three factors combining the response surface method is utilized to optimize the desorption process. The optimal conditions for the desorption of Ni(II) from RAFT-IIP are as follows: an HCl-type eluent, an eluent concentration of 2.0 mol/L, and an eluent volume of 10 mL.

  17. A novel mechanism of regulating breast cancer cell migration via palmitoylation-dependent alterations in the lipid raft affiliation of CD44

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Most breast cancer-related deaths result from metastasis, a process involving dynamic regulation of tumour cell adhesion and migration. The adhesion protein CD44, a key regulator of cell migration, is enriched in cholesterol-enriched membrane microdomains termed lipid rafts. We recently reported that raft affiliation of CD44 negatively regulates interactions with its migratory binding partner ezrin. Since raft affiliation is regulated by post-translational modifications including palmitoylation, we sought to establish the contribution of CD44 palmitoylation and lipid raft affiliation to cell migration. Methods Recovery of CD44 and its binding partners from raft versus non-raft membrane microdomains was profiled in non-migrating and migrating breast cancer cell lines. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to introduce single or double point mutations into both CD44 palmitoylation sites (Cys286 and Cys295), whereupon the implications for lipid raft recovery, phenotype, ezrin co-precipitation and migratory behaviour was assessed. Finally CD44 palmitoylation status and lipid raft affiliation was assessed in primary cultures from a small panel of breast cancer patients. Results CD44 raft affiliation was increased during migration of non-invasive breast cell lines, but decreased during migration of highly-invasive breast cells. The latter was paralleled by increased CD44 recovery in non-raft fractions, and exclusive non-raft recovery of its binding partners. Point mutation of CD44 palmitoylation sites reduced CD44 raft affiliation in invasive MDA-MB-231 cells, increased CD44-ezrin co-precipitation and accordingly enhanced cell migration. Expression of palmitoylation-impaired (raft-excluded) CD44 mutants in non-invasive MCF-10a cells was sufficient to reversibly induce the phenotypic appearance of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and to increase cell motility. Interestingly, cell migration was associated with temporal reductions in CD44 palmitoylation in

  18. Fish oil increases raft size and membrane order of B cells accompanied by differential effects on function.

    PubMed

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Melton, Mark; Williams, Justin; Wassall, Stephen R; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2012-04-01

    Fish oil (FO) targets lipid microdomain organization to suppress T-cell and macrophage function; however, little is known about this relationship with B cells, especially at the animal level. We previously established that a high FO dose diminished mouse B-cell lipid raft microdomain clustering induced by cross-linking GM1. To establish relevance, here we tested a FO dose modeling human intake on B-cell raft organization relative to a control. Biochemical analysis revealed more docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) incorporated into phosphatidylcholines than phosphatidylethanolamines of detergent-resistant membranes, consistent with supporting studies with model membranes. Subsequent imaging experiments demonstrated that FO increased raft size, GM1 expression, and membrane order upon cross-linking GM1 relative to no cross-linking. Comparative in vitro studies showed some biochemical differences from in vivo measurements but overall revealed that DHA, but not eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), increased membrane order. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that disrupting rafts with FO would suppress B-cell responses ex vivo. FO enhanced LPS-induced B-cell activation but suppressed B-cell stimulation of transgenic naive CD4(+) T cells. Altogether, our studies with B cells support an emerging model that FO increases raft size and membrane order accompanied by functional changes; furthermore, the results highlight differences in EPA and DHA bioactivity.

  19. Fish oil increases raft size and membrane order of B cells accompanied by differential effects on function[S

    PubMed Central

    Rockett, Benjamin Drew; Teague, Heather; Harris, Mitchel; Melton, Mark; Williams, Justin; Wassall, Stephen R.; Shaikh, Saame Raza

    2012-01-01

    Fish oil (FO) targets lipid microdomain organization to suppress T-cell and macrophage function; however, little is known about this relationship with B cells, especially at the animal level. We previously established that a high FO dose diminished mouse B-cell lipid raft microdomain clustering induced by cross-linking GM1. To establish relevance, here we tested a FO dose modeling human intake on B-cell raft organization relative to a control. Biochemical analysis revealed more docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) incorporated into phosphatidylcholines than phosphatidylethanolamines of detergent-resistant membranes, consistent with supporting studies with model membranes. Subsequent imaging experiments demonstrated that FO increased raft size, GM1 expression, and membrane order upon cross-linking GM1 relative to no cross-linking. Comparative in vitro studies showed some biochemical differences from in vivo measurements but overall revealed that DHA, but not eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), increased membrane order. Finally, we tested the hypothesis that disrupting rafts with FO would suppress B-cell responses ex vivo. FO enhanced LPS-induced B-cell activation but suppressed B-cell stimulation of transgenic naive CD4+ T cells. Altogether, our studies with B cells support an emerging model that FO increases raft size and membrane order accompanied by functional changes; furthermore, the results highlight differences in EPA and DHA bioactivity. PMID:22315394

  20. A possible role of lysophospholipids produced by calcium-independent phospholipase A(2) in membrane-raft budding and fission.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Takanari; Inoue, Ikuo; Shinozaki, Rina; Matsui, Masanori; Akatsuka, Toshitaka; Takahashi, Seiichiro; Tanaka, Kayoko; Akita, Masumi; Seo, Makoto; Hokari, Shigeru; Katayama, Shigehiro; Komoda, Tsugikazu

    2009-10-01

    Phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) not only plays a role in the membrane vesiculation system but also mediates membrane-raft budding and fission in artificial giant liposomes. This study aimed to demonstrate the same effects in living cells. Differentiated Caco-2 cells were cultured on filter membranes. MDCK cells were challenged with Influenza virus. The MDCK cultures were harvested for virus titration with a plaque assay. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a membrane-raft associated glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein, was 70% released by adding 0.2 mmol/l lysophosphatidylcholine, which was abolished by treatment with a membrane-raft disrupter, methyl-beta-cyclodextrin. Activation of calcium-independent PLA(2) (iPLA(2)) by brefeldin A increased the apical release of ALP by approximately 1.5-fold (p<0.01), which was blocked by PLA(2) inhibitor bromoenol lactone (BEL). BEL also reduced Influenza virus production into the media (<10%) in the MDCK culture. These results suggest that cells utilize inverted corn-shaped lysophospholipids generated by PLA(2) to modulate plasma membrane structure and assist the budding of raft-associated plasma membrane particles, which virus utilizes for its budding. Brush borders are enriched with membrane-rafts and undergo rapid turnover; thus, PLA(2) may be involved in the regulatory mechanism in membrane dynamism. Further, iPLA(2) may provide a therapeutic target for viral infections.

  1. Translocation of cellular prion protein to non-lipid rafts protects human prion-mediated neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Moon, Myung-Hee; Lee, You-Jin; Seol, Jae-Won; Park, Sang-Youel

    2012-03-01

    Prions are the causative agents of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, such as variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans. Cellular prion proteins (PrPC) connect with cholesterol- and glycosphingolipid-rich lipid rafts through association of their glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor with saturated raft lipids and interaction of their N-terminal regions. Our previous study showed that cellular cholesterol enrichment prevented PrP(106-126)-induced neuronal death. We have now studied the influence of membrane cholesterol in PrP(106-126)-mediated neurotoxicity and identified membrane domains involved in this activity. We found that PrPC is normally distributed in lipid rafts, but high membrane cholesterol levels as a result of cholesterol treatment led to the translocation of PrPC from lipid rafts to non-lipid rafts. Moreover, cholesterol-mediated PrPC translocation protects PrP(106-126)-mediated apoptosis and p-38 activation and caspase-3 activation. In a mitochondrial functional assay including mitochondrial transmembrane potential, cholesterol treatment prevented the loss of mitochondrial potential, translocation of Bax and cytochrome c by prion protein fragment. Our results indicate that modulation of the PrPC location appears to protect against neuronal cell death caused by prion peptides. The results of this study suggest that regulation of membrane cholesterol affects the translocation of PrPC, which in turn regulates PrP(106-126)-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and neurotoxicity.

  2. Sterol carrier protein 2 regulates proximal tubule size in the Xenopus pronephric kidney by modulating lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Débora M; Tran, Uyen; Romaker, Daniel; Abreu, José G; Wessely, Oliver

    2014-10-01

    The kidney is a homeostatic organ required for waste excretion and reabsorption of water, salts and other macromolecules. To this end, a complex series of developmental steps ensures the formation of a correctly patterned and properly proportioned organ. While previous studies have mainly focused on the individual signaling pathways, the formation of higher order receptor complexes in lipid rafts is an equally important aspect. These membrane platforms are characterized by differences in local lipid and protein compositions. Indeed, the cells in the Xenopus pronephric kidney were positive for the lipid raft markers ganglioside GM1 and Caveolin-1. To specifically interfere with lipid raft function in vivo, we focused on the Sterol Carrier Protein 2 (scp2), a multifunctional protein that is an important player in remodeling lipid raft composition. In Xenopus, scp2 mRNA was strongly expressed in differentiated epithelial structures of the pronephric kidney. Knockdown of scp2 did not interfere with the patterning of the kidney along its proximo-distal axis, but dramatically decreased the size of the kidney, in particular the proximal tubules. This phenotype was accompanied by a reduction of lipid rafts, but was independent of the peroxisomal or transcriptional activities of scp2. Finally, disrupting lipid micro-domains by inhibiting cholesterol synthesis using Mevinolin phenocopied the defects seen in scp2 morphants. Together these data underscore the importance for localized signaling platforms in the proper formation of the Xenopus kidney.

  3. Severe Alterations in Lipid Composition of Frontal Cortex Lipid Rafts from Parkinson’s Disease and Incidental Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Santpere, Gabriel; Marín, Raquel; Torrent, Laia; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains that provide a highly saturated and viscous physicochemical microenvironment to promote protein–lipid and protein–protein interactions. We purified lipid rafts from human frontal cortex from normal, early motor stages of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and incidental Parkinson’s disease (iPD) subjects and analyzed their lipid composition. We observed that lipid rafts from PD and iPD cortices exhibit dramatic reductions in their contents of n-3 and n-6 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, especially docosahexaenoic acid (22:6-n3) and arachidonic acid (20:4n-6). Also, saturated fatty acids (16:0 and 18:0) were significantly higher than in control brains. Paralleling these findings, unsaturation and peroxidability indices were considerably reduced in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Lipid classes were also affected in PD and iPD lipid rafts. Thus, phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol were increased in PD and iPD, whereas cerebrosides and sulfatides and plasmalogen levels were considerably diminished. Our data pinpoint a dramatic increase in lipid raft order due to the aberrant biochemical structure in PD and iPD and indicate that these abnormalities of lipid rafts in the frontal cortex occur at early stages of PD pathology. The findings correlate with abnormal lipid raft signaling and cognitive decline observed during the development of these neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:21717034

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux in pregnancy: a systematic review on the benefit of raft forming agents.

    PubMed

    Quartarone, G

    2013-10-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms in pregnancy is very high, up to 80%, with a maximum peak during the third trimester. Together with lifestyle modifications, antacids and antisecretive agents, such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs), are commonly prescribed in non-pregnant, adult population. In certain Countries these drugs are not allowed in or are allowed only during the late stages of pregnancy. Alginate-based formulations have been used for the symptomatic treatment of heartburn for decades, as they usually contain sodium or potassium bicarbonate. In the presence of gastric acid, a foamy raft is created above the gastric contents. The alginate raft moves into the esophagus in place or ahead of acidic gastric contents during reflux episodes physically preventing reflux of gastric contents into the esophagus. Alginate-based formulations are allowed with no restrictions also in pregnancy: their safety profile make them a very valid option taking into account the risk/benefit ratio for both parturient and unborn baby. This systematic review paper aims to explore the use of medications for treating GERD in pregnancy, including alginate raft-forming-agents, highlighting the benefits for both the mother and the fetus. Electronic search in databases was conducted on databases such as Medline, PubMed, Ovid retrieving data concerning the reflux treatments in pregnancy, with a special focus on alginate raft forming antireflux agents. From the literature on alginate use in pregnancy, no particular risks have been shown to date for both parturient and unborn baby when alginate had been administered during all the pregnancy trimesters. The physical mode of action ensures the maximum esophageal protection by the neutral foam floating in the stomach, maintaining physiological pH values at stomach level, without interfering with the digestive processes. The symptoms' healing has been markedly improved

  5. Overview of engineering and agricultural design considerations of the Raft River soil-warming and heat-dissipation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Stanley, N.E.; Engen, I.A.; Yrene, C.S.

    1982-04-01

    The engineering and agricultural considerations of the Raft River soil-warming and heat-dissipation experiment are presented. The experiment is designed to investigate the thermal characteristics of a subsurface pipe network for cooling power-plant condenser effluent, and crop responses to soil warming in an open-field plot. The subsurface soil-warming system is designed to dissipate approximately 100 kW of heat from circulating, 38/sup 0/C geothermal water. Summer operating conditions in the Raft River area, located on the Intermountain Plateau are emphasized. Design is based on the thermal characteristics of the local soil, the climate of the Raft River Valley, management practices for normal agriculture, and the need for an unheated control plot. The resultant design calls for 38-mm polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe in a grid composed of parallel loops, for dissipating heat into a 0.8-hectare experimental plot.

  6. Euphol from Euphorbia tirucalli Negatively Modulates TGF-β Responsiveness via TGF-β Receptor Segregation inside Membrane Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Lin; Chen, Ying-Pin; Lin, Ming-Wei; Huang, Yaw-Bin; Chang, Fang-Rong; Duh, Tsai-Hui; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Wu, Wei-Chiang; Kao, Yu-Chen; Yang, Pei-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) responsiveness in cultured cells can be modulated by TGF-β partitioning between lipid raft/caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis pathways. Lipid rafts are plasma membrane microdomains with an important role in cell survival signaling, and cholesterol is necessary for the lipid rafts’ structure and function. Euphol is a euphane-type triterpene alcohol that is structurally similar to cholesterol and has a wide range of pharmacological properties, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. In the present study, euphol suppressed TGF-β signaling by inducing TGF-β receptor movement into lipid-raft microdomains and degrading TGF-β receptors. PMID:26448474

  7. Effect of integral proteins in the phase stability of a lipid bilayer: Application to raft formation in cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez, Jordi; Sagués, Francesc; Reigada, Ramon

    2010-04-01

    The existence of lipid rafts is a controversial issue. The affinity of cholesterol for saturated lipids is manifested in macroscopic phase separation in model membranes, and is believed to be the thermodynamic driving force for raft formation. However, there is no clear reason to explain the small (nanometric) size of raft domains in cell membranes. In a recent paper Yethiraj and Weisshaar [Biophys. J. 93, 3113 (2007)] proposed that the effect of neutral integral membrane proteins may prevent from the formation of large lipid domains. In this paper we extend this approach by studying the effect of the protein size, as well as the lipid-protein interaction. Depending on these factors, two different mechanisms for nanodomain stabilization are shown to be possible for static proteins. The application of these results to a biological context is discussed.

  8. Cytomegalovirus Restructures Lipid Rafts via a US28/CDC42-Mediated Pathway, Enhancing Cholesterol Efflux from Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Low, Hann; Mukhamedova, Nigora; Cui, Huanhuan L; McSharry, Brian P; Avdic, Selmir; Hoang, Anh; Ditiatkovski, Michael; Liu, Yingying; Fu, Ying; Meikle, Peter J; Blomberg, Martin; Polyzos, Konstantinos A; Miller, William E; Religa, Piotr; Bukrinsky, Michael; Soderberg-Naucler, Cecilia; Slobedman, Barry; Sviridov, Dmitri

    2016-06-28

    Cytomegalovirus (HCMV) contains cholesterol, but how HCMV interacts with host cholesterol metabolism is unknown. We found that, in human fibroblasts, HCMV infection increased the efflux of cellular cholesterol, despite reducing the abundance of ABCA1. Mechanistically, viral protein US28 was acting through CDC42, rearranging actin microfilaments, causing association of actin with lipid rafts, and leading to a dramatic change in the abundance and/or structure of lipid rafts. These changes displaced ABCA1 from the cell surface but created new binding sites for apolipoprotein A-I, resulting in enhanced cholesterol efflux. The changes also reduced the inflammatory response in macrophages. HCMV infection modified the host lipidome profile and expression of several genes and microRNAs involved in cholesterol metabolism. In mice, murine CMV infection elevated plasma triglycerides but did not affect the level and functionality of high-density lipoprotein. Thus, HCMV, through its protein US28, reorganizes lipid rafts and disturbs cell cholesterol metabolism.

  9. Ligand Binding Alters Dimerization and Sequestering of Urokinase Receptors in Raft-Mimicking Lipid Mixtures

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Yifan; Siegel, Amanda P.; Jordan, Rainer; Naumann, Christoph A.

    2014-01-01

    Lipid heterogeneities, such as lipid rafts, are widely considered to be important for the sequestering of membrane proteins in plasma membranes, thereby influencing membrane protein functionality. However, the underlying mechanisms of such sequestration processes remain elusive, in part, due to the small size and often transient nature of these functional membrane heterogeneities in cellular membranes. To overcome these challenges, here we report the sequestration behavior of urokinase receptor (uPAR), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, in a planar model membrane platform with raft-mimicking lipid mixtures of well-defined compositions using a powerful optical imaging platform consisting of confocal spectroscopy XY-scans, photon counting histogram, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy analyses. This methodology provides parallel information about receptor sequestration, oligomerization state, and lateral mobility with single molecule sensitivity. Most notably, our experiments demonstrate that moderate changes in uPAR sequestration are not only associated with modifications in uPAR dimerization levels, but may also be linked to ligand-mediated allosteric changes of these membrane receptors. Our data show that these modifications in uPAR sequestration can be induced by exposure to specific ligands (urokinase plasminogen activator, vitronectin), but not via adjustment of the cholesterol level in the planar model membrane system. Good agreement of our key findings with published results on cell membranes confirms the validity of our model membrane approach. We hypothesize that the observed mechanism of receptor translocation in the presence of raft-mimicking lipid mixtures is also applicable to other glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins. PMID:25418095

  10. Ligand binding alters dimerization and sequestering of urokinase receptors in raft-mimicking lipid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yifan; Siegel, Amanda P; Jordan, Rainer; Naumann, Christoph A

    2014-11-01

    Lipid heterogeneities, such as lipid rafts, are widely considered to be important for the sequestering of membrane proteins in plasma membranes, thereby influencing membrane protein functionality. However, the underlying mechanisms of such sequestration processes remain elusive, in part, due to the small size and often transient nature of these functional membrane heterogeneities in cellular membranes. To overcome these challenges, here we report the sequestration behavior of urokinase receptor (uPAR), a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, in a planar model membrane platform with raft-mimicking lipid mixtures of well-defined compositions using a powerful optical imaging platform consisting of confocal spectroscopy XY-scans, photon counting histogram, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy analyses. This methodology provides parallel information about receptor sequestration, oligomerization state, and lateral mobility with single molecule sensitivity. Most notably, our experiments demonstrate that moderate changes in uPAR sequestration are not only associated with modifications in uPAR dimerization levels, but may also be linked to ligand-mediated allosteric changes of these membrane receptors. Our data show that these modifications in uPAR sequestration can be induced by exposure to specific ligands (urokinase plasminogen activator, vitronectin), but not via adjustment of the cholesterol level in the planar model membrane system. Good agreement of our key findings with published results on cell membranes confirms the validity of our model membrane approach. We hypothesize that the observed mechanism of receptor translocation in the presence of raft-mimicking lipid mixtures is also applicable to other glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins.

  11. Unexpectedly high radioactivity burdens in ice-rafted sediments from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Cota, Glenn F; Cooper, Lee W; Darby, Dennis A; Larsen, I L

    2006-07-31

    Unexpectedly high specific activities of (137)Cs (1800-2000 Bq kg(-1) dry weight) have been detected in fine-grained sediments entrained in multi-year sea ice floes grounded in Resolute Bay near the center of the Northwest Passage through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. These results are remarkable because: (1) the specific activities are about two orders of magnitude higher than average specific activities detected in previous studies of sea ice rafted sediments from the Arctic Ocean, (2) two independent observations of these unexpectedly high specific activities were made several years apart, (3) the sampling site is on the opposite side of the Arctic basin from potential radioactive sources such as disposal and weapons testing sites of the former Soviet Union and nuclear fuel reprocessing sites in western Europe, and (4) the closest compositional match to known geologic source regions is Banks Island, on the western edge of the Arctic Archipelago, although a smaller number of grains from one of the two samples were mineralogically matched to sediments in the Laptev Sea. Consequently, the sediments are probably not from a single distinct source and were likely mixed during sea ice transport. Coupled with previous observations of higher radionuclide specific activities in some sea ice rafted sediments relative to bottom sediments, these new observations indicate that comparatively high as well as variable radioactive contaminant burdens in ice rafted sediments must be common and geographically independent of proximity to known contaminant sources. The mechanisms that would facilitate these unexpected high radionuclide burdens in sea ice are not known and require additional study, as well as investigations of the implications for the transport and fate of contaminants in Arctic sea ice. PMID:16197983

  12. PMP22 Is Critical for Actin-Mediated Cellular Functions and for Establishing Lipid Rafts

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sooyeon; Amici, Stephanie; Tavori, Hagai; Zeng, Waylon M.; Freeland, Steven; Fazio, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Haploinsufficiency of peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) causes hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies, a peripheral nerve lesion induced by minimal trauma or compression. As PMP22 is localized to cholesterol-enriched membrane domains that are closely linked with the underlying actin network, we asked whether the myelin instability associated with PMP22 deficiency could be mediated by involvement of the protein in actin-dependent cellular functions and/or lipid raft integrity. In peripheral nerves and cells from mice with PMP22 deletion, we assessed the organization of filamentous actin (F-actin), and actin-dependent cellular functions. Using in vitro models, we discovered that, in the absence of PMP22, the migration and adhesion capacity of Schwann cells and fibroblasts are similarly impaired. Furthermore, PMP22-deficient Schwann cells produce shortened myelin internodes, and display compressed axial cell length and collapsed lamellipodia. During early postnatal development, F-actin-enriched Schmidt-Lanterman incisures do not form properly in nerves from PMP22−/− mice, and the expression and localization of molecules associated with uncompacted myelin domains and lipid rafts, including flotillin-1, cholesterol, and GM1 ganglioside, are altered. In addition, we identified changes in the levels and distribution of cholesterol and ApoE when PMP22 is absent. Significantly, cholesterol supplementation of the culture medium corrects the elongation and migration deficits of PMP22−/− Schwann cells, suggesting that the observed functional impairments are directly linked with cholesterol deficiency of the plasma membrane. Our findings support a novel role for PMP22 in the linkage of the actin cytoskeleton with the plasma membrane, likely through regulating the cholesterol content of lipid rafts. PMID:25429154

  13. Unexpectedly high radioactivity burdens in ice-rafted sediments from the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

    PubMed

    Cota, Glenn F; Cooper, Lee W; Darby, Dennis A; Larsen, I L

    2006-07-31

    Unexpectedly high specific activities of (137)Cs (1800-2000 Bq kg(-1) dry weight) have been detected in fine-grained sediments entrained in multi-year sea ice floes grounded in Resolute Bay near the center of the Northwest Passage through the Canadian Arctic Archipelago. These results are remarkable because: (1) the specific activities are about two orders of magnitude higher than average specific activities detected in previous studies of sea ice rafted sediments from the Arctic Ocean, (2) two independent observations of these unexpectedly high specific activities were made several years apart, (3) the sampling site is on the opposite side of the Arctic basin from potential radioactive sources such as disposal and weapons testing sites of the former Soviet Union and nuclear fuel reprocessing sites in western Europe, and (4) the closest compositional match to known geologic source regions is Banks Island, on the western edge of the Arctic Archipelago, although a smaller number of grains from one of the two samples were mineralogically matched to sediments in the Laptev Sea. Consequently, the sediments are probably not from a single distinct source and were likely mixed during sea ice transport. Coupled with previous observations of higher radionuclide specific activities in some sea ice rafted sediments relative to bottom sediments, these new observations indicate that comparatively high as well as variable radioactive contaminant burdens in ice rafted sediments must be common and geographically independent of proximity to known contaminant sources. The mechanisms that would facilitate these unexpected high radionuclide burdens in sea ice are not known and require additional study, as well as investigations of the implications for the transport and fate of contaminants in Arctic sea ice.

  14. Role of the lipid rafts in the life cycle of canine coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Annamaria; Colao, Valeriana

    2015-02-01

    Coronaviruses are enveloped RNA viruses that have evolved complex relationships with their host cells, and modulate their lipid composition, lipid synthesis and signalling. Lipid rafts, enriched in sphingolipids, cholesterol and associated proteins, are special plasma membrane microdomains involved in several processes in viral infections. The extraction of cholesterol leads to disorganization of lipid microdomains and to dissociation of proteins bound to lipid rafts. Because cholesterol-rich microdomains appear to be a general feature of the entry mechanism of non-eneveloped viruses and of several coronaviruses, the purpose of this study was to analyse the contribution of lipids to the infectivity of canine coronavirus (CCoV). The CCoV life cycle is closely connected to plasma membrane cholesterol, from cell entry to viral particle production. The methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) was employed to remove cholesterol and to disrupt the lipid rafts. Cholesterol depletion from the cell membrane resulted in a dose-dependent reduction, but not abolishment, of virus infectivity, and at a concentration of 15 mM, the reduction in the infection rate was about 68 %. MβCD treatment was used to verify if cholesterol in the envelope was required for CCoV infection. This resulted in a dose-dependent inhibitory effect, and at a concentration of 9 mM MβCD, infectivity was reduced by about 73 %. Since viral entry would constitute a target for antiviral strategies, inhibitory molecules interacting with viral and/or cell membranes, or interfering with lipid metabolism, may have strong antiviral potential. It will be interesting in the future to analyse the membrane microdomains in the CCoV envelope.

  15. Cutting Edge: Localization of linker for activation of T cells to lipid rafts is not essential in T cell activation and development.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Minghua; Shen, Shudan; Liu, Yan; Granillo, Olivia; Zhang, Weiguo

    2005-01-01

    It has been proposed that upon T cell activation, linker for activation of T cells (LAT), a transmembrane adaptor protein localized to lipid rafts, orchestrates formation of multiprotein complexes and activates signaling cascades in lipid rafts. However, whether lipid rafts really exist or function remains controversial. To address the importance of lipid rafts in LAT function, we generated a fusion protein to target LAT to nonraft fractions using the transmembrane domain from a nonraft protein, linker for activation of X cells (LAX). Surprisingly, this fusion protein functioned well in TCR signaling. It restored MAPK activation, calcium flux, and NFAT activation in LAT-deficient cells. To further study the function of this fusion protein in vivo, we generated transgenic mice that express this protein. Analysis of these mice indicated that it was fully capable of replacing LAT in thymocyte development and T cell function. Our results demonstrate that LAT localization to lipid rafts is not essential during normal T cell activation and development.

  16. Lipid rafts association and anti-apoptotic function of prohibitin in ultraviolet B light-irradiated HaCaT keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Wu, Shiyong

    2012-08-01

    Upon UVB irradiation, an alternation of major lipid raft components can lead to the recruitment/activation of rafts-associated proteins and initiation of downstream apoptotic signalling pathways. We used two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) to identify potential regulators of UVB-induced apoptosis and mass spectrometry fingerprint analysis to identify proteins that are altered in the rafts after UVB irradiation. Our data show that levels of several proteins, including prohibitin (PHB), were changed in lipid rafts after UVB irradiation. We also demonstrate that while total PHB expression was not changed, the protein was enriched in lipid rafts after UVB irradiation. Reduced expression of PHB using siRNA knockdown resulted in an increase in cellular apoptosis after UVB irradiation. Based on these results, we propose that PHB protects keratinocytes from UVB-induced apoptosis. PMID:22776003

  17. STS-55 MS2 Precourt in life raft during egress exercises at JSC's WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Using a small single person life raft, STS-55 Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Charles J. Precourt floats in the pool located in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Precourt, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), operates the Space Shuttle Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking (SARSAT) portable locating beacon (PLC) as SCUBA-equipped diver looks on. Precourt, along with other crewmembers, practiced launch emergency egress (bailout). STS-55 with the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) payload will fly aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, in 1993.

  18. RAFT I: Discovery of New Planetary Candidates and Updated Orbits from Archival FEROS Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, M. G.; Jenkins, J. S.; Jones, M. I.

    2015-09-01

    The first results of the Reanalysis of Archival FEROS specTra (RAFT) project are presented. We have analysed FEROS data for five stars with proposed planetary companions in order to test the reliability of the solutions with our new methodology. For HD 11977, HD 47536 and HD 110014 we confirm the presence of one orbiting companion. We reject the presence of a second companion around HD 47536, as well as the planets detected around HD 70573 and HD 122430. Finally, we propose the existence of a new second planetary companion around the giant star HD 110014.

  19. Amine functionalization of cellulose surface grafted with glycidyl methacrylate by γ-initiated RAFT polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsbay, Murat; Güven, Olgun; Kodama, Yasko

    2016-07-01

    This study presents the functionalization of poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (PGMA) grafted cellulose filter paper by a model compound, ethylenediamine (EDA), through the epoxy groups of PGMA. Cellulose based copolymers were prepared via the radiation-induced and RAFT-mediated graft polymerization. The samples were characterized by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), elemental analysis, contact angle measurements and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). An efficient modification density of around 1 mmol EDA/mg copolymer was attained within ca. 8 h, indicating that chemical composition of well-defined copolymers may further be tuned by appropriately selecting the reactive agents for use in many emerging fields.

  20. Perceived psychosocial benefits associated with perceived restorative potential of wilderness river-rafting trips.

    PubMed

    Garg, R; Couture, R T; Ogryzlo, T; Schinke, R

    2010-08-01

    Analysis of the restorative experiences and psychosocial benefits of wilderness river rafting trips of varying difficulty with 186 Canadian participants of different ages supported the restorative potential of natural settings for all age groups as measured by the Perceived Restorativeness Scale. The two-factor structure (General Restorativeness and Coherence) was confirmed. Significant associations were found between scores on the General Restorative subscale and perceived psychosocial benefits (relaxation, nature appreciation or kinship, and physical fitness or achievement) and positive affect. However, the findings associated with the Coherence subscale were not conclusive. PMID:20923066

  1. A Role for Lipid Shells in Targeting Proteins to Caveolae, Rafts, and Other Lipid Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Richard G. W.; Jacobson, Ken

    2002-06-01

    The surface membrane of cells is studded with morphologically distinct regions, or domains, like microvilli, cell-cell junctions, and coated pits. Each of these domains is specialized for a particular function, such as nutrient absorption, cell-cell communication, and endocytosis. Lipid domains, which include caveolae and rafts, are one of the least understood membrane domains. These domains are high in cholesterol and sphingolipids, have a light buoyant density, and function in both endocytosis and cell signaling. A major mystery, however, is how resident molecules are targeted to lipid domains. Here, we propose that the molecular address for proteins targeted to lipid domains is a lipid shell.

  2. STS-55 MS2 Precourt in life raft during egress exercises at JSC's WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-55 Mission Specialist 2 (MS2) Charles J. Precourt drains his single person life raft (using hose) as he floats in the pool located in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. Precourt, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), is participating in launch emergency egress (bailout) training. A SCUBA-equipped diver monitors Precourt's actions. STS-55 with the Spacelab Deutsche 2 (SL-D2) payload will fly aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, in 1993.

  3. STS-32 MS Dunbar wearing LES floats in life raft during water egress training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    STS-32 Mission Specialist (MS) Bonnie J. Dunbar, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and lauch and entry helmet (LEH), in a single-occupant (one man) lift raft enlists the aid of two SCUBA-equipped divers as she floats in 25 ft deep pool located in JSC's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29. During the exercises the crew practiced the procedures to follow in the event of an emergency aboard the Space Shuttle and familiarized themselves with post-Challenger pole system of emergency egress.

  4. STS-65 Pilot Halsell floats in a life raft during WETF bailout exercises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    STS-65 Pilot James D. Halsell, Jr, wearing a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), floats in a single person life raft while he is assisted by a SCUBA-equipped diver during an emergency egress bailout rehearsal. The STS-65 crew used the 25-feet deep pool in Johnson Space Center's (JSC's) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 to simulate a water landing during the launch emergency egress (bailout) exercise. Halsell will join five other NASA astronauts and a Japanese payload specialist for the International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) mission aboard Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, later this year.

  5. STS-42 Payload Specialist Bondar in single person life raft at JSC's WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    STS-42 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Payload Specialist Roberta L. Bondar, wearing launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), floats in single person life raft during launch emergency egress exercises held in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool. Bondar holds the Space Shuttle Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking (SARSAT) portable locating beacon (PLB). The STS-42 crewmembers rehearsed procedures for launch emergency egress and a water landing. Bondar is representing Canada during the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (IML-1) mission aboard OV-103.

  6. On scattered waves and lipid domains: detecting membrane rafts with X-rays and neutrons.

    PubMed

    Marquardt, Drew; Heberle, Frederick A; Nickels, Jonathan D; Pabst, Georg; Katsaras, John

    2015-12-21

    In order to understand the biological role of lipids in cell membranes, it is necessary to determine the mesoscopic structure of well-defined model membrane systems. Neutron and X-ray scattering are non-invasive, probe-free techniques that have been used extensively in such systems to probe length scales ranging from angstroms to microns, and dynamics occurring over picosecond to millisecond time scales. Recent developments in the area of phase separated lipid systems mimicking membrane rafts will be presented, and the underlying concepts of the different scattering techniques used to study them will be discussed in detail.

  7. Regulation of the high-affinity choline transporter activity and trafficking by its association with cholesterol-rich lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Cuddy, Leah K; Winick-Ng, Warren; Rylett, Rebecca Jane

    2014-03-01

    The sodium-coupled, hemicholinium-3-sensitive, high-affinity choline transporter (CHT) is responsible for transport of choline into cholinergic nerve terminals from the synaptic cleft following acetylcholine release and hydrolysis. In this study, we address regulation of CHT function by plasma membrane cholesterol. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts in both SH-SY5Y cells and nerve terminals from mouse forebrain. Treatment of SH-SY5Y cells expressing rat CHT with filipin, methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβC) or cholesterol oxidase significantly decreased choline uptake. In contrast, CHT activity was increased by addition of cholesterol to membranes using cholesterol-saturated MβC. Kinetic analysis of binding of [(3)H]hemicholinium-3 to CHT revealed that reducing membrane cholesterol with MβC decreased both the apparent binding affinity (KD) and maximum number of binding sites (Bmax ); this was confirmed by decreased plasma membrane CHT protein in lipid rafts in cell surface protein biotinylation assays. Finally, the loss of cell surface CHT associated with lipid raft disruption was not because of changes in CHT internalization. In summary, we provide evidence that CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for transporter function and localization. Alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol cholinergic nerve terminals could diminish cholinergic transmission by reducing choline availability for acetylcholine synthesis. The sodium-coupled choline transporter CHT moves choline into cholinergic nerve terminals to serve as substrate for acetylcholine synthesis. We show for the first time that CHT is concentrated in cholesterol-rich lipid rafts, and decreasing membrane cholesterol significantly reduces both choline uptake activity and cell surface CHT protein levels. CHT association with cholesterol-rich rafts is critical for its function, and alterations in plasma membrane cholesterol could diminish cholinergic

  8. Aβ promotes VDAC1 channel dephosphorylation in neuronal lipid rafts. Relevance to the mechanisms of neurotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Echevarria, C; Díaz, M; Ferrer, I; Canerina-Amaro, A; Marin, R

    2014-10-10

    Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is a mitochondrial protein abundantly found in neuronal lipid rafts. In these membrane domains, VDAC is associated with a complex of signaling proteins that trigger neuroprotective responses. Loss of lipid raft integrity may result in disruption of multicomplex association and alteration of signaling responses that may ultimately promote VDAC activation. Some data have demonstrated that VDAC at the neuronal membrane may be involved in the mechanisms of amyloid beta (Aβ)-induced neurotoxicity, through yet unknown mechanisms. Aβ is generated from amyloid precursor protein (APP), and is released to the extracellular space where it may undergo self-aggregation. Aβ aggregate deposition in the form of senile plaques may lead to Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, although other pathological hallmarks (such as hyper-phosphorylated Tau deposition) also participate in this neurodegenerative process. The present study demonstrates that VDAC1 associates with APP and Aβ in lipid rafts of neurons. Interaction of VDAC1 with APP was observed in lipid rafts from the frontal and entorhinal cortex of human brains affected by AD at early stages (I-IV/0-B of Braak and Braak). Furthermore, Aβ exposure enhanced the dephosphorylation of VDAC1 that correlated with cell death. Both effects were reverted in the presence of tyrosine phosphatase inhibitors. VDAC1 dephosphorylation was corroborated in lipid rafts of AD brains. These results demonstrate that Aβ is involved in alterations of the phosphorylation state of VDAC in neuronal lipid rafts. Modulation of this channel may contribute to the development and progression of AD pathology.

  9. Intracellular Triggering of Fas Aggregation and Recruitment of Apoptotic Molecules into Fas-enriched Rafts in Selective Tumor Cell Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Gajate, Consuelo; del Canto-Jañez, Esther; Acuña, A. Ulises; Amat-Guerri, Francisco; Geijo, Emilio; Santos-Beneit, Antonio M.; Veldman, Robert J.; Mollinedo, Faustino

    2004-01-01

    We have discovered a new and specific cell-killing mechanism mediated by the selective uptake of the antitumor drug 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET-18-OCH3, Edelfosine) into lipid rafts of tumor cells, followed by its coaggregation with Fas death receptor (also known as APO-1 or CD95) and recruitment of apoptotic molecules into Fas-enriched rafts. Drug sensitivity was dependent on drug uptake and Fas expression, regardless of the presence of other major death receptors, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor 1 or TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand R2/DR5 in the target cell. Drug microinjection experiments in Fas-deficient and Fas-transfected cells unable to incorporate exogenous ET-18-OCH3 demonstrated that Fas was intracellularly activated. Partial deletion of the Fas intracellular domain prevented apoptosis. Unlike normal lymphocytes, leukemic T cells incorporated ET-18-OCH3 into rafts coaggregating with Fas and underwent apoptosis. Fas-associated death domain protein, procaspase-8, procaspase-10, c-Jun amino-terminal kinase, and Bid were recruited into rafts, linking Fas and mitochondrial signaling routes. Clustering of rafts was necessary but not sufficient for ET-18-OCH3–mediated cell death, with Fas being required as the apoptosis trigger. ET-18-OCH3–mediated apoptosis did not require sphingomyelinase activation. Normal cells, including human and rat hepatocytes, did not incorporate ET-18-OCH3 and were spared. This mechanism represents the first selective activation of Fas in tumor cells. Our data set a framework for the development of more targeted therapies leading to intracellular Fas activation and recruitment of downstream signaling molecules into Fas-enriched rafts. PMID:15289504

  10. Radiation-induced and RAFT-mediated grafting of poly(hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (PHEMA) from cellulose surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Yasko; Barsbay, Murat; Güven, Olgun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of RAFT mediated free-radical graft copolymerization of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) onto cellulose fibers in a "grafting-from" approach under γ-irradiation. The effects of absorbed dose and monomer concentration on the graft ratios were investigated at different monomer (HEMA) to RAFT agent (cumyl dithiobenzoate, CDB) ratios. Cellulose-g-PHEMA copolymers with various graft ratios up to 92% (w/w) have been synthesized. The synthesized copolymers were characterized by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, elemental analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The results of various techniques confirmed the existence of PHEMA in the copolymer composition.

  11. Norepinephrine and endothelin activate diacylglycerol kinases in caveolae/rafts of rat mesenteric arteries: agonist-specific role of PI3-kinase.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Christopher J; Ohanian, Vasken; Ohanian, Jacqueline

    2007-05-01

    The phosphatidylinositol (PI) signaling pathway mediates norepinephrine (NE)- and endothelin-1 (ET-1)-stimulated vascular smooth muscle contraction through an inositol-trisphosphate-induced rise in intracellular calcium and diacylglycerol (DG) activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Subsequent activation of DG kinases (DGKs) metabolizes DG to phosphatidic acid (PA), potentially regulating PKC activity. Because precise regulation and spatial restriction of the PI pathway is necessary for specificity, we have investigated whether this occurs within caveolae/rafts, specialized plasma membrane microdomains implicated in vascular smooth muscle contraction. We show that components of the PI signaling cascade-phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)), PA, and DGK-theta are present in caveolae/rafts prepared from rat mesenteric small arteries. Stimulation with NE or ET-1 induced [(33)P]PIP(2) hydrolysis solely within caveolae/rafts. NE stimulated an increase in DGK activity in caveolae/rafts alone, whereas ET-1 activated DGK in caveolae/rafts and noncaveolae/rafts; however, [(33)P]PA increased in all fractions with both agonists. Previously, we reported that NE activated DGK-theta in a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase)-dependent manner; here, we describe PI3-kinase-dependent DGK activation and [(33)P]PA production in caveolae/rafts in response to NE but not ET-1. Additionally, PKB, a potential activator of DGK-theta, translocated to caveolae/rafts in response to NE but not ET-1, and PI3-kinase inhibition prevented this. Furthermore, PI3-kinase inhibition reduced the sensitivity of contraction to NE but not ET-1. Our study shows that caveolae/rafts are major sites of vasoconstrictor hormone activation of the PI pathway in intact small arteries and suggest a link between lipid signaling events within caveolae/rafts and contraction. PMID:17208990

  12. Glacitectonic rafting and associated deformation of mid-Pleistocene glacigenic sediments, near Central Graben, central North Sea; results of a 2D High-Resolution Geophysical Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan-Hirsch, David

    2013-04-01

    Glacitectonic rafts are defined as dislocated slabs of bedrock or unconsolidated sediments, transported from their original position by glacial action. These relatively thin, slab-like bodies feature transport distances ranging from tens of meters to hundreds of kilometers. They occur as either single rafts, or multiple stacked bodies associated with a variety of ice-pushed landforms. Internally, rafts frequently appear undeformed although at a larger scale, they may be folded or cut by shear zones and brittle faults. However, the processes leading to the detachment, transport and subsequent emplacement of the rafts remain uncertain. This work describes the results of a geophysical 2D seismic survey of thrust-bound glacitectonic rafts and associated deformation structures, occurring within mid-Pleistocene glacigenic sediments of the Central Graben, central North Sea. The total shortened length of the rafted section is 2.4km, comprising a series of nine discrete rafts which individually range from 235m to 1018m in length. The principle basal detachment occurs at the erosive contact between Aberdeen Ground Formation and overlying Ling Bank Formation. The ice-proximal (northern) limit of rafting is defined by the presence of a large-scale palaeo-channel oriented perpendicular to the direction of rafting, composed of sediments of the Ling Bank Formation and the Forth Formation. The observed deformation structures infer a mean tectonic direction of 178°, indicating that they are associated with an active glacial advance from the north. The resulting deformation creates a minimum lateral shortening throughout the observed sequence of 35%, typifying a strongly compressional regieme associated with rafting. Throughout the surveyed area, structurally younger rafts are found to be emplaced towards the south, compared to the structurally older rafts which are emplaced towards the south-east. This distinction is suggested to be caused by early rafts creating an obstacle to

  13. On rafting in a single crystal nickel-base superalloy after high and low temperature creep

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, P.; Berglin, L.; Jansson, C.

    1998-12-18

    Rafting (also known as directional coarsening) was first studied more than 25 years ago in SX Udimet 700. At intermediate temperatures, 700--800 C, no microstructural changes were seen during the creep of SX alloys in tests which lasted less than a few thousand hours. In a study of CMSX-4 crept at 750 C the immediate area of the fracture contained many cracks, but away from the fracture the microstructure looked identical to that of the uncrept material. It was not possible to see a change in the material with scanning electron microscopy. The aim of the work presented here was to find a way of imaging low and intermediate temperature creep damage using simple techniques and equipment readily available in most laboratories. This area is one of practical importance as SX alloys are being introduced into industrial gas turbines for power generation and principles for condition assessment need to be developed which are relevant to the temperature of usage. As a first step towards finding a solution it was necessary to study the conditions under which rafting occurred in other SX alloys and a brief summary of some important findings is given.

  14. Deuterium NMR of Raft Model Membranes Reveals Domain-Specific Order Profiles and Compositional Distribution

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Tomokazu; Tsuchikawa, Hiroshi; Murata, Michio; Matsumori, Nobuaki

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we applied site-specifically deuterated N-stearoylsphingomyelins (SSMs) to raft-exhibiting ternary mixtures containing SSM, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC), and cholesterol (Chol) and successfully acquired deuterium quadrupole coupling profiles of SSM from liquid-ordered (Lo) and liquid-disordered (Ld) domains. To our knowledge, this is the first report that shows detailed lipid chain dynamics separately and simultaneously obtained from coexisting Lo and Ld domains. We also found that the quadrupole profile of the Lo phase in the ternary system was almost identical to that in the SSM-Chol binary mixture, suggesting that the order profile of the binary system is essentially applicable to more complicated membrane systems in terms of the acyl chain order. We also demonstrated that 2H NMR spectroscopy, in combination with organic synthesis of deuterated components, could be used to reveal the accurate mole fractions of each component distributed in the Lo and Ld domains. As compared with the reported tie-line analysis of phase diagrams, the merit of our 2H NMR analysis is that the domain-specific compositional fractions are directly attainable without experimental complexity and ambiguity. The accurate compositional distributions as well as lipid order profiles in ternary mixtures are relevant to understanding the molecular mechanism of lipid raft formation. PMID:25992728

  15. Alkyl ether lipids, ion channels and lipid raft reorganization in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jaffrès, Paul-Alain; Gajate, Consuelo; Bouchet, Ana Maria; Couthon-Gourvès, Hélène; Chantôme, Aurélie; Potier-Cartereau, Marie; Besson, Pierre; Bougnoux, Philippe; Mollinedo, Faustino; Vandier, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    Synthetic alkyl lipids, such as the ether lipids edelfosine (1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine) and ohmline (1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-β-lactose), are forming a class of antitumor agents that target cell membranes to induce apoptosis and to decrease cell migration/invasion, leading to the inhibition of tumor and metastasis development. In this review, we present the structure-activity relationship of edelfosine and ohmline, and we point out differences and similarities between these two amphiphilic compounds. We also discuss the mechanisms of action of these synthetic alkyl ether lipids (involving, among other structures and molecules, membrane domains, Fas/CD95 death receptor signaling, and ion channels), and highlight a key role for lipid rafts in the underlying process. The reorganization of lipid raft membrane domains induced by these alkyl lipids affects the function of death receptors and ion channels, thus leading to apoptosis and/or inhibition of cancer cell migration. The possible therapeutic use of these alkyl lipids and the clinical perspectives for these lipids in prevention or/and treatment of tumor development and metastasis are also discussed.

  16. Hybrid and Nonhybrid Lipids Exert Common Effects on Membrane Raft Size and Morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Heberle, Frederick A; Doktorova, Milka; Goh, Shih Lin; Standaert, Robert F; Katsaras, John; Feigenson, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    Nanometer-scale domains in cholesterolrich model membranes emulate lipid rafts in cell plasma membranes (PMs). The physicochemical mechanisms that maintain a finite, small domain size are, however, not well understood. A special role has been postulated for chainasymmetric or hybrid lipids having a saturated sn-1 chain and an unsaturated sn-2 chain. Hybrid lipids generate nanodomains in some model membranes and are also abundant in the PM. It was proposed that they align in a preferred orientation at the boundary of ordered and disordered phases, lowering the interfacial energy and thus reducing domain size. We used small-angle neutron scattering and fluorescence techniques to detect nanoscopic and modulated liquid phase domains in a mixture composed entirely of nonhybrid lipids and cholesterol. Our results are indistinguishable from those obtained previously for mixtures containing hybrid lipids, conclusively showing that hybrid lipids are not required for the formation of nanoscopic liquid domains and strongly implying a common mechanism for the overall control of raft size and morphology. We discuss implications of these findings for theoretical descriptions of nanodomains.

  17. Influence of dynamic soil-pile raft-structure interaction: an experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Rajib; Haldar, Sumanta; Dutta, Sekhar Chandra

    2015-12-01

    Traditionally seismic design of structures supported on piled raft foundation is performed by considering fixed base conditions, while the pile head is also considered to be fixed for the design of the pile foundation. Major drawback of this assumption is that it cannot capture soil-foundation-structure interaction due to flexibility of soil or the inertial interaction involving heavy foundation masses. Previous studies on this subject addressed mainly the intricacy in modelling of dynamic soil structure interaction (DSSI) but not the implication of such interaction on the distribution of forces at various elements of the pile foundation and supported structure. A recent numerical study by the authors showed significant change in response at different elements of the piled raft supported structure when DSSI effects are considered. The present study is a limited attempt in this direction, and it examines such observations through shake table tests. The effect of DSSI is examined by comparing dynamic responses from fixed base scaled down model structures and the overall systems. This study indicates the possibility of significant underestimation in design forces for both the column and pile if designed under fixed base assumption. Such underestimation in the design forces may have serious implication in the design of a foundation or structural element.

  18. CRITICAL ROLE OF LIPID RAFT REDOX SIGNALING PLATFORMS IN ENDOSTATIN-INDUCED CORONARY ENDOTHELIAL DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Si; Zhang, Yang; Yi, Fan; Li, Pin-Lan

    2009-01-01

    Objective Endostatin (EST) was found to initiate a redox signaling cascade associated with activation of NADPH oxidase in endothelial cells (ECs). The present study tested whether EST stimulate clustering of ceramide-enriched lipid rafts (LR), which assembles and activates NADPH oxidase to form redox signaling platforms. Methods and Results Using confocal microscopy, we first demonstrated a co-localization of LR clusters with NADPH oxidase subunits, gp91phox and p47phox in the ECs membrane upon EST stimulation. Immunoblot analysis of floated detergent-resistant membrane fractions found that in LR fractions NADPH oxidase subunits gp91phox and p47phox are enriched and that the activity of this enzyme increased dramatically, as measured by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometry. This EST-increased LR platform formation was shown to be attenuated by inhibition or RNA interference of acid sphingomyelinase (A-SMase). Functionally, EST pretreatment significantly impaired bradykinin or A23187-induced vasodilation in isolated small coronary arteries, which could be partially reversed by LR disruptors. Conclusions The early injury effect of EST on the vascular endothelium is associated with the formation of redox signaling platforms via lipid raft clustering. Besides its proapototic effects, EST is also able to induce endothelial dysfunction. This early-stage action of EST is associated with LR clustering and consequent assembling and activation of NADPH oxidase. PMID:18162606

  19. Development and thermodynamic evaluation of novel lipid raft stationary phase chromatography for screening potential antitumor agents.

    PubMed

    Tong, Shanshan; Sun, Chaonan; Cao, Xia; Zheng, Qianfeng; Zhang, Huiyun; Firempong, Caleb Kesse; Feng, Yingshu; Yang, Yan; Yu, Jiangnan; Xu, Ximing

    2014-12-01

    Novel lipid raft stationary phase chromatography (LRSC), with lipid rafts that contain abundant tropomyosin-related tyrosine kinase A receptors immobilized on the stationary phase, was developed for a high-throughput screening of potentially active antitumor agents. Lestaurtinib was used as a model compound to determine the operational parameters of the LRSC. Of all the factors considered, the particle size of column packing, the column temperature and the flow rate were of immense importance in determining the performance of the established LRSC system. In order to profoundly comprehend the binding interaction between the model drug and the receptors on the column, thermodynamic studies were employed. The results revealed that the interaction was spontaneous and exothermic, a typical enthalpy-driven process. Additionally, the primary forces were hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. In evaluating the applicability of the method, active extracts from Albizziae Cortex were screened out using the LRSC system under the optimized conditions. The bioactive components were successfully confirmed by the MTT assay. In conclusion, it could be said that the LRSC is a good model for screening potential antitumor agents because of its viability, rapid response and scalable features.

  20. Analysis of the response of the Raft River monitor wells to the 1979 injection tests

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, S.G.; Callan, D.M.

    1980-09-01

    The geothermal resource for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Raft River Geothermal 5 MWe Power Project is located in a closed ground water basin in southcentral Idaho. Chemical analyses indicate the existence of natural communication along fractures between the geothermal reservoir and the shallower aquifers developed for irrigation. Much of the ground water that is presently used for irrigation is of poor quality. Injection of geothermal fluids at intermediate depths may increase communication between the reservoir and the aquifer, resulting in further degradation of shallow ground water quality over time. Seven monitor wells, ranging in depth from 150 m to 400 m, were drilled to evaluate the potential for this degradation. Monitoring of these wells during two 21-day injection tests at the Raft River Geothermal Injection Well-6 (RRGI-6) indicates two types of response in the shallow aquifer system. First, the water level in Monitor Well-4 (MW-4) increased an average of 0.4 m/week during injection, indicating direct fracture connection between the injection zone and the aquifer penetrated by MW-4. Second, water levels in MW-5, MW-6, and MW-7 showed a step function decrease which coincided with the period of the injection tests. Analyses indicate that this response may be caused by elastic deformation in the aquifer matrix.

  1. Recent progress on lipid lateral heterogeneity in plasma membranes: From rafts to submicrometric domains.

    PubMed

    Carquin, Mélanie; D'Auria, Ludovic; Pollet, Hélène; Bongarzone, Ernesto R; Tyteca, Donatienne

    2016-04-01

    The concept of transient nanometric domains known as lipid rafts has brought interest to reassess the validity of the Singer-Nicolson model of a fluid bilayer for cell membranes. However, this new view is still insufficient to explain the cellular control of surface lipid diversity or membrane deformability. During the past decades, the hypothesis that some lipids form large (submicrometric/mesoscale vs nanometric rafts) and stable (>min vs s) membrane domains has emerged, largely based on indirect methods. Morphological evidence for stable submicrometric lipid domains, well-accepted for artificial and highly specialized biological membranes, was further reported for a variety of living cells from prokaryot es to yeast and mammalian cells. However, results remained questioned based on limitations of available fluorescent tools, use of poor lipid fixatives, and imaging artifacts due to non-resolved membrane projections. In this review, we will discuss recent evidence generated using powerful and innovative approaches such as lipid-specific toxin fragments that support the existence of submicrometric domains. We will integrate documented mechanisms involved in the formation and maintenance of these domains, and provide a perspective on their relevance on membrane deformability and regulation of membrane protein distribution.

  2. Hybrid and nonhybrid lipids exert common effects on membrane raft size and morphology.

    PubMed

    Heberle, Frederick A; Doktorova, Milka; Goh, Shih Lin; Standaert, Robert F; Katsaras, John; Feigenson, Gerald W

    2013-10-01

    Nanometer-scale domains in cholesterol-rich model membranes emulate lipid rafts in cell plasma membranes (PMs). The physicochemical mechanisms that maintain a finite, small domain size are, however, not well understood. A special role has been postulated for chain-asymmetric or hybrid lipids having a saturated sn-1 chain and an unsaturated sn-2 chain. Hybrid lipids generate nanodomains in some model membranes and are also abundant in the PM. It was proposed that they align in a preferred orientation at the boundary of ordered and disordered phases, lowering the interfacial energy and thus reducing domain size. We used small-angle neutron scattering and fluorescence techniques to detect nanoscopic and modulated liquid phase domains in a mixture composed entirely of nonhybrid lipids and cholesterol. Our results are indistinguishable from those obtained previously for mixtures containing hybrid lipids, conclusively showing that hybrid lipids are not required for the formation of nanoscopic liquid domains and strongly implying a common mechanism for the overall control of raft size and morphology. We discuss implications of these findings for theoretical descriptions of nanodomains.

  3. Exogenous Alpha-Synuclein Alters Pre- and Post-Synaptic Activity by Fragmenting Lipid Rafts.

    PubMed

    Emanuele, Marco; Esposito, Alessandro; Camerini, Serena; Antonucci, Flavia; Ferrara, Silvia; Seghezza, Silvia; Catelani, Tiziano; Crescenzi, Marco; Marotta, Roberto; Canale, Claudio; Matteoli, Michela; Menna, Elisabetta; Chieregatti, Evelina

    2016-05-01

    Alpha-synuclein (αSyn) interferes with multiple steps of synaptic activity at pre-and post-synaptic terminals, however the mechanism/s by which αSyn alters neurotransmitter release and synaptic potentiation is unclear. By atomic force microscopy we show that human αSyn, when incubated with reconstituted membrane bilayer, induces lipid rafts' fragmentation. As a consequence, ion channels and receptors are displaced from lipid rafts with consequent changes in their activity. The enhanced calcium entry leads to acute mobilization of synaptic vesicles, and exhaustion of neurotransmission at later stages. At the post-synaptic terminal, an acute increase in glutamatergic transmission, with increased density of PSD-95 puncta, is followed by disruption of the interaction between N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and PSD-95 with ensuing decrease of long term potentiation. While cholesterol loading prevents the acute effect of αSyn at the presynapse; inhibition of casein kinase 2, which appears activated by reduction of cholesterol, restores the correct localization and clustering of NMDARs.

  4. TNAP, an Essential Player in Membrane Lipid Rafts of Neuronal Cells.

    PubMed

    Ermonval, Myriam; Baychelier, Florence; Fonta, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    The tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) is a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored glycoprotein which exists under different forms and is expressed in different tissues. As the other members of the ecto-phosphatase family, TNAP is targeted to membrane lipid rafts. Such micro domains enriched in particular lipids, are involved in cell sorting, are in close contact with the cellular cytoskeleton and play the role of signaling platform. In addition to its location in functional domains, the extracellular orientation of TNAP and the fact this glycoprotein can be shed from plasma membranes, contribute to its different phosphatase activities by acting as a phosphomonoesterase on various soluble substrates (inorganic pyrophosphate -PPi-, pyridoxal phosphate -PLP-, phosphoethanolamine -PEA-), as an ectonucleotidase on nucleotide-phosphate and presumably as a phosphatase able to dephosphorylate phosphoproteins and phospholipids associated to cells or to extra cellular matrix. More and more data accumulate on an involvement of the brain TNAP both in physiological and pathological situations. This review will summarize what is known and expected from the TNAP localization in lipid rafts with a particular emphasis on the role of a neuronal microenvironment on its potential function in the central nervous system.

  5. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis and physiology-based cell membrane traffic models of doxorubicin liposomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghuan; Gao, Lei; Tan, Xi; Li, Feiyang; Zhao, Ming; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-08-01

    The clathrin-mediated endocytosis is likely a major mechanism of liposomes' internalization. A kinetic approach was used to assess the internalization mechanism of doxorubicin (Dox) loaded cationic liposomes and to establish physiology-based cell membrane traffic mathematic models. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis, including dynamin-dependent or -independent endocytosis of noncaveolar structure, was a dominant process. The mathematic models divided Dox loaded liposomes binding lipid rafts (B) into saturable binding (SB) and nonsaturable binding (NSB) followed by energy-driven endocytosis. The intracellular trafficking demonstrated early endosome-late endosome-lysosome or early/late endosome-cytoplasm-nucleus pathways. The three properties of liposome structures, i.e., cationic lipid, fusogenic lipid, and pegylation, were investigated to compare their contributions to cell membrane and intracellular traffic. The results revealed great contribution of cationic lipid DOTAP and fusogenic lipid DOPE to cell membrane binding and internalization. The valid Dox in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with cationic liposomes containing 40mol% of DOPE were 1.2-fold and 1.5-fold higher than that in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with liposomes containing 20mol% of DOPE, respectively, suggesting the dependence of cell type. This tendency was proportional to the increase of cell-associated total liposomal Dox. The mathematic models would be useful to predict intracellular trafficking of liposomal Dox.

  6. Enhancement of a hybrid petroleum system by raft tectonics: Example of onshore Angola

    SciTech Connect

    Cramez, C.; DeJanvry, G.C.; Duval, B.C.; Plittion, J.L.

    1996-08-01

    Northern Angola shelf area is part of the western Lower Congo basin. The Pinda formation, containing most of the area oil and gas reserves, belongs to a generally transgressive carbonate sequence with a marked backstripping configuration. Three main sources were identified, the lacustrine Pre-salt Bucomazi formation, largely present in the gas window, the rich marine Upper labe formation (Senonian and Paleocene), and the Tertiary Malembo, of lower quality. Integrated geochemical studies and basin modeling showed an early generation from Pre-salt rocks in the deepest grabens, while generation from the labe and Malembo, and the final mixed charging of traps, is very recent. This hybrid petroleum system is strongly enhanced by salt tectonics. Firstly, a combination of large open windows in the Aptian salt and intense faulting in the updip ends of fault blocks facilitated early vertical migration from the Bucomazi source rock. Secondly, hydrocarbons are trapped in Pinda structures related to early halokinesis due to Aptian salt. These salt movements caused the segmentation of the Pinda platform and the development of allochthonous blocks or rafts. Thirdly, the main reservoir developments of the Pinda formation are related to high energy carbonates accumulated on structural positive features. Fourthly, the respective roles of vertical and lateral migration are controlled by the degree of separation of the rafts, with more lateral migration taking place in the preraft more {open_quotes}connected{close_quotes} easternmost domain. Finally, hydrocarbons of Tertiary origin are linked to depocenters, where lateral space was created to accommodate the extension.

  7. Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate 5-Kinase β Controls Recruitment of Lipid Rafts into the Immunological Synapse.

    PubMed

    Kallikourdis, Marinos; Trovato, Anna Elisa; Roselli, Giuliana; Muscolini, Michela; Porciello, Nicla; Tuosto, Loretta; Viola, Antonella

    2016-02-15

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) is critical for T lymphocyte activation serving as a substrate for the generation of second messengers and the remodeling of actin cytoskeleton necessary for the clustering of lipid rafts, TCR, and costimulatory receptors toward the T:APC interface. Spatiotemporal analysis of PIP2 synthesis in T lymphocytes suggested that distinct isoforms of the main PIP2-generating enzyme, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase (PIP5K), play a differential role on the basis of their distinct localization. In this study, we analyze the contribution of PIP5Kβ to T cell activation and show that CD28 induces the recruitment of PIP5Kβ to the immunological synapse, where it regulates filamin A and lipid raft accumulation, as well as T cell activation, in a nonredundant manner. Finally, we found that Vav1 and the C-terminal 83 aa of PIP5Kβ are pivotal for the PIP5Kβ regulatory functions in response to CD28 stimulation.

  8. The role of membrane rafts in Lck transport, regulation and signalling in T-cells.

    PubMed

    Ventimiglia, Leandro N; Alonso, Miguel A

    2013-09-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is one of the key covalent modifications that occur in multicellular organisms. Since its discovery more than 30 years ago, tyrosine phosphorylation has come to be understood as a fundamentally important mechanism of signal transduction and regulation in all eukaryotic cells. The tyrosine kinase Lck (lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase) plays a crucial role in the T-cell response by transducing early activation signals triggered by TCR (T-cell receptor) engagement. These signals result in the phosphorylation of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs present within the cytosolic tails of the TCR-associated CD3 subunits that, once phosphorylated, serve as scaffolds for the assembly of a large supramolecular signalling complex responsible for T-cell activation. The existence of membrane nano- or micro-domains or rafts as specialized platforms for protein transport and cell signalling has been proposed. The present review discusses the signals that target Lck to membrane rafts and the importance of these specialized membranes in the transport of Lck to the plasma membrane, the regulation of Lck activity and the phosphorylation of the TCR.

  9. HSL-knockout mouse testis exhibits class B scavenger receptor upregulation and disrupted lipid raft microdomains.

    PubMed

    Casado, María Emilia; Huerta, Lydia; Ortiz, Ana Isabel; Pérez-Crespo, Mirian; Gutiérrez-Adán, Alfonso; Kraemer, Fredric B; Lasunción, Miguel Ángel; Busto, Rebeca; Martín-Hidalgo, Antonia

    2012-12-01

    There is a tight relationship between fertility and changes in cholesterol metabolism during spermatogenesis. In the testis, class B scavenger receptors (SR-B) SR-BI, SR-BII, and LIMP II mediate the selective uptake of cholesterol esters from HDL, which are hydrolyzed to unesterified cholesterol by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). HSL is critical because HSL knockout (KO) male mice are sterile. The aim of the present work was to determine the effects of the lack of HSL in testis on the expression of SR-B, lipid raft composition, and related cell signaling pathways. HSL-KO mouse testis presented altered spermatogenesis associated with decreased sperm counts, sperm motility, and infertility. In wild-type (WT) testis, HSL is expressed in elongated spermatids; SR-BI, in Leydig cells and spermatids; SR-BII, in spermatocytes and spermatids but not in Leydig cells; and LIMP II, in Sertoli and Leydig cells. HSL knockout male mice have increased expression of class B scavenger receptors, disrupted caveolin-1 localization in lipid raft plasma membrane microdomains, and activated phospho-ERK, phospho-AKT, and phospho-SRC in the testis, suggesting that class B scavenger receptors are involved in cholesterol ester uptake for steroidogenesis and spermatogenesis in the testis.

  10. Model of a Raft in Both Leaves of an Asymmetric Lipid Bilayer

    PubMed Central

    Shlomovitz, Roie; Schick, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a theory of inhomogeneities in the plasma membrane, or rafts, that can exist in both leaves of the plasma membrane. We note that although neither of the major phospholipid components of the outer leaf, sphingomyelin (SM) nor phosphatidylcholine (PC), evinces a tendency to form phases characterized by nonzero curvature, one of the major components of the inner leaf, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), displays a strong tendency to do so whereas the other, phosphatidylserine (PS), does not. Therefore, we posit that the concentration difference of PS and PE couples to height fluctuations of the plasma membrane bilayer. This brings about a microemulsion in the inner leaf. Coupling of the concentration difference between PS and PE in the inner leaf and SM and PC in the outer leaf propagates the microemulsion to that leaf as well. The characteristic size of the inhomogeneities is equal to the square-root of the ratio of the bending modulus of the bilayer to its surface tension, a size which is ∼100 nm for the plasma membrane. If the coupling between leaves were to be provided by the interchange of cholesterol, then our model raft would consist of SM and cholesterol in the outer leaf and PS and cholesterol in the inner leaf floating in a sea of PC and PE in both leaves. PMID:24047992

  11. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis and physiology-based cell membrane traffic models of doxorubicin liposomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Yinghuan; Gao, Lei; Tan, Xi; Li, Feiyang; Zhao, Ming; Peng, Shiqi

    2016-08-01

    The clathrin-mediated endocytosis is likely a major mechanism of liposomes' internalization. A kinetic approach was used to assess the internalization mechanism of doxorubicin (Dox) loaded cationic liposomes and to establish physiology-based cell membrane traffic mathematic models. Lipid rafts-mediated endocytosis, including dynamin-dependent or -independent endocytosis of noncaveolar structure, was a dominant process. The mathematic models divided Dox loaded liposomes binding lipid rafts (B) into saturable binding (SB) and nonsaturable binding (NSB) followed by energy-driven endocytosis. The intracellular trafficking demonstrated early endosome-late endosome-lysosome or early/late endosome-cytoplasm-nucleus pathways. The three properties of liposome structures, i.e., cationic lipid, fusogenic lipid, and pegylation, were investigated to compare their contributions to cell membrane and intracellular traffic. The results revealed great contribution of cationic lipid DOTAP and fusogenic lipid DOPE to cell membrane binding and internalization. The valid Dox in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with cationic liposomes containing 40mol% of DOPE were 1.2-fold and 1.5-fold higher than that in the nuclei of HepG2 and A375 cells treated with liposomes containing 20mol% of DOPE, respectively, suggesting the dependence of cell type. This tendency was proportional to the increase of cell-associated total liposomal Dox. The mathematic models would be useful to predict intracellular trafficking of liposomal Dox. PMID:27117641

  12. Sulfonated macro-RAFT agents for the surfactant-free synthesis of cerium oxide-based hybrid latexes.

    PubMed

    Garnier, Jérôme; Warnant, Jérôme; Lacroix-Desmazes, Patrick; Dufils, Pierre-Emmanuel; Vinas, Jérôme; van Herk, Alex

    2013-10-01

    Three types of amphiphatic macro-RAFT agents were employed as compatibilizers to promote the polymerization reaction at the surface of nanoceria for the synthesis of CeO2-based hybrid latexes. Macro-RAFT copolymers and terpolymers were first synthesized employing various combinations of butyl acrylate as a hydrophobic monomer and acrylic acid (AA) and/or 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS) as hydrophilic monomers. After characterizing the adsorption of these macro-RAFT agents at the cerium oxide surface by UV-visible spectrometry, emulsion copolymerization reactions of styrene and methyl acrylate were then carried out in the presence of the surface-modified nanoceria. Dynamic Light Scattering and cryo-Transmission Electron Microscopy were employed to confirm the hybrid structure of the final CeO2/polymer latexes, and proved that the presence of acrylic acid units in amphiphatic macro-RAFT agents enabled an efficient formation of hybrid structures, while the presence of AMPS units, when combined with AA units, resulted in a better distribution of cerium oxide nanoclusters between latex particles.

  13. Astronaut Daniel W. Bursch, mission specialist, uses his helmet to bail out water from his life raft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-77 TRAINING VIEW --- Astronaut Daniel W. Bursch, mission specialist, uses his helmet to bail out water from his life raft during emergency bailout training for crew members in the Johnson Space Centers (JSC) Weightless Environment Training Facility (WET-F). Bursch will join five other astronauts for nine days aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour next month.

  14. Interaction of the human N-Ras protein with lipid raft model membranes of varying degrees of complexity.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Alexander; Nikolaus, Jörg; Weise, Katrin; Triola, Gemma; Waldmann, Herbert; Winter, Roland; Herrmann, Andreas; Huster, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Ternary lipid mixtures composed of cholesterol, saturated (frequently with sphingosine backbone), and unsaturated phospholipids show stable phase separation and are often used as model systems of lipid rafts. Yet, their ability to reproduce raft properties and function is still debated. We investigated the properties and functional aspects of three lipid raft model systems of varying degrees of biological relevance--PSM/POPC/Chol, DPPC/POPC/Chol, and DPPC/DOPC/Chol--using 2H solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, fluorescence microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. While some minor differences were observed, the general behavior and properties of all three model mixtures were similar to previously investigated influenza envelope lipid membranes, which closely mimic the lipid composition of biological membranes. For the investigation of the functional aspects, we employed the human N-Ras protein, which is posttranslationally modified by two lipid modifications that anchor the protein to the membrane. It was previously shown that N-Ras preferentially resides in liquid-disordered domains and exhibits a time-dependent accumulation in the domain boundaries of influenza envelope lipid membranes. For all three model mixtures, we observed the same membrane partitioning behavior for N-Ras. Therefore, we conclude that even relatively simple models of raft membranes are able to reproduce many of their specific properties and functions.

  15. Evidence for the involvement of lipid rafts localized at the ER-mitochondria associated membranes in autophagosome formation.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Tina; Matarrese, Paola; Manganelli, Valeria; Marconi, Matteo; Tinari, Antonella; Gambardella, Lucrezia; Faggioni, Alberto; Misasi, Roberta; Sorice, Maurizio; Malorni, Walter

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria-associated membranes (MAMs) are subdomains of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that interact with mitochondria. This membrane scrambling between ER and mitochondria appears to play a critical role in the earliest steps of autophagy. Recently, lipid microdomains, i.e. lipid rafts, have been identified as further actors of the autophagic process. In the present work, a series of biochemical and molecular analyses has been carried out in human fibroblasts with the specific aim of characterizing lipid rafts in MAMs and to decipher their possible implication in the autophagosome formation. In fact, the presence of lipid microdomains in MAMs has been detected and, in these structures, a molecular interaction of the ganglioside GD3, a paradigmatic "brick" of lipid rafts, with core-initiator proteins of autophagy, such as AMBRA1 and WIPI1, was revealed. This association seems thus to take place in the early phases of autophagic process in which MAMs have been hypothesized to play a key role. The functional activity of GD3 was suggested by the experiments carried out by knocking down ST8SIA1 gene expression, i.e., the synthase that leads to the ganglioside formation. This experimental condition results in fact in the impairment of the ER-mitochondria crosstalk and the subsequent hindering of autophagosome nucleation. We thus hypothesize that MAM raft-like microdomains could be pivotal in the initial organelle scrambling activity that finally leads to the formation of autophagosome.

  16. Candida albicans Targets a Lipid Raft/Dectin-1 Platform to Enter Human Monocytes and Induce Antigen Specific T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    de Turris, Valeria; Teloni, Raffaela; Chiani, Paola; Bromuro, Carla; Mariotti, Sabrina; Pardini, Manuela; Nisini, Roberto; Torosantucci, Antonella; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Several pathogens have been described to enter host cells via cholesterol-enriched membrane lipid raft microdomains. We found that disruption of lipid rafts by the cholesterol-extracting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by the cholesterol-binding antifungal drug Amphotericin B strongly impairs the uptake of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans by human monocytes, suggesting a role of raft microdomains in the phagocytosis of the fungus. Time lapse confocal imaging indicated that Dectin-1, the C-type lectin receptor that recognizes Candida albicans cell wall-associated β-glucan, is recruited to lipid rafts upon Candida albicans uptake by monocytes, supporting the notion that lipid rafts act as an entry platform. Interestingly disruption of lipid raft integrity and interference with fungus uptake do not alter cytokine production by monocytes in response to Candida albicans but drastically dampen fungus specific T cell response. In conclusion, these data suggest that monocyte lipid rafts play a crucial role in the innate and adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans in humans and highlight a new and unexpected immunomodulatory function of the antifungal drug Amphotericin B.

  17. L-plastin is involved in NKG2D recruitment into lipid rafts and NKG2D-mediated NK cell migration.

    PubMed

    Serrano-Pertierra, Esther; Cernuda-Morollón, Eva; Brdička, Tomáš; Hoøejši, Václav; López-Larrea, Carlos

    2014-09-01

    Membrane rafts are microdomains of the plasma membrane that have multiple biological functions. The involvement of these structures in the biology of T cells, namely in signal transduction by the TCR, has been widely studied. However, the role of membrane rafts in immunoreceptor signaling in NK cells is less well known. We studied the distribution of the activating NKG2D receptor in lipid rafts by isolating DRMs in a sucrose density gradient or by raft fractionation by β-OG-selective solubility in the NKL cell line. We found that the NKG2D-DAP10 complex and pVav are recruited into rafts upon receptor stimulation. Qualitative proteomic analysis of these fractions showed that the actin cytoskeleton is involved in this process. In particular, we found that the actin-bundling protein L-plastin plays an important role in the clustering of NKG2D into lipid rafts. Moreover, coengagement of the inhibitory receptor NKG2A partially disrupted NKG2D recruitment into rafts. Furthermore, we demonstrated that L-plastin participates in NKG2D-mediated inhibition of NK cell chemotaxis.

  18. Altered lipid composition in cortical lipid rafts occurs at early stages of sporadic Alzheimer's disease and facilitates APP/BACE1 interactions.

    PubMed

    Fabelo, Noemí; Martín, Virginia; Marín, Raquel; Moreno, Dolores; Ferrer, Isidre; Díaz, Mario

    2014-08-01

    The presence of lipid alterations in lipid rafts from the frontal cortex in late stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been recently demonstrated. Here, we have isolated and analyzed the lipid composition of lipid rafts from different brain areas from control and AD subjects at initial neuropathologic stages. We have observed that frontal cortex lipid rafts are profoundly altered in AD brains from the earliest stages of AD, namely AD I/II. These changes in the lipid matrix of lipid rafts affected both lipid classes and fatty acids and were also detected in the entorhinal cortex, but not in the cerebellum from the same subjects. Paralleling these changes, lipid rafts from AD frontal and entorhinal cortices displayed higher anisotropy for environment-sensitive probes, indicating that lipid changes in AD lipid rafts increased membrane order and viscosity in these domains. The pathophysiological consequences of these alterations in the development and progression of AD were strengthened by the significant, and specific, accumulation of β-secretase within the lipid rafts of AD subjects even at the earliest stages. Our results provide a mechanistic connection between lipid alterations in these microdomains and amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein.

  19. Candida albicans Targets a Lipid Raft/Dectin-1 Platform to Enter Human Monocytes and Induce Antigen Specific T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chiani, Paola; Bromuro, Carla; Mariotti, Sabrina; Pardini, Manuela; Nisini, Roberto; Torosantucci, Antonella; Gagliardi, Maria Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Several pathogens have been described to enter host cells via cholesterol-enriched membrane lipid raft microdomains. We found that disruption of lipid rafts by the cholesterol-extracting agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by the cholesterol-binding antifungal drug Amphotericin B strongly impairs the uptake of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans by human monocytes, suggesting a role of raft microdomains in the phagocytosis of the fungus. Time lapse confocal imaging indicated that Dectin-1, the C-type lectin receptor that recognizes Candida albicans cell wall-associated β-glucan, is recruited to lipid rafts upon Candida albicans uptake by monocytes, supporting the notion that lipid rafts act as an entry platform. Interestingly disruption of lipid raft integrity and interference with fungus uptake do not alter cytokine production by monocytes in response to Candida albicans but drastically dampen fungus specific T cell response. In conclusion, these data suggest that monocyte lipid rafts play a crucial role in the innate and adaptive immune responses to Candida albicans in humans and highlight a new and unexpected immunomodulatory function of the antifungal drug Amphotericin B. PMID:26562838

  20. Evaluation of a programme for ‘Rapid Assessment of Febrile Travelers’ (RAFT): a clinic-based quality improvement initiative

    PubMed Central

    Jazuli, Farah; Lynd, Terence; Mah, Jordan; Klowak, Michael; Jechel, Dale; Klowak, Stefanie; Ovens, Howard; Sabbah, Sam; Boggild, Andrea K

    2016-01-01

    Background Fever in the returned traveller is a potential medical emergency warranting prompt attention to exclude life-threatening illnesses. However, prolonged evaluation in the emergency department (ED) may not be required for all patients. As a quality improvement initiative, we implemented an algorithm for rapid assessment of febrile travelers (RAFT) in an ambulatory setting. Methods Criteria for RAFT referral include: presentation to the ED, reported fever and travel to the tropics or subtropics within the past year. Exclusion criteria include Plasmodium falciparum malaria, and fulfilment of admission criteria such as unstable vital signs or significant laboratory derangements. We performed a time series analysis preimplementation and postimplementation, with primary outcome of wait time to tropical medicine consultation. Secondary outcomes included number of ED visits averted for repeat malaria testing, and algorithm adherence. Results From February 2014 to December 2015, 154 patients were seen in the RAFT clinic: 68 men and 86 women. Median age was 36 years (range 16–78 years). Mean time to RAFT clinic assessment was 1.2±0.07 days (range 0–4 days) postimplementation, compared to 5.4±1.8 days (range 0–26 days) prior to implementation (p<0.0001). The RAFT clinic averted 132 repeat malaria screens in the ED over the study period (average 6 per month). Common diagnoses were: traveller's diarrhoea (n=27, 17.5%), dengue (n=12, 8%), viral upper respiratory tract infection (n=11, 7%), chikungunya (n=10, 6.5%), laboratory-confirmed influenza (n=8, 5%) and lobar pneumonia (n=8, 5%). Conclusions In addition to provision of more timely care to ambulatory febrile returned travellers, we reduced ED bed-usage by providing an alternate setting for follow-up malaria screening, and treatment of infectious diseases manageable in an outpatient setting, but requiring specific therapy. PMID:27473947

  1. Designing Functionality and Stimuli-Responsiveness into Azlactone-Based Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Messman, Jamie M; Lokitz, Bradley S; Ankner, John Francis; Kilbey, II, S Michael

    2008-01-01

    There continues to be considerable interest in stimuli-responsive and reactive polymers for drug delivery vehicles or gene therapy agents, as well as soft interfaces capable of being patterned or chemically modified to serve as a biomaterial coating. One class of materials with particularly interesting potential are polymers based on 2-vinyl-4,4-dimethylazlactone (VDMA), which react rapidly with various nucleophiles without producing a leaving group or requiring a catalyst. In this contribution we describe the synthesis and characterization of polymers and copolymers incorporating VDMA, and their conjugation with biomolecules. By using reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization we are able to produce well-defined VDMA-containing homopolymers and block copolymers having tailored molecular weights and narrow molecular weight distributions. The conversion of these materials into polyelectrolytes and bioconjugates can be monitored in real time using infrared spectroscopy. Poly(VDMA)-based brushes can be synthesized by RAFT polyermization using surface-tethered chain transfer agents, and these brushes can be modified in situ and structural changes monitored using neutron reflectometry.

  2. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets - protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores.

    PubMed

    Arbor, Sage C; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-03-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer's Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  3. Supramolecular Nanofibers Enhance Growth Factor Signaling by Increasing Lipid Raft Mobility.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Christina J; Sur, Shantanu; Lee, Sungsoo S; Yu, Jeong Min; Zhou, Yan; Snead, Malcolm L; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-05-11

    The nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials have been previously designed to tune the release of growth factors in order to optimize biological repair and regeneration. We report here on the discovery that weakly cohesive peptide nanostructures in terms of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, when combined with low concentrations of osteogenic growth factor, enhance both BMP-2 and Wnt mediated signaling in myoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells, respectively. Conversely, analogous nanostructures with enhanced levels of internal hydrogen bonding and cohesion lead to an overall reduction in BMP-2 signaling. We propose that the mechanism for enhanced growth factor signaling by the nanostructures is related to their ability to increase diffusion within membrane lipid rafts. The phenomenon reported here could lead to new nanomedicine strategies to mediate growth factor signaling for translational targets. PMID:27070195

  4. Fluidized-bed potato waste drying experiments at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, L.T.; Schmitt, R.C.

    1980-06-01

    A fluidized-bed dryer was built and operated at the Raft River Geothermal Test Site in south central Idaho to test the feasibility of using low-temperature (145/sup 0/C or lower) geothermal fluids as an energy source for drying operations. The dryer performed successfully on two potato industry waste products that had a solid content of 5 to 13%. The dried product was removed as a sand-like granular material or as fines with a flour-like texture. Test results, observations, and design recommendations are presented. Also presented is an economic evaluation for commercial-scale drying plants using either geothermal low-temperature water or oil as a heat source.

  5. Membrane lipid raft organization is uniquely modified by n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Harmony F.; Chapkin, Robert S.

    2012-01-01

    Fish oil, enriched in bioactive n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), has been shown to play a role in prevention of colon cancer. The effects of n-3 PUFA are pleiotropic and multifaceted, resulting in an incomplete understanding of their molecular mechanisms of action. Here, we focus on a highly conserved mechanism of n-3 PUFA, which is the alteration of the organization of the plasma membrane. We highlight recent work demonstrating that enrichment of n-3 PUFA in the plasma membrane alters the lateral organization of membrane signaling assemblies (i.e. lipid rafts). This mechanism is central for n-3 PUFA regulation of downstream signaling, T-cell activation, transcriptional activation, and cytokine secretion. We conclude that these studies provide strong evidence for a predominant mechanism by which n-3 PUFA function in colon cancer prevention. PMID:22515942

  6. Amyloid-beta Alzheimer targets — protein processing, lipid rafts, and amyloid-beta pores

    PubMed Central

    Arbor, Sage C.; LaFontaine, Mike; Cumbay, Medhane

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid beta (Aβ), the hallmark of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), now appears to be deleterious in its low number aggregate form as opposed to the macroscopic Aβ fibers historically seen postmortem. While Alzheimer targets, such as the tau protein, amyloid precursor protein (APP) processing, and immune system activation continue to be investigated, the recent discovery that amyloid beta aggregates at lipid rafts and likely forms neurotoxic pores has led to a new paradigm regarding why past therapeutics may have failed and how to design the next round of compounds for clinical trials. An atomic resolution understanding of Aβ aggregates, which appear to exist in multiple conformations, is most desirable for future therapeutic development. The investigative difficulties, structures of these small Aβ aggregates, and current therapeutics are summarized in this review. PMID:27505013

  7. Reconstituting ring-rafts in bud-mimicking topography of model membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Yong-Sang; Lee, In-Ho; Suh, Jeng-Hun; Park, Seung Chul; Oh, Soojung; Jordan, Luke R.; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Jeon, Noo Li; Lee, Byoungho; Parikh, Atul N.; Lee, Sin-Doo

    2014-07-01

    During vesicular trafficking and release of enveloped viruses, the budding and fission processes dynamically remodel the donor cell membrane in a protein- or a lipid-mediated manner. In all cases, in addition to the generation or relief of the curvature stress, the buds recruit specific lipids and proteins from the donor membrane through restricted diffusion for the development of a ring-type raft domain of closed topology. Here, by reconstituting the bud topography in a model membrane, we demonstrate the preferential localization of cholesterol- and sphingomyelin-enriched microdomains in the collar band of the bud-neck interfaced with the donor membrane. The geometrical approach to the recapitulation of the dynamic membrane reorganization, resulting from the local radii of curvatures from nanometre-to-micrometre scales, offers important clues for understanding the active roles of the bud topography in the sorting and migration machinery of key signalling proteins involved in membrane budding.

  8. Supramolecular Nanofibers Enhance Growth Factor Signaling by Increasing Lipid Raft Mobility.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, Christina J; Sur, Shantanu; Lee, Sungsoo S; Yu, Jeong Min; Zhou, Yan; Snead, Malcolm L; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-05-11

    The nanostructures of self-assembling biomaterials have been previously designed to tune the release of growth factors in order to optimize biological repair and regeneration. We report here on the discovery that weakly cohesive peptide nanostructures in terms of intermolecular hydrogen bonding, when combined with low concentrations of osteogenic growth factor, enhance both BMP-2 and Wnt mediated signaling in myoblasts and bone marrow stromal cells, respectively. Conversely, analogous nanostructures with enhanced levels of internal hydrogen bonding and cohesion lead to an overall reduction in BMP-2 signaling. We propose that the mechanism for enhanced growth factor signaling by the nanostructures is related to their ability to increase diffusion within membrane lipid rafts. The phenomenon reported here could lead to new nanomedicine strategies to mediate growth factor signaling for translational targets.

  9. The structural role of cholesterol in cell membranes: from condensed bilayers to lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Krause, Martin R; Regen, Steven L

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Defining the two-dimensional structure of cell membranes represents one of the most daunting challenges currently facing chemists, biochemists, and biophysicists. In particular, the time-averaged lateral organization of the lipids and proteins that make up these natural enclosures has yet to be established. As the classic Singer-Nicolson model of cell membranes has evolved over the past 40 years, special attention has focused on the structural role played by cholesterol, a key component that represents ca. 30% of the total lipids that are present. Despite extensive studies with model membranes, two fundamental issues have remained a mystery: (i) the mechanism by which cholesterol condenses low-melting lipids by uncoiling their acyl chains and (ii) the thermodynamics of the interaction between cholesterol and high- and low-melting lipids. The latter bears directly on one of the most popular notions in modern cell biology, that is, the lipid raft hypothesis, whereby cholesterol is thought to combine with high-melting lipids to form "lipid rafts" that float in a "sea" of low-melting lipids. In this Account, we first describe a chemical approach that we have developed in our laboratories that has allowed us to quantify the interactions between exchangeable mimics of cholesterol and low- and high-melting lipids in model membranes. In essence, this "nearest-neighbor recognition" (NNR) method involves the synthesis of dimeric forms of these lipids that contain a disulfide moiety as a linker. By means of thiolate-disulfide interchange reactions, equilibrium mixtures of dimers are then formed. These exchange reactions are initiated either by adding dithiothreitol to a liposomal dispersion to generate a small amount of thiol monomer or by including a small amount of thiol monomer in the liposomes at pH 5.0 and then raising the pH to 7.4. We then show how such NNR measurements have allowed us to distinguish between two very different mechanisms that have been

  10. STS-65 Mission Specialist Chiao floats in a single person raft in JSC's WETF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Having just deployed a small, single-person life raft, astronaut and STS-65 Mission Specialist Leroy Chiao, outfitted in a launch and entry suit (LES) and launch and entry helmet (LEH), floats in a 25-feet deep pool at the Johnson Space Center (JSC). The astronaut was in the Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) Bldg 29 pool for a training exercise, designed to familiarize crewmembers with procedures to call on in the event of an emergency egress situation with the Space Shuttle. Chiao will join five other NASA astronauts and a Japanese payload specialist for the second International Microgravity Laboratory 2 (IML-2) mission aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, later this year.

  11. LIPID RAFTS, FLUID/FLUID PHASE SEPARATION, AND THEIR RELEVANCE TO PLASMA MEMBRANE STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Prabuddha; Baird, Barbara; Holowka, David

    2007-01-01

    Novel biophysical approaches combined with modeling and new biochemical data have helped to recharge the lipid raft field and have contributed to the generation of a refined model of plasma membrane organization. In this review, we summarize new information in the context of previous literature to provide new insights into the spatial organization and dynamics of lipids and proteins in the plasma membrane of live cells. Recent findings of large-scale separation of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases in plasma membrane vesicles demonstrate this capacity within the complex milieu of plasma membrane proteins and lipids. Roles for membrane heterogeneity and reorganization in immune cell activation are discussed in light of this new information. PMID:17764993

  12. Tetraspan microdomains distinct from lipid rafts enrich select peptide-MHC class II complexes.

    PubMed

    Kropshofer, H; Spindeldreher, S; Röhn, T A; Platania, N; Grygar, C; Daniel, N; Wölpl, A; Langen, H; Horejsi, V; Vogt, A B

    2002-01-01

    Complexes of peptide and major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II are expressed on the surface of antigen-presenting cells but their molecular organization is unknown. Here we show that subsets of MHC class II molecules localize to membrane microdomains together with tetraspan proteins, the peptide editor HLA-DM and the costimulator CD86. Tetraspan microdomains differ from other membrane areas such as lipid rafts, as they enrich MHC class II molecules carrying a selected set of peptide antigens. Antigen-presenting cells deficient in tetraspan microdomains have a reduced capacity to activate CD4+ T cells. Thus, the organization of uniformly loaded peptide-MHC class II complexes in tetraspan domains may be a very early event that determines both the composition of the immunological synapse and the quality of the subsequent T helper cell response.

  13. Sphingomyelin-rich domains are sites of lysenin oligomerization: implications for raft studies.

    PubMed

    Kulma, Magdalena; Hereć, Monika; Grudziński, Wojciech; Anderluh, Gregor; Gruszecki, Wiesław I; Kwiatkowska, Katarzyna; Sobota, Andrzej

    2010-03-01

    Lysenin is a self-assembling, pore-forming toxin which specifically recognizes sphingomyelin. Mutation of tryptophan 20 abolishes lysenin oligomerization and cytolytic activity. We studied the interaction of lysenin WT and W20A with sphingomyelin in membranes of various lipid compositions which, according to atomic force microscopy studies, generated either homo- or heterogeneous sphingomyelin distribution. Liposomes composed of SM/DOPC, SM/DOPC/cholesterol and SM/DPPC/cholesterol could bind the highest amounts of GST-lysenin WT, as shown by surface plasmon resonance analysis. These lipid compositions enhanced the release of carboxyfluorescein from liposomes induced by lysenin WT, pointing to the importance of heterogeneous sphingomyelin distribution for lysenin WT binding and oligomerization. Lysenin W20A bound more weakly to sphingomyelin-containing liposomes than did lysenin WT. The same amounts of lysenin W20A bound to sphingomyelin mixed with either DOPC or DPPC, indicating that the binding was not affected by sphingomyelin distribution in the membranes. The mutant lysenin had a limited ability to penetrate hydrophobic region of the membrane as indicated by measurements of surface pressure changes. When applied to detect sphingomyelin on the cell surface, lysenin W20A formed large conglomerates on the membrane, different from small and regular clusters of lysenin WT. Only lysenin WT recognized sphingomyelin pool affected by formation of raft-based signaling platforms. During fractionation of Triton X-100 cell lysates, SDS-resistant oligomers of lysenin WT associated with membrane fragments insoluble in Triton X-100 while monomers of lysenin W20A partitioned to Triton X-100-soluble membrane fractions. Altogether, the data suggest that oligomerization of lysenin WT is a prerequisite for its docking in raft-related domains.

  14. Evidence for middle Eocene Arctic sea ice from diatoms and ice-rafted debris.

    PubMed

    Stickley, Catherine E; St John, Kristen; Koç, Nalân; Jordan, Richard W; Passchier, Sandra; Pearce, Richard B; Kearns, Lance E

    2009-07-16

    Oceanic sediments from long cores drilled on the Lomonosov ridge, in the central Arctic, contain ice-rafted debris (IRD) back to the middle Eocene epoch, prompting recent suggestions that ice appeared in the Arctic about 46 million years (Myr) ago. However, because IRD can be transported by icebergs (derived from land-based ice) and also by sea ice, IRD records are restricted to providing a history of general ice-rafting only. It is critical to differentiate sea ice from glacial (land-based) ice as climate feedback mechanisms vary and global impacts differ between these systems: sea ice directly affects ocean-atmosphere exchanges, whereas land-based ice affects sea level and consequently ocean acidity. An earlier report assumed that sea ice was prevalent in the middle Eocene Arctic on the basis of IRD, and although somewhat preliminary supportive evidence exists, these data are neither comprehensive nor quantified. Here we show the presence of middle Eocene Arctic sea ice from an extraordinary abundance of a group of sea-ice-dependent fossil diatoms (Synedropsis spp.). Analysis of quartz grain textural characteristics further supports sea ice as the dominant transporter of IRD at this time. Together with new information on cosmopolitan diatoms and existing IRD records, our data strongly suggest a two-phase establishment of sea ice: initial episodic formation in marginal shelf areas approximately 47.5 Myr ago, followed approximately 0.5 Myr later by the onset of seasonally paced sea-ice formation in offshore areas of the central Arctic. Our data establish a 2-Myr record of sea ice, documenting the transition from a warm, ice-free environment to one dominated by winter sea ice at the start of the middle Eocene climatic cooling phase.

  15. Interaction of methionine-enkephalins with raft-forming lipids: monolayers and BAM experiments.

    PubMed

    Tsanova, A; Jordanova, A; Dzimbova, T; Pajpanova, T; Golovinsky, E; Lalchev, Z

    2014-05-01

    Enkephalins (Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met/Leu) are opioid peptides with proven antinociceptive action in organism. They interact with opioid receptors belonging to G-protein coupled receptor superfamily. It is known that these receptors are located preferably in membrane rafts composed mainly of sphingomyelin (Sm), cholesterol (Cho), and phosphatidylcholine. In the present work, using Langmuir's monolayer technique in combination with Wilhelmy's method for measuring the surface pressure, the interaction of synthetic methionine-enkephalin and its amidated derivative with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), Sm, and Cho, as well as with their double and triple mixtures, was studied. From the pressure/area isotherms measured, the compressional moduli of the lipids and lipid-peptide monolayers were determined. Our results showed that the addition of the synthetic enkephalins to the monolayers studied led to change in the lipid monolayers characteristics, which was more evident in enkephalinamide case. In addition, using Brewster angle microscopy (BAM), the surface morphology of the lipid monolayers, before and after the injection of both enkephalins, was determined. The BAM images showed an increase in surface density of the mixed surface lipids/enkephalins films, especially with double and triple component lipid mixtures. This effect was more pronounced for the enkephalinamide as well. These observations showed that there was an interaction between the peptides and the raft-forming lipids, which was stronger for the amidated peptide, suggesting a difference in folding of both enkephalins. Our research demonstrates the potential of lipid monolayers for elegant and simple membrane models to study lipid-peptide interactions at the plane of biomembranes.

  16. Critical role of the lipid rafts in caprine herpesvirus type 1 infection in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, Annamaria; Colao, Valeriana

    2016-01-01

    The fusion machinery for herpesvirus entry in the host cells involves the interactions of viral glycoproteins with cellular receptors, although additional viral and cellular domains are required. Extensive areas of the plasma membrane surface consist of lipid rafts organized into cholesterol-rich microdomains involved in signal transduction, protein sorting, membrane transport and in many processes of viruses infection. Because of the extraction of cholesterol leads to disorganization of lipid microdomains and to dissociation of proteins bound to the lipid rafts, we investigated the effect of cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) on caprine herpesvirus 1 (CpHV.1) in three important phases of virus infection such as binding, entry and post-entry. MβCD treatment did not prejudice virus binding to cells, while a dose-dependent reduction of the virus yield was observed at the virus entry stage, and 30 mM MβCD reduced infectivity evidently. Treatment of MDBK after virus entry revealed a moderate inhibitory effect suggesting that cholesterol is mainly required during virus entry rather than during the post-entry stage. Alteration of the envelope lipid composition affected virus entry and a noticeable reduction in virus infectivity was detected in the presence of 15 mM MβCD. Considering that the recognition of a host cell receptor is a crucial step in the start-up phase of infection, these data are essential for the study of CpHV.1 pathogenesis. To date virus receptors for CpHV.1 have not yet been identified and further investigations are required to state that MβCD treatment affects the expression of the viral receptors.

  17. Seismic baseline and induction studies: Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and Raft River, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Zandt, G.; McPherson, L.; Schaff, S.; Olsen, S.

    1982-05-01

    Local seismic networks were established at the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area, utah and at Raft River geothermal area, Idaho to monitor the background seismicity prior to initiation of geothermal power production. The Raft River study area is currently seismically quiet down to the level of approximately magnitude one. The Roosevelt Hot Springs area has low-level seismic activity for M/sub L/ greater than about two; however, microearthquake (M/sub L/ less than or equal to 2) swarms appear to be relatively common. One swarm occurred adjacent to the Roosevelt geothermal area during the summer of 1981. From June 27 to August 28, 1044 microearthquakes (M/sub L/ less than or equal to 1.5) were recorded from which 686 earthquakes were located and analysed. The main cluster of microearthquakes was located about 2 km east of the production field at a depth of about 5 km. A few small events were located in the production field at shallow depths (< 2 km). Three of the four largest earthquakes in the swarm (M/sub L/ 1.5-2.0) were located 4 to 5 km further east along a n-NW trend beneath the flank of the adjacent Mineral Mountains. Focal mechanism solutions indicate primarily normal faulting due to the regional E-W extension which characterizes this portion of the eastern Basin and Range province. Hence, the Mineral Mountain swarm appears to be a natural release of tectonic stress in this area. Nevertheless, the occurrence of natural earthquake swarms indicates a potential for induced seismicity at Roosevelt Hot Springs after major production operations are initiated.

  18. Using organotypic (raft) epithelial tissue cultures for the biosynthesis and isolation of infectious human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Ozbun, Michelle A; Patterson, Nicole A

    2014-08-01

    Papillomaviruses have a strict tropism for epithelial cells, and they are fully reliant on cellular differentiation for completion of their life cycles, resulting in the production of progeny virions. Thus, a permissive environment for full viral replication in vitro-wherein virion morphogenesis occurs under cooperative viral and cellular cues-requires the cultivation of epithelium. Presented in the first section of this unit is a protocol to grow differentiating epithelial tissues that mimic many important morphological and biochemical aspects of normal skin. The technique involves growing epidermal cells atop a dermal equivalent consisting of live fibroblasts and a collagen lattice. Epithelial stratification and differentiation ensues when the keratinocyte-dermal equivalent is placed at the air-liquid interface. The apparent floating nature of the cell-matrix in this method led to the nickname "raft" cultures. The general technique can be applied to normal low passage keratinocytes, to cells stably transfected with papillomavirus genes or genomes, or keratinocytes established from neoplastic lesions. However, infectious papillomavirus particles have only been isolated from organotypic epithelial cultures initiated with cells that maintain oncogenic human papillomavirus genomes in an extrachomosomal replicative form. The second section of this unit is dedicated to a virion isolation method that minimizes aerosol and skin exposure to these human carcinogens. Although the focus of the protocols is on the growth of tissues that yields infectious papillomavirus progeny, this culture system facilitates the investigation of these fastidious viruses during their complex replicative cycles, and raft tissues can be manipulated and harvested at any point during the process. Importantly, a single-step virus growth cycle is achieved in this process, as it is unlikely that progeny virions are released to initiate subsequent rounds of infection.

  19. A novel form of Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (LG-TIRFM) reveals different and independent lipid raft domains in living cells.

    PubMed

    Asanov, Alexander; Zepeda, Angélica; Vaca, Luis

    2010-02-01

    In the present study we have applied a novel form of Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscopy (LG-TIRFM) in combination with fluorescently labeled cholera toxin to the study of lipid rafts dynamics in living cells. We demonstrate the usefulness of such approach by showing the dynamic formation/disaggregation of islands of cholera toxin on the surface of cells. Using multicolor LG-TIRFM with co-localization studies we show for the first time that two receptors previously identified as constituents of lipid rafts are found on different and independent "raft domains" on the cell plasma membrane. Furthermore, LG-TIRFM studies revealed limited association and dissociation of both domains overtime on different areas of the plasma membrane. The implications of different "raft domains" on cell physiology are discussed.

  20. Lipid rafts, KCa/ClCa/Ca2+ channel complexes and EGFR signaling: Novel targets to reduce tumor development by lipids?

    PubMed

    Guéguinou, Maxime; Gambade, Audrey; Félix, Romain; Chantôme, Aurélie; Fourbon, Yann; Bougnoux, Philippe; Weber, Günther; Potier-Cartereau, Marie; Vandier, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    Membrane lipid rafts are distinct plasma membrane nanodomains that are enriched with cholesterol, sphingolipids and gangliosides, with occasional presence of saturated fatty acids and phospholipids containing saturated acyl chains. It is well known that they organize receptors (such as Epithelial Growth Factor Receptor), ion channels and their downstream acting molecules to regulate intracellular signaling pathways. Among them are Ca2+ signaling pathways, which are modified in tumor cells and inhibited upon membrane raft disruption. In addition to protein components, lipids from rafts also contribute to the organization and function of Ca2+ signaling microdomains. This article aims to focus on the lipid raft KCa/ClCa/Ca2+ channel complexes that regulate Ca2+ and EGFR signaling in cancer cells, and discusses the potential modification of these complexes by lipids as a novel therapeutic approach in tumor development. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.