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Sample records for additional analyses based

  1. Cucumis monosomic alien addition lines: morphological, cytological, and genotypic analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Feng; Luo, Xiang-Dong; Qian, Chun-Tao; Jahn, Molly M; Staub, Jack E; Zhuang, Fei-Yun; Lou, Qun-Feng; Ren, Gang

    2004-05-01

    Cucumis hystrix Chakr. (HH, 2n=24), a wild relative of the cultivated cucumber, possesses several potentially valuable disease-resistance and abiotic stress-tolerance traits for cucumber ( C. sativus L., CC, 2n=14) improvement. Numerous attempts have been made to transfer desirable traits since the successful interspecific hybridization between C. hystrix and C. sativus, one of which resulted in the production of an allotriploid (HCC, 2n=26: one genome of C. hystrix and two of C. sativus). When this genotype was treated with colchicine to induce polyploidy, two monosomic alien addition lines (MAALs) (plant nos. 87 and 517: 14 CC+1 H, 2n=15) were recovered among 252 viable plants. Each of these plants was morphologically distinct from allotriploids and cultivated cucumbers. Cytogenetic and molecular marker analyses were performed to confirm the genetic constitution and further characterize these two MAALs. Chromosome counts made from at least 30 meristematic cells from each plant confirmed 15 nuclear chromosomes. In pollen mother cells of plant nos. 87 and 517, seven bivalents and one univalent were observed at diakinesis and metaphase I; the frequency of trivalent formation was low (about 4-5%). At anaphase I and II, stochastic and asymmetric division led to the formation of two gamete classes: n=7 and n=8; however, pollen fertility was relatively high. Pollen stainability in plant no. 87 was 86.7% and in plant no. 517 was 93.2%. Random amplified polymorphic DNA analysis was performed using 100 random 10-base primers. Genotypes obtained with eight primers (A-9, A-11, AH-13, AI-19, AJ-18, AJ-20, E-19, and N-20) showed a band common to the two MAAL plants and C. hystrix that was absent in C. sativus, confirming that the alien chromosomes present in the MAALs were derived from C. hystrix. Morphological differences and differences in banding patterns were also observed between plant nos. 87 and 517 after amplification with primers AI-5, AJ-13, N-12, and N-20

  2. Cosmetology: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum Center.

    These task analyses are designed to be used in combination with the "Trade and Industrial Education Service Area Resource" in order to implement competency-based education in the cosmetology program in Virginia. The task analysis document contains the task inventory, suggested task sequence lists, and content outlines for the secondary courses…

  3. ADDITIONAL STRESS AND FRACTURE MECHANICS ANALYSES OF PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR PRESSURE VESSEL NOZZLES

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, Matthew; Yin, Shengjun; Stevens, Gary; Sommerville, Daniel; Palm, Nathan; Heinecke, Carol

    2012-01-01

    In past years, the authors have undertaken various studies of nozzles in both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs) located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) adjacent to the core beltline region. Those studies described stress and fracture mechanics analyses performed to assess various RPV nozzle geometries, which were selected based on their proximity to the core beltline region, i.e., those nozzle configurations that are located close enough to the core region such that they may receive sufficient fluence prior to end-of-life (EOL) to require evaluation of embrittlement as part of the RPV analyses associated with pressure-temperature (P-T) limits. In this paper, additional stress and fracture analyses are summarized that were performed for additional PWR nozzles with the following objectives: To expand the population of PWR nozzle configurations evaluated, which was limited in the previous work to just two nozzles (one inlet and one outlet nozzle). To model and understand differences in stress results obtained for an internal pressure load case using a two-dimensional (2-D) axi-symmetric finite element model (FEM) vs. a three-dimensional (3-D) FEM for these PWR nozzles. In particular, the ovalization (stress concentration) effect of two intersecting cylinders, which is typical of RPV nozzle configurations, was investigated. To investigate the applicability of previously recommended linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) hand solutions for calculating the Mode I stress intensity factor for a postulated nozzle corner crack for pressure loading for these PWR nozzles. These analyses were performed to further expand earlier work completed to support potential revision and refinement of Title 10 to the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 50, Appendix G, Fracture Toughness Requirements, and are intended to supplement similar evaluation of nozzles presented at the 2008, 2009, and 2011 Pressure Vessels and Piping (PVP

  4. Dose-Response Effects of a Web-Based Physical Activity Program on Body Composition and Metabolic Health in Inactive Older Adults: Additional Analyses of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Vroege, David P; Wijsman, Carolien A; Broekhuizen, Karen; de Craen, Anton JM; van Heemst, Diana; van der Ouderaa, Frans JG; van Mechelen, Willem; Slagboom, P Eline; Catt, Michael; Westendorp, Rudi GJ; Verhagen, Evert ALM

    2014-01-01

    Background Low physical activity is a major risk factor for several age-related diseases. Recently, we showed in a randomized controlled trial that a 12-week Web-based intervention (Philips DirectLife) to increase physical activity was effective in increasing physical activity levels and metabolic health in an inactive population aged 60-70 years. Objective The goal of this paper was to assess how many participants successfully reached the physical activity level as targeted by the intervention and what the effects of the intervention on body composition and metabolic health in these successful individuals were to provide insight in the maximum attainable effect of the intervention. Methods Among the 235 participants in a randomized controlled trial of the Actief en Gezond Oud (AGO) study, we assessed the effects of the intervention on metabolic parameters in those who had successfully reached their personalized physical activity target compared with the entire intervention group. Furthermore, we studied the dose-response effect of increase in physical activity on metabolic outcome within the intervention group. Results Of the intervention group, 50 of 119 (42.0%) participants successfully reached the physical activity target (corresponding to a 10% increased daily physical activity on average). This group showed markedly higher effects of the intervention compared to the entire intervention group, with greater decreases in body weight (2.74 vs 1.49 kg), waist circumference (3.74 vs 2.33 cm), insulin resistance (HOMA index: 0.23 vs 0.20), and in cholesterol/HDL ratio (0.39 vs 0.20) and Framingham risk score (0.90% vs 0.54%). We found that men compared to women were more likely to be successful. The dose-response analysis showed that there was a significant association between increase in minutes spent in moderate-to-vigorous activity and body weight loss, BMI reduction, waist circumference reduction, HDL cholesterol increasing, and cholesterol/HDL ratio lowering

  5. Additional Measurements and Analyses of H217O and H218O

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, John; Yu, Shanshan; Walters, Adam; Daly, Adam M.

    2015-06-01

    Historically the analysis of the spectrum of water has been a balance between the quality of the data set and the applicability of the Hamiltonian to a highly non-rigid molecule. Recently, a number of different non-rigid analysis approaches have successfully been applied to 16O water resulting in a self-consistent set of transitions and energy levels to high J which allowed the spectrum to be modeled to experimental precision. The data set for 17O and 18O water was previously reviewed and many of the problematic measurements identified, but Hamiltonian modeling of the remaining data resulted in significantly poorer quality fits than that for the 16O parent. As a result, we have made additional microwave measurements and modeled the existing 17O and 18O data sets with an Euler series model. This effort has illuminated a number of additional problematic measurements in the previous data sets and has resulted in analyses of 17O and 18O water that are of similar quality to the 16O analysis. We report the new lines, the analyses and make recommendations on the quality of the experimental data sets. SS. Yu, J.C. Pearson, B.J. Drouin et al. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 279,~16-25 (2012) J. Tennyson, P.F. Bernath, L.R. Brown et al. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Trans. 117, 29-58 (2013) J. Tennyson, P.F. Bernath, L.R. Brown et al. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Rad. Trans. 110, 573-596 (2009) H.M. Pickett, J.C. Pearson, C.E. Miller J. Mol. Spectrosc. 233, 174-179 (2005)

  6. Analysing organic transistors based on interface approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Akiyama, Yuto; Mori, Takehiko

    2014-01-15

    Temperature-dependent characteristics of organic transistors are analysed thoroughly using interface approximation. In contrast to amorphous silicon transistors, it is characteristic of organic transistors that the accumulation layer is concentrated on the first monolayer, and it is appropriate to consider interface charge rather than band bending. On the basis of this model, observed characteristics of hexamethylenetetrathiafulvalene (HMTTF) and dibenzotetrathiafulvalene (DBTTF) transistors with various surface treatments are analysed, and the trap distribution is extracted. In turn, starting from a simple exponential distribution, we can reproduce the temperature-dependent transistor characteristics as well as the gate voltage dependence of the activation energy, so we can investigate various aspects of organic transistors self-consistently under the interface approximation. Small deviation from such an ideal transistor operation is discussed assuming the presence of an energetically discrete trap level, which leads to a hump in the transfer characteristics. The contact resistance is estimated by measuring the transfer characteristics up to the linear region.

  7. Reprocessing the Southern Hemisphere ADditional OZonesondes (SHADOZ) Database for Long-Term Trend Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, J. C.; Thompson, A. M.; Coetzee, G.; Fujiwara, M.; Johnson, B. J.; Sterling, C. W.; Cullis, P.; Ashburn, C. E.; Jordan, A. F.

    2015-12-01

    SHADOZ is a large archive of tropical balloon-bone ozonesonde data at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center with data from 14 tropical and subtropical stations provided by collaborators in Europe, Asia, Latin America and Africa . The SHADOZ time series began in 1998, using electrochemical concentration cell (ECC) ozonesondes. Like many long-term sounding stations, SHADOZ is characterized by variations in operating procedures, launch protocols, and data processing such that biases within a data record and among sites appear. In addition, over time, the radiosonde and ozonesonde instruments and data processing protocols have changed, adding to the measurement uncertainties at individual stations and limiting the reliability of ozone profile trends and continuous satellite validation. Currently, the ozonesonde community is engaged in reprocessing ECC data, with an emphasis on homogenization of the records to compensate for the variations in instrumentation and technique. The goals are to improve the information and integrity of each measurement record and to support calculation of more reliable trends. We illustrate the reprocessing activity of SHADOZ with selected stations. We will (1) show reprocessing steps based on the recent WMO report that provides post-processing guidelines for ozonesondes; (2) characterize uncertainties in various parts of the ECC conditioning process; and (3) compare original and reprocessed data to co-located ground and satellite measurements of column ozone.

  8. Training Residential Staff to Conduct Trial-Based Functional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, Joseph M.; Bloom, Sarah E.; Kunnavatana, S. Shanun; Collins, Shawnee D.; Clay, Casey J.

    2013-01-01

    We taught 6 supervisors of a residential service provider for adults with developmental disabilities to train 9 house managers to conduct trial-based functional analyses. Effects of the training were evaluated with a nonconcurrent multiple baseline. Results suggest that house managers can be trained to conduct trial-based functional analyses with…

  9. Using Additional Analyses to Clarify the Functions of Problem Behavior: An Analysis of Two Cases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, Steven W.; Dozier, Claudia L.; Neidert, Pamela L.; Jowett, Erica S.; Newquist, Matthew H.

    2014-01-01

    Functional analyses (FA) have proven useful for identifying contingencies that influence problem behavior. Research has shown that some problem behavior may only occur in specific contexts or be influenced by multiple or idiosyncratic variables. When these contexts or sources of influence are not assessed in an FA, further assessment may be…

  10. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  11. Metagenomic analyses of the late Pleistocene permafrost - additional tools for reconstruction of environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivkina, Elizaveta; Petrovskaya, Lada; Vishnivetskaya, Tatiana; Krivushin, Kirill; Shmakova, Lyubov; Tutukina, Maria; Meyers, Arthur; Kondrashov, Fyodor

    2016-04-01

    A comparative analysis of the metagenomes from two 30 000-year-old permafrost samples, one of lake-alluvial origin and the other from late Pleistocene Ice Complex sediments, revealed significant differences within microbial communities. The late Pleistocene Ice Complex sediments (which have been characterized by the absence of methane with lower values of redox potential and Fe2+ content) showed a low abundance of methanogenic archaea and enzymes from both the carbon and nitrogen cycles, but a higher abundance of enzymes associated with the sulfur cycle. The metagenomic and geochemical analyses described in the paper provide evidence that the formation of the sampled late Pleistocene Ice Complex sediments likely took place under much more aerobic conditions than lake-alluvial sediments.

  12. Additional Development and Systems Analyses of Pneumatic Technology for High Speed Civil Transport Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Englar, Robert J.; Willie, F. Scott; Lee, Warren J.

    1999-01-01

    In the Task I portion of this NASA research grant, configuration development and experimental investigations have been conducted on a series of pneumatic high-lift and control surface devices applied to a generic High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) model configuration to determine their potential for improved aerodynamic performance, plus stability and control of higher performance aircraft. These investigations were intended to optimize pneumatic lift and drag performance; provide adequate control and longitudinal stability; reduce separation flowfields at high angle of attack; increase takeoff/climbout lift-to-drag ratios; and reduce system complexity and weight. Experimental aerodynamic evaluations were performed on a semi-span HSCT generic model with improved fuselage fineness ratio and with interchangeable plain flaps, blown flaps, pneumatic Circulation Control Wing (CCW) high-lift configurations, plain and blown canards, a novel Circulation Control (CC) cylinder blown canard, and a clean cruise wing for reference. Conventional tail power was also investigated for longitudinal trim capability. Also evaluated was unsteady pulsed blowing of the wing high-lift system to determine if reduced pulsed mass flow rates and blowing requirements could be made to yield the same lift as that resulting from steady-state blowing. Depending on the pulsing frequency applied, reduced mass flow rates were indeed found able to provide lift augmentation at lesser blowing values than for the steady conditions. Significant improvements in the aerodynamic characteristics leading to improved performance and stability/control were identified, and the various components were compared to evaluate the pneumatic potential of each. Aerodynamic results were provided to the Georgia Tech Aerospace System Design Lab. to conduct the companion system analyses and feasibility study (Task 2) of theses concepts applied to an operational advanced HSCT aircraft. Results and conclusions from these

  13. Independet Component Analyses of Ground-based Exoplanetary Transits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva Martins-Filho, Walter; Griffith, Caitlin Ann; Pearson, Kyle; Waldmann, Ingo; Biddle, Lauren; Zellem, Robert Thomas; Alvarez-Candal, Alvaro

    2016-10-01

    Most observations of exoplanetary atmospheres are conducted when a "Hot Jupiter" exoplanet transits in front of its host star. These Jovian-sized planets have small orbital periods, on the order of days, and therefore a short transit time, making them more ameanable to observations. Measurements of Hot Jupiter transits must achieve a 10-4 level of accuracy in the flux to determine the spectral modulations of the exoplanetary atmosphere. In order to accomplish this level of precision, we need to extract systematic errors, and, for ground-based measurements, the effects of Earth's atmosphere, from the signal due to the exoplanet, which is several orders of magnitudes smaller. Currently, the effects of the terrestrial atmosphere and the some of the time-dependent systematic errors are treated by dividing the host star by a reference star at each wavelength and time step of the transit. More recently, Independent Component Analyses (ICA) have been used to remove systematic effects from the raw data of space-based observations (Waldmann 2014,2012; Morello et al.,2015,2016). ICA is a statistical method born from the ideas of the blind-source separation studies, which can be used to de-trend several independent source signals of a data set (Hyvarinen and Oja, 2000). One strength of this method is that it requires no additional prior knowledge of the system. Here, we present a study of the application of ICA to ground-based transit observations of extrasolar planets, which are affected by Earth's atmosphere. We analyze photometric data of two extrasolar planets, WASP-1b and GJ3470b, recorded by the 61" Kuiper Telescope at Stewart Observatory using the Harris B and U filters. The presentation will compare the light curve depths and their dispersions as derived from the ICA analysis to those derived by analyses that ratio of the host star to nearby reference stars.References: Waldmann, I.P. 2012 ApJ, 747, 12, Waldamann, I. P. 2014 ApJ, 780, 23; Morello G. 2015 ApJ, 806

  14. Commercial Photography: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endo, Paula; Morrell, Linda

    These task analyses are designed to be used in combination with the "Trade and Industrial Education Service Area Resource" in order to implement competency-based education in the commercial photography program in Virginia. The task analysis document contains the task inventory, suggested task sequence lists, and content outlines for the courses in…

  15. Analyses of microbial community within a composter operated using household garbage with special reference to the addition of soybean oil.

    PubMed

    Aoshima, M; Pedro, M S; Haruta, S; Ding, L; Fukada, T; Kigawa, A; Kodama, T; Ishii, M; Igarashi, Y

    2001-01-01

    A commercially available composter was operated using fixed composition of garbage with or without the addition of soybean oil. The composter was operated without adding seed microorganisms or bulking materials. Microflora within the composter were analyzed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) in the case of oil addition, or by 16/18 S rRNA gene sequencing of the isolated microorganisms in the case of no oil addition. The results showed that, irrespective of the addition of oil, the bacteria identified were all gram positive, and that lactobacilli seemed to be the key microorganisms. Based on the results, suitable microflora for use in a household composter are discussed.

  16. Array-based GNSS Ionospheric Sensing: Estimability and Precision Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teunissen, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Array-based GNSS Ionospheric Sensing: Estimability and Precision Analyses PJG Teunissen1,2, A Khodabandeh1 and B Zhang1 1GNSS Research Centre, Curtin University, Perth, Australia 2Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands Introduction: The Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) have proved to be an effective means of measuring the Earth's ionosphere. The well-known geometry-free linear combinations of the GNSS data serve as the input of an external ionospheric model to capture both the spatial and temporal characteristics of the ionosphere. Next to the slant ionospheric delays experienced by the GNSS antennas, the geometry-free combinations also contain additional unknown delays that are caused by the presence of the carrier-phase ambiguous cycles and/or the code instrumental delays. That the geometry-free combinations, without an external ionospheric model, cannot unbiasedly determine the slant ionospheric delays reveals the lack of information content in the GNSS data. Motivation and objectives: With the advent of modernized multi-frequency signals, one is confronted with many different combinations of the GNSS data that are capable of sensing the ionosphere. Owing to such diversity and the lack of information content in the GNSS data, various estimable ionospheric delays of different interpretations (and of different precision) can therefore be formed. How such estimable ionospheric delays should be interpreted and the extent to which they contribute to the precision of the unbiased slant ionosphere are the topics of this contribution. Approach and results: In this contribution, we apply S-system theory to study the estimability and precision of the estimable slant ionospheric delays that are measured by the multi-frequency GNSS data. Two different S-systems are presented, leading to two different estimable parameters of different precision: 1) the phase-driven ionospheric delays and 2) the code-driven ionospheric delays

  17. Chemical Mixture Risk Assessment Additivity-Based Approaches

    EPA Science Inventory

    Powerpoint presentation includes additivity-based chemical mixture risk assessment methods. Basic concepts, theory and example calculations are included. Several slides discuss the use of "common adverse outcomes" in analyzing phthalate mixtures.

  18. Implementation of Complexity Analyzing Based on Additional Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Na; Liang, Yanhong; Liu, Fang

    According to the Complexity Theory, there is complexity in the system when the functional requirement is not be satisfied. There are several study performances for Complexity Theory based on Axiomatic Design. However, they focus on reducing the complexity in their study and no one focus on method of analyzing the complexity in the system. Therefore, this paper put forth a method of analyzing the complexity which is sought to make up the deficiency of the researches. In order to discussing the method of analyzing the complexity based on additional effect, this paper put forth two concepts which are ideal effect and additional effect. The method of analyzing complexity based on additional effect combines Complexity Theory with Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ). It is helpful for designers to analyze the complexity by using additional effect. A case study shows the application of the process.

  19. The Increasing Importance of Gene-Based Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Cirulli, Elizabeth T.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, genome and exome sequencing studies have implicated a plethora of new disease genes with rare causal variants. Here, I review 150 exome sequencing studies that claim to have discovered that a disease can be caused by different rare variants in the same gene, and I determine whether their methods followed the current best-practice guidelines in the interpretation of their data. Specifically, I assess whether studies appropriately assess controls for rare variants throughout the entire gene or implicated region as opposed to only investigating the specific rare variants identified in the cases, and I assess whether studies present sufficient co-segregation data for statistically significant linkage. I find that the proportion of studies performing gene-based analyses has increased with time, but that even in 2015 fewer than 40% of the reviewed studies used this method, and only 10% presented statistically significant co-segregation data. Furthermore, I find that the genes reported in these papers are explaining a decreasing proportion of cases as the field moves past most of the low-hanging fruit, with 50% of the genes from studies in 2014 and 2015 having variants in fewer than 5% of cases. As more studies focus on genes explaining relatively few cases, the importance of performing appropriate gene-based analyses is increasing. It is becoming increasingly important for journal editors and reviewers to require stringent gene-based evidence to avoid an avalanche of misleading disease gene discovery papers. PMID:27055023

  20. Unconscious analyses of visual scenes based on feature conjunctions.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Ryosuke; Noguchi, Yasuki

    2015-06-01

    To efficiently process a cluttered scene, the visual system analyzes statistical properties or regularities of visual elements embedded in the scene. It is controversial, however, whether those scene analyses could also work for stimuli unconsciously perceived. Here we show that our brain performs the unconscious scene analyses not only using a single featural cue (e.g., orientation) but also based on conjunctions of multiple visual features (e.g., combinations of color and orientation information). Subjects foveally viewed a stimulus array (duration: 50 ms) where 4 types of bars (red-horizontal, red-vertical, green-horizontal, and green-vertical) were intermixed. Although a conscious perception of those bars was inhibited by a subsequent mask stimulus, the brain correctly analyzed the information about color, orientation, and color-orientation conjunctions of those invisible bars. The information of those features was then used for the unconscious configuration analysis (statistical processing) of the central bars, which induced a perceptual bias and illusory feature binding in visible stimuli at peripheral locations. While statistical analyses and feature binding are normally 2 key functions of the visual system to construct coherent percepts of visual scenes, our results show that a high-level analysis combining those 2 functions is correctly performed by unconscious computations in the brain. PMID:25798783

  1. Computer-Based Coding of Occupation Codes for Epidemiological Analyses.

    PubMed

    Russ, Daniel E; Ho, Kwan-Yuet; Johnson, Calvin A; Friesen, Melissa C

    2014-05-01

    Mapping job titles to standardized occupation classification (SOC) codes is an important step in evaluating changes in health risks over time as measured in inspection databases. However, manual SOC coding is cost prohibitive for very large studies. Computer based SOC coding systems can improve the efficiency of incorporating occupational risk factors into large-scale epidemiological studies. We present a novel method of mapping verbatim job titles to SOC codes using a large table of prior knowledge available in the public domain that included detailed description of the tasks and activities and their synonyms relevant to each SOC code. Job titles are compared to our knowledge base to find the closest matching SOC code. A soft Jaccard index is used to measure the similarity between a previously unseen job title and the knowledge base. Additional information such as standardized industrial codes can be incorporated to improve the SOC code determination by providing additional context to break ties in matches. PMID:25221787

  2. EP Additive Performance in Biobased vs. Paraffinic Base Oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A series of commercial extreme pressure (EP) additives containing sulfur, phosphorus, and chlorine were investigated for their EP properties in soybean (SBO) and paraffinic (PRFN) base oils. The investigations were conducted using a 4-ball (4B) and twist-compression (TC) tribometers. The concentra...

  3. Analyses of S-Box in Image Encryption Applications Based on Fuzzy Decision Making Criterion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Inayatur; Shah, Tariq; Hussain, Iqtadar

    2014-06-01

    In this manuscript, we put forward a standard based on fuzzy decision making criterion to examine the current substitution boxes and study their strengths and weaknesses in order to decide their appropriateness in image encryption applications. The proposed standard utilizes the results of correlation analysis, entropy analysis, contrast analysis, homogeneity analysis, energy analysis, and mean of absolute deviation analysis. These analyses are applied to well-known substitution boxes. The outcome of these analyses are additional observed and a fuzzy soft set decision making criterion is used to decide the suitability of an S-box to image encryption applications.

  4. Additives for cement compositions based on modified peat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopanitsa, Natalya; Sarkisov, Yurij; Gorshkova, Aleksandra; Demyanenko, Olga

    2016-01-01

    High quality competitive dry building mixes require modifying additives for various purposes to be included in their composition. There is insufficient amount of quality additives having stable properties for controlling the properties of cement compositions produced in Russia. Using of foreign modifying additives leads to significant increasing of the final cost of the product. The cost of imported modifiers in the composition of the dry building mixes can be up to 90% of the material cost, depending on the composition complexity. Thus, the problem of import substitution becomes relevant, especially in recent years, due to difficult economic situation. The article discusses the possibility of using local raw materials as a basis for obtaining dry building mixtures components. The properties of organo-mineral additives for cement compositions based on thermally modified peat raw materials are studied. Studies of the structure and composition of the additives are carried out by physicochemical research methods: electron microscopy and X-ray analysis. Results of experimental research showed that the peat additives contribute to improving of cement-sand mortar strength and hydrophysical properties.

  5. Operational Satellite-based Surface Oil Analyses (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streett, D.; Warren, C.

    2010-12-01

    During the Deepwater Horizon spill, NOAA imagery analysts in the Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) issued more than 300 near-real-time satellite-based oil spill analyses. These analyses were used by the oil spill response community for planning, issuing surface oil trajectories and tasking assets (e.g., oil containment booms, skimmers, overflights). SAB analysts used both Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and high resolution visible/near IR multispectral satellite imagery as well as a variety of ancillary datasets. Satellite imagery used included ENVISAT ASAR (ESA), TerraSAR-X (DLR), Cosmo-Skymed (ASI), ALOS (JAXA), Radarsat (MDA), ENVISAT MERIS (ESA), SPOT (SPOT Image Corp.), Aster (NASA), MODIS (NASA), and AVHRR (NOAA). Ancillary datasets included ocean current information, wind information, location of natural oil seeps and a variety of in situ oil observations. The analyses were available as jpegs, pdfs, shapefiles and through Google, KML files and also available on a variety of websites including Geoplatform and ERMA. From the very first analysis issued just 5 hours after the rig sank through the final analysis issued in August, the complete archive is still publicly available on the NOAA/NESDIS website http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/MPS/deepwater.html SAB personnel also served as the Deepwater Horizon International Disaster Charter Project Manager (at the official request of the USGS). The Project Manager’s primary responsibility was to acquire and oversee the processing and dissemination of satellite data generously donated by numerous private companies and nations in support of the oil spill response including some of the imagery described above. SAB has begun to address a number of goals that will improve our routine oil spill response as well as help assure that we are ready for the next spill of national significance. We hope to (1) secure a steady, abundant and timely stream of suitable satellite imagery even in the absence of large-scale emergencies such as

  6. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analyses of contact lens deposition

    PubMed Central

    Green-Church, Kari B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this report is to describe the contact lens deposition proteome associated with two silicone hydrogel contact lenses and care solutions using a mass spectrometric-based approach. Methods This was a randomized, controlled, examiner-masked crossover clinical trial that included 48 participants. Lenses and no-rub care solutions evaluated included galyfilcon A (Acuvue Advance, Vistakon Inc., Jacksonville, FL), lotrafilcon B (O2 Optix, CIBA Vision Inc., Duluth, GA), AQuify (CIBA Vision Inc.), and ReNu MoistureLoc (Bausch and Lomb Inc., Rochester, NY). After two weeks of daily wear in each lens-solution combination, the left lens was removed by the examiner (using gloves and forceps) and placed in a protein precipitation buffer (acetone). The precipitate was quantitated for total protein concentration (per lens), and proteins were then identified using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (nano-LC-MS/MS) and peptide sequencing. Results Between 7.32 and 9.76 µg/lens of protein was observed on average from each lens-solution combination. There were 19 total unique proteins identified across the two lens materials, and six proteins were identified in all four lens-solution combinations including lipocalin, lysozyme, lacritin, lactoferrin, proline rich 4, and Ig Alpha. Lotrafilcon B was associated with 15 individual proteins (across both care solutions), and 53% of these proteins were observed in at least 50% of the analyses. Galyfilcon A was associated with 13 individual proteins, and 38.5% of these proteins were observed in at least 50% of the analyses. There were three unique proteins identified from galyfilcon A and four unique proteins identified from lotrafilcon B. Conclusions The total amount of proteins identified from silicone hydrogel materials is much less than the amount from traditional soft lens materials. For the most part, the deposition proteome across these lenses is similar, although the different polymer characteristics

  7. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Parker, Jack C.; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip; Gu, Baohua

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO{sub 3}{sup -}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  8. Modeling uranium transport in acidic contaminated groundwater with base addition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Luo, Wensui; Parker, Jack C; Brooks, Scott C; Watson, David B; Jardine, Philip M; Gu, Baohua

    2011-06-15

    This study investigates reactive transport modeling in a column of uranium(VI)-contaminated sediments with base additions in the circulating influent. The groundwater and sediment exhibit oxic conditions with low pH, high concentrations of NO(3)(-), SO(4)(2-), U and various metal cations. Preliminary batch experiments indicate that additions of strong base induce rapid immobilization of U for this material. In the column experiment that is the focus of the present study, effluent groundwater was titrated with NaOH solution in an inflow reservoir before reinjection to gradually increase the solution pH in the column. An equilibrium hydrolysis, precipitation and ion exchange reaction model developed through simulation of the preliminary batch titration experiments predicted faster reduction of aqueous Al than observed in the column experiment. The model was therefore modified to consider reaction kinetics for the precipitation and dissolution processes which are the major mechanism for Al immobilization. The combined kinetic and equilibrium reaction model adequately described variations in pH, aqueous concentrations of metal cations (Al, Ca, Mg, Sr, Mn, Ni, Co), sulfate and U(VI). The experimental and modeling results indicate that U(VI) can be effectively sequestered with controlled base addition due to sorption by slowly precipitated Al with pH-dependent surface charge. The model may prove useful to predict field-scale U(VI) sequestration and remediation effectiveness.

  9. Web-based cephalometric procedure for craniofacial and dentition analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arun Kumar, N. S.; Kamath, Srijit R.; Ram, S.; Muthukumaran, B.; Venkatachalapathy, A.; Nandakumar, A.; Jayakumar, P.

    2000-05-01

    Craniofacial analysis is a very important and widely used procedure in orthodontic caphalometry, which plays a key role in diagnosis and treatment planning. This involves establishing reference standards and specification of landmarks and variables. The manual approach takes up a tremendous amount of the orthodontist's time. In this paper, we developed a web-based approach for the craniofacial and dentition analyses. A digital computed radiography (CR) system is utilized for obtaining the craniofacial image, which is stored as a bitmap file. The system comprises of two components - a server and a client. The server component is a program that runs on a remote machine. To use the system, the user has to connect to the website. The client component is now activated, which uploads the image from the PC and displays it on the canvas area. The landmarks are identified using a mouse interface. The reference lines are generated. The resulting image is then sent to the server which performs all measurement and calculates the mean, standard deviation, etc. of the variables. The results generated are sent immediately to the client where it is displayed on a separate frame along with the standard values for comparison. This system eliminates the need for every user to load other expensive programs on his machine.

  10. Analyser-based x-ray imaging for biomedical research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suortti, Pekka; Keyriläinen, Jani; Thomlinson, William

    2013-12-01

    Analyser-based imaging (ABI) is one of the several phase-contrast x-ray imaging techniques being pursued at synchrotron radiation facilities. With advancements in compact source technology, there is a possibility that ABI will become a clinical imaging modality. This paper presents the history of ABI as it has developed from its laboratory source to synchrotron imaging. The fundamental physics of phase-contrast imaging is presented both in a general sense and specifically for ABI. The technology is dependent on the use of perfect crystal monochromator optics. The theory of the x-ray optics is developed and presented in a way that will allow optimization of the imaging for specific biomedical systems. The advancement of analytical algorithms to produce separate images of the sample absorption, refraction angle map and small-angle x-ray scattering is detailed. Several detailed applications to biomedical imaging are presented to illustrate the broad range of systems and body sites studied preclinically to date: breast, cartilage and bone, soft tissue and organs. Ultimately, the application of ABI in clinical imaging will depend partly on the availability of compact sources with sufficient x-ray intensity comparable with that of the current synchrotron environment.

  11. A Classification of Mediterranean Cyclones Based on Global Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reale, Oreste; Atlas, Robert

    2003-01-01

    The Mediterranean Sea region is dominated by baroclinic and orographic cyclogenesis. However, previous work has demonstrated the existence of rare but intense subsynoptic-scale cyclones displaying remarkable similarities to tropical cyclones and polar lows, including, but not limited to, an eye-like feature in the satellite imagery. The terms polar low and tropical cyclone have been often used interchangeably when referring to small-scale, convective Mediterranean vortices and no definitive statement has been made so far on their nature, be it sub-tropical or polar. Moreover, most of the classifications of Mediterranean cyclones have neglected the small-scale convective vortices, focusing only on the larger-scale and far more common baroclinic cyclones. A classification of all Mediterranean cyclones based on operational global analyses is proposed The classification is based on normalized horizontal shear, vertical shear, scale, low versus mid-level vorticity, low-level temperature gradients, and sea surface temperatures. In the classification system there is a continuum of possible events, according to the increasing role of barotropic instability and decreasing role of baroclinic instability. One of the main results is that the Mediterranean tropical cyclone-like vortices and the Mediterranean polar lows appear to be different types of events, in spite of the apparent similarity of their satellite imagery. A consistent terminology is adopted, stating that tropical cyclone- like vortices are the less baroclinic of all, followed by polar lows, cold small-scale cyclones and finally baroclinic lee cyclones. This classification is based on all the cyclones which occurred in a four-year period (between 1996 and 1999). Four cyclones, selected among all the ones which developed during this time-frame, are analyzed. Particularly, the classification allows to discriminate between two cyclones (occurred in October 1996 and in March 1999) which both display a very well

  12. Colloidal-based additive manufacturing of bio-inspired composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studart, Andre R.

    Composite materials in nature exhibit heterogeneous architectures that are tuned to fulfill the functional demands of the surrounding environment. Examples range from the cellulose-based organic structure of plants to highly mineralized collagen-based skeletal parts like bone and teeth. Because they are often utilized to combine opposing properties such as strength and low-density or stiffness and wear resistance, the heterogeneous architecture of natural materials can potentially address several of the technical limitations of artificial homogeneous composites. However, current man-made manufacturing technologies do not allow for the level of composition and fiber orientation control found in natural heterogeneous systems. In this talk, I will present two additive manufacturing technologies recently developed in our group to build composites with exquisite architectures only rivaled by structures made by living organisms in nature. Since the proposed techniques utilize colloidal suspensions as feedstock, understanding the physics underlying the stability, assembly and rheology of the printing inks is key to predict and control the architecture of manufactured parts. Our results will show that additive manufacturing routes offer a new exciting pathway for the fabrication of biologically-inspired composite materials with unprecedented architectures and functionalities.

  13. Biochemical analyses of the antioxidative activity and chemical ingredients in eight different Allium alien monosomic addition lines.

    PubMed

    Yaguchi, Shigenori; Matsumoto, Misato; Date, Rie; Harada, Kazuki; Maeda, Toshimichi; Yamauchi, Naoki; Shigyo, Masayoshi

    2013-01-01

    We measured the antioxidant contents and antioxidative activities in eight Allium fistulosum-shallot monosomic addition lines (MAL; FF+1A-FF+8A). The high antioxidative activity lines (FF+2A and FF+6A) showed high polyphenol accumulation. These additional chromosomes (2A and 6A) would therefore have anonymous genes related to the upregulation of polyphenol production, the antioxidative activities consequently being increased in these MALs. PMID:24317054

  14. Graphic-based musculoskeletal model for biomechanical analyses and animation.

    PubMed

    Chao, Edmund Y S

    2003-04-01

    The ability to combine physiology and engineering analyses with computer sciences has opened the door to the possibility of creating the 'Virtual Human' reality. This paper presents a broad foundation for a full-featured biomechanical simulator for the human musculoskeletal system physiology. This simulation technology unites the expertise in biomechanical analysis and graphic modeling to investigate joint and connective tissue mechanics at the structural level and to visualize the results in both static and animated forms together with the model. Adaptable anatomical models including prosthetic implants and fracture fixation devices and a robust computational infrastructure for static, kinematic, kinetic, and stress analyses under varying boundary and loading conditions are incorporated on a common platform, the VIMS (Virtual Interactive Musculoskeletal System). Within this software system, a manageable database containing long bone dimensions, connective tissue material properties and a library of skeletal joint system functional activities and loading conditions are also available and they can easily be modified, updated and expanded. Application software is also available to allow end-users to perform biomechanical analyses interactively. This paper details the design, capabilities, and features of the VIMS development at Johns Hopkins University, an effort possible only through academic and commercial collaborations. Examples using these models and the computational algorithms in a virtual laboratory environment are used to demonstrate the utility of this unique database and simulation technology. This integrated system will impact on medical education, basic research, device development and application, and clinical patient care related to musculoskeletal diseases, trauma, and rehabilitation.

  15. Polysulfide and bio-based EP additive performance in vegetable vs. paraffinic base oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twist compression test (TCT) and 4-ball extreme pressure (EP) methods were used to investigate commercial polysulfide (PS) and bio-based polyester (PE) EP additives in paraffinic (150N) and refined soybean (SOY) base oils of similar viscosity. Binary blends of EP additive and base oil were investiga...

  16. FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis: Volume 1,Scientific Bases and Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Dobson, David

    2001-05-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is considering the possible recommendation of a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, for development as a geologic repository for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. To facilitate public review and comment, in May 2001 the DOE released the Yucca Mountain Science and Engineering Report (S&ER) (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]), which presents technical information supporting the consideration of the possible site recommendation. The report summarizes the results of more than 20 years of scientific and engineering studies. A decision to recommend the site has not been made: the DOE has provided the S&ER and its supporting documents as an aid to the public in formulating comments on the possible recommendation. When the S&ER (DOE 2001 [DIRS 153849]) was released, the DOE acknowledged that technical and scientific analyses of the site were ongoing. Therefore, the DOE noted in the Federal Register Notice accompanying the report (66 FR 23013 [DIRS 155009], p. 2) that additional technical information would be released before the dates, locations, and times for public hearings on the possible recommendation were announced. This information includes: (1) the results of additional technical studies of a potential repository at Yucca Mountain, contained in this FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 1, Scientific Bases and Analyses; and FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analyses: Vol. 2, Performance Analyses (McNeish 2001 [DIRS 155023]) (collectively referred to as the SSPA) and (2) a preliminary evaluation of the Yucca Mountain site's preclosure and postclosure performance against the DOE's proposed site suitability guidelines (10 CFR Part 963 [64 FR 67054 [DIRS 124754

  17. Improved dental adhesive formulations based on reactive nanogel additives.

    PubMed

    Morães, R R; Garcia, J W; Wilson, N D; Lewis, S H; Barros, M D; Yang, B; Pfeifer, C S; Stansbury, J W

    2012-02-01

    Current challenges in adhesive dentistry include over-hydrophilic bonding formulations, which facilitate water percolation through the hybrid layer and result in unreliable bonded interfaces. This study introduces nanogel-modified adhesives as a way to control the material's hydrophobic character without changing the basic monomer formulation (keeping water-chasing capacity and operatory techniques unaltered). Nanogel additives of varied hydrophobicity were synthesized in solution, rendering 10- to 100-nm-sized particles. A model BisGMA/HEMA solvated adhesive was prepared (control), to which reactive nanogels were added. The increase in adhesive viscosity did not impair solvent removal by air-thinning. The degree of conversion in the adhesive was similar between control and nanogel-modified materials, while the bulk dry and, particularly, the wet mechanical properties were significantly improved through nanogel-based network reinforcement and reduced water solubility. As preliminary validation of this approach, short-term micro-tensile bond strengths to acid-etched and primed dentin were significantly enhanced by nanogel inclusion in the adhesive resins. PMID:22019910

  18. Training Teachers to Conduct Trial-Based Functional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunnavatana, S. Shanun; Bloom, Sarah E.; Samaha, Andrew L.; Dayton, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    The trial-based functional analysis (FA) is a promising approach to identification of behavioral function and is especially suited for use in educational settings. Not all studies on trial-based FA have included teachers as therapists, and those studies that have, included minimal information on teacher training. The purpose of this study was to…

  19. Development and application of new nucleic acid-based technologies for microbial community analyses in foods.

    PubMed

    Rudi, Knut; Nogva, Hege K; Moen, Birgitte; Nissen, Hilde; Bredholt, Sylvia; Møretrø, Trond; Naterstad, Kristine; Holck, Askild

    2002-09-15

    Several challenges still persist in the analysis of microorganisms in foods, particularly in studies of complex communities. Nucleic acid-based methods are promising tools in addressing new questions concerning microbial communities. We have developed several new methods in the field of nucleic acid-based microbial community analyses. These methods cover both sample preparation and detection approaches. The sample preparation method involves simplified DNA purification using paramagnetic beads. As an extension of this method, the same paramagnetic beads are used for both cell separation and DNA purification. This enables full automation. The separate detection of viable and dead bacteria is a major issue in nucleic acid-based diagnostics. We have applied a living/dead dye that binds covalently to DNA and inhibits the PCR from dead cells. In addition, a DNA array-based detection assay has been developed. The assay combines the specificity obtained by enzymatic labeling of DNA probes with the possibility of detecting several targets simultaneously by DNA array hybridization. In combination with 16S rDNA amplification, this is a promising tool for community analyses. Also, we have developed a novel approach for multiplex quantitative PCR. The multiplex PCR has been combined with our DNA array-based detection method. Finally, we are now in the process of adapting a system for monitoring microbial growth and death in real-time through the tagging of bacteria with green fluorescent protein (GFP) combined with fluorescence detection using a high-resolution confocal laser scanner.

  20. Meta-Analyses of Human Cell-Based Cardiac Regeneration Therapies: Controversies in Meta-Analyses Results on Cardiac Cell-Based Regenerative Studies.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Navarese, Eliano P; Moye, Lemuel À

    2016-04-15

    In contrast to multiple publication-based meta-analyses involving clinical cardiac regeneration therapy in patients with recent myocardial infarction, a recently published meta-analysis based on individual patient data reported no effect of cell therapy on left ventricular function or clinical outcome. A comprehensive review of the data collection, statistics, and the overall principles of meta-analyses provides further clarification and explanation for this controversy. The advantages and pitfalls of different types of meta-analyses are reviewed here. Each meta-analysis approach has a place when pivotal clinical trials are lacking and sheds light on the magnitude of the treatment in a complex healthcare field. PMID:27081108

  1. Meta-Analyses of Human Cell-Based Cardiac Regeneration Therapies: Controversies in Meta-Analyses Results on Cardiac Cell-Based Regenerative Studies.

    PubMed

    Gyöngyösi, Mariann; Wojakowski, Wojciech; Navarese, Eliano P; Moye, Lemuel À

    2016-04-15

    In contrast to multiple publication-based meta-analyses involving clinical cardiac regeneration therapy in patients with recent myocardial infarction, a recently published meta-analysis based on individual patient data reported no effect of cell therapy on left ventricular function or clinical outcome. A comprehensive review of the data collection, statistics, and the overall principles of meta-analyses provides further clarification and explanation for this controversy. The advantages and pitfalls of different types of meta-analyses are reviewed here. Each meta-analysis approach has a place when pivotal clinical trials are lacking and sheds light on the magnitude of the treatment in a complex healthcare field.

  2. A Cyber-Attack Detection Model Based on Multivariate Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yuto; Rinsaka, Koichiro; Dohi, Tadashi

    In the present paper, we propose a novel cyber-attack detection model based on two multivariate-analysis methods to the audit data observed on a host machine. The statistical techniques used here are the well-known Hayashi's quantification method IV and cluster analysis method. We quantify the observed qualitative audit event sequence via the quantification method IV, and collect similar audit event sequence in the same groups based on the cluster analysis. It is shown in simulation experiments that our model can improve the cyber-attack detection accuracy in some realistic cases where both normal and attack activities are intermingled.

  3. Agricultural Production: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrico County Public Schools, Glen Allen, VA. Virginia Vocational Curriculum Center.

    This task analysis guide is intended to help teachers and administrators develop instructional materials and implement competency-based education in the agricultural production program. Section 1 contains a validated task inventory for agricultural production. Tasks are divided into 10 duty areas: orienting the student to agricultural production,…

  4. PCR and RFLP analyses based on the ribosomal protein operon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differentiation and classification of phytoplasmas have been primarily based on the highly conserved 16Sr RNA gene. RFLP analysis of 16Sr RNA gene sequences has identified 31 16Sr RNA (16Sr) groups and more than 100 16Sr subgroups. Classification of phytoplasma strains can however, become more refin...

  5. Dental Aide: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newport News Public Schools, VA.

    This task analysis guide is intended to help teachers and administrators develop instructional materials and implement competency-based education in the dental aide program. Section 1 contains a validated task inventory for dental aide. For each task, applicable information pertaining to performance and enabling objectives, criterion-referenced…

  6. Natural Resources Management: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James Madison Univ., Harrisonburg, VA.

    This task analysis guide is intended to help teachers and administrators develop instructional materials and implement competency-based education for natural resources management courses in the agricultural resources program. Section 1 contains a validated task inventory for natural resources management. For each task, applicable information…

  7. Rust preventive oil additives based on microbial fats

    SciTech Connect

    Salenko, V.I.; Fedorov, V.V.; Kazantsev, Yu.E.

    1983-03-01

    This article investigates the composition and lubricating properties of microbial fats obtained from microorganisms grown on various hydrocarbon substrates (n-paraffins, alcohols, natural gas, petroleum distillates, etc.). Focuses on the protective functions of the 4 main fractions (unsaponifiables, free fatty acids, glycerides, and phospholipids) which comprise the microbial fat from a yeast grown on purified liquid n-paraffins. Concludes that neutralized microbial fats can be used as preservative additives; that the principal components of the microbial fats have the properties necessary for oil-soluble corrosion inhibitors; that the phospholipids of the microbial fat can fulfill the functions of not only preservative additives, but also highly effective operational/ preservative additives; and that fats of microbial origin can be used in the development of multipurpose polyfunctional additives.

  8. Design and Analyses of a MEMS Based Resonant Magnetometer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Dahai; Wu, Lingqi; Yan, Meizhi; Cui, Mingyang; You, Zheng; Hu, Muzhi

    2009-01-01

    A novel design of a MEMS torsional resonant magnetometer based on Lorentz force is presented and fabricated. The magnetometer consists of a silicon resonator, torsional beam, excitation coil, capacitance plates and glass substrate. Working in a resonant condition, the sensor’s vibration amplitude is converted into the sensing capacitance change, which reflects the outside magnetic flux-density. Based on the simulation, the key structure parameters are optimized and the air damping effect is estimated. The test results of the prototype are in accordance with the simulation results of the designed model. The resolution of the magnetometer can reach 30 nT. The test results indicate its sensitivity of more than 400 mV/μT when operating in a 10 Pa vacuum environment. PMID:22399981

  9. Design and Analyses of a MEMS Based Resonant Magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Ren, Dahai; Wu, Lingqi; Yan, Meizhi; Cui, Mingyang; You, Zheng; Hu, Muzhi

    2009-01-01

    A novel design of a MEMS torsional resonant magnetometer based on Lorentz force is presented and fabricated. The magnetometer consists of a silicon resonator, torsional beam, excitation coil, capacitance plates and glass substrate. Working in a resonant condition, the sensor's vibration amplitude is converted into the sensing capacitance change, which reflects the outside magnetic flux-density. Based on the simulation, the key structure parameters are optimized and the air damping effect is estimated. The test results of the prototype are in accordance with the simulation results of the designed model. The resolution of the magnetometer can reach 30 nT. The test results indicate its sensitivity of more than 400 mV/μT when operating in a 10 Pa vacuum environment.

  10. Phylogenomic analyses of bat subordinal relationships based on transcriptome data

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Ming; Dong, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Bats, order Chiroptera, are one of the largest monophyletic clades in mammals. Based on morphology and behaviour bats were once differentiated into two suborders Megachiroptera and Microchiroptera Recently, researchers proposed alternative views of chiropteran classification (suborders Yinpterochiroptera and Yangochiroptera) based on morphological, molecular and fossil evidence. Since genome-scale data can significantly increase the number of informative characters for analysis, transcriptome RNA-seq data for 12 bat taxa were generated in an attempt to resolve bat subordinal relationships at the genome level. Phylogenetic reconstructions were conducted using up to 1470 orthologous genes and 634,288 aligned sites. We found strong support for the Yinpterochiroptera-Yangochiroptera classification. Next, we built expression distance matrices for each species and reconstructed gene expression trees. The tree is highly consistent with sequence-based phylogeny. We also examined the influence of taxa sampling on the performance of phylogenetic methods, and found that the topology is robust to sampling. Relaxed molecular clock estimates the divergence between Yinpterochiroptera and Yangochiroptera around 63 million years ago. The most recent common ancestor of Yinpterochiroptera, corresponding to the split between Rhinolophoidea and Pteropodidae (Old World Fruit bats), is estimated to have occurred 60 million years ago. Our work provided a valuable resource to further explore the evolutionary relationship within bats. PMID:27291671

  11. Design of the storage location based on the ABC analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jemelka, Milan; Chramcov, Bronislav; Kříž, Pavel

    2016-06-01

    The paper focuses on process efficiency and saving storage costs. Maintaining inventory through putaway strategy takes personnel time and costs money. The aim is to control inventory in the best way. The ABC classification based on Villefredo Pareto theory is used for a design of warehouse layout. New design of storage location reduces the distance of fork-lifters, total costs and it increases inventory process efficiency. The suggested solutions and evaluation of achieved results are described in detail. Proposed solutions were realized in real warehouse operation.

  12. Activity-based analyses lead to better decision making.

    PubMed

    Player, S

    1998-08-01

    Activity-based costing (ABC) and activity-based management (ABM) are cost-management tools that are relatively new to the healthcare industry. ABC is used for strategic decision making. It assesses the costs associated with specific activities and resources and links those costs to specific internal and external customers of the healthcare enterprise (e.g., patients, service lines, and physician groups) to determine the costs associated with each customer. This cost information then can be adjusted to account for anticipated changes and to predict future costs. ABM, on the other hand, supports operations by focusing on the causes of costs and how costs can be reduced. It assesses cost drivers that directly affect the cost of a product or service, and uses performance measures to evaluate the financial or nonfinancial benefit an activity provides. By identifying each cost driver and assessing the value the element adds to the healthcare enterprise, ABM provides a basis for selecting areas that can be changed to reduce costs. PMID:10182280

  13. Hyperbolic tangential function-based progressive addition lens design.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Gufeng; Cui, Xudong

    2015-12-10

    The diopter distribution is key to the successful design of a progressive addition lens. A hyperbolic tangential function is then introduced to describe well the desired diopter distribution on the lens. Simulation and fabrication show that the astigmia on the whole surface is very close to the addition, exhibiting superior performance than that of currently used high-order polynomials and cosine functions. Our investigations found that once the diopter distribution design is reasonable, both the direct and indirect methods of constructing a progressive addition lens can give consistent results. With this function we are able to effectively control the design of critical areas, the position, sizes of far-view and near-view zones, as well as the channel of the lens. This study would provide an efficient way to customize different progressive lenses not only for presbyopia, but also for anti-fatigue, office progressive usages, etc. PMID:26836863

  14. CrusView: a Java-based visualization platform for comparative genomics analyses in Brassicaceae species.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Wang, Xiangfeng

    2013-09-01

    In plants and animals, chromosomal breakage and fusion events based on conserved syntenic genomic blocks lead to conserved patterns of karyotype evolution among species of the same family. However, karyotype information has not been well utilized in genomic comparison studies. We present CrusView, a Java-based bioinformatic application utilizing Standard Widget Toolkit/Swing graphics libraries and a SQLite database for performing visualized analyses of comparative genomics data in Brassicaceae (crucifer) plants. Compared with similar software and databases, one of the unique features of CrusView is its integration of karyotype information when comparing two genomes. This feature allows users to perform karyotype-based genome assembly and karyotype-assisted genome synteny analyses with preset karyotype patterns of the Brassicaceae genomes. Additionally, CrusView is a local program, which gives its users high flexibility when analyzing unpublished genomes and allows users to upload self-defined genomic information so that they can visually study the associations between genome structural variations and genetic elements, including chromosomal rearrangements, genomic macrosynteny, gene families, high-frequency recombination sites, and tandem and segmental duplications between related species. This tool will greatly facilitate karyotype, chromosome, and genome evolution studies using visualized comparative genomics approaches in Brassicaceae species. CrusView is freely available at http://www.cmbb.arizona.edu/CrusView/.

  15. Base Oil-Extreme Pressure Additive Synergy in Lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extreme pressure (EP) additives are those containing reactive elements such as sulfur, phosphorus, and chlorine. In lubrication processes that occur under extremely severe conditions (e.g., high pressure and/or slow speed), these elements undergo chemical reactions generating new materials (tribofi...

  16. Additivity of Feature-Based and Symmetry-Based Grouping Effects in Multiple Object Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chundi; Zhang, Xuemin; Li, Yongna; Lyu, Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple object tracking (MOT) is an attentional process wherein people track several moving targets among several distractors. Symmetry, an important indicator of regularity, is a general spatial pattern observed in natural and artificial scenes. According to the “laws of perceptual organization” proposed by Gestalt psychologists, regularity is a principle of perceptual grouping, such as similarity and closure. A great deal of research reported that feature-based similarity grouping (e.g., grouping based on color, size, or shape) among targets in MOT tasks can improve tracking performance. However, no additive feature-based grouping effects have been reported where the tracking objects had two or more features. “Additive effect” refers to a greater grouping effect produced by grouping based on multiple cues instead of one cue. Can spatial symmetry produce a similar grouping effect similar to that of feature similarity in MOT tasks? Are the grouping effects based on symmetry and feature similarity additive? This study includes four experiments to address these questions. The results of Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated the automatic symmetry-based grouping effects. More importantly, an additive grouping effect of symmetry and feature similarity was observed in Experiments 3 and 4. Our findings indicate that symmetry can produce an enhanced grouping effect in MOT and facilitate the grouping effect based on color or shape similarity. The “where” and “what” pathways might have played an important role in the additive grouping effect. PMID:27199875

  17. Additivity of Feature-Based and Symmetry-Based Grouping Effects in Multiple Object Tracking.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chundi; Zhang, Xuemin; Li, Yongna; Lyu, Chuang

    2016-01-01

    Multiple object tracking (MOT) is an attentional process wherein people track several moving targets among several distractors. Symmetry, an important indicator of regularity, is a general spatial pattern observed in natural and artificial scenes. According to the "laws of perceptual organization" proposed by Gestalt psychologists, regularity is a principle of perceptual grouping, such as similarity and closure. A great deal of research reported that feature-based similarity grouping (e.g., grouping based on color, size, or shape) among targets in MOT tasks can improve tracking performance. However, no additive feature-based grouping effects have been reported where the tracking objects had two or more features. "Additive effect" refers to a greater grouping effect produced by grouping based on multiple cues instead of one cue. Can spatial symmetry produce a similar grouping effect similar to that of feature similarity in MOT tasks? Are the grouping effects based on symmetry and feature similarity additive? This study includes four experiments to address these questions. The results of Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrated the automatic symmetry-based grouping effects. More importantly, an additive grouping effect of symmetry and feature similarity was observed in Experiments 3 and 4. Our findings indicate that symmetry can produce an enhanced grouping effect in MOT and facilitate the grouping effect based on color or shape similarity. The "where" and "what" pathways might have played an important role in the additive grouping effect.

  18. Computer-based image-analyses of laminated shales, carboniferous of the Midcontinent and surrounding areas

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, A.W. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-02-01

    Computerized image-analyses of petrographic data can greatly facilitate the quantification of detailed descriptions and analyses of fine-scale fabric, or petrofabric. In thinly laminated rocks, manual measurement of successive lamina thicknesses is very time consuming, especially when applied to thick, cored sequences. In particular, images of core materials can be digitized and the resulting image then processed as a large matrix. Using such techniques, it is relatively easy to automate continuous measurements of lamina thickness and lateral continuity. This type of analyses has been applied to a variety of Carboniferous strata, particularly those siliciclastics that occur within the outside shale' portions of Kansas cyclothems. Of the various sedimentological processes capable of producing such non-random thickness variations, a model invoking tidal processes appears to be particularly robust. Tidal sedimentation could not only have resulted in the deposition of individual lamina, but in addition tidal-height variations during various phases of the lunar orbit can serve to explain the systematic variations. Comparison of these Carboniferous shales with similar laminations formed in modern high tidal-range environments indicates many similarities. These modern analogs include the Bay of Fundy in Canada, and Bay of Mont-Staint-Michel in France. Lamina-thickness variations, in specific cases, can be correlated with known tidal periodicities. In addition, in some samples, details of the tidal regime can be interpolated, such as the nature of the tidal system (i.e., diurnal or semidiurnal) and some indicators of tidal range can be ascertained based upon modern analogs.

  19. System and method for high power diode based additive manufacturing

    DOEpatents

    El-Dasher, Bassem S.; Bayramian, Andrew; Demuth, James A.; Farmer, Joseph C.; Torres, Sharon G.

    2016-04-12

    A system is disclosed for performing an Additive Manufacturing (AM) fabrication process on a powdered material forming a substrate. The system may make use of a diode array for generating an optical signal sufficient to melt a powdered material of the substrate. A mask may be used for preventing a first predetermined portion of the optical signal from reaching the substrate, while allowing a second predetermined portion to reach the substrate. At least one processor may be used for controlling an output of the diode array.

  20. Multifunctional additives for automotive gasolines based on oxyethylated compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Lykov, O.P.; Vishnyakova, T.P.; Tsygan, L.V.; Emel'yanov, V.E.

    1987-03-01

    The authors have investigated various oil-soluble nonionic surfactants with different degrees of oxyethylation as multifunctional additives for gasolines. The following products were taken for oxyethylation: C/sub 17/-C/sub 20/ synthetic fatty acids; concentrate of isocarboxylic and unsaturated acids segregated from C/sub 17/-C/sub 20/ SFA by cold acetone; technical C/sub 10/-C/sub 18/ alkylsalicylic acids; products from the condensation of AC acids with C/sub 10/-C/sub 16/ aliphatic amines; primary aliphatic amines.

  1. Meta-Analyses and Orthodontic Evidence-Based Clinical Practice in the 21st Century

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Moschos A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Aim of this systematic review was to assess the orthodontic related issues which currently provide the best evidence as documented by meta-analyses, by critically evaluating and discussing the methodology used in these studies. Material and Methods: Several electronic databases were searched and handsearching was also performed in order to identify the corresponding meta-analyses investigating orthodontic related subjects. In total, 197 studies were retrieved initially. After applying specific inclusion and exclusion criteria, 27 articles were identified as meta-analyses treating orthodontic-related subjects. Results: Many of these 27 papers presented sufficient quality and followed appropriate meta-analytic approaches to quantitatively synthesize data and presented adequately supported evidence. However, the methodology used in some of them presented weaknesses, limitations or deficiencies. Consequently, the topics in orthodontics which currently provide the best evidence, include some issues related to Class II or Class III treatment, treatment of transverse problems, external apical root resorption, dental anomalies, such as congenital missing teeth and tooth transposition, frequency of severe occlusal problems, nickel hypersensitivity, obstructive sleep apnea syndrome, and computer-assisted learning in orthodontic education. Conclusions: Only a few orthodontic related issues have been so far investigated by means of MAs. In addition, for some of these issues investigated in the corresponding MAs no definite conclusions could be drawn, due to significant methodological deficiencies of these studies. According to this investigation, it can be concluded that at the begin of the 21st century there is evidence for only a few orthodontic related issues as documented by meta-analyses, and more well-conducted high quality research studies are needed to produce strong evidence in order to support evidence-based clinical practice in orthodontics. PMID

  2. SOCR Analyses – an Instructional Java Web-based Statistical Analysis Toolkit

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Annie; Cui, Jenny; Dinov, Ivo D.

    2011-01-01

    The Statistical Online Computational Resource (SOCR) designs web-based tools for educational use in a variety of undergraduate courses (Dinov 2006). Several studies have demonstrated that these resources significantly improve students' motivation and learning experiences (Dinov et al. 2008). SOCR Analyses is a new component that concentrates on data modeling and analysis using parametric and non-parametric techniques supported with graphical model diagnostics. Currently implemented analyses include commonly used models in undergraduate statistics courses like linear models (Simple Linear Regression, Multiple Linear Regression, One-Way and Two-Way ANOVA). In addition, we implemented tests for sample comparisons, such as t-test in the parametric category; and Wilcoxon rank sum test, Kruskal-Wallis test, Friedman's test, in the non-parametric category. SOCR Analyses also include several hypothesis test models, such as Contingency tables, Friedman's test and Fisher's exact test. The code itself is open source (http://socr.googlecode.com/), hoping to contribute to the efforts of the statistical computing community. The code includes functionality for each specific analysis model and it has general utilities that can be applied in various statistical computing tasks. For example, concrete methods with API (Application Programming Interface) have been implemented in statistical summary, least square solutions of general linear models, rank calculations, etc. HTML interfaces, tutorials, source code, activities, and data are freely available via the web (www.SOCR.ucla.edu). Code examples for developers and demos for educators are provided on the SOCR Wiki website. In this article, the pedagogical utilization of the SOCR Analyses is discussed, as well as the underlying design framework. As the SOCR project is on-going and more functions and tools are being added to it, these resources are constantly improved. The reader is strongly encouraged to check the SOCR site for most

  3. Validating Trial-Based Functional Analyses in Mainstream Primary School Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Jennifer L.; Groves, Emily A.; Reynish, Lisa C.; Francis, Laura L.

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence to support the use of trial-based functional analyses, particularly in classroom settings. However, there currently are no evaluations of this procedure with typically developing children. Furthermore, it is possible that refinements may be needed to adapt trial-based analyses to mainstream classrooms. This study was…

  4. Analysing spatio-temporal patterns of the global NO2-distribution retrieved from GOME satellite observations using a generalized additive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayn, M.; Beirle, S.; Hamprecht, F. A.; Platt, U.; Menze, B. H.; Wagner, T.

    2009-09-01

    With the increasing availability of observational data from different sources at a global level, joint analysis of these data is becoming especially attractive. For such an analysis - oftentimes with little prior knowledge about local and global interactions between the different observational variables at hand - an exploratory, data-driven analysis of the data may be of particular relevance. In the present work we used generalized additive models (GAM) in an exemplary study of spatio-temporal patterns in the tropospheric NO2-distribution derived from GOME satellite observations (1996 to 2001) at global scale. We focused on identifying correlations between NO2 and local wind fields, a quantity which is of particular interest in the analysis of spatio-temporal interactions. Formulating general functional, parametric relationships between the observed NO2 distribution and local wind fields, however, is difficult - if not impossible. So, rather than following a model-based analysis testing the data for predefined hypotheses (assuming, for example, sinusoidal seasonal trends), we used a GAM with non-parametric model terms to learn this functional relationship between NO2 and wind directly from the data. The NO2 observations showed to be affected by wind-dominated processes over large areas. We estimated the extent of areas affected by specific NO2 emission sources, and were able to highlight likely atmospheric transport "pathways". General temporal trends which were also part of our model - weekly, seasonal and linear changes - showed to be in good agreement with previous studies and alternative ways of analysing the time series. Overall, using a non-parametric model provided favorable means for a rapid inspection of this large spatio-temporal NO2 data set, with less bias than parametric approaches, and allowing to visualize dynamical processes of the NO2 distribution at a global scale.

  5. Impact of enzalutamide on quality of life in men with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer after chemotherapy: additional analyses from the AFFIRM randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Cella, D.; Ivanescu, C.; Holmstrom, S.; Bui, C. N.; Spalding, J.; Fizazi, K.

    2015-01-01

    Background To present longitudinal changes in Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) scores during 25-week treatment with enzalutamide or placebo in men with progressive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) after chemotherapy in the AFFIRM trial. Patients and methods Patients were randomly assigned to enzalutamide 160 mg/day or placebo. FACT-P was completed before randomization, at weeks 13, 17, 21, and 25, and every 12 weeks thereafter while on study treatment. Longitudinal changes in FACT-P scores from baseline to 25 weeks were analyzed using a mixed effects model for repeated measures (MMRM), with a pattern mixture model (PMM) applied as secondary analysis to address non-ignorable missing data. Cumulative distribution function (CDF) plots were generated and different methodological approaches and models for handling missing data were applied. Due to the exploratory nature of the analyses, adjustments for multiple comparisons were not made. AFFIRM is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00974311. Results The intention-to-treat FACT-P population included 938 patients (enzalutamide, n = 674; placebo n = 264) with evaluable FACT-P assessments at baseline and ≥1 post-baseline assessment. After 25 weeks, the mean FACT-P total score decreased by 1.52 points with enzalutamide compared with 13.73 points with placebo (P < 0.001). In addition, significant treatment differences at week 25 favoring enzalutamide were evident for all FACT-P subscales and indices, whether analyzed by MMRM or PMM. CDF plots revealed differences favoring enzalutamide compared with placebo across the full range of possible response levels for FACT-P total and all disease- and symptom-specific subscales/indices. Conclusion In men with progressive mCRPC after docetaxel-based chemotherapy, enzalutamide is superior to placebo in health-related quality-of-life outcomes, regardless of analysis model or threshold selected for meaningful response. Clinical

  6. Activity Based Curriculum for Elementary Education. Additional Activities, K-6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichita Public Schools, KS.

    This elementary curriculum is a vehicle to provide manipulative activities that reinforce academic skills through meaningful, relevant, activity-based awareness of modern society. The twenty-six activity plans included in the curriculum place a major emphasis upon realistic or concrete experiences that deal with the manipulation and exploration of…

  7. Multiscale Modeling of Powder Bed-Based Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markl, Matthias; Körner, Carolin

    2016-07-01

    Powder bed fusion processes are additive manufacturing technologies that are expected to induce the third industrial revolution. Components are built up layer by layer in a powder bed by selectively melting confined areas, according to sliced 3D model data. This technique allows for manufacturing of highly complex geometries hardly machinable with conventional technologies. However, the underlying physical phenomena are sparsely understood and difficult to observe during processing. Therefore, an intensive and expensive trial-and-error principle is applied to produce components with the desired dimensional accuracy, material characteristics, and mechanical properties. This review presents numerical modeling approaches on multiple length scales and timescales to describe different aspects of powder bed fusion processes. In combination with tailored experiments, the numerical results enlarge the process understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms and support the development of suitable process strategies and component topologies.

  8. Multiscale Modeling of Powder Bed–Based Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markl, Matthias; Körner, Carolin

    2016-07-01

    Powder bed fusion processes are additive manufacturing technologies that are expected to induce the third industrial revolution. Components are built up layer by layer in a powder bed by selectively melting confined areas, according to sliced 3D model data. This technique allows for manufacturing of highly complex geometries hardly machinable with conventional technologies. However, the underlying physical phenomena are sparsely understood and difficult to observe during processing. Therefore, an intensive and expensive trial-and-error principle is applied to produce components with the desired dimensional accuracy, material characteristics, and mechanical properties. This review presents numerical modeling approaches on multiple length scales and timescales to describe different aspects of powder bed fusion processes. In combination with tailored experiments, the numerical results enlarge the process understanding of the underlying physical mechanisms and support the development of suitable process strategies and component topologies.

  9. Candidate gene analyses by scanning or brute force fluorescent sequencing: a comparison of DOVAM-S with gel-based and capillary-based sequencing.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinong; Yan, Jin; Li, Wenyan; Chen, Jiesheng; Sommer, Steve S

    2007-01-01

    For epidemiological and diagnostic applications, detection of virtually all mutations is desired. Herein, blinded analyses of DOVAM-S (Detection Of Virtually All Mutations-SSCP), a robotically enhanced multiplex SSCP method, demonstrate that all of 525 mutations (391 unique) are detected by the method. In addition, the costs of DOVAM-S, gel-based fluorescent sequencing and capillary-based fluorescent sequencing are compared. The relative cost effectiveness of gel-based and capillary-based sequence analysis depends on throughput and whether depreciation and service are considered. DOVAM-S reduces the cost of candidate gene analyses relative to brute force sequencing by about threefold. PMID:17949284

  10. Biothiol Xenon MRI Sensor Based on Thiol-Addition Reaction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shengjun; Jiang, Weiping; Ren, Lili; Yuan, Yaping; Zhang, Bin; Luo, Qing; Guo, Qianni; Bouchard, Louis-S; Liu, Maili; Zhou, Xin

    2016-06-01

    Biothiols such as cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (Hcy), and glutathione (GSH) play an important role in regulating the vital functions of living organisms. Knowledge of their biodistribution in real-time could help diagnose a variety of conditions. However, existing methods of biothiol detection are invasive and require assays. Herein we report a molecular biosensor for biothiol detection using the nuclear spin resonance of (129)Xe. The (129)Xe biosensor consists of a cryptophane cage encapsulating a xenon atom and an acrylate group. The latter serves as a reactive site to covalently bond biothiols through a thiol-addition reaction. The biosensor enables discrimination of Cys from Hcy and GSH through the chemical shift and average reaction rate. This biosensor can be detected at a concentration of 10 μM in a single scan and it has been applied to detect biothiols in bovine serum solution. Our results indicate that this biosensor is a promising tool for the real-time imaging of biothiol distributions. PMID:27128102

  11. Interactions between organic additives and active powders in water-based lithium iron phosphate electrode slurries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chia-Chen; Lin, Yu-Sheng

    2012-12-01

    The interactions of organic additives with active powders are investigated and are found to have great influence on the determination of the mixing process for preparing electrode slurries with good dispersion and electrochemical properties of lithium iron phosphate (LiFePO4) electrodes. Based on the analyses of zeta potential, sedimentation, and rheology, it is shown that LiFePO4 prefers to interact with styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR) relative to other organic additives such as sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (SCMC), and thus shows preferential adsorption by SBR, whereas SBR has much lower efficiency than SCMC in dispersing LiFePO4. Therefore, for SCMC to interact with and disperse LiFePO4 before the interaction of LiFePO4 with SBR, it is suggested to mix SCMC with LiFePO4 prior to the addition of SBR during the slurry preparation process. For the electrode prepared via the suggested process, i.e., the sequenced adding process in which SCMC is mixed with active powders prior to the addition of SBR, a much better electrochemical performance is obtained than that of the one prepared via the process referred as the simultaneous adding process, in which mixing of SCMC and SBR with active powders in simultaneous.

  12. Butyric acid-based feed additives help protect broiler chickens from Salmonella Enteritidis infection.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Rubio, C; Ordóñez, C; Abad-González, J; Garcia-Gallego, A; Honrubia, M Pilar; Mallo, J Jose; Balaña-Fouce, R

    2009-05-01

    Sodium butyrate is a sodium salt of a volatile short-chain fatty acid (butyric acid) used to prevent Salmonella Enteritidis infection in birds. Three groups of fifty 1-d-old broilers each were fed the following diets: T0 = standard broiler diet (control); T1 = standard broiler diet supplemented with 0.92 g/kg of an additive with free sodium butyrate (Gustor XXI B92); and T2 = standard broiler diet supplemented with 0.92 g/kg of an additive with sodium butyrate partially protected with vegetable fats (Gustor XXI BP70). Twenty percent of the birds were orally infected with Salmonella Enteritidis at d 5 posthatching and fecal Salmonella shedding was assessed at d 6, 9, 13, 20, 27, 34, and 41 of the trial. At d 42, all birds were slaughtered and 20 of them dissected: crop, cecum, liver, and spleen were sampled for bacteriological analyses. Both butyrate-based additives showed a significant reduction (P < 0.05) of Salmonella Enteritidis infection in birds from d 27 onward. However, the partially protected butyrate additive was more effective at the late phase of infection. Partially protected butyrate treatment successfully decreased infection not only in the crop and cecum but also in the liver. There were no differences in the spleen. These results suggest that sodium butyrate partially protected with vegetable fats offers a unique balance of free and protected active substances effective all along the gastrointestinal tract because it is slowly released during digestion.

  13. Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of 10-undecenoic acid-based epithio derivatives as multifunctional additives.

    PubMed

    Geethanjali, Gorla; Padmaja, Korlipara V; Sammaiah, Arukali; Prasad, Rachapudi B N

    2014-11-26

    Novel epithio compounds from alkyl epoxy undecanoates (n-alkyl, C1, C4, and C6; isoalkyl, C3, C4, and C8) were synthesized using an ammonium thiocyanate in ionic liquid 1-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate/H2O (2:1) solvent system in 85-90% yields by gas chromatographic (GC) analysis. The synthesized products were characterized by (1)H and (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), gas chromatography, and GC mass spectral (GC-MS) analyses and evaluated for their antioxidant, extreme pressure (EP), and antiwear (AW) properties in three different base oils, namely, epoxy jatropha fatty acid n-butyl esters (EJB), di-2-ethylhexyl sebacate (DOS), and mineral oil (S-105). Among the synthesized products, n-butyl epithio undecanoate exhibited superior antioxidant property (229.2 °C) compared to butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT, 193.8 °C) in base oil DOS and comparable performance in EJB and S-105 base oils. All of the epithio derivatives exhibited significantly enhanced weld point for the base oils EJB and DOS at 2 wt % level and displayed moderate enhancement in S-105 base oil. Methyl epithio undecanoate at 0.6% concentration exhibited considerable improvement in the wear scar of DOS base oil. The synthesized epithio derivatives have potential as multifunctional additives in lubricant formulations.

  14. How Can Meta-Analyses Guide Practice? A Review of the Learning Disability Research Base

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Therrien, William J.; Zaman, Maliha; Banda, Devender R.

    2011-01-01

    Meta-analysis is considered an acceptable method to evaluate research studies for evidence-based practices. The purpose of this review is to examine the applicability of using meta-analyses in the learning disability field to guide classroom practice. The authors evaluated 15 learning disability meta-analyses in three domains: large-scale…

  15. PeroxiBase: a powerful tool to collect and analyse peroxidase sequences from Viridiplantae.

    PubMed

    Oliva, Michele; Theiler, Grégory; Zamocky, Marcel; Koua, Dominique; Margis-Pinheiro, Marcia; Passardi, Filippo; Dunand, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Peroxidases are enzymes that are implicated in several biological processes and are detected in all living organisms. The increasing number of sequencing projects and the poor quality of annotation justified the creation of an efficient tool that was suitable for collecting and annotating the huge quantity of data. Started in 2004 to collect only class III peroxidases, PeroxiBase has undergone important updates since then and, currently, the majority of peroxidase sequences from all kingdoms of life is stored in the database. In addition, the web site (http://peroxibase.isb-sib.ch) provides a series of bioinformatics tools and facilities suitable for analysing these stored sequences. In particular, the high number of isoforms in each organism makes phylogenetic studies extremely useful to elucidate the complex evolution of these enzymes, not only within the plant kingdom but also between the different kingdoms. This paper provides a general overview of PeroxiBase, focusing on its tools and the stored data. The main goal is to give researchers some guidelines to extract classified and annotated sequences from the data base in a quick and easy way in order to perform alignments and phylogenetic analysis. The description of the database is accompanied by the updates we have recently carried out in order to improve its completeness and make it more user-friendly.

  16. Toxicity testing and chemical analyses of recycled fibre-based paper for food contact.

    PubMed

    Binderup, M L; Pedersen, G A; Vinggaard, A M; Rasmussen, E S; Rosenquist, H; Cederberg, T

    2002-01-01

    Food-contact materials, including paper, have to comply with a basic set of criteria concerning safety. This means that paper for food contact should not give rise to migration of components, which can endanger human health. The objectives of this pilot study were, first, to compare paper of different qualities as food-contact materials and to perform a preliminary evaluation of their suitability, from a safety point of view, and, second, to evaluate the use of different in vitro toxicity tests for screening of paper and board. Paper produced from three different categories of recycled fibres (B-D) and a raw material produced from virgin fibres (A) were obtained from industry, and extracts were examined by chemical analyses and diverse in vitro toxicity test systems. The products tested were either based on different raw materials or different treatments were applied. Paper category B was made from 40% virgin fibres, 40% unprinted cuttings from newspapers, and 20% de-inked newspapers and magazines. Paper categories C and D were based on newspapers and magazines. However, paper D was de-inked, whereas C was not. To identify constituents of the papers with a potential to migrate into foodstuff, samples of the paper products were extracted with either 99% ethanol or water. Potential migrants in the extracts were identified and semiquantified by GC-IR-MS or GC-HRMS. In parallel to the chemical analyses, a battery of four different in vitro toxicity tests with different endpoints were applied to the same extracts. (1) a cytotoxicity test using normal human skin fibroblasts. The test was based on measurements of the reduction of resazurin to resorufin by cellular redox processes and used as a screening test for acute or general toxicity; (2) a Salmonella/microsome assay (Ames test) as a screening test for mutagenic and potentially carcinogenic compounds; (3) a recombinant yeast cell bioassay as a screening test for compounds with oestrogenic activity; (4) an aryl

  17. Statistical Reform: Evidence-Based Practice, Meta-Analyses, and Single Subject Designs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenson, William R.; Clark, Elaine; Kircher, John C.; Kristjansson, Sean D.

    2007-01-01

    Evidence-based practice approaches to interventions has come of age and promises to provide a new standard of excellence for school psychologists. This article describes several definitions of evidence-based practice and the problems associated with traditional statistical analyses that rely on rejection of the null hypothesis for the…

  18. Exploring Methods of Analysing Talk in Problem-Based Learning Tutorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clouston, Teena J.

    2007-01-01

    This article explores the use of discourse analysis and conversation analysis as an evaluation tool in problem-based learning. The basic principles of the methods are discussed and their application in analysing talk in problem-based learning considered. Findings suggest that these methods could enable an understanding of how effective…

  19. Mitochondrial DNA-Based Analyses of Relatedness Among Turkeys, Meleagris gallopavo.

    PubMed

    Guan, Xiaojing; Silva, Pradeepa; Gyenai, Kwaku; Xu, Jun; Geng, Tuoyu; Smith, Edward

    2015-04-01

    The domesticated turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, is believed to be a single breed with several varieties whose relatedness and origins remain poorly understood. Using the mitochondrial genome sequence (GenBank accession no. EF153719) that our group first reported, we investigated the relationships among 15 of the most widely occurring turkey varieties using D-loop and 16S RNA sequences. We included, as a non-traditional outgroup, mtDNA sequence information from wild turkey varieties. A total of 24 SNPs, including 18 in the D-loop and 6 in the 16S rRNA, was identified, validated and used. Of the 15 haplotypes detected based on these SNPs, 7 were unique to wild turkeys. Nucleotide diversity estimates were relatively low when compared to those reported for chickens and other livestock. Network and phylogenetic analyses showed a closer relationship among heritage varieties than between heritage and wild turkeys. The mtDNA data provide additional evidence that suggest a recent divergence of turkey varieties.

  20. Ecology of Subglacial Lake Vostok (Antarctica), Based on Metagenomic/Metatranscriptomic Analyses of Accretion Ice

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Scott O.; Shtarkman, Yury M.; Koçer, Zeynep A.; Edgar, Robyn; Veerapaneni, Ram; D’Elia, Tom

    2013-01-01

    Lake Vostok is the largest of the nearly 400 subglacial Antarctic lakes and has been continuously buried by glacial ice for 15 million years. Extreme cold, heat (from possible hydrothermal activity), pressure (from the overriding glacier) and dissolved oxygen (delivered by melting meteoric ice), in addition to limited nutrients and complete darkness, combine to produce one of the most extreme environments on Earth. Metagenomic/metatranscriptomic analyses of ice that accreted over a shallow embayment and over the southern main lake basin indicate the presence of thousands of species of organisms (94% Bacteria, 6% Eukarya, and two Archaea). The predominant bacterial sequences were closest to those from species of Firmicutes, Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria, while the predominant eukaryotic sequences were most similar to those from species of ascomycetous and basidiomycetous Fungi. Based on the sequence data, the lake appears to contain a mixture of autotrophs and heterotrophs capable of performing nitrogen fixation, nitrogen cycling, carbon fixation and nutrient recycling. Sequences closest to those of psychrophiles and thermophiles indicate a cold lake with possible hydrothermal activity. Sequences most similar to those from marine and aquatic species suggest the presence of marine and freshwater regions. PMID:24832801

  1. Characterization of Ti and Co based biomaterials processed via laser based additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu

    Titanium and Cobalt based metallic materials are currently the most ideal materials for load-bearing metallic bio medical applications. However, the long term tribological degradation of these materials still remains a problem that needs a solution. To improve the tribological performance of these two metallic systems, three different research approaches were adapted, stemming out four different research projects. First, the simplicity of laser gas nitriding was utilized with a modern LENS(TM) technology to form an in situ nitride rich later in titanium substrate material. This nitride rich composite coating improved the hardness by as much as fifteen times and reduced the wear rate by more than a magnitude. The leaching of metallic ions during wear was also reduced by four times. In the second research project, a mixture of titanium and silicon were processed on a titanium substrate in a nitrogen rich environment. The results of this reactive, in situ additive manufacturing process were Ti-Si-Nitride coatings that were harder than the titanium substrate by more than twenty times. These coatings also reduced the wear rate by more than two magnitudes. In the third research approach, composites of CoCrMo alloy and Calcium phosphate (CaP) bio ceramic were processed using LENS(TM) based additive manufacturing. These composites were effective in reducing the wear in the CoCrMo alloy by more than three times as well as reduce the leaching of cobalt and chromium ions during wear. The novel composite materials were found to develop a tribofilm during wear. In the final project, a combination of hard nitride coating and addition of CaP bioceramic was investigated by processing a mixture of Ti6Al4V alloy and CaP in a nitrogen rich environment using the LENS(TM) technology. The resultant Ti64-CaP-Nitride coatings significantly reduced the wear damage on the substrate. There was also a drastic reduction in the metal ions leached during wear. The results indicate that the three

  2. Physical-mechanical properties of Bis-EMA based root canal sealer with different fillers addition

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Marcela Oliveira; Branco Leitune, Vicente Castelo; Bohn, Priscila Veit; Werner Samuel, Susana Maria; Collares, Fabrício Mezzomo

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate influence of three different filler particles on an experimental Bisphenol A ethoxylated dimethacrylate (Bis-EMA) based root filling material. Materials and Methods: Resin-based endodontic sealers were produced using Bis-EMA, camphorquinone, ethyl 4-dimethylaminobenzoate (EDAB), N, N-dihydroxyethyl-p-toluidine (DHEPT), butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), and benzoyl peroxide. The experimental groups were formulated adding 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50% of calcium tungstate (CaWO4), ytterbium trifluoride(YbF3), and tantalum oxide(Ta2O5). Flow, thickness, and radiopacity tests were conducted in accordance with ISO 6876. Sorption and solubility (SL) tests were conducted in accordance with ISO 4049, pH was measured with a pH meter, and degree of conversion (DC) was evaluated with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). For radiopacity, two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey's multiple comparison test was performed. For DC analysis, one-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison test was performed. All statistical analyses were performed with a significance level of 5%. Results: All groups showed lower flow with increased filler concentration. All groups showed film thickness values lower than 50μm, as ISO recommends, except CaWO450% group (76.7μm). pH values varied from 5.95 (± 0.07) in YbF340% group to 6.90 (± 0.07) in Ta2O540% group. In the radiopacity test, YbF330%, Ta2O540%, and Ta2O550% groups showed no statistical significant difference to 3mmAl. Ta2O5 and YbF3 groups in 10, 20, and 30% concentrations presented sorption and SL values as ISOrecommendation. Addition ofTa2O5 and CaWO4 decreased DC after 14 days. YbF3 addition showed no difference in DC from control group. Conclusion: YbF3 filler addition promoted higher properties compared to CaWO4 and Ta2O5 on Bis-EMA based root canal sealer. PMID:26069410

  3. 49 CFR 1515.9 - Appeal of security threat assessment based on other analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Appeal of security threat assessment based on other analyses. 1515.9 Section 1515.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROCEDURAL RULES APPEAL AND WAIVER PROCEDURES...

  4. 49 CFR 1515.9 - Appeal of security threat assessment based on other analyses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Appeal of security threat assessment based on other analyses. 1515.9 Section 1515.9 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ADMINISTRATIVE AND PROCEDURAL RULES APPEAL AND WAIVER PROCEDURES...

  5. Dimensionality of the Chinese Dyadic Adjustment Scale Based on Confirmatory Factor Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shek, Daniel T. L.; Cheung, C. K.

    2008-01-01

    Based on the responses of 1,501 Chinese married adults to the Chinese version of the Dyadic Adjustment Scale (C-DAS), confirmatory factor analyses showed that four factors were abstracted from the C-DAS (Dyadic Consensus, Dyadic Cohesion, Dyadic Satisfaction and Affectional Expression) and these four primary factors were subsumed under a…

  6. An additive manufacturing-based PCL-alginate-chondrocyte bioprinted scaffold for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Joydip; Shim, Jin-Hyung; Jang, Jinah; Kim, Sung-Won; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2015-11-01

    Regenerative medicine is targeted to improve, restore or replace damaged tissues or organs using a combination of cells, materials and growth factors. Both tissue engineering and developmental biology currently deal with the process of tissue self-assembly and extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition. In this investigation, additive manufacturing (AM) with a multihead deposition system (MHDS) was used to fabricate three-dimensional (3D) cell-printed scaffolds using layer-by-layer (LBL) deposition of polycaprolactone (PCL) and chondrocyte cell-encapsulated alginate hydrogel. Appropriate cell dispensing conditions and optimum alginate concentrations for maintaining cell viability were determined. In vitro cell-based biochemical assays were performed to determine glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), DNA and total collagen contents from different PCL-alginate gel constructs. PCL-alginate gels containing transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) showed higher ECM formation. The 3D cell-printed scaffolds of PCL-alginate gel were implanted in the dorsal subcutaneous spaces of female nude mice. Histochemical [Alcian blue and haematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining] and immunohistochemical (type II collagen) analyses of the retrieved implants after 4 weeks revealed enhanced cartilage tissue and type II collagen fibril formation in the PCL-alginate gel (+TGFβ) hybrid scaffold. In conclusion, we present an innovative cell-printed scaffold for cartilage regeneration fabricated by an advanced bioprinting technology.

  7. Deciphering Clostridium tyrobutyricum Metabolism Based on the Whole-Genome Sequence and Proteome Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joungmin; Jang, Yu-Sin; Han, Mee-Jung; Kim, Jin Young

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clostridium tyrobutyricum is a Gram-positive anaerobic bacterium that efficiently produces butyric acid and is considered a promising host for anaerobic production of bulk chemicals. Due to limited knowledge on the genetic and metabolic characteristics of this strain, however, little progress has been made in metabolic engineering of this strain. Here we report the complete genome sequence of C. tyrobutyricum KCTC 5387 (ATCC 25755), which consists of a 3.07-Mbp chromosome and a 63-kbp plasmid. The results of genomic analyses suggested that C. tyrobutyricum produces butyrate from butyryl-coenzyme A (butyryl-CoA) through acetate reassimilation by CoA transferase, differently from Clostridium acetobutylicum, which uses the phosphotransbutyrylase-butyrate kinase pathway; this was validated by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) of related genes, protein expression levels, in vitro CoA transferase assay, and fed-batch fermentation. In addition, the changes in protein expression levels during the course of batch fermentations on glucose were examined by shotgun proteomics. Unlike C. acetobutylicum, the expression levels of proteins involved in glycolytic and fermentative pathways in C. tyrobutyricum did not decrease even at the stationary phase. Proteins related to energy conservation mechanisms, including Rnf complex, NfnAB, and pyruvate-phosphate dikinase that are absent in C. acetobutylicum, were identified. Such features explain why this organism can produce butyric acid to a much higher titer and better tolerate toxic metabolites. This study presenting the complete genome sequence, global protein expression profiles, and genome-based metabolic characteristics during the batch fermentation of C. tyrobutyricum will be valuable in designing strategies for metabolic engineering of this strain. PMID:27302759

  8. Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Bo; Madduri, Ravi K; Sotomayor, Borja; Chard, Kyle; Lacinski, Lukasz; Dave, Utpal J; Li, Jianqiang; Liu, Chunchen; Foster, Ian T

    2014-01-01

    Due to the upcoming data deluge of genome data, the need for storing and processing large-scale genome data, easy access to biomedical analyses tools, efficient data sharing and retrieval has presented significant challenges. The variability in data volume results in variable computing and storage requirements, therefore biomedical researchers are pursuing more reliable, dynamic and convenient methods for conducting sequencing analyses. This paper proposes a Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses, which enables reliable and highly scalable execution of sequencing analyses workflows in a fully automated manner. Our platform extends the existing Galaxy workflow system by adding data management capabilities for transferring large quantities of data efficiently and reliably (via Globus Transfer), domain-specific analyses tools preconfigured for immediate use by researchers (via user-specific tools integration), automatic deployment on Cloud for on-demand resource allocation and pay-as-you-go pricing (via Globus Provision), a Cloud provisioning tool for auto-scaling (via HTCondor scheduler), and the support for validating the correctness of workflows (via semantic verification tools). Two bioinformatics workflow use cases as well as performance evaluation are presented to validate the feasibility of the proposed approach. PMID:24462600

  9. Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Madduri, Ravi K; Sotomayor, Borja; Chard, Kyle; Lacinski, Lukasz; Dave, Utpal J; Li, Jianqiang; Liu, Chunchen; Foster, Ian T

    2014-06-01

    Due to the upcoming data deluge of genome data, the need for storing and processing large-scale genome data, easy access to biomedical analyses tools, efficient data sharing and retrieval has presented significant challenges. The variability in data volume results in variable computing and storage requirements, therefore biomedical researchers are pursuing more reliable, dynamic and convenient methods for conducting sequencing analyses. This paper proposes a Cloud-based bioinformatics workflow platform for large-scale next-generation sequencing analyses, which enables reliable and highly scalable execution of sequencing analyses workflows in a fully automated manner. Our platform extends the existing Galaxy workflow system by adding data management capabilities for transferring large quantities of data efficiently and reliably (via Globus Transfer), domain-specific analyses tools preconfigured for immediate use by researchers (via user-specific tools integration), automatic deployment on Cloud for on-demand resource allocation and pay-as-you-go pricing (via Globus Provision), a Cloud provisioning tool for auto-scaling (via HTCondor scheduler), and the support for validating the correctness of workflows (via semantic verification tools). Two bioinformatics workflow use cases as well as performance evaluation are presented to validate the feasibility of the proposed approach.

  10. A versatile software package for inter-subject correlation based analyses of fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Pajula, Juha; Tohka, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    In the inter-subject correlation (ISC) based analysis of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, the extent of shared processing across subjects during the experiment is determined by calculating correlation coefficients between the fMRI time series of the subjects in the corresponding brain locations. This implies that ISC can be used to analyze fMRI data without explicitly modeling the stimulus and thus ISC is a potential method to analyze fMRI data acquired under complex naturalistic stimuli. Despite of the suitability of ISC based approach to analyze complex fMRI data, no generic software tools have been made available for this purpose, limiting a widespread use of ISC based analysis techniques among neuroimaging community. In this paper, we present a graphical user interface (GUI) based software package, ISC Toolbox, implemented in Matlab for computing various ISC based analyses. Many advanced computations such as comparison of ISCs between different stimuli, time window ISC, and inter-subject phase synchronization are supported by the toolbox. The analyses are coupled with re-sampling based statistical inference. The ISC based analyses are data and computation intensive and the ISC toolbox is equipped with mechanisms to execute the parallel computations in a cluster environment automatically and with an automatic detection of the cluster environment in use. Currently, SGE-based (Oracle Grid Engine, Son of a Grid Engine, or Open Grid Scheduler) and Slurm environments are supported. In this paper, we present a detailed account on the methods behind the ISC Toolbox, the implementation of the toolbox and demonstrate the possible use of the toolbox by summarizing selected example applications. We also report the computation time experiments both using a single desktop computer and two grid environments demonstrating that parallelization effectively reduces the computing time. The ISC Toolbox is available in https

  11. A versatile software package for inter-subject correlation based analyses of fMRI.

    PubMed

    Kauppi, Jukka-Pekka; Pajula, Juha; Tohka, Jussi

    2014-01-01

    In the inter-subject correlation (ISC) based analysis of the functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data, the extent of shared processing across subjects during the experiment is determined by calculating correlation coefficients between the fMRI time series of the subjects in the corresponding brain locations. This implies that ISC can be used to analyze fMRI data without explicitly modeling the stimulus and thus ISC is a potential method to analyze fMRI data acquired under complex naturalistic stimuli. Despite of the suitability of ISC based approach to analyze complex fMRI data, no generic software tools have been made available for this purpose, limiting a widespread use of ISC based analysis techniques among neuroimaging community. In this paper, we present a graphical user interface (GUI) based software package, ISC Toolbox, implemented in Matlab for computing various ISC based analyses. Many advanced computations such as comparison of ISCs between different stimuli, time window ISC, and inter-subject phase synchronization are supported by the toolbox. The analyses are coupled with re-sampling based statistical inference. The ISC based analyses are data and computation intensive and the ISC toolbox is equipped with mechanisms to execute the parallel computations in a cluster environment automatically and with an automatic detection of the cluster environment in use. Currently, SGE-based (Oracle Grid Engine, Son of a Grid Engine, or Open Grid Scheduler) and Slurm environments are supported. In this paper, we present a detailed account on the methods behind the ISC Toolbox, the implementation of the toolbox and demonstrate the possible use of the toolbox by summarizing selected example applications. We also report the computation time experiments both using a single desktop computer and two grid environments demonstrating that parallelization effectively reduces the computing time. The ISC Toolbox is available in https://code.google.com/p/isc-toolbox/

  12. Queueing Delay and Energy Efficiency Analyses of Sleep Based Power Saving Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Fan; Wu, Yiqun; Niu, Zhisheng

    In wireless networks, sleep mode based power saving mechanisms can reduce the energy consumption at the expense of additional packet delay. This letter analyzes its packet queueing delay and wireless terminals' energy efficiency. Based on the analysis, optimal sleep window size can be derived to optimize terminal energy efficiency with delay constraint.

  13. Analysing task design and students' responses to context-based problems through different analytical frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broman, Karolina; Bernholt, Sascha; Parchmann, Ilka

    2015-05-01

    Background:Context-based learning approaches are used to enhance students' interest in, and knowledge about, science. According to different empirical studies, students' interest is improved by applying these more non-conventional approaches, while effects on learning outcomes are less coherent. Hence, further insights are needed into the structure of context-based problems in comparison to traditional problems, and into students' problem-solving strategies. Therefore, a suitable framework is necessary, both for the analysis of tasks and strategies. Purpose:The aim of this paper is to explore traditional and context-based tasks as well as students' responses to exemplary tasks to identify a suitable framework for future design and analyses of context-based problems. The paper discusses different established frameworks and applies the Higher-Order Cognitive Skills/Lower-Order Cognitive Skills (HOCS/LOCS) taxonomy and the Model of Hierarchical Complexity in Chemistry (MHC-C) to analyse traditional tasks and students' responses. Sample:Upper secondary students (n=236) at the Natural Science Programme, i.e. possible future scientists, are investigated to explore learning outcomes when they solve chemistry tasks, both more conventional as well as context-based chemistry problems. Design and methods:A typical chemistry examination test has been analysed, first the test items in themselves (n=36), and thereafter 236 students' responses to one representative context-based problem. Content analysis using HOCS/LOCS and MHC-C frameworks has been applied to analyse both quantitative and qualitative data, allowing us to describe different problem-solving strategies. Results:The empirical results show that both frameworks are suitable to identify students' strategies, mainly focusing on recall of memorized facts when solving chemistry test items. Almost all test items were also assessing lower order thinking. The combination of frameworks with the chemistry syllabus has been

  14. Development of a Low-Cost SIA-Based Analyser for Water Samples

    PubMed Central

    Knochen, Moisés; Caamaño, Alejandro; Bentos, Heinkel

    2011-01-01

    An automated multiparametric water analyser was developed and evaluated. The system was based on Sequential Injection Analysis and featured a photometric detection system comprising a tricolour RGB LED source and a photodiode. A program compiled in Visual Basic was used to control the SIA flow system, the LEDs, and the data acquisition and processing. The program loads and executes methods written in ASCII and stored as text files. The system was capable of handling up to four methods simultaneously. When used to carry out methods based on the APHA standard methods, the figures of merit obtained were considered satisfactory for the purpose. The total cost was under US $4600. It was concluded that the analyser is appropriate for routine use and has potential for an increased number of simultaneous methods and for enhanced capabilities if new versions of the software are developed. PMID:21785573

  15. Designing Location-Based Learning Experiences for People with Intellectual Disabilities and Additional Sensory Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, David J.; McHugh, David; Standen, Penny; Evett, Lindsay; Shopland, Nick; Battersby, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The research reported here is part of a larger project which seeks to combine serious games (or games-based learning) with location-based services to help people with intellectual disabilities and additional sensory impairments to develop work based skills. Specifically this paper reports on where these approaches are combined to scaffold the…

  16. SNiPlay3: a web-based application for exploration and large scale analyses of genomic variations.

    PubMed

    Dereeper, Alexis; Homa, Felix; Andres, Gwendoline; Sempere, Guilhem; Sarah, Gautier; Hueber, Yann; Dufayard, Jean-François; Ruiz, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    SNiPlay is a web-based tool for detection, management and analysis of genetic variants including both single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and InDels. Version 3 now extends functionalities in order to easily manage and exploit SNPs derived from next generation sequencing technologies, such as GBS (genotyping by sequencing), WGRS (whole gre-sequencing) and RNA-Seq technologies. Based on the standard VCF (variant call format) format, the application offers an intuitive interface for filtering and comparing polymorphisms using user-defined sets of individuals and then establishing a reliable genotyping data matrix for further analyses. Namely, in addition to the various scaled-up analyses allowed by the application (genomic annotation of SNP, diversity analysis, haplotype reconstruction and network, linkage disequilibrium), SNiPlay3 proposes new modules for GWAS (genome-wide association studies), population stratification, distance tree analysis and visualization of SNP density. Additionally, we developed a suite of Galaxy wrappers for each step of the SNiPlay3 process, so that the complete pipeline can also be deployed on a Galaxy instance using the Galaxy ToolShed procedure and then be computed as a Galaxy workflow. SNiPlay is accessible at http://sniplay.southgreen.fr.

  17. SNiPlay3: a web-based application for exploration and large scale analyses of genomic variations

    PubMed Central

    Dereeper, Alexis; Homa, Felix; Andres, Gwendoline; Sempere, Guilhem; Sarah, Gautier; Hueber, Yann; Dufayard, Jean-François; Ruiz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    SNiPlay is a web-based tool for detection, management and analysis of genetic variants including both single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and InDels. Version 3 now extends functionalities in order to easily manage and exploit SNPs derived from next generation sequencing technologies, such as GBS (genotyping by sequencing), WGRS (whole gre-sequencing) and RNA-Seq technologies. Based on the standard VCF (variant call format) format, the application offers an intuitive interface for filtering and comparing polymorphisms using user-defined sets of individuals and then establishing a reliable genotyping data matrix for further analyses. Namely, in addition to the various scaled-up analyses allowed by the application (genomic annotation of SNP, diversity analysis, haplotype reconstruction and network, linkage disequilibrium), SNiPlay3 proposes new modules for GWAS (genome-wide association studies), population stratification, distance tree analysis and visualization of SNP density. Additionally, we developed a suite of Galaxy wrappers for each step of the SNiPlay3 process, so that the complete pipeline can also be deployed on a Galaxy instance using the Galaxy ToolShed procedure and then be computed as a Galaxy workflow. SNiPlay is accessible at http://sniplay.southgreen.fr. PMID:26040700

  18. SNiPlay3: a web-based application for exploration and large scale analyses of genomic variations.

    PubMed

    Dereeper, Alexis; Homa, Felix; Andres, Gwendoline; Sempere, Guilhem; Sarah, Gautier; Hueber, Yann; Dufayard, Jean-François; Ruiz, Manuel

    2015-07-01

    SNiPlay is a web-based tool for detection, management and analysis of genetic variants including both single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and InDels. Version 3 now extends functionalities in order to easily manage and exploit SNPs derived from next generation sequencing technologies, such as GBS (genotyping by sequencing), WGRS (whole gre-sequencing) and RNA-Seq technologies. Based on the standard VCF (variant call format) format, the application offers an intuitive interface for filtering and comparing polymorphisms using user-defined sets of individuals and then establishing a reliable genotyping data matrix for further analyses. Namely, in addition to the various scaled-up analyses allowed by the application (genomic annotation of SNP, diversity analysis, haplotype reconstruction and network, linkage disequilibrium), SNiPlay3 proposes new modules for GWAS (genome-wide association studies), population stratification, distance tree analysis and visualization of SNP density. Additionally, we developed a suite of Galaxy wrappers for each step of the SNiPlay3 process, so that the complete pipeline can also be deployed on a Galaxy instance using the Galaxy ToolShed procedure and then be computed as a Galaxy workflow. SNiPlay is accessible at http://sniplay.southgreen.fr. PMID:26040700

  19. Data on phylogenetic analyses of gazelles (genus Gazella) based on mitochondrial and nuclear intron markers

    PubMed Central

    Lerp, Hannes; Klaus, Sebastian; Allgöwer, Stefanie; Wronski, Torsten; Pfenninger, Markus; Plath, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The data provided is related to the article “Phylogenetic analyses of gazelles reveal repeated transitions of key ecological traits and provide novel insights into the origin of the genus Gazella” [1]. The data is based on 48 tissue samples of all nine extant species of the genus Gazella, namely Gazella gazella, Gazella arabica, Gazella bennettii, Gazella cuvieri, Gazella dorcas, Gazella leptoceros, Gazella marica, Gazella spekei, and Gazella subgutturosa and four related taxa (Saiga tatarica, Antidorcas marsupialis, Antilope cervicapra and Eudorcas rufifrons). It comprises alignments of sequences of a cytochrome b data set and of six nuclear intron markers. For the latter new primers were designed based on cattle and sheep genomes. Based on these alignments phylogenetic trees were inferred using Bayesian Inference and Maximum Likelihood methods. Furthermore, ancestral character states (inferred with BayesTraits 1.0) and ancestral ranges based on a Dispersal-Extinction-Cladogenesis model were estimated and results׳ files were stored within this article. PMID:27054158

  20. Data on phylogenetic analyses of gazelles (genus Gazella) based on mitochondrial and nuclear intron markers.

    PubMed

    Lerp, Hannes; Klaus, Sebastian; Allgöwer, Stefanie; Wronski, Torsten; Pfenninger, Markus; Plath, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The data provided is related to the article "Phylogenetic analyses of gazelles reveal repeated transitions of key ecological traits and provide novel insights into the origin of the genus Gazella" [1]. The data is based on 48 tissue samples of all nine extant species of the genus Gazella, namely Gazella gazella, Gazella arabica, Gazella bennettii, Gazella cuvieri, Gazella dorcas, Gazella leptoceros, Gazella marica, Gazella spekei, and Gazella subgutturosa and four related taxa (Saiga tatarica, Antidorcas marsupialis, Antilope cervicapra and Eudorcas rufifrons). It comprises alignments of sequences of a cytochrome b data set and of six nuclear intron markers. For the latter new primers were designed based on cattle and sheep genomes. Based on these alignments phylogenetic trees were inferred using Bayesian Inference and Maximum Likelihood methods. Furthermore, ancestral character states (inferred with BayesTraits 1.0) and ancestral ranges based on a Dispersal-Extinction-Cladogenesis model were estimated and results׳ files were stored within this article. PMID:27054158

  1. A protein relational database and protein family knowledge bases to facilitate structure-based design analyses.

    PubMed

    Mobilio, Dominick; Walker, Gary; Brooijmans, Natasja; Nilakantan, Ramaswamy; Denny, R Aldrin; Dejoannis, Jason; Feyfant, Eric; Kowticwar, Rupesh K; Mankala, Jyoti; Palli, Satish; Punyamantula, Sairam; Tatipally, Maneesh; John, Reji K; Humblet, Christine

    2010-08-01

    The Protein Data Bank is the most comprehensive source of experimental macromolecular structures. It can, however, be difficult at times to locate relevant structures with the Protein Data Bank search interface. This is particularly true when searching for complexes containing specific interactions between protein and ligand atoms. Moreover, searching within a family of proteins can be tedious. For example, one cannot search for some conserved residue as residue numbers vary across structures. We describe herein three databases, Protein Relational Database, Kinase Knowledge Base, and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, containing protein structures from the Protein Data Bank. In Protein Relational Database, atom-atom distances between protein and ligand have been precalculated allowing for millisecond retrieval based on atom identity and distance constraints. Ring centroids, centroid-centroid and centroid-atom distances and angles have also been included permitting queries for pi-stacking interactions and other structural motifs involving rings. Other geometric features can be searched through the inclusion of residue pair and triplet distances. In Kinase Knowledge Base and Matrix Metalloproteinase Knowledge Base, the catalytic domains have been aligned into common residue numbering schemes. Thus, by searching across Protein Relational Database and Kinase Knowledge Base, one can easily retrieve structures wherein, for example, a ligand of interest is making contact with the gatekeeper residue.

  2. Low power proximity electronics for dust analysers based on light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molfese, C.; Esposito, F.; Cortecchia, F.; Cozzolino, F.

    2012-04-01

    The present paper focuses on the development of an optimized version of the Proximity Electronics (PE) for dust analysers based on static light scattering. This kind of instruments, aimed to the systematic measurement of the size of dust grains in Martian atmosphere, was developed by the Cosmic Physics and Planetology Group at the INAF Astronomical Observatory of Capodimonte (OAC) and University Parthenope (LFC group), in Naples, Italy. One of these instruments, the MEDUSA Experiment, was selected for the Humboldt Payload of the ExoMars mission, the first mission to Mars of the ESA Aurora Programme. Thereafter, this mission was revised because of increasing costs and lack of funds and the MEDUSA experiment has been completely re-engineered to meet more demanding constraints of mass and power consumption. The dust analyser under development is named MicroMED, as it is a lighter and more compact version of MEDUSA. MicroMED is provided with an Optical System (OS) based on the same concept of the one present in MEDUSA, but with a low power PE and low power laser source. This paper reports the features and the tests results of three versions of low power PE developed for MicroMED, and also compares two basic approaches, one based on a linear amplifier, derived from the solution implemented in two different MEDUSA breadboards (B/Bs), and the other one based on a logarithmic amplifier, with better performance in terms of compactness and low power consumption.

  3. Global Stability of Plasma Proteomes for Mass Spectrometry-Based Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Lisa J.; Li, Ming; Yarbrough, Wendell G.; Slebos, Robbert J. C.; Liebler, Daniel C.

    2012-01-01

    Peptide-based mass spectrometry approaches, such as multiple reaction monitoring, provide a powerful means to measure candidate protein biomarkers in plasma. A potential confounding problem is the effect of preanalytical variables, which may affect the integrity of proteins and peptides. Although some blood proteins undergo rapid physiological proteolysis ex vivo, the stability of most plasma proteins to preanalytical variables remains largely unexplored. We applied liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry shotgun proteomics and multiple reaction monitoring analyses to characterize the stability of proteins at the peptide level in plasma. We systematically evaluated the effects of delay in plasma preparation at different temperatures, multiple freeze-thaw cycles and erythocyte hemolysis on peptide and protein inventories in prospectively collected human plasma. Time course studies indicated few significant changes in peptide and protein identifications, semitryptic peptides and methionine-oxidized peptides in plasma from blood collected in EDTA plasma tubes and stored for up to a week at 4 °C or room temperature prior to plasma isolation. Similarly, few significant changes were observed in similar analyses of plasma subjected to up to 25 freeze-thaw cycles. Hemolyzed samples produced no significant differences beyond the presence of hemoglobin proteins. Finally, paired comparisons of plasma and serum samples prepared from the same patients also yielded few significant differences, except for the depletion of fibrinogen in serum. Blood proteins thus are broadly stable to preanalytical variables when analyzed at the peptide level. Collection protocols to generate plasma for multiple reaction monitoring-based analyses may have different requirements than for other analyses directed at intact proteins. PMID:22301387

  4. TWINAN90: a FORTRAN program for conducting ANOVA-based and likelihood-based analyses of twin data.

    PubMed

    Williams, C J; Christian, J C; Norton, J A

    1992-07-01

    We discuss the program, TWINAN90, which can perform several different types of analysis of twin data. TWINAN90 incorporates the ANOVA-based twin analyses from the TWINAN twin analysis program, and also includes maximum likelihood estimation of parameters from three path models. Another feature of TWINAN90 is the optional output of a pedigree file which can be read by the quantitative genetics package FISHER. The diagnostic features of the program make TWINAN90 useful also for preliminary analyses prior to the use of more sophisticated modeling procedures which are available in packages such as LISREL and FISHER. An annotated printout from TWINAN90 is presented to illustrate the statistical analyses performed in the program.

  5. Features of Computer-Based Decision Aids: Systematic Review, Thematic Synthesis, and Meta-Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Krömker, Dörthe; Meguerditchian, Ari N; Tamblyn, Robyn

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient information and education, such as decision aids, are gradually moving toward online, computer-based environments. Considerable research has been conducted to guide content and presentation of decision aids. However, given the relatively new shift to computer-based support, little attention has been given to how multimedia and interactivity can improve upon paper-based decision aids. Objective The first objective of this review was to summarize published literature into a proposed classification of features that have been integrated into computer-based decision aids. Building on this classification, the second objective was to assess whether integration of specific features was associated with higher-quality decision making. Methods Relevant studies were located by searching MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and CENTRAL databases. The review identified studies that evaluated computer-based decision aids for adults faced with preference-sensitive medical decisions and reported quality of decision-making outcomes. A thematic synthesis was conducted to develop the classification of features. Subsequently, meta-analyses were conducted based on standardized mean differences (SMD) from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that reported knowledge or decisional conflict. Further subgroup analyses compared pooled SMDs for decision aids that incorporated a specific feature to other computer-based decision aids that did not incorporate the feature, to assess whether specific features improved quality of decision making. Results Of 3541 unique publications, 58 studies met the target criteria and were included in the thematic synthesis. The synthesis identified six features: content control, tailoring, patient narratives, explicit values clarification, feedback, and social support. A subset of 26 RCTs from the thematic synthesis was used to conduct the meta-analyses. As expected, computer-based decision aids performed better than usual care or alternative aids; however

  6. Testing for Additivity at Select Mixture Groups of Interest Based on Statistical Equivalence Testing Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, LeAnna M.; Gennings, Chris; Carchman, Richard; Carter, Jr., Walter H.; Pounds, Joel G.; Mumtaz, Moiz

    2006-12-01

    Several assumptions, defined and undefined, are used in the toxicity assessment of chemical mixtures. In scientific practice mixture components in the low-dose region, particularly subthreshold doses, are often assumed to behave additively (i.e., zero interaction) based on heuristic arguments. This assumption has important implications in the practice of risk assessment, but has not been experimentally tested. We have developed methodology to test for additivity in the sense of Berenbaum (Advances in Cancer Research, 1981), based on the statistical equivalence testing literature where the null hypothesis of interaction is rejected for the alternative hypothesis of additivity when data support the claim. The implication of this approach is that conclusions of additivity are made with a false positive rate controlled by the experimenter. The claim of additivity is based on prespecified additivity margins, which are chosen using expert biological judgment such that small deviations from additivity, which are not considered to be biologically important, are not statistically significant. This approach is in contrast to the usual hypothesis-testing framework that assumes additivity in the null hypothesis and rejects when there is significant evidence of interaction. In this scenario, failure to reject may be due to lack of statistical power making the claim of additivity problematic. The proposed method is illustrated in a mixture of five organophosphorus pesticides that were experimentally evaluated alone and at relevant mixing ratios. Motor activity was assessed in adult male rats following acute exposure. Four low-dose mixture groups were evaluated. Evidence of additivity is found in three of the four low-dose mixture groups.The proposed method tests for additivity of the whole mixture and does not take into account subset interactions (e.g., synergistic, antagonistic) that may have occurred and cancelled each other out.

  7. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  8. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  9. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... particular occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on...

  10. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  11. 20 CFR 10.116 - What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... based on occupational disease? 10.116 Section 10.116 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF WORKERS' COMPENSATION... of Proof § 10.116 What additional evidence is needed in cases based on occupational disease? (a) The... occupational diseases. The medical report should also include the information specified on the checklist...

  12. 7 CFR 985.153 - Issuance of additional allotment base to new and existing producers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING ORDER REGULATING THE HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST... base have ability to produce spearmint oil. The names of all eligible new producers from each region... spearmint oil who requests additional allotment base and who has the ability to produce...

  13. 7 CFR 985.153 - Issuance of additional allotment base to new and existing producers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING ORDER REGULATING THE HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST... base have ability to produce spearmint oil. The names of all eligible new producers from each region... spearmint oil who requests additional allotment base and who has the ability to produce...

  14. 7 CFR 985.153 - Issuance of additional allotment base to new and existing producers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING ORDER REGULATING THE HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST... base have ability to produce spearmint oil. The names of all eligible new producers from each region... spearmint oil who requests additional allotment base and who has the ability to produce...

  15. 7 CFR 985.153 - Issuance of additional allotment base to new and existing producers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING ORDER REGULATING THE HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST... base have ability to produce spearmint oil. The names of all eligible new producers from each region... spearmint oil who requests additional allotment base and who has the ability to produce...

  16. 7 CFR 985.153 - Issuance of additional allotment base to new and existing producers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MARKETING ORDER REGULATING THE HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST... base have ability to produce spearmint oil. The names of all eligible new producers from each region... spearmint oil who requests additional allotment base and who has the ability to produce...

  17. Analysing spatio-temporal patterns of the global NO2-distribution retrieved from GOME satellite observations using a generalized additive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayn, M.; Beirle, S.; Hamprecht, F. A.; Platt, U.; Menze, B. H.; Wagner, T.

    2009-04-01

    With the increasing availability of observations from different space-borne sensors, the joint analysis of observational data from multiple sources becomes more and more attractive. For such an analysis - oftentimes with little prior knowledge about local and global interactions between the different observational variables available - an explorative data-driven analysis of the remote sensing data may be of particular relevance. In the present work we used generalized additive models (GAM) in this task, in an exemplary study of spatio-temporal patterns in the tropospheric NO2-distribution derived from GOME satellite observations (1996 to 2001) at global scale. We modelled different temporal trends in the time series of the observed NO2, but focused on identifying correlations between NO2 and local wind fields. Here, our nonparametric modelling approach had several advantages over standard parametric models: While the model-based analysis allowed to test predefined hypotheses (assuming, for example, sinusoidal seasonal trends) only, the GAM allowed to learn functional relations between different observational variables directly from the data. This was of particular interest in the present task, as little was known about relations between the observed NO2 distribution and transport processes by local wind fields, and the formulation of general functional relationships to be tested remained difficult. We found the observed temporal trends - weekly, seasonal and linear changes - to be in overall good agreement with previous studies and alternative ways of data analysis. However, NO2 observations showed to be affected by wind-dominated processes over several areas, world wide. Here we were able to estimate the extent of areas affected by specific NO2 emission sources, and to highlight likely atmospheric transport pathways. Overall, using a nonparametric model provided favourable means for a rapid inspection of this large spatio-temporal data set,with less bias than

  18. Differentiating LGBT individuals in substance abuse treatment: analyses based on sexuality and drug preference.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Bryan N; Peavy, K Michelle; Santa, Annesa Flentje

    2007-01-01

    In a prior study (Cochran & Cauce, 2006), LGBT individuals seeking treatment demonstrated greater substance use severity, more psychosocial stressors, and increased use of psychiatric services when compared to their heterosexual counterparts. That study, and similar to others in the field of LGBT research, collapsed LGBT individuals into a single category and did not examine individual differences within this category. The present study utilizes the same sample of LGBT clients (N = 610); however, an exploratory cluster analysis was conducted, based on drug preference, to determine which subcategories exist within this unique sample. In a subsequent set of analyses, the sample was divided based on sexuality to determine if there were differences between these groups on psychosocial functioning variables. Results indicated three distinct clusters, which differed in both demographic characteristics and severity of substance use problems. Groups based on sexuality differed in terms of primary problem substance, as well as psychosocial variables. Implications for treatment of these subgroups are discussed. PMID:19835042

  19. GIS-based detachment susceptibility analyses of a cut slope in limestone, Ankara—Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oztekin, B.; Topal, T.

    2005-11-01

    Due to the rapidly growing population of the city of Ankara (Turkey) and increased traffic congestion, it has become necessary to widen the Ankara-Eskişehir (E-90) highway connecting the newly built areas west of the city to the city center. During widening, several cut slopes were formed along the highway route. As a result, some instability problems (small-sized rock falls/sliding, sloughing, raveling) produced detachment zones along a cut slope in highly jointed, folded and sheared limestone, causing local degradation of the cut slope. Identification of the areas that are likely to detach from the cut slope in the future is considered to be very important for the application of remedial measures. For this purpose, the relationships between the existing detachment zones and various parameters (e.g., point load strength index, weathering, block size, daylighting, shear zone) were investigated using GIS-based statistical detachment susceptibility analyses in order to predict the further aerial extension of the detachment zones with time. During the overlay analyses, statistical index and weighting factor methods were used. The outcomes of the analyses were compared and evaluated with the field observations to check the reliability of the methods and to assess the detachment zones that may develop in the future. The detachment susceptibility map without the block-size layer gives the best result and indicates some risky zones where detachments are likely to occur in the future. Recommendations on remedial measures of the cut slope should consider these risky zones.

  20. Prediction Formulas for Individual Opioid Analgesic Requirements Based on Genetic Polymorphism Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Kaori; Nishizawa, Daisuke; Ichinomiya, Takashi; Ichinohe, Tatsuya; Hayashida, Masakazu; Fukuda, Ken-ichi; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2015-01-01

    Background The analgesic efficacy of opioids is well known to vary widely among individuals, and various factors related to individual differences in opioid sensitivity have been identified. However, a prediction model to calculate appropriate opioid analgesic requirements has not yet been established. The present study sought to construct prediction formulas for individual opioid analgesic requirements based on genetic polymorphisms and clinical data from patients who underwent cosmetic orthognathic surgery and validate the utility of the prediction formulas in patients who underwent major open abdominal surgery. Methods To construct the prediction formulas, we performed multiple linear regression analyses using data from subjects who underwent cosmetic orthognathic surgery. The dependent variable was 24-h postoperative or perioperative fentanyl use, and the independent variables were age, gender, height, weight, pain perception latencies (PPL), and genotype data of five single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To examine the utility of the prediction formulas, we performed simple linear regression analyses using subjects who underwent major open abdominal surgery. Actual 24-h postoperative or perioperative analgesic use and the predicted values that were calculated using the multiple regression equations were incorporated as dependent and independent variables, respectively. Results Multiple linear regression analyses showed that the four SNPs, PPL, and weight were retained as independent predictors of 24-h postoperative fentanyl use (R2 = 0.145, P = 5.66 × 10-10) and the two SNPs and weight were retained as independent predictors of perioperative fentanyl use (R2 = 0.185, P = 1.99 × 10-15). Simple linear regression analyses showed that the predicted values were retained as an independent predictor of actual 24-h postoperative analgesic use (R2 = 0.033, P = 0.030) and perioperative analgesic use (R2 = 0.100, P = 1.09 × 10-4), respectively. Conclusions We

  1. Segregation analyses of 1,476 population-based Australian families affected by prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Cui, J; Staples, M P; Hopper, J L; English, D R; McCredie, M R; Giles, G G

    2001-05-01

    Segregation analyses aim to detect genetic factors that have a major effect on an individual's risk of disease and to describe them in terms of mode of inheritance, age-specific cumulative risk (penetrance), and allele frequency. We conducted single- and two-locus segregation analyses of data from 1,476 men with prostate cancer diagnosed at age <70 years and ascertained through population registries in Melbourne, Sydney, and Perth, Australia, and from their brothers, fathers, and both maternal and paternal lineal uncles. Estimation and model selection were based on asymptotic likelihood theory and were performed through use of the software MENDEL. All two-locus models gave better fits than did single-locus models, even if lineal uncles were excluded or if we censored data (age and disease status) for relatives at 1992, when prostate-specific-antigen testing started to have a major impact on the incidence of prostate cancer in Australia. Among the genetic models that we considered, the best-fitting ones included a dominantly inherited increased risk that was greater, in multiplicative terms, at younger ages, as well as a recessively inherited or X-linked increased risk that was greater, in multiplicative terms, at older ages. The recessive and X-linked effects were strongly confounded, and it was not possible to fit them together. Penetrance to age 80 years was approximately 70% (95% confidence interval [CI] 57%-85%) for the dominant effect and virtually 100% for the recessive and X-linked effects. Approximately 1/30 (95% CI 1/80-1/12) men would carry the dominant risk, and 1/140 (95% CI 1/220-1/90) would carry the recessive risk or 1/200 (95% CI 1/380-1/100) would carry the X-linked risk. Within discussed limitations, these analyses confirm the genetic heterogeneity, of prostate cancer susceptibility, that is becoming evident from linkage analyses, and they may aid future efforts in gene discovery.

  2. TRMM-based Merged Data Products Compared to Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George J.; Bolvin, David; Curtis, Scott

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes recent results of using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) (launched in November 1997) information as the key calibration tool; in a merged analysis on a 1 degree x l degree latitude/longitude monthly scale based on multiple satellite sources and raingauge analyses. The TRMM-based product will be compared with the community-based Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) results. The long-term GPCP analysis is compared to the new TRMM-based analysis which uses the most accurate TRMM information to calibrate the estimates from the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) and geosynchronous IR observations and merges those estimates together with the TRMM and gauge information to produce accurate rainfall estimates with the increased sampling provided by the combined satellite information. The comparison with TRMM results on a month-to-month basis should clarify the strengths and weaknesses of the long-term GPCP product in the tropics and point to how to improve the monitoring analysis. Preliminary results from the TRMM merged satellite analysis indicates close agreement with the GPCP estimates. By the time of the meeting over a year of TRMM products will be available for comparison. Global tropical and regional values will be compared. Seasonal variations, and variations associated with the 1998 El Nino/Southern Oscillation ENSO event will be examined and compared between the two analyses. These variations will be examined carefully and validated where possible from surface-based radar and gauge observations. The role of TRMM observations in the refinement of the long-term monitoring product will be outlined.

  3. Wood lens design philosophy based on a binary additive manufacturing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasco, Peter L.; Bailey, Christopher

    2016-04-01

    Using additive manufacturing techniques in optical engineering to construct a gradient index (GRIN) optic may overcome a number of limitations of GRIN technology. Such techniques are maturing quickly, yielding additional design degrees of freedom for the engineer. How best to employ these degrees of freedom is not completely clear at this time. This paper describes a preliminary design philosophy, including assumptions, pertaining to a particular printing technique for GRIN optics. It includes an analysis based on simulation and initial component measurement.

  4. Genome-Based Comparative Analyses of Antarctic and Temperate Species of Paenibacillus

    PubMed Central

    Dsouza, Melissa; Taylor, Michael W.; Turner, Susan J.; Aislabie, Jackie

    2014-01-01

    Antarctic soils represent a unique environment characterised by extremes of temperature, salinity, elevated UV radiation, low nutrient and low water content. Despite the harshness of this environment, members of 15 bacterial phyla have been identified in soils of the Ross Sea Region (RSR). However, the survival mechanisms and ecological roles of these phyla are largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate whether strains of Paenibacillus darwinianus owe their resilience to substantial genomic changes. For this, genome-based comparative analyses were performed on three P. darwinianus strains, isolated from gamma-irradiated RSR soils, together with nine temperate, soil-dwelling Paenibacillus spp. The genome of each strain was sequenced to over 1,000-fold coverage, then assembled into contigs totalling approximately 3 Mbp per genome. Based on the occurrence of essential, single-copy genes, genome completeness was estimated at approximately 88%. Genome analysis revealed between 3,043–3,091 protein-coding sequences (CDSs), primarily associated with two-component systems, sigma factors, transporters, sporulation and genes induced by cold-shock, oxidative and osmotic stresses. These comparative analyses provide an insight into the metabolic potential of P. darwinianus, revealing potential adaptive mechanisms for survival in Antarctic soils. However, a large proportion of these mechanisms were also identified in temperate Paenibacillus spp., suggesting that these mechanisms are beneficial for growth and survival in a range of soil environments. These analyses have also revealed that the P. darwinianus genomes contain significantly fewer CDSs and have a lower paralogous content. Notwithstanding the incompleteness of the assemblies, the large differences in genome sizes, determined by the number of genes in paralogous clusters and the CDS content, are indicative of genome content scaling. Finally, these sequences are a resource for further investigations into

  5. [Analysis of constituents of ester-type gum bases used as natural food additives].

    PubMed

    Tada, Atsuko; Masuda, Aino; Sugimoto, Naoki; Yamagata, Kazuo; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Tanamoto, Kenichi

    2007-12-01

    The differences in the constituents of ten ester-type gum bases used as natural food additives in Japan (urushi wax, carnauba wax, candelilla wax, rice bran wax, shellac wax, jojoba wax, bees wax, Japan wax, montan wax, and lanolin) were investigated. Several kinds of gum bases showed characteristic TLC patterns of lipids. In addition, compositions of fatty acid and alcohol moieties of esters in the gum bases were analyzed by GC/MS after methanolysis and hydrolysis, respectively. The results indicated that the varieties of fatty acids and alcohols and their compositions were characteristic for each gum base. These results will be useful for identification and discrimination of the ester-type gum bases. PMID:18203503

  6. On the role of DNA in DNA-based catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Dijk, Ewold W; Boersma, Arnold J; Feringa, Ben L; Roelfes, Gerard

    2010-09-01

    A kinetic study of DNA-based catalytic enantioselective Friedel-Crafts alkylation and Michael addition reactions showed that DNA affects the rate of these reactions significantly. Whereas in the presence of DNA, a large acceleration was found for the Friedel-Crafts alkylation and a modest acceleration in the Michael addition of dimethyl malonate, a deceleration was observed when using nitromethane as nucleophile. Also, the enantioselectivities proved to be dependent on the DNA sequence. In comparison with the previously reported Diels-Alder reaction, the results presented here suggest that DNA plays a similar role in both cycloaddition and conjugate addition reactions.

  7. The Seismic Reliability of Offshore Structures Based on Nonlinear Time History Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Hosseini, Mahmood; Karimiyani, Somayyeh; Ghafooripour, Amin; Jabbarzadeh, Mohammad Javad

    2008-07-08

    Regarding the past earthquakes damages to offshore structures, as vital structures in the oil and gas industries, it is important that their seismic design is performed by very high reliability. Accepting the Nonlinear Time History Analyses (NLTHA) as the most reliable seismic analysis method, in this paper an offshore platform of jacket type with the height of 304 feet, having a deck of 96 feet by 94 feet, and weighing 290 million pounds has been studied. At first, some Push-Over Analyses (POA) have been preformed to recognize the more critical members of the jacket, based on the range of their plastic deformations. Then NLTHA have been performed by using the 3-components accelerograms of 100 earthquakes, covering a wide range of frequency content, and normalized to three Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) levels of 0.3 g, 0.65 g, and 1.0 g. By using the results of NLTHA the damage and rupture probabilities of critical member have been studied to assess the reliability of the jacket structure. Regarding that different structural members of the jacket have different effects on the stability of the platform, an 'importance factor' has been considered for each critical member based on its location and orientation in the structure, and then the reliability of the whole structure has been obtained by combining the reliability of the critical members, each having its specific importance factor.

  8. Computer-based interventions for sexual health promotion: systematic review and meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Bailey, J V; Murray, E; Rait, G; Mercer, C H; Morris, R W; Peacock, R; Cassell, J; Nazareth, I

    2012-06-01

    This systematic review was conducted to determine the effects of self-help interactive computer-based interventions (ICBIs) for sexual health promotion. We searched 40 databases for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of computer-based interventions, defining 'interactive' as programmes that require contributions from users to produce personally relevant material. We conducted searches and analysed data using Cochrane Collaboration methods. Results of RCTs were pooled using a random-effects model with standardized mean differences for continuous outcomes and odds ratios (ORs) for binary outcomes, with heterogeneity assessed using the I(2) statistic. We identified 15 RCTs of ICBIs (3917 participants). Comparing ICBIs to minimal interventions, there were significant effects on sexual health knowledge (standardized mean difference [SMD] 0.72, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27-1.18); safer sex self-efficacy (SMD 0.17, 95% CI 0.05-0.29); safer-sex intentions (SMD 0.16, 95% CI 0.02-0.30); and sexual behaviour (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.18-2.59). ICBIs had a greater impact on sexual health knowledge than face-to-face interventions did (SMD 0.36, 95% CI 0.13-0.58). ICBIs are effective tools for learning about sexual health, and show promising effects on self-efficacy, intention and sexual behaviour. More data are needed to analyse biological outcomes and cost-effectiveness.

  9. An integrated software suite for surface-based analyses of cerebral cortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Essen, D. C.; Drury, H. A.; Dickson, J.; Harwell, J.; Hanlon, D.; Anderson, C. H.

    2001-01-01

    The authors describe and illustrate an integrated trio of software programs for carrying out surface-based analyses of cerebral cortex. The first component of this trio, SureFit (Surface Reconstruction by Filtering and Intensity Transformations), is used primarily for cortical segmentation, volume visualization, surface generation, and the mapping of functional neuroimaging data onto surfaces. The second component, Caret (Computerized Anatomical Reconstruction and Editing Tool Kit), provides a wide range of surface visualization and analysis options as well as capabilities for surface flattening, surface-based deformation, and other surface manipulations. The third component, SuMS (Surface Management System), is a database and associated user interface for surface-related data. It provides for efficient insertion, searching, and extraction of surface and volume data from the database.

  10. MULTI-DIMENSIONAL MASS SPECTROMETRY-BASED SHOTGUN LIPIDOMICS AND NOVEL STRATEGIES FOR LIPIDOMIC ANALYSES

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xianlin; Yang, Kui; Gross, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Since our last comprehensive review on multi-dimensional mass spectrometry-based shotgun lipidomics (Mass Spectrom. Rev. 24 (2005), 367), many new developments in the field of lipidomics have occurred. These developments include new strategies and refinements for shotgun lipidomic approaches that use direct infusion, including novel fragmentation strategies, identification of multiple new informative dimensions for mass spectrometric interrogation, and the development of new bioinformatic approaches for enhanced identification and quantitation of the individual molecular constituents that comprise each cell’s lipidome. Concurrently, advances in liquid chromatography-based platforms and novel strategies for quantitative matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry for lipidomic analyses have been developed. Through the synergistic use of this repertoire of new mass spectrometric approaches, the power and scope of lipidomics has been greatly expanded to accelerate progress toward the comprehensive understanding of the pleiotropic roles of lipids in biological systems. PMID:21755525

  11. Automated determination of chemical functionalisation addition routes based on magnetic susceptibility and nucleus independent chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lier, G.; Ewels, C. P.; Geerlings, P.

    2008-07-01

    We present a modified version of our previously reported meta-code SACHA, for systematic analysis of chemical addition. The code automates the generation of structures, running of quantum chemical codes, and selection of preferential isomers based on chosen selection rules. While the selection rules for the previous version were based on the total system energy, predicting purely thermodynamic addition patterns, we examine here the possibility of using other system parameters, notably magnetic susceptibility as a descriptor of global aromaticity, and nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) as local aromaticity descriptor.

  12. Non-target screening analyses of organic contaminants in river systems as a base for monitoring measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzbauer, J.

    2009-04-01

    Organic contaminants discharged to the aquatic environment exhibit a high diversity with respect to their molecular structures and the resulting physico-chemical properties. The chemical analysis of anthropogenic contamination in river systems is still an important feature, especially with respect to (i) the identification and structure elucidation of novel contaminants, (ii) to the characterisation of their environmental behaviour and (iii) to their risk for natural systems. A huge proportion of riverine contamination is caused by low-molecular weight organic compounds, like pesticides plasticizers, pharmaceuticals, personal care products, technical additives etc. Some of them, like PCB or PAH have already been investigated thoroughly and, consequently, their behaviour in aqueous systems is very well described. Although analyses on organic substances in river water traditionally focused on selected pollutants, in particular on common priority pollutants which are monitored routinely, the occurrence of further contaminants, e.g. pharmaceuticals, personal care products or chelating agents has received increasing attention within the last decade. Accompanied, screening analyses revealing an enormous diversity of low-molecular weight organic contaminants in waste water effluents and river water become more and more noticed. Since many of these substances have been rarely noticed so far, it will be an important task for the future to study their occurrence and fate in natural environments. Further on, it should be a main issue of environmental studies to provide a comprehensive view on the state of pollution of river water, in particular with respect to lipophilic low molecular weight organic contaminants. However, such non-target-screening analyses has been performed only rarely in the past. Hence, we applied extended non-target screening analyses on longitudinal sections of the rivers Rhine, Rur and Lippe (Germany) on the base of GC/MS analyses. The investigations

  13. Additive-dominance genetic model analyses for late-maturity alpha-amylase activity in a bread wheat factorial crossing population.

    PubMed

    Rasul, Golam; Glover, Karl D; Krishnan, Padmanaban G; Wu, Jixiang; Berzonsky, William A; Ibrahim, Amir M H

    2015-12-01

    Elevated level of late maturity α-amylase activity (LMAA) can result in low falling number scores, reduced grain quality, and downgrade of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) class. A mating population was developed by crossing parents with different levels of LMAA. The F2 and F3 hybrids and their parents were evaluated for LMAA, and data were analyzed using the R software package 'qgtools' integrated with an additive-dominance genetic model and a mixed linear model approach. Simulated results showed high testing powers for additive and additive × environment variances, and comparatively low powers for dominance and dominance × environment variances. All variance components and their proportions to the phenotypic variance for the parents and hybrids were significant except for the dominance × environment variance. The estimated narrow-sense heritability and broad-sense heritability for LMAA were 14 and 54%, respectively. High significant negative additive effects for parents suggest that spring wheat cultivars 'Lancer' and 'Chester' can serve as good general combiners, and that 'Kinsman' and 'Seri-82' had negative specific combining ability in some hybrids despite of their own significant positive additive effects, suggesting they can be used as parents to reduce LMAA levels. Seri-82 showed very good general combining ability effect when used as a male parent, indicating the importance of reciprocal effects. High significant negative dominance effects and high-parent heterosis for hybrids demonstrated that the specific hybrid combinations; Chester × Kinsman, 'Lerma52' × Lancer, Lerma52 × 'LoSprout' and 'Janz' × Seri-82 could be generated to produce cultivars with significantly reduced LMAA level.

  14. Effectiveness of iron-based fuel additives for diesel soot control

    SciTech Connect

    Zeller, H.W.; Westphal, T.E.

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines evaluated the effects of two iron-based fuel additives on diesel particulate matter (DPM) emissions. The 5.6-L, six-cylinder test engine is typical of engines used in underground mines. One additive, ferrous picrate, did not measurably affect exhaust emissions. This report is mainly about a ferrocene-based additive that reduced DPM between 4 and 45 pct, depending on engine operating conditions. The report concludes that the DPM reductions were caused by the catalytic oxidation properties of a ferric oxide coating that developed inside the engine's combustion chamber. The ferric oxide coating also decreased gas-phase hydrocarbons and O[sub 2], but it increased CO[sub 2] and NO[sub x]. The increase in NO[sub x], of about 12 pct, is considered the only adverse effect of the ferrocene-based fuel additive. The results suggest that the effectiveness of ferrocene was partially offset by increased sulfates because of the high-sulfur fuel used. Recommendations for continuing fuel additive research are presented.

  15. Biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite scaffolds processed by lithography-based additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Tesavibul, Passakorn; Chantaweroad, Surapol; Laohaprapanon, Apinya; Channasanon, Somruethai; Uppanan, Paweena; Tanodekaew, Siriporn; Chalermkarnnon, Prasert; Sitthiseripratip, Kriskrai

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of hydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications by using lithography-based additive manufacturing techniques has been introduced due to the abilities to control porous structures with suitable resolutions. In this research, the use of hydroxyapatite cellular structures, which are processed by lithography-based additive manufacturing machine, as a bone tissue engineering scaffold was investigated. The utilization of digital light processing system for additive manufacturing machine in laboratory scale was performed in order to fabricate the hydroxyapatite scaffold, of which biocompatibilities were eventually evaluated by direct contact and cell-culturing tests. In addition, the density and compressive strength of the scaffolds were also characterized. The results show that the hydroxyapatite scaffold at 77% of porosity with 91% of theoretical density and 0.36 MPa of the compressive strength are able to be processed. In comparison with a conventionally sintered hydroxyapatite, the scaffold did not present any cytotoxic signs while the viability of cells at 95.1% was reported. After 14 days of cell-culturing tests, the scaffold was able to be attached by pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) leading to cell proliferation and differentiation. The hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone tissue engineering was able to be processed by the lithography-based additive manufacturing machine while the biocompatibilities were also confirmed. PMID:26484553

  16. Biocompatibility of hydroxyapatite scaffolds processed by lithography-based additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Tesavibul, Passakorn; Chantaweroad, Surapol; Laohaprapanon, Apinya; Channasanon, Somruethai; Uppanan, Paweena; Tanodekaew, Siriporn; Chalermkarnnon, Prasert; Sitthiseripratip, Kriskrai

    2015-01-01

    The fabrication of hydroxyapatite scaffolds for bone tissue engineering applications by using lithography-based additive manufacturing techniques has been introduced due to the abilities to control porous structures with suitable resolutions. In this research, the use of hydroxyapatite cellular structures, which are processed by lithography-based additive manufacturing machine, as a bone tissue engineering scaffold was investigated. The utilization of digital light processing system for additive manufacturing machine in laboratory scale was performed in order to fabricate the hydroxyapatite scaffold, of which biocompatibilities were eventually evaluated by direct contact and cell-culturing tests. In addition, the density and compressive strength of the scaffolds were also characterized. The results show that the hydroxyapatite scaffold at 77% of porosity with 91% of theoretical density and 0.36 MPa of the compressive strength are able to be processed. In comparison with a conventionally sintered hydroxyapatite, the scaffold did not present any cytotoxic signs while the viability of cells at 95.1% was reported. After 14 days of cell-culturing tests, the scaffold was able to be attached by pre-osteoblasts (MC3T3-E1) leading to cell proliferation and differentiation. The hydroxyapatite scaffold for bone tissue engineering was able to be processed by the lithography-based additive manufacturing machine while the biocompatibilities were also confirmed.

  17. Models of population-based analyses for data collected from large extended families

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Elisa T.; Howard, Barbara V.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Devereux, Richard B.; MacCluer, Jean W.; Laston, Sandra; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Shara, Nawar M.; Welty, Thomas K.

    2014-01-01

    Large studies of extended families usually collect valuable phenotypic data that may have scientific value for purposes other than testing genetic hypotheses if the families were not selected in a biased manner. These purposes include assessing population-based associations of diseases with risk factors/covariates and estimating population characteristics such as disease prevalence and incidence. Relatedness among participants however, violates the traditional assumption of independent observations in these classic analyses. The commonly used adjustment method for relatedness in population-based analyses is to use marginal models, in which clusters (families) are assumed to be independent (unrelated) with a simple and identical covariance (family) structure such as those called independent, exchangeable and unstructured covariance structures. However, using these simple covariance structures may not be optimally appropriate for outcomes collected from large extended families, and may under- or over-estimate the variances of estimators and thus lead to uncertainty in inferences. Moreover, the assumption that families are unrelated with an identical family structure in a marginal model may not be satisfied for family studies with large extended families. The aim of this paper is to propose models incorporating marginal models approaches with a covariance structure for assessing population-based associations of diseases with their risk factors/covariates and estimating population characteristics for epidemiological studies while adjusting for the complicated relatedness among outcomes (continuous/categorical, normally/non-normally distributed) collected from large extended families. We also discuss theoretical issues of the proposed models and show that the proposed models and covariance structure are appropriate for and capable of achieving the aim. PMID:20882324

  18. CaO--P2O5--Na2O-based sintering additives for hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics.

    PubMed

    Kalita, S J; Bose, S; Hosick, H L; Bandyopadhyay, A

    2004-05-01

    We have assessed the effect of CaO--P2O5--Na2O-based sintering additives on mechanical and biological properties of hydroxyapatite (HAp) ceramics. Five different compositions of sintering additives were selected and prepared by mixing of CaO, P2O5, and Na2CO3 powders. 2.5 wt% of each additive was combined with commercial HAp powder, separately, followed by ball milling, and sintering at 1250 degrees C and 1300 degrees C in a muffle furnace. Green and sintered densities of the compacts were analyzed for the influence of additives on densification of HAp. Phase analyses were carried out using an X-ray diffractometer. Vickers microhardness testing was used to evaluate hardness of sintered compacts of different compositions. A maximum microhardness of 4.6 (+/- 0.28) GPa was attained for a composition with 2.5 wt% addition of CaO:P2O5:Na2O in the ratio of 3:3:4. Results from mechanical property evaluation showed that some of these sintering additives improved failure strength of HAp under compressive loading. Maximum compressive strength was observed for samples with 2.5 wt% addition of CaO. Average failure strength for this set of samples was calculated to be 220 (+/- 50) MPa. Cytotoxicity, and cell attachment studies were carried out using a modified human osteoblast cell line called OPC-1. In vitro results showed that these compositions were non-toxic. Some sintering aids enhanced cell attachment and proliferation, which was revealed from SEM examination of the scaffolds seeded with OPC-1 cells. PMID:14741598

  19. A synchrotron study of microstructure gradient in laser additively formed epitaxial Ni-based superalloy.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; Li, Yao; Qian, Dan; Wan, Jingchun; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Laser additive forming is considered to be one of the promising techniques to repair single crystal Ni-based superalloy parts to extend their life and reduce the cost. Preservation of the single crystalline nature and prevention of thermal mechanical failure are two of the most essential issues for the application of this technique. Here we employ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction to evaluate the quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect distribution of a Ni-based superalloy DZ125L directly formed by a laser additive process rooted from a single crystalline substrate of the same material. We show that a disorientation gradient caused by a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations and resultant subgrains exists in the interfacial region between the epitaxial and stray grains. This creates a potential relationship of stray grain formation and defect accumulation. The observation offers new directions on the study of performance control and reliability of the laser additive manufactured superalloys. PMID:26446425

  20. A synchrotron study of microstructure gradient in laser additively formed epitaxial Ni-based superalloy

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; Li, Yao; Qian, Dan; Wan, Jingchun; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2015-10-08

    Laser additive forming is considered to be one of the promising techniques to repair single crystal Ni-based superalloy parts to extend their life and reduce the cost. Preservation of the single crystalline nature and prevention of thermal mechanical failure are two of the most essential issues for the application of this technique. Here we employ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction to evaluate the quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect distribution of a Ni-based superalloy DZ125L directly formed by a laser additive process rooted from a single crystalline substrate of the same material. We show that a disorientation gradient caused by a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations and resultant subgrains exists in the interfacial region between the epitaxial and stray grains. This creates a potential relationship of stray grain formation and defect accumulation. In conclusion, the observation offers new directions on the study of performance control and reliability of the laser additive manufactured superalloys.

  1. A synchrotron study of microstructure gradient in laser additively formed epitaxial Ni-based superalloy

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; Li, Yao; Qian, Dan; Wan, Jingchun; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Laser additive forming is considered to be one of the promising techniques to repair single crystal Ni-based superalloy parts to extend their life and reduce the cost. Preservation of the single crystalline nature and prevention of thermal mechanical failure are two of the most essential issues for the application of this technique. Here we employ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction to evaluate the quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect distribution of a Ni-based superalloy DZ125L directly formed by a laser additive process rooted from a single crystalline substrate of the same material. We show that a disorientation gradient caused by a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations and resultant subgrains exists in the interfacial region between the epitaxial and stray grains. This creates a potential relationship of stray grain formation and defect accumulation. The observation offers new directions on the study of performance control and reliability of the laser additive manufactured superalloys. PMID:26446425

  2. Biphenol-based phosphoramidite ligands for the enantioselective copper-catalyzed conjugate addition of diethylzinc.

    PubMed

    Alexakis, Alexandre; Polet, Damien; Rosset, Stéphane; March, Sébastien

    2004-08-20

    Phosphoramidite ligands, based on ortho-substituted biphenols and a chiral amine, induce high enantioselectivities (ee's up to 99%) in the copper-catalyzed conjugate addition of dialkylzinc reagents to a variety of Michael acceptors. Particularly, the best reported ee's were obtained for acyclic nitroolefins. PMID:15307737

  3. Effects of Ga Addition on Interfacial Reactions Between Sn-Based Solders and Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao-Hong; Li, Kuan-Ting

    2016-07-01

    The use of Ga as a micro-alloying element in Sn-based solders can change the microstructure of solder joints to improve the mechanical properties, and even suppress the interfacial intermetallic compound (IMC) growth. This research investigated the effects of Ga addition (0.2-1 wt.%Ga) on the IMC formation and morphological evolution in the Sn-based solder joints with Ni substrate. In the soldering reaction at 250°C and with less than 0.2 wt.%Ga addition, the formed phase was Ni3Sn4. When the Ga addition increased to 0.5 wt.%, it changed to a thin Ni2Ga3 layer of ˜1 μm thick, which stably existed at the interface in the initial 1-h reaction. Subsequently, the whole Ni2Ga3 layer detached from the Ni substrate and drifted into the molten solder. The Ni3Sn4 phase became dominant in the later stage. Notably, the Ga addition significantly reduced the grain size of Ni3Sn4, resulting in the massive spalling of Ni3Sn4 grains. With 1 wt.%Ga addition, the Ni2Ga3 layer remained very thin with no significant growth, and it stably existed at the interface for more than 10 h. In addition, the solid-state reactions were examined at temperatures of 160°C to 200°C. With addition of 0.5 wt.%Ga, the Ni3Sn4 phase dominated the whole reaction. By contrast, with increasing to 1 wt.%Ga, only a thin Ni2Ga3 layer was found even after aging at 160°C for more than 1200 h. The 1 wt.%Ga addition in solder can effectively inhibit the Ni3Sn4 formation in soldering and the long-term aging process.

  4. Static and dynamic stress analyses of the prototype high head Francis runner based on site measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Oram, C.; Sick, M.

    2014-03-01

    More efforts are put on hydro-power to balance voltage and frequency within seconds for primary control in modern smart grids. This requires hydraulic turbines to run at off-design conditions. especially at low load or speed-no load. Besides. the tendency of increasing power output and decreasing weight of the turbine runners has also led to the high level vibration problem of the runners. especially high head Francis runners. Therefore. it is important to carry out the static and dynamic stress analyses of prototype high head Francis runners. This paper investigates the static and dynamic stresses on the prototype high head Francis runner based on site measurements and numerical simulations. The site measurements are performed with pressure transducers and strain gauges. Based on the measured results. computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the flow channel from stay vane to draft tube cone are performed. Static pressure distributions and dynamic pressure pulsations caused by rotor-stator interaction (RSI) are obtained under various operating conditions. With the CFD results. static and dynamic stresses on the runner at different operating points are calculated by means of the finite element method (FEM). The agreement between simulation and measurement is analysed with linear regression method. which indicates that the numerical result agrees well with that of measurement. Furthermore. the maximum static and dynamic stresses on the runner blade are obtained at various operating points. The relations of the maximum stresses and the power output are discussed in detail. The influences of the boundary conditions on the structural behaviour of the runner are also discussed.

  5. On the use of the calibration-based approach for debris-flow forward-analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirulli, M.

    2010-05-01

    In the present paper the problem of modeling the propagation of potential debris flows is tackled resorting to a numerical approach. In particular, numerical analyses are carried out with the RASH3D code, based on a single-phase depth-averaged continuum mechanics approach. Since each numerical analysis requires the selection of a rheology and the setting of the rheological input parameters, a calibration-based approach, where the rheological parameters are constrained by systematic adjustment during trial-and-error back-analysis of full-scale events, has been assumed. The back-analysis of a 1000 m3 debris flow, located at Tate's Cairn, Hong Kong, and the forward-analysis of a 10 000 m3 potential debris flow, located in the same basin have been used to investigate the transferability of back-calculated rheological parameters from one case to another. Three different rheologies have been tested: Frictional, Voellmy and Quadratic. From obtained results it emerges that 1) the back-calculation of a past event with different rheologies can help in selecting the rheology that better reproduces the runout of the analysed event and, on the basis of that selection, can give some indication about the dynamics of the investigated flow, 2) the use of back-calculated parameters for forward purposes requires that past and potential events have similar characteristics, some of which are a function of the assumed rheology. Among tested rheologies, it is observed that the Quadratic rheology is more influenced by volume size than Frictional and Voellmy rheologies and consequently its application requires that events are also similar in volume.

  6. Assessment of trophic structure of Cretaceous communities based on stable nitrogen isotope analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostrom, P. H.; Macko, S. A.; Engel, M. H.; Russell, D. A.

    1993-06-01

    New δ15N data suggest the retention of an indigenous signal in ancient high molecular weight organic material. These data open the possibility of obtaining new paleoecological information, based on isotopic analyses, on ancient, well-preserved fossil communities. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope analyses were performed on high molecular weight organic material isolated from 22 taxa of Late Cretaceous vertebrates (Judith River Formation, Alberta,Canada). The majority of δ13C and δ15N values (-27‰ to -23‰ and 4‰ to 12‰, for δ13C and δ15N, respectively) are similar to those reported for modern consumers. An assessment of trophic levels based on δ15N is consistent with previous interpretations of food web structure derived from paleoecological interpretations. Among terrestrial consumers, carnivorous theropods (tyrannosaurids and dromaeosaurids) have high δ15N values (6.6‰ ±0.4‰ and 7.9‰, respectively) relative to those of the dominant megaherbivore (hadrosaurids, 4.7‰ ±0.5‰). Within aquatic environments, the values of δ15N of the bowfin Amia (11.6‰) and plesiosaur (11.0‰),distinguish the piscivorous tendencies of these organisms from those of tower trophic level consumers such as the benthic feeding sturgeon Acipenser and the turtle Aspideretes (δ15N = 5.1‰ and 4.5‰, respectively). The correlation in trophic position between δ15N values and paleoecological evidence is unlikely to be coincidental.

  7. Novel Flow Cytometry Analyses of Boar Sperm Viability: Can the Addition of Whole Sperm-Rich Fraction Seminal Plasma to Frozen-Thawed Boar Sperm Affect It?

    PubMed Central

    Díaz, Rommy; Boguen, Rodrigo; Martins, Simone Maria Massami Kitamura; Ravagnani, Gisele Mouro; Leal, Diego Feitosa; Oliveira, Melissa de Lima; Muro, Bruno Bracco Donatelli; Parra, Beatriz Martins; Meirelles, Flávio Vieira; Papa, Frederico Ozanan; Dell’Aqua, José Antônio; Alvarenga, Marco Antônio; Moretti, Aníbal de Sant’Anna; Sepúlveda, Néstor

    2016-01-01

    Boar semen cryopreservation remains a challenge due to the extension of cold shock damage. Thus, many alternatives have emerged to improve the quality of frozen-thawed boar sperm. Although the use of seminal plasma arising from boar sperm-rich fraction (SP-SRF) has shown good efficacy; however, the majority of actual sperm evaluation techniques include a single or dual sperm parameter analysis, which overrates the real sperm viability. Within this context, this work was performed to introduce a sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential. We then used the sperm flow cytometry fourfold stain technique to study the effect of SP-SRF on frozen-thawed boar sperm and further evaluated the effect of this treatment on sperm movement, tyrosine phosphorylation and fertility rate (FR). The sperm fourfold stain technique is accurate (R2 = 0.9356, p > 0.01) for simultaneous evaluation of plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential (IPIAH cells). Centrifugation pre-cryopreservation was not deleterious (p > 0.05) for any analyzed variables. Addition of SP-SRF after cryopreservation was able to improve total and progressive motility (p < 0.05) when boar semen was cryopreserved without SP-SRF; however, it was not able to decrease tyrosine phosphorylation (p > 0.05) or improve IPIAH cells (p > 0.05). FR was not (p > 0.05) statistically increased by the addition of seminal plasma, though females inseminated with frozen-thawed boar semen plus SP-SRF did perform better than those inseminated with sperm lacking seminal plasma. Thus, we conclude that sperm fourfold stain can be used to simultaneously evaluate plasma and acrosomal membrane integrity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and the addition of SP-SRF at thawed boar semen cryopreserved in absence of SP-SRF improve its total and progressive motility. PMID:27529819

  8. Sensitivity analyses of turbulence theory-based variance-covariance matrices of tropospheric slant delays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vennebusch, M.; Schön, S.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric turbulence induces physical correlations on any space geodetic technique based on electromagnetic waves. Thus, also GNSS phase observations are both temporally and spatially correlated due to refractivity fluctuations along the signal's path from the transmitter to the receiver. Currently, these physical correlations are rarely considered in GNSS data analysis; yielding too optimistic parameter variances and covariances. Based on turbulence theory, Schön and Brunner (2008) developed a formulation of the variances and covariances induced by refractivity fluctuations in the troposphere. This model adequately describes the variance-covariance matrix (VCM) of tropospheric slant delays. The parametrisation is mainly based on the turbulence structure constant, the outer scale length, the integration height, the wind direction and the observation geometry. The VCM can adequately be used to determine synthetic slant delay time series. In this paper, this strategy will be described by using an exemplary GPS configuration. Furthermore, the latest results of simulation studies and sensitivity analyses of this VCM model w.r.t. the model parameters are presented. As a result, the most dominant parameters (that should be either determined with special care or precisely known) will be identified.

  9. A unified set-based test with adaptive filtering for gene-environment interaction analyses.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qianying; Chen, Lin S; Nicolae, Dan L; Pierce, Brandon L

    2016-06-01

    In genome-wide gene-environment interaction (GxE) studies, a common strategy to improve power is to first conduct a filtering test and retain only the SNPs that pass the filtering in the subsequent GxE analyses. Inspired by two-stage tests and gene-based tests in GxE analysis, we consider the general problem of jointly testing a set of parameters when only a few are truly from the alternative hypothesis and when filtering information is available. We propose a unified set-based test that simultaneously considers filtering on individual parameters and testing on the set. We derive the exact distribution and approximate the power function of the proposed unified statistic in simplified settings, and use them to adaptively calculate the optimal filtering threshold for each set. In the context of gene-based GxE analysis, we show that although the empirical power function may be affected by many factors, the optimal filtering threshold corresponding to the peak of the power curve primarily depends on the size of the gene. We further propose a resampling algorithm to calculate P-values for each gene given the estimated optimal filtering threshold. The performance of the method is evaluated in simulation studies and illustrated via a genome-wide gene-gender interaction analysis using pancreatic cancer genome-wide association data. PMID:26496228

  10. A unified set-based test with adaptive filtering for gene-environment interaction analyses

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qianying; Chen, Lin S.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Pierce, Brandon L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary In genome-wide gene-environment interaction (GxE) studies, a common strategy to improve power is to first conduct a filtering test and retain only the SNPs that pass the filtering in the subsequent GxE analyses. Inspired by two-stage tests and gene-based tests in GxE analysis, we consider the general problem of jointly testing a set of parameters when only a few are truly from the alternative hypothesis and when filtering information is available. We propose a unified set-based test that simultaneously considers filtering on individual parameters and testing on the set. We derive the exact distribution and approximate the power function of the proposed unified statistic in simplified settings, and use them to adaptively calculate the optimal filtering threshold for each set. In the context of gene-based GxE analysis, we show that although the empirical power function may be affected by many factors, the optimal filtering threshold corresponding to the peak of the power curve primarily depends on the size of the gene. We further propose a resampling algorithm to calculate p-values for each gene given the estimated optimal filtering threshold. The performance of the method is evaluated in simulation studies and illustrated via a genome-wide gene-gender interaction analysis using pancreatic cancer genome-wide association data. PMID:26496228

  11. Microarray Analyses and Comparisons of Upper or Lower Flanks of Rice Shoot Base Preceding Gravitropic Bending

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Aiping; Chen, Haiying; Dou, Xianying; Jin, Jing; Cai, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    Gravitropism is a complex process involving a series of physiological pathways. Despite ongoing research, gravitropism sensing and response mechanisms are not well understood. To identify the key transcripts and corresponding pathways in gravitropism, a whole-genome microarray approach was used to analyze transcript abundance in the shoot base of rice (Oryza sativa sp. japonica) at 0.5 h and 6 h after gravistimulation by horizontal reorientation. Between upper and lower flanks of the shoot base, 167 transcripts at 0.5 h and 1202 transcripts at 6 h were discovered to be significantly different in abundance by 2-fold. Among these transcripts, 48 were found to be changed both at 0.5 h and 6 h, while 119 transcripts were only changed at 0.5 h and 1154 transcripts were changed at 6 h in association with gravitropism. MapMan and PageMan analyses were used to identify transcripts significantly changed in abundance. The asymmetric regulation of transcripts related to phytohormones, signaling, RNA transcription, metabolism and cell wall-related categories between upper and lower flanks were demonstrated. Potential roles of the identified transcripts in gravitropism are discussed. Our results suggest that the induction of asymmetrical transcription, likely as a consequence of gravitropic reorientation, precedes gravitropic bending in the rice shoot base. PMID:24040303

  12. A general theory to analyse and design wireless power transfer based on impedance matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuo; Chen, Linhui; Zhou, Yongchun; Cui, Tie Jun

    2014-10-01

    We propose a general theory to analyse and design the wireless power transfer (WPT) systems based on impedance matching. We take two commonly used structures as examples, the transformer-coupling-based WPT and the series/parallel capacitor-based WPT, to show how to design the impedance matching network (IMN) to obtain the maximum transfer efficiency and the maximum output power. Using the impedance matching theory (IMT), we derive a simple expression of the overall transfer efficiency by the coils' quality factors and the coupling coefficient, which has perfect accuracy compared to full-circuit simulations. Full-wave electromagnetic software, CST Microwave Studio, has been used to extract the parameters of coils, thus providing us a comprehensive way to simulate WPT systems directly from the coils' physical model. We have also discussed the relationship between the output power and the transfer efficiency, and found that the maximum output power and the maximum transfer efficiency may occur at different frequencies. Hence, both power and efficiency should be considered in real WPT applications. To validate the proposed theory, two types of WPT experiments have been conducted using 30 cm-diameter coils for lighting a 20 W light bulb with 60% efficiency over a distance of 50 cm. The experimental results have very good agreements to the theoretical predictions.

  13. Tribological properties of few-layer graphene oxide sheets as oil-based lubricant additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhe; Liu, Yuhong; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-03-01

    The performance of a lubricant largely depends on the additives it involves. However, currently used additives cause severe pollution if they are burned and exhausted. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a new generation of green additives. Graphene oxide (GO) consists of only C, H and O and thus is considered to be environmentally friendly. So the tribological properties of the few-layer GO sheet as an additive in hydrocarbon base oil are investigated systematically. It is found that, with the addition of GO sheets, both the coefficient of friction (COF) and wear are decreased and the working temperature range of the lubricant is expanded in the positive direction. Moreover, GO sheets has better performance under higher sliding speed and the optimized concentration of GO sheets is determined to be 0.5wt%. After rubbing, GO is detected on the wear scars through Raman spectroscopy. And it is believed that, during the rubbing, GO sheets adhere to the sliding surfaces, behaving like protective films and preventing the sliding surfaces from contacting with each other directly. This paper proves that the GO sheet is an effective lubricant additive, illuminates the lubrication mechanism, and provides some critical parameters for the practical application of GO sheets in lubrication.

  14. Textbook Questions in Context-Based and Traditional Chemistry Curricula Analysed from a Content Perspective and a Learning Activities Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overman, Michelle; Vermunt, Jan D.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Bulte, Astrid M. W.; Brekelmans, Mieke

    2013-01-01

    In this study, questions in context-based and traditional chemistry textbooks were analysed from two perspectives that are at the heart of chemistry curricula reforms: a content perspective and a learning activities perspective. To analyse these textbook questions, we developed an instrument for each perspective. In total, 971 textbook questions…

  15. Fluorescent "turn-on" detecting CN- by nucleophilic addition induced Schiff-base hydrolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qi; Cai, Yi; Li, Qiao; Shi, Bing-Bing; Yao, Hong; Zhang, You-Ming; Wei, Tai-Bao

    2015-04-01

    A new chemosensor Sz based on Schiff-base group as recognition site and naphthalene as the fluorescence signal group was designed and synthesised. It could fluorescent "turn-on" detect cyanide (CN-) via a novel mechanism of nucleophilic addition induced Schiff-base hydrolysis. Adding the CN- into the solution of Sz could induce Sz to emit blue fluorescence at 435 nm instantly. Moreover, Sz could also colorimetric detect CN-. Upon the addition of CN-, the Sz showed dramatic color change from yellow to colorless. These sensing procedures could not be interfered by other coexistent competitive anions such as F-, AcO-, H2PO4- and SCN-. In addition, Sz showed high sensitivity for CN-, the detection limits is 3.42 × 10-8 M of CN-, which is far lower than the WHO guideline of CN- in drinking water (less than 1.9 × 10-6 M). The CN- test strips based on Sz could act as a convenient CN- test kits.

  16. Improving sulfolane-based electrolyte for high voltage Li-ion cells with electrolyte additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jian; Dahn, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    An electrolyte mixture containing 1 M LiPF6 in sulfolane:ethylmethyl carbonate 3:7 with vinylene carbonate and other electrolyte additives exhibited promising cycling and storage performance in high voltage Li(Ni0·4Mn0·4Co0.2)O2/graphite pouch type Li-ion cells tested to 4.5 V. Voltage drop during storage, coulombic efficiency, charge endpoint capacity slippage during ultra high precision cycling, charge-transfer resistance after storage or cycling, gas evolution during storage and cycling as well as capacity retention during long-term cycling were examined. The results for cells with sulfolane-based electrolytes were compared with those for cells with ethylene carbonate-based electrolytes containing state-of-the-art electrolyte additives. This survey showed that the combination of vinylene carbonate and triallyl phosphate as electrolyte additives in sulfolane:ethylmethyl carbonate electrolyte yielded cells capable of better performance during tests to 4.5 V than cells with ethylene carbonate-based electrolytes. These results suggest that sulfolane-based electrolytes may be promising for high voltage Li-ion cells.

  17. Improving sulfolane-based electrolyte for high voltage Li-ion cells with electrolyte additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jian; Dahn, J. R.

    2016-08-01

    An electrolyte mixture containing 1 M LiPF6 in sulfolane:ethylmethyl carbonate 3:7 with vinylene carbonate and other electrolyte additives exhibited promising cycling and storage performance in high voltage Li(Ni0·4Mn0·4Co0.2)O2/graphite pouch type Li-ion cells tested to 4.5 V. Voltage drop during storage, coulombic efficiency, charge endpoint capacity slippage during ultra high precision cycling, charge-transfer resistance after storage or cycling, gas evolution during storage and cycling as well as capacity retention during long-term cycling were examined. The results for cells with sulfolane-based electrolytes were compared with those for cells with ethylene carbonate-based electrolytes containing state-of-the-art electrolyte additives. This survey showed that the combination of vinylene carbonate and triallyl phosphate as electrolyte additives in sulfolane:ethylmethyl carbonate electrolyte yielded cells capable of better performance during tests to 4.5 V than cells with ethylene carbonate-based electrolytes. These results suggest that sulfolane-based electrolytes may be promising for high voltage Li-ion cells.

  18. Revised age of deglaciation of Lake Emma based on new radiocarbon and macrofossil analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elias, S.A.; Carrara, P.E.; Toolin, L.J.; Jull, A.J.T.

    1991-01-01

    Previous radiocarbon ages of detrital moss fragments in basal organic sediments of Lake Emma indicated that extensive deglaciation of the San Juan Mountains occurred prior to 14,900 yr B.P. (Carrara et al., 1984). Paleoecological analyses of insect and plant macrofossils from these basal sediments cast doubt on the reliability of the radiocarbon ages. Subsequent accelerator radiocarbon dates of insect fossils and wood fragments indicate an early Holocene age, rather than a late Pleistocene age, for the basal sediments of Lake Emma. These new radiocarbon ages suggest that by at least 10,000 yr B.P. deglaciation of the San Juan Mountains was complete. The insect and plant macrofossils from the basal organic sediments indicate a higher-than-present treeline during the early Holocene. The insect assemblages consisted of about 30% bark beetles, which contrasts markedly with the composition of insects from modern lake sediments and modern specimens collected in the Lake Emma cirque, in which bark beetles comprise only about 3% of the assemblages. In addition, in the fossil assemblages there were a number of flightless insect species (not subject to upslope transport by wind) indicative of coniferous forest environments. These insects were likewise absent in the modern assemblage. ?? 1991.

  19. Revised age of deglaciation of Lake Emma based on new radiocarbon and macrofossil analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, Scott A.; Carrara, Paul E.; Toolin, L. J.; Jull, A. J. T.

    1991-11-01

    Previous radiocarbon ages of detrital moss fragments in basal organic sediments of Lake Emma indicated that extensive deglaciation of the San Juan Mountains occurred prior to 14,900 yr B.P. (Carrara et al., 1984). Paleoecological analyses of insect and plant macrofossils from these basal sediments cast doubt on the reliability of the radiocarbon ages. Subsequent accelerator radiocarbon dates of insect fossils and wood fragments indicate an early Holocene age, rather than a late Pleistocene age, for the basal sediments of Lake Emma. These new radiocarbon ages suggest that by at least 10,000 yr B.P. deglaciation of the San Juan Mountains was complete. The insect and plant macrofossils from the basal organic sediments indicate a higher-than-present treeline during the early Holocene. The insect assemblages consisted of about 30% bark beetles, which contrasts markedly with the composition of insects from modern lake sediments and modern specimens collected in the Lake Emma cirque, in which bark beetles comprise only about 3% of the assemblages. In addition, in the fossil assemblages there were a number of flightless insect species (not subject to upslope transport by wind) indicative of coniferous forest environments. These insects were likewise absent in the modern assemblage.

  20. Systems-based analyses of brain regions functionally impacted in Parkinson's disease reveals underlying causal mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Riley, Brigit E; Gardai, Shyra J; Emig-Agius, Dorothea; Bessarabova, Marina; Ivliev, Alexander E; Schüle, Birgitt; Schüle, Birgit; Alexander, Jeff; Wallace, William; Halliday, Glenda M; Langston, J William; Braxton, Scott; Yednock, Ted; Shaler, Thomas; Johnston, Jennifer A

    2014-01-01

    Detailed analysis of disease-affected tissue provides insight into molecular mechanisms contributing to pathogenesis. Substantia nigra, striatum, and cortex are functionally connected with increasing degrees of alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease. We undertook functional and causal pathway analysis of gene expression and proteomic alterations in these three regions, and the data revealed pathways that correlated with disease progression. In addition, microarray and RNAseq experiments revealed previously unidentified causal changes related to oligodendrocyte function and synaptic vesicle release, and these and other changes were reflected across all brain regions. Importantly, subsets of these changes were replicated in Parkinson's disease blood; suggesting peripheral tissue may provide important avenues for understanding and measuring disease status and progression. Proteomic assessment revealed alterations in mitochondria and vesicular transport proteins that preceded gene expression changes indicating defects in translation and/or protein turnover. Our combined approach of proteomics, RNAseq and microarray analyses provides a comprehensive view of the molecular changes that accompany functional loss and alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease, and may be instrumental to understand, diagnose and follow Parkinson's disease progression.

  1. Comparative UPLC-QTOF-MS-based metabolomics and bioactivities analyses of Garcinia oblongifolia.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; AnandhiSenthilkumar, Harini; Wu, Shi-biao; Liu, Bo; Guo, Zhi-yong; Fata, Jimmie E; Kennelly, Edward J; Long, Chun-lin

    2016-02-01

    Garcinia oblongifolia Champ. ex Benth. (Clusiaceae) is a well-known medicinal plant from southern China, with edible fruits. However, the phytochemistry and bioactivity of the different plant parts of G. oblongifolia have not been studied extensively. Comparative metabolic profiling and bioactivities of the leaf, branch, and fruit of G. oblongifolia were investigated. A total of 40 compounds such as biflavonoids, xanthones, and benzophenones were identified using UPLC-QTOF-MS and MS(E), including 15 compounds reported for the first time from this species. Heatmap analyses found that benzophenones, xanthones, and biflavonoids were predominately found in branches, with benzophenones present in relatively high concentrations in all three plant parts. Xanthones were found to have limited distribution in fruit while biflavonoids were present at only low levels in leaves. In addition, the cytotoxic (MCF-7 breast cancer cell line) and antioxidant (ABTS and DPPH chemical tests) activities of the crude extracts of G. oblongifolia indicate that the branch extract exhibits greater bioactivity than either the leaf or the fruit extracts. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminate analysis was used to find 12 marker compounds, mainly xanthones, from the branches, including well-known antioxidants and cytotoxic agents. These G. oblongifolia results revealed that the variation in metabolite profiles can be correlated to the differences in bioactivity of the three plant parts investigated. This UPLC-QTOF-MS strategy can be useful to identify bioactive constituents expressed differentially in the various plant parts of a single species. PMID:26773895

  2. Phylogenetic analyses of endoparasitic Acanthocephala based on mitochondrial genomes suggest secondary loss of sensory organs.

    PubMed

    Weber, Mathias; Wey-Fabrizius, Alexandra R; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Witek, Alexander; Schill, Ralph O; Sugár, László; Herlyn, Holger; Hankeln, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The metazoan taxon Syndermata (Monogononta, Bdelloidea, Seisonidea, Acanthocephala) comprises species with vastly different lifestyles. The focus of this study is on the phylogeny within the syndermatan subtaxon Acanthocephala (thorny-headed worms, obligate endoparasites). In order to investigate the controversially discussed phylogenetic relationships of acanthocephalan subtaxa we have sequenced the mitochondrial (mt) genomes of Echinorhynchus truttae (Palaeacanthocephala), Paratenuisentis ambiguus (Eoacanthocephala), Macracanthorhynchus hirudinaceus (Archiacanthocephala), and Philodina citrina (Bdelloidea). In doing so, we present the largest molecular phylogenetic dataset so far for this question comprising all major subgroups of Acanthocephala. Alongside with publicly available mt genome data of four additional syndermatans as well as 18 other lophotrochozoan (spiralian) taxa and one outgroup representative, the derived protein-coding sequences were used for Maximum Likelihood as well as Bayesian phylogenetic analyses. We achieved entirely congruent results, whereupon monophyletic Archiacanthocephala represent the sister taxon of a clade comprising Eoacanthocephala and monophyletic Palaeacanthocephala (Echinorhynchida). This topology suggests the secondary loss of lateral sensory organs (sensory pores) within Palaeacanthocephala and is further in line with the emergence of apical sensory organs in the stem lineage of Archiacanthocephala.

  3. Systems-Based Analyses of Brain Regions Functionally Impacted in Parkinson's Disease Reveals Underlying Causal Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Emig-Agius, Dorothea; Bessarabova, Marina; Ivliev, Alexander E.; Schüle, Birgit; Alexander, Jeff; Wallace, William; Halliday, Glenda M.; Langston, J. William; Braxton, Scott; Yednock, Ted; Shaler, Thomas; Johnston, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    Detailed analysis of disease-affected tissue provides insight into molecular mechanisms contributing to pathogenesis. Substantia nigra, striatum, and cortex are functionally connected with increasing degrees of alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease. We undertook functional and causal pathway analysis of gene expression and proteomic alterations in these three regions, and the data revealed pathways that correlated with disease progression. In addition, microarray and RNAseq experiments revealed previously unidentified causal changes related to oligodendrocyte function and synaptic vesicle release, and these and other changes were reflected across all brain regions. Importantly, subsets of these changes were replicated in Parkinson's disease blood; suggesting peripheral tissue may provide important avenues for understanding and measuring disease status and progression. Proteomic assessment revealed alterations in mitochondria and vesicular transport proteins that preceded gene expression changes indicating defects in translation and/or protein turnover. Our combined approach of proteomics, RNAseq and microarray analyses provides a comprehensive view of the molecular changes that accompany functional loss and alpha-synuclein pathology in Parkinson's disease, and may be instrumental to understand, diagnose and follow Parkinson's disease progression. PMID:25170892

  4. Effects of waste glass additions on quality of textile sludge-based bricks.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Ari; Urabe, Takeo; Kishimoto, Naoyuki; Mizuhara, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    This research investigated the utilization of textile sludge as a substitute for clay in brick production. The addition of textile sludge to a brick specimen enhanced its pores, thus reducing the quality of the product. However, the addition of waste glass to brick production materials improved the quality of the brick in terms of both compressive strength and water absorption. Maximum compressive strength was observed with the following composition of waste materials: 30% textile sludge, 60% clay and 10% waste glass. The melting of waste glass clogged up pores on the brick, which improved water absorption performance and compressive strength. Moreover, a leaching test on a sludge-based brick to which 10% waste glass did not detect significant heavy metal compounds in leachates, with the product being in conformance with standard regulations. The recycling of textile sludge for brick production, when combined with waste glass additions, may thus be promising in terms of both product quality and environmental aspects.

  5. Phosphazene Based Additives for Improvement of Safety and Battery Lifetimes in Lithium-Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Mason K Harrup; Kevin L Gering; Harry W Rollins; Sergiy V Sazhin; Michael T Benson; David K Jamison; Christopher J Michelbacher

    2011-10-01

    There need to be significant improvements made in lithium-ion battery technology, principally in the areas of safety and useful lifetimes to truly enable widespread adoption of large format batteries for the electrification of the light transportation fleet. In order to effect the transition to lithium ion technology in a timely fashion, one promising next step is through improvements to the electrolyte in the form of novel additives that simultaneously improve safety and useful lifetimes without impairing performance characteristics over wide temperature and cycle duty ranges. Recent efforts in our laboratory have been focused on the development of such additives with all the requisite properties enumerated above. We present the results of the study of novel phosphazene based electrolytes additives.

  6. Improved Li-TiS2 cell cycling in ether-based electrolytes with synergistic additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, D. H.; Subbarao, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Huang, C.-K.; Halpert, G.; Dominey, L.; Koch, V. R.; Goldman, J.

    1991-01-01

    Results of the application of 2-MeF and KOH additives to improve the lithium stability in THF, dioxolane, and THF/2-MeTHF solvent-based electrolytes are presented. The stability of these electrolytes with and without additives is evaluated by microcalorimetry and AC impedance spectroscopy. A novel method, cathode turnover number, is proposed to represent the electrolyte performance in a given system. The lithium cycling efficiency and cathode turnover number of the electrolytes are calculated from the cycle life data in experimental Li-TiS2 cells. Overall, THF/2-MeTHF electrolyte containing 2-MeF and/or KOH exhibited higher stability, lithium cycling efficiency, and cathode turnover number compared to THF and dioxolane electrolytes with and without additives.

  7. Improved Li-TiS2 cell cycling in ether-based electrolytes with synergistic additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, D. H.; Subbarao, S.; Deligiannis, F.; Huang, C.-K.; Halpert, G.; Dominey, L.; Koch, V. R.; Goldman, J.

    Results of the application of 2-MeF and KOH additives to improve the lithium stability in THF, dioxolane, and THF/2-MeTHF solvent-based electrolytes are presented. The stability of these electrolytes with and without additives is evaluated by microcalorimetry and AC impedance spectroscopy. A novel method, cathode turnover number, is proposed to represent the electrolyte performance in a given system. The lithium cycling efficiency and cathode turnover number of the electrolytes are calculated from the cycle life data in experimental Li-TiS2 cells. Overall, THF/2-MeTHF electrolyte containing 2-MeF and/or KOH exhibited higher stability, lithium cycling efficiency, and cathode turnover number compared to THF and dioxolane electrolytes with and without additives.

  8. The effects of beryllium additions on the oxidation of nickel aluminide and titanium aluminide based intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Chen, K.C.; Brady, M.P.

    1998-12-31

    The effects of Be additions on the oxidation behavior of {beta}-NiAl in moist air at 1,000 C and borderline alumina-forming {gamma} (TiAl) + Laves Ti-Al-Cr based alloys at 800 C and 1,000 C in dry and moist air were investigated. The addition of Be to {beta}-NiAl suppressed the formation of transient alumina, and resulted in the formation of a protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. In dry air, the addition of Be to the Ti-Al-Cr alloys also resulted in the formation of a protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. In moist air, only Ti-Al-Cr-Be alloys with a high Cr content (10 to 15 a/o) formed the protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} scale.

  9. The effects of beryllium additions on the oxidation of nickel aluminide and titanium aluminide based intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, R.J. Jr.; Chen, K.C.; Brady, M.P.

    1998-11-01

    The effects of Be additions on the oxidation behavior of {beta}-NiAl in moist air at 1,000 C as well as on the borderline alumina-forming {gamma} + Laves Ti-Al-Cr based alloys at 800 C and 1,000 C in dry and moist air were investigated. The addition of Be to {beta}-NiAl suppressed the formation of transient alumina and resulted in the formation of a protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. In dry air, the addition of Be to the Ti-Al-Cr alloys also resulted in the formation of a protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase. In moist air, only Ti-Al-Cr-Be alloys with a high Cr content (10 to 15 a/o) formed the protective BeAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} scale.

  10. Generalized additive modeling with implicit variable selection by likelihood-based boosting.

    PubMed

    Tutz, Gerhard; Binder, Harald

    2006-12-01

    The use of generalized additive models in statistical data analysis suffers from the restriction to few explanatory variables and the problems of selection of smoothing parameters. Generalized additive model boosting circumvents these problems by means of stagewise fitting of weak learners. A fitting procedure is derived which works for all simple exponential family distributions, including binomial, Poisson, and normal response variables. The procedure combines the selection of variables and the determination of the appropriate amount of smoothing. Penalized regression splines and the newly introduced penalized stumps are considered as weak learners. Estimates of standard deviations and stopping criteria, which are notorious problems in iterative procedures, are based on an approximate hat matrix. The method is shown to be a strong competitor to common procedures for the fitting of generalized additive models. In particular, in high-dimensional settings with many nuisance predictor variables it performs very well. PMID:17156269

  11. Influence of oxide-based sintering additives on densification and mechanical behavior of tricalcium phosphate (TCP).

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Himesh A; Kalita, Samar J

    2007-05-01

    In this research, we studied and analyzed the effects of four different oxide-based sintering additives on densification, mechanical behavior, biodegradation and biocompatibility of tricalcium phosphate (TCP) bioceramics. Selective sintering additives were introduced into pure TCP ceramics, in small quantities, through homogeneous mixing, using a mortar and pestle. The consequent powders of different compositions were pressed into cylindrical compacts, uniaxially and sintered at elevated temperatures, 1150 degrees C and 1250 degrees C, separately in a muffle furnace. X-ray powder diffraction technique was used to analyze the phase-purity of TCP after sintering. Hardness of these sintered specimens was evaluated using a Vickers hardness tester. Sintered cylindrical samples were tested under uniaxial compressive loading, as a function of composition to determine their failure strength. Biodegradation studies conducted using simulated body fluid under dynamic environment, revealed that these additives could control the rate of resorption and hardness degradation of TCP ceramics. PMID:17211718

  12. Risk-based analyses in support of California hazardous site remediation

    SciTech Connect

    Ringland, J.T.

    1995-08-01

    The California Environmental Enterprise (CEE) is a joint program of the Department of Energy (DOE), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratories. Its goal is to make DOE laboratory expertise accessible to hazardous site cleanups in the state This support might involve working directly with parties responsible for individual cleanups or it might involve working with the California Environmental Protection Agency to develop tools that would be applicable across a broad range of sites. As part of its initial year`s activities, the CEE supported a review to examine where laboratory risk and risk-based systems analysis capabilities might be most effectively applied. To this end, this study draws the following observations. The labs have a clear role in analyses supporting the demonstration and transfer of laboratory characterization or remediation technologies. The labs may have opportunities in developing broadly applicable analysis tools and computer codes for problems such as site characterization or efficient management of resources. Analysis at individual sites, separate from supporting lab technologies or prototyping general tools, may be appropriate only in limited circumstances. In any of these roles, the labs` capabilities extend beyond health risk assessment to the broader areas of risk management and risk-based systems analysis.

  13. Analyses of microstructural and elastic properties of porous SOFC cathodes based on focused ion beam tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhangwei; Wang, Xin; Giuliani, Finn; Atkinson, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical properties of porous SOFC electrodes are largely determined by their microstructures. Measurements of the elastic properties and microstructural parameters can be achieved by modelling of the digitally reconstructed 3D volumes based on the real electrode microstructures. However, the reliability of such measurements is greatly dependent on the processing of raw images acquired for reconstruction. In this work, the actual microstructures of La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) cathodes sintered at an elevated temperature were reconstructed based on dual-beam FIB/SEM tomography. Key microstructural and elastic parameters were estimated and correlated. Analyses of their sensitivity to the grayscale threshold value applied in the image segmentation were performed. The important microstructural parameters included porosity, tortuosity, specific surface area, particle and pore size distributions, and inter-particle neck size distribution, which may have varying extent of effect on the elastic properties simulated from the microstructures using FEM. Results showed that different threshold value range would result in different degree of sensitivity for a specific parameter. The estimated porosity and tortuosity were more sensitive than surface area to volume ratio. Pore and neck size were found to be less sensitive than particle size. Results also showed that the modulus was essentially sensitive to the porosity which was largely controlled by the threshold value.

  14. Bacterial regulon modeling and prediction based on systematic cis regulatory motif analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bingqiang; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Guojun; Zhang, Hanyuan; Zeng, Erliang; Liu, Qi; Ma, Qin

    2016-03-01

    Regulons are the basic units of the response system in a bacterial cell, and each consists of a set of transcriptionally co-regulated operons. Regulon elucidation is the basis for studying the bacterial global transcriptional regulation network. In this study, we designed a novel co-regulation score between a pair of operons based on accurate operon identification and cis regulatory motif analyses, which can capture their co-regulation relationship much better than other scores. Taking full advantage of this discovery, we developed a new computational framework and built a novel graph model for regulon prediction. This model integrates the motif comparison and clustering and makes the regulon prediction problem substantially more solvable and accurate. To evaluate our prediction, a regulon coverage score was designed based on the documented regulons and their overlap with our prediction; and a modified Fisher Exact test was implemented to measure how well our predictions match the co-expressed modules derived from E. coli microarray gene-expression datasets collected under 466 conditions. The results indicate that our program consistently performed better than others in terms of the prediction accuracy. This suggests that our algorithms substantially improve the state-of-the-art, leading to a computational capability to reliably predict regulons for any bacteria.

  15. Deconvoluting complex tissues for expression quantitative trait locus-based analyses

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji-Heui; Li, Qiyuan; Fatima, Aquila; Eklund, Aron; Szallasi, Zoltan; Polyak, Kornelia; Richardson, Andrea L.; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer genome-wide association studies have pinpointed dozens of variants associated with breast cancer pathogenesis. The majority of risk variants, however, are located outside of known protein-coding regions. Therefore, identifying which genes the risk variants are acting through presents an important challenge. Variants that are associated with mRNA transcript levels are referred to as expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). Many studies have demonstrated that eQTL-based strategies provide a direct way to connect a trait-associated locus with its candidate target gene. Performing eQTL-based analyses in human samples is complicated because of the heterogeneous nature of human tissue. We addressed this issue by devising a method to computationally infer the fraction of cell types in normal human breast tissues. We then applied this method to 13 known breast cancer risk loci, which we hypothesized were eQTLs. For each risk locus, we took all known transcripts within a 2 Mb interval and performed an eQTL analysis in 100 reduction mammoplasty cases. A total of 18 significant associations were discovered (eight in the epithelial compartment and 10 in the stromal compartment). This study highlights the ability to perform large-scale eQTL studies in heterogeneous tissues. PMID:23650637

  16. Elasticity analyses of size-based red and white abalone matrix models: management and conservation.

    PubMed

    Rogers-Bennett, Laura; Leaf, Robert T

    2006-02-01

    Prospective elasticity analyses have been used to aid in the management of fished species and the conservation of endangered species. Elasticities were examined for deterministic size-based matrix models of red abalone, Haliotis rufescens, and white abalone, H. sorenseni, to evaluate which size classes influenced population growth (lambda) the most. In the red abalone matrix, growth transitions were determined from a tag recapture study and grouped into nine size classes. In the white abalone matrix, abalone growth was determined from a laboratory study and grouped into five size classes. Survivorship was estimated from tag recapture data for red abalone using a Jolly-Seber model with size as a covariate and used for both red and white abalone. Reproduction estimates for both models used averages of the number of mature eggs produced by female red and white abalone in each size class from four-year reproduction studies. Population growth rate (lambda) was set to 1.0, and the first-year survival (larval survival through to the first size class) was estimated by iteration. Survival elasticities were higher than fecundity elasticities in both the red and white matrix models. The sizes classes with the greatest survival elasticities, and therefore the most influence on population growth in the model, were the sublegal red abalone (150-178 mm) and the largest white abalone size class (140-175 mm). For red abalone, the existing minimum legal size (178 mm) protects the size class the model suggests is critical to population growth. Implementation of education programs for novice divers coupled with renewed enforcement may serve to minimize incidental mortality of the critical size class. For white abalone, conservation efforts directed at restoring adults may have more of an impact on population growth than efforts focusing on juveniles. Our work is an example of how prospective elasticity analyses of size-structured matrix models can be used to quantitatively evaluate

  17. Enhancing Surface Finish of Additively Manufactured Titanium and Cobalt Chrome Elements Using Laser Based Finishing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gora, Wojciech S.; Tian, Yingtao; Cabo, Aldara Pan; Ardron, Marcus; Maier, Robert R. J.; Prangnell, Philip; Weston, Nicholas J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    Additive manufacturing (AM) offers the possibility of creating a complex free form object as a single element, which is not possible using traditional mechanical machining. Unfortunately the typically rough surface finish of additively manufactured parts is unsuitable for many applications. As a result AM parts must be post-processed; typically mechanically machined and/or and polished using either chemical or mechanical techniques (both of which have their limitations). Laser based polishing is based on remelting of a very thin surface layer and it offers potential as a highly repeatable, higher speed process capable of selective area polishing, and without any waste problems (no abrasives or liquids). In this paper an in-depth investigation of CW laser polishing of titanium and cobalt chrome AM elements is presented. The impact of different scanning strategies, laser parameters and initial surface condition on the achieved surface finish is evaluated.

  18. An Additive to Improve the Wear Characteristics of Perfluoropolyether Based Greases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, David G. V.; Fowzy, Mahmoud A.; Landry, James F.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Nguyen, QuynhGiao

    1999-01-01

    The friction and wear characteristics of two formulated perfluoropolyether based greases were compared to their non-additive base greases. One grease was developed for the electronics industry (designated as GXL-296A) while the other is for space applications (designated as GXL-320A). The formulated greases (GXL-296B and GXL-320B) contained a proprietary antiwear additive at an optimized concentration. Tests were conducted using a vacuum four-ball tribometer. AISI 52100 steel specimens were used for all GXL-296 tests. Both AISI 52100 steel and 440C stainless steel were tested with the GXL-320 greases. Test conditions included: a pressure less than 6.7 x 10(exp )-4 Pa, a 200N load, a sliding velocity of 28.8 mm/sec (100 rpm) and room temperature (approximately equal to 23 C). Wear rates for each grease were determined from the slope of the wear volume as a function of sliding distance. Both non-additive base greases yielded relatively high wear rates on the order of 10(exp -8) cu mm using AISI 52100 steel specimens. Formulated grease GXL-296B yielded a reduction in wear rate by a factor of approximately 21, while grease GXL-320B had a reduction of approximately 12 times. Lower wear rates (-50%) were observed with both GXL-320 greases using 440C stainless steel. Mean friction coefficients were slightly higher for both formulated greases compared to their base greases. The GXL-296 series (higher base oil viscosity) yielded much higher friction coefficients compared to their GXL-320 series (lower base oil viscosity) counterparts.

  19. Lewis base activation of Lewis acids: catalytic, enantioselective vinylogous aldol addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Denmark, Scott E; Heemstra, John R

    2007-07-20

    The generality of Lewis base catalyzed, Lewis acid mediated, enantioselective vinylogous aldol addition reactions has been investigated. The combination of silicon tetrachloride and chiral phosphoramides is a competent catalyst for highly selective additions of a variety of alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone-, 1,3-diketone-, and alpha,beta-unsaturated amide-derived dienolates to aldehydes. These reactions provided high levels of gamma-site selectivity for a variety of substitution patterns on the dienyl unit. Both ketone- and morpholine amide-derived dienol ethers afforded high enantio- and diastereoselectivity in the addition to conjugated aldehydes. Although alpha,beta-unsaturated ketone-derived dienolate did not react with aliphatic aldehydes, alpha,beta-unsaturated amide-derived dienolates underwent addition at reasonable rates affording high yields of vinylogous aldol product. The enantioselectivities achieved with the morpholine derived-dienolate in the addition to aliphatic aldehydes was the highest afforded to date with the silicon tetrachloride-chiral phosphoramide system. Furthermore, the ability to cleanly convert the morpholine amide to a methyl ketone was demonstrated.

  20. Pyrosequencing with di-base addition for single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping.

    PubMed

    Pu, Dan; Mao, Chengguang; Cui, Lunbiao; Shi, Zhiyang; Xiao, Pengfeng

    2016-05-01

    We develop color code-based pyrosequencing with di-base addition for analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). When a di-base is added into the polymerization, one or several two-color code(s) containing the type and the number of incorporated nucleotides will be produced. The code information obtained in a single run is useful to genotype SNPs as each allelic variant will give a specific pattern compared to the two other variants. Special care has to be taken while designing the di-base dispensation order. Here, we present a detailed protocol for establishing sequence-specific di-base addition to avoid nonsynchronous extension at the SNP sites. By using this technology, as few as 50 copies of DNA templates were accurately sequenced. Higher signals were produced and thus a relatively lower sample amount was required. Furthermore, the read length of per flow was increased, making simultaneous identification of multiple SNPs in a single sequencing run possible. Validation of the method was performed by using templates with two SNPs covering 37 bp and with three SNPs covering 58 bp as well as 82 bp. These SNPs were successfully genotyped by using only a sequencing primer in a single PCR/sequencing run. Our results demonstrated that this technology could be potentially developed into a powerful methodology to accurately determine SNPs so as to diagnose clinical settings.

  1. Pyrosequencing with di-base addition for single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping.

    PubMed

    Pu, Dan; Mao, Chengguang; Cui, Lunbiao; Shi, Zhiyang; Xiao, Pengfeng

    2016-05-01

    We develop color code-based pyrosequencing with di-base addition for analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). When a di-base is added into the polymerization, one or several two-color code(s) containing the type and the number of incorporated nucleotides will be produced. The code information obtained in a single run is useful to genotype SNPs as each allelic variant will give a specific pattern compared to the two other variants. Special care has to be taken while designing the di-base dispensation order. Here, we present a detailed protocol for establishing sequence-specific di-base addition to avoid nonsynchronous extension at the SNP sites. By using this technology, as few as 50 copies of DNA templates were accurately sequenced. Higher signals were produced and thus a relatively lower sample amount was required. Furthermore, the read length of per flow was increased, making simultaneous identification of multiple SNPs in a single sequencing run possible. Validation of the method was performed by using templates with two SNPs covering 37 bp and with three SNPs covering 58 bp as well as 82 bp. These SNPs were successfully genotyped by using only a sequencing primer in a single PCR/sequencing run. Our results demonstrated that this technology could be potentially developed into a powerful methodology to accurately determine SNPs so as to diagnose clinical settings. PMID:26935928

  2. Passivity and Passification of Memristor-Based Recurrent Neural Networks With Additive Time-Varying Delays.

    PubMed

    Rakkiyappan, Rajan; Chandrasekar, Arunachalam; Cao, Jinde

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a new design scheme for the passivity and passification of a class of memristor-based recurrent neural networks (MRNNs) with additive time-varying delays. The predictable assumptions on the boundedness and Lipschitz continuity of activation functions are formulated. The systems considered here are based on a different time-delay model suggested recently, which includes additive time-varying delay components in the state. The connection between the time-varying delay and its upper bound is considered when estimating the upper bound of the derivative of Lyapunov functional. It is recognized that the passivity condition can be expressed in a linear matrix inequality (LMI) format and by using characteristic function method. For state feedback passification, it is verified that it is apathetic to use immediate or delayed state feedback. By constructing a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional and employing Jensen's inequality and reciprocal convex combination technique together with a tighter estimation of the upper bound of the cross-product terms derived from the derivatives of the Lyapunov functional, less conventional delay-dependent passivity criteria are established in terms of LMIs. Moreover, second-order reciprocally convex approach is employed for deriving the upper bound for terms with inverses of squared convex parameters. The model based on the memristor with additive time-varying delays widens the application scope for the design of neural networks. Finally, pertinent examples are given to show the advantages of the derived passivity criteria and the significant improvement of the theoretical approaches.

  3. Formulation and Testing of Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels Containing Energetic Additives for Hybrid Rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs,Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    Many approaches have been considered in an effort to improve the regression rate of solid fuels for hybrid rocket applications. One promising method is to use a fuel with a fast burning rate such as paraffin wax; however, additional performance increases to the fuel regression rate are necessary to make the fuel a viable candidate to replace current launch propulsion systems. The addition of energetic and/or nano-sized particles is one way to increase mass-burning rates of the solid fuels and increase the overall performance of the hybrid rocket motor.1,2 Several paraffin-based fuel grains with various energetic additives (e.g., lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH4) have been cast in an attempt to improve regression rates. There are two major advantages to introducing LiAlH4 additive into the solid fuel matrix: 1) the increased characteristic velocity, 2) decreased dependency of Isp on oxidizer-to-fuel ratio. The testing and characterization of these solid-fuel grains have shown that continued work is necessary to eliminate unburned/unreacted fuel in downstream sections of the test apparatus.3 Changes to the fuel matrix include higher melting point wax and smaller energetic additive particles. The reduction in particle size through various methods can result in more homogeneous grain structure. The higher melting point wax can serve to reduce the melt-layer thickness, allowing the LiAlH4 particles to react closer to the burning surface, thus increasing the heat feedback rate and fuel regression rate. In addition to the formulation of LiAlH4 and paraffin wax solid-fuel grains, liquid additives of triethylaluminum and diisobutylaluminum hydride will be included in this study. Another promising fuel formulation consideration is to incorporate a small percentage of RDX as an additive to paraffin. A novel casting technique will be used by dissolving RDX in a solvent to crystallize the energetic additive. After dissolving the RDX in a solvent chosen for its compatibility

  4. White matter disruption in moderate/severe pediatric traumatic brain injury: Advanced tract-based analyses

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Emily L.; Jin, Yan; Villalon-Reina, Julio E.; Zhan, Liang; Kernan, Claudia L.; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard B.; Babbitt, Christopher J.; Johnson, Jeffrey L.; Giza, Christopher C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Asarnow, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children and can lead to a wide range of impairments. Brain imaging methods such as DTI (diffusion tensor imaging) are uniquely sensitive to the white matter (WM) damage that is common in TBI. However, higher-level analyses using tractography are complicated by the damage and decreased FA (fractional anisotropy) characteristic of TBI, which can result in premature tract endings. We used the newly developed autoMATE (automated multi-atlas tract extraction) method to identify differences in WM integrity. 63 pediatric patients aged 8–19 years with moderate/severe TBI were examined with cross sectional scanning at one or two time points after injury: a post-acute assessment 1–5 months post-injury and a chronic assessment 13–19 months post-injury. A battery of cognitive function tests was performed in the same time periods. 56 children were examined in the first phase, 28 TBI patients and 28 healthy controls. In the second phase 34 children were studied, 17 TBI patients and 17 controls (27 participants completed both post-acute and chronic phases). We did not find any significant group differences in the post-acute phase. Chronically, we found extensive group differences, mainly for mean and radial diffusivity (MD and RD). In the chronic phase, we found higher MD and RD across a wide range of WM. Additionally, we found correlations between these WM integrity measures and cognitive deficits. This suggests a distributed pattern of WM disruption that continues over the first year following a TBI in children. PMID:25737958

  5. Application of a computer-based chromatograph for automated water pollution analyses.

    PubMed

    Dowty, B; Green, L; Laseter, J L

    1976-04-01

    A modified head-space analysis technique, coupling thermal extraction with subsequent adsorption of organics on a poly (para 2,6-diphenyl phenylene) oxide adsorbent (Tenax-GC), has been found to be an efficacious tool when combined with gas chromatography for the study and monitoring of low molecular weight organics present in drinking water supplies (1-4). This procedure has allowed for the analysis of volatile organics in the low parts-per-billion range from 1 liter or less of tap water. Because thermal extraction requires smaller sample sizes than required in carbon-chloroform extraction methods and liquid/liquid extractions, the EPA has recently adopted this type of methodology (5,6). Passage of the Safe Water Drinking Act in December of 1974 has mandated that each state assumes the primary responsibility for carrying out the purposes of the legislation (7). Because the Act says that any supplier of water serving 25 individuals or more must comply with these regulations, large-scale monitoring programs will have to be undertaken. It was thus our desire to try to simplify the sample collection and data acquistion and reduction processes as much as possible, in the effort to make the procedure more adaptable for incorporation into routine monitoring programs. Also, automation reduces the experience and number of personnel required to perform the analyses. In addition to analysis of drinking water samples, the automated procedure described hereinafter can also be applied to monitoring industrial plant effluents, waste water treatment processes, and general quality control monitoring of low molecular weight organic compounds.

  6. Application of a computer-based chromatograph for automated water pollution analyses.

    PubMed

    Dowty, B; Green, L; Laseter, J L

    1976-04-01

    A modified head-space analysis technique, coupling thermal extraction with subsequent adsorption of organics on a poly (para 2,6-diphenyl phenylene) oxide adsorbent (Tenax-GC), has been found to be an efficacious tool when combined with gas chromatography for the study and monitoring of low molecular weight organics present in drinking water supplies (1-4). This procedure has allowed for the analysis of volatile organics in the low parts-per-billion range from 1 liter or less of tap water. Because thermal extraction requires smaller sample sizes than required in carbon-chloroform extraction methods and liquid/liquid extractions, the EPA has recently adopted this type of methodology (5,6). Passage of the Safe Water Drinking Act in December of 1974 has mandated that each state assumes the primary responsibility for carrying out the purposes of the legislation (7). Because the Act says that any supplier of water serving 25 individuals or more must comply with these regulations, large-scale monitoring programs will have to be undertaken. It was thus our desire to try to simplify the sample collection and data acquistion and reduction processes as much as possible, in the effort to make the procedure more adaptable for incorporation into routine monitoring programs. Also, automation reduces the experience and number of personnel required to perform the analyses. In addition to analysis of drinking water samples, the automated procedure described hereinafter can also be applied to monitoring industrial plant effluents, waste water treatment processes, and general quality control monitoring of low molecular weight organic compounds. PMID:1254680

  7. PASMet: a web-based platform for prediction, modelling and analyses of metabolic systems.

    PubMed

    Sriyudthsak, Kansuporn; Mejia, Ramon Francisco; Arita, Masanori; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-07-01

    PASMet (Prediction, Analysis and Simulation of Metabolic networks) is a web-based platform for proposing and verifying mathematical models to understand the dynamics of metabolism. The advantages of PASMet include user-friendliness and accessibility, which enable biologists and biochemists to easily perform mathematical modelling. PASMet offers a series of user-functions to handle the time-series data of metabolite concentrations. The functions are organised into four steps: (i) Prediction of a probable metabolic pathway and its regulation; (ii) Construction of mathematical models; (iii) Simulation of metabolic behaviours; and (iv) Analysis of metabolic system characteristics. Each function contains various statistical and mathematical methods that can be used independently. Users who may not have enough knowledge of computing or programming can easily and quickly analyse their local data without software downloads, updates or installations. Users only need to upload their files in comma-separated values (CSV) format or enter their model equations directly into the website. Once the time-series data or mathematical equations are uploaded, PASMet automatically performs computation on server-side. Then, users can interactively view their results and directly download them to their local computers. PASMet is freely available with no login requirement at http://pasmet.riken.jp/ from major web browsers on Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems.

  8. PASMet: a web-based platform for prediction, modelling and analyses of metabolic systems

    PubMed Central

    Sriyudthsak, Kansuporn; Mejia, Ramon Francisco; Arita, Masanori; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-01-01

    PASMet (Prediction, Analysis and Simulation of Metabolic networks) is a web-based platform for proposing and verifying mathematical models to understand the dynamics of metabolism. The advantages of PASMet include user-friendliness and accessibility, which enable biologists and biochemists to easily perform mathematical modelling. PASMet offers a series of user-functions to handle the time-series data of metabolite concentrations. The functions are organised into four steps: (i) Prediction of a probable metabolic pathway and its regulation; (ii) Construction of mathematical models; (iii) Simulation of metabolic behaviours; and (iv) Analysis of metabolic system characteristics. Each function contains various statistical and mathematical methods that can be used independently. Users who may not have enough knowledge of computing or programming can easily and quickly analyse their local data without software downloads, updates or installations. Users only need to upload their files in comma-separated values (CSV) format or enter their model equations directly into the website. Once the time-series data or mathematical equations are uploaded, PASMet automatically performs computation on server-side. Then, users can interactively view their results and directly download them to their local computers. PASMet is freely available with no login requirement at http://pasmet.riken.jp/ from major web browsers on Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems. PMID:27174940

  9. Structure-based Analyses Reveal Distinct Binding Sites for Atg2 and Phosphoinositides in Atg18*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yasunori; Kobayashi, Takafumi; Yamamoto, Hayashi; Hoshida, Hisashi; Akada, Rinji; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori; Noda, Nobuo N.

    2012-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system by which cytoplasmic materials are enclosed by an autophagosome and delivered to a lysosome/vacuole. Atg18 plays a critical role in autophagosome formation as a complex with Atg2 and phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate (PtdIns(3)P). However, little is known about the structure of Atg18 and its recognition mode of Atg2 or PtdIns(3)P. Here, we report the crystal structure of Kluyveromyces marxianus Hsv2, an Atg18 paralog, at 2.6 Å resolution. The structure reveals a seven-bladed β-propeller without circular permutation. Mutational analyses of Atg18 based on the K. marxianus Hsv2 structure suggested that Atg18 has two phosphoinositide-binding sites at blades 5 and 6, whereas the Atg2-binding region is located at blade 2. Point mutations in the loops of blade 2 specifically abrogated autophagy without affecting another Atg18 function, the regulation of vacuolar morphology at the vacuolar membrane. This architecture enables Atg18 to form a complex with Atg2 and PtdIns(3)P in parallel, thereby functioning in the formation of autophagosomes at autophagic membranes. PMID:22851171

  10. PASMet: a web-based platform for prediction, modelling and analyses of metabolic systems.

    PubMed

    Sriyudthsak, Kansuporn; Mejia, Ramon Francisco; Arita, Masanori; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-07-01

    PASMet (Prediction, Analysis and Simulation of Metabolic networks) is a web-based platform for proposing and verifying mathematical models to understand the dynamics of metabolism. The advantages of PASMet include user-friendliness and accessibility, which enable biologists and biochemists to easily perform mathematical modelling. PASMet offers a series of user-functions to handle the time-series data of metabolite concentrations. The functions are organised into four steps: (i) Prediction of a probable metabolic pathway and its regulation; (ii) Construction of mathematical models; (iii) Simulation of metabolic behaviours; and (iv) Analysis of metabolic system characteristics. Each function contains various statistical and mathematical methods that can be used independently. Users who may not have enough knowledge of computing or programming can easily and quickly analyse their local data without software downloads, updates or installations. Users only need to upload their files in comma-separated values (CSV) format or enter their model equations directly into the website. Once the time-series data or mathematical equations are uploaded, PASMet automatically performs computation on server-side. Then, users can interactively view their results and directly download them to their local computers. PASMet is freely available with no login requirement at http://pasmet.riken.jp/ from major web browsers on Windows, Mac and Linux operating systems. PMID:27174940

  11. Assessing cognitive processes with diffusion model analyses: a tutorial based on fast-dm-30

    PubMed Central

    Voss, Andreas; Voss, Jochen; Lerche, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion models can be used to infer cognitive processes involved in fast binary decision tasks. The model assumes that information is accumulated continuously until one of two thresholds is hit. In the analysis, response time distributions from numerous trials of the decision task are used to estimate a set of parameters mapping distinct cognitive processes. In recent years, diffusion model analyses have become more and more popular in different fields of psychology. This increased popularity is based on the recent development of several software solutions for the parameter estimation. Although these programs make the application of the model relatively easy, there is a shortage of knowledge about different steps of a state-of-the-art diffusion model study. In this paper, we give a concise tutorial on diffusion modeling, and we present fast-dm-30, a thoroughly revised and extended version of the fast-dm software (Voss and Voss, 2007) for diffusion model data analysis. The most important improvement of the fast-dm version is the possibility to choose between different optimization criteria (i.e., Maximum Likelihood, Chi-Square, and Kolmogorov-Smirnov), which differ in applicability for different data sets. PMID:25870575

  12. A Rapid and Simple Method for Microscopy-Based Stomata Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Jochen F.; Fäßler, Florian; Bürgel, Patrick F.; Chaban, Christina

    2016-01-01

    There are two major methodical approaches with which changes of status in stomatal pores are addressed: indirectly by measurement of leaf transpiration, and directly by measurement of stomatal apertures. Application of the former method requires special equipment, whereas microscopic images are utilized for the direct measurements. Due to obscure visualization of cell boundaries in intact leaves, a certain degree of invasive leaf manipulation is often required. Our aim was to develop a protocol based on the minimization of leaf manipulation and the reduction of analysis completion time, while still producing consistent results. We applied rhodamine 6G staining of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves for stomata visualization, which greatly simplifies the measurement of stomatal apertures. By using this staining protocol, we successfully conducted analyses of stomatal responses in Arabidopsis leaves to both closure and opening stimuli. We performed long-term monitoring of living stomata and were able to document the same leaf before and after treatment. Moreover, we developed a protocol for rapid-fixation of epidermal peels, which enables high throughput data analysis. The described method allows analysis of stomatal apertures with minimal leaf manipulation and usage of the same leaf for sequential measurements, and will facilitate the analysis of several lines in parallel. PMID:27732636

  13. Considerations for Comprehensive Analyses of Sporozoite-Based Controlled Human Malaria Infection Studies

    PubMed Central

    Lover, Andrew A.

    2015-01-01

    There has been renewed interest in the use of sporozoite-based approaches for controlled human malaria infections (CHMIs), and several sets of human challenge studies have recently completed. A study undertaken in Tanzania and published in 2014 found dose dependence between 10,000 and 25,000 sporozoite doses, as well as divergent times-to-parasitemia relative to earlier studies in European volunteers, with important implications for planning future studies. Analysis of time-to-event data has had extensive development in recent years, but these methods have had limited exposure outside biostatistics. Expansion of the published analyses to include recent methodological approaches optimized for the types of data used could provide a richer analysis of these studies and may result in alternative findings. Specifically, in a re-analysis of these data using survival analysis techniques, the differences recorded in prepatent periods between the two dosing regimens do not reach statistical significance, and there is no evidence for statistically significant differences in prepatent periods between the Dutch and Tanzanian study sites. Although these findings do not impact the reported safety and tolerability of challange with cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum sporozoites (PfSPZ), or invalidate the authors' hypotheses regarding naturally acquired immunity and its effect on parasite growth rates and prepatent periods, they highlight important opportunities to more fully use datasets from these trials and related CHMI experiments in the planning of future challenge studies. PMID:26392161

  14. Effect of conductive additives to gel electrolytes on activated carbon-based supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzegar, Farshad; Dangbegnon, Julien K.; Bello, Abdulhakeem; Momodu, Damilola Y.; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Manyala, Ncholu

    2015-09-01

    This article is focused on polymer based gel electrolyte due to the fact that polymers are cheap and can be used to achieve extended potential window for improved energy density of the supercapacitor devices when compared to aqueous electrolytes. Electrochemical characterization of a symmetric supercapacitor devices based on activated carbon in different polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) based gel electrolytes was carried out. The device exhibited a maximum energy density of 24 Wh kg-1 when carbon black was added to the gel electrolyte as conductive additive. The good energy density was correlated with the improved conductivity of the electrolyte medium which is favorable for fast ion transport in this relatively viscous environment. Most importantly, the device remained stable with no capacitance lost after 10,000 cycles.

  15. Processing of New Materials by Additive Manufacturing: Iron-Based Alloys Containing Silver for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niendorf, Thomas; Brenne, Florian; Hoyer, Peter; Schwarze, Dieter; Schaper, Mirko; Grothe, Richard; Wiesener, Markus; Grundmeier, Guido; Maier, Hans Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    In the biomedical sector, production of bioresorbable implants remains challenging due to improper dissolution rates or deficient strength of many candidate alloys. Promising materials for overcoming the prevalent drawbacks are iron-based alloys containing silver. However, due to immiscibility of iron and silver these alloys cannot be manufactured based on conventional processing routes. In this study, iron-manganese-silver alloys were for the first time synthesized by means of additive manufacturing. Based on combined mechanical, microscopic, and electrochemical studies, it is shown that silver particles well distributed in the matrix can be obtained, leading to cathodic sites in the composite material. Eventually, this results in an increased dissolution rate of the alloy. Stress-strain curves showed that the incorporation of silver barely affects the mechanical properties.

  16. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  17. Infrared thermography for laser-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing processes

    SciTech Connect

    Moylan, Shawn; Whitenton, Eric; Lane, Brandon; Slotwinski, John

    2014-02-18

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has the potential to revolutionize discrete part manufacturing, but improvements in processing of metallic materials are necessary before AM will see widespread adoption. A better understanding of AM processes, resulting from physics-based modeling as well as direct process metrology, will form the basis for these improvements. Infrared (IR) thermography of AM processes can provide direct process metrology, as well as data necessary for the verification of physics-based models. We review selected works examining how IR thermography was implemented and used in various powder-bed AM processes. This previous work, as well as significant experience at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in temperature measurement and IR thermography for machining processes, shapes our own research in AM process metrology with IR thermography. We discuss our experimental design, as well as plans for future IR measurements of a laser-based powder bed fusion AM process.

  18. Linking Proxy-Based and Datum-Based Shorelines on a High-Energy Coastline: Implications for Shoreline Change Analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruggiero, P.; Kaminsky, G.M.; Gelfenbaum, G.

    2003-01-01

    A primary purpose of this paper is to quantitatively link variously defined and derived shoreline estimates commonly used for shoreline change analysis. Estimates of shoreline mapping and derivation error, natural shoreline variability, and the relationships between horizontally-derived (proxy-based) shorelines to vertical datums (e.g. MHW) are presented. A series of shoreline repeatability and variability experiments as well as data from a beach monitoring program along the high-energy US Pacific Northwest coast, indicate total uncertainty estimates of the horizontal position of proxy-based shorelines to be approximately ?? 50-150 m for T-sheets and aerial photography and approximately ?? 15 m for datum-based shorelines derived from ground- or air-based topographic surveys. The ability to obtain reliable shoreline change results depends upon both the selected shoreline definition (e.g. horizontal- or feature-based proxy, or datum-based intercept) and the accuracy of the technique used in mapping or interpreting its position. The position of the selected shoreline on the beach profile determines its inherent temporal and spatial variability, an important consideration that has often been overlooked in the scientific literature on shoreline change, Historical shorelines mapped on NOS T-sheets and aerial photos have commonly identified high water line (HWL)-type shorelines, which are shown to be higher on the beach surface than the MHW-datum intercept along coasts subject to wave runup. Analyses of 4.5 years of beach profile data from the southwest Washington coast suggest that both the MHW and HWL-type shorelines have greater natural short-term variability than expected, significantly greater than the variability of shoreline proxies defined farther landward and higher on the beach profile. A model for determining the natural variability of HWL-type shorelines reveals that this short-term variability is the dominant factor in the large total uncertainty values

  19. A synchrotron study of microstructure gradient in laser additively formed epitaxial Ni-based superalloy

    DOE PAGES

    Xue, Jiawei; Zhang, Anfeng; Li, Yao; Qian, Dan; Wan, Jingchun; Qi, Baolu; Tamura, Nobumichi; Song, Zhongxiao; Chen, Kai

    2015-10-08

    Laser additive forming is considered to be one of the promising techniques to repair single crystal Ni-based superalloy parts to extend their life and reduce the cost. Preservation of the single crystalline nature and prevention of thermal mechanical failure are two of the most essential issues for the application of this technique. Here we employ synchrotron X-ray microdiffraction to evaluate the quality in terms of crystal orientation and defect distribution of a Ni-based superalloy DZ125L directly formed by a laser additive process rooted from a single crystalline substrate of the same material. We show that a disorientation gradient caused bymore » a high density of geometrically necessary dislocations and resultant subgrains exists in the interfacial region between the epitaxial and stray grains. This creates a potential relationship of stray grain formation and defect accumulation. In conclusion, the observation offers new directions on the study of performance control and reliability of the laser additive manufactured superalloys.« less

  20. Measurements and simulations analysing the noise behaviour of grating-based X-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, T.; Bartl, P.; Durst, J.; Haas, W.; Michel, T.; Ritter, A.; Anton, G.

    2011-08-01

    In the last decades, phase-contrast imaging using a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer is possible even with a low-brilliance X-ray source. With the potential of increasing the soft-tissue contrast, this method is on its way into medical imaging. For this purpose, the knowledge of the underlying physics of this technique is necessary.With this paper, we would like to contribute to the understanding of grating-based phase-contrast imaging by presenting results on measurements and simulations regarding the noise behaviour of the differential phases.These measurements were done using a microfocus X-ray tube with a hybrid, photon-counting, semiconductor Medipix2 detector. The additional simulations were performed by our in-house developed phase-contrast simulation tool “SPHINX”, combining both wave and particle contributions of the simulated photons.The results obtained by both of these methods show the same behaviour. Increasing the number of photons leads to a linear decrease of the standard deviation of the phase. The number of used phase steps has no influence on the standard deviation, if the total number of photons is held constant.Furthermore, the probability density function (pdf) of the reconstructed differential phases was analysed. It turned out that the so-called von Mises distribution is the physically correct pdf, which was also confirmed by measurements.This information advances the understanding of grating-based phase-contrast imaging and can be used to improve image quality.

  1. Mango and acerola pulps as antioxidant additives in cassava starch bio-based film.

    PubMed

    Souza, Carolina O; Silva, Luciana T; Silva, Jaff R; López, Jorge A; Veiga-Santos, Pricila; Druzian, Janice I

    2011-03-23

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of incorporating mango and acerola pulps into a biodegradable matrix as a source of polyphenols, carotenoids, and other antioxidant compounds. We also sought to evaluate the efficacy of mango and acerola pulps as antioxidants in film-forming dispersions using a response surface methodology design experiment. The bio-based films were used to pack palm oil (maintained for 45 days of storage) under accelerated oxidation conditions (63% relative humidity and 30 °C) to simulate a storage experiment. The total carotenoid, total polyphenol, and vitamin C contents of films were evaluated, while the total carotenoid, peroxide index, conjugated diene, and hexanal content of the packaged product (palm oil) were also monitored. The same analysis also evaluated palm oil packed in films without antioxidant additives (C1), palm oil packed in low-density polyethylene films (C2), and palm oil with no package (C3) as a control. Although the film-forming procedure affected the antioxidant compounds, the results indicated that antioxidants were effective additives for protecting the packaged product. A lower peroxide index (36.12%), which was significantly different from that of the control (p<0.05), was detected in products packed in film formulations containing high concentration of additives. However, it was found that the high content of vitamin C in acerola pulp acted as a prooxidant agent, which suggests that the use of rich vitamin C pulps should be avoided as additives for films. PMID:21361289

  2. Mango and acerola pulps as antioxidant additives in cassava starch bio-based film.

    PubMed

    Souza, Carolina O; Silva, Luciana T; Silva, Jaff R; López, Jorge A; Veiga-Santos, Pricila; Druzian, Janice I

    2011-03-23

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of incorporating mango and acerola pulps into a biodegradable matrix as a source of polyphenols, carotenoids, and other antioxidant compounds. We also sought to evaluate the efficacy of mango and acerola pulps as antioxidants in film-forming dispersions using a response surface methodology design experiment. The bio-based films were used to pack palm oil (maintained for 45 days of storage) under accelerated oxidation conditions (63% relative humidity and 30 °C) to simulate a storage experiment. The total carotenoid, total polyphenol, and vitamin C contents of films were evaluated, while the total carotenoid, peroxide index, conjugated diene, and hexanal content of the packaged product (palm oil) were also monitored. The same analysis also evaluated palm oil packed in films without antioxidant additives (C1), palm oil packed in low-density polyethylene films (C2), and palm oil with no package (C3) as a control. Although the film-forming procedure affected the antioxidant compounds, the results indicated that antioxidants were effective additives for protecting the packaged product. A lower peroxide index (36.12%), which was significantly different from that of the control (p<0.05), was detected in products packed in film formulations containing high concentration of additives. However, it was found that the high content of vitamin C in acerola pulp acted as a prooxidant agent, which suggests that the use of rich vitamin C pulps should be avoided as additives for films.

  3. Impact ignition of aluminum-teflon based energetic materials impregnated with nano-structured carbon additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kappagantula, Keerti; Pantoya, Michelle L.; Hunt, Emily M.

    2012-07-01

    The inclusion of graphene into composite energetic materials to enhance their performance is a new area of interest. Studies have shown that the addition of graphene significantly enhances the thermal transport properties of an energetic composite, but how graphene influences the composite's ignition sensitivity has not been studied. The objective of this study is to examine the influence of carbon additives in composite energetic material composed of aluminum and polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon™) on ignition sensitivity due to low velocity, drop weight impact. Specifically, three forms of carbon additives were investigated and selected based on different physical and structural properties: spherically shaped amorphous nano particles of carbon, cylindrically shaped multi walled carbon nanotubes, and sheet like graphene flakes. Results show an interesting trend: composites consisting of carbon nanotubes are significantly more sensitive to impact ignition and require the lowest ignition energy. In contrast, graphene is least sensitive to ignition exhibiting negligible reduction in ignition energy with low concentrations of graphene additive. While graphene does not significantly sensitize the energetic composite to ignition, graphene does, however, result in greater overall reactivity as observed through images of the reaction. The enhanced thermal transport properties of graphene containing composites may promote greater energy transport once ignited, but those properties do not also increase ignition sensitivity. These results and the understanding of the structural arrangement of particles within a composite as a key parameter affecting impact ignition sensitivity will have an impact on the safe handling and use of composite energetic materials.

  4. Development of SAM-based multi-layer SERS substrates for intracellular analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klutse, Charles K.; Cullum, Brian M.

    2010-04-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful tool for intracellular analyses due its minimally invasive nature and molecular specificity. This research focuses on optimizing the sensitivity of SERS in order to widely apply it to the detection of ultra-trace biomolecules within individual living cells. Recent results have shown that large SERS enhancement factors (EF) can be achieved with multi-layer SERS substrates. To fabricate multi-layer SERS substrates, alternating layers of metal films and dielectric spacers are cast over a non-confluent monolayer of nanostructures. Individual particles of these substrates are then immobilized with antibodies to develop SERS-based immuno-nanosensors. The multi-layer SERS EFs can be increased by the use of appropriate dielectric spacer to fabricate the substrates. To further understand the effect of dielectric spacers on the multi-layer SERS EFs, this talk discusses the characterization of the SERS enhancements of multi-layer metal film on nanostructure SERS substrates fabricated with self-assembled monolayer (SAM) spacers. Monolayers with different chain lengths have been systematically capped with varying amount of metal films. It was found that the SERS EFs depend on the nature of the monolayer formed and the amount of metal film deposited on the monolayer. Using optimal SAMs and the appropriate amount of metal film overlayers, SAM multi-layer SERS substrate with optimized SERS intensity can be fabricated. This talk will also explore the functionalization of the SERS substrates with appropriate bio-recognition elements to develop SERS-based immuno-nanosensors.

  5. Single-base-pair discrimination of terminal mismatches by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urakawa, Hidetoshi; Noble, Peter A.; El Fantroussi, Said; Kelly, John J.; Stahl, David A.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of single-base-pair near-terminal and terminal mismatches on the dissociation temperature (T(d)) and signal intensity of short DNA duplexes were determined by using oligonucleotide microarrays and neural network (NN) analyses. Two perfect-match probes and 29 probes having a single-base-pair mismatch at positions 1 to 5 from the 5' terminus of the probe were designed to target one of two short sequences representing 16S rRNA. Nonequilibrium dissociation rates (i.e., melting profiles) of all probe-target duplexes were determined simultaneously. Analysis of variance revealed that position of the mismatch, type of mismatch, and formamide concentration significantly affected the T(d) and signal intensity. Increasing the concentration of formamide in the washing buffer decreased the T(d) and signal intensity, and it decreased the variability of the signal. Although T(d)s of probe-target duplexes with mismatches in the first or second position were not significantly different from one another, duplexes with mismatches in the third to fifth positions had significantly lower T(d)s than those with mismatches in the first or second position. The trained NNs predicted the T(d) with high accuracies (R(2) = 0.93). However, the NNs predicted the signal intensity only moderately accurately (R(2) = 0.67), presumably due to increased noise in the signal intensity at low formamide concentrations. Sensitivity analysis revealed that the concentration of formamide explained most (75%) of the variability in T(d)s, followed by position of the mismatch (19%) and type of mismatch (6%). The results suggest that position of the mismatch at or near the 5' terminus plays a greater role in determining the T(d) and signal intensity of duplexes than the type of mismatch.

  6. Neural Spike-Train Analyses of the Speech-Based Envelope Power Spectrum Model

    PubMed Central

    Rallapalli, Varsha H.

    2016-01-01

    Diagnosing and treating hearing impairment is challenging because people with similar degrees of sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) often have different speech-recognition abilities. The speech-based envelope power spectrum model (sEPSM) has demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratio (SNRENV) from a modulation filter bank provides a robust speech-intelligibility measure across a wider range of degraded conditions than many long-standing models. In the sEPSM, noise (N) is assumed to: (a) reduce S + N envelope power by filling in dips within clean speech (S) and (b) introduce an envelope noise floor from intrinsic fluctuations in the noise itself. While the promise of SNRENV has been demonstrated for normal-hearing listeners, it has not been thoroughly extended to hearing-impaired listeners because of limited physiological knowledge of how SNHL affects speech-in-noise envelope coding relative to noise alone. Here, envelope coding to speech-in-noise stimuli was quantified from auditory-nerve model spike trains using shuffled correlograms, which were analyzed in the modulation-frequency domain to compute modulation-band estimates of neural SNRENV. Preliminary spike-train analyses show strong similarities to the sEPSM, demonstrating feasibility of neural SNRENV computations. Results suggest that individual differences can occur based on differential degrees of outer- and inner-hair-cell dysfunction in listeners currently diagnosed into the single audiological SNHL category. The predicted acoustic-SNR dependence in individual differences suggests that the SNR-dependent rate of susceptibility could be an important metric in diagnosing individual differences. Future measurements of the neural SNRENV in animal studies with various forms of SNHL will provide valuable insight for understanding individual differences in speech-in-noise intelligibility.

  7. Evidence-based recommendations on storing and handling specimens for analyses of insect microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Tobin J; Dickerson, Jacob C; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    the methods tested here, and base their choice according to practical considerations such as prior use, cost, and availability in the field, although we still advise that all samples within a study be handled in an identical manner when possible. We also suggest that, in large-scale molecular studies of hundreds of insect specimens, surface sterilization may not be worth the time and effort involved. This information should help researchers design sampling strategies and will facilitate cross-comparisons and meta-analyses of microbial community data obtained from insect specimens preserved in different ways. PMID:26311208

  8. Evidence-based recommendations on storing and handling specimens for analyses of insect microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Dickerson, Jacob C.; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    use any of the methods tested here, and base their choice according to practical considerations such as prior use, cost, and availability in the field, although we still advise that all samples within a study be handled in an identical manner when possible. We also suggest that, in large-scale molecular studies of hundreds of insect specimens, surface sterilization may not be worth the time and effort involved. This information should help researchers design sampling strategies and will facilitate cross-comparisons and meta-analyses of microbial community data obtained from insect specimens preserved in different ways. PMID:26311208

  9. Evidence-based recommendations on storing and handling specimens for analyses of insect microbiota.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Tobin J; Dickerson, Jacob C; Fierer, Noah

    2015-01-01

    the methods tested here, and base their choice according to practical considerations such as prior use, cost, and availability in the field, although we still advise that all samples within a study be handled in an identical manner when possible. We also suggest that, in large-scale molecular studies of hundreds of insect specimens, surface sterilization may not be worth the time and effort involved. This information should help researchers design sampling strategies and will facilitate cross-comparisons and meta-analyses of microbial community data obtained from insect specimens preserved in different ways.

  10. Energy and exergy analyses of a biomass-based hydrogen production system.

    PubMed

    Cohce, M K; Dincer, I; Rosen, M A

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, a novel biomass-based hydrogen production plant is investigated. The system uses oil palm shell as a feedstock. The main plant processes are biomass gasification, steam methane reforming and shift reaction. The modeling of the gasifier uses the Gibbs free energy minimization approach and chemical equilibrium considerations. The plant, with modifications, is simulated and analyzed thermodynamically using the Aspen Plus process simulation code (version 11.1). Exergy analysis, a useful tool for understanding and improving efficiency, is used throughout the investigation, in addition to energy analysis. The overall performance of the system is evaluated, and its efficiencies become 19% for exergy efficiency and 22% energy efficiency while the gasifier cold gas efficiency is 18%. PMID:21724387

  11. Energy and exergy analyses of a biomass-based hydrogen production system.

    PubMed

    Cohce, M K; Dincer, I; Rosen, M A

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, a novel biomass-based hydrogen production plant is investigated. The system uses oil palm shell as a feedstock. The main plant processes are biomass gasification, steam methane reforming and shift reaction. The modeling of the gasifier uses the Gibbs free energy minimization approach and chemical equilibrium considerations. The plant, with modifications, is simulated and analyzed thermodynamically using the Aspen Plus process simulation code (version 11.1). Exergy analysis, a useful tool for understanding and improving efficiency, is used throughout the investigation, in addition to energy analysis. The overall performance of the system is evaluated, and its efficiencies become 19% for exergy efficiency and 22% energy efficiency while the gasifier cold gas efficiency is 18%.

  12. Calibration-free absolute frequency response measurement of directly modulated lasers based on additional modulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shangjian; Zou, Xinhai; Wang, Heng; Zhang, Yali; Lu, Rongguo; Liu, Yong

    2015-10-15

    A calibration-free electrical method is proposed for measuring the absolute frequency response of directly modulated semiconductor lasers based on additional modulation. The method achieves the electrical domain measurement of the modulation index of directly modulated lasers without the need for correcting the responsivity fluctuation in the photodetection. Moreover, it doubles measuring frequency range by setting a specific frequency relationship between the direct and additional modulation. Both the absolute and relative frequency response of semiconductor lasers are experimentally measured from the electrical spectrum of the twice-modulated optical signal, and the measured results are compared to those obtained with conventional methods to check the consistency. The proposed method provides calibration-free and accurate measurement for high-speed semiconductor lasers with high-resolution electrical spectrum analysis.

  13. A brief survey of sensing for metal-based powder bed fusion additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Bryant K.; Reutzel, Edward W.; Nassar, Abdalla R.; Dickman, Corey J.; Hall, Benjamin T.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose - Powder bed fusion additive manufacturing (PBFAM) of metal components has attracted much attention, but the inability to quickly and easily ensure quality has limited its industrial use. Since the technology is currently being investigated for critical engineered components and is largely considered unsuitable for high volume production, traditional statistical quality control methods cannot be readily applied. An alternative strategy for quality control is to monitor the build in real time with a variety of sensing methods and, when possible, to correct any defects as they occur. This article reviews the cause of common defects in powder bed additive manufacturing, briefly surveys process monitoring strategies in the literature, and summarizes recently-developed strategies to monitor part quality during the build process. Design/methodology/approach - Factors that affect part quality in powder bed additive manufacturing are categorized as those influenced by machine variables and those affected by other build attributes. Within each category, multiple process monitoring methods are presented. Findings - A multitude of factors contribute to the overall quality of a part built using PBFAM. Rather than limiting processing to a pre-defined build recipe and assuming complete repeatability, part quality will be ensured by monitoring the process as it occurs and, when possible, altering the process conditions or build plan in real-time. Recent work shows promise in this area and brings us closer to the goal of wide-spread adoption of additive manufacturing technology. Originality/value - This work serves to introduce and define the possible sources of defects and errors in metal-based PBFAM, and surveys sensing and control methods which have recently been investigated to increase overall part quality. Emphasis has been placed on novel developments in the field and their contribution to the understanding of the additive manufacturing process.

  14. Subspace-based additive fuzzy systems for classification and dimension reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jauch, Thomas W.

    1997-10-01

    In classification tasks the appearance of high dimensional feature vectors and small datasets is a common problem. It is well known that these two characteristics usually result in an oversized model with poor generalization power. In this contribution a new way to cope with such tasks is presented which is based on the assumption that in high dimensional problems almost all data points are located in a low dimensional subspace. A way is proposed to design a fuzzy system on a unified framework, and to use it to develop a new model for classification tasks. It is shown that the new model can be understood as an additive fuzzy system with parameter based basis functions. Different parts of the models are only defined in a subspace of the whole feature space. The subspaces are not defined a priori but are subject to an optimization procedure as all other parameters of the model. The new model has the capability to cope with high feature dimensions. The model has similarities to projection pursuit and to the mixture of experts architecture. The model is trained in a supervised manner via conjugate gradients and logistic regression, or backfitting and conjugate gradients to handle classification tasks. An efficient initialization procedure is also presented. In addition a technique based on oblique projections is presented which enlarges the capabilities of the model to use data with missing features. It is possible to use data with missing features in the training and in the classification phase. Based on the design of the model, it is possible to prune certain basis functions with an OLS (orthogonal least squares) based technique in order to reduce the model size. Results are presented on an artificial and an application example.

  15. Improved Li/TiS2 cell cycling in ether-based electrolytes with synergistic additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominey, L. A.; Goldman, J. L.; Koch, V. R.; Shen, D.; Subbarao, S.; Huang, C.-K.; Halpert, G.; Deligiannis, F.

    1991-01-01

    Based on an extensive series of normalized full cell Li/TiS2 cycling studies, open-circuit storage tests, microcalorimetry and AC impedance studies, and chemical precedent, we propose an integrated chemical model consistent with experimental observations concerning the behavior of numerous LiAsF6/cyclic ether electrolytes. The particularly striking potency of certain additives such as 2-methylfuran and the hydroxide action resides in their ability to intercept several different adverse catalytic processes concurrently in the bulk electrolyte as well as the Li anode and TiS2 cathode.

  16. Neither azeotropic drying, nor base nor other additives: a minimalist approach to (18)F-labeling.

    PubMed

    Richarz, R; Krapf, P; Zarrad, F; Urusova, E A; Neumaier, B; Zlatopolskiy, B D

    2014-10-28

    A novel, efficient, time-saving and reliable radiolabeling procedure via nucleophilic substitution with [(18)F]fluoride is described. Different radiolabeled aliphatic and aromatic compounds were prepared in high radiochemical yields simply by heating of quaternary anilinium, diaryliodonium and triarylsulfonium [(18)F]fluorides in suitable solvents. The latter were obtained via direct elution of (18)F(-) from an anion exchange resin with alcoholic solutions of onium precursors. Neither azeotropic evaporation of water, nor a base, nor any other additives like cryptands or crown ethers were necessary. Due to its simplicity this method should be highly suitable for automated radiosyntheses, especially in microfluidic devices. PMID:25190038

  17. Analyses of preservatives by capillary electrochromatography using methacrylate ester-based monolithic columns.

    PubMed

    Huang, Hsi-Ya; Chiu, Chen-Wen; Huang, I-Yun; Yeh, Jui-Ming

    2004-10-01

    Five common food preservatives were analyzed by capillary electrochromatography, utilizing a methacrylate ester-based monolithic capillary as separation column. In order to optimize the separation of these preservatives, the effects of the pore size of the polymeric stationary phase, the pH and composition of the mobile phase on separation were examined. For all analytes, it was found that an increase in pore size caused a reduction in retention time. However, separation performances were greatly improved in monolithic columns with smaller pore sizes. The pH of the mobile phase had little influence on separation resolution, but a dramatic effect on the amount of sample that was needed to be electrokinetically injected into the monolithic column. In addition, the retention behaviors of these analytes were strongly influenced by the level of acetonitrile in the mobile phase. An optimal separation of the five preservatives was obtained within 7.0 min with a pH 3.0 mobile phase composed of phosphate buffer and acetonitrile 35:65 v/v. Finally, preservatives in real commercial products, including cold syrup, lotion, wine, and soy sauces, were successfully determined by the methacrylate ester-based polymeric monolithic column under this optimized condition.

  18. Convergence analyses on on-line weight noise injection-based training algorithms for MLPs.

    PubMed

    Sum, John; Leung, Chi-Sing; Ho, Kevin

    2012-11-01

    Injecting weight noise during training is a simple technique that has been proposed for almost two decades. However, little is known about its convergence behavior. This paper studies the convergence of two weight noise injection-based training algorithms, multiplicative weight noise injection with weight decay and additive weight noise injection with weight decay. We consider that they are applied to multilayer perceptrons either with linear or sigmoid output nodes. Let w(t) be the weight vector, let V(w) be the corresponding objective function of the training algorithm, let α >; 0 be the weight decay constant, and let μ(t) be the step size. We show that if μ(t)→ 0, then with probability one E[||w(t)||2(2)] is bound and lim(t) → ∞ ||w(t)||2 exists. Based on these two properties, we show that if μ(t)→ 0, Σtμ(t)=∞, and Σtμ(t)(2) <; ∞, then with probability one these algorithms converge. Moreover, w(t) converges with probability one to a point where ∇wV(w)=0. PMID:24808076

  19. Extending substructure based iterative solvers to multiple load and repeated analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farhat, Charbel

    1993-01-01

    Direct solvers currently dominate commercial finite element structural software, but do not scale well in the fine granularity regime targeted by emerging parallel processors. Substructure based iterative solvers--often called also domain decomposition algorithms--lend themselves better to parallel processing, but must overcome several obstacles before earning their place in general purpose structural analysis programs. One such obstacle is the solution of systems with many or repeated right hand sides. Such systems arise, for example, in multiple load static analyses and in implicit linear dynamics computations. Direct solvers are well-suited for these problems because after the system matrix has been factored, the multiple or repeated solutions can be obtained through relatively inexpensive forward and backward substitutions. On the other hand, iterative solvers in general are ill-suited for these problems because they often must restart from scratch for every different right hand side. In this paper, we present a methodology for extending the range of applications of domain decomposition methods to problems with multiple or repeated right hand sides. Basically, we formulate the overall problem as a series of minimization problems over K-orthogonal and supplementary subspaces, and tailor the preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm to solve them efficiently. The resulting solution method is scalable, whereas direct factorization schemes and forward and backward substitution algorithms are not. We illustrate the proposed methodology with the solution of static and dynamic structural problems, and highlight its potential to outperform forward and backward substitutions on parallel computers. As an example, we show that for a linear structural dynamics problem with 11640 degrees of freedom, every time-step beyond time-step 15 is solved in a single iteration and consumes 1.0 second on a 32 processor iPSC-860 system; for the same problem and the same parallel

  20. Molecular Characterization of Five Potyviruses Infecting Korean Sweet Potatoes Based on Analyses of Complete Genome Sequences.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jaedeok; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Jung, Mi-Nam; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Lee, Sukchan; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2015-12-01

    Sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas L.) are grown extensively, in tropical and temperate regions, and are important food crops worldwide. In Korea, potyviruses, including Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), Sweet potato virus C (SPVC), Sweet potato virus G (SPVG), Sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2), and Sweet potato latent virus (SPLV), have been detected in sweet potato fields at a high (~95%) incidence. In the present work, complete genome sequences of 18 isolates, representing the five potyviruses mentioned above, were compared with previously reported genome sequences. The complete genomes consisted of 10,081 to 10,830 nucleotides, excluding the poly-A tails. Their genomic organizations were typical of the Potyvirus genus, including one target open reading frame coding for a putative polyprotein. Based on phylogenetic analyses and sequence comparisons, the Korean SPFMV isolates belonged to the strains RC and O with >98% nucleotide sequence identity. Korean SPVC isolates had 99% identity to the Japanese isolate SPVC-Bungo and 70% identity to the SPFMV isolates. The Korean SPVG isolates showed 99% identity to the three previously reported SPVG isolates. Korean SPV2 isolates had 97% identity to the SPV2 GWB-2 isolate from the USA. Korean SPLV isolates had a relatively low (88%) nucleotide sequence identity with the Taiwanese SPLV-TW isolates, and they were phylogenetically distantly related to SPFMV isolates. Recombination analysis revealed that possible recombination events occurred in the P1, HC-Pro and NIa-NIb regions of SPFMV and SPLV isolates and these regions were identified as hotspots for recombination in the sweet potato potyviruses.

  1. Molecular Characterization of Five Potyviruses Infecting Korean Sweet Potatoes Based on Analyses of Complete Genome Sequences.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jaedeok; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Jung, Mi-Nam; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Lee, Sukchan; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2015-12-01

    Sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas L.) are grown extensively, in tropical and temperate regions, and are important food crops worldwide. In Korea, potyviruses, including Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), Sweet potato virus C (SPVC), Sweet potato virus G (SPVG), Sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2), and Sweet potato latent virus (SPLV), have been detected in sweet potato fields at a high (~95%) incidence. In the present work, complete genome sequences of 18 isolates, representing the five potyviruses mentioned above, were compared with previously reported genome sequences. The complete genomes consisted of 10,081 to 10,830 nucleotides, excluding the poly-A tails. Their genomic organizations were typical of the Potyvirus genus, including one target open reading frame coding for a putative polyprotein. Based on phylogenetic analyses and sequence comparisons, the Korean SPFMV isolates belonged to the strains RC and O with >98% nucleotide sequence identity. Korean SPVC isolates had 99% identity to the Japanese isolate SPVC-Bungo and 70% identity to the SPFMV isolates. The Korean SPVG isolates showed 99% identity to the three previously reported SPVG isolates. Korean SPV2 isolates had 97% identity to the SPV2 GWB-2 isolate from the USA. Korean SPLV isolates had a relatively low (88%) nucleotide sequence identity with the Taiwanese SPLV-TW isolates, and they were phylogenetically distantly related to SPFMV isolates. Recombination analysis revealed that possible recombination events occurred in the P1, HC-Pro and NIa-NIb regions of SPFMV and SPLV isolates and these regions were identified as hotspots for recombination in the sweet potato potyviruses. PMID:26673876

  2. Fatigue analyses of the prototype Francis runners based on site measurements and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, X.; Chamberland-Lauzon, J.; Oram, C.; Klopfer, A.; Ruchonnet, N.

    2014-03-01

    With the increasing development of solar power and wind power which give an unstable output to the electrical grid, hydropower is required to give a rapid and flexible compensation, and the hydraulic turbines have to operate at off-design conditions frequently. Prototype Francis runners suffer from strong vibrations induced by high pressure pulsations at part load, low part load, speed-no-load and during start-stops and load rejections. Fatigue and damage may be caused by the alternating stress on the runner blades. Therefore, it becomes increasingly important to carry out fatigue analysis and life time assessment of the prototype Francis runners, especially at off-design conditions. This paper presents the fatigue analyses of the prototype Francis runners based on the strain gauge site measurements and numerical simulations. In the case of low part load, speed-no-load and transient events, since the Francis runners are subjected to complex hydraulic loading, which shows a stochastic characteristic, the rainflow counting method is used to obtain the number of cycles for various dynamic amplitude ranges. From middle load to full load, pressure pulsations caused by Rotor-stator- Interaction become the dominant hydraulic excitation of the runners. Forced response analysis is performed to calculate the maximum dynamic stress. The agreement between numerical and experimental stresses is evaluated using linear regression method. Taking into account the effect of the static stress on the S-N curve, the Miner's rule, a linear cumulative fatigue damage theory, is employed to calculate the damage factors of the prototype Francis runners at various operating conditions. The relative damage factors of the runners at different operating points are compared and discussed in detail.

  3. Molecular Characterization of Five Potyviruses Infecting Korean Sweet Potatoes Based on Analyses of Complete Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jaedeok; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Jung, Mi-Nam; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Lee, Sukchan; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas L.) are grown extensively, in tropical and temperate regions, and are important food crops worldwide. In Korea, potyviruses, including Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), Sweet potato virus C (SPVC), Sweet potato virus G (SPVG), Sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2), and Sweet potato latent virus (SPLV), have been detected in sweet potato fields at a high (~95%) incidence. In the present work, complete genome sequences of 18 isolates, representing the five potyviruses mentioned above, were compared with previously reported genome sequences. The complete genomes consisted of 10,081 to 10,830 nucleotides, excluding the poly-A tails. Their genomic organizations were typical of the Potyvirus genus, including one target open reading frame coding for a putative polyprotein. Based on phylogenetic analyses and sequence comparisons, the Korean SPFMV isolates belonged to the strains RC and O with >98% nucleotide sequence identity. Korean SPVC isolates had 99% identity to the Japanese isolate SPVC-Bungo and 70% identity to the SPFMV isolates. The Korean SPVG isolates showed 99% identity to the three previously reported SPVG isolates. Korean SPV2 isolates had 97% identity to the SPV2 GWB-2 isolate from the USA. Korean SPLV isolates had a relatively low (88%) nucleotide sequence identity with the Taiwanese SPLV-TW isolates, and they were phylogenetically distantly related to SPFMV isolates. Recombination analysis revealed that possible recombination events occurred in the P1, HC-Pro and NIa-NIb regions of SPFMV and SPLV isolates and these regions were identified as hotspots for recombination in the sweet potato potyviruses. PMID:26673876

  4. Automated microbial metabolism laboratory. [design of advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into test chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    The design and rationale of an advanced labeled release experiment based on single addition of soil and multiple sequential additions of media into each of four test chambers are outlined. The feasibility for multiple addition tests was established and various details of the methodology were studied. The four chamber battery of tests include: (1) determination of the effect of various atmospheric gases and selection of that gas which produces an optimum response; (2) determination of the effect of incubation temperature and selection of the optimum temperature for performing Martian biochemical tests; (3) sterile soil is dosed with a battery of C-14 labeled substrates and subjected to experimental temperature range; and (4) determination of the possible inhibitory effects of water on Martian organisms is performed initially by dosing with 0.01 ml and 0.5 ml of medium, respectively. A series of specifically labeled substrates are then added to obtain patterns in metabolic 14CO2 (C-14)O2 evolution.

  5. Metal hydride and pyrophoric fuel additives for dicyclopentadiene based hybrid propellants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shark, Steven C.

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the use of reactive energetic fuel additives that have the potential to increase the combustion performance of hybrid rocket propellants in terms of solid fuel regression rate and combustion efficiency. Additives that can augment the combustion flame zone in a hybrid rocket motor by means of increased energy feedback to the fuel grain surface are of great interest. Metal hydrides have large volumetric hydrogen densities, which gives these materials high performance potential as fuel additives in terms of specifc impulse. The excess hydrogen and corresponding base metal may also cause an increase in the hybrid rocket solid fuel regression rate. Pyrophoric additives also have potential to increase the solid fuel regression rate by reacting more readily near the burning fuel surface providing rapid energy feedback. An experimental performance evaluation of metal hydride fuel additives for hybrid rocket motor propulsion systems is examined in this study. Hypergolic ignition droplet tests and an accelerated aging study revealed the protection capabilities of Dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) as a fuel binder, and the ability for unaided ignition. Static hybrid rocket motor experiments were conducted using DCPD as the fuel. Sodium borohydride (NabH4) and aluminum hydride (AlH3) were examined as fuel additives. Ninety percent rocket grade hydrogen peroxide (RGHP) was used as the oxidizer. In this study, the sensitivity of solid fuel regression rate and characteristic velocity (C*) efficiency to total fuel grain port mass flux and particle loading is examined. These results were compared to HTPB combustion performance as a baseline. Chamber pressure histories revealed steady motor operation in most tests, with reduced ignition delays when using NabH4 as a fuel additive. The addition of NabH4 and AlH3 produced up to a 47% and 85% increase in regression rate over neat DCPD, respectively. For all test conditions examined C* efficiency ranges

  6. Effect of additives on the tensile performance and protein solubility of industrial oilseed residual based plastics.

    PubMed

    Newson, William R; Kuktaite, Ramune; Hedenqvist, Mikael S; Gällstedt, Mikael; Johansson, Eva

    2014-07-16

    Ten chemical additives were selected from the literature for their proposed modifying activity in protein-protein interactions. These consisted of acids, bases, reducing agents, and denaturants and were added to residual deoiled meals of Crambe abyssinica (crambe) and Brassica carinata (carinata) to modify the properties of plastics produced through hot compression molding at 130 °C. The films produced were examined for tensile properties, protein solubility, molecular weight distribution, and water absorption. Of the additives tested, NaOH had the greatest positive effect on tensile properties, with increases of 105% in maximum stress and 200% in strain at maximum stress for crambe and a 70% increase in strain at maximum stress for carinata. Stiffness was not increased by any of the applied additives. Changes in tensile strength and elongation for crambe and elongation for carinata were related to changes in protein solubility. Increased pH was the most successful in improving the protein aggregation and mechanical properties within the complex chemistry of residual oilseed meals.

  7. Magnetic Force Microscopy Study of Zr2Co11 -Based Nanocrystalline Materials: Effect of Mo Addition

    DOE PAGES

    Yue, Lanping; Jin, Yunlong; Zhang, Wenyong; Sellmyer, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he addition of Molybdenum was used to modify the nanostructure and enhance coercivity of rare-earth-free Zr2Co11-based nanocrystalline permanent magnets. he effect of Mo addition on magnetic domain structures of melt spun nanocrystalline Zr16Co84-xMox(x=0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, and 2.0) ribbons has been investigated. It was found that magnetic properties and local domain structures are strongly influenced by Mo doping. he coercivity of the samples increases with the increase in Mo content (x≤1.5). he maximum energy product(BH)maxincreases with increasingxfrom 0.5 MGOe forx=0to a maximum value of 4.2 MGOe forx=1.5. he smallest domain size with a relatively short magnetic correlation length of 128 nm and largest root-mean-square phase shiftΦrmsvalue of 0.66° are observed for thex=1.5. he optimal Mo addition promotes magnetic domain structure refinement and thus leads to a significant increase in coercivity and energy product in this sample.« less

  8. Effect of additives on the tensile performance and protein solubility of industrial oilseed residual based plastics.

    PubMed

    Newson, William R; Kuktaite, Ramune; Hedenqvist, Mikael S; Gällstedt, Mikael; Johansson, Eva

    2014-07-16

    Ten chemical additives were selected from the literature for their proposed modifying activity in protein-protein interactions. These consisted of acids, bases, reducing agents, and denaturants and were added to residual deoiled meals of Crambe abyssinica (crambe) and Brassica carinata (carinata) to modify the properties of plastics produced through hot compression molding at 130 °C. The films produced were examined for tensile properties, protein solubility, molecular weight distribution, and water absorption. Of the additives tested, NaOH had the greatest positive effect on tensile properties, with increases of 105% in maximum stress and 200% in strain at maximum stress for crambe and a 70% increase in strain at maximum stress for carinata. Stiffness was not increased by any of the applied additives. Changes in tensile strength and elongation for crambe and elongation for carinata were related to changes in protein solubility. Increased pH was the most successful in improving the protein aggregation and mechanical properties within the complex chemistry of residual oilseed meals. PMID:24971658

  9. Development of new peat based growing media by addition of pruning waste and biochars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieto, Aurora; Gascó, Gabriel; Paz-Ferreiro, Jorge; Plaza, César; Fernández, José Manuel; Méndez, Ana

    2015-04-01

    In the last years, several researches have been performed to find high quality and low cost substrates from different organic wastes in order to decrease peat consumption since the indiscriminate exploitation of peat lands is exhausting this non-renewable useful resource and destroying endangered wetland ecosystems worldwide. The use of organic wastes as soil amendments or possible peat substitute could be improved by pyrolysis treatment, leading to biochar, a carbon-rich material that has attached important attention. Our research group has been worked in the formulation of new based-growing media by peat substitution in 50 and 75 vol% of pruning waste (PW), commercial charcoal (CC), biochar from PW at 300°C (B300) and 500°C (B500). Growing media show adequate physicochemical and hydrophysical properties. Experiments performed with lettuce germination show that PW addition in a 75vol% reduces germination index probably due to their high content on phenolic compounds. Lettuce growing experiments were performed during 5 weeks and show that addition of PW and CC to peat decreases biomass production whereas; B300 and specially, B500 addition significantly increases the lettuce biomass.

  10. A Case Study Analysing the Process of Analogy-Based Learning in a Teaching Unit about Simple Electric Circuits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paatz, Roland; Ryder, James; Schwedes, Hannelore; Scott, Philip

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to analyse the learning processes of a 16-year-old student as she learns about simple electric circuits in response to an analogy-based teaching sequence. Analogical thinking processes are modelled by a sequence of four steps according to Gentner's structure mapping theory (activate base domain, postulate local…

  11. Cloud-Based Automated Design and Additive Manufacturing: A Usage Data-Enabled Paradigm Shift.

    PubMed

    Lehmhus, Dirk; Wuest, Thorsten; Wellsandt, Stefan; Bosse, Stefan; Kaihara, Toshiya; Thoben, Klaus-Dieter; Busse, Matthias

    2015-12-19

    Integration of sensors into various kinds of products and machines provides access to in-depth usage information as basis for product optimization. Presently, this large potential for more user-friendly and efficient products is not being realized because (a) sensor integration and thus usage information is not available on a large scale and (b) product optimization requires considerable efforts in terms of manpower and adaptation of production equipment. However, with the advent of cloud-based services and highly flexible additive manufacturing techniques, these obstacles are currently crumbling away at rapid pace. The present study explores the state of the art in gathering and evaluating product usage and life cycle data, additive manufacturing and sensor integration, automated design and cloud-based services in manufacturing. By joining and extrapolating development trends in these areas, it delimits the foundations of a manufacturing concept that will allow continuous and economically viable product optimization on a general, user group or individual user level. This projection is checked against three different application scenarios, each of which stresses different aspects of the underlying holistic concept. The following discussion identifies critical issues and research needs by adopting the relevant stakeholder perspectives.

  12. Cloud-Based Automated Design and Additive Manufacturing: A Usage Data-Enabled Paradigm Shift

    PubMed Central

    Lehmhus, Dirk; Wuest, Thorsten; Wellsandt, Stefan; Bosse, Stefan; Kaihara, Toshiya; Thoben, Klaus-Dieter; Busse, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Integration of sensors into various kinds of products and machines provides access to in-depth usage information as basis for product optimization. Presently, this large potential for more user-friendly and efficient products is not being realized because (a) sensor integration and thus usage information is not available on a large scale and (b) product optimization requires considerable efforts in terms of manpower and adaptation of production equipment. However, with the advent of cloud-based services and highly flexible additive manufacturing techniques, these obstacles are currently crumbling away at rapid pace. The present study explores the state of the art in gathering and evaluating product usage and life cycle data, additive manufacturing and sensor integration, automated design and cloud-based services in manufacturing. By joining and extrapolating development trends in these areas, it delimits the foundations of a manufacturing concept that will allow continuous and economically viable product optimization on a general, user group or individual user level. This projection is checked against three different application scenarios, each of which stresses different aspects of the underlying holistic concept. The following discussion identifies critical issues and research needs by adopting the relevant stakeholder perspectives. PMID:26703606

  13. Cloud-Based Automated Design and Additive Manufacturing: A Usage Data-Enabled Paradigm Shift.

    PubMed

    Lehmhus, Dirk; Wuest, Thorsten; Wellsandt, Stefan; Bosse, Stefan; Kaihara, Toshiya; Thoben, Klaus-Dieter; Busse, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Integration of sensors into various kinds of products and machines provides access to in-depth usage information as basis for product optimization. Presently, this large potential for more user-friendly and efficient products is not being realized because (a) sensor integration and thus usage information is not available on a large scale and (b) product optimization requires considerable efforts in terms of manpower and adaptation of production equipment. However, with the advent of cloud-based services and highly flexible additive manufacturing techniques, these obstacles are currently crumbling away at rapid pace. The present study explores the state of the art in gathering and evaluating product usage and life cycle data, additive manufacturing and sensor integration, automated design and cloud-based services in manufacturing. By joining and extrapolating development trends in these areas, it delimits the foundations of a manufacturing concept that will allow continuous and economically viable product optimization on a general, user group or individual user level. This projection is checked against three different application scenarios, each of which stresses different aspects of the underlying holistic concept. The following discussion identifies critical issues and research needs by adopting the relevant stakeholder perspectives. PMID:26703606

  14. Some Lewis acid-base adducts involving boron trifluoride as electrolyte additives for lithium ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Mengyun; Madec, L.; Xia, J.; Hall, D. S.; Dahn, J. R.

    2016-10-01

    Three complexes with boron trifluoride (BF3) as the Lewis acid and different Lewis bases were synthesized and used as electrolyte additives in Li[Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3]O2/graphite and Li[Ni0.42Mn0.42Co0.16]O2/graphite pouch cells. Lewis acid-base adducts with a boron-oxygen (Bsbnd O) bond were trimethyl phosphate boron trifluoride (TMP-BF) and triphenyl phosphine oxide boron trifluoride (TPPO-BF). These were compared to pyridine boron trifluoride (PBF) which has a boron-nitrogen (Bsbnd N) bond. The experimental results showed that cells with PBF had the least voltage drop during storage at 4.2 V, 4.4 V and 4.7 V at 40 °C and the best capacity retention during long-term cycling at 55 °C compared to cells with the other additives. Charge-hold-discharge cycling combined with simultaneous electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements showed that impedance growth in TMP-BF and TPPO-BF containing cells was faster than cells containing 2%PBF, suggesting that PBF is useful for impedance control at high voltages (>4.4 V). XPS analysis of the SEI films highlighted a specific reactivity of the PBF-derived SEI species that apparently hinders the degradation of both LiPF6 and solvent during formation and charge-hold-discharge cycling. The modified SEI films may explain the improved impedance, the smaller voltage drop during storage and the improved capacity retention during cycling of cells containing the PBF additive.

  15. 3D printed microfluidic circuitry via multijet-based additive manufacturing†

    PubMed Central

    Sochol, R. D.; Sweet, E.; Glick, C. C.; Venkatesh, S.; Avetisyan, A.; Ekman, K. F.; Raulinaitis, A.; Tsai, A.; Wienkers, A.; Korner, K.; Hanson, K.; Long, A.; Hightower, B. J.; Slatton, G.; Burnett, D. C.; Massey, T. L.; Iwai, K.; Lee, L. P.; Pister, K. S. J.; Lin, L.

    2016-01-01

    The miniaturization of integrated fluidic processors affords extensive benefits for chemical and biological fields, yet traditional, monolithic methods of microfabrication present numerous obstacles for the scaling of fluidic operators. Recently, researchers have investigated the use of additive manufacturing or “three-dimensional (3D) printing” technologies – predominantly stereolithography – as a promising alternative for the construction of submillimeter-scale fluidic components. One challenge, however, is that current stereolithography methods lack the ability to simultaneously print sacrificial support materials, which limits the geometric versatility of such approaches. In this work, we investigate the use of multijet modelling (alternatively, polyjet printing) – a layer-by-layer, multi-material inkjetting process – for 3D printing geometrically complex, yet functionally advantageous fluidic components comprised of both static and dynamic physical elements. We examine a fundamental class of 3D printed microfluidic operators, including fluidic capacitors, fluidic diodes, and fluidic transistors. In addition, we evaluate the potential to advance on-chip automation of integrated fluidic systems via geometric modification of component parameters. Theoretical and experimental results for 3D fluidic capacitors demonstrated that transitioning from planar to non-planar diaphragm architectures improved component performance. Flow rectification experiments for 3D printed fluidic diodes revealed a diodicity of 80.6 ± 1.8. Geometry-based gain enhancement for 3D printed fluidic transistors yielded pressure gain of 3.01 ± 0.78. Consistent with additional additive manufacturing methodologies, the use of digitally-transferrable 3D models of fluidic components combined with commercially-available 3D printers could extend the fluidic routing capabilities presented here to researchers in fields beyond the core engineering community. PMID:26725379

  16. 3D printed microfluidic circuitry via multijet-based additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Sochol, R D; Sweet, E; Glick, C C; Venkatesh, S; Avetisyan, A; Ekman, K F; Raulinaitis, A; Tsai, A; Wienkers, A; Korner, K; Hanson, K; Long, A; Hightower, B J; Slatton, G; Burnett, D C; Massey, T L; Iwai, K; Lee, L P; Pister, K S J; Lin, L

    2016-02-21

    The miniaturization of integrated fluidic processors affords extensive benefits for chemical and biological fields, yet traditional, monolithic methods of microfabrication present numerous obstacles for the scaling of fluidic operators. Recently, researchers have investigated the use of additive manufacturing or "three-dimensional (3D) printing" technologies - predominantly stereolithography - as a promising alternative for the construction of submillimeter-scale fluidic components. One challenge, however, is that current stereolithography methods lack the ability to simultaneously print sacrificial support materials, which limits the geometric versatility of such approaches. In this work, we investigate the use of multijet modelling (alternatively, polyjet printing) - a layer-by-layer, multi-material inkjetting process - for 3D printing geometrically complex, yet functionally advantageous fluidic components comprised of both static and dynamic physical elements. We examine a fundamental class of 3D printed microfluidic operators, including fluidic capacitors, fluidic diodes, and fluidic transistors. In addition, we evaluate the potential to advance on-chip automation of integrated fluidic systems via geometric modification of component parameters. Theoretical and experimental results for 3D fluidic capacitors demonstrated that transitioning from planar to non-planar diaphragm architectures improved component performance. Flow rectification experiments for 3D printed fluidic diodes revealed a diodicity of 80.6 ± 1.8. Geometry-based gain enhancement for 3D printed fluidic transistors yielded pressure gain of 3.01 ± 0.78. Consistent with additional additive manufacturing methodologies, the use of digitally-transferrable 3D models of fluidic components combined with commercially-available 3D printers could extend the fluidic routing capabilities presented here to researchers in fields beyond the core engineering community.

  17. Improved microstructure of cement-based composites through the addition of rock wool particles

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Wei-Ting; Cheng, An; Huang, Ran; Zou, Si-Yu

    2013-10-15

    Rock wool is an inorganic fibrous substance produced by steam blasting and cooling molten glass. As with other industrial by-products, rock wool particles can be used as cementitious materials or ultra fine fillers in cement-based composites. This study investigated the microstructure of mortar specimens produced with cement-based composites that include various forms of rock wool particles. It conducted compressive strength testing, rapid chloride penetration tests, X-ray diffraction analysis, thermo-gravimetric analysis, and scanning electronic microscopy to evaluate the macro- and micro-properties of the cement-based composites. Test results indicate that inclusion of rock wool particles in composites improved compressive strength and reduced chloride ion penetration at the age of 91 days due to the reduction of calcium hydroxide content. Microscopic analysis confirms that the use of rock wool particles contributed to the formation of a denser, more compact microstructure within the hardened paste. In addition, X-ray diffraction analysis shows few changes in formation of pozzolanic reaction products and no new hydrations are formed with incorporating rock wool particles. - Highlights: • We report the microstructural characterization of cement-based composites. • Different mixes produced with various rock wool particles have been tested. • The influence of different mixes on macro and micro properties has been discussed. • The macro properties are included compressive strength and permeability. • XRD and SEM observations confirm the pozzolanic reaction in the resulting pastes.

  18. Treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis: Model-Based Analyses on the Spread of Antimony-Resistant L. donovani in Bihar, India

    PubMed Central

    Stauch, Anette; Duerr, Hans-Peter; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Vanaerschot, Manu; Sundar, Shyam; Eichner, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Background Pentavalent antimonials have been the mainstay of antileishmanial therapy for decades, but increasing failure rates under antimonial treatment have challenged further use of these drugs in the Indian subcontinent. Experimental evidence has suggested that parasites which are resistant against antimonials have superior survival skills than sensitive ones even in the absence of antimonial treatment. Methods and Findings We use simulation studies based on a mathematical L. donovani transmission model to identify parameters which can explain why treatment failure rates under antimonial treatment increased up to 65% in Bihar between 1980 and 1997. Model analyses suggest that resistance to treatment alone cannot explain the observed treatment failure rates. We explore two hypotheses referring to an increased fitness of antimony-resistant parasites: the additional fitness is (i) disease-related, by causing more clinical cases (higher pathogenicity) or more severe disease (higher virulence), or (ii) is transmission-related, by increasing the transmissibility from sand flies to humans or vice versa. Conclusions Both hypotheses can potentially explain the Bihar observations. However, increased transmissibility as an explanation appears more plausible because it can occur in the background of asymptomatically transmitted infection whereas disease-related factors would most probably be observable. Irrespective of the cause of fitness, parasites with a higher fitness will finally replace sensitive parasites, even if antimonials are replaced by another drug. PMID:23285309

  19. Taxonomic position of Eothenomys wardi (Arvicolinae: Cricetidae) based on morphological and molecular analyses with a detailed description of the species.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Tao; Jin, Wei; Sun, Zhi Yu; Liu, Yang; Murphy, Robert W; Fu, Jian Rong; Wang, Xin; Hou, Quan Fen; Tu, Fei Yun; Liao, Rui; Liu, Shao Ying; Yue, Bi Song

    2013-01-01

    Ward's Red-backed Vole (Eothenomys wardi) is a rodent from the family Cricetidae. This endemic species occurs only in extreme northwestern Yunnan province, China in the Mekong and Salween river divide. It occupies steep cliffs at 2,800 to 4,250 m above sea level on the remote Qinghai-Tibetan plateau. The validity of E. wardi is controversial and no specimens exist apart from the nominal series. In 2010, we collected 38 topotypes of E. wardi from Meri Snow Mountain. The results of our phylogenetic analyses based on nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial genes cytochrome b (cytb) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit one (COI) suggest that E. wardi is the sister group of E. custos, against its previously presumed sister species or conspecific species E. chinensis. In addition, seven out of 34 morphological characters differentiate E. wardi from other members of the genus Eothenomys. Therefore, we consider E. wardi to be a valid species and we provide its detailed morphological description.

  20. Genetic relationship between lodging and lodging components in barley (Hordeum vulgare) based on unconditional and conditional quantitative trait locus analyses.

    PubMed

    Chen, W Y; Liu, Z M; Deng, G B; Pan, Z F; Liang, J J; Zeng, X Q; Tashi, N M; Long, H; Yu, M Q

    2014-03-17

    Lodging (LD) is a major constraint limiting the yield and forage quality of barley. Detailed analyses of LD component (LDC) traits were conducted using 246 F2 plants generated from a cross between cultivars ZQ320 and 1277. Genetic relationships between LD and LDC were evaluated by unconditional and conditional quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping with 117 simple sequence repeat markers. Ultimately, 53 unconditional QTL related to LD were identified on seven barley chromosomes. Up to 15 QTL accounted for over 10% of the phenotypic variation, and up to 20 QTL for culm strength were detected. Six QTL with pleiotropic effects showing significant negative correlations with LD were found between markers Bmag353 and GBM1482 on chromosome 4H. These alleles and alleles of QTL for wall thickness, culm strength, plant height, and plant weight originated from ZQ320. Conditional mapping identified 96 additional QTL for LD. Conditional QTL analysis demonstrated that plant height, plant height center of gravity, and length of the sixth internode had the greatest contribution to LD, whereas culm strength and length of the fourth internode, and culm strength of the second internode were the key factors for LD-resistant. Therefore, lodging resistance in barley can be improved based on selection of alleles affecting culm strength, wall thickness, plant height, and plant weight. The conditional QTL mapping method can be used to evaluate possible genetic relationships between LD and LDC while efficiently and precisely determining counteracting QTL, which will help in understanding the genetic basis of LD in barley.

  1. Child abduction: aged-based analyses of offender, victim, and offense characteristics in 550 cases of alleged child disappearance.

    PubMed

    Boudreaux, M C; Lord, W D; Dutra, R L

    1999-05-01

    Crimes against children, particularly cases involving abduction and/or homicide, continue to be problematic as both a social phenomenon and judicial responsibility. Such cases routinely receive immense community and media attention and rapidly overwhelm investigative resources. Research in the area of childhood victimization, however, has only recently gained national prominence. While numerous studies on child abuse and neglect have been conducted, research on child abduction and homicide remains scant. Previous studies examining child abduction suffer from limited geographical scope or fail to base predictive analyses on victim characteristics. The current study reports the results of a nationally representative sample (47 states, the District of Columbia, and Puerto Rico) of 550 cases of alleged child abduction obtained from Federal Bureau of Investigation files for the period 1985 through 1995. Study results demonstrate that both offender and offense characteristics vary significantly according to victim age, gender, and race. Such differences appear critical to crime reconstruction, criminal profiling, and investigative resolution. Additionally, these data suggest that current child abduction prevention programs may emphasize inaccurate offender traits.

  2. Feasible Muscle Activation Ranges Based on Inverse Dynamics Analyses of Human Walking

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Cole S.; Sohn, M. Hongchul; Allen, Jessica L.; Ting, Lena H.

    2015-01-01

    Although it is possible to produce the same movement using an infinite number of different muscle activation patterns owing to musculoskeletal redundancy, the degree to which observed variations in muscle activity can deviate from optimal solutions computed from biomechanical models is not known. Here, we examined the range of biomechanically permitted activation levels in individual muscles during human walking using a detailed musculoskeletal model and experimentally-measured kinetics and kinematics. Feasible muscle activation ranges define the minimum and maximum possible level of each muscle’s activation that satisfy inverse dynamics joint torques assuming that all other muscles can vary their activation as needed. During walking, 73% of the muscles had feasible muscle activation ranges that were greater than 95% of the total muscle activation range over more than 95% of the gait cycle, indicating that, individually, most muscles could be fully active or fully inactive while still satisfying inverse dynamics joint torques. Moreover, the shapes of the feasible muscle activation ranges did not resemble previously-reported muscle activation patterns nor optimal solutions, i.e. static optimization and computed muscle control, that are based on the same biomechanical constraints. Our results demonstrate that joint torque requirements from standard inverse dynamics calculations are insufficient to define the activation of individual muscles during walking in healthy individuals. Identifying feasible muscle activation ranges may be an effective way to evaluate the impact of additional biomechanical and/or neural constraints on possible versus actual muscle activity in both normal and impaired movements. PMID:26300401

  3. [Health risks in different living circumstances of mothers. Analyses based on a population study].

    PubMed

    Sperlich, Stefanie

    2014-12-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the living circumstances ('Lebenslagen') in mothers which are associated with elevated health risks. Data were derived from a cross-sectional population based sample of German women (n = 3129) with underage children. By means of a two-step cluster analysis ten different maternal living circumstances were assessed which proved to be distinct with respect to indicators of socioeconomic position, employment status and family-related factors. Out of the ten living circumstances, one could be attributed to higher socioeconomic status (SES), while five were assigned to a middle SES and four to a lower SES. In line with previous findings, mothers with a high SES predominantly showed the best health while mothers with a low SES tended to be at higher health risk with respect to subjective health, mental health (anxiety and depression), obesity and smoking. However, there were important health differences between the different living circumstances within the middle and lower SES. In addition, varying health risks were found among different living circumstances of single mothers, pointing to the significance of family and job-related living conditions in establishing health risks. With this exploratory analysis strategy small-scale living conditions could be detected which were associated with specific health risks. This approach seemed particularly suitable to provide a more precise definition of target groups for health promotion. The findings encourage a more exrensive application of the concept of living conditions in medical sociology research as well as health monitoring.

  4. Feasible muscle activation ranges based on inverse dynamics analyses of human walking.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Cole S; Sohn, M Hongchul; Allen, Jessica L; Ting, Lena H

    2015-09-18

    Although it is possible to produce the same movement using an infinite number of different muscle activation patterns owing to musculoskeletal redundancy, the degree to which observed variations in muscle activity can deviate from optimal solutions computed from biomechanical models is not known. Here, we examined the range of biomechanically permitted activation levels in individual muscles during human walking using a detailed musculoskeletal model and experimentally-measured kinetics and kinematics. Feasible muscle activation ranges define the minimum and maximum possible level of each muscle's activation that satisfy inverse dynamics joint torques assuming that all other muscles can vary their activation as needed. During walking, 73% of the muscles had feasible muscle activation ranges that were greater than 95% of the total muscle activation range over more than 95% of the gait cycle, indicating that, individually, most muscles could be fully active or fully inactive while still satisfying inverse dynamics joint torques. Moreover, the shapes of the feasible muscle activation ranges did not resemble previously-reported muscle activation patterns nor optimal solutions, i.e. static optimization and computed muscle control, that are based on the same biomechanical constraints. Our results demonstrate that joint torque requirements from standard inverse dynamics calculations are insufficient to define the activation of individual muscles during walking in healthy individuals. Identifying feasible muscle activation ranges may be an effective way to evaluate the impact of additional biomechanical and/or neural constraints on possible versus actual muscle activity in both normal and impaired movements.

  5. Biological and health effects of exposure to kerosene-based jet fuels and performance additives.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, Glenn; Still, Kenneth; Rossi, John; Bekkedal, Marni; Bobb, Andrew; Arfsten, Darryl

    2003-01-01

    Over 2 million military and civilian personnel per year (over 1 million in the United States) are occupationally exposed, respectively, to jet propulsion fuel-8 (JP-8), JP-8 +100 or JP-5, or to the civil aviation equivalents Jet A or Jet A-1. Approximately 60 billion gallon of these kerosene-based jet fuels are annually consumed worldwide (26 billion gallon in the United States), including over 5 billion gallon of JP-8 by the militaries of the United States and other NATO countries. JP-8, for example, represents the largest single chemical exposure in the U.S. military (2.53 billion gallon in 2000), while Jet A and A-1 are among the most common sources of nonmilitary occupational chemical exposure. Although more recent figures were not available, approximately 4.06 billion gallon of kerosene per se were consumed in the United States in 1990 (IARC, 1992). These exposures may occur repeatedly to raw fuel, vapor phase, aerosol phase, or fuel combustion exhaust by dermal absorption, pulmonary inhalation, or oral ingestion routes. Additionally, the public may be repeatedly exposed to lower levels of jet fuel vapor/aerosol or to fuel combustion products through atmospheric contamination, or to raw fuel constituents by contact with contaminated groundwater or soil. Kerosene-based hydrocarbon fuels are complex mixtures of up to 260+ aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbon compounds (C(6) -C(17+); possibly 2000+ isomeric forms), including varying concentrations of potential toxicants such as benzene, n-hexane, toluene, xylenes, trimethylpentane, methoxyethanol, naphthalenes (including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs], and certain other C(9)-C(12) fractions (i.e., n-propylbenzene, trimethylbenzene isomers). While hydrocarbon fuel exposures occur typically at concentrations below current permissible exposure limits (PELs) for the parent fuel or its constituent chemicals, it is unknown whether additive or synergistic interactions among hydrocarbon constituents, up to six

  6. Feature based Weld-Deposition for Additive Manufacturing of Complex Shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchagnula, Jayaprakash Sharma; Simhambhatla, Suryakumar

    2016-08-01

    Fabricating functional metal parts using Additive Manufacturing (AM) is a leading trend. However, realizing overhanging features has been a challenge due to the lack of support mechanism for metals. Powder-bed fusion techniques like, Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) employ easily-breakable-scaffolds made of the same material to realize the overhangs. However, the same approach is not extendible to deposition processes like laser or arc based direct energy deposition processes. Although it is possible to realize small overhangs by exploiting the inherent overhanging capability of the process or by blinding some small features like holes, the same cannot be extended for more complex geometries. The current work presents a novel approach for realizing complex overhanging features without the need of support structures. This is possible by using higher order kinematics and suitably aligning the overhang with the deposition direction. Feature based non-uniform slicing and non-uniform area-filling are some vital concepts required in realizing the same and are briefly discussed here. This method can be used to fabricate and/or repair fully dense and functional components for various engineering applications. Although this approach has been implemented for weld-deposition based system, the same can be extended to any other direct energy deposition processes also.

  7. Titration of the bacteriorhodopsin Schiff base involves titration of an additional protein residue.

    PubMed

    Zadok, Uri; Asato, Alfred E; Sheves, Mordechai

    2005-06-14

    The retinal protein protonated Schiff base linkage plays a key role in the function of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) as a light-driven proton pump. In the unphotolyzed pigment, the Schiff base (SB) is titrated with a pK(a) of approximately 13, but following light absorption, it experiences a decrease in the pK(a) and undergoes several alterations, including a deprotonation process. We have studied the SB titration using retinal analogues which have intrinsically lower pK(a)'s which allow for SB titrations over a much lower pH range. We found that above pH 9 the channel for the SB titration is perturbed, and the titration rate is considerably reduced. On the basis of studies with several mutants, it is suggested that the protonation state of residue Glu204 is responsible for the channel perturbation. We suggest that above pH 12 a channel for the SB titration is restored probably due to titration of an additional protein residue. The observations may imply that during the bR photocycle and M photointermediate formation the rate of Schiff base protonation from the bulk is decreased. This rate decrease may be due to the deprotonation process of the "proton-releasing complex" which includes Glu204. In contrast, during the lifetime of the O intermediate, the protonated SB is exposed to the bulk. Possible implications for the switch mechanism, and the directionality of the proton movement, are discussed.

  8. Epistatic Gene-Based Interaction Analyses for Glaucoma in eMERGE and NEIGHBOR Consortium.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shefali Setia; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N; Lucas, Anastasia; Bradford, Yuki; Linneman, James G; Hauser, Michael A; Pasquale, Louis R; Peissig, Peggy L; Brilliant, Murray H; McCarty, Catherine A; Haines, Jonathan L; Wiggs, Janey L; Vrabec, Tamara R; Tromp, Gerard; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2016-09-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a complex disease and is one of the major leading causes of blindness worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have successfully identified several common variants associated with glaucoma; however, most of these variants only explain a small proportion of the genetic risk. Apart from the standard approach to identify main effects of variants across the genome, it is believed that gene-gene interactions can help elucidate part of the missing heritability by allowing for the test of interactions between genetic variants to mimic the complex nature of biology. To explain the etiology of glaucoma, we first performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on glaucoma case-control samples obtained from electronic medical records (EMR) to establish the utility of EMR data in detecting non-spurious and relevant associations; this analysis was aimed at confirming already known associations with glaucoma and validating the EMR derived glaucoma phenotype. Our findings from GWAS suggest consistent evidence of several known associations in POAG. We then performed an interaction analysis for variants found to be marginally associated with glaucoma (SNPs with main effect p-value <0.01) and observed interesting findings in the electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics Network (eMERGE) network dataset. Genes from the top epistatic interactions from eMERGE data (Likelihood Ratio Test i.e. LRT p-value <1e-05) were then tested for replication in the NEIGHBOR consortium dataset. To replicate our findings, we performed a gene-based SNP-SNP interaction analysis in NEIGHBOR and observed significant gene-gene interactions (p-value <0.001) among the top 17 gene-gene models identified in the discovery phase. Variants from gene-gene interaction analysis that we found to be associated with POAG explain 3.5% of additional genetic variance in eMERGE dataset above what is explained by the SNPs in genes that are replicated from previous GWAS studies (which

  9. Epistatic Gene-Based Interaction Analyses for Glaucoma in eMERGE and NEIGHBOR Consortium.

    PubMed

    Verma, Shefali Setia; Cooke Bailey, Jessica N; Lucas, Anastasia; Bradford, Yuki; Linneman, James G; Hauser, Michael A; Pasquale, Louis R; Peissig, Peggy L; Brilliant, Murray H; McCarty, Catherine A; Haines, Jonathan L; Wiggs, Janey L; Vrabec, Tamara R; Tromp, Gerard; Ritchie, Marylyn D

    2016-09-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a complex disease and is one of the major leading causes of blindness worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have successfully identified several common variants associated with glaucoma; however, most of these variants only explain a small proportion of the genetic risk. Apart from the standard approach to identify main effects of variants across the genome, it is believed that gene-gene interactions can help elucidate part of the missing heritability by allowing for the test of interactions between genetic variants to mimic the complex nature of biology. To explain the etiology of glaucoma, we first performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on glaucoma case-control samples obtained from electronic medical records (EMR) to establish the utility of EMR data in detecting non-spurious and relevant associations; this analysis was aimed at confirming already known associations with glaucoma and validating the EMR derived glaucoma phenotype. Our findings from GWAS suggest consistent evidence of several known associations in POAG. We then performed an interaction analysis for variants found to be marginally associated with glaucoma (SNPs with main effect p-value <0.01) and observed interesting findings in the electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics Network (eMERGE) network dataset. Genes from the top epistatic interactions from eMERGE data (Likelihood Ratio Test i.e. LRT p-value <1e-05) were then tested for replication in the NEIGHBOR consortium dataset. To replicate our findings, we performed a gene-based SNP-SNP interaction analysis in NEIGHBOR and observed significant gene-gene interactions (p-value <0.001) among the top 17 gene-gene models identified in the discovery phase. Variants from gene-gene interaction analysis that we found to be associated with POAG explain 3.5% of additional genetic variance in eMERGE dataset above what is explained by the SNPs in genes that are replicated from previous GWAS studies (which

  10. Epistatic Gene-Based Interaction Analyses for Glaucoma in eMERGE and NEIGHBOR Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Shefali Setia; Lucas, Anastasia; Bradford, Yuki; Linneman, James G.; Hauser, Michael A.; Pasquale, Louis R.; Peissig, Peggy L.; Brilliant, Murray H.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Wiggs, Janey L.; Vrabec, Tamara R.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2016-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is a complex disease and is one of the major leading causes of blindness worldwide. Genome-wide association studies have successfully identified several common variants associated with glaucoma; however, most of these variants only explain a small proportion of the genetic risk. Apart from the standard approach to identify main effects of variants across the genome, it is believed that gene-gene interactions can help elucidate part of the missing heritability by allowing for the test of interactions between genetic variants to mimic the complex nature of biology. To explain the etiology of glaucoma, we first performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on glaucoma case-control samples obtained from electronic medical records (EMR) to establish the utility of EMR data in detecting non-spurious and relevant associations; this analysis was aimed at confirming already known associations with glaucoma and validating the EMR derived glaucoma phenotype. Our findings from GWAS suggest consistent evidence of several known associations in POAG. We then performed an interaction analysis for variants found to be marginally associated with glaucoma (SNPs with main effect p-value <0.01) and observed interesting findings in the electronic MEdical Records and GEnomics Network (eMERGE) network dataset. Genes from the top epistatic interactions from eMERGE data (Likelihood Ratio Test i.e. LRT p-value <1e-05) were then tested for replication in the NEIGHBOR consortium dataset. To replicate our findings, we performed a gene-based SNP-SNP interaction analysis in NEIGHBOR and observed significant gene-gene interactions (p-value <0.001) among the top 17 gene-gene models identified in the discovery phase. Variants from gene-gene interaction analysis that we found to be associated with POAG explain 3.5% of additional genetic variance in eMERGE dataset above what is explained by the SNPs in genes that are replicated from previous GWAS studies (which

  11. IMPROVING CONTROL ROOM DESIGN AND OPERATIONS BASED ON HUMAN FACTORS ANALYSES OR HOW MUCH HUMAN FACTORS UPGRADE IS ENOUGH ?

    SciTech Connect

    HIGGINS,J.C.; OHARA,J.M.; ALMEIDA,P.

    2002-09-19

    THE JOSE CABRERA NUCLEAR POWER PLANT IS A ONE LOOP WESTINGHOUSE PRESSURIZED WATER REACTOR. IN THE CONTROL ROOM, THE DISPLAYS AND CONTROLS USED BY OPERATORS FOR THE EMERGENCY OPERATING PROCEDURES ARE DISTRIBUTED ON FRONT AND BACK PANELS. THIS CONFIGURATION CONTRIBUTED TO RISK IN THE PROBABILISTIC SAFETY ASSESSMENT WHERE IMPORTANT OPERATOR ACTIONS ARE REQUIRED. THIS STUDY WAS UNDERTAKEN TO EVALUATE THE IMPACT OF THE DESIGN ON CREW PERFORMANCE AND PLANT SAFETY AND TO DEVELOP DESIGN IMPROVEMENTS.FIVE POTENTIAL EFFECTS WERE IDENTIFIED. THEN NUREG-0711 [1], PROGRAMMATIC, HUMAN FACTORS, ANALYSES WERE CONDUCTED TO SYSTEMATICALLY EVALUATE THE CR-LA YOUT TO DETERMINE IF THERE WAS EVIDENCE OF THE POTENTIAL EFFECTS. THESE ANALYSES INCLUDED OPERATING EXPERIENCE REVIEW, PSA REVIEW, TASK ANALYSES, AND WALKTHROUGH SIMULATIONS. BASED ON THE RESULTS OF THESE ANALYSES, A VARIETY OF CONTROL ROOM MODIFICATIONS WERE IDENTIFIED. FROM THE ALTERNATIVES, A SELECTION WAS MADE THAT PROVIDED A REASONABLEBALANCE BE TWEEN PERFORMANCE, RISK AND ECONOMICS, AND MODIFICATIONS WERE MADE TO THE PLANT.

  12. Graph model for calculating the properties of saturated monoalcohols based on the additivity of energy terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grebeshkov, V. V.; Smolyakov, V. M.

    2012-05-01

    A 16-constant additive scheme was derived for calculating the physicochemical properties of saturated monoalcohols CH4O-C9H20O and decomposing the triangular numbers of the Pascal triangle based on the similarity of subgraphs in the molecular graphs (MGs) of the homologous series of these alcohols. It was shown, using this scheme for calculation of properties of saturated monoalcohols as an example, that each coefficient of the scheme (in other words, the number of methods to impose a chain of a definite length i 1, i 2, … on a molecular graph) is the result of the decomposition of the triangular numbers of the Pascal triangle. A linear dependence was found within the adopted classification of structural elements. Sixteen parameters of the schemes were recorded as linear combinations of 17 parameters. The enthalpies of vaporization L {298/K 0} of the saturated monoalcohols CH4O-C9H20O, for which there were no experimental data, were calculated. It was shown that the parameters are not chosen randomly when using the given procedure for constructing an additive scheme by decomposing the triangular numbers of the Pascal triangle.

  13. Additive Manufacturing of Reactive In Situ Zr Based Ultra-High Temperature Ceramic Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahasrabudhe, Himanshu; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2016-03-01

    Reactive in situ multi-material additive manufacturing of ZrB2-based ultra-high-temperature ceramics in a Zr metal matrix was demonstrated using LENS™. Sound metallurgical bonding was achieved between the Zr metal and Zr-BN composites with Ti6Al4V substrate. Though the feedstock Zr power had α phase, LENS™ processing of the Zr powder and Zr-BN premix powder mixture led to the formation of some β phase of Zr. Microstructure of the Zr-BN composite showed primary grains of zirconium diboride phase in zirconium metal matrix. The presence of ZrB2 ceramic phase was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Hardness of pure Zr was measured as 280 ± 12 HV and, by increasing the BN content in the feedstock, the hardness was found to increase. In Zr-5%BN composite, the hardness was 421 ± 10 HV and the same for Zr-10%BN composite was 562 ± 10 HV. It is envisioned that such multi-materials additive manufacturing will enable products in the future that cannot be manufactured using traditional approaches particularly in the areas of high-temperature metal-ceramic composites with compositional and functional gradation.

  14. Role of Ag addition in L10 ordering of FePt-based nanocomposite magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisan, A. D.; Vasiliu, F.; Mercioniu, I.; Crisan, O.

    2014-01-01

    The FePt system has important perspectives as high-temperature corrosion-resistant magnets. In the form of rapidly solidified melt-spun ribbons, FePt-based magnets may exhibit in certain cases a two-phase hard-soft magnetic behaviour. The present paper deals with a microstructural and magnetic study of FePtAgB alloys with increasing Ag content. The aim is to identify and confirm the effect of Ag addition in decreasing the temperature of the FePt disorder-order structural phase transformation. A detailed high-resolution transmission electron microscopy study is employed, and the alternative disposal of hard and soft regions within the two-phase microstructure is observed and interpreted with respect to the X-ray diffraction results. In the as-cast Ag-containing samples, it is shown that there is an optimum of the Ag content for which best magnetic properties are obtained. Ag addition creates a nonlinear behaviour of the coercive field and the ordering parameter, similar to the RKKY interaction-induced interlayer exchange coupling (IEC) observed in magnetic layers separated by non-magnetic spacer layers. Direct formation of the L10 phase from the as-cast state in the FePtAgB alloys is reported with magnetic parameters compatible to other exchange spring permanent nanomagnets. These findings open novel perspectives into utilization of such alloys in applications requiring magnets operating in high-temperature industrial environments.

  15. Stereo- and Temporally Controlled Coordination Polymerization Triggered by Alternating Addition of a Lewis Acid and Base.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bo; Cui, Dongmei; Tang, Tao

    2016-09-19

    Significant progress has been made with regard to temporally controlled radical and ring-opening polymerizations, for example, by means of chemical reagents, light, and voltage, whereas quantitative switch coordination polymerization is still challenging. Herein, we report the temporally and stereocontrolled 3,4-polymerization of isoprene through allosterically regulating the active metal center by alternating addition of Lewis basic pyridine to "poison" the Lewis acidic active metal species through acid-base interactions and Lewis acidic Al(i) Bu3 to release the original active species through pyridine abstraction. This process is quick, quantitative, and can be repeated multiple times while maintaining high 3,4-selectivity. Moreover, this strategy is also effective for the switch copolymerization of isoprene and styrene with dual 3,4- and syndiotactic selectivity. Tuning the switch cycles and intervals enables the isolation of various copolymers with different distributions of 3,4-polyisoprene and syndiotactic polystyrene sequences. PMID:27539866

  16. Quality control of laser- and powder bed-based Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berumen, Sebastian; Bechmann, Florian; Lindner, Stefan; Kruth, Jean-Pierre; Craeghs, Tom

    The quality of metal components manufactured by laser- and powder bed-based additive manufacturing technologies has continuously been improved over the last years. However, to establish this production technology in industries with very high quality standards the accessibility of prevalent quality management methods to all steps of the process chain needs still to be enhanced. This publication describes which tools are and will be available to fulfil those requirements from the perspective of a laser machine manufacturer. Generally five aspects of the part building process are covered by separate Quality Management (QM) modules: the powder quality, the temperature management, the process gas atmosphere, the melt pool behaviour and the documentation module. This paper sets the focus on melt pool analysis and control.

  17. Evaporation model for beam based additive manufacturing using free surface lattice Boltzmann methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klassen, Alexander; Scharowsky, Thorsten; Körner, Carolin

    2014-07-01

    Evaporation plays an important role in many technical applications including beam-based additive manufacturing processes, such as selective electron beam or selective laser melting (SEBM/SLM). In this paper, we describe an evaporation model which we employ within the framework of a two-dimensional free surface lattice Boltzmann method. With this method, we solve the hydrodynamics as well as thermodynamics of the molten material taking into account the mass and energy losses due to evaporation and the recoil pressure acting on the melt pool. Validation of the numerical model is performed by measuring maximum melt depths and evaporative losses in samples of pure titanium and Ti-6Al-4V molten by an electron beam. Finally, the model is applied to create processing maps for an SEBM process. The results predict that the penetration depth of the electron beam, which is a function of the acceleration voltage, has a significant influence on evaporation effects.

  18. Optimization-based additive decomposition of weakly coercive problems with applications

    DOE PAGES

    Bochev, Pavel B.; Ridzal, Denis

    2016-01-27

    In this study, we present an abstract mathematical framework for an optimization-based additive decomposition of a large class of variational problems into a collection of concurrent subproblems. The framework replaces a given monolithic problem by an equivalent constrained optimization formulation in which the subproblems define the optimization constraints and the objective is to minimize the mismatch between their solutions. The significance of this reformulation stems from the fact that one can solve the resulting optimality system by an iterative process involving only solutions of the subproblems. Consequently, assuming that stable numerical methods and efficient solvers are available for every subproblem,more » our reformulation leads to robust and efficient numerical algorithms for a given monolithic problem by breaking it into subproblems that can be handled more easily. An application of the framework to the Oseen equations illustrates its potential.« less

  19. Adding functionality with additive manufacturing: Fabrication of titanium-based antibiotic eluting implants.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sophie C; Jamshidi, Parastoo; Eisenstein, Neil M; Webber, Mark A; Hassanin, Hany; Attallah, Moataz M; Shepherd, Duncan E T; Addison, Owen; Grover, Liam M

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies have been utilised in healthcare to create patient-specific implants. This study demonstrates the potential to add new implant functionality by further exploiting the design flexibility of these technologies. Selective laser melting was used to manufacture titanium-based (Ti-6Al-4V) implants containing a reservoir. Pore channels, connecting the implant surface to the reservoir, were incorporated to facilitate antibiotic delivery. An injectable brushite, calcium phosphate cement, was formulated as a carrier vehicle for gentamicin. Incorporation of the antibiotic significantly (p=0.01) improved the compressive strength (5.8±0.7MPa) of the cement compared to non-antibiotic samples. The controlled release of gentamicin sulphate from the calcium phosphate cement injected into the implant reservoir was demonstrated in short term elution studies using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Orientation of the implant pore channels were shown, using micro-computed tomography, to impact design reproducibility and the back-pressure generated during cement injection which ultimately altered porosity. The amount of antibiotic released from all implant designs over a 6hour period (<28% of the total amount) were found to exceed the minimum inhibitory concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus (16μg/mL) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (1μg/mL); two bacterial species commonly associated with periprosthetic infections. Antibacterial efficacy was confirmed against both bacterial cultures using an agar diffusion assay. Interestingly, pore channel orientation was shown to influence the directionality of inhibition zones. Promisingly, this work demonstrates the potential to additively manufacture a titanium-based antibiotic eluting implant, which is an attractive alternative to current treatment strategies of periprosthetic infections.

  20. Adding functionality with additive manufacturing: Fabrication of titanium-based antibiotic eluting implants.

    PubMed

    Cox, Sophie C; Jamshidi, Parastoo; Eisenstein, Neil M; Webber, Mark A; Hassanin, Hany; Attallah, Moataz M; Shepherd, Duncan E T; Addison, Owen; Grover, Liam M

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing technologies have been utilised in healthcare to create patient-specific implants. This study demonstrates the potential to add new implant functionality by further exploiting the design flexibility of these technologies. Selective laser melting was used to manufacture titanium-based (Ti-6Al-4V) implants containing a reservoir. Pore channels, connecting the implant surface to the reservoir, were incorporated to facilitate antibiotic delivery. An injectable brushite, calcium phosphate cement, was formulated as a carrier vehicle for gentamicin. Incorporation of the antibiotic significantly (p=0.01) improved the compressive strength (5.8±0.7MPa) of the cement compared to non-antibiotic samples. The controlled release of gentamicin sulphate from the calcium phosphate cement injected into the implant reservoir was demonstrated in short term elution studies using ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy. Orientation of the implant pore channels were shown, using micro-computed tomography, to impact design reproducibility and the back-pressure generated during cement injection which ultimately altered porosity. The amount of antibiotic released from all implant designs over a 6hour period (<28% of the total amount) were found to exceed the minimum inhibitory concentrations of Staphylococcus aureus (16μg/mL) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (1μg/mL); two bacterial species commonly associated with periprosthetic infections. Antibacterial efficacy was confirmed against both bacterial cultures using an agar diffusion assay. Interestingly, pore channel orientation was shown to influence the directionality of inhibition zones. Promisingly, this work demonstrates the potential to additively manufacture a titanium-based antibiotic eluting implant, which is an attractive alternative to current treatment strategies of periprosthetic infections. PMID:27127071

  1. A Comparison of Model- and Multiple Imputation-Based Approaches to Longitudinal Analyses with Partial Missingness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Terry E.; Duncan, Susan C.; Li, Fuzhong

    1998-01-01

    Presents an application of latent growth curve methodology to the analysis of longitudinal developmental change in alcohol consumption of 586 young adults, illustrating three approaches to the analysis of missing data: (1) multiple-sample structural equation modeling procedures; (2) raw maximum likelihood analyses; and (3) multiple modeling and…

  2. Impact of Student Language Background on Content-Based Performance: Analyses of Extant Data. CSE Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abedi, Jamal

    Data from four different school sites nationwide were analyzed to examine whether standardized test results may be confounded by the lack of language proficiency of English language learners. Several analyses comparing the performance of limited English proficient (LEP) students and their non-LEP classmates revealed major differences. A Disparity…

  3. Comparing Surface-Based and Volume-Based Analyses of Functional Neuroimaging Data in Patients with Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Anticevic, Alan; Dierker, Donna L.; Gillespie, Sarah K.; Repovs, Grega; Csernansky, John G.; Van Essen, David C.; Barch, Deanna M.

    2008-01-01

    A major challenge in functional neuroimaging is to cope with individual variability in cortical structure and function. Most analyses of cortical function compensate for variability using affine or low-dimensional nonlinear volume-based registration (VBR) of individual subjects to an atlas, which does not explicitly take into account the geometry of cortical convolutions. A promising alternative is to use surface-based registration (SBR), which capitalizes on explicit surface representations of cortical folding patterns in individual subjects. In this study, we directly compare results from SBR and affine VBR in a study of working memory in healthy controls and patients with schizophrenia (SCZ). Each subject's structural scan was used for cortical surface reconstruction using the SureFit method. fMRI data were mapped directly onto individual cortical surface models, and each hemisphere was registered to the population-average PALS-B12 atlas using landmark-constrained SBR. The precision with which cortical sulci were aligned was much greater for SBR than VBR. SBR produced superior alignment precision across the entire cortex, and this benefit was greater in patients with schizophrenia. We demonstrate that spatial smoothing on the surface provides better resolution and signal preservation than a comparable degree of smoothing in the volume domain. Lastly, the statistical power of functional activation in the working memory task was greater for SBR than for VBR. These results indicate that SBR provides significant advantages over affine VBR when analyzing cortical fMRI activations. Furthermore, these improvements can be even greater in disorders that have associated structural abnormalities. PMID:18434199

  4. Shrinkage Behavior and Diffusion in Ni-based Internal Electrodes with Additional Amount and Particle Size of BaTiO3 Additive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Ji-Hun; Joo, Dongwon; Jung, Yeon-Gil; Paik, Ungyu

    2008-02-01

    The effect of additional amount and particle size of BaTiO3 additive on shrinkage behavior and inter-diffusion in Ni-based internal electrodes has been investigated, in order to reduce the large shrinkage mismatch between the internal electrode and the dielectric layer and to control the thermal and/or residual stresses in multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCCs). Ni powder of 100-500 nm and two kinds of BaTiO3 powders of 100 and 200 nm were used as matrix and additive, respectively. The Ni and BaTiO3 powders were mixed with volume ratios of 95:5, 90:10, 85:15, respectively, and then cold-isostatic pressed. The shrinkage of starting materials and each composite was measured in a range of 700-1300 °C with 150 °C interval in H2/Ar atmosphere, using ASTM standard method. Diffusion phenomena at interface of Ni/BaTiO3 composites with 85:15 and 90:10 volume ratios were investigated using SEM, EDX, and TEM. The particle size affects the shrinkage behavior in relatively low temperatures below 1000 °C, showing a turning point at that temperature. The final shrinkage of composites is matched with that of bulk BaTiO3 of smaller particle size, independent of additional amount of BaTiO3 additive. A reaction layer of about 1000 nm wide is observed at the interface between the Ni and BaTiO3 powders in the composite of 85:15 volume ratio. The quantitative amount of elemental Ni diffused into the BaTiO3 is about 9.7 mass% in the composite of 90:10 volume ratio, without another phase seen in the Ni.

  5. Dropwise additive manufacturing of pharmaceutical products for solvent-based dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Hirshfield, Laura; Giridhar, Arun; Taylor, Lynne S; Harris, Michael T; Reklaitis, Gintaras V

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, the US Food and Drug Administration has encouraged pharmaceutical companies to develop more innovative and efficient manufacturing methods with improved online monitoring and control. Mini-manufacturing of medicine is one such method enabling the creation of individualized product forms for each patient. This work presents dropwise additive manufacturing of pharmaceutical products (DAMPP), an automated, controlled mini-manufacturing method that deposits active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) directly onto edible substrates using drop-on-demand (DoD) inkjet printing technology. The use of DoD technology allows for precise control over the material properties, drug solid state form, drop size, and drop dynamics and can be beneficial in the creation of high-potency drug forms, combination drugs with multiple APIs or individualized medicine products tailored to a specific patient. In this work, DAMPP was used to create dosage forms from solvent-based formulations consisting of API, polymer, and solvent carrier. The forms were then analyzed to determine the reproducibility of creating an on-target dosage form, the morphology of the API of the final form and the dissolution behavior of the drug over time. DAMPP is found to be a viable alternative to traditional mass-manufacturing methods for solvent-based oral dosage forms.

  6. Unexpected δ-Phase Formation in Additive-Manufactured Ni-Based Superalloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idell, Y.; Levine, L. E.; Allen, A. J.; Zhang, F.; Campbell, C. E.; Olson, G. B.; Gong, J.; Snyder, D. R.; Deutchman, H. Z.

    2016-03-01

    An as-built and solutionized Ni-based superalloy built by additive manufacturing through a direct metal laser sintering technique is characterized to understand the microstructural differences as compared to the as-wrought alloy. Initially, each layer undergoes rapid solidification as it is melted by the laser; however, as the part is built, the underlying layers experience a variety of heating and cooling cycles that produce significant microsegregation of niobium which allows for the formation of the deleterious δ-phase. The as-built microstructure was characterized through Vickers hardness, optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, electron back-scattering diffraction, x-ray diffraction, and synchrotron x-ray microLaue diffraction. The isothermal formation and growth of the δ-phase were characterized using synchrotron-based in situ small angle and wide angle x-ray scattering experiments. These experimental results are compared with multicomponent diffusion simulations that predict the phase fraction and composition. The high residual stresses and unexpected formation of the δ-phase will require further annealing treatments to be designed so as to remove these deficiencies and obtain an optimized microstructure.

  7. Solid-state supercapacitors with ionic liquid based gel polymer electrolyte: Effect of lithium salt addition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, G. P.; Hashmi, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Performance characteristics of the solid-state supercapacitors fabricated with ionic liquid (IL) incorporated gel polymer electrolyte and acid treated multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) electrodes have been studied. The effect of Li-salt (LiPF6) addition in the IL (1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tris(pentafluoroethyl) trifluorophosphate, EMImFAP) based gel electrolyte on the performance of supercapacitors has been specifically investigated. The LiPF6/IL/poly(vinylidine fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) (PVdF-HFP) gel electrolyte film possesses excellent electrochemical window of 4 V (from -2.0 to 2.0 V), high ionic conductivity ˜2.6 × 10-3 S cm-1 at 20 °C and high enough thermal stability. The comparative performance of supercapacitors employing electrolytes with and without lithium salt has been evaluated by impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetric studies. The acid-treated MWCNT electrodes show specific capacitance of ˜127 F g-1 with IL/LiPF6 containing gel polymer electrolyte as compared to that with the gel polymer electrolyte without Li-salt, showing the value of ˜76 F g-1. The long cycling stability of the solid state supercapacitor based on the Li-salt containing gel polymer electrolyte confirms the electrochemical stability of the electrolyte.

  8. Modifying Si-based consolidants through the addition of colloidal nano-particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksinopoulou, E.; Bakolas, A.; Moropoulou, A.

    2016-04-01

    The modification of silicon-based stone consolidants has been the subject of many scientific studies aiming to overcome the commonly reported drawbacks of these materials, such as the tendency to shrink and crack during drying. The addition of nano-particle dispersions into silica matrix has been found to enhance their effectiveness in several ways. Objective of the current research was to study the preparation of particle-modified consolidants (PMC), consisting of an ethyl silicate matrix (TEOS) loaded with colloidal silica (SiO2) nano-particles and oxide titania (TiO2) particles. The effect of the polyacrylic acid on the dispersion stability was also investigated, by varying its concentration into PMC samples. The prepared materials were allowed to dry in two different relative humidity environments and then evaluated based on their stability in the sol phase, the aggregation sizes, determined through dynamic light scattering, the % solids content and their morphological characteristics, observed via scanning electron microscopy (SEM-EDAX). Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also applied to investigate the microstructural characteristics and differences between the prepared consolidants. Significant role in the final form of the material is played by both the initial molar ratios in the mixtures, as well as the conditions where the drying and aging takes place. Based on the results, the three-component PMCs appear to be promising in stone consolidation, as they show a reduction in cracking and shrinkage during drying and a more porous network, compared with the siliceous material, or the two-component TEOS-SiO2 formulation.

  9. Teacher-Conducted Trial-Based Functional Analyses as the Basis for Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bloom, Sarah E.; Lambert, Joseph M.; Dayton, Elizabeth; Samaha, Andrew L.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on whether a trial-based functional analysis (FA) yields the same outcomes as more traditional FAs, and whether interventions based on trial-based FAs can reduce socially maintained problem behavior. We included a full range of behavior functions and taught 3 teachers to conduct a trial-based FA with 3 boys with…

  10. Effect of Boron Addition on the Thermal, Degradation, and Cytocompatibility Properties of Phosphate-Based Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Muhammad S.; Parsons, Andrew J.; Furniss, David; Scotchford, Colin A.; Ahmed, Ifty; Rudd, Chris D.

    2013-01-01

    In this study eight different phosphate-based glass compositions were prepared by melt-quenching: four in the (P2O5)45-(CaO)16-(Na2O)15-x -(MgO)24-(B2O3)x system and four in the system (P2O5)50-(CaO)16-(Na2O)10-x-(MgO)24-(B2O3)x, where x = 0,1, 5 and 10 mol%. The effect of B2O3 addition on the thermal properties, density, molar volume, dissolution rates, and cytocompatibility were studied for both glass systems. Addition of B2O3 increased the glass transition (Tg), crystallisation (Tc), melting (Tm), Liquidus (TL) and dilatometric softening (Td) temperature and molar volume (Vm). The thermal expansion coefficient (α) and density (ρ) were seen to decrease. An assessment of the thermal stability of the glasses was made in terms of their processing window (crystallisation onset, Tc,ons minus glass transition temperature, Tg), and an increase in the processing window was observed with increasing B2O3 content. Degradation studies of the glasses revealed that the rates decreased with increasing B2O3 content and a decrease in degradation rates was also observed as the P2O5 content reduced from 50 to 45 mol%. MG63 osteoblast-like cells cultured in direct contact with the glass samples for 14 days revealed comparative data to the positive control for the cell metabolic activity, proliferation, ALP activity, and morphology for glasses containing up to 5 mol% of B2O3. PMID:23991425

  11. Electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing process for PVDF polymer-based piezoelectric device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, ChaBum; Tarbutton, Joshua A.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a new additive manufacturing (AM) process to directly and continuously print piezoelectric devices from polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) polymeric filament rods under a strong electric field. This process, called ‘electric poling-assisted additive manufacturing or EPAM, combines AM and electric poling processes and is able to fabricate free-form shape piezoelectric devices continuously. In this process, the PVDF polymer dipoles remain well-aligned and uniform over a large area in a single design, production and fabrication step. During EPAM process, molten PVDF polymer is simultaneously mechanically stresses in-situ by the leading nozzle and electrically poled by applying high electric field under high temperature. The EPAM system was constructed to directly print piezoelectric structures from PVDF polymeric filament while applying high electric field between nozzle tip and printing bed in AM machine. Piezoelectric devices were successfully fabricated using the EPAM process. The crystalline phase transitions that occurred from the process were identified by using the Fourier transform infrared spectroscope. The results indicate that devices printed under a strong electric field become piezoelectric during the EPAM process and that stronger electric fields result in greater piezoelectricity as marked by the electrical response and the formation of sharper peaks at the polar β crystalline wavenumber of the PVDF polymer. Performing this process in the absence of an electric field does not result in dipole alignment of PVDF polymer. The EPAM process is expected to lead to the widespread use of AM to fabricate a variety of piezoelectric PVDF polymer-based devices for sensing, actuation and energy harvesting applications with simple, low cost, single processing and fabrication step.

  12. Wall-models for large eddy simulation based on a generic additive-filter formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez Rocha, Martin

    Based on the philosophy of only resolving the large scales of turbulent motion, Large Eddy Simulation (LES) has demonstrated potential to provide high-fidelity turbulence simulations at low computational cost. However, when the scales that control the turbulence in a particular flow are not large, LES has to increase significantly its computational cost to provide accurate predictions. This is the case in wall-bounded flows, where the grid resolution required by LES to resolve the near-wall structures is close to the requirements to resolve the smallest dissipative scales in turbulence. Therefore, to reduce this demanding requirement, it has been proposed to model the near-wall region with Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, in what is known as hybrid RANS/LES approach. In this work, the mathematical implications of merging two different turbulence modeling approaches are addressed by deriving the exact hybrid RANS/LES Navier-Stokes equations. These equations are derived by introducing an additive-filter, which linearly combines the RANS and LES operators with a blending function. The equations derived with the additive-filter predict additional hybrid terms, which represent the interactions between RANS and LES formulations. Theoretically, the prediction of the hybrid terms demonstrates that the hybridization of the two approaches cannot be accomplished only by the turbulence model equations, as it is claimed in current hybrid RANS/LES models. The importance of the exact hybrid RANS/LES equations is demonstrated by conducting numerical calculations on a turbulent flat-plate boundary layer. Results indicate that the hybrid terms help to maintain an equilibrated model transition when the hybrid formulation switches from RANS to LES. Results also indicate, that when the hybrid terms are not included, the accuracy of the calculations strongly relies on the blending function implemented in the additive-filter. On the other hand, if the exact equations are

  13. Use of Additives to Improve Performance of Methyl Butyrate-Based Lithium-Ion Electrolytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.

    2011-01-01

    This work addresses the need for robust rechargeable batteries that can operate well over a wide temperature range. To this end, a number of electrolyte formulations have been developed that incorporate the use of electrolyte additives to improve the high-temperature resilience, low-temperature power capability, and life characteristics of methyl butyrate-based electrolyte solutions. These electrolyte additives include mono-fluoroethylene carbonate (FEC), lithium oxalate, vinylene carbonate (VC), and lithium bis(oxalato)borate (LiBOB), which have been shown to result in improved high-temperature resilience of all carbonate-based electrolytes. Improved performance has been demonstrated of Li-ion cells with methyl butyrate-based electrolytes, including 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %); 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 2% FEC; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 4% FEC; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + lithium oxalate; 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 2% VC; and 1.20M LiPF6 in EC+EMC+MB (20:20:60 v/v %) + 0.10M LiBOB. These electrolytes have been shown to improve performance in MCMB-LiNiCoO2 and graphite-LiNi1/3Co1/3Mn1/3O2 experimental Li-ion cells. A number of LiPF6-based mixed carbonate electrolyte formulations have been developed that contain ester co-solvents, which have been optimized for operation at low temperature, while still providing reasonable performance at high temperature. For example, a number of ester co-solvents were investigated, including methyl propionate (MP), ethyl propionate (EP), methyl butyrate (MB), ethyl butyrate (EB), propyl butyrate (PB), and butyl butyrate (BB) in multi-component electrolytes of the following composition: 1.0M LiPF6 in ethylene carbonate (EC) + ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC) + X (20:60:20 v/v %) [where X = ester co-solvent]. ["Optimized Car bon ate and Ester-Based Li-Ion Electrolytes", NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 32, No. 4 (April 2008), p. 56.] Focusing upon improved rate

  14. Indoor carbon dioxide concentrations and sick building syndrome symptoms in the BASE study revisited: Analyses of the 100 building dataset

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmann, Christine A.; Steiner, Kate C.; Apte, Michael G.

    2002-02-01

    In previously published analyses of the 41-building 1994-1996 USEPA Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) dataset, higher workday time-averaged indoor minus outdoor CO{sub 2} concentrations (dCO{sub 2}) were associated with increased prevalence of certain mucous membrane and lower respiratory sick building syndrome (SBS) symptoms, even at peak dCO{sub 2} concentrations below 1,000 ppm. For this paper, similar analyses were performed using the larger 100-building 1994-1998 BASE dataset. Multivariate logistic regression analyses quantified the associations between dCO{sub 2} and the SBS symptoms, adjusting for age, sex, smoking status, presence of carpet in workspace, thermal exposure, relative humidity, and a marker for entrained automobile exhaust. Adjusted dCO{sub 2} prevalence odds ratios for sore throat and wheeze were 1.17 and 1.20 per 100-ppm increase in dCO{sub 2} (p <0.05), respectively. These new analyses generally support our prior findings. Regional differences in climate, building design, and operation may account for some of the differences observed in analyses of the two datasets.

  15. The value of survival analyses for evidence-based rural medical workforce planning

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    family physicians in Australia are currently based on a geographical ‘remoteness’ classification rather than population size. In addition, this study demonstrates how survival analysis assists health workforce planning, such as through generating evidence to assist in benchmarking ‘reasonable’ lengths of practice in different geographic settings that might guide service obligation requirements. PMID:24330603

  16. 78 FR 54758 - Listing of Color Additives Exempt From Certification; Mica-Based Pearlescent Pigments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... the Federal Register of June 12, 2013 (78 FR 35115). The final rule amended the color additive... the Federal Register of June 12, 2013 (78 FR 35115), we amended the color additive regulations in Sec... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 73 Listing of Color Additives Exempt...

  17. Decision analyses for optimization of monitoring networks based on uncertainty quantification of model predictions of contaminant transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vesselinov, V. V.; Harp, D.

    2011-12-01

    Model-based decision making related to environmental management problems is a challenging problem. There has been substantial theoretical research and practical applications related to this problem. However, there are very few cases in which the actual decision analyses have been tested in the field to evaluate their adequacy. Over the last several years, we have performed a series of decision analyses to support optimization of a monitoring network at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) site. The problem deals with contaminant transport in the regional aquifer beneath the LANL site. At three separate stages, the existing monitoring network was augmented based on analyses of the existing uncertainties; in total, five new monitoring wells were proposed. At each stage, the data collected at the new monitoring wells demonstrated the adequacy of the prior uncertainty and decision analyses. The decision analyses required a detailed estimation of uncertainties in model predictions. Various uncertainties, including measurement errors and uncertainties in the conceptualization and model parameters, contributed to the uncertainties in the model predictions. The decision analyses were computationally intensive requiring on the order of one million model simulations; computational efficiency is achieved using (1) high-performance computing (LANL multiprocessor clusters), (2) novel computational techniques for model analysis, and (3) a simple analytical 3D simulator to simulate contaminant transport. Decision support related to optimal design of monitoring networks required optimization of the proposed new monitoring well locations in order to reduce existing model-prediction uncertainties and environmental risk. An important aspect of the analysis is the application of novel techniques for optimization (SQUADS based on coupling of Particle Swarm and Levenberg-Marquardt optimization methods; Vesselinov & Harp, 2011) and uncertainty quantification (ABAGUS: Agent-Based

  18. Linking field-based metabolomics and chemical analyses to identify contaminants of emerging concern in the Great Lakes ecosystem

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although research has focused on remediating ecological impacts of environmental contaminants on the Great Lakes and other aquatic ecosystems, there exists a continuing need for additional biologically-based tools for monitoring success. Profiling of endogenous metabolites (i.e....

  19. Insights into the phylogeny of sporadotrichid ciliates (Protozoa, Ciliophora: Hypotricha) based on genealogical analyses of multiple molecular markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoyan; Hu, Xiaozhong; Al-Rasheid, Khaled A. S.; Al-Farraj, Saleh A.; Song, Weibo

    2011-01-01

    The sporadotrichid ciliates are an especially diverse group. A number of investigators have studied the morphological, morphogenetic, and molecular relationships among members of this group. Despite this, a consistent classification is still lacking and several important questions about the phylogenetic relationships within this group remain unsolved. To improve our understanding of these relationships, we constructed phylogenetic trees using the nucleotide sequences of the small-subunit rRNA (SSrRNA) gene and amino acid sequences of actin I and α-tubulin. Analyses of SSrRNA gene sequences indicated that: 1) the Sporadotrichida sensu Lynn (2008) and the Oxytrichidae are polyphyletic; 2) the Uroleptus species, which are classified to urostylids, formed a sister group with the oxytrichids; 3) Halteria grandinella, which is grouped morphologically with oligotrich species, clustered within the oxytrichids. These results are congruent with previous studies based on SSrRNA gene sequences. However, the amino acid sequences of actin I and α-tubulin yielded different topologies. The main results are: 1) in all phylogenetic trees, the genus Oxytricha was paraphyletic; 2) Uroleptus was sister to a subset of Urostyla and Holosticha, albeit with low supporting values; 3) Halteria grandinella was separated distantly from the Oxytrichidae in trees inferred from actin I amino acid sequences but clustered with oligotrichids in the α-tubulin analysis. The inconsistency among the trees inferred from these different molecular markers may be caused by rapidly accumulated genetic characterizations of ciliates. Further studies with additional molecular markers and sampling of more taxa are expected to better address the relationships among sporadotrichids.

  20. Comprehensive Phylogenetic Reconstruction of Amoebozoa Based on Concatenated Analyses of SSU-rDNA and Actin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lahr, Daniel J. G.; Grant, Jessica; Nguyen, Truc; Lin, Jian Hua; Katz, Laura A.

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary relationships within Amoebozoa have been the subject of controversy for two reasons: 1) paucity of morphological characters in traditional surveys and 2) haphazard taxonomic sampling in modern molecular reconstructions. These along with other factors have prevented the erection of a definitive system that resolves confidently both higher and lower-level relationships. Additionally, the recent recognition that many protosteloid amoebae are in fact scattered throughout the Amoebozoa suggests that phylogenetic reconstructions have been excluding an extensive and integral group of organisms. Here we provide a comprehensive phylogenetic reconstruction based on 139 taxa using molecular information from both SSU-rDNA and actin genes. We provide molecular data for 13 of those taxa, 12 of which had not been previously characterized. We explored the dataset extensively by generating 18 alternative reconstructions that assess the effect of missing data, long-branched taxa, unstable taxa, fast evolving sites and inclusion of environmental sequences. We compared reconstructions with each other as well as against previously published phylogenies. Our analyses show that many of the morphologically established lower-level relationships (defined here as relationships roughly equivalent to Order level or below) are congruent with molecular data. However, the data are insufficient to corroborate or reject the large majority of proposed higher-level relationships (above the Order-level), with the exception of Tubulinea, Archamoebae and Myxogastrea, which are consistently recovered. Moreover, contrary to previous expectations, the inclusion of available environmental sequences does not significantly improve the Amoebozoa reconstruction. This is probably because key amoebozoan taxa are not easily amplified by environmental sequencing methodology due to high rates of molecular evolution and regular occurrence of large indels and introns. Finally, in an effort to facilitate

  1. Soy Protein Isolate As Fluid Loss Additive in Bentonite-Water-Based Drilling Fluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Chun; Wu, Qinglin; Song, Kunlin; Lee, Sunyoung; Jin, Chunde; Ren, Suxia; Lei, Tingzhou

    2015-11-11

    Wellbore instability and formation collapse caused by lost circulation are vital issues during well excavation in the oil industry. This study reports the novel utilization of soy protein isolate (SPI) as fluid loss additive in bentonite-water based drilling fluids (BT-WDFs) and describes how its particle size and concentration influence on the filtration property of SPI/BT-WDFs. It was found that high pressure homogenization (HPH)-treated SPI had superior filtration property over that of native SPI due to the improved ability for the plugging pore throat. HPH treatment also caused a significant change in the surface characteristic of SPI, leading to a considerable surface interaction with BT in aqueous solution. The concentration of SPI had a significant impact on the dispersion state of SPI/BT mixtures in aquesous solution. At low SPI concentrations, strong aggregations were created, resulting in the formation of thick, loose, high-porosity and high-permeability filter cakes and high fluid loss. At high SPI concentrations, intercatlated/exfoliated structures were generated, resulting in the formation of thin, compact, low-porosity and low-permeability filter cakes and low fluid loss. The SPI/BT-WDFs exhibited superior filtration property than pure BT-WDFs at the same solid concentraion, demonstrating the potential utilization of SPI as an effective, renewable, and biodegradable fluid loss reducer in well excavation applications. PMID:26492498

  2. Dropwise additive manufacturing of pharmaceutical products for melt-based dosage forms.

    PubMed

    Içten, Elçin; Giridhar, Arun; Taylor, Lynne S; Nagy, Zoltan K; Reklaitis, Gintaras V

    2015-05-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration introduced the quality by design approach and process analytical technology guidance to encourage innovation and efficiency in pharmaceutical development, manufacturing, and quality assurance. As part of this renewed emphasis on the improvement of manufacturing, the pharmaceutical industry has begun to develop more efficient production processes with more intensive use of online measurement and sensing, real-time quality control, and process control tools. Here, we present dropwise additive manufacturing of pharmaceutical products (DAMPP) as an alternative to conventional pharmaceutical manufacturing methods. This mini-manufacturing process for the production of pharmaceuticals utilizes drop on demand printing technology for automated and controlled deposition of melt-based formulations onto edible substrates. The advantages of drop-on-demand technology, including reproducible production of small droplets, adjustable drop sizing, high placement accuracy, and flexible use of different formulations, enable production of individualized dosing even for low-dose and high-potency drugs. In this work, DAMPP is used to produce solid oral dosage forms from hot melts of an active pharmaceutical ingredient and a polymer. The dosage forms are analyzed to show the reproducibility of dosing and the dissolution behavior of different formulations.

  3. Repurposing mainstream CNC machine tools for laser-based additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Jason B.

    2016-04-01

    The advent of laser technology has been a key enabler for industrial 3D printing, known as Additive Manufacturing (AM). Despite its commercial success and unique technical capabilities, laser-based AM systems are not yet able to produce parts with the same accuracy and surface finish as CNC machining. To enable the geometry and material freedoms afforded by AM, yet achieve the precision and productivity of CNC machining, hybrid combinations of these two processes have started to gain traction. To achieve the benefits of combined processing, laser technology has been integrated into mainstream CNC machines - effectively repurposing them as hybrid manufacturing platforms. This paper reviews how this engineering challenge has prompted beam delivery innovations to allow automated changeover between laser processing and machining, using standard CNC tool changers. Handling laser-processing heads using the tool changer also enables automated change over between different types of laser processing heads, further expanding the breadth of laser processing flexibility in a hybrid CNC. This paper highlights the development, challenges and future impact of hybrid CNCs on laser processing.

  4. Soy Protein Isolate As Fluid Loss Additive in Bentonite-Water-Based Drilling Fluids.

    PubMed

    Li, Mei-Chun; Wu, Qinglin; Song, Kunlin; Lee, Sunyoung; Jin, Chunde; Ren, Suxia; Lei, Tingzhou

    2015-11-11

    Wellbore instability and formation collapse caused by lost circulation are vital issues during well excavation in the oil industry. This study reports the novel utilization of soy protein isolate (SPI) as fluid loss additive in bentonite-water based drilling fluids (BT-WDFs) and describes how its particle size and concentration influence on the filtration property of SPI/BT-WDFs. It was found that high pressure homogenization (HPH)-treated SPI had superior filtration property over that of native SPI due to the improved ability for the plugging pore throat. HPH treatment also caused a significant change in the surface characteristic of SPI, leading to a considerable surface interaction with BT in aqueous solution. The concentration of SPI had a significant impact on the dispersion state of SPI/BT mixtures in aquesous solution. At low SPI concentrations, strong aggregations were created, resulting in the formation of thick, loose, high-porosity and high-permeability filter cakes and high fluid loss. At high SPI concentrations, intercatlated/exfoliated structures were generated, resulting in the formation of thin, compact, low-porosity and low-permeability filter cakes and low fluid loss. The SPI/BT-WDFs exhibited superior filtration property than pure BT-WDFs at the same solid concentraion, demonstrating the potential utilization of SPI as an effective, renewable, and biodegradable fluid loss reducer in well excavation applications.

  5. The comparison of classification analyses on the public opinion focus of biofuels based on twitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shianghau; Guo, Jiannjong

    2016-02-01

    The study combined with the text mining and classification methodology to investigate the biofuels related tweets on the social network so as to understand the general public opinion focus. The contribution of the study enclosed the subsequent two points. First, the study utilized the text mining method to explore the content of biofuels connected tweets on the famed social network "twitter" and found the main keywords consistent with their frequencies. Second, the study applied the Back Propagation Neural Network (BPN), random forests model and two sorts of hybrid algorithmclassification analyses to compare the classification results.

  6. Application of finite-element-based solution technologies for viscoplastic structural analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arya, V. K.

    1990-01-01

    Finite-element solution technology developed for use in conjunction with advanced viscoplastic models is described. The development of such solution technology is necessary for performing stress/life analyses of engineering structural problems where the complex geometries and loadings make the conventional analytical solutions difficult. The versatility of the solution technology is demonstrated by applying it to viscoplastic models possessing different mathematical structures and encompassing isotropic and anisotropic material. The computational results qualitatively replicate deformation behavior observed in experiments on prototypical structural components.

  7. Teacher-conducted trial-based functional analyses as the basis for intervention.

    PubMed

    Bloom, Sarah E; Lambert, Joseph M; Dayton, Elizabeth; Samaha, Andrew L

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have focused on whether a trial-based functional analysis (FA) yields the same outcomes as more traditional FAs, and whether interventions based on trial-based FAs can reduce socially maintained problem behavior. We included a full range of behavior functions and taught 3 teachers to conduct a trial-based FA with 3 boys with developmental and intellectual disabilities who engaged in problem behavior. Based on the results of the trial-based FAs, we developed and conducted 5 function-based interventions, using differential reinforcement of an alternative behavior and extinction in all but 1 case. In the remaining case, we used noncontingent reinforcement. All interventions led to reductions in problem behavior and increases in alternative behavior.

  8. Phase stability of thermal barrier oxides based on t'-zirconia with trivalent oxide additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebollo Franco, Noemi Rosa

    Zirconia stabilized with 7+/-1 wt.% addition of yttria (7YSZ) is widely used for thermal barrier coatings (TBC's) on actively cooled gas turbine components, selected partly because of its superior durability under thermal cyclic conditions. As deposited, 7YSZ occurs as a metastable single-phase tetragonal solid solution (t') that is thermodynamically stable against the deleterious transformation to monoclinic upon cooling. However, at high temperatures t' is driven to decompose diffusionally into an equilibrium mixture of high-Y cubic and low-Y tetragonal; the latter becomes transformable to monoclinic compromising the mechanical integrity of the system. This dissertation explores the effects of trivalent stabilizers, including Y, Sc and selected rare-earth oxides (REO's), on the phase stability of the resulting solid solutions in zirconia. The REO additions are of interest because they can potentially enhance the insulation efficiency on the coating allowing higher operating temperatures. However, understanding of their effects on phase stability and potentially on cyclic durability at the projected use temperature in next generation engines (1200-1400°C) is insufficient to guide the design of coatings with the desirable combination of lower thermal conductivity and acceptable durability. Sc was also investigated because of previous reports on the higher phase stability of materials doped with Sc, and Y served as the baseline. The experimental approach is based on powders synthesized by reverse co-precipitation of precursor solutions, usually compacted and then subjected to a variety of heat treatments, following their evolution by means of X-ray diffractometry, dilatometry, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The use of powders facilitated the synthesis of a wider range of compositions that would not have been possible by coating deposition approaches, and because the synthesis occurs at low temperature, it also enabled the starting

  9. Video-Based Analyses of Motivation and Interaction in Science Classrooms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller Andersen, Hanne; Nielsen, Birgitte Lund

    2013-04-01

    An analytical framework for examining students' motivation was developed and used for analyses of video excerpts from science classrooms. The framework was developed in an iterative process involving theories on motivation and video excerpts from a 'motivational event' where students worked in groups. Subsequently, the framework was used for an analysis of students' motivation in the whole class situation. A cross-case analysis was carried out illustrating characteristics of students' motivation dependent on the context. This research showed that students' motivation to learn science is stimulated by a range of different factors, with autonomy, relatedness and belonging apparently being the main sources of motivation. The teacher's combined use of questions, uptake and high level evaluation was very important for students' learning processes and motivation, especially students' self-efficacy. By coding and analysing video excerpts from science classrooms, we were able to demonstrate that the analytical framework helped us gain new insights into the effect of teachers' communication and other elements on students' motivation.

  10. New bedding site examination-based method to analyse deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) infection in cervids.

    PubMed

    Kaunisto, Sirpa; Kortet, Raine; Härkönen, Laura; Härkönen, Sauli; Ylönen, Hannu; Laaksonen, Sauli

    2009-03-01

    Invasion of the deer ked (Lipoptena cervi), an ectoparasitic fly commonly found in cervids, has been rapid in Finland during the last four decades. As the distribution area of this species has expanded from the south towards the northern latitudes, the associated problems have become more evident. Various animals such as horses, cattle and especially reindeer have been reported to host this parasite. Moreover, in certain areas, the deer ked causes major inconveniences for humans potentially limiting recreational activities in forests. We wanted to study if deer ked parasitism and intensity of the infection in winter time could be detected by using visual examination of the snow on cervid bedding sites and by analysing biotic samples found from the bedding sites. Our results demonstrate that chronic deer ked infection causes reddish-brown snow discolouration (host tissue fluid and deer ked faeces) on the bedding sites to the extent that parasitism can be diagnosed. Hence, we suggest that deer ked infection prevalence and range expansion could be rapidly monitored using our new practical and reliable method. In the future, bedding site analyses will likely be useful in predicting and potentially preventing the negative effects of this ecologically and socio-economically important parasite. PMID:19050924

  11. Production of stream habitat gradients by montane watersheds: Hypothesis tests based on spatially explicit path analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isaak, D.J.; Hubert, W.A.

    2001-01-01

    We studied how the features of mountain watersheds interact to cause gradients in three stream attributes: baseflow stream widths, total alkalinity, and stream slope. A priori hypotheses were developed before being tested in a series of path analyses using data from 90 stream reaches on 24 second- to fourth-order streams across a fifth-order Rocky Mountain watershed. Because most of the conventional least squares regressions initially calculated for the path analyses had spatially correlated residuals (13 of 15 regressions), spatially explicit regressions were often used to derive more accurate parameter estimates and significance tests. Our final working hypotheses accounted for most of the variation in baseflow stream width (73%), total alkalinity (74%), and stream slope (78%) and provide systemic views of watershed function by depicting interactions that occur between geomorphology, land surface features, and stream attributes. Stream gradients originated mainly from the unidirectional changes in geomorphic features that occur over the lengths of streams. Land surface features were of secondary importance and, because they change less predictably relative to the stream, appear to modify the rate at which stream gradients change.

  12. New bedding site examination-based method to analyse deer ked (Lipoptena cervi) infection in cervids.

    PubMed

    Kaunisto, Sirpa; Kortet, Raine; Härkönen, Laura; Härkönen, Sauli; Ylönen, Hannu; Laaksonen, Sauli

    2009-03-01

    Invasion of the deer ked (Lipoptena cervi), an ectoparasitic fly commonly found in cervids, has been rapid in Finland during the last four decades. As the distribution area of this species has expanded from the south towards the northern latitudes, the associated problems have become more evident. Various animals such as horses, cattle and especially reindeer have been reported to host this parasite. Moreover, in certain areas, the deer ked causes major inconveniences for humans potentially limiting recreational activities in forests. We wanted to study if deer ked parasitism and intensity of the infection in winter time could be detected by using visual examination of the snow on cervid bedding sites and by analysing biotic samples found from the bedding sites. Our results demonstrate that chronic deer ked infection causes reddish-brown snow discolouration (host tissue fluid and deer ked faeces) on the bedding sites to the extent that parasitism can be diagnosed. Hence, we suggest that deer ked infection prevalence and range expansion could be rapidly monitored using our new practical and reliable method. In the future, bedding site analyses will likely be useful in predicting and potentially preventing the negative effects of this ecologically and socio-economically important parasite.

  13. Increased Risk of Additional Cancers Among Patients with Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, James D.; Ma, Grace L.; Baumgartner, Joel M.; Madlensky, Lisa; Burgoyne, Adam M.; Tang, Chih-Min; Martinez, Maria Elena; Sicklick, Jason K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Most gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) are considered non-hereditary or sporadic. However, single-institution studies suggest that GIST patients develop additional malignancies with increased frequencies. We hypothesized that we could gain greater insight into possible associations between GIST and other malignancies using a national cancer database inquiry. Methods Patients diagnosed with GIST (2001–2011) in the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results database were included. Standardized prevalence ratios (SPRs) and standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were used to quantify cancer risks incurred by GIST patients before and after GIST diagnoses, respectively, when compared with the general U.S. population. Results Of 6,112 GIST patients, 1,047 (17.1%) had additional cancers. There were significant increases in overall cancer rates: 44% (SPR=1.44) before diagnosis and 66% (SIR=1.66) after GIST diagnoses. Malignancies with significantly increased occurrence both before/after diagnoses included other sarcomas (SPR=5.24/SIR=4.02), neuroendocrine-carcinoid tumors (SPR=3.56/SIR=4.79), non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (SPR=1.69/SIR=1.76), and colorectal adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.51/SIR=2.16). Esophageal adenocarcinoma (SPR=12.0), bladder adenocarcinoma (SPR=7.51), melanoma (SPR=1.46), and prostate adenocarcinoma (SPR=1.20) were significantly more common only before GIST. Ovarian carcinoma (SIR=8.72), small intestine adenocarcinoma (SIR=5.89), papillary thyroid cancer (SIR=5.16), renal cell carcinoma (SIR=4.46), hepatobiliary adenocarcinomas (SIR=3.10), gastric adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.70), pancreatic adenocarcinoma (SIR=2.03), uterine adenocarcinoma (SIR=1.96), non-small cell lung cancer (SIR=1.74), and transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (SIR=1.65) were significantly more common only after GIST. Conclusion This is the first population-based study to characterize the associations and temporal relationships between GIST and other cancers, both by site and

  14. Palindrome analyser - A new web-based server for predicting and evaluating inverted repeats in nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Brázda, Václav; Kolomazník, Jan; Lýsek, Jiří; Hároníková, Lucia; Coufal, Jan; Št'astný, Jiří

    2016-09-30

    DNA cruciform structures play an important role in the regulation of natural processes including gene replication and expression, as well as nucleosome structure and recombination. They have also been implicated in the evolution and development of diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Cruciform structures are formed by inverted repeats, and their stability is enhanced by DNA supercoiling and protein binding. They have received broad attention because of their important roles in biology. Computational approaches to study inverted repeats have allowed detailed analysis of genomes. However, currently there are no easily accessible and user-friendly tools that can analyse inverted repeats, especially among long nucleotide sequences. We have developed a web-based server, Palindrome analyser, which is a user-friendly application for analysing inverted repeats in various DNA (or RNA) sequences including genome sequences and oligonucleotides. It allows users to search and retrieve desired gene/nucleotide sequence entries from the NCBI databases, and provides data on length, sequence, locations and energy required for cruciform formation. Palindrome analyser also features an interactive graphical data representation of the distribution of the inverted repeats, with options for sorting according to the length of inverted repeat, length of loop, and number of mismatches. Palindrome analyser can be accessed at http://bioinformatics.ibp.cz.

  15. Palindrome analyser - A new web-based server for predicting and evaluating inverted repeats in nucleotide sequences.

    PubMed

    Brázda, Václav; Kolomazník, Jan; Lýsek, Jiří; Hároníková, Lucia; Coufal, Jan; Št'astný, Jiří

    2016-09-30

    DNA cruciform structures play an important role in the regulation of natural processes including gene replication and expression, as well as nucleosome structure and recombination. They have also been implicated in the evolution and development of diseases such as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Cruciform structures are formed by inverted repeats, and their stability is enhanced by DNA supercoiling and protein binding. They have received broad attention because of their important roles in biology. Computational approaches to study inverted repeats have allowed detailed analysis of genomes. However, currently there are no easily accessible and user-friendly tools that can analyse inverted repeats, especially among long nucleotide sequences. We have developed a web-based server, Palindrome analyser, which is a user-friendly application for analysing inverted repeats in various DNA (or RNA) sequences including genome sequences and oligonucleotides. It allows users to search and retrieve desired gene/nucleotide sequence entries from the NCBI databases, and provides data on length, sequence, locations and energy required for cruciform formation. Palindrome analyser also features an interactive graphical data representation of the distribution of the inverted repeats, with options for sorting according to the length of inverted repeat, length of loop, and number of mismatches. Palindrome analyser can be accessed at http://bioinformatics.ibp.cz. PMID:27603574

  16. Revised Morning Loops of the Arabidopsis Circadian Clock Based on Analyses of Direct Regulatory Interactions.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sally; Manfield, Ian; Stockley, Peter; Carré, Isabelle A

    2015-01-01

    The network structure of the plant circadian clock is complex and direct regulatory interactions between individual components have proven particularly difficult to predict from genetic analyses. Here, we systematically investigate in vivo binding interactions between the morning-specific transcription factor, LATE ELONGATED HYPOCOTYL (LHY) and the promoters of other components of the network. We then demonstrate the functionality of these interactions by testing the responsiveness of the target gene to an ethanol-induced change in expression level of the LHY protein. We uncover novel, negative autoregulatory feedback loops from LHY and the closely related CIRCADIAN CLOCK ASSOCIATED-1 (CCA1) onto their own and each other's expression. Furthermore we show that LHY acts as a repressor of all other clock components, including PSEUDO-RESPONSE REGULATORs (PRRs) 9 and 7, which were previously thought to be positive regulatory targets. These experimental results lead to a substantial revision of the morning loops of the clock. PMID:26625126

  17. Using the Results of IAI DAta Base Analyses to Generate Educational Program Architecture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reneau, Gail; Milazzo, Patricia

    This report describes the technical means for generating and justifying an educational program design via empirically-based analysis of Instructional Accomplishment Information System data bases. The conventional approach to educational program planning is to pursue design implementation first, operational implementation next, and then to hope…

  18. Activity Based Learning in a Freshman Global Business Course: Analyses of Preferences and Demographic Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Mark F.; Guy, Paul W.

    2007-01-01

    The present study investigates pre-business students' reaction to Activity Based Learning in a lower division core required course entitled Introduction to Global Business in the business curriculum at California State University Chico. The study investigates students' preference for Activity Based Learning in comparison to a more traditional…

  19. The use of elemental powder mixes in laser-based additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clayton, Rodney Michael

    This study examines the use and functionality of laser depositing alloys from mixes of elemental metallic powders. Through the use of laser-based additive manufacturing (LAM), near net-shaped 3-Dimensional metallic parts can be produced in a layer-by-layer fashion. It is customary for pre-alloyed powders to be used in this process. However, mixes of elemental powders can be used to produce alloys that are formed during the deposition process. This alternative technique requires that the elemental powders adequately mix during deposition for a homogeneous deposit to be produced. Cost savings and versatility are among several of the advantages to using elemental powder mixes in LAM. Representative alloys of 316 and 430 Stainless Steel (SS) and Ti-6Al-4V were produced with elemental powder mixes during this research. These deposits were then compared to deposits of the same material manufactured with pre-alloyed powder. Comparison between the two types of samples included; EDS analysis to examine chemical homogeneity, metallography techniques to compare microstructures, and finally hardness testing to observe mechanical properties. The enthalpy of mixing is also discussed as this can impact the resulting homogeneity of deposits produced with mixes of elemental powders. Some differences were observed between the two types of deposits for 430 SS and Ti-6Al-4V. Results indicate that deposits fabricated with mixes of elemental powders can be produced to an equivalent quality of pre-alloyed powder deposits for 316 SS. This research also proposes potential alloys that could be considered for use in an elemental powder mixing technique.

  20. Low-Friction Adsorbed Layers of a Triblock Copolymer Additive in Oil-Based Lubrication.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shinji; Fujihara, Ami; Yusa, Shin-ichi; Tanabe, Tadao; Kurihara, Kazue

    2015-11-10

    The tribological properties of the dilute solution of an ABA triblock copolymer, poly(11-acrylamidoundecanoic acid)-block-poly(stearyl methacrylate)-block-poly(11-acrylamidoundecanoic acid (A5S992A5), in poly(α-olefin) (PAO) confined between mica surfaces were investigated using the surface forces apparatus (SFA). Friction force was measured as a function of applied load and sliding velocity, and the film thickness and contact geometry during sliding were analyzed using the fringes of equal chromatic order (FECO) in the SFA. The results were contrasted with those of confined PAO films; the effects of the addition of A5S992A5 on the tribological properties were discussed. The thickness of the A5S992A5/PAO system varied with time after surface preparation and with repetitive sliding motions. The thickness was within the range from 40 to 70 nm 1 day after preparation (the Day1 film), and was about 20 nm on the following day (the Day2 film). The thickness of the confined PAO film was thinner than 1.4 nm, indicating that the A5S992A5/PAO system formed thick adsorbed layers on mica surfaces. The friction coefficient was about 0.03 to 0.04 for the Day1 film and well below 0.01 for the Day2 film, which were 1 or 2 orders of magnitude lower than the values for the confined PAO films. The time dependent changes of the adsorbed layer thickness and friction properties should be caused by the relatively low solubility of A5S992A5 in PAO. The detailed analysis of the contact geometry and friction behaviors implies that the particularly low friction of the Day2 film originates from the following factors: (i) shrinkage of the A5S992A5 molecules (mainly the poly(stearyl methacrylate) blocks) that leads to a viscoelastic properties of the adsorbed layers; and (ii) the intervening PAO layer between the adsorbed polymer layers that constitutes a high-fluidity sliding interface. Our results suggest that the block copolymer having relatively low solubility in a lubricant base oil is

  1. Topsoil organic carbon content of Europe, a new map based on a generalised additive model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Brogniez, Delphine; Ballabio, Cristiano; Stevens, Antoine; Jones, Robert J. A.; Montanarella, Luca; van Wesemael, Bas

    2014-05-01

    There is an increasing demand for up-to-date spatially continuous organic carbon (OC) data for global environment and climatic modeling. Whilst the current map of topsoil organic carbon content for Europe (Jones et al., 2005) was produced by applying expert-knowledge based pedo-transfer rules on large soil mapping units, the aim of this study was to replace it by applying digital soil mapping techniques on the first European harmonised geo-referenced topsoil (0-20 cm) database, which arises from the LUCAS (land use/cover area frame statistical survey) survey. A generalized additive model (GAM) was calibrated on 85% of the dataset (ca. 17 000 soil samples) and a backward stepwise approach selected slope, land cover, temperature, net primary productivity, latitude and longitude as environmental covariates (500 m resolution). The validation of the model (applied on 15% of the dataset), gave an R2 of 0.27. We observed that most organic soils were under-predicted by the model and that soils of Scandinavia were also poorly predicted. The model showed an RMSE of 42 g kg-1 for mineral soils and of 287 g kg-1 for organic soils. The map of predicted OC content showed the lowest values in Mediterranean countries and in croplands across Europe, whereas highest OC content were predicted in wetlands, woodlands and in mountainous areas. The map of standard error of the OC model predictions showed high values in northern latitudes, wetlands, moors and heathlands, whereas low uncertainty was mostly found in croplands. A comparison of our results with the map of Jones et al. (2005) showed a general agreement on the prediction of mineral soils' OC content, most probably because the models use some common covariates, namely land cover and temperature. Our model however failed to predict values of OC content greater than 200 g kg-1, which we explain by the imposed unimodal distribution of our model, whose mean is tilted towards the majority of soils, which are mineral. Finally, average

  2. Evaluating the Accuracy of Results for Teacher Implemented Trial-Based Functional Analyses.

    PubMed

    Rispoli, Mandy; Ninci, Jennifer; Burke, Mack D; Zaini, Samar; Hatton, Heather; Sanchez, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    Trial-based functional analysis (TBFA) allows for the systematic and experimental assessment of challenging behavior in applied settings. The purposes of this study were to evaluate a professional development package focused on training three Head Start teachers to conduct TBFAs with fidelity during ongoing classroom routines. To assess the accuracy of the TBFA results, the effects of a function-based intervention derived from the TBFA were compared with the effects of a non-function-based intervention. Data were collected on child challenging behavior and appropriate communication. An A-B-A-C-D design was utilized in which A represented baseline, and B and C consisted of either function-based or non-function-based interventions counterbalanced across participants, and D represented teacher implementation of the most effective intervention. Results showed that the function-based intervention produced greater decreases in challenging behavior and greater increases in appropriate communication than the non-function-based intervention for all three children.

  3. Evaluating the Accuracy of Results for Teacher Implemented Trial-Based Functional Analyses.

    PubMed

    Rispoli, Mandy; Ninci, Jennifer; Burke, Mack D; Zaini, Samar; Hatton, Heather; Sanchez, Lisa

    2015-09-01

    Trial-based functional analysis (TBFA) allows for the systematic and experimental assessment of challenging behavior in applied settings. The purposes of this study were to evaluate a professional development package focused on training three Head Start teachers to conduct TBFAs with fidelity during ongoing classroom routines. To assess the accuracy of the TBFA results, the effects of a function-based intervention derived from the TBFA were compared with the effects of a non-function-based intervention. Data were collected on child challenging behavior and appropriate communication. An A-B-A-C-D design was utilized in which A represented baseline, and B and C consisted of either function-based or non-function-based interventions counterbalanced across participants, and D represented teacher implementation of the most effective intervention. Results showed that the function-based intervention produced greater decreases in challenging behavior and greater increases in appropriate communication than the non-function-based intervention for all three children. PMID:26069219

  4. Novel optical-based methods and analyses for elucidating cellular mechanics and dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Peter K.

    Resolving distinct biochemical interaction states by analyzing the diffusive behaviors of individual protein trajectories is challenging due to the limited statistics provided by short trajectories and experimental noise sources, which are intimately coupled into each proteins localization. In the first part of this thesis, we introduce a novel, a machine-learning based classification methodology, called perturbation expectation-maximization (pEM), which simultaneously analyzes a population of protein trajectories to uncover the system of short-time diffusive behaviors which collectively result from distinct biochemical interactions. We then discuss an experimental application of pEM to Rho GTPase, an integral regulator of cytoskeletal dynamics and cellular homeostasis, inside live cells. We also derive the maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) for driven diffusion, confined diffusion, and fractional Brownian motion. We demonstrate that MLE yields improved estimates in comparison with traditional diffusion analysis, namely mean squared displacement analysis. In addition, we also introduce mleBayes, which is an empirical Bayesian model selection scheme to classify an individual protein trajectory to a given diffusion mode. By employing mleBayes on simulated data, we demonstrate that accurate determination of the underlying diffusive properties, beyond normal diffusion, remains challenging when analyzing particle trajectories on an individual basis. To improve upon the statistical limitations of classification from analyzing trajectories on an individual basis, we extend pEM with a new version (pEMv2) to simultaneously analyzing a collection of particle trajectories to uncover the system of interactions which give rise to unique normal or non-normal diffusive states. We test the performance of pEMv2 on various sets of simulated particle trajectories which transition between various modes of normal and non-normal diffusive states to highlight considerations when

  5. Analyses of Crime Patterns in NIBRS Data Based on a Novel Graph Theory Clustering Method: Virginia as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Jim

    2014-01-01

    This paper suggests a novel clustering method for analyzing the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data, which include the determination of correlation of different crime types, the development of a likelihood index for crimes to occur in a jurisdiction, and the clustering of jurisdictions based on crime type. The method was tested by using the 2005 assault data from 121 jurisdictions in Virginia as a test case. The analyses of these data show that some different crime types are correlated and some different crime parameters are correlated with different crime types. The analyses also show that certain jurisdictions within Virginia share certain crime patterns. This information assists with constructing a pattern for a specific crime type and can be used to determine whether a jurisdiction may be more likely to see this type of crime occur in their area. PMID:24778585

  6. Analyses of crime patterns in NIBRS data based on a novel graph theory clustering method: Virginia as a case study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Peixin; Darrah, Marjorie; Nolan, Jim; Zhang, Cun-Quan

    2014-01-01

    This paper suggests a novel clustering method for analyzing the National Incident-Based Reporting System (NIBRS) data, which include the determination of correlation of different crime types, the development of a likelihood index for crimes to occur in a jurisdiction, and the clustering of jurisdictions based on crime type. The method was tested by using the 2005 assault data from 121 jurisdictions in Virginia as a test case. The analyses of these data show that some different crime types are correlated and some different crime parameters are correlated with different crime types. The analyses also show that certain jurisdictions within Virginia share certain crime patterns. This information assists with constructing a pattern for a specific crime type and can be used to determine whether a jurisdiction may be more likely to see this type of crime occur in their area.

  7. Satellite Sounder-Based OLR-, Cloud- and Atmospheric Temperature Climatologies for Climate Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Gyula I.; Susskind, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Global energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system may change due to natural and man-made climate variations. For example, changes in the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) can be regarded as a crucial indicator of climate variations. Clouds play an important role -still insufficiently assessed in the global energy balance on all spatial and temporal scales, and satellites provide an ideal platform to measure cloud and large-scale atmospheric variables simultaneously. The TOVS series of satellites were the first to provide this type of information since 1979. OLR [Mehta and Susskind], cloud cover and cloud top pressure [Susskind et al] are among the key climatic parameters computed by the TOVS Pathfinder Path-A algorithm using mainly the retrieved temperature and moisture profiles. AIRS, regarded as the new and improved TOVS , has a much higher spectral resolution and greater S/N ratio, retrieving climatic parameters with higher accuracy. First we present encouraging agreements between MODIS and AIRS cloud top pressure (C(sub tp) and effective (A(sub eff), a product of infrared emissivity at 11 microns and physical cloud cover or A(sub c)) cloud fraction seasonal and interannual variabilities for selected months. Next we present validation efforts and preliminary trend analyses of TOVS-retrieved C(sub tp) and A(sub eff). For example, decadal global trends of the TOVS Path-A and ISCCP-D2 P(sub c), and A(sub eff)/A(sub c), values are similar. Furthermore, the TOVS Path-A and ISCCP-AVHRR [available since 19831 cloud fractions correlate even more strongly, including regional trends. We also present TOVS and AIRS OLR validation effort results and (for the longer-term TOVS Pathfinder Path-A dataset) trend analyses. OLR interannual spatial variabilities from the available state-of-the-art CERES measurements and both from the AIRS [Susskind et al] and TOVS OLR computations are in remarkably good agreement. Global monthly mean CERES and TOVS OLR time series show very good

  8. Impact of zeolite-based nanomodified additive on the structure and strength of the cement stone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, A. D.; Filippova, K. E.

    2015-01-01

    Portland cement is the main binder in the building materials industry; its properties strongly influence properties of mortars and concretes. Some regions experience difficulties with delivery and storage of Portland cement, raising the need to develop an effective additive from the available raw materials. Such materials for the Republic of Sakha (Yakutia) are zeolite-containing rocks. Studies have shown that introducing of dibutylphthalate to the composition of modified additive during mechanochemical activation leads to achievement of up to 11% of total amount particles with the size of 3-30 nm. After introducing 0.5% of the obtained additives, the compressive strength of cement-sand slurry samples increases up to 28%. Positive effect of additives introduction is also observed at high flow rate of water (W / C = 0.7). Gaining strength reaches 23%, allowing the efficient use of additive for movable mixtures with enhanced strength properties. In general, the proposed supplement allows reducing the water flow in the solution without decreasing its mobility, and increasing strength properties, which makes it possible to obtain a whole class of solutions of modified cement binder. The market value of the developed additives is 18 rubles per 1 kg, making sound competition in the market of modifying additives.

  9. A geobotanical investigation based on linear discriminant and profile analyses of airborne Thematic Mapper Simulator data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaller, Mathew R.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the application of linear discriminant and profile analyses to detailed investigation of an airborne Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) image collected over a geobotanical test site. The test site was located on the Keweenaw Peninsula of Michigan's Upper Peninsula, and remote sensing data collection coincided with the onset of leaf senescence in the regional deciduous flora. Linear discriminant analysis revealed that sites overlying soil geochemical anomalies were distinguishable from background sites by the reflectance and thermal emittance of the tree canopy imaged in the airborne TMS data. The correlation of individual bands with the linear discriminant function suggested that the TMS thermal Channel 7 (10.32-12.33 microns) contributed most, while TMS Bands 2 (0.53-0.60 microns), 3 (0.63-0.69 microns), and 5 (1.53-1.73 microns) contributed somewhat more modestly to the separation of anomalous and background sites imaged by the TMS. The observed changes in canopy reflectance and thermal emittance of the deciduous flora overlying geochemically anomalous areas are consistent with the biophysical changes which are known or presumed to occur as a result of injury induced in metal-stressed vegetation.

  10. Taxonomic hypotheses regarding the genus Gerbillus (Rodentia, Muridae, Gerbillinae) based on molecular analyses of museum specimens

    PubMed Central

    Ndiaye, Arame; Tatard, Caroline; Stanley, William; Granjon, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methodological improvements now allow routine analyses of highly degraded DNA samples as found in museum specimens. Using these methods could be useful in studying such groups as rodents of the genus Gerbillus for which i) the taxonomy is still highly debated, ii) collection of fresh specimens may prove difficult. Here we address precise taxonomic questions using a small portion of the cytochrome b gene obtained from 45 dry skin/skull museum samples (from 1913 to 1974) originating from two African and three Asian countries. The specimens were labelled Gerbillus gerbillus, Gerbillus andersoni, Gerbillus nanus, Gerbillus amoenus, Gerbillus perpallidus and Gerbillus pyramidum, and molecular results mostly confirmed these assignations. The close relationship between Gerbillus nanus (Asian origin) and Gerbillus amoenus (African origin) confirmed that they represent vicariant sibling species which differentiated in allopatry on either side of the Red Sea. In the closely related Gerbillus perpallidus and Gerbillus pyramidum, specimens considered as belonging to one Gerbillus pyramidum subspecies (Gerbillus pyramidum floweri) appeared closer to Gerbillus perpallidus suggesting that they (Gerbillus pyramidum floweri and Gerbillus perpallidus) may represent a unique species, distributed on both sides of the Nile River, for which the correct name should be Gerbillus floweri. Furthermore, the three other Gerbillus pyramidum subspecies grouped together with no apparent genetic structure suggesting that they may not yet represent genetically differentiated lineages. This study confirms the importance of using these methods on museum samples, which can open new perspectives in this particular group as well as in other groups of interest. PMID:27047247

  11. Taxonomic hypotheses regarding the genus Gerbillus (Rodentia, Muridae, Gerbillinae) based on molecular analyses of museum specimens.

    PubMed

    Ndiaye, Arame; Tatard, Caroline; Stanley, William; Granjon, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Methodological improvements now allow routine analyses of highly degraded DNA samples as found in museum specimens. Using these methods could be useful in studying such groups as rodents of the genus Gerbillus for which i) the taxonomy is still highly debated, ii) collection of fresh specimens may prove difficult. Here we address precise taxonomic questions using a small portion of the cytochrome b gene obtained from 45 dry skin/skull museum samples (from 1913 to 1974) originating from two African and three Asian countries. The specimens were labelled Gerbillus gerbillus, Gerbillus andersoni, Gerbillus nanus, Gerbillus amoenus, Gerbillus perpallidus and Gerbillus pyramidum, and molecular results mostly confirmed these assignations. The close relationship between Gerbillus nanus (Asian origin) and Gerbillus amoenus (African origin) confirmed that they represent vicariant sibling species which differentiated in allopatry on either side of the Red Sea. In the closely related Gerbillus perpallidus and Gerbillus pyramidum, specimens considered as belonging to one Gerbillus pyramidum subspecies (Gerbillus pyramidum floweri) appeared closer to Gerbillus perpallidus suggesting that they (Gerbillus pyramidum floweri and Gerbillus perpallidus) may represent a unique species, distributed on both sides of the Nile River, for which the correct name should be Gerbillus floweri. Furthermore, the three other Gerbillus pyramidum subspecies grouped together with no apparent genetic structure suggesting that they may not yet represent genetically differentiated lineages. This study confirms the importance of using these methods on museum samples, which can open new perspectives in this particular group as well as in other groups of interest. PMID:27047247

  12. Evaluating Instrument Quality in Science Education: Rasch-based analyses of a Nature of Science test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Irene; Neumann, Knut; Nehm, Ross

    2011-07-01

    Given the central importance of the Nature of Science (NOS) and Scientific Inquiry (SI) in national and international science standards and science learning, empirical support for the theoretical delineation of these constructs is of considerable significance. Furthermore, tests of the effects of varying magnitudes of NOS knowledge on domain-specific science understanding and belief require the application of instruments validated in accordance with AERA, APA, and NCME assessment standards. Our study explores three interrelated aspects of a recently developed NOS instrument: (1) validity and reliability; (2) instrument dimensionality; and (3) item scales, properties, and qualities within the context of Classical Test Theory and Item Response Theory (Rasch modeling). A construct analysis revealed that the instrument did not match published operationalizations of NOS concepts. Rasch analysis of the original instrument-as well as a reduced item set-indicated that a two-dimensional Rasch model fit significantly better than a one-dimensional model in both cases. Thus, our study revealed that NOS and SI are supported as two separate dimensions, corroborating theoretical distinctions in the literature. To identify items with unacceptable fit values, item quality analyses were used. A Wright Map revealed that few items sufficiently distinguished high performers in the sample and excessive numbers of items were present at the low end of the performance scale. Overall, our study outlines an approach for how Rasch modeling may be used to evaluate and improve Likert-type instruments in science education.

  13. Estimation of Sonic Fatigue by Reduced-Order Finite Element Based Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rizzi, Stephen A.; Przekop, Adam

    2006-01-01

    A computationally efficient, reduced-order method is presented for prediction of sonic fatigue of structures exhibiting geometrically nonlinear response. A procedure to determine the nonlinear modal stiffness using commercial finite element codes allows the coupled nonlinear equations of motion in physical degrees of freedom to be transformed to a smaller coupled system of equations in modal coordinates. The nonlinear modal system is first solved using a computationally light equivalent linearization solution to determine if the structure responds to the applied loading in a nonlinear fashion. If so, a higher fidelity numerical simulation in modal coordinates is undertaken to more accurately determine the nonlinear response. Comparisons of displacement and stress response obtained from the reduced-order analyses are made with results obtained from numerical simulation in physical degrees-of-freedom. Fatigue life predictions from nonlinear modal and physical simulations are made using the rainflow cycle counting method in a linear cumulative damage analysis. Results computed for a simple beam structure under a random acoustic loading demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach and compare favorably with results obtained from the solution in physical degrees-of-freedom.

  14. Disparity in population structuring of Southwestern Willow Flycatchers based on geographic distance, movement patterns, and genetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, Katie J; Theimer, Tad C; McLeod, Mary Anne; Koronkiewicz, Thomas J

    2014-12-01

    Estimates of population connectivity often are based on demographic analysis of movements among subpopulations, but this approach may fail to detect rare migrants or overestimate the contribution of movements into populations when migrants fail to successfully reproduce. We compared movement data of endangered Southwestern Willow Flycatchers among isolated populations in Nevada and Arizona from 1997 to 2008 to genetic analyses of samples collected between 2004 and 2008 to determine the degree to which these two methods were concordant in their estimates of population structuring. Given that documented movements of 13 color-banded adults and 23 juveniles over 10 years indicated low rates of long-distance movements, we predicted that genetic analyses would show significant population structuring between a northern (Nevada) deme and a southern (Arizona) deme. We genotyped 93 adult individuals at seven microsatellite loci and used two Bayesian clustering programs, STRUCTURE and GENELAND, to predict population structure. Both clustering algorithms produced the same structuring pattern; a cluster containing birds breeding in Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, the northern-most Nevada site, and a cluster comprised of all other populations. These results highlight that estimates of subpopulation connectivity based on demographic analyses may differ from those based on genetics, suggesting either temporal changes in the pattern of movements, the importance of undetected movements, or differential contribution of migrants to the subpopulations they enter.

  15. Safety assessment of historical masonry churches based on pre-assigned kinematic limit analysis, FE limit and pushover analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Milani, Gabriele Valente, Marco

    2014-10-06

    This study presents some results of a comprehensive numerical analysis on three masonry churches damaged by the recent Emilia-Romagna (Italy) seismic events occurred in May 2012. The numerical study comprises: (a) pushover analyses conducted with a commercial code, standard nonlinear material models and two different horizontal load distributions; (b) FE kinematic limit analyses performed using a non-commercial software based on a preliminary homogenization of the masonry materials and a subsequent limit analysis with triangular elements and interfaces; (c) kinematic limit analyses conducted in agreement with the Italian code and based on the a-priori assumption of preassigned failure mechanisms, where the masonry material is considered unable to withstand tensile stresses. All models are capable of giving information on the active failure mechanism and the base shear at failure, which, if properly made non-dimensional with the weight of the structure, gives also an indication of the horizontal peak ground acceleration causing the collapse of the church. The results obtained from all three models indicate that the collapse is usually due to the activation of partial mechanisms (apse, façade, lateral walls, etc.). Moreover the horizontal peak ground acceleration associated to the collapse is largely lower than that required in that seismic zone by the Italian code for ordinary buildings. These outcomes highlight that structural upgrading interventions would be extremely beneficial for the considerable reduction of the seismic vulnerability of such kind of historical structures.

  16. PCaAnalyser: a 2D-image analysis based module for effective determination of prostate cancer progression in 3D culture.

    PubMed

    Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Windus, Louisa C E; Lovitt, Carrie J; Avery, Vicky M

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) in vitro cell based assays for Prostate Cancer (PCa) research are rapidly becoming the preferred alternative to that of conventional 2D monolayer cultures. 3D assays more precisely mimic the microenvironment found in vivo, and thus are ideally suited to evaluate compounds and their suitability for progression in the drug discovery pipeline. To achieve the desired high throughput needed for most screening programs, automated quantification of 3D cultures is required. Towards this end, this paper reports on the development of a prototype analysis module for an automated high-content-analysis (HCA) system, which allows for accurate and fast investigation of in vitro 3D cell culture models for PCa. The Java based program, which we have named PCaAnalyser, uses novel algorithms that allow accurate and rapid quantitation of protein expression in 3D cell culture. As currently configured, the PCaAnalyser can quantify a range of biological parameters including: nuclei-count, nuclei-spheroid membership prediction, various function based classification of peripheral and non-peripheral areas to measure expression of biomarkers and protein constituents known to be associated with PCa progression, as well as defining segregate cellular-objects effectively for a range of signal-to-noise ratios. In addition, PCaAnalyser architecture is highly flexible, operating as a single independent analysis, as well as in batch mode; essential for High-Throughput-Screening (HTS). Utilising the PCaAnalyser, accurate and rapid analysis in an automated high throughput manner is provided, and reproducible analysis of the distribution and intensity of well-established markers associated with PCa progression in a range of metastatic PCa cell-lines (DU145 and PC3) in a 3D model demonstrated.

  17. Lateralization of High-Frequency Clicks Based on Interaural Time: Additivity of Information across Frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenzel, Elizabeth Marie

    Lateralization performance based on interaural differences of time (IDTs) was measured for trains of Gaussian clicks which varied in spectral content. In the first experiment, thresholds ((DELTA)IDTs) were measured as a function of the number of clicks in the train (n = 1 to 32), the interclick interval (ICI = 2.5 or 5 ms), and the spectral content (1 vs. 2 or 4 carriers). Subjects' performance was compared to perfect statistical summation which predicts slopes of -.50 when log-(DELTA)IDT vs. long -n is plotted. The results showed that increasing the spectral content of the clicks decreased the intercepts of the log -log functions (decreased thresholds) while having little effect on their slopes. Shortening the ICIs caused the slopes of the functions to decrease in absolute value. To estimate the bandwidth of frequency-interaction in lateralization, d's were measured for clicks with constant IDTs (n = 1) with a fixed carrier (FF = 4000, 5200, 6000 or 7200 Hz), both alone and combined with a second click whose carrier (F) varied from 3500 to 8500 Hz. Performance in combined conditions was compared to independent summation of the information carried by the two frequency-bands. Performance improved as the separation between F and FF increased until the level predicted by independence was reached. The final experiment investigated the interaction of frequency content with IDT. d's were measured as a function of the IDT in clicks with carriers of 5200, 6000 or 7200 Hz, both alone and combined with a 4000-Hz click with a fixed IDT. Performance in combined conditions was again compared to independent additivity. The improvement with frequency was explained by an increase in the number of samples of the IDT reaching the binaural centers due to spread of excitation along the basilar membrane. Less than independent summation was explained by correlation between overlapping bands which reduced the amount of information exciting independent channels. The data also suggest that

  18. Asthma-susceptibility variants identified using probands in case-control and family-based analyses

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease whose genetic basis has been explored for over two decades, most recently via genome-wide association studies. We sought to find asthma-susceptibility variants by using probands from a single population in both family-based and case-control association designs. Methods We used probands from the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) in two primary genome-wide association study designs: (1) probands were combined with publicly available population controls in a case-control design, and (2) probands and their parents were used in a family-based design. We followed a two-stage replication process utilizing three independent populations to validate our primary findings. Results We found that single nucleotide polymorphisms with similar case-control and family-based association results were more likely to replicate in the independent populations, than those with the smallest p-values in either the case-control or family-based design alone. The single nucleotide polymorphism that showed the strongest evidence for association to asthma was rs17572584, which replicated in 2/3 independent populations with an overall p-value among replication populations of 3.5E-05. This variant is near a gene that encodes an enzyme that has been implicated to act coordinately with modulators of Th2 cell differentiation and is expressed in human lung. Conclusions Our results suggest that using probands from family-based studies in case-control designs, and combining results of both family-based and case-control approaches, may be a way to augment our ability to find SNPs associated with asthma and other complex diseases. PMID:20698975

  19. Development of gas chromatographic methods for the analyses of organic carbonate-based electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terborg, Lydia; Weber, Sascha; Passerini, Stefano; Winter, Martin; Karst, Uwe; Nowak, Sascha

    2014-01-01

    In this work, novel methods based on gas chromatography (GC) for the investigation of common organic carbonate-based electrolyte systems are presented, which are used in lithium ion batteries. The methods were developed for flame ionization detection (FID), mass spectrometric detection (MS). Further, headspace (HS) sampling for the investigation of solid samples like electrodes is reported. Limits of detection are reported for FID. Finally, the developed methods were applied to the electrolyte system of commercially available lithium ion batteries as well as on in-house assembled cells.

  20. A pathway-based analysis provides additional support for an immune-related genetic susceptibility to Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Holmans, Peter; Moskvina, Valentina; Jones, Lesley; Sharma, Manu; Vedernikov, Alexey; Buchel, Finja; Saad, Mohamad; Sadd, Mohamad; Bras, Jose M; Bettella, Francesco; Nicolaou, Nayia; Simón-Sánchez, Javier; Mittag, Florian; Gibbs, J Raphael; Schulte, Claudia; Durr, Alexandra; Guerreiro, Rita; Hernandez, Dena; Brice, Alexis; Stefánsson, Hreinn; Majamaa, Kari; Gasser, Thomas; Heutink, Peter; Wood, Nicholas W; Martinez, Maria; Singleton, Andrew B; Nalls, Michael A; Hardy, John; Morris, Huw R; Williams, Nigel M

    2013-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disease affecting 1-2% in people >60 and 3-4% in people >80. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have now implicated significant evidence for association in at least 18 genomic regions. We have studied a large PD-meta analysis and identified a significant excess of SNPs (P < 1 × 10(-16)) that are associated with PD but fall short of the genome-wide significance threshold. This result was independent of variants at the 18 previously implicated regions and implies the presence of additional polygenic risk alleles. To understand how these loci increase risk of PD, we applied a pathway-based analysis, testing for biological functions that were significantly enriched for genes containing variants associated with PD. Analysing two independent GWA studies, we identified that both had a significant excess in the number of functional categories enriched for PD-associated genes (minimum P = 0.014 and P = 0.006, respectively). Moreover, 58 categories were significantly enriched for associated genes in both GWA studies (P < 0.001), implicating genes involved in the 'regulation of leucocyte/lymphocyte activity' and also 'cytokine-mediated signalling' as conferring an increased susceptibility to PD. These results were unaltered by the exclusion of all 178 genes that were present at the 18 genomic regions previously reported to be strongly associated with PD (including the HLA locus). Our findings, therefore, provide independent support to the strong association signal at the HLA locus and imply that the immune-related genetic susceptibility to PD is likely to be more widespread in the genome than previously appreciated.

  1. Analysing Task Design and Students' Responses to Context-Based Problems through Different Analytical Frameworks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broman, Karolina; Bernholt, Sascha; Parchmann, Ilka

    2015-01-01

    Background: Context-based learning approaches are used to enhance students' interest in, and knowledge about, science. According to different empirical studies, students' interest is improved by applying these more non-conventional approaches, while effects on learning outcomes are less coherent. Hence, further insights are needed into the…

  2. Identification of Bacterial Populations in Drinking Water Using 16S rRNA-Based Sequence Analyses

    EPA Science Inventory

    Intracellular RNA is rapidly degraded in stressed cells and is more unstable outside of the cell than DNA. As a result, RNA-based methods have been suggested to study the active microbial fraction in environmental matrices. The aim of this study was to identify bacterial populati...

  3. A Critical Examination of the Technical Adequacy of a Curriculum-Based Assessment Using Rasch Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchell, Brooke

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to (a) examine the psychometric properties of The Assessment, Evaluation, and Programming System for Infants and Children (AEPS Test); (b) provide a process for establishing psychometric properties for other Curriculum Based Assessments (CBAs); and (c) identify and guide evaluation and subsequent revisions of the AEPS…

  4. Analysing a Web-Based E-Commerce Learning Community: A Case Study in Brazil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joia, Luiz Antonio

    2002-01-01

    Demonstrates the use of a Web-based participative virtual learning environment for graduate students in Brazil enrolled in an electronic commerce course in a Masters in Business Administration program. Discusses learning communities; computer-supported collaborative work and collaborative learning; influences on student participation; the role of…

  5. Implementation and Validation of Trial-Based Functional Analyses in Public Elementary School Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Blair P.; Wehby, Joseph H.; Weaver, Emily S.; Goldman, Samantha E.; Harvey, Michelle N.; Sherlock, Daniel R.

    2015-01-01

    Although functional analysis (FA) remains the standard for identifying the function of problem behavior for students with developmental disabilities, traditional FA procedures are typically costly in terms of time, resources, and perceived risks. Preliminary research suggests that trial-based FA may be a less costly alternative. The purpose of…

  6. Improving the safety of a body composition analyser based on the PGNAA method.

    PubMed

    Miri-Hakimabad, Hashem; Izadi-Najafabadi, Reza; Vejdani-Noghreiyan, Alireza; Panjeh, Hamed

    2007-12-01

    The 252Cf radioisotope and 241Am-Be are intense neutron emitters that are readily encapsulated in compact, portable and sealed sources. Some features such as high flux of neutron emission and reliable neutron spectrum of these sources make them suitable for the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) method. The PGNAA method can be used in medicine for neutron radiography and body chemical composition analysis. 252Cf and 241Am-Be sources generate not only neutrons but also are intense gamma emitters. Furthermore, the sample in medical treatments is a human body, so it may be exposed to the bombardments of these gamma-rays. Moreover, accumulations of these high-rate gamma-rays in the detector volume cause simultaneous pulses that can be piled up and distort the spectra in the region of interest (ROI). In order to remove these disadvantages in a practical way without being concerned about losing the thermal neutron flux, a gamma-ray filter made of Pb must be employed. The paper suggests a relatively safe body chemical composition analyser (BCCA) machine that uses a spherical Pb shield, enclosing the neutron source. Gamma-ray shielding effects and the optimum radius of the spherical Pb shield have been investigated, using the MCNP-4C code, and compared with the unfiltered case, the bare source. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that an optimised gamma-ray shield for the neutron source in a BCCA can reduce effectively the risk of exposure to the 252Cf and 241Am-Be sources. PMID:18268376

  7. Geology of Southern Guinevere Planitia, Venus, based on analyses of Goldstone radar data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R. E.; Plaut, J. J.; Jurgens, R. F.; Saunders, R. S.; Slade, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    The ensemble of 41 backscatter images of Venus acquired by the S Band (12.6 cm) Goldstone radar system covers approx. 35 million km and includes the equatorial portion of Guinevere Planitia, Navka Planitia, Heng-O Chasma, and Tinatin Planitia, and parts of Devana Chasma and Phoebe Regio. The images and associated altimetry data combine relatively high spatial resolution (1 to 10 km) with small incidence angles (less than 10 deg) for regions not covered by either Venera Orbiter or Arecibo radar data. Systematic analyses of the Goldstone data show that: (1) Volcanic plains dominate, including groups of small volcanic constructs, radar bright flows on a NW-SE arm of Phoebe Regio and on Ushas Mons and circular volcano-tectonic depressions; (2) Some of the regions imaged by Goldstone have high radar cross sections, including the flows on Ushas Mons and the NW-SE arm of Phoebe Regio, and several other unnamed hills, ridged terrains, and plains areas; (3) A 1000 km diameter multiringed structure is observed and appears to have a morphology not observed in Venera data (The northern section corresponds to Heng-O Chasma); (4) A 150 km wide, 2 km deep, 1400 km long rift valley with upturned flanks is located on the western flank of Phoebe Regio and extends into Devana Chasma; (5) A number of structures can be discerned in the Goldstone data, mainly trending NW-SE and NE-SW, directions similar to those discerned in Pioneer-Venus topography throughout the equatorial region; and (6) The abundance of circular and impact features is similar to the plains global average defined from Venera and Arecibo data, implying that the terrain imaged by Goldstone has typical crater retention ages, measured in hundreds of millions of years. The rate of resurfacing is less than or equal to 4 km/Ga.

  8. Improving the safety of a body composition analyser based on the PGNAA method.

    PubMed

    Miri-Hakimabad, Hashem; Izadi-Najafabadi, Reza; Vejdani-Noghreiyan, Alireza; Panjeh, Hamed

    2007-12-01

    The 252Cf radioisotope and 241Am-Be are intense neutron emitters that are readily encapsulated in compact, portable and sealed sources. Some features such as high flux of neutron emission and reliable neutron spectrum of these sources make them suitable for the prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) method. The PGNAA method can be used in medicine for neutron radiography and body chemical composition analysis. 252Cf and 241Am-Be sources generate not only neutrons but also are intense gamma emitters. Furthermore, the sample in medical treatments is a human body, so it may be exposed to the bombardments of these gamma-rays. Moreover, accumulations of these high-rate gamma-rays in the detector volume cause simultaneous pulses that can be piled up and distort the spectra in the region of interest (ROI). In order to remove these disadvantages in a practical way without being concerned about losing the thermal neutron flux, a gamma-ray filter made of Pb must be employed. The paper suggests a relatively safe body chemical composition analyser (BCCA) machine that uses a spherical Pb shield, enclosing the neutron source. Gamma-ray shielding effects and the optimum radius of the spherical Pb shield have been investigated, using the MCNP-4C code, and compared with the unfiltered case, the bare source. Finally, experimental results demonstrate that an optimised gamma-ray shield for the neutron source in a BCCA can reduce effectively the risk of exposure to the 252Cf and 241Am-Be sources.

  9. Information Omitted From Analyses.

    PubMed

    2015-08-01

    In the Original Article titled “Higher- Order Genetic and Environmental Structure of Prevalent Forms of Child and Adolescent Psychopathology” published in the February 2011 issue of JAMA Psychiatry (then Archives of General Psychiatry) (2011;68[2]:181-189), there were 2 errors. Although the article stated that the dimensions of psychopathology were measured using parent informants for inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and oppositional defiant disorder, and a combination of parent and youth informants for conduct disorder, major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder, all dimensional scores used in the reported analyses were actually based on parent reports of symptoms; youth reports were not used. In addition, whereas the article stated that each symptom dimension was residualized on age, sex, age-squared, and age by sex, the dimensions actually were only residualized on age, sex, and age-squared. All analyses were repeated using parent informants for inattention, hyperactivity-impulsivity, and oppositional defiant disorder, and a combination of parent and youth informants for conduct disorder,major depression, generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, agoraphobia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder; these dimensional scores were residualized on age, age-squared, sex, sex by age, and sex by age-squared. The results of the new analyses were qualitatively the same as those reported in the article, with no substantial changes in conclusions. The only notable small difference was that major depression and generalized anxiety disorder dimensions had small but significant loadings on the internalizing factor in addition to their substantial loadings on the general factor in the analyses of both genetic and non-shared covariances in the selected models in the new analyses. Corrections were made to the

  10. [Analyses of biogenic related compounds based on intramolecular excimer-forming fluorescence derivatization].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideyuki

    2003-08-01

    A highly selective and sensitive method based on a novel concept is introduced for the assay of biological substances. This method is based on an intramolecular excimer-forming fluorescence derivatization with a pyrene reagent, followed by reverse-phase HPLC. Polyamines, polyphenols, and dicarboxylic acids, which have two or more reactive functional groups in a molecule, were converted to the corresponding polypyrene-labeled derivatives by reaction with the appropriate pyrene reagent. The derivatives exhibited intramolecular excimer fluorescence (440-520 nm), which can clearly be discriminated from the monomer (normal) fluorescence (360-420 nm) emitted by pyrene reagents and monopyrene-labeled derivatives of monofunctional compounds. With excimer fluorescence detection, highly selective and sensitive determination of polyamines, polyphenols, and dicarboxylic acids can be achieved. Furthermore, the methods were successfully applied to the determination of various biological and environmental substances in real samples, which require only a small amount of sample and simple pretreatment.

  11. New 1,6-heptadienes with pyrimidine bases attached: Syntheses and spectroscopic analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammud, Hassan H.; Ghannoum, Amer M.; Fares, Fares A.; Abramian, Lara K.; Bouhadir, Kamal H.

    2008-06-01

    A simple, high yielding synthesis leading to the functionalization of some pyrimidine bases with a 1,6-heptadienyl moiety spaced from the N - 1 position by a methylene group is described. A key step in this synthesis involves a Mitsunobu reaction by coupling 3N-benzoyluracil and 3N-benzoylthymine to 2-allyl-pent-4-en-1-ol followed by alkaline hydrolysis of the 3N-benzoyl protecting groups. This protocol should eventually lend itself to the synthesis of a host of N-alkylated nucleoside analogs. The absorption and emission properties of these pyrimidine derivatives ( 3- 6) were studied in solvents of different physical properties. Computerized analysis and multiple regression techniques were applied to calculate the regression and correlation coefficients based on the equation that relates peak position λmax to the solvent parameters that depend on the H-bonding ability, refractive index, and dielectric constant of solvents.

  12. An Approach to Risk-Based Design Incorporating Damage Tolerance Analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Glaessgen, Edward H.; Sleight, David W.

    2002-01-01

    Incorporating risk-based design as an integral part of spacecraft development is becoming more and more common. Assessment of uncertainties associated with design parameters and environmental aspects such as loading provides increased knowledge of the design and its performance. Results of such studies can contribute to mitigating risk through a system-level assessment. Understanding the risk of an event occurring, the probability of its occurrence, and the consequences of its occurrence can lead to robust, reliable designs. This paper describes an approach to risk-based structural design incorporating damage-tolerance analysis. The application of this approach to a candidate Earth-entry vehicle is described. The emphasis of the paper is on describing an approach for establishing damage-tolerant structural response inputs to a system-level probabilistic risk assessment.

  13. A bead-based western for high-throughput cellular signal transduction analyses

    PubMed Central

    Treindl, Fridolin; Ruprecht, Benjamin; Beiter, Yvonne; Schultz, Silke; Döttinger, Anette; Staebler, Annette; Joos, Thomas O.; Kling, Simon; Poetz, Oliver; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans; Kuster, Bernhard; Templin, Markus F.

    2016-01-01

    Dissecting cellular signalling requires the analysis of large number of proteins. The DigiWest approach we describe here transfers the western blot to a bead-based microarray platform. By combining gel-based protein separation with immobilization on microspheres, hundreds of replicas of the initial blot are created, thus enabling the comprehensive analysis of limited material, such as cells collected by laser capture microdissection, and extending traditional western blotting to reach proteomic scales. The combination of molecular weight resolution, sensitivity and signal linearity on an automated platform enables the rapid quantification of hundreds of specific proteins and protein modifications in complex samples. This high-throughput western blot approach allowed us to identify and characterize alterations in cellular signal transduction that occur during the development of resistance to the kinase inhibitor Lapatinib, revealing major changes in the activation state of Ephrin-mediated signalling and a central role for p53-controlled processes. PMID:27659302

  14. Using gender-based analyses to understand physical inactivity among women in Yellowstone County, Montana.

    PubMed

    Duin, Diane K; Golbeck, Amanda L; Keippel, April Ennis; Ciemins, Elizabeth; Hanson, Hillary; Neary, Tracy; Fink, Heather

    2015-08-01

    Physical inactivity contributes to many health problems. Gender, the socially constructed roles and activities deemed appropriate for men and women, is an important factor in women's physical inactivity. To better understand how gender influences participation in leisure-time physical activity, a gender analysis was conducted using sex-disaggregated data from a county-wide health assessment phone survey and a qualitative analysis of focus group transcripts. From this gender analysis, several gender-based constraints emerged, including women's roles as caregivers, which left little time or energy for physical activity, women's leisure time activities and hobbies, which were less active than men's hobbies, and expectations for women's appearance that made them uncomfortable sweating in front of strangers. Gender-based opportunities included women's enjoyment of activity as a social connection, less rigid gender roles for younger women, and a sense of responsibility to set a good example for their families. The gender analysis was used to gain a deeper understanding of gender-based constraints and opportunities related to physical activity. This understanding is being used in the next step of our research to develop a gender-specific intervention to promote physical activity in women that addresses the underlying causes of physical inactivity through accommodation or transformation of those gender norms.

  15. A Wave-Based Approach for Seismic Response Analyses of High-Rise Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, R.; Hilali, S. Al; Abdulla, A.; Kurbi, M. Al

    This study examines one-dimensional wave propagation in a multi-story building with seismic excitation. In particular, the building is modeled as a series of shear beams for columns/walls and lumped masses for floors. Wave response at one location of the building is then derived to an impulse displacement at another location in time and frequency domains, termed here as wave-based or generalized impulse/frequency response function (GIRF/GFRF), which is dependent upon the building characteristics above the impulse location. Not only does this study illustrate features of GIRF/GFRF in terms of building properties, it also shows broad-based applications of the modeling. Two examples are presented with the use of the modeling. One is wave-based characterization of ten-story Millikan Library in Pasadena, California with the recordings of Yorba Linda earthquake of September 3, 2002. The other is analysis for influence of stochastic floor-to-column mass ratio, story-height and seismic input in seismic wave responses.

  16. RTMOD: an Internet based system to analyse the predictions of long-range atmospheric dispersion models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellasio, Roberto; Bianconi, Roberto; Graziani, Giovanni; Mosca, Sonia

    1999-08-01

    After the Chernobyl accident caused the atmospheric release of radioactive substances that contaminated most of the European territory, the importance of supporting the decisional process in emergency conditions with reliable long-range dispersion models was understood. Generally, the reliability of models is evaluated and verified through comparison against measurements gained during planned experiments or accidental releases. The proper evaluation is based on a set of appropriate statistical indices, each of them giving insight into the specific characteristics of the model. This paper describes an Internet-based system (RTMOD, real time model evaluation) developed to compare in real time, on a graphical and numerical basis, the prediction of several long-range dispersion models. The structure of the system and some examples are presented in the following of this paper. RTMOD was developed to compare model predictions from various 'dry runs' (such as fictitious atmospheric releases), but it can also be used to compare model results against measurements in the situation of an actual release. Hence it is also a useful tool in validating mathematical dispersion models. Moreover, provided that a certain number of models are used, RTMOD becomes also a useful tool in real time managing of accidental releases by indicating the probability that a fixed threshold value will be exceeded, based on the set of model predictions.

  17. Integrated Genomic and Network-Based Analyses of Complex Diseases and Human Disease Network.

    PubMed

    Al-Harazi, Olfat; Al Insaif, Sadiq; Al-Ajlan, Monirah A; Kaya, Namik; Dzimiri, Nduna; Colak, Dilek

    2016-06-20

    A disease phenotype generally reflects various pathobiological processes that interact in a complex network. The highly interconnected nature of the human protein interaction network (interactome) indicates that, at the molecular level, it is difficult to consider diseases as being independent of one another. Recently, genome-wide molecular measurements, data mining and bioinformatics approaches have provided the means to explore human diseases from a molecular basis. The exploration of diseases and a system of disease relationships based on the integration of genome-wide molecular data with the human interactome could offer a powerful perspective for understanding the molecular architecture of diseases. Recently, subnetwork markers have proven to be more robust and reliable than individual biomarker genes selected based on gene expression profiles alone, and achieve higher accuracy in disease classification. We have applied one of these methodologies to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) data that we have generated using a microarray and identified significant subnetworks associated with the disease. In this paper, we review the recent endeavours in this direction, and summarize the existing methodologies and computational tools for network-based analysis of complex diseases and molecular relationships among apparently different disorders and human disease network. We also discuss the future research trends and topics of this promising field. PMID:27318646

  18. Integrated Genomic and Network-Based Analyses of Complex Diseases and Human Disease Network.

    PubMed

    Al-Harazi, Olfat; Al Insaif, Sadiq; Al-Ajlan, Monirah A; Kaya, Namik; Dzimiri, Nduna; Colak, Dilek

    2016-06-20

    A disease phenotype generally reflects various pathobiological processes that interact in a complex network. The highly interconnected nature of the human protein interaction network (interactome) indicates that, at the molecular level, it is difficult to consider diseases as being independent of one another. Recently, genome-wide molecular measurements, data mining and bioinformatics approaches have provided the means to explore human diseases from a molecular basis. The exploration of diseases and a system of disease relationships based on the integration of genome-wide molecular data with the human interactome could offer a powerful perspective for understanding the molecular architecture of diseases. Recently, subnetwork markers have proven to be more robust and reliable than individual biomarker genes selected based on gene expression profiles alone, and achieve higher accuracy in disease classification. We have applied one of these methodologies to idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (IDCM) data that we have generated using a microarray and identified significant subnetworks associated with the disease. In this paper, we review the recent endeavours in this direction, and summarize the existing methodologies and computational tools for network-based analysis of complex diseases and molecular relationships among apparently different disorders and human disease network. We also discuss the future research trends and topics of this promising field.

  19. Web-based applications for building, managing and analysing kinetic models of biological systems

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Rajib; Yusufi, Faraaz Noor Khan; Park, Wonjun; Karimi, Iftekhar A.

    2009-01-01

    Mathematical modelling and computational analysis play an essential role in improving our capability to elucidate the functions and characteristics of complex biological systems such as metabolic, regulatory and cell signalling pathways. The modelling and concomitant simulation render it possible to predict the cellular behaviour of systems under various genetically and/or environmentally perturbed conditions. This motivates systems biologists/bioengineers/bioinformaticians to develop new tools and applications, allowing non-experts to easily conduct such modelling and analysis. However, among a multitude of systems biology tools developed to date, only a handful of projects have adopted a web-based approach to kinetic modelling. In this report, we evaluate the capabilities and characteristics of current web-based tools in systems biology and identify desirable features, limitations and bottlenecks for further improvements in terms of usability and functionality. A short discussion on software architecture issues involved in web-based applications and the approaches taken by existing tools is included for those interested in developing their own simulation applications. PMID:18805901

  20. Kinetic analyses and performance of a colloidal magnetic nanoparticle based immunoassay dedicated to allergy diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Teste, Bruno; Kanoufi, Frédéric; Descroix, Stéphanie; Poncet, Pascal; Georgelin, Thomas; Siaugue, Jean-Michel; Petr, Jan; Varenne, Anne; Hennion, Marie-Claire

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the possibility to use magnetic nanoparticles as immunosupports for allergy diagnosis. Most immunoassays used for immunosupports and clinical diagnosis are based on a heterogeneous solid-phase system and suffer from mass-transfer limitation. The nanoparticles' colloidal behavior and magnetic properties bring the advantages of homogeneous immunoassay, i.e., species diffusion, and of heterogeneous immunoassay, i.e., easy separation of the immunocomplex and free forms, as well as analyte preconcentration. We thus developed a colloidal, non-competitive, indirect immunoassay using magnetic core-shell nanoparticles (MCSNP) as immunosupports. The feasibility of such an immunoassay was first demonstrated with a model antibody and described by comparing the immunocapture kinetics using macro (standard microtiter plate), micro (microparticles) and nanosupports (MCSNP). The influence of the nanosupport properties (surface chemistry, antigen density) and of the medium (ionic strength, counter ion nature) on the immunocapture efficiency and specificity was then investigated. The performances of this original MCSNP-based immunoassay were compared with a gold standard enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a microtiter plate. The capture rate of target IgG was accelerated 200-fold and a tenfold lower limit of detection was achieved. Finally, the MCSNP-based immunoassay was successfully applied to the detection of specific IgE from milk-allergic patient's sera with a lower LOD and a good agreement (CV < 6%) with the microtiter plate, confirming the great potential of this analytical platform in the field of immunodiagnosis.

  1. Assessing an organizational culture instrument based on the Competing Values Framework: Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses

    PubMed Central

    Helfrich, Christian D; Li, Yu-Fang; Mohr, David C; Meterko, Mark; Sales, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    Background The Competing Values Framework (CVF) has been widely used in health services research to assess organizational culture as a predictor of quality improvement implementation, employee and patient satisfaction, and team functioning, among other outcomes. CVF instruments generally are presented as well-validated with reliable aggregated subscales. However, only one study in the health sector has been conducted for the express purpose of validation, and that study population was limited to hospital managers from a single geographic locale. Methods We used exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses to examine the underlying structure of data from a CVF instrument. We analyzed cross-sectional data from a work environment survey conducted in the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). The study population comprised all staff in non-supervisory positions. The survey included 14 items adapted from a popular CVF instrument, which measures organizational culture according to four subscales: hierarchical, entrepreneurial, team, and rational. Results Data from 71,776 non-supervisory employees (approximate response rate 51%) from 168 VHA facilities were used in this analysis. Internal consistency of the subscales was moderate to strong (α = 0.68 to 0.85). However, the entrepreneurial, team, and rational subscales had higher correlations across subscales than within, indicating poor divergent properties. Exploratory factor analysis revealed two factors, comprising the ten items from the entrepreneurial, team, and rational subscales loading on the first factor, and two items from the hierarchical subscale loading on the second factor, along with one item from the rational subscale that cross-loaded on both factors. Results from confirmatory factor analysis suggested that the two-subscale solution provides a more parsimonious fit to the data as compared to the original four-subscale model. Conclusion This study suggests that there may be problems applying conventional

  2. CO hydrogenation on nickel-based catalysts: Effects of copper addition

    SciTech Connect

    Agnelli, M.; Mirodatos, C.

    2000-05-15

    The effect of copper addition on the catalytic properties of silica-supported nickel catalysts for the reaction of CO hydrogenation in the temperature range of 200--500 C has been investigated. Different effects, positive or negative, depending on the temperature and the copper content, are described and explained. At low temperature (230 C), the addition of low copper content prevents the loss of the active surface by sintering without inhibiting the rate of CO hydrogenation too much. At high temperatures (450 C), high copper content is necessary to limit the accumulation of poisonous carbon products, but at the expense of CO conversion. On the basis of the various kinetic and morphologic effects of copper addition, an advanced description of the CO hydrogenation mechanism is also provided, assuming an active site formed by 2--3 adjacent Ni atoms, whatever the temperature or the copper content may be.

  3. Effect of oxygenated liquid additives on the urea based SNCR process.

    PubMed

    Tayyeb Javed, M; Nimmo, W; Mahmood, Asif; Irfan, Naseem

    2009-08-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to study the effect of oxygenated liquid additives, H(2)O(2), C(2)H(5)OH, C(2)H(4)(OH)(2) and C(3)H(5)(OH)(3) on NO(x) removal from flue gases by the selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) process using urea as a reducing agent. Experiments were performed with a 150kW pilot scale reactor in which a simulated flue gas was generated by the combustion of methane operating with 6% excess oxygen in flue gases. The desired levels of initial NO(x) (500ppm) were achieved by doping the fuel gas with ammonia. Experiments were performed throughout the temperature range of interest, i.e. from 800 to 1200 degrees C for the investigation of the effects of the process additives on the performance of aqueous urea DeNO(x). With H(2)O(2) addition a downward shift of 150 degrees C in the peak reduction temperature from 1130 to 980 degrees C was observed during the experimentation, however, the peak reduction efficiency was reduced from 81 to 63% when no additive was used. The gradual addition of C(2)H(5)OH up to a molar ratio of 2.0 further impairs the peak NO(x) reduction efficiency by reducing it to 50% but this is accompanied by a downward shift of 180 degrees C in the peak reduction temperature. Further exploration using C(2)H(4)(OH)(2) suggested that a 50% reduction could be attained for all the temperatures higher than 940 degrees C. The use of C(3)H(5)(OH)(3) as a secondary additive has a significant effect on the peak reduction efficiency that decreased to 40% the reductions were achievable at a much lower temperature of 800 degrees C showing a downward shift of 330 degrees C.

  4. Experimental and theoretical analyses on the ultrasonic cavitation processing of Al-based alloys and nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Shian

    Strong evidence is showing that microstructure and mechanical properties of a casting component can be significantly improved if nanoparticles are used as reinforcement to form metal-matrix-nano-composite (MMNC). In this paper, 6061/A356 nanocomposite castings are fabricated using the ultrasonic stirring technology (UST). The 6061/A356 alloy and Al2O3/SiC nanoparticles are used as the matrix alloy and the reinforcement, respectively. Nanoparticles are injected into the molten metal and dispersed by ultrasonic cavitation and acoustic streaming. The applied UST parameters in the current experiments are used to validate a recently developed multiphase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model, which is used to model the nanoparticle dispersion during UST processing. The CFD model accounts for turbulent fluid flow, heat transfer and the complex interaction between the molten alloy and nanoparticles using the ANSYS Fluent Dense Discrete Phase Model (DDPM). The modeling study includes the effects of ultrasonic probe location and the initial location where the nanoparticles are injected into the molten alloy. The microstructure, mechanical behavior and mechanical properties of the nanocomposite castings have been also investigated in detail. The current experimental results show that the tensile strength and elongation of the as-cast nanocomposite samples (6061/A356 alloy reinforced by Al2O 3 or SiC nanoparticles) are improved. The addition of the Al2O 3 or SiC nanoparticles in 6061/A356 alloy matrix changes the fracture mechanism from brittle dominated to ductile dominated.

  5. Gene set enrichment and topological analyses based on interaction networks in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    SUI, SHUXIANG; WANG, XIN; ZHENG, HUA; GUO, HUA; CHEN, TONG; JI, DONG-MEI

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) accounts for over one-quarter of all pediatric cancers. Interacting genes and proteins within the larger human gene interaction network of the human genome are rarely investigated by studies investigating pediatric ALL. In the present study, interaction networks were constructed using the empirical Bayesian approach and the Search Tool for the Retrieval of Interacting Genes/proteins database, based on the differentially-expressed (DE) genes in pediatric ALL, which were identified using the RankProd package. Enrichment analysis of the interaction network was performed using the network-based methods EnrichNet and PathExpand, which were compared with the traditional expression analysis systematic explored (EASE) method. In total, 398 DE genes were identified in pediatric ALL, and LIF was the most significantly DE gene. The co-expression network consisted of 272 nodes, which indicated genes and proteins, and 602 edges, which indicated the number of interactions adjacent to the node. Comparison between EASE and PathExpand revealed that PathExpand detected more pathways or processes that were closely associated with pediatric ALL compared with the EASE method. There were 294 nodes and 1,588 edges in the protein-protein interaction network, with the processes of hematopoietic cell lineage and porphyrin metabolism demonstrating a close association with pediatric ALL. Network enrichment analysis based on the PathExpand algorithm was revealed to be more powerful for the analysis of interaction networks in pediatric ALL compared with the EASE method. LIF and MLLT11 were identified as the most significantly DE genes in pediatric ALL. The process of hematopoietic cell lineage was the pathway most significantly associated with pediatric ALL. PMID:26788135

  6. Root distribution analyses as a means of improving sensor-based deficit irrigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloss, Sebastian; Werisch, Martin; Schütze, Niels

    2014-05-01

    The limited and seasonally variable availability of water and its efficient distribution when growing crops is still an unsolved problem in agriculture. Sensor-based deficit irrigation (DI), where a sensor is used to detect the soil water status and irrigation is provided according to certain threshold values, is one strategy to address that issue. Threshold values are needed that ensure high water productivity and high reliability. A stochastic approach of simulation and optimization in combination with irrigation experiments of drip irrigated maize for model parameterization was used to derive reliable soil water tension threshold values for irrigation control. A weakness of the applied model was the unknown parameterization of the plant root, which had to be included into the optimization besides parameters for the soil only, thus increasing the complexity of the problem. In a follow-up irrigation experiment with the same DI system parameters, focus was put on the investigation of the plant's root distribution in order to improve the validity of the model when determining optimal soil water tension threshold values in sensor-based deficit irrigation systems. Soil samples for a fully and a deficiently irrigated treatment during different stages of plant development were taken and the root density at different depths was determined. The difference in root growth for both treatments are shown and reliable soil water tension threshold values for varying values of irrigation parameters recalculated in a Monte Carlo simulation, after incorporating the new root parameterization into the model. This further improves the significance of derived threshold values and helps to assess possibilities and limitations of this approach when used for investigating the potentials of sensor-based DI systems.

  7. Model-based analyses: Promises, pitfalls, and example applications to the study of cognitive control

    PubMed Central

    Mars, Rogier B.; Shea, Nicholas J.; Kolling, Nils; Rushworth, Matthew F. S.

    2011-01-01

    We discuss a recent approach to investigating cognitive control, which has the potential to deal with some of the challenges inherent in this endeavour. In a model-based approach, the researcher defines a formal, computational model that performs the task at hand and whose performance matches that of a research participant. The internal variables in such a model might then be taken as proxies for latent variables computed in the brain. We discuss the potential advantages of such an approach for the study of the neural underpinnings of cognitive control and its pitfalls, and we make explicit the assumptions underlying the interpretation of data obtained using this approach. PMID:20437297

  8. Microbial genome analyses: global comparisons of transport capabilities based on phylogenies, bioenergetics and substrate specificities.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, I T; Sliwinski, M K; Saier, M H

    1998-04-01

    We have conducted genome sequence analyses of seven prokaryotic microorganisms for which completely sequenced genomes are available (Escherichia coli, Haemophilus influenzae, Helicobacter pylori, Bacillus subtilis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Synechocystis PCC6803 and Methanococcus jannaschii). We report the distribution of encoded known and putative polytopic cytoplasmic membrane transport proteins within these genomes. Transport systems for each organism were classified according to (1) putative membrane topology, (2) protein family, (3) bioenergetics, and (4) substrate specificities. The overall transport capabilities of each organism were thereby estimated. Probable function was assigned to greater than 90% of the putative transport proteins identified. The results show the following: (1) Numbers of transport systems in eubacteria are approximately proportional to genome size and correspond to 9.7 to 10.8% of the total encoded genes except for H. pylori (5.4%), Synechocystis (4.7%) and M. jannaschii (3.5%) which exhibit substantially lower proportions. (2) The distribution of topological types is similar in all seven organisms. (3) Transport systems belonging to 67 families were identified within the genomes of these organisms, and about half of these families are also found in eukaryotes. (4) 12% of these families are found exclusively in Gram-negative bacteria, but none is found exclusively in Gram-positive bacteria, cyanobacteria or archaea. (5) Two superfamilies, the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) and major facilitator (MF) superfamilies account for nearly 50% of all transporters in each organism, but the relative representation of these two transporter types varies over a tenfold range, depending on the organism. (6) Secondary, pmf-dependent carriers are 1.5 to threefold more prevalent than primary ATP-dependent carriers in E. coli, H. influenzae, H. pylori and B. subtilis while primary carriers are about twofold more prevalent in M. genitalium and Synechocystis. M

  9. Lewis base additives improve the zeolite ferrierite-catalyzed synthesis of isostearic acid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isostearic acid (IA) is of interest for industrial purposes especially in the area of biolubricants, such as cosmetics and slip additives for polyolefin and related copolymer films. This study was designed to develop a zeolitic catalysis process for IA production through isomerization of fatty aci...

  10. Effect of additives on the anisotropic etching of silicon by using a TMAH based solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Ki-Hwa; Kim, Bum-Joon; Kim, Jung-Sik

    2015-09-01

    In this study, the anisotropic etching properties of single crystal silicon were examined using a tetramethyl ammonium hydroxide (TMAH). The variations in the Si etching rate and surface morphology at different etching temperatures and TMAH concentrations were evaluated. The effects of different additives were also examined. As the THAM concentration (10-25 wt. %) decreased, the etching rate increased from 10 μm/h to 70 μm/h at temperatures between 70°C and 90°C. On the other hand, the etched surface roughness became degraded as the hillock density and corner undercut ratio increased. To solve these problems, four additives, pyrazine, ammonium persulfate (AP), ammonium hydrogen sulfate (AHS), and isopropyl alcohol (IPA), were added to the TMAH solution. The experimental results showed that these additives play an important role in increasing the etching rate up to 10-20%. The etched surface was also improved significantly by the decreased hillock density on the surface. The addition of IPA to the TMAH solution showed excellent results in improving the etched surface flatness and the undercutting compensation. On the other hand, one of the characteristics of IPA is the decrease in etching rate with increasing amount of IPA. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. The Use of ICT in Kindergarten for Teaching Addition Based on Realistic Mathematics Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaranis, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate if information and communications technology (ICT) helps improve kindergarten students' basic mathematical achievement regarding addition. Our research compares the level of mathematical competence of the students taught using our ICT oriented learning method which specifically takes advantage of…

  12. Combine and Conquer: Surfactants, Solvents, and Chaotropes for Robust Mass Spectrometry Based Analyses of Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) based proteomic technologies enable the identification and quantification of membrane proteins as well as their post-translational modifications. A prerequisite for their quantitative and reliable MS-based bottom-up analysis is the efficient digestion into peptides by proteases, though digestion of membrane proteins is typically challenging due to their inherent properties such as hydrophobicity. Here, we investigated the effect of eight commercially available MS-compatible surfactants, two organic solvents, and two chaotropes on the enzymatic digestion efficiency of membrane protein-enriched complex mixtures in a multiphase study using a gelfree approach. Multiple parameters, including the number of peptides and proteins identified, total protein sequence coverage, and digestion specificity were used to evaluate transmembrane protein digestion performance. A new open-source software tool was developed to allow for the specific assessment of transmembrane domain sequence coverage. Results demonstrate that while Progenta anionic surfactants outperform other surfactants when tested alone, combinations of guanidine and acetonitrile improve performance of all surfactants to near similar levels as well as enhance trypsin specificity to >90%, which has critical implications for future quantitative and qualitative proteomic studies. PMID:24392666

  13. Augmentation of French grunt diet description using combined visual and DNA-based analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hargrove, John S.; Parkyn, Daryl C.; Murie, Debra J.; Demopoulos, Amanda W.J.; Austin, James D.

    2012-01-01

    Trophic linkages within a coral-reef ecosystem may be difficult to discern in fish species that reside on, but do not forage on, coral reefs. Furthermore, dietary analysis of fish can be difficult in situations where prey is thoroughly macerated, resulting in many visually unrecognisable food items. The present study examined whether the inclusion of a DNA-based method could improve the identification of prey consumed by French grunt, Haemulon flavolineatum, a reef fish that possesses pharyngeal teeth and forages on soft-bodied prey items. Visual analysis indicated that crustaceans were most abundant numerically (38.9%), followed by sipunculans (31.0%) and polychaete worms (5.2%), with a substantial number of unidentified prey (12.7%). For the subset of prey with both visual and molecular data, there was a marked reduction in the number of unidentified sipunculans (visual – 31.1%, combined &ndash 4.4%), unidentified crustaceans (visual &ndash 15.6%, combined &ndash 6.7%), and unidentified taxa (visual &ndash 11.1%, combined &ndash 0.0%). Utilising results from both methodologies resulted in an increased number of prey placed at the family level (visual &ndash 6, combined &ndash 33) and species level (visual &ndash 0, combined &ndash 4). Although more costly than visual analysis alone, our study demonstrated the feasibility of DNA-based identification of visually unidentifiable prey in the stomach contents of fish.

  14. A web-based survey of odontologist's opinions concerning bitemark analyses.

    PubMed

    Pretty, I A

    2003-09-01

    Within the field of forensic dentistry, the detection, collection, and analysis of bitemarks remains one of the most contentious areas. Attempts at the production of consensus documents have produced documents such as the ABFO's Guidelines for Bitemark Evidence Collection. Despite this, the range of differing analysis techniques, allied with a varied opinion base on the robustness of bitemark conclusions has led to polarized views within the profession. The purpose of this study was to survey forensic dentists to obtain their views on a number of crucial components of bitemark theory and contentious areas within the discipline. Using a web-based survey, 14 questions were asked of respondents. Seventy-two odontologists completed the survey, with 38% being of Diplomate status, 10% had completed 20 or more bitemark cases, and 20% between 10 and 20 cases, 91% of respondents believed that the human dentition was unique, with 78% believing that this uniqueness could be represented on human skin during the biting process. Seventy percent believed that they could positively identify an individual from a bitemark, and 22% stated that the statistical tool, the product rule, should be applied to bitemark conclusions. Over half of the odontologists used overlays for bitemark analysis. with a digital method of production the most popular. The implications of these and other findings are discussed. PMID:14535678

  15. Drive-based recording analyses at >800 Gfc/in 2 using shingled recording

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    William Cross, R.; Montemorra, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Since the introduction of perpendicular recording, conventional perpendicular scaling has enabled the hard disk drive industry to deliver products ranging from ˜130 to well over 500 Gb/in 2 in a little over 4 years. The incredible areal density growth spurt enabled by perpendicular recording is now endangered by an inability to effectively balance writeability with erasure effects at the system level. Shingled magnetic recording (SMR) offers an effective means to continue perpendicular areal density growth using conventional heads and tuned media designs. The use of specially designed edge-write head structures (also known as 'corner writers') should further increase the AD gain potential for shingled recording. In this paper, we will demonstrate the drive-based recording performance characteristics of a shingled recording system at areal densities in excess of 800 Gb/in 2 using a conventional head. Using a production drive base, developmental heads/media and a number of sophisticated analytical routines, we have studied the recording performance of a shingled magnetic recording subsystem. Our observations confirm excellent writeability in excess of 400 ktpi and a perpendicular system with acceptable noise balance, especially at extreme ID and OD skews where the benefits of SMR are quite pronounced. We believe that this demonstration illustrates that SMR is not only capable of productization, but is likely the path of least resistance toward production drive areal density closer to 1 Tb/in 2 and beyond.

  16. Bootstrap-based methods for estimating standard errors in Cox's regression analyses of clustered event times.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yongling; Abrahamowicz, Michal

    2010-03-30

    We propose two bootstrap-based methods to correct the standard errors (SEs) from Cox's model for within-cluster correlation of right-censored event times. The cluster-bootstrap method resamples, with replacement, only the clusters, whereas the two-step bootstrap method resamples (i) the clusters, and (ii) individuals within each selected cluster, with replacement. In simulations, we evaluate both methods and compare them with the existing robust variance estimator and the shared gamma frailty model, which are available in statistical software packages. We simulate clustered event time data, with latent cluster-level random effects, which are ignored in the conventional Cox's model. For cluster-level covariates, both proposed bootstrap methods yield accurate SEs, and type I error rates, and acceptable coverage rates, regardless of the true random effects distribution, and avoid serious variance under-estimation by conventional Cox-based standard errors. However, the two-step bootstrap method over-estimates the variance for individual-level covariates. We also apply the proposed bootstrap methods to obtain confidence bands around flexible estimates of time-dependent effects in a real-life analysis of cluster event times.

  17. New insights in quantum chemical topology studies using numerical grid-based analyses.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, David; Pilmé, Julien

    2011-11-30

    New insights in Quantum Chemical Topology of one-electron density functions have been proposed here by using a recent grid-based algorithm (Tang et al., J Phys Condens Matter 2009, 21, 084204), initially designed for the decomposition of the electron density. Beyond the charge analysis, we show that this algorithm is suitable for different scalar functions showing a more complex topology, that is, the Laplacian of the electron density, the electron localization function (ELF), and the molecular electrostatic potential (MEP). This algorithm makes use of a robust methodology enabling to numerically assign the data points of three-dimensional grids to basin volumes, and it has the advantage of requiring only the values of the scalar function without details on the wave function used to build the grid. Our implementation is briefly outlined (program named TopChem), its capabilities are examined, and technical aspects in terms of CPU requirement and accuracy of the results are discussed. Illustrative examples for individual molecules and crystalline solids obtained with gaussian and plane-wave-based density functional theory calculations are presented. Special attention was given to the MEP because its topological analysis is complex and scarce.

  18. Reconstruction of Holocene coastal depositional environments based on sedimentological and palaeontological analyses, Zakynthos Island, Western Greece Mediterranean Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramidis, Pavlos; Iliopoulos, George; Papadopoulou, Penelope; Nikolaou, Konstantinos; Kontopoulos, Nikolaos; Wijngaarden, Gert

    2014-05-01

    Zakynthos Island is one of the most seismically active regions in Europe and the Holocene coastal depositional environments were influenced both by tectonic activity and sea level rise. In the present study detailed sedimentological, palaeontological and 14C dating analyses were used in order to reconstruct the Holocene coastal depositional environments as well as the different rates of sedimentation, based on data from three cores up to 30 m deep. The results of the analyses indicate changes in depositional environments from marine to brackish lagoonal and lagoon / barrier systems with temporary intrusions of marine water via storms or tsunamigenic events. High sedimentation rates in coastal areas of Zakynthos Island correspond well to the most widespread Holocene warm and humid phases. The interpretation of the sedimentological environments reveals that Zakynthos Island before 8300 BP was constituted by two islands, where the present southern part of the island was separated from the northern one by a shallow and narrow sea channel.

  19. Fossil-based comparative analyses reveal ancient marine ancestry erased by extinction in ray-finned fishes.

    PubMed

    Betancur-R, Ricardo; Ortí, Guillermo; Pyron, Robert Alexander

    2015-05-01

    The marine-freshwater boundary is a major biodiversity gradient and few groups have colonised both systems successfully. Fishes have transitioned between habitats repeatedly, diversifying in rivers, lakes and oceans over evolutionary time. However, their history of habitat colonisation and diversification is unclear based on available fossil and phylogenetic data. We estimate ancestral habitats and diversification and transition rates using a large-scale phylogeny of extant fish taxa and one containing a massive number of extinct species. Extant-only phylogenetic analyses indicate freshwater ancestry, but inclusion of fossils reveal strong evidence of marine ancestry in lineages now restricted to freshwaters. Diversification and colonisation dynamics vary asymmetrically between habitats, as marine lineages colonise and flourish in rivers more frequently than the reverse. Our study highlights the importance of including fossils in comparative analyses, showing that freshwaters have played a role as refuges for ancient fish lineages, a signal erased by extinction in extant-only phylogenies. PMID:25808114

  20. Fossil-based comparative analyses reveal ancient marine ancestry erased by extinction in ray-finned fishes.

    PubMed

    Betancur-R, Ricardo; Ortí, Guillermo; Pyron, Robert Alexander

    2015-05-01

    The marine-freshwater boundary is a major biodiversity gradient and few groups have colonised both systems successfully. Fishes have transitioned between habitats repeatedly, diversifying in rivers, lakes and oceans over evolutionary time. However, their history of habitat colonisation and diversification is unclear based on available fossil and phylogenetic data. We estimate ancestral habitats and diversification and transition rates using a large-scale phylogeny of extant fish taxa and one containing a massive number of extinct species. Extant-only phylogenetic analyses indicate freshwater ancestry, but inclusion of fossils reveal strong evidence of marine ancestry in lineages now restricted to freshwaters. Diversification and colonisation dynamics vary asymmetrically between habitats, as marine lineages colonise and flourish in rivers more frequently than the reverse. Our study highlights the importance of including fossils in comparative analyses, showing that freshwaters have played a role as refuges for ancient fish lineages, a signal erased by extinction in extant-only phylogenies.

  1. Seasonal profiles of ovarian activity in Iberian lynx (Lynx pardinus) based on urinary hormone metabolite analyses.

    PubMed

    Jewgenow, K; Göritz, F; Vargas, A; Dehnhard, M

    2009-07-01

    The Iberian Lynx Ex-Situ Conservation Programme is an essential part of a co-ordinated action plan to conserve the most endangered felid species of the world. Successful captive breeding demands reliable methods for reproduction monitoring including reliable non-invasive pregnancy diagnosis. During a 3-year study, urine samples from six captive Iberian lynx females were obtained (one non-pregnant, one pseudo-pregnant and 11 pregnant cycles). Progesterone, pregnanediol and oestradiol were determined in urinary extracts and relevant urinary oestrogen metabolites were characterized by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Urinary progestins did not follow the typical pregnancy-related course of felids. In the lynx, we failed to demonstrate an urinary progestin elevation during pregnancy. In contrast, urinary oestrogens increased from 3.8 +/- 0.6 to 8.6 +/- 0.5 ng/mg creatinine (p < 0.001) during the pregnancy. A comparison of pseudo-pregnant with pregnant cycles revealed a further increase of oestrogens caused by implantation (p < 0.05). In one female, which refused to mate, no difference was estimated between oestrogens levels during the breeding and non-breeding seasons. Almost 10-fold higher oestrogen concentrations were measured in urines of females that shared enclosures with males. HPLC analysis of oestrogens in urine samples collected from Iberian lynx during the pregnancy revealed that lynx urine is composed of two polar oestrogen metabolites in addition to oestrone and minor amounts of oestradiol. Oestrone was detectable in all urinary extracts (8-12% of metabolites), whereas oestradiol was elevated only during late pregnancy (18%). Thus, seasonal luteal activity in Iberian lynx can be monitored by urinary oestrogens. The increase of urinary oestradiol during late pregnancy might indicate an oestradiol secretion by the lynx placenta.

  2. Quantitative characterization of metastatic disease in the spine. Part II. Histogram-based analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Whyne, Cari; Hardisty, Michael; Wu, Florence; Skrinskas, Tomas; Clemons, Mark; Gordon, Lyle; Basran, Parminder S.

    2007-08-15

    Radiological imaging is essential to the appropriate management of patients with bone metastasis; however, there have been no widely accepted guidelines as to the optimal method for quantifying the potential impact of skeletal lesions or to evaluate response to treatment. The current inability to rapidly quantify the response of bone metastases excludes patients with cancer and bone disease from participating in clinical trials of many new treatments as these studies frequently require patients with so-called measurable disease. Computed tomography (CT) can provide excellent skeletal detail with a sensitivity for the diagnosis of bone metastases. The purpose of this study was to establish an objective method to quantitatively characterize disease in the bony spine using CT-based segmentations. It was hypothesized that histogram analysis of CT vertebral density distributions would enable standardized segmentation of tumor tissue and consequently allow quantification of disease in the metastatic spine. Thirty two healthy vertebral CT scans were first studied to establish a baseline characterization. The histograms of the trabecular centrums were found to be Gaussian distributions (average root-mean-square difference=30 voxel counts), as expected for a uniform material. Intrapatient vertebral level similarity was also observed as the means were not significantly different (p>0.8). Thus, a patient-specific healthy vertebral body histogram is able to characterize healthy trabecular bone throughout that individual's thoracolumbar spine. Eleven metastatically involved vertebrae were analyzed to determine the characteristics of the lytic and blastic bone voxels relative to the healthy bone. Lytic and blastic tumors were segmented as connected areas with voxel intensities between specified thresholds. The tested thresholds were {mu}-1.0{sigma}, {mu}-1.5{sigma}, and {mu}-2.0{sigma}, for lytic and {mu}+2.0{sigma}, {mu}+3.0{sigma}, and {mu}+3.5{sigma} for blastic tissue where

  3. Analyses of DNA Base Sequences for Eukaryotes in Terms of Power Spectrum Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isohata, Yasuhiko; Hayashi, Masaki

    2005-02-01

    By adopting a power spectrum method we have analyzed long-range correlations in the gene base sequences, exons and introns for five or six eukaryote species. As a measure of the long-range correlations, we have used an exponent α in 1/fα, which is an approximation of a power spectrum in a low-frequency region. We have analyzed frequency distributions of α and the dependence of its average values <α> on the sequence length for the five or six species, paying particular attention to the species dependence. We have shown that long-range correlations have been formed mainly due to the intron's elongation as well as by the sequence structures of introns acquired over the course of evolution.

  4. Analysing the thermal state of voltage transformer based on resistive voltage divider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, V.; Zhukov, V.; Yablokov, A.

    2015-10-01

    We performed a simulation of the thermal state of a resistive voltage divider based on an equation of heat conductivity with internal sources of heat, solving this equation by using two numerical procedures. We also conducted experimental research regarding transformer thermal state on a laboratory stand. We obtained numerical results of the above heat conductivity equation, taking into account the supply of heat energy from internal sources, and compared the results of our calculations with our experimental data. Transformer thermal state simulation and numerical solution procedures enable us to formulate and resolve the problems of choosing optimal transformer design and operating modes, ensuring maximum measuring accuracy when limiting the thermal state of resistive elements.

  5. Optimizing Laguerre expansion based deconvolution methods for analysing bi-exponential fluorescence lifetime images.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yongliang; Chen, Yu; Li, David Day-Uei

    2016-06-27

    Fast deconvolution is an essential step to calibrate instrument responses in big fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) image analysis. This paper examined a computationally effective least squares deconvolution method based on Laguerre expansion (LSD-LE), recently developed for clinical diagnosis applications, and proposed new criteria for selecting Laguerre basis functions (LBFs) without considering the mutual orthonormalities between LBFs. Compared with the previously reported LSD-LE, the improved LSD-LE allows to use a higher laser repetition rate, reducing the acquisition time per measurement. Moreover, we extended it, for the first time, to analyze bi-exponential fluorescence decays for more general FLIM-FRET applications. The proposed method was tested on both synthesized bi-exponential and realistic FLIM data for studying the endocytosis of gold nanorods in Hek293 cells. Compared with the previously reported constrained LSD-LE, it shows promising results. PMID:27410552

  6. Genealogical analyses of rabies virus strains from Brazil based on N gene alleles.

    PubMed

    Heinemann, M B; Fernandes-Matioli, F M C; Cortez, A; Soares, R M; Sakamoto, S M; Bernardi, F; Ito, F H; Madeira, A M B N; Richtzenhain, L J

    2002-06-01

    Thirty rabies virus isolates from cows and vampire bats from different regions of São Paulo State, Southeastern Brazil and three rabies vaccines were studied genetically. The analysis was based on direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products of 600 nucleotides coding for the amino terminus of nucleoprotein gene. The sequences were checked to verify their genealogical and evolutionary relationships and possible implication for health programmes. Statistical data indicated that there were no significant genetic differences between samples isolated from distinct hosts, from different geographical regions and between samples collected in the last two decades. According to the HKA test, the variability observed in the sequences is probably due to genetic drift. Since changes in genetic material may produce modifications in the protein responsible for immunogenicity of virus, which may eventually cause vaccine failure in herds, we suggest that continuous efforts in monitoring genetic diversity in rabies virus field strains, in relation to vaccine strains, must be conducted. PMID:12113496

  7. Genealogical analyses of rabies virus strains from Brazil based on N gene alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, M. B.; Fernandes-Matioli, F. M. C.; Cortez, A.; Soares, R. M.; Sakamoto, S. M.; Bernardi, F.; Ito, F. H.; Madeira, A. M. B. N.; Richtzenhain, L. J.

    2002-01-01

    Thirty rabies virus isolates from cows and vampire bats from different regions of São Paulo State, Southeastern Brazil and three rabies vaccines were studied genetically. The analysis was based on direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products of 600 nucleotides coding for the amino terminus of nucleoprotein gene. The sequences were checked to verify their genealogical and evolutionary relationships and possible implication for health programmes. Statistical data indicated that there were no significant genetic differences between samples isolated from distinct hosts, from different geographical regions and between samples collected in the last two decades. According to the HKA test, the variability observed in the sequences is probably due to genetic drift. Since changes in genetic material may produce modifications in the protein responsible for immunogenicity of virus, which may eventually cause vaccine failure in herds, we suggest that continuous efforts in monitoring genetic diversity in rabies virus field strains, in relation to vaccine strains, must be conducted. PMID:12113496

  8. A Phylogeny of the Family Poritidae (Cnidaria, Scleractinia) Based on Molecular and Morphological Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kitano, Yuko F.; Benzoni, Francesca; Arrigoni, Roberto; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Wallace, Carden C.; Fukami, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    The family Poritidae formerly included 6 genera: Alveopora, Goniopora, Machadoporites, Porites, Poritipora, and Stylaraea. Morphologically, the genera can be differentiated based on the number of tentacles, the number of septa and their arrangement, the length of the polyp column, and the diameter of the corallites. However, the phylogenetic relationships within and between the genera are unknown or contentious. On the one hand, Alveopora has been transferred to the Acroporidae recently because it was shown to be more closely related to this family than to the Poritidae by previous molecular studies. On the other hand, Goniopora is morphologically similar to 2 recently described genera, Machadoporites and Poritipora, particularly with regard to the number of septa (approximately 24), but they have not yet been investigated at the molecular level. In this study, we analyzed 93 samples from all 5 poritid genera and Alveopora using 2 genetic markers (the barcoding region of the mitochondrial COI and the ITS region of the nuclear rDNA) to investigate their phylogenetic relationships and to revise their taxonomy. The reconstructed molecular trees confirmed that Alveopora is genetically distant from all poritid genera but closely related to the family Acroporidae, whereas the other genera are genetically closely related. The molecular trees also revealed that Machadoporites and Poritipora were indistinguishable from Goniopora. However, Goniopora stutchburyi was genetically isolated from the other congeneric species and formed a sister group to Goniopora together with Porites and Stylaraea, thus suggesting that 24 septa could be an ancestral feature in the Poritidae. Based on these data, we move G. stutchburyi into a new genus, Bernardpora gen. nov., whereas Machadoporites and Poritipora are merged with Goniopora. PMID:24871224

  9. Surface-Based Analyses of Anatomical Properties of the Visual Cortex in Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Prins, Doety; Plank, Tina; Baseler, Heidi A.; Gouws, André D.; Beer, Anton; Morland, Antony B.; Greenlee, Mark W.; Cornelissen, Frans W.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Macular degeneration (MD) can cause a central visual field defect. In a previous study, we found volumetric reductions along the entire visual pathways of MD patients, possibly indicating degeneration of inactive neuronal tissue. This may have important implications. In particular, new therapeutic strategies to restore retinal function rely on intact visual pathways and cortex to reestablish visual function. Here we reanalyze the data of our previous study using surface-based morphometry (SBM) rather than voxel-based morphometry (VBM). This can help determine the robustness of the findings and will lead to a better understanding of the nature of neuroanatomical changes associated with MD. Methods The metrics of interest were acquired by performing SBM analysis on T1-weighted MRI data acquired from 113 subjects: patients with juvenile MD (JMD; n = 34), patients with age-related MD (AMD; n = 24) and healthy age-matched controls (HC; n = 55). Results Relative to age-matched controls, JMD patients showed a thinner cortex, a smaller cortical surface area and a lower grey matter volume in V1 and V2, while AMD patients showed thinning of the cortex in V2. Neither patient group showed a significant difference in mean curvature of the visual cortex. Discussion The thinner cortex, smaller surface area and lower grey matter volume in the visual cortex of JMD patients are consistent with our previous results showing a volumetric reduction in their visual cortex. Finding comparable results using two rather different analysis techniques suggests the presence of marked cortical degeneration in the JMD patients. In the AMD patients, we found a thinner cortex in V2 but not in V1. In contrast to our previous VBM analysis, SBM revealed no volumetric reductions of the visual cortex. This suggests that the cortical changes in AMD patients are relatively subtle, as they apparently can be missed by one of the methods. PMID:26789126

  10. Feasibility study for lowering the minimum gas pressure in solution-mined caverns based on geomechanical analyses of creep-induced damage and healing

    SciTech Connect

    Ratigan, J.L.; Nieland, J.D.; Devries, K.L.

    1998-12-31

    Geomechanical analyses were made to determine the minimum gas pressure allowable based on an existing stress-based criterion (Damage Potential) and an advanced constitutive model (MDCF model) capable of quantifying the level of damage and healing in rock salt. The MDCF model is a constitutive model developed for the WIPP to provide a continuum description of the dislocation and damage deformation of salt. The purpose of this study was to determine if the MDCF model is applicable for evaluating the minimum gas pressure of CNG storage caverns. Specifically, it was to be determined if this model would predict that the minimum gas pressure in the caverns could be lowered without compromising the stability of the cavern. Additionally, the healing behavior of the salt was analyzed to determine if complete healing of the damaged rock zone would occur during the period the cavern was at maximum gas pressure. Significant findings of this study are reported.

  11. Avoiding Split Attention in Computer-Based Testing: Is Neglecting Additional Information Facilitative?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jarodzka, Halszka; Janssen, Noortje; Kirschner, Paul A.; Erkens, Gijsbert

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated whether design guidelines for computer-based learning can be applied to computer-based testing (CBT). Twenty-two students completed a CBT exam with half of the questions presented in a split-screen format that was analogous to the original paper-and-pencil version and half in an integrated format. Results show that students…

  12. Extreme urban-rural temperatures in the coastal city of Turku, Finland: Quantification and visualization based on a generalized additive model.

    PubMed

    Hjort, Jan; Suomi, Juuso; Käyhkö, Jukka

    2016-11-01

    Fundamental knowledge on the determinants of air temperatures across spatial and temporal scales is essential in climate change mitigation and adaptation. Spatial-based statistical modelling provides an efficient approach for the analysis and prediction of air temperatures in human-modified environments at high spatial accuracy. The aim of the study was firstly, to analyse the environmental factors affecting extreme air temperature conditions in a coastal high-latitude city and secondly, to explore the applicability of generalized additive model (GAM) in the study of urban-rural temperatures. We utilized air temperature data from 50 permanent temperature logger stations and extensive geospatial environmental data on different scales from Turku, SW Finland. We selected five temperature situations (cases) and altogether 12 urban and natural explanatory variables for the analyses. The results displayed that (i) water bodies and topographical conditions were often more important than urban variables in controlling the spatial variability of extreme air temperatures, (ii) case specificity of the explanatory variables and their scales should be considered in the analyses and (iii) GAM was highly suitable in quantifying and visualizing the relations between urban-rural temperatures and environmental determinants at local scales. The results promote the use of GAMs in spatial-based statistical modelling of air temperature in future.

  13. Extreme urban-rural temperatures in the coastal city of Turku, Finland: Quantification and visualization based on a generalized additive model.

    PubMed

    Hjort, Jan; Suomi, Juuso; Käyhkö, Jukka

    2016-11-01

    Fundamental knowledge on the determinants of air temperatures across spatial and temporal scales is essential in climate change mitigation and adaptation. Spatial-based statistical modelling provides an efficient approach for the analysis and prediction of air temperatures in human-modified environments at high spatial accuracy. The aim of the study was firstly, to analyse the environmental factors affecting extreme air temperature conditions in a coastal high-latitude city and secondly, to explore the applicability of generalized additive model (GAM) in the study of urban-rural temperatures. We utilized air temperature data from 50 permanent temperature logger stations and extensive geospatial environmental data on different scales from Turku, SW Finland. We selected five temperature situations (cases) and altogether 12 urban and natural explanatory variables for the analyses. The results displayed that (i) water bodies and topographical conditions were often more important than urban variables in controlling the spatial variability of extreme air temperatures, (ii) case specificity of the explanatory variables and their scales should be considered in the analyses and (iii) GAM was highly suitable in quantifying and visualizing the relations between urban-rural temperatures and environmental determinants at local scales. The results promote the use of GAMs in spatial-based statistical modelling of air temperature in future. PMID:27362632

  14. Rapid discrimination of slimming capsules based on illegal additives by electronic nose and flash gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Zhenzhen; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2015-02-01

    The discrimination of counterfeit and/or illegally manufactured medicines is an important task in the pharmaceutical industry for pharmaceutical safety. In this study, 22 slimming capsule samples with illegally added sibutramine and phenolphthalein were analyzed by electronic nose and flash gas chromatography. To reveal the difference among the different classes of samples, principal component analysis and linear discriminant analysis were employed to analyze the data acquired from electronic nose and flash gas chromatography, respectively. The samples without illegal additives can be discriminated from the ones with illegal additives by using electronic nose or flash gas chromatography data individually. To improve the performance of classification, a data fusion strategy was applied to integrate the data from electronic nose and flash gas chromatography data into a single model. The results show that the samples with phenolphthalein, sibutramine and both can be classified well by using fused data.

  15. Multi-Length-Scale Morphologies Driven by Mixed Additives in Porphyrin-Based Organic Photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ke; Miao, Jingsheng; Xiao, Liangang; Deng, Wanyuan; Kan, Yuanyuan; Liang, Tianxiang; Wang, Cheng; Huang, Fei; Peng, Junbiao; Cao, Yong; Liu, Feng; Russell, Thomas P; Wu, Hongbin; Peng, Xiaobin

    2016-06-01

    A new category of deep-absorbing small molecules is developed. Optimized devices driven by mixed additives show a remarkable short-circuit current of ≈20 mA cm(-2) and a highest power conversion efficiency of 9.06%. A multi-length-scale morphology is formed, which is fully characterized by resonant soft X-ray scattering, high-angle annular dark film image transmission electron microscopy, etc.

  16. Audio-visual perception of 3D cinematography: an fMRI study using condition-based and computation-based analyses.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Akitoshi; Bordier, Cecile; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    The use of naturalistic stimuli to probe sensory functions in the human brain is gaining increasing interest. Previous imaging studies examined brain activity associated with the processing of cinematographic material using both standard "condition-based" designs, as well as "computational" methods based on the extraction of time-varying features of the stimuli (e.g. motion). Here, we exploited both approaches to investigate the neural correlates of complex visual and auditory spatial signals in cinematography. In the first experiment, the participants watched a piece of a commercial movie presented in four blocked conditions: 3D vision with surround sounds (3D-Surround), 3D with monaural sound (3D-Mono), 2D-Surround, and 2D-Mono. In the second experiment, they watched two different segments of the movie both presented continuously in 3D-Surround. The blocked presentation served for standard condition-based analyses, while all datasets were submitted to computation-based analyses. The latter assessed where activity co-varied with visual disparity signals and the complexity of auditory multi-sources signals. The blocked analyses associated 3D viewing with the activation of the dorsal and lateral occipital cortex and superior parietal lobule, while the surround sounds activated the superior and middle temporal gyri (S/MTG). The computation-based analyses revealed the effects of absolute disparity in dorsal occipital and posterior parietal cortices and of disparity gradients in the posterior middle temporal gyrus plus the inferior frontal gyrus. The complexity of the surround sounds was associated with activity in specific sub-regions of S/MTG, even after accounting for changes of sound intensity. These results demonstrate that the processing of naturalistic audio-visual signals entails an extensive set of visual and auditory areas, and that computation-based analyses can track the contribution of complex spatial aspects characterizing such life-like stimuli. PMID

  17. Analysis of redox additive-based overcharge protection for rechargeable lithium batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, S. R.; Surampudi, S.; Attia, A. I.; Bankston, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    The overcharge condition in secondary lithium batteries employing redox additives for overcharge protection, has been theoretically analyzed in terms of a finite linear diffusion model. The analysis leads to expressions relating the steady-state overcharge current density and cell voltage to the concentration, diffusion coefficient, standard reduction potential of the redox couple, and interelectrode distance. The model permits the estimation of the maximum permissible overcharge rate for any chosen set of system conditions. Digital simulation of the overcharge experiment leads to numerical representation of the potential transients, and estimate of the influence of diffusion coefficient and interelectrode distance on the transient attainment of the steady state during overcharge. The model has been experimentally verified using 1,1-prime-dimethyl ferrocene as a redox additive. The analysis of the experimental results in terms of the theory allows the calculation of the diffusion coefficient and the formal potential of the redox couple. The model and the theoretical results may be exploited in the design and optimization of overcharge protection by the redox additive approach.

  18. A fuzzy-set-theory-based approach to analyse species membership in DNA barcoding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, A-B; Muster, C; Liang, H-B; Zhu, C-D; Crozier, R; Wan, P; Feng, J; Ward, R D

    2012-04-01

    Reliable assignment of an unknown query sequence to its correct species remains a methodological problem for the growing field of DNA barcoding. While great advances have been achieved recently, species identification from barcodes can still be unreliable if the relevant biodiversity has been insufficiently sampled. We here propose a new notion of species membership for DNA barcoding-fuzzy membership, based on fuzzy set theory-and illustrate its successful application to four real data sets (bats, fishes, butterflies and flies) with more than 5000 random simulations. Two of the data sets comprise especially dense species/population-level samples. In comparison with current DNA barcoding methods, the newly proposed minimum distance (MD) plus fuzzy set approach, and another computationally simple method, 'best close match', outperform two computationally sophisticated Bayesian and BootstrapNJ methods. The new method proposed here has great power in reducing false-positive species identification compared with other methods when conspecifics of the query are absent from the reference database.

  19. A method of mounting multiple otoliths for beam-based microchemical analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donohoe, C.J.; Zimmerman, C.E.

    2010-01-01

    Beam-based analytical methods are widely used to measure the concentrations of elements and isotopes in otoliths. These methods usually require that otoliths be individually mounted and prepared to properly expose the desired growth region to the analytical beam. Most analytical instruments, such as LA-ICPMS and ion and electron microprobes, have sample holders that will accept only one to six slides or mounts at a time. We describe a method of mounting otoliths that allows for easy transfer of many otoliths to a single mount after they have been prepared. Such an approach increases the number of otoliths that can be analyzed in a single session by reducing the need open the sample chamber to exchange slides-a particularly time consuming step on instruments that operate under vacuum. For ion and electron microprobes, the method also greatly reduces the number of slides that must be coated with an electrical conductor prior to analysis. In this method, a narrow strip of cover glass is first glued at one end to a standard microscope slide. The otolith is then mounted in thermoplastic resin on the opposite, free end of the strip. The otolith can then be ground and flipped, if needed, by reheating the mounting medium. After otolith preparation is complete, the cover glass is cut with a scribe to free the otolith and up to 20 small otoliths can be arranged on a single petrographic slide. ?? 2010 The Author(s).

  20. UniPrimer: A Web-Based Primer Design Tool for Comparative Analyses of Primate Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Batnyam, Nomin; Lee, Jimin; Lee, Jungnam; Hong, Seung Bok; Oh, Sejong; Han, Kyudong

    2012-01-01

    Whole genome sequences of various primates have been released due to advanced DNA-sequencing technology. A combination of computational data mining and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to validate the data is an excellent method for conducting comparative genomics. Thus, designing primers for PCR is an essential procedure for a comparative analysis of primate genomes. Here, we developed and introduced UniPrimer for use in those studies. UniPrimer is a web-based tool that designs PCR- and DNA-sequencing primers. It compares the sequences from six different primates (human, chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, gibbon, and rhesus macaque) and designs primers on the conserved region across species. UniPrimer is linked to RepeatMasker, Primer3Plus, and OligoCalc softwares to produce primers with high accuracy and UCSC In-Silico PCR to confirm whether the designed primers work. To test the performance of UniPrimer, we designed primers on sample sequences using UniPrimer and manually designed primers for the same sequences. The comparison of the two processes showed that UniPrimer was more effective than manual work in terms of saving time and reducing errors. PMID:22693428

  1. Metabolic model for the filamentous ‘Candidatus Microthrix parvicella' based on genomic and metagenomic analyses

    PubMed Central

    Jon McIlroy, Simon; Kristiansen, Rikke; Albertsen, Mads; Michael Karst, Søren; Rossetti, Simona; Lund Nielsen, Jeppe; Tandoi, Valter; James Seviour, Robert; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2013-01-01

    ‘Candidatus Microthrix parvicella' is a lipid-accumulating, filamentous bacterium so far found only in activated sludge wastewater treatment plants, where it is a common causative agent of sludge separation problems. Despite attracting considerable interest, its detailed physiology is still unclear. In this study, the genome of the RN1 strain was sequenced and annotated, which facilitated the construction of a theoretical metabolic model based on available in situ and axenic experimental data. This model proposes that under anaerobic conditions, this organism accumulates preferentially long-chain fatty acids as triacylglycerols. Utilisation of trehalose and/or polyphosphate stores or partial oxidation of long-chain fatty acids may supply the energy required for anaerobic lipid uptake and storage. Comparing the genome sequence of this isolate with metagenomes from two full-scale wastewater treatment plants with enhanced biological phosphorus removal reveals high similarity, with few metabolic differences between the axenic and the dominant community ‘Ca. M. parvicella' strains. Hence, the metabolic model presented in this paper could be considered generally applicable to strains in full-scale treatment systems. The genomic information obtained here will provide the basis for future research into in situ gene expression and regulation. Such information will give substantial insight into the ecophysiology of this unusual and biotechnologically important filamentous bacterium. PMID:23446830

  2. Analyses of Large Coal-Based SOFCs for High Power Stack Block Development

    SciTech Connect

    Recknagle, Kurtis P; Koeppel, Brian J

    2010-10-01

    This report summarizes the numerical modeling and analytical efforts for SOFC stack development performed for the coal-based SOFC program. The stack modeling activities began in 2004, but this report focuses on the most relevant results obtained since August 2008. This includes the latter half of Phase-I and all of Phase-II activities under technical guidance of VPS and FCE. The models developed to predict the thermal-flow-electrochemical behaviors and thermal-mechanical responses of generic planar stacks and towers are described. The effects of cell geometry, fuel gas composition, on-cell reforming, operating conditions, cell performance, seal leak, voltage degradation, boundary conditions, and stack height are studied. The modeling activities to evaluate and achieve technical targets for large stack blocks are described, and results from the latest thermal-fluid-electrochemical and structural models are summarized. Modeling results for stack modifications such as scale-up and component thickness reduction to realize cost reduction are presented. Supporting modeling activities in the areas of cell fabrication and loss of contact are also described.

  3. SEM-EBSD based Realistic Modeling and Crystallographic Homogenization FE Analyses of LDH Formability Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuramae, Hiroyuki; Ngoc Tam, Nguyen; Nakamura, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Hidetoshi; Morimoto, Hideo; Nakamachi, Eiji

    2007-05-01

    Homogenization algorithm is introduced to the elastic/crystalline viscoplastic finite element (FE) procedure to develop multi-scale analysis code to predict the formability of sheet metal in macro scale, and simultaneously the crystal texture and hardening evolutions in micro scale. The isotropic and kinematical hardening lows are employed in the crystalline plasticity constitutive equation. For the multi-scale structure, two scales are considered. One is a microscopic polycrystal structure and the other a macroscopic elastic plastic continuum. We measure crystal morphologies by using the scanning electron microscope (SEM) with electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD), and define a three dimensional representative volume element (RVE) of micro ploycrystal structure, which satisfy the periodicity condition of crystal orientation distribution. Since nonlinear multi-scale FE analysis requires large computation time, development of parallel computing technique is needed. To realize the parallel analysis on PC cluster system, the dynamic explicit FE formulations are employed. Applying the domain partitioning technique to FE mesh of macro continuum, homogenized stresses based on micro crystal structures are computed in parallel without solving simultaneous linear equation. The parallel FEM code is applied to simulate the limit dome height (LDH) test problem and hemispherical cup deep drawing problem of aluminum alloy AL6022, mild steel DQSK, high strength steel HSLA, and dual phase steel DP600 sheet metals. The localized distribution of thickness strain and the texture evolution are obtained.

  4. Phylogeny-based developmental analyses illuminate evolution of inflorescence architectures in dogwoods (Cornus s. l., Cornaceae).

    PubMed

    Feng, Chun-Miao; Xiang, Qiu-Yun Jenny; Franks, Robert G

    2011-08-01

    • Inflorescence architecture is important to angiosperm reproduction, but our knowledge of the developmental basis underlying the evolution of inflorescence architectures is limited. Using a phylogeny-based comparative analysis of developmental pathways, we tested the long-standing hypothesis that umbel evolved from elongated inflorescences by suppression of inflorescence branches, while head evolved from umbels by suppression of pedicels. • The developmental pathways of six species of Cornus producing different inflorescence types were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and histological analysis. Critical developmental events were traced over the molecular phylogeny to identify evolutionary changes leading to the formation of umbels and heads using methods accounting for evolutionary time and phylogenetic uncertainty. • We defined 24 developmental events describing the developmental progression of the different inflorescence types. The evolutionary transition from paniculate cymes to umbels and heads required alterations of seven developmental events occurring at different evolutionary times. • Our results indicate that heads and umbels evolved independently in Cornus from elongated forms via an umbellate dichasium ancestor and this process involved several independent changes. Our findings shed novel insights into head and umbel evolution concealed by outer morphology. Our work illustrates the importance of combining developmental and phylogenetic data to better define morphological evolutionary processes.

  5. Quantitative analyses of tartaric acid based on terahertz time domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Binghua; Fan, Mengbao

    2010-10-01

    Terahertz wave is the electromagnetic spectrum situated between microwave and infrared wave. Quantitative analysis based on terahertz spectroscopy is very important for the application of terahertz techniques. But how to realize it is still under study. L-tartaric acid is widely used as acidulant in beverage, and other food, such as soft drinks, wine, candy, bread and some colloidal sweetmeats. In this paper, terahertz time-domain spectroscopy is applied to quantify the tartaric acid. Two methods are employed to process the terahertz spectra of different samples with different content of tartaric acid. The first one is linear regression combining correlation analysis. The second is partial least square (PLS), in which the absorption spectra in the 0.8-1.4THz region are used to quantify the tartaric acid. To compare the performance of these two principles, the relative error of the two methods is analyzed. For this experiment, the first method does better than the second one. But the first method is suitable for the quantitative analysis of materials which has obvious terahertz absorption peaks, while for material which has no obvious terahertz absorption peaks, the second one is more appropriate.

  6. Rule-based integration of RNA-Seq analyses tools for identification of novel transcripts.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Harshal; Datta, Avik; Manjari, K Sunitha; Joshi, Rajendra

    2014-10-01

    Recent evidences suggest that a substantial amount of genome is transcribed more than that was anticipated, giving rise to a large number of unknown or novel transcripts. Identification of novel transcripts can provide key insights into understanding important cellular functions as well as molecular mechanisms underlying complex diseases like cancer. RNA-Seq has emerged as a powerful tool to detect novel transcripts, which previous profiling techniques failed to identify. A number of tools are available for enabling identification of novel transcripts at different levels. Read mappers such as TopHat, MapSplice, and SOAPsplice predict novel junctions, which are the indicators of novel transcripts. Cufflinks assembles novel transcripts based on alignment information and Oases performs de novo construction of transcripts. A common limitation of all these tools is prediction of sizable number of spurious or false positive (FP) novel transcripts. An approach that integrates information from all above sources and simultaneously scrutinizes FPs to correctly identify authentic novel transcripts of high confidence is proposed. PMID:25245144

  7. Rhodinocichla rosea is an emberizid (Aves; Passeriformes) based on mitochondrial DNA analyses.

    PubMed

    Seutin, G; Bermingham, E

    1997-10-01

    The systematic position of the avian species Rhodinocichla rosea is unclear. Recent opinions are that it is either a mockingbird (family Mimidae) or a tanager (Thraupinae; Emberizidae). In either case, it would be an atypical member of the family. We sequenced approximately 600 bases of the mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene of Rhodinocichla, several mimids, tanagers, and other passerines. We used maximum likelihood (ML), distance and parsimony approaches to analyze the sequences and concluded that Rhodinocichla belongs to the family Emberizidae. Phenotypic characteristics that suggested its relationship with mimids are the product of convergent evolution. The precise relationships of Rhodinocichla within the Emberizidae could not be resolved. Short internal branches in ML and distance trees suggested, as did earlier genetic studies, that the radiation of that family was explosive. Apparently, the extent of the tanagers as a higher taxon needs to be clarified. Our analysis of the evolutionary dynamics of avian COI suggested that its usefulness for phylogenetic studies is limited because silent positions saturate rapidly and replacement substitutions are rare. Thus, our data indicate that COI nucleotide data will be most useful in intraspecific investigations, while other data suggested its usefulness at the interordinal level.

  8. Invalidation of Diphyllobothrium hottai (Cestoda: Diphyllobothriidae) based on morphological and molecular phylogenetic analyses.

    PubMed

    Banzai-Umehara, Azusa; Suzuki, Mika; Akiyama, Takahiro; Ooi, Hong-Kean; Kawakami, Yasushi

    2016-10-01

    Diphyllobothrium hottai Yazaki, Fukumoto & Abe, 1988 was described based on the morphology of adult worms recovered from golden hamsters that had been experimentally infected with plerocercoids obtained from Japanese surf smelts (Hypomesus pretiosus japonicus) and olive rainbow smelts (Osmerus eperlanus mordax). Although D. hottai was considered to be distinct from Diphyllobothrium ditremum (Creplin, 1825), their taxonomic relationship requires further clarification. In our study, D. hottai and D. ditremum obtained from hamsters experimentally infected with plerocercoids isolated from Japanese surf smelts were compared using morphological and molecular methods. The criterion usually used to differentiate between D. hottai and D. ditremum is the difference in the angle between the long axis of the cirrus sac and that of the seminal vesicle. However, we found variation of the angle within the same individual and, one specimen showed both of the different angles that were supposedly unique to each of the species. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis of the complete sequences of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 and cytochrome b genes revealed that both species were genetically indistinguishable. Therefore, D. hottai is considered to be a junior synonym of D. ditremum. PMID:27353020

  9. Copper response of Proteus hauseri based on proteomic and genetic expression and cell morphology analyses.

    PubMed

    Ng, I-Son; Zheng, Xuesong; Wang, Nan; Chen, Bor-Yann; Zhang, Xia; Lu, Yinghua

    2014-07-01

    The copper response of Proteus hauseri ZMd44 was determined using one-dimensional (1D) gel electrophoresis coupled with MALDI-TOF-TOF mass spectrometry for a similarity analysis of proteins isolated from P. hauseri ZMd44 cultured in CuSO4-bearing LB medium. Candidate proteins identified as a copper-transporting P-type ATPase (CTPP), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), flagellin (Fla), and outer membrane proteins (Omps) were the major copper-associated proteins in P. hauseri. In a comparative analysis of subcellular (i.e., periplasmic, intracellular, and inner membranes) and cellular debris, proteomics analysis revealed a distinct differential expression of proteins in P. hauseri with and without copper ion exposure. These findings were consistent with the transcription level dynamics determined using quantitative real-time PCR. Based on a genetic cluster analysis of copper-associated proteins from P. hauseri, Fla and one of the Omps showed greater diversity in their protein sequences compared to those of other Proteus species. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and the observed growth on LB agar plates showed that the swarming motility of cells was significantly suppressed and inhibited upon Cu(II) exposure. Thus, copper stress could have important therapeutic significance due to the loss of swarming motility capacity in P. hauseri, which causes urinary tract infections.

  10. Methodology for definition of yellow fever priority areas, based on environmental variables and multiple correspondence analyses.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Eduardo Stramandinoli; Barata, Rita de Cássia Barradas

    2012-01-01

    Yellow fever (YF) is endemic in much of Brazil, where cases of the disease are reported every year. Since 2008, outbreaks of the disease have occurred in regions of the country where no reports had been registered for decades, which has obligated public health authorities to redefine risk areas for the disease. The aim of the present study was to propose a methodology of environmental risk analysis for defining priority municipalities for YF vaccination, using as example, the State of São Paulo, Brazil. The municipalities were divided into two groups (affected and unaffected by YF) and compared based on environmental parameters related to the disease's eco-epidemiology. Bivariate analysis was used to identify statistically significant associations between the variables and virus circulation. Multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) was used to evaluate the relationship among the variables and their contribution to the dynamics of YF in Sao Paulo. The MCA generated a factor that was able to differentiate between affected and unaffected municipalities and was used to determine risk levels. This methodology can be replicated in other regions, standardized, and adapted to each context.

  11. Contextualising and Analysing Planetary Rover Image Products through the Web-Based PRoGIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morley, Jeremy; Sprinks, James; Muller, Jan-Peter; Tao, Yu; Paar, Gerhard; Huber, Ben; Bauer, Arnold; Willner, Konrad; Traxler, Christoph; Garov, Andrey; Karachevtseva, Irina

    2014-05-01

    The international planetary science community has launched, landed and operated dozens of human and robotic missions to the planets and the Moon. They have collected various surface imagery that has only been partially utilized for further scientific purposes. The FP7 project PRoViDE (Planetary Robotics Vision Data Exploitation) is assembling a major portion of the imaging data gathered so far from planetary surface missions into a unique database, bringing them into a spatial context and providing access to a complete set of 3D vision products. Processing is complemented by a multi-resolution visualization engine that combines various levels of detail for a seamless and immersive real-time access to dynamically rendered 3D scenes. PRoViDE aims to (1) complete relevant 3D vision processing of planetary surface missions, such as Surveyor, Viking, Pathfinder, MER, MSL, Phoenix, Huygens, and Lunar ground-level imagery from Apollo, Russian Lunokhod and selected Luna missions, (2) provide highest resolution & accuracy remote sensing (orbital) vision data processing results for these sites to embed the robotic imagery and its products into spatial planetary context, (3) collect 3D Vision processing and remote sensing products within a single coherent spatial data base, (4) realise seamless fusion between orbital and ground vision data, (5) demonstrate the potential of planetary surface vision data by maximising image quality visualisation in 3D publishing platform, (6) collect and formulate use cases for novel scientific application scenarios exploiting the newly introduced spatial relationships and presentation, (7) demonstrate the concepts for MSL, (9) realize on-line dissemination of key data & its presentation by a web-based GIS and rendering tool named PRoGIS (Planetary Robotics GIS). PRoGIS is designed to give access to rover image archives in geographical context, using projected image view cones, obtained from existing meta-data and updated according to

  12. Analysing Amazonian forest productivity using a new individual and trait-based model (TFS v.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyllas, N. M.; Gloor, E.; Mercado, L. M.; Sitch, S.; Quesada, C. A.; Domingues, T. F.; Galbraith, D. R.; Torre-Lezama, A.; Vilanova, E.; Ramírez-Angulo, H.; Higuchi, N.; Neill, D. A.; Silveira, M.; Ferreira, L.; Aymard C, G. A.; Malhi, Y.; Phillips, O. L.; Lloyd, J.

    2014-02-01

    Repeated long-term censuses have revealed large-scale spatial patterns in Amazon Basin forest structure and dynamism, with some forests in the west of the Basin having up to a twice as high rate of aboveground biomass production and tree recruitment as forests in the east. Possible causes for this variation could be the climatic and edaphic gradients across the Basin and/or the spatial distribution of tree species composition. To help understand causes of this variation a new individual-based model of tropical forest growth designed to take full advantage of the forest census data available from the Amazonian Forest Inventory Network (RAINFOR) has been developed. The model incorporates variations in tree size distribution, functional traits and soil physical properties and runs at the stand level with four functional traits, leaf dry mass per area (Ma), leaf nitrogen (NL) and phosphorus (PL) content and wood density (DW) used to represent a continuum of plant strategies found in tropical forests. We first applied the model to validate canopy-level water fluxes at three Amazon eddy flux sites. For all three sites the canopy-level water fluxes were adequately simulated. We then applied the model at seven plots, where intensive measurements of carbon allocation are available. Tree-by-tree multi-annual growth rates generally agreed well with observations for small trees, but with deviations identified for large trees. At the stand-level, simulations at 40 plots were used to explore the influence of climate and soil fertility on the gross (ΠG) and net (ΠN) primary production rates as well as the carbon use efficiency (CU). Simulated ΠG, ΠN and CU were not associated with temperature. However all three measures of stand level productivity were positively related to annual precipitation and soil fertility.

  13. The importance of retaining a phylogenetic perspective in traits-based community analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Poteat, Monica D.; Buchwalter, David B.; Jacobus, Luke M.

    2015-04-08

    1) Many environmental stressors manifest their effects via physiological processes (traits) that can differ significantly among species and species groups. We compiled available data for three traits related to the bioconcentration of the toxic metal cadmium (Cd) from 42 aquatic insect species representing orders Ephemeroptera (mayfly), Plecoptera (stonefly), and Trichoptera (caddisfly). These traits included the propensity to take up Cd from water (uptake rate constant, ku), the ability to excrete Cd (efflux rate constant, ke), and the net result of these two processes (bioconcentration factor, BCF). 2) Ranges in these Cd bioaccumulation traits varied in magnitude across lineages (some lineages had a greater tendency to bioaccumulate Cd than others). Overlap in the ranges of trait values among different lineages was common and highlights situations where species from different lineages can share a similar trait state, but represent the high end of possible physiological values for one lineage and the low end for another. 3) Variance around the mean trait state differed widely across clades, suggesting that some groups (e.g., Ephemerellidae) are inherently more variable than others (e.g., Perlidae). Thus, trait variability/lability is at least partially a function of lineage. 4) Akaike information criterion (AIC) comparisons of statistical models were more often driven by clade than by other potential biological or ecological explanation tested. Clade-driven models generally improved with increasing taxonomic resolution. 5) Altogether, these findings suggest that lineage provides context for the analysis of species traits, and that failure to consider lineage in community-based analysis of traits may obscure important patterns of species responses to environmental change.

  14. The importance of retaining a phylogenetic perspective in traits-based community analyses

    DOE PAGES

    Poteat, Monica D.; Buchwalter, David B.; Jacobus, Luke M.

    2015-04-08

    1) Many environmental stressors manifest their effects via physiological processes (traits) that can differ significantly among species and species groups. We compiled available data for three traits related to the bioconcentration of the toxic metal cadmium (Cd) from 42 aquatic insect species representing orders Ephemeroptera (mayfly), Plecoptera (stonefly), and Trichoptera (caddisfly). These traits included the propensity to take up Cd from water (uptake rate constant, ku), the ability to excrete Cd (efflux rate constant, ke), and the net result of these two processes (bioconcentration factor, BCF). 2) Ranges in these Cd bioaccumulation traits varied in magnitude across lineages (some lineagesmore » had a greater tendency to bioaccumulate Cd than others). Overlap in the ranges of trait values among different lineages was common and highlights situations where species from different lineages can share a similar trait state, but represent the high end of possible physiological values for one lineage and the low end for another. 3) Variance around the mean trait state differed widely across clades, suggesting that some groups (e.g., Ephemerellidae) are inherently more variable than others (e.g., Perlidae). Thus, trait variability/lability is at least partially a function of lineage. 4) Akaike information criterion (AIC) comparisons of statistical models were more often driven by clade than by other potential biological or ecological explanation tested. Clade-driven models generally improved with increasing taxonomic resolution. 5) Altogether, these findings suggest that lineage provides context for the analysis of species traits, and that failure to consider lineage in community-based analysis of traits may obscure important patterns of species responses to environmental change.« less

  15. Genetic structure of wild boar (Sus scrofa) populations from East Asia based on microsatellite loci analyses

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Wild boar, Sus scrofa, is an extant wild ancestor of the domestic pig as an agro-economically important mammal. Wild boar has a worldwide distribution with its geographic origin in Southeast Asia, but genetic diversity and genetic structure of wild boar in East Asia are poorly understood. To characterize the pattern and amount of genetic variation and population structure of wild boar in East Asia, we genotyped and analyzed microsatellite loci for a total of 238 wild boar specimens from ten locations across six countries in East and Southeast Asia. Results Our data indicated that wild boar populations in East Asia are genetically diverse and structured, showing a significant correlation of genetic distance with geographic distance and implying a low level of gene flow at a regional scale. Bayesian-based clustering analysis was indicative of seven inferred genetic clusters in which wild boars in East Asia are geographically structured. The level of genetic diversity was relatively high in wild boars from Southeast Asia, compared with those from Northeast Asia. This gradient pattern of genetic diversity is consistent with an assumed ancestral population of wild boar in Southeast Asia. Genetic evidences from a relationship tree and structure analysis suggest that wild boar in Jeju Island, South Korea have a distinct genetic background from those in mainland Korea. Conclusions Our results reveal a diverse pattern of genetic diversity and the existence of genetic differentiation among wild boar populations inhabiting East Asia. This study highlights the potential contribution of genetic variation of wild boar to the high genetic diversity of local domestic pigs during domestication in East Asia. PMID:25034725

  16. The analyses of extreme climate events over China based on CMIP5 historical and future simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, S.; Dong, W.; Feng, J.; Chou, J.

    2013-12-01

    The extreme climate events have a serious influence on human society. Based on observations and 12 simulations from Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5), Climatic extremes and their changes over china in history and future scenarios of three Representative Concentration Pathways (RCPs) are analyzed. Because of the background of global warming, in observations, the frost days (FD) and low-temperature threshold days (TN10P) have decreasing trend, and summer days (SU), high-temperature threshold days (TX90P), the heavy precipitation days (R20) and contribution of heavy precipitation days (P95T) show an increasing trend. Most coupled models can basically simulate main characteristics of most extreme indexes. The models reproduce the mean FD and TX90P value best and can give basic trends of the FD, TN10P, SU and TX90P. High correlation coefficients between simulated results and observation are found in FD, SU and P95T. For FD and SU index, most of the models have good ability to capture the spatial differences between the mean state of the 1986-2005 and 1961-1980 periods, but for other indexes, most of models' simulation ability for spatial disparity are not so satisfactory and have to be promoted. Under the high emission scenario of RCP8.5, the century-scale linear changes of Multi-Model Ensembles (MME) for FD, SU, TN10P, TX90P, R20 and P95T are -46.9, 46.0, -27.1, 175.4, 2.9 days and 9.9%, respectively. Due to the complexities of physical process parameterizations and the limitation of forcing data, a large uncertainty still exists in the simulations of climatic extremes. Fig.1 Observed and modeled multi-year average for each index (Dotted line: observation) Table1. Extreme index definition

  17. Metabolonote: A Wiki-Based Database for Managing Hierarchical Metadata of Metabolome Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ara, Takeshi; Enomoto, Mitsuo; Arita, Masanori; Ikeda, Chiaki; Kera, Kota; Yamada, Manabu; Nishioka, Takaaki; Ikeda, Tasuku; Nihei, Yoshito; Shibata, Daisuke; Kanaya, Shigehiko; Sakurai, Nozomu

    2015-01-01

    Metabolomics – technology for comprehensive detection of small molecules in an organism – lags behind the other “omics” in terms of publication and dissemination of experimental data. Among the reasons for this are difficulty precisely recording information about complicated analytical experiments (metadata), existence of various databases with their own metadata descriptions, and low reusability of the published data, resulting in submitters (the researchers who generate the data) being insufficiently motivated. To tackle these issues, we developed Metabolonote, a Semantic MediaWiki-based database designed specifically for managing metabolomic metadata. We also defined a metadata and data description format, called “Togo Metabolome Data” (TogoMD), with an ID system that is required for unique access to each level of the tree-structured metadata such as study purpose, sample, analytical method, and data analysis. Separation of the management of metadata from that of data and permission to attach related information to the metadata provide advantages for submitters, readers, and database developers. The metadata are enriched with information such as links to comparable data, thereby functioning as a hub of related data resources. They also enhance not only readers’ understanding and use of data but also submitters’ motivation to publish the data. The metadata are computationally shared among other systems via APIs, which facilitate the construction of novel databases by database developers. A permission system that allows publication of immature metadata and feedback from readers also helps submitters to improve their metadata. Hence, this aspect of Metabolonote, as a metadata preparation tool, is complementary to high-quality and persistent data repositories such as MetaboLights. A total of 808 metadata for analyzed data obtained from 35 biological species are published currently. Metabolonote and related tools are available free of cost at http

  18. Effect of Stevia rebaudiana addition on bioaccessibility of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of beverages based on exotic fruits mixed with oat following simulated human digestion.

    PubMed

    Carbonell-Capella, Juana M; Buniowska, Magdalena; Esteve, María J; Frígola, Ana

    2015-10-01

    In order to determine the impact of Stevia rebaudiana (SR) addition on bioactive compounds bioaccessibility of a new developed functional beverage based on exotic fruits (mango juice, papaya juice and açaí) mixed with orange juice and oat, an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion was performed. Ascorbic acid, total carotenoids, total phenolics, total anthocyanins, total antioxidant capacity and steviol glycosides were evaluated before and after a simulated gastrointestinal digestion. Salivary and gastric digestion had no substantial effect on any of the major phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid, total antioxidant capacity and steviol glycosides, whereas carotenoids and anthocyanins diminished significantly during the gastric step. All analysed compounds were significantly altered during the pancreatic-bile digestion and this effect was more marked for carotenoids and total anthocyanins. However, phenolic compounds, anthocyanins, total antioxidant capacity and steviol glycosides bioaccessibility increased as did SR concentration. Ascorbic acid bioaccessibility was negatively affected by the SR addition. PMID:25872434

  19. Effect of Stevia rebaudiana addition on bioaccessibility of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of beverages based on exotic fruits mixed with oat following simulated human digestion.

    PubMed

    Carbonell-Capella, Juana M; Buniowska, Magdalena; Esteve, María J; Frígola, Ana

    2015-10-01

    In order to determine the impact of Stevia rebaudiana (SR) addition on bioactive compounds bioaccessibility of a new developed functional beverage based on exotic fruits (mango juice, papaya juice and açaí) mixed with orange juice and oat, an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion was performed. Ascorbic acid, total carotenoids, total phenolics, total anthocyanins, total antioxidant capacity and steviol glycosides were evaluated before and after a simulated gastrointestinal digestion. Salivary and gastric digestion had no substantial effect on any of the major phenolic compounds, ascorbic acid, total antioxidant capacity and steviol glycosides, whereas carotenoids and anthocyanins diminished significantly during the gastric step. All analysed compounds were significantly altered during the pancreatic-bile digestion and this effect was more marked for carotenoids and total anthocyanins. However, phenolic compounds, anthocyanins, total antioxidant capacity and steviol glycosides bioaccessibility increased as did SR concentration. Ascorbic acid bioaccessibility was negatively affected by the SR addition.

  20. Design and Development of Microcontroller-Based Clinical Chemistry Analyser for Measurement of Various Blood Biochemistry Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Taneja, S. R.; Kumar, Jagdish; Thariyan, K. K.; Verma, Sanjeev

    2005-01-01

    Clinical chemistry analyser is a high-performance microcontroller-based photometric biochemical analyser to measure various blood biochemical parameters such as blood glucose, urea, protein, bilirubin, and so forth, and also to measure and observe enzyme growth occurred while performing the other biochemical tests such as ALT (alkaline amino transferase), amylase, AST (aspartate amino transferase), and so forth. These tests are of great significance in biochemistry and used for diagnostic purposes and classifying various disorders and diseases such as diabetes, liver malfunctioning, renal diseases, and so forth. An inexpensive clinical chemistry analyser developed by the authors is described in this paper. This is an open system in which any reagent kit available in the market can be used. The system is based on the principle of absorbance transmittance photometry. System design is based around 80C31 microcontroller with RAM, EPROM, and peripheral interface devices. The developed system incorporates light source, an optical module, interference filters of various wave lengths, peltier device for maintaining required temperature of the mixture in flow cell, peristaltic pump for sample aspiration, graphic LCD display for displaying blood parameters, patients test results and kinetic test graph, 40 columns mini thermal printer, and also 32-key keyboard for executing various functions. The lab tests conducted on the instrument include versatility of the analyzer, flexibility of the software, and treatment of sample. The prototype was tested and evaluated over 1000 blood samples successfully for seventeen blood parameters. Evaluation was carried out at Government Medical College and Hospital, the Department of Biochemistry. The test results were found to be comparable with other standard instruments. PMID:18924737

  1. Design and development of microcontroller-based clinical chemistry analyser for measurement of various blood biochemistry parameters.

    PubMed

    Taneja, S R; Gupta, R C; Kumar, Jagdish; Thariyan, K K; Verma, Sanjeev

    2005-01-01

    Clinical chemistry analyser is a high-performance microcontroller-based photometric biochemical analyser to measure various blood biochemical parameters such as blood glucose, urea, protein, bilirubin, and so forth, and also to measure and observe enzyme growth occurred while performing the other biochemical tests such as ALT (alkaline amino transferase), amylase, AST (aspartate amino transferase), and so forth. These tests are of great significance in biochemistry and used for diagnostic purposes and classifying various disorders and diseases such as diabetes, liver malfunctioning, renal diseases, and so forth. An inexpensive clinical chemistry analyser developed by the authors is described in this paper. This is an open system in which any reagent kit available in the market can be used. The system is based on the principle of absorbance transmittance photometry. System design is based around 80C31 microcontroller with RAM, EPROM, and peripheral interface devices. The developed system incorporates light source, an optical module, interference filters of various wave lengths, peltier device for maintaining required temperature of the mixture in flow cell, peristaltic pump for sample aspiration, graphic LCD display for displaying blood parameters, patients test results and kinetic test graph, 40 columns mini thermal printer, and also 32-key keyboard for executing various functions. The lab tests conducted on the instrument include versatility of the analyzer, flexibility of the software, and treatment of sample. The prototype was tested and evaluated over 1000 blood samples successfully for seventeen blood parameters. Evaluation was carried out at Government Medical College and Hospital, the Department of Biochemistry. The test results were found to be comparable with other standard instruments.

  2. Analysing Amazonian forest productivity using a new individual and trait-based model (TFS v.1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyllas, N. M.; Gloor, E.; Mercado, L. M.; Sitch, S.; Quesada, C. A.; Domingues, T. F.; Galbraith, D. R.; Torre-Lezama, A.; Vilanova, E.; Ramírez-Angulo, H.; Higuchi, N.; Neill, D. A.; Silveira, M.; Ferreira, L.; Aymard C., G. A.; Malhi, Y.; Phillips, O. L.; Lloyd, J.

    2014-07-01

    Repeated long-term censuses have revealed large-scale spatial patterns in Amazon basin forest structure and dynamism, with some forests in the west of the basin having up to a twice as high rate of aboveground biomass production and tree recruitment as forests in the east. Possible causes for this variation could be the climatic and edaphic gradients across the basin and/or the spatial distribution of tree species composition. To help understand causes of this variation a new individual-based model of tropical forest growth, designed to take full advantage of the forest census data available from the Amazonian Forest Inventory Network (RAINFOR), has been developed. The model allows for within-stand variations in tree size distribution and key functional traits and between-stand differences in climate and soil physical and chemical properties. It runs at the stand level with four functional traits - leaf dry mass per area (Ma), leaf nitrogen (NL) and phosphorus (PL) content and wood density (DW) varying from tree to tree - in a way that replicates the observed continua found within each stand. We first applied the model to validate canopy-level water fluxes at three eddy covariance flux measurement sites. For all three sites the canopy-level water fluxes were adequately simulated. We then applied the model at seven plots, where intensive measurements of carbon allocation are available. Tree-by-tree multi-annual growth rates generally agreed well with observations for small trees, but with deviations identified for larger trees. At the stand level, simulations at 40 plots were used to explore the influence of climate and soil nutrient availability on the gross (ΠG) and net (ΠN) primary production rates as well as the carbon use efficiency (CU). Simulated ΠG, ΠN and CU were not associated with temperature. On the other hand, all three measures of stand level productivity were positively related to both mean annual precipitation and soil nutrient status

  3. Using a laser-based CO2 carbon isotope analyser to investigate gas transfer in geological media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillon, S.; Pili, E.; Agrinier, P.

    2012-05-01

    CO2 stable carbon isotopes are very attractive in environmental research to investigate both natural and anthropogenic carbon sources. Laser-based CO2 carbon isotope analysis provides continuous measurement at high temporal resolution and is a promising alternative to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). We performed a thorough assessment of a commercially available CO2 Carbon Isotope Analyser (CCIA DLT-100, Los Gatos Research) that allows in situ measurement of δ 13C in CO2. Using a set of reference gases of known CO2 concentration and carbon isotopic composition, we evaluated the precision, long-term stability, temperature sensitivity and concentration dependence of the analyser. Despite good precision calculated from Allan variance (5.0 ppm for CO2 concentration, and 0.05 ‰ for δ 13C at 60 s averaging), real performances are altered by two main sources of error: temperature sensitivity and dependence of δ 13C on CO2 concentration. Data processing is required to correct for these errors. Following application of these corrections, we achieve an accuracy of 8.7 ppm for CO2 concentration and 1.3 ‰ for δ 13C, which is worse compared to mass spectrometry performance, but still allowing field applications. With this portable analyser we measured CO2 flux degassed from rock in an underground tunnel. The obtained carbon isotopic composition agrees with IRMS measurement, and can be used to identify the carbon source.

  4. Phylogenetic relationships within caniform carnivores based on analyses of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene.

    PubMed

    Ledje, C; Arnason, U

    1996-12-01

    The complete 12S rRNA gene of 32 carnivore species, including four feliforms and 28 caniforms, was sequenced. The sequences were aligned on the basis of their secondary structures and used in phylogenetic analyses that addressed several evolutionary relationships within the Caniformia. The analyses showed an unresolved polytomy of the basic caniform clades; pinnipeds, mustelids, procyonids, skunks, Ailurus (lesser panda), ursids, and canids. The polytomy indicates a major diversification of caniforms during a relatively short period of time. The lesser panda was distinct from other caniforms, suggesting its inclusion in a monotypic family, Ailuridae. The giant panda and the bears were joined on the same branch. The skunks are traditionally included in the family Mustelidae. The present analysis, however, showed a less close molecular relationship between the skunks and the remaining Mustelidae (sensu stricto) than between Mustelidae (sensu stricto) and Procyonidae, making Mustelidae (sensu lato) paraphyletic. The results suggest that the skunks should be included in a separate family, Mephitidae. Within the Pinnipedia, the grouping of walrus, sea lions, and fur seals was strongly supported. Analyses of a combined set of 12S rRNA and cytochrome b data were generally consistent with the findings based on each gene. PMID:8995061

  5. Subshell fitting of relativistic atomic core electron densities for use in QTAIM analyses of ECP-based wave functions.

    PubMed

    Keith, Todd A; Frisch, Michael J

    2011-11-17

    Scalar-relativistic, all-electron density functional theory (DFT) calculations were done for free, neutral atoms of all elements of the periodic table using the universal Gaussian basis set. Each core, closed-subshell contribution to a total atomic electron density distribution was separately fitted to a spherical electron density function: a linear combination of s-type Gaussian functions. The resulting core subshell electron densities are useful for systematically and compactly approximating total core electron densities of atoms in molecules, for any atomic core defined in terms of closed subshells. When used to augment the electron density from a wave function based on a calculation using effective core potentials (ECPs) in the Hamiltonian, the atomic core electron densities are sufficient to restore the otherwise-absent electron density maxima at the nuclear positions and eliminate spurious critical points in the neighborhood of the atom, thus enabling quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) analyses to be done in the neighborhoods of atoms for which ECPs were used. Comparison of results from QTAIM analyses with all-electron, relativistic and nonrelativistic molecular wave functions validates the use of the atomic core electron densities for augmenting electron densities from ECP-based wave functions. For an atom in a molecule for which a small-core or medium-core ECPs is used, simply representing the core using a simplistic, tightly localized electron density function is actually sufficient to obtain a correct electron density topology and perform QTAIM analyses to obtain at least semiquantitatively meaningful results, but this is often not true when a large-core ECP is used. Comparison of QTAIM results from augmenting ECP-based molecular wave functions with the realistic atomic core electron densities presented here versus augmenting with the limiting case of tight core densities may be useful for diagnosing the reliability of large-core ECP models in

  6. A Promiscuous De Novo Retro-Aldolase Catalyzes Asymmetric Michael Additions via Schiff Base Intermediates.

    PubMed

    Garrabou, Xavier; Beck, Tobias; Hilvert, Donald

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in computational design have enabled the development of primitive enzymes for a range of mechanistically distinct reactions. Here we show that the rudimentary active sites of these catalysts can give rise to useful chemical promiscuity. Specifically, RA95.5-8, designed and evolved as a retro-aldolase, also promotes asymmetric Michael additions of carbanions to unsaturated ketones with high rates and selectivities. The reactions proceed by amine catalysis, as indicated by mutagenesis and X-ray data. The inherent flexibility and tunability of this catalyst should make it a versatile platform for further optimization and/or mechanistic diversification by directed evolution. PMID:25777153

  7. Ultrasonic online monitoring of additive manufacturing processes based on selective laser melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, Hans; Dillhöfer, Alexander; Spies, Martin; Bamberg, Joachim; Hess, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Additive manufacturing processes have become commercially available and are particularly interesting for the production of free-formed parts. Selective laser melting allows to manufacture components by localized melting of successive layers of metal powder. In order to be able to describe and to understand the complex dynamics of selective laser melting processes more accurately, online measurements using ultrasound have been performed for the first time. In this contribution, we report on the integration of the measurement technique into the manufacturing facility and on a variety of promising monitoring results.

  8. Audio-Visual Perception of 3D Cinematography: An fMRI Study Using Condition-Based and Computation-Based Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Akitoshi; Bordier, Cecile; Macaluso, Emiliano

    2013-01-01

    The use of naturalistic stimuli to probe sensory functions in the human brain is gaining increasing interest. Previous imaging studies examined brain activity associated with the processing of cinematographic material using both standard “condition-based” designs, as well as “computational” methods based on the extraction of time-varying features of the stimuli (e.g. motion). Here, we exploited both approaches to investigate the neural correlates of complex visual and auditory spatial signals in cinematography. In the first experiment, the participants watched a piece of a commercial movie presented in four blocked conditions: 3D vision with surround sounds (3D-Surround), 3D with monaural sound (3D-Mono), 2D-Surround, and 2D-Mono. In the second experiment, they watched two different segments of the movie both presented continuously in 3D-Surround. The blocked presentation served for standard condition-based analyses, while all datasets were submitted to computation-based analyses. The latter assessed where activity co-varied with visual disparity signals and the complexity of auditory multi-sources signals. The blocked analyses associated 3D viewing with the activation of the dorsal and lateral occipital cortex and superior parietal lobule, while the surround sounds activated the superior and middle temporal gyri (S/MTG). The computation-based analyses revealed the effects of absolute disparity in dorsal occipital and posterior parietal cortices and of disparity gradients in the posterior middle temporal gyrus plus the inferior frontal gyrus. The complexity of the surround sounds was associated with activity in specific sub-regions of S/MTG, even after accounting for changes of sound intensity. These results demonstrate that the processing of naturalistic audio-visual signals entails an extensive set of visual and auditory areas, and that computation-based analyses can track the contribution of complex spatial aspects characterizing such life-like stimuli

  9. The Pathogen-Host Interactions database (PHI-base): additions and future developments

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Martin; Pant, Rashmi; Raghunath, Arathi; Irvine, Alistair G.; Pedro, Helder; Hammond-Kosack, Kim E.

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly evolving pathogens cause a diverse array of diseases and epidemics that threaten crop yield, food security as well as human, animal and ecosystem health. To combat infection greater comparative knowledge is required on the pathogenic process in multiple species. The Pathogen-Host Interactions database (PHI-base) catalogues experimentally verified pathogenicity, virulence and effector genes from bacterial, fungal and protist pathogens. Mutant phenotypes are associated with gene information. The included pathogens infect a wide range of hosts including humans, animals, plants, insects, fish and other fungi. The current version, PHI-base 3.6, available at http://www.phi-base.org, stores information on 2875 genes, 4102 interactions, 110 host species, 160 pathogenic species (103 plant, 3 fungal and 54 animal infecting species) and 181 diseases drawn from 1243 references. Phenotypic and gene function information has been obtained by manual curation of the peer-reviewed literature. A controlled vocabulary consisting of nine high-level phenotype terms permits comparisons and data analysis across the taxonomic space. PHI-base phenotypes were mapped via their associated gene information to reference genomes available in Ensembl Genomes. Virulence genes and hotspots can be visualized directly in genome browsers. Future plans for PHI-base include development of tools facilitating community-led curation and inclusion of the corresponding host target(s). PMID:25414340

  10. Bis(fluoromalonato)borate (BFMB) Anion Based Ionic Liquid As an Additive for Lithium-Ion Battery Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xiao-Guang; Liao, Chen; Baggetto, Loic; Guo, Bingkun; Unocic, Raymond R; Veith, Gabriel M; Dai, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Propylene carbonate (PC) is a good solvent for lithium ion battery applications due to its low melting point and high dielectric constant. However, PC is easily intercalated into graphite causing it to exfoliate, killing its electrochemical performance. Here we report on the synthesis of a new ionic liquid electrolyte based on partially fluorinated borate anion, 1-butyl-1,2-dimethylimidazolium bis(fluoromalonato)borate (BDMIm.BFMB), which can be used as an additive in 1 M LiPF6/PC electrolyte to suppress graphite exfoliation and improve cycling performance. In addition, both PC and BDMIm.BFMB can be used synergistically as additive to 1.0M LiPF6/methyl isopropyl sulfone (MIPS) to dramatically improve its cycling performance. It is also found that the chemistry nature of the ionic liquids has dramatic effect on their role as additive in PC based electrolyte.

  11. Lightweight custom composite prosthetic components using an additive manufacturing-based molding technique.

    PubMed

    Leddy, Michael T; Belter, Joseph T; Gemmell, Kevin D; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are becoming more prominent and cost-effective as 3D printing becomes higher quality and more inexpensive. The idea of 3D printed prosthetics components promises affordable, customizable devices, but these systems currently have major shortcomings in durability and function. In this paper, we propose a fabrication method for custom composite prostheses utilizing additive manufacturing, allowing for customizability, as well the durability of professional prosthetics. The manufacturing process is completed using 3D printed molds in a multi-stage molding system, which creates a custom finger or palm with a lightweight epoxy foam core, a durable composite outer shell, and soft urethane gripping surfaces. The composite material was compared to 3D printed and aluminum materials using a three-point bending test to compare stiffness, as well as gravimetric measurements to compare weight. The composite finger demonstrates the largest stiffness with the lowest weight compared to other tested fingers, as well as having customizability and lower cost, proving to potentially be a substantial benefit to the development of upper-limb prostheses. PMID:26737367

  12. Additions to the Human Plasma Proteome via a Tandem MARS Depletion iTRAQ-Based Workflow.

    PubMed

    Cao, Zhiyun; Yende, Sachin; Kellum, John A; Robinson, Renã A S

    2013-01-01

    Robust platforms for determining differentially expressed proteins in biomarker and discovery studies using human plasma are of great interest. While increased depth in proteome coverage is desirable, it is associated with costs of experimental time due to necessary sample fractionation. We evaluated a robust quantitative proteomics workflow for its ability (1) to provide increased depth in plasma proteome coverage and (2) to give statistical insight useful for establishing differentially expressed plasma proteins. The workflow involves dual-stage immunodepletion on a multiple affinity removal system (MARS) column, iTRAQ tagging, offline strong-cation exchange chromatography, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Independent workflow experiments were performed in triplicate on four plasma samples tagged with iTRAQ 4-plex reagents. After stringent criteria were applied to database searched results, 689 proteins with at least two spectral counts (SC) were identified. Depth in proteome coverage was assessed by comparison to the 2010 Human Plasma Proteome Reference Database in which our studies reveal 399 additional proteins which have not been previously reported. Additionally, we report on the technical variation of this quantitative workflow which ranges from ±11 to 30%.

  13. Elaboration And Characterization Of Foam Glass Based On Cullet With Addition Of Soluble Silicates

    SciTech Connect

    Ayadi, A.; Stiti, N.; Benhaoua, F.; Boumchedda, K.; Lerari, Y.

    2011-01-17

    The politics of the energy saving and of the acoustic comfort buildings is at the heart of the research of new compounds permitting to improve the materials performance actually commercialised. With this aim in view, we'll purpose to elaborate a porous material (foam glass) with addition of soluble silicates (up to 40%) of which the principal material is the waste glass in order to recycle it and improving the present laws about the waste products in closed circuit: (Finished products (leftarrow) waste products (leftarrow) finished products). The investigations have shown that grinding waste glass to particle size less than 0.1 mm and adding 1% of Ca CO{sub 3} content provide production of material with the following properties: particle density 0,5 g/cm{sup 3}, strength 17,50 MPa and water adsorption 95%, the temperature for foaming ranges were determined at 850 deg. C. The microstructures are homogenous, with pore sizes up to 2 mm. The addition of soluble silicates (up to 40%) has resulted in the foam glass of very high porosity. The foam glass is counted among the new glass products meeting certain requirements sought comfort in the building industry in particular (thermal and acoustic insulation). The product obtained present of excellent properties thermal ({lambda} = 0,031 W/m deg. C) and acoustic (R = 15 dB).

  14. Elaboration And Characterization Of Foam Glass Based On Cullet With Addition Of Soluble Silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayadi, A.; Stiti, N.; Benhaoua, F.; Boumchedda, K.; Lerari, Y.

    2011-01-01

    The politics of the energy saving and of the acoustic comfort buildings is at the heart of the research of new compounds permitting to improve the materials performance actually commercialised. With this aim in view, we'll purpose to elaborate a porous material (foam glass) with addition of soluble silicates (up to 40%) of which the principal material is the waste glass in order to recycle it and improving the present laws about the waste products in closed circuit: (Finished products ← waste products← finished products). The investigations have shown that grinding waste glass to particle size less than 0.1 mm and adding 1% of Ca CO3 content provide production of material with the following properties: particle density 0,5 g/cm3, strength 17,50 MPa and water adsorption 95%, the temperature for foaming ranges were determined at 850° C. The microstructures are homogenous, with pore sizes up to 2 mm. The addition of soluble silicates (up to 40%) has resulted in the foam glass of very high porosity. The foam glass is counted among the new glass products meeting certain requirements sought comfort in the building industry in particular (thermal and acoustic insulation). The product obtained present of excellent properties thermal (λ = 0,031 W/m° C) and acoustic (R = 15 dB).

  15. Additions to the Human Plasma Proteome via a Tandem MARS Depletion iTRAQ-Based Workflow

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhiyun; Yende, Sachin; Kellum, John A.; Robinson, Renã A. S.

    2013-01-01

    Robust platforms for determining differentially expressed proteins in biomarker and discovery studies using human plasma are of great interest. While increased depth in proteome coverage is desirable, it is associated with costs of experimental time due to necessary sample fractionation. We evaluated a robust quantitative proteomics workflow for its ability (1) to provide increased depth in plasma proteome coverage and (2) to give statistical insight useful for establishing differentially expressed plasma proteins. The workflow involves dual-stage immunodepletion on a multiple affinity removal system (MARS) column, iTRAQ tagging, offline strong-cation exchange chromatography, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Independent workflow experiments were performed in triplicate on four plasma samples tagged with iTRAQ 4-plex reagents. After stringent criteria were applied to database searched results, 689 proteins with at least two spectral counts (SC) were identified. Depth in proteome coverage was assessed by comparison to the 2010 Human Plasma Proteome Reference Database in which our studies reveal 399 additional proteins which have not been previously reported. Additionally, we report on the technical variation of this quantitative workflow which ranges from ±11 to 30%. PMID:23509626

  16. Lightweight custom composite prosthetic components using an additive manufacturing-based molding technique.

    PubMed

    Leddy, Michael T; Belter, Joseph T; Gemmell, Kevin D; Dollar, Aaron M

    2015-01-01

    Additive manufacturing techniques are becoming more prominent and cost-effective as 3D printing becomes higher quality and more inexpensive. The idea of 3D printed prosthetics components promises affordable, customizable devices, but these systems currently have major shortcomings in durability and function. In this paper, we propose a fabrication method for custom composite prostheses utilizing additive manufacturing, allowing for customizability, as well the durability of professional prosthetics. The manufacturing process is completed using 3D printed molds in a multi-stage molding system, which creates a custom finger or palm with a lightweight epoxy foam core, a durable composite outer shell, and soft urethane gripping surfaces. The composite material was compared to 3D printed and aluminum materials using a three-point bending test to compare stiffness, as well as gravimetric measurements to compare weight. The composite finger demonstrates the largest stiffness with the lowest weight compared to other tested fingers, as well as having customizability and lower cost, proving to potentially be a substantial benefit to the development of upper-limb prostheses.

  17. Lithium-Ion Electrolytes Containing Phosphorous-Based, Flame-Retardant Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Smith, Kiah A.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Prakash, G. K. Surya

    2010-01-01

    Future NASA missions aimed at exploring Mars, the Moon, and the outer planets require rechargeable batteries that can operate over a wide temperature range (-60 to +60 C) to satisfy the requirements of various applications. In addition, many of these applications will require improved safety, due to their use by humans. Currently, the state-of-the-art lithium-ion (Li-ion) system has been demonstrated to operate over a wide range of temperatures (-40 to +40 C); however, abuse conditions can often lead to cell rupture and fire. The nature of the electrolyte can greatly affect the propensity of the cell/battery to catch fire, given the flammability of the organic solvents used within. Li-ion electrolytes have been developed that contain a flame-retardant additive in conjunction with fluorinated co-solvents to provide a safe system with a wide operating temperature range. Previous work incorporated fluorinated esters into multi-component electrolyte formulations, which were demonstrated to cover a temperature range from 60 to +60 C. This work was described in Fluoroester Co-Solvents for Low-Temperature Li+ Cells (NPO-44626), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 9 (September 2009), p. 37; and Optimized Li-Ion Electrolytes Con tain ing Fluorinated Ester Co-Solvents (NPO-45824), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 48. Other previous work improved the safety characteristics of the electrolytes by adding flame-retardant additives such as triphenyl phosphate (TPhPh), tri-butyl phosphate (TBuPh), triethyl phosphate (TEtPh), and bis(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) methyl phosphonate (TFMPo). The current work involves further investigation of other types of flame-retardant additives, including tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphate, tris(2,2,2-trifluoroethyl) phosphite, triphenylphosphite, diethyl ethylphosphonate, and diethyl phenylphosphonate added to an electrolyte composition intended for wide operating temperatures. In general, many of the formulations investigated in this

  18. Pyrolysis bio-oils as additives for vegetable oil based lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Softwood and hardwood lignins, along with hardwood as such, were pyrolyzed to afford bio-oil distillates in which phenols were major products. Extraction with alkali gave a range of lignin-related phenols having molecular weights (MWs) from 110 to 344. Because vegetable oil based lubricants have dra...

  19. Titanium-Based Hip Stems with Drug Delivery Functionality through Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Bezuidenhout, Martin B; Dimitrov, Dimitar M; van Staden, Anton D; Oosthuizen, Gert A; Dicks, Leon M T

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infections are a major concern in patients that receive implants. These infections generally occur in areas with poor blood flow and pathogens do not always respond to antibiotic treatment. With the latest developments in nanotechnology, the incorporation of antibiotics into prosthetic implants may soon become a standard procedure. The success will, however, depend on the ability to control the release of antibiotics at concentrations high enough to prevent the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. Through additive manufacturing, antibiotics can be incorporated into cementless femoral stems to produce prosthetic devices with antimicrobial properties. With the emerging increase in resistance to antibiotics, the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds other than antibiotics, preferably drugs with a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, will have to be explored. This review highlights the microorganisms associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA), discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the latest materials used in hip implants, compares different antimicrobial agents that could be incorporated, and addresses novel ideas for future research.

  20. Additive manufacturing of a monolithic optical force sensor based on polarization modulation.

    PubMed

    Nierenberger, Mathieu; Lecler, Sylvain; Pfeiffer, Pierre; Geiskopf, François; Guilhem, Mathieu; Renaud, Pierre

    2015-08-01

    One of the specific interests of optical sensors is their compatibility with harsh environments. The polarization modulated force sensor we propose offers this advantage, in addition to low cost and ease of manufacturing thanks to its acrylate 3D printed monolithic design. All the polarization control is indeed achieved using the geometry of a single component making unnecessary future alignments. The complex geometry of the transducer is obtained thanks to the 3D printing process. This process and the resulting material optical properties are described. The sensor concept and the fabrication method are experimentally investigated. A monolithic force sensor in the required range of 20 N is exhibited for application in the field of MR-compatible robotics. The potentiality of 3D printing for optical application in the design of the force sensor is illustrated.

  1. A correlative imaging based methodology for accurate quantitative assessment of bone formation in additive manufactured implants.

    PubMed

    Geng, Hua; Todd, Naomi M; Devlin-Mullin, Aine; Poologasundarampillai, Gowsihan; Kim, Taek Bo; Madi, Kamel; Cartmell, Sarah; Mitchell, Christopher A; Jones, Julian R; Lee, Peter D

    2016-06-01

    A correlative imaging methodology was developed to accurately quantify bone formation in the complex lattice structure of additive manufactured implants. Micro computed tomography (μCT) and histomorphometry were combined, integrating the best features from both, while demonstrating the limitations of each imaging modality. This semi-automatic methodology registered each modality using a coarse graining technique to speed the registration of 2D histology sections to high resolution 3D μCT datasets. Once registered, histomorphometric qualitative and quantitative bone descriptors were directly correlated to 3D quantitative bone descriptors, such as bone ingrowth and bone contact. The correlative imaging allowed the significant volumetric shrinkage of histology sections to be quantified for the first time (~15 %). This technique demonstrated the importance of location of the histological section, demonstrating that up to a 30 % offset can be introduced. The results were used to quantitatively demonstrate the effectiveness of 3D printed titanium lattice implants.

  2. Towards internationally acceptable standards for food additives and contaminants based on the use of risk analysis.

    PubMed

    Huggett, A; Petersen, B J; Walker, R; Fisher, C E; Notermans, S H; Rombouts, F M; Abbott, P; Debackere, M; Hathaway, S C; Hecker, E F; Knaap, A G; Kuznesof, P M; Meyland, I; Moy, G; Narbonne, J F; Paakkanen, J; Smith, M R; Tennant, D; Wagstaffe, P; Wargo, J; Würtzen, G

    1998-06-01

    Internationally acceptable norms need to incorporate sound science and consistent risk management principles in an open and transparent manner, as set out in the Agreement on the Application of Sanitary and Phytosanitary Measures (the SPS Agreement). The process of risk analysis provides a procedure to reach these goals. The interaction between risk assessors and risk managers is considered vital to this procedure. This paper reports the outcome of a meeting of risk assessors and risk managers on specific aspects of risk analysis and its application to international standard setting for food additives and contaminants. Case studies on aflatoxins and aspartame were used to identify the key steps of the interaction process which ensure scientific justification for risk management decisions. A series of recommendations were proposed in order to enhance the scientific transparency in these critical phases of the standard setting procedure.

  3. Laser-based additive manufacturing: where it has been, where it needs to go

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Khershed P.

    2014-03-01

    It is no secret that the laser was the driver for additive manufacturing (AM) of 3D objects since such objects were first demonstrated in the mid-1980s. A myriad of techniques utilizing the directed energy of lasers were invented. Lasers are used to selectively sinter or fuse incremental layers in powder-beds, melt streaming powder following a programmed path, and polymerize photopolymers in a liquid vat layer-by-layer. The laser is an energy source of choice for repair of damaged components, for manufacture of new or replacement parts, and for rapid prototyping of concept designs. Lasers enable microstructure gradients and heterogeneous structures designed to exhibit unique properties and behavior. Laserbased additive manufacturing has been successful in producing relatively simple near net-shape metallic parts saving material and cost, but requiring finish-machining and in repair and refurbishment of worn components. It has been routinely used to produce polymer parts. These capabilities have been widely recognized as evidenced by the explosion in interest in AM technology, nationally. These successes are, however, tempered by challenges facing practitioners such as process and part qualification and verification, which are needed to bring AM as a true manufacturing technology. The ONR manufacturing science program, in collaboration with other agencies, invested in basic R&D in AM since its beginnings. It continues to invest, currently focusing on developing cyber-enabled manufacturing systems for AM. It is believed that such computation, communication and control approaches will help in validating AM and moving it to the factory floor along side CNC machines.

  4. Influence of tall oil biodiesel with Mg and Mo based fuel additives on diesel engine performance and emission.

    PubMed

    Keskin, Ali; Gürü, Metin; Altiparmak, Duran

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate influences of tall oil biodiesel with Mg and Mo based fuel additives on diesel engine performance and emission. Tall oil resinic acids were reacted with MgO and MoO(2) stoichiometrically for the production of metal-based fuel additives (combustion catalysts). The metal-based additives were added into tall oil biodiesel (B60) at the rate of 4 micromol/l, 8 micromol/l and 12 micromol/l for preparing test fuels. In general, both of the metal-based additives improved flash point, pour point and viscosity of the biodiesel fuel, depending on the rate of additives. A single cylinder DI diesel engine was used in the tests. Engine performance values did not change significantly with biodiesel fuels, but exhaust emission profile was improved. CO emissions and smoke opacity decreased by 56.42% and by 30.43%, respectively. In general, low NO(x) and CO(2) emissions were measured with the biodiesel fuels.

  5. Neutron measurements of stresses in a test artifact produced by laser-based additive manufacturing

    SciTech Connect

    Gnäupel-Herold, Thomas; Slotwinski, John; Moylan, Shawn

    2014-02-18

    A stainless steel test artifact produced by Direct Metal Laser Sintering and similar to a proposed standardized test artifact was examined using neutron diffraction. The artifact contained a number of structures with different aspect ratios pertaining to wall thickness, height above base plate, and side length. Through spatial resolutions of the order of one millimeter the volumetric distribution of stresses in several was measured. It was found that the stresses peak in the tensile region around 500 MPa near the top surface, with balancing compressive stresses in the interior. The presence of a support structure (a one millimeter high, thin walled, hence weaker, lattice structure deposited on the base plate, followed by a fully dense AM structure) has only minor effects on the stresses.

  6. Characteristics of tetrahydrofuran-based electrolytes with magnesium alkoxide additives for rechargeable magnesium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, In-Tae; Yamabuki, Kazuhiro; Sumimoto, Michinori; Tsutsumi, Hiromori; Morita, Masayuki; Yoshimoto, Nobuko

    2016-08-01

    The electrochemical behavior of magnesium (Mg) metal was investigated in tetrahydrofuran (THF)-based solutions containing magnesium bromide (MgBr2) and/or magnesium ethoxide (Mg(OEt)2). THF solutions containing a single solute, MgBr2 or Mg(OEt)2, show no visible faradaic current based on Mg deposition and/or dissolution. However, the electrolyte system containing both solutes, MgBr2 + Mg(OEt)2/THF, gives a reversible current response of Mg deposition and dissolution. The ionic structure of the electrolyte system containing the binary solute was examined by infrared (IR) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. It was confirmed that MgBr2 and Mg(OEt)2 are coordinated (solvated) with THF molecules to form an EtOsbnd Mgsbnd Br·4THF complex. The DFT calculations also suggest the possible formation of μ-complexes for the MgBr2/Mg(OEt)2 binary system in THF. The voltammetric responses at the Pt electrode indicate low overpotential and high coulombic efficiency for Mg deposition and dissolution in THF-based solutions containing suitable molar ratios of MgBr2 and Mg(OEt)2. The constant-current charge-discharge cycling of Mg in MgBr2 + Mg(OEt)2/THF electrolyte also shows low overpotential and good cyclability over 300 cycles.

  7. Refolding of laccase in dilution additive mode with copper-based ionic liquid.

    PubMed

    Bae, Sang-Woo; Ahn, Kihun; Koo, Yoon-Mo; Ha, Sung Ho

    2013-11-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are molten salts which do not crystallize at room temperature. Tunable physicochemical properties of ILs including hydrophobicity and polarity facilitate their applications in many biological processes. In this study, a copper-based IL was employed in order to enhance the refolding efficiency of laccase from Trametes versicolor which requires copper as a cofactor. When 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trichlorocuprate ([EMIM][CuCl₃]) was added to refolding buffer instead of urea, the laccase refolding yield was improved more than 2.7 times compared to the conventional refolding buffer which contains urea. When the refolding of laccase was carried out at different temperatures (4, 25, and 37 °C), the highest refolding yield was obtained at 25 °C. At low temperature, two conflicting effects, i.e., suppression of the aggregate formation and decrease of folding rate, influence the protein refolding. In contrast, a copper-based IL did not enhance the refolding of lysozyme, a non-copper-containing protein. From these results, we can conclude that this copper-based IL, [EMIM][CuCl₃], was exclusively effective on the refolding process of a copper-containing protein.

  8. Bilaterian phylogeny based on analyses of a region of the sodium-potassium ATPase beta-subunit gene.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Frank E; Córdoba, Alonso J; Thollesson, Mikael

    2004-03-01

    Molecular investigations of deep-level relationships within and among the animal phyla have been hampered by a lack of slowly evolving genes that are amenable to study by molecular systematists. To provide new data for use in deep-level metazoan phylogenetic studies, primers were developed to amplify a 1.3-kb region of the alpha subunit of the nuclear-encoded sodium-potassium ATPase gene from 31 bilaterians representing several phyla. Maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, and Bayesian analyses of these sequences (combined with ATPase sequences for 23 taxa downloaded from GenBank) yield congruent trees that corroborate recent findings based on analyses of other data sets (e.g., the 18S ribosomal RNA gene). The ATPase-based trees support monophyly for several clades (including Lophotrochozoa, a form of Ecdysozoa, Vertebrata, Mollusca, Bivalvia, Gastropoda, Arachnida, Hexapoda, Coleoptera, and Diptera) but do not support monophyly for Deuterostomia, Arthropoda, or Nemertea. Parametric bootstrapping tests reject monophyly for Arthropoda and Nemertea but are unable to reject deuterostome monophyly. Overall, the sodium-potassium ATPase alpha-subunit gene appears to be useful for deep-level studies of metazoan phylogeny.

  9. Single-cell SNP analyses and interpretations based on RNA-Seq data for colon cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiahuan; Zhou, Qian; Wang, Yangfan; Ning, Kang

    2016-01-01

    Single-cell sequencing is useful for illustrating the cellular heterogeneities inherent in many intricate biological systems, particularly in human cancer. However, owing to the difficulties in acquiring, amplifying and analyzing single-cell genetic material, obstacles remain for single-cell diversity assessments such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses, rendering biological interpretations of single-cell omics data elusive. We used RNA-Seq data from single-cell and bulk colon cancer samples to analyze the SNP profiles for both structural and functional comparisons. Colon cancer-related pathways with single-cell level SNP enrichment, including the TGF-β and p53 signaling pathways, were also investigated based on both their SNP enrichment patterns and gene expression. We also detected a certain number of fusion transcripts, which may promote tumorigenesis, at the single-cell level. Based on these results, single-cell analyses not only recapitulated the SNP analysis results from the bulk samples but also detected cell-to-cell and cell-to-bulk variations, thereby aiding in early diagnosis and in identifying the precise mechanisms underlying cancers at the single-cell level. PMID:27677461

  10. Spatializing Area-Based Measures of Neighborhood Characteristics for Multilevel Regression Analyses: An Areal Median Filtering Approach.

    PubMed

    Oka, Masayoshi; Wong, David W S

    2016-06-01

    Area-based measures of neighborhood characteristics simply derived from enumeration units (e.g., census tracts or block groups) ignore the potential of spatial spillover effects, and thus incorporating such measures into multilevel regression models may underestimate the neighborhood effects on health. To overcome this limitation, we describe the concept and method of areal median filtering to spatialize area-based measures of neighborhood characteristics for multilevel regression analyses. The areal median filtering approach provides a means to specify or formulate "neighborhoods" as meaningful geographic entities by removing enumeration unit boundaries as the absolute barriers and by pooling information from the neighboring enumeration units. This spatializing process takes into account for the potential of spatial spillover effects and also converts aspatial measures of neighborhood characteristics into spatial measures. From a conceptual and methodological standpoint, incorporating the derived spatial measures into multilevel regression analyses allows us to more accurately examine the relationships between neighborhood characteristics and health. To promote and set the stage for informative research in the future, we provide a few important conceptual and methodological remarks, and discuss possible applications, inherent limitations, and practical solutions for using the areal median filtering approach in the study of neighborhood effects on health.

  11. Creep data analyses of a columnar-grained nickel-base superalloy by conventional and {beta}-envelope methods

    SciTech Connect

    Krishna, M.S.G.; Sriramamurthy, A.M.; Radhakrishnan, V.M.

    1998-08-01

    Creep-rupture properties of a columnar-grained nickel-base superalloy have been evaluated over a wide temperature range (1,033 to 1,311 K) and stress levels (80 to 850 MPa). Creep data analyses based on the conventional approach as well as on a new graphical method--the {beta}-envelope method--have been carried out for creep strain and life estimation purposes. The relation between minimum creep rate of the alloy with the applied stress obeys simple power law, whereas the rupture data of the alloy fits well to the Larson-Miller parameter. Also, the Monkman-Grant relation between the minimum creep rate and the rupture life produces a trend with some degree of scatter in the data. The latter relation in its generalized form by the {beta}-envelope method exhibited the best correlation with significantly reduced scatter in the data.

  12. A comparison between evapotranspiration estimates based on remotely sensed surface energy balance and ground-based soil water balance analyses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Remotely sensed and in-situ data were used to investigate dynamics of root zone soil moisture and evapotranspiration (ET) at four Mesonet stations in north-central Oklahoma over an 11-year period (2000-2010). Two moisture deficit indicators based on soil matric potential had spatial and temporal pat...

  13. The Effect of CeO2 Addition on the Microstructure and Properties of Ni-Based Flame-Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Liang, Bunv; Guo, Hongjian

    2014-04-01

    Ni-based alloy with different amount of CeO2 powders were flame sprayed and melted onto 1045 carbon steel substrate. Microstructure and properties of the coatings were studied by XRD, field emission gun scanning electron microscope (FEGSEM) and SEM analyses. The wear behavior of the coatings was investigated under dry sliding wear conditions, and was compared with that of the coatings without CeO2, The results show that the microstructure of the coating with CeO2 differs widely from the coating without CeO2, the novel microstructure is beneficial for wear resistance. Abrasive wear tests without lubricant and analysis of the worn surfaces revealed that the Ni-based alloy coatings with the addition of 0.8% CeO2 exhibit higher wear resistance.

  14. Bifunctional heterogeneous catalysis of silica-alumina-supported tertiary amines with controlled acid-base interactions for efficient 1,4-addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Motokura, Ken; Tanaka, Satoka; Tada, Mizuki; Iwasawa, Yasuhiro

    2009-10-19

    We report the first tunable bifunctional surface of silica-alumina-supported tertiary amines (SA-NEt(2)) active for catalytic 1,4-addition reactions of nitroalkanes and thiols to electron-deficient alkenes. The 1,4-addition reaction of nitroalkanes to electron-deficient alkenes is one of the most useful carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions and applicable toward a wide range of organic syntheses. The reaction between nitroethane and methyl vinyl ketone scarcely proceeded with either SA or homogeneous amines, and a mixture of SA and amines showed very low catalytic activity. In addition, undesirable side reactions occurred in the case of a strong base like sodium ethoxide employed as a catalytic reagent. Only the present SA-supported amine (SA-NEt(2)) catalyst enabled selective formation of a double-alkylated product without promotions of side reactions such as an intramolecular cyclization reaction. The heterogeneous SA-NEt(2) catalyst was easily recovered from the reaction mixture by simple filtration and reusable with retention of its catalytic activity and selectivity. Furthermore, the SA-NEt(2) catalyst system was applicable to the addition reaction of other nitroalkanes and thiols to various electron-deficient alkenes. The solid-state magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopic analyses, including variable-contact-time (13)C cross-polarization (CP)/MAS NMR spectroscopy, revealed that acid-base interactions between surface acid sites and immobilized amines can be controlled by pretreatment of SA at different temperatures. The catalytic activities for these addition reactions were strongly affected by the surface acid-base interactions.

  15. In situ sulfur isotopes (δ(34)S and δ(33)S) analyses in sulfides and elemental sulfur using high sensitivity cones combined with the addition of nitrogen by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jiali; Hu, Zhaochu; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Lu; Liu, Yongsheng; Li, Ming; Zong, Keqing; Gao, Shan; Hu, Shenghong

    2016-03-10

    The sulfur isotope is an important geochemical tracer in diverse fields of geosciences. In this study, the effects of three different cone combinations with the addition of N2 on the performance of in situ S isotope analyses were investigated in detail. The signal intensities of S isotopes were improved by a factor of 2.3 and 3.6 using the X skimmer cone combined with the standard sample cone or the Jet sample cone, respectively, compared with the standard arrangement (H skimmer cone combined with the standard sample cone). This signal enhancement is important for the improvement of the precision and accuracy of in situ S isotope analysis at high spatial resolution. Different cone combinations have a significant effect on the mass bias and mass bias stability for S isotopes. Poor precisions of S isotope ratios were obtained using the Jet and X cones combination at their corresponding optimum makeup gas flow when using Ar plasma only. The addition of 4-8 ml min(-1) nitrogen to the central gas flow in laser ablation MC-ICP-MS was found to significantly enlarge the mass bias stability zone at their corresponding optimum makeup gas flow in these three different cone combinations. The polyatomic interferences of OO, SH, OOH were also significantly reduced, and the interference free plateaus of sulfur isotopes became broader and flatter in the nitrogen mode (N2 = 4 ml min(-1)). However, the signal intensity of S was not increased by the addition of nitrogen in this study. The laser fluence and ablation mode had significant effects on sulfur isotope fractionation during the analysis of sulfides and elemental sulfur by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS. The matrix effect among different sulfides and elemental sulfur was observed, but could be significantly reduced by line scan ablation in preference to single spot ablation under the optimized fluence. It is recommended that the d90 values of the particles in pressed powder pellets for accurate and precise S isotope analysis

  16. In situ sulfur isotopes (δ(34)S and δ(33)S) analyses in sulfides and elemental sulfur using high sensitivity cones combined with the addition of nitrogen by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jiali; Hu, Zhaochu; Zhang, Wen; Yang, Lu; Liu, Yongsheng; Li, Ming; Zong, Keqing; Gao, Shan; Hu, Shenghong

    2016-03-10

    The sulfur isotope is an important geochemical tracer in diverse fields of geosciences. In this study, the effects of three different cone combinations with the addition of N2 on the performance of in situ S isotope analyses were investigated in detail. The signal intensities of S isotopes were improved by a factor of 2.3 and 3.6 using the X skimmer cone combined with the standard sample cone or the Jet sample cone, respectively, compared with the standard arrangement (H skimmer cone combined with the standard sample cone). This signal enhancement is important for the improvement of the precision and accuracy of in situ S isotope analysis at high spatial resolution. Different cone combinations have a significant effect on the mass bias and mass bias stability for S isotopes. Poor precisions of S isotope ratios were obtained using the Jet and X cones combination at their corresponding optimum makeup gas flow when using Ar plasma only. The addition of 4-8 ml min(-1) nitrogen to the central gas flow in laser ablation MC-ICP-MS was found to significantly enlarge the mass bias stability zone at their corresponding optimum makeup gas flow in these three different cone combinations. The polyatomic interferences of OO, SH, OOH were also significantly reduced, and the interference free plateaus of sulfur isotopes became broader and flatter in the nitrogen mode (N2 = 4 ml min(-1)). However, the signal intensity of S was not increased by the addition of nitrogen in this study. The laser fluence and ablation mode had significant effects on sulfur isotope fractionation during the analysis of sulfides and elemental sulfur by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS. The matrix effect among different sulfides and elemental sulfur was observed, but could be significantly reduced by line scan ablation in preference to single spot ablation under the optimized fluence. It is recommended that the d90 values of the particles in pressed powder pellets for accurate and precise S isotope analysis

  17. Additive Manufacturing of SiC Based Ceramics and Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael Charles; Singh, Mrityunjay

    2015-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) ceramics and SiC fiber reinforcedSiC ceramic matrix composites (SiCSiC CMCs) offer high payoff as replacements for metals in turbine engine applications due to their lighter weight, higher temperature capability, and lower cooling requirements. Additive manufacturing approaches can offer game changing technologies for the quick and low cost fabrication of parts with much greater design freedom and geometric complexity. Four approaches for developing these materials are presented. The first two utilize low cost 3D printers. The first uses pre-ceramic pastes developed as feed materials which are converted to SiC after firing. The second uses wood containing filament to print a carbonaceous preform which is infiltrated with a pre-ceramic polymer and converted to SiC. The other two approaches pursue the AM of CMCs. The first is binder jet SiC powder processing in collaboration with rp+m (Rapid Prototyping+Manufacturing). Processing optimization was pursued through SiC powder blending, infiltration with and without SiC nano powder loading, and integration of nanofibers into the powder bed. The second approach was laminated object manufacturing (LOM) in which fiber prepregs and laminates are cut to shape by a laser and stacked to form the desired part. Scanning electron microscopy was conducted on materials from all approaches with select approaches also characterized with XRD, TGA, and bend testing.

  18. Protective Effect of Two Yeast Based Feed Additives on Pigs Chronically Exposed to Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Alexandra C.; See, M. Todd; Kim, Sung Woo

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of the mycotoxins deoxynivalenol (DON) and zearalenone (ZEA) on pigs and the benefits of two mycotoxin mitigation strategies, gilts (n = 84, 9.1 ± 0.1 kg) were allotted to four treatments: CON (control); MT (4.8 mg/kg feed DON and 0.3 mg/kg feed ZEA); MT-YC (MT + 2 g/kg of yeast cell wall product); and MT-YF (MT + 2 g/kg of yeast fermentation product). After 42 days of feeding, pigs fed MT had reduced (p < 0.05) growth performance compared with pigs fed CON. Pigs fed MT-YF had greater (p < 0.05) average daily gain and tended to have greater (p = 0.080) average daily feed intake than MT, whereas pigs fed MT-YC did not differ from MT. Oxidative DNA damage increased (p < 0.05) in MT, whereas pigs fed MT-YF tended to have lower (p = 0.067) oxidative stress. Liver hydropic degeneration was increased (p < 0.05) in MT in contrast to CON and MT-YF, and tended to be greater (p = 0.079) than MT-YC. Collectively, feeding diets contaminated with mycotoxins significantly reduced growth performance and impacted pig health. The yeast additives had varied ability to reduce mycotoxin effects on pig growth and health, but may still play a beneficial role in reducing the overall impacts of a mycotoxin challenge on pigs. PMID:25533517

  19. Do Health Professionals Need Additional Competencies for Stratified Cancer Prevention Based on Genetic Risk Profiling?

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Susmita; Henneman, Lidewij; Dent, Tom; Hall, Alison; Burton, Alice; Pharoah, Paul; Pashayan, Nora; Burton, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    There is growing evidence that inclusion of genetic information about known common susceptibility variants may enable population risk-stratification and personalized prevention for common diseases including cancer. This would require the inclusion of genetic testing as an integral part of individual risk assessment of an asymptomatic individual. Front line health professionals would be expected to interact with and assist asymptomatic individuals through the risk stratification process. In that case, additional knowledge and skills may be needed. Current guidelines and frameworks for genetic competencies of non-specialist health professionals place an emphasis on rare inherited genetic diseases. For common diseases, health professionals do use risk assessment tools but such tools currently do not assess genetic susceptibility of individuals. In this article, we compare the skills and knowledge needed by non-genetic health professionals, if risk-stratified prevention is implemented, with existing competence recommendations from the UK, USA and Europe, in order to assess the gaps in current competences. We found that health professionals would benefit from understanding the contribution of common genetic variations in disease risk, the rationale for a risk-stratified prevention pathway, and the implications of using genomic information in risk-assessment and risk management of asymptomatic individuals for common disease prevention. PMID:26068647

  20. Optimization of solution-processed oligothiophene:fullerene based organic solar cells by using solvent additives.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Gisela L; Urdanpilleta, Marta; Fitzner, Roland; Brier, Eduard; Mena-Osteritz, Elena; Reinold, Egon; Bäuerle, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The optimization of solution-processed organic bulk-heterojunction solar cells with the acceptor-substituted quinquethiophene DCV5T-Bu 4 as donor in conjunction with PC61BM as acceptor is described. Power conversion efficiencies up to 3.0% and external quantum efficiencies up to 40% were obtained through the use of 1-chloronaphthalene as solvent additive in the fabrication of the photovoltaic devices. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy investigations of the photoactive layer gave insight into the distribution of donor and acceptor within the blend. The unique combination of solubility and thermal stability of DCV5T-Bu 4 also allows for fabrication of organic solar cells by vacuum deposition. Thus, we were able to perform a rare comparison of the device characteristics of the solution-processed DCV5T-Bu 4 :PC61BM solar cell with its vacuum-processed DCV5T-Bu 4 :C60 counterpart. Interestingly in this case, the efficiencies of the small-molecule organic solar cells prepared by using solution techniques are approaching those fabricated by using vacuum technology. This result is significant as vacuum-processed devices typically display much better performances in photovoltaic cells.

  1. Titanium-Based Hip Stems with Drug Delivery Functionality through Additive Manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Bezuidenhout, Martin B; Dimitrov, Dimitar M; van Staden, Anton D; Oosthuizen, Gert A; Dicks, Leon M T

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infections are a major concern in patients that receive implants. These infections generally occur in areas with poor blood flow and pathogens do not always respond to antibiotic treatment. With the latest developments in nanotechnology, the incorporation of antibiotics into prosthetic implants may soon become a standard procedure. The success will, however, depend on the ability to control the release of antibiotics at concentrations high enough to prevent the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. Through additive manufacturing, antibiotics can be incorporated into cementless femoral stems to produce prosthetic devices with antimicrobial properties. With the emerging increase in resistance to antibiotics, the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds other than antibiotics, preferably drugs with a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, will have to be explored. This review highlights the microorganisms associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA), discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the latest materials used in hip implants, compares different antimicrobial agents that could be incorporated, and addresses novel ideas for future research. PMID:26504776

  2. Titanium-Based Hip Stems with Drug Delivery Functionality through Additive Manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Bezuidenhout, Martin B.; Dimitrov, Dimitar M.; van Staden, Anton D.; Oosthuizen, Gert A.; Dicks, Leon M. T.

    2015-01-01

    Postoperative infections are a major concern in patients that receive implants. These infections generally occur in areas with poor blood flow and pathogens do not always respond to antibiotic treatment. With the latest developments in nanotechnology, the incorporation of antibiotics into prosthetic implants may soon become a standard procedure. The success will, however, depend on the ability to control the release of antibiotics at concentrations high enough to prevent the development of antibiotic-resistant strains. Through additive manufacturing, antibiotics can be incorporated into cementless femoral stems to produce prosthetic devices with antimicrobial properties. With the emerging increase in resistance to antibiotics, the incorporation of antimicrobial compounds other than antibiotics, preferably drugs with a broader spectrum of antimicrobial activity, will have to be explored. This review highlights the microorganisms associated with total hip arthroplasty (THA), discusses the advantages and disadvantages of the latest materials used in hip implants, compares different antimicrobial agents that could be incorporated, and addresses novel ideas for future research. PMID:26504776

  3. High-performance lubricant additives based on modified graphene oxide by ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Liping

    2015-08-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a layered material bearing a variety of oxygen-containing functional groups on its basal planes and edges, which allow it as a substrate to conduct a variety of chemical transformations. Here modified graphene oxide (MGO) was prepared using alkyl imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (LB104), 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium hexafluorophosphate (LP104) and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) amide (LF106)) via epoxide ring-opening reaction, cation-π stacking or van der Waals interactions, with LB104 modified graphene (MG) exfoliated from graphite rod by a moderate electrochemical method as a comparison. The stability and tribological properties of MGO and MG as multialkylated cyclopentanes (MACs) additives were investigated in detail. The results show that GO is converted into graphene through the chemical modification using ILs, and MGO with good dispersion and stability in MACs significantly improves the tribological performance (friction and wear were reduced about 27% and 74% with pure MACs as a comparison, respectively). The excellent tribological properties are attributed to the formation of an ILs-containing graphene-rich tribofilm on the sliding surfaces, which as the third body can prevent the sliding surfaces from straight asperity contact and improve friction reducing and anti-wear behaviors.

  4. High-performance lubricant additives based on modified graphene oxide by ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Liping

    2015-08-15

    Graphene oxide (GO) is a layered material bearing a variety of oxygen-containing functional groups on its basal planes and edges, which allow it as a substrate to conduct a variety of chemical transformations. Here modified graphene oxide (MGO) was prepared using alkyl imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) (1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (LB104), 1-butyl-3-methyl imidazolium hexafluorophosphate (LP104) and 1-hexyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl) amide (LF106)) via epoxide ring-opening reaction, cation-π stacking or van der Waals interactions, with LB104 modified graphene (MG) exfoliated from graphite rod by a moderate electrochemical method as a comparison. The stability and tribological properties of MGO and MG as multialkylated cyclopentanes (MACs) additives were investigated in detail. The results show that GO is converted into graphene through the chemical modification using ILs, and MGO with good dispersion and stability in MACs significantly improves the tribological performance (friction and wear were reduced about 27% and 74% with pure MACs as a comparison, respectively). The excellent tribological properties are attributed to the formation of an ILs-containing graphene-rich tribofilm on the sliding surfaces, which as the third body can prevent the sliding surfaces from straight asperity contact and improve friction reducing and anti-wear behaviors. PMID:25935280

  5. A study of alternative metal particle structures and mixtures for dental amalgams based on mercury additions.

    PubMed

    Marquez, J A; Murr, L E; Agüero, V

    2000-08-01

    The perception that mercury in dental amalgam is toxic to the human organism has prompted worldwide efforts by the scientific community to develop alternative amalgam-like materials that utilize little or no mercury. In this investigation, an attempt is made to develop a new dental alloy system by adding liquid mercury to silver-coated Ag4Sn intermetallic particles in lesser amounts than are used in conventional amalgam alloys. An effort to precipitate the important eta-prime (Cu6Sn5) phase was made by adding pure Cu and Sn powders to the alloy formulation during trituration. Tytin a popular Ag-Sn-Cu single-composition, spray-atomized conventional dental alloy was used as the control to obtain baseline data for comparisons of microstructures and mechanical properties. Amalgamation of the coated particles with mercury, with or without the addition of Cu and Sn powders, mostly produced specimens with chemically non-coherent microstructures that were relatively weak in compression. These results were due, in part, to mercury's inability to chemically wet the Ag-coated particles and Cu and Sn powders because of naturally occurring surface oxide films. The strongest specimens tested had silver dendritic coatings, resulting in compression strength values up to 40% of the control's. Their higher strength is attributed to mechanical interlocking at the particle/matrix interfaces.

  6. Effects of Surface Modification Conditions on Hydrophobicity of Silica-based Coating Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Beth L; Pawel, Steven J; Hunter, Scott Robert; Haynes, James A; Hillesheim, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Superhydrophobic silica (SHS) powders are being evaluated as a potential additive to the polyurethane topcoats used in Chemical Agent Resistant Coating (CARC) systems, with the goal of improving water repellency and corrosion protection characteristics. The current generation of CARC topcoats is already highly loaded with solids, and thus there is a premium on minimization of the total SHS powder required to achieve the desired properties. Therefore, efficient surface modification of the silica and proper dispersion in the coating will be required. The effect of a dispersant on the surface modification of silica particles by chlorosilanes was addressed in this study. The properties of various SHS powders were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis and mass spectroscopy. Correlations between powder modification conditions and the ultimate effects of the modified particles on hydrophobicity of CARC topcoats were assessed. The use of contact and rolling angle measurements along with scanning electron microscopy are discussed as they pertain to the ability to quantify the effects of modified silicas on corrosion prevention coatings. Furthermore, a systematic approach to modifying and testing both powders and top coats of corrosion prevention systems is presented.

  7. Restructuring the introductory physics lab with the addition of computer-based laboratories.

    PubMed

    Pierri-Galvao, Monica

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays, data acquisition software and sensors are being widely used in introductory physics laboratories. This allows the student to spend more time exploring the data that is collected by the computer hence focusing more on the physical concept. Very often, a faculty is faced with the challenge of updating or introducing a microcomputer-based laboratory (MBL) at his or her institution. This article will provide a list of experiments and equipment needed to convert about half of the traditional labs on a 1-year introductory physics lab into MBLs.

  8. Nucleophilic lewis base dependent addition reactions of allenoates with trifluoromethylated cyclic ketimines.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li-Jun; Li, Shen; Wang, Shuai; Nie, Jing; Ma, Jun-An

    2014-04-18

    A detailed investigation on the different reactivity patterns shown by phosphorus- and nitrogen-containing Lewis base catalysts in the reactions of allenoates with cyclic trifluoromethyl ketimines was accomplished. With PPh3, [3 + 2] annulations proceeded smoothly to afford dihydropyrrole derivatives in excellent yields. Under the catalysis of DABCO, [2 + 2] annulations occurred, producing azetidine derivatives in good to high yields. However, in the presence of pyridine, α,α'-disubstituted allenoates were obtained in very high yields via aza-Morita-Baylis-Hillman reactions. These studies provide an opportunity for diverse synthesis of a variety of N-heterocyclic compounds from the same starting materials.

  9. Mechanics of additively manufactured porous biomaterials based on the rhombicuboctahedron unit cell.

    PubMed

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-01-01

    Thanks to recent developments in additive manufacturing techniques, it is now possible to fabricate porous biomaterials with arbitrarily complex micro-architectures. Micro-architectures of such biomaterials determine their physical and biological properties, meaning that one could potentially improve the performance of such biomaterials through rational design of micro-architecture. The relationship between the micro-architecture of porous biomaterials and their physical and biological properties has therefore received increasing attention recently. In this paper, we studied the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials made from a relatively unexplored unit cell, namely rhombicuboctahedron. We derived analytical relationships that relate the micro-architecture of such porous biomaterials, i.e. the dimensions of the rhombicuboctahedron unit cell, to their elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, and yield stress. Finite element models were also developed to validate the analytical solutions. Analytical and numerical results were compared with experimental data from one of our recent studies. It was found that analytical solutions and numerical results show a very good agreement particularly for smaller values of apparent density. The elastic moduli predicted by analytical and numerical models were in very good agreement with experimental observations too. While in excellent agreement with each other, analytical and numerical models somewhat over-predicted the yield stress of the porous structures as compared to experimental data. As the ratio of the vertical struts to the inclined struts, α, approaches zero and infinity, the rhombicuboctahedron unit cell respectively approaches the octahedron (or truncated cube) and cube unit cells. For those limits, the analytical solutions presented here were found to approach the analytic solutions obtained for the octahedron, truncated cube, and cube unit cells, meaning that the presented solutions are generalizations of the

  10. Tribotronic control of friction in oil-based lubricants with ionic liquid additives.

    PubMed

    Cooper, P K; Li, H; Rutland, M W; Webber, G B; Atkin, R

    2016-08-24

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that tribotronic control of friction using an external potential applied to a gold surface is possible for ionic liquid (IL) concentrations as low as 5 mol% in hexadecane. The IL used is trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium bis(2,4,4-trimethylpentyl)phosphinate, in which both the cation and anion have surfactant-like structures, and is miscible with hexadecane in all proportions. For IL concentrations less than 5 mol% friction does not vary with applied potential, but for 5 mol% and above changing the potential changes the composition of the IL boundary layer from cation-enriched (negative potentials) to anion-enriched (positive potentials). As the lubricities of the cation-rich and anion-rich boundary layers differ, this enables active control of friction in oil-based lubricants. PMID:27511143

  11. Composite materials based on high-modulus compounds for additive technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Kotelnikov, N.; Buyakova, S.; Kulkov, S.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of adding nanocrystalline ZrO2 and submicron TiC to ultrafine Al2O3 on mechanical properties and the microstructure of the composites developed by hot pressing was investigated. It was shown that by means of hot pressing in argon atmosphere at the sintering temperature of 1500 °C one can obtain the composites of Al2O3-ZrO2-TiC with a fine structure and minimal porosity. It was shown that in the material a multi-scale hierarchical structure is formed, which possesses high physical and mechanical properties: the hardness and fracture toughness was 22 GPa and 5.2 MPa*m1/2, respectively. It has been shown that mechanical properties of the composite are better than those of commercial composites based on aluminum oxide (Al2O3, ZTA, Al2O3-TiC) and are comparable to those of silicon nitride.

  12. Structure-property effects of tantalum additions to nickel-base superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heckel, R. W.; Pletka, B. J.; Koss, D. A.; Jackson, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    The characterization of the effect of Ta on the structure of Ni base superalloys, the determination of the effects of Ta (structure) variations on the mechanical, thermal, and oxidation behavior, and the identification of alloying elements which have potential as substitutes for Ta are investigated. Mar M247 type alloys are emphasized; nominal and analyzed compositions of ten alloys under study are given. X-ray and composition analysis are being used to determine the partitioning of alloying elements between gamma, gamma primes, and MC (cubic) as a function of Ta content. The diffusional interactions of the Mar M247-type alloys with as cast beta + gamma alloys are studied to determine the effects of Ta on alloy/coating degradation.

  13. Addition of visual noise boosts evoked potential-based brain-computer interface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jun; Xu, Guanghua; Wang, Jing; Zhang, Sicong; Zhang, Feng; Li, Yeping; Han, Chengcheng; Li, Lili

    2014-05-14

    Although noise has a proven beneficial role in brain functions, there have not been any attempts on the dedication of stochastic resonance effect in neural engineering applications, especially in researches of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). In our study, a steady-state motion visual evoked potential (SSMVEP)-based BCI with periodic visual stimulation plus moderate spatiotemporal noise can achieve better offline and online performance due to enhancement of periodic components in brain responses, which was accompanied by suppression of high harmonics. Offline results behaved with a bell-shaped resonance-like functionality and 7-36% online performance improvements can be achieved when identical visual noise was adopted for different stimulation frequencies. Using neural encoding modeling, these phenomena can be explained as noise-induced input-output synchronization in human sensory systems which commonly possess a low-pass property. Our work demonstrated that noise could boost BCIs in addressing human needs.

  14. A screening method based on UV-Visible spectroscopy and multivariate analysis to assess addition of filler juices and water to pomegranate juices.

    PubMed

    Boggia, Raffaella; Casolino, Maria Chiara; Hysenaj, Vilma; Oliveri, Paolo; Zunin, Paola

    2013-10-15

    Consumer demand for pomegranate juice has considerably grown, during the last years, for its potential health benefits. Since it is an expensive functional food, cheaper fruit juices addition (i.e., grape and apple juices) or its simple dilution, or polyphenols subtraction are deceptively used. At present, time-consuming analyses are used to control the quality of this product. Furthermore these analyses are expensive and require well-trained analysts. Thus, the purpose of this study was to propose a high-speed and easy-to-use shortcut. Based on UV-VIS spectroscopy and chemometrics, a screening method is proposed to quickly screening some common fillers of pomegranate juice that could decrease the antiradical scavenging capacity of pure products. The analytical method was applied to laboratory prepared juices, to commercial juices and to representative experimental mixtures at different levels of water and filler juices. The outcomes were evaluated by means of multivariate exploratory analysis. The results indicate that the proposed strategy can be a useful screening tool to assess addition of filler juices and water to pomegranate juices. PMID:23692760

  15. A method for predicting DCT-based denoising efficiency for grayscale images corrupted by AWGN and additive spatially correlated noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubel, Aleksey S.; Lukin, Vladimir V.; Egiazarian, Karen O.

    2015-03-01

    Results of denoising based on discrete cosine transform for a wide class of images corrupted by additive noise are obtained. Three types of noise are analyzed: additive white Gaussian noise and additive spatially correlated Gaussian noise with middle and high correlation levels. TID2013 image database and some additional images are taken as test images. Conventional DCT filter and BM3D are used as denoising techniques. Denoising efficiency is described by PSNR and PSNR-HVS-M metrics. Within hard-thresholding denoising mechanism, DCT-spectrum coefficient statistics are used to characterize images and, subsequently, denoising efficiency for them. Results of denoising efficiency are fitted for such statistics and efficient approximations are obtained. It is shown that the obtained approximations provide high accuracy of prediction of denoising efficiency.

  16. Ligand- and base-free Pd(II)-catalyzed controlled switching between oxidative Heck and conjugate addition reactions.

    PubMed

    Walker, Sarah E; Boehnke, Julian; Glen, Pauline E; Levey, Steven; Patrick, Lisa; Jordan-Hore, James A; Lee, Ai-Lan

    2013-04-19

    A simple change of solvent allows controlled and efficient switching between oxidative Heck and conjugate addition reactions on cyclic Michael acceptor substrates, catalyzed by a cationic Pd(II) catalyst system. Both reactions are ligand- and base-free and tolerant of air and moisture, and the controlled switching sheds light on some of the factors which favor one reaction over the other.

  17. Novel Evolutionary Lineages Revealed in the Chaetothyriales (Fungi) Based on Multigene Phylogenetic Analyses and Comparison of ITS Secondary Structure

    PubMed Central

    Réblová, Martina; Untereiner, Wendy A.; Réblová, Kamila

    2013-01-01

    Cyphellophora and Phialophora (Chaetothyriales, Pezizomycota) comprise species known from skin infections of humans and animals and from a variety of environmental sources. These fungi were studied based on the comparison of cultural and morphological features and phylogenetic analyses of five nuclear loci, i.e., internal transcribed spacer rDNA operon (ITS), large and small subunit nuclear ribosomal DNA (nuc28S rDNA, nuc18S rDNA), β-tubulin, DNA replication licensing factor (mcm7) and second largest subunit of RNA polymerase II (rpb2). Phylogenetic results were supported by comparative analysis of ITS1 and ITS2 secondary structure of representatives of the Chaetothyriales and the identification of substitutions among the taxa analyzed. Base pairs with non-conserved, co-evolving nucleotides that maintain base pairing in the RNA transcript and unique evolutionary motifs in the ITS2 that characterize whole clades or individual taxa were mapped on predicted secondary structure models. Morphological characteristics, structural data and phylogenetic analyses of three datasets, i.e., ITS, ITS-β-tubulin and 28S-18S-rpb2-mcm7, define a robust clade containing eight species of Cyphellophora (including the type) and six species of Phialophora. These taxa are now accommodated in the Cyphellophoraceae, a novel evolutionary lineage within the Chaetothyriales. Cyphellophora is emended and expanded to encompass species with both septate and nonseptate conidia formed on discrete, intercalary, terminal or lateral phialides. Six new combinations in Cyphellophora are proposed and a dichotomous key to species accepted in the genus is provided. Cyphellophora eugeniae and C. hylomeconis, which grouped in the Chaetothyriaceae, represent another novel lineage and are introduced as the type species of separate genera. PMID:23723988

  18. Sodium and phosphorus-based food additives: persistent but surmountable hurdles in the management of nutrition in chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M.

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and phosphorus-based food additives are among the most commonly consumed nutrients in the world. This is because both have diverse applications in processed food manufacturing, leading to their widespread utilization by the food industry. Since most foods are naturally low in salt, sodium additives almost completely account for the excessive consumption of sodium throughout the world. Similarly, phosphorus additives represent a major and “hidden” phosphorus load in modern diets. These factors pose a major barrier to successfully lowering sodium or phosphorus intake in patients with chronic kidney disease. As such, any serious effort to reduce sodium or phosphorus consumption will require reductions in the use of these additives by the food industry. The current regulatory environment governing the use of food additives does not favor this goal, however, in large part because these additives have historically been classified as generally safe for public consumption. To overcome these barriers, coordinated efforts will be needed to demonstrate that high intakes of these additives are not safe for public consumption and as such, should be subject to greater regulatory scrutiny. PMID:23439374

  19. Sodium- and phosphorus-based food additives: persistent but surmountable hurdles in the management of nutrition in chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Orlando M

    2013-03-01

    Sodium- and phosphorus-based food additives are among the most commonly consumed nutrients in the world. This is because both have diverse applications in processed food manufacturing, leading to their widespread use by the food industry. Since most foods are naturally low in salt, sodium additives almost completely account for the excessive consumption of sodium throughout the world. Similarly, phosphorus additives represent a major and "hidden" phosphorus load in modern diets. These factors pose a major barrier to successfully lowering sodium or phosphorus intake in patients with CKD. As such, any serious effort to reduce sodium or phosphorus consumption will require reductions in the use of these additives by the food industry. The current regulatory environment governing the use of food additives does not favor this goal, however, in large part because these additives have historically been classified as generally safe for public consumption. To overcome these barriers, coordinated efforts will be needed to demonstrate that high intake of these additives is not safe for public consumption and as such should be subject to greater regulatory scrutiny.

  20. Molecular Characterization and Variation of the Broad bean wilt virus 2 Isolates Based on Analyses of Complete Genome Sequences.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Ye-Ji; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2013-12-01

    The full-genome sequences of fourteen isolates of Broad bean wilt virus 2 (BBWV2), collected from broad bean, pea, spinach, bell pepper and paprika plants in Korea during the years 2006-2012, were determined and analyzed comparatively along with fifteen previously reported BBWV2 genome sequences. Sequence analyses showed that RNA-1 and RNA-2 sequences of BBWV2 Korean isolates consisted of 5950-5956 and 3568-3604 nucleotides, respectively. Full-length genome sequence-based phylogenetic analyses revealed that the BBWV2 Korean isolates could be divided into three major groups comprising GS-I (isolates BB2 and RP7) along with isolate IP, GS-II (isolates BB5, P2, P3 and RP3) along with isolate B935, and GS-III including 16 BBWV2 Korean isolates. Interestingly, GS-III appears to be newly emerged and predominant in Korea. Recombination analyses identified two recombination events in the analyzed BBWV2 population: one in the RNA-1 of isolate K and another one in the RNA-2 of isolate XJ14-3. However, no recombination events were detected in the other 21 Korean isolates. On the other hand, out of 29 BBWV2 isolates, 16 isolates were found to be reassortants, of which each RNA segment (i.e. RNA1 and RNA2) was originated from different parental isolates. Our findings suggested that reassortment rather than recombination is a major evolutionary force in the genetic diversification of BBWV population in Korea. PMID:25288968

  1. Fiber-based solid phase microextraction using fused silica lined bottles to collect, store, and stabilize a multianalyte headspace gas sample for offline analyses.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Chris A; Carter, J Chance; Ertel, John R; Alviso, Cindy T; Chinn, Sarah C; Maxwell, Robert S

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a solid phase microextraction (SPME) sampling method using fused silica lined bottles (400 ml) to collect, store, and stabilize a headspace subsample from the source for subsequent offline, repetitive analyses of the gas using fiber-based SPME. The method enables long-term stability for repeated offline analysis of the organic species collected from the source headspace and retains all the advantages of fiber SPME sampling (e.g. rapid extraction, solvent free, simple and inexpensive) while providing additional advantages. Typically, the analytes collected on the SPME fiber must be desorbed and analyzed immediately to mitigate analyte loss or contamination. The new SPME sampling method, conducted offline using carboxen/polydimethylsiloxane (carboxen/PDMS - 85 μm) coated fibers, has been shown to be identical to in situ SPME sampling of a headspace acquired from an 80 component organic matrix with reproducibility demonstrated to be less than %RSD=7.0% for replicate samples measured over a 30-day period. In addition, repetitive samplings from one headspace aliquot are possible using one or more fibers and fiber types as well as quantitative options such as internal standard addition as demonstrated in a feasibility study using a benzene/toluene/xylene (BTX; 1 ppmv) certified gas standard, in which the SPME measurement precision (%RSD) was improved by a factor of 1.5-1.9 compared to the use of an external standard.

  2. Evaluation of Laser Based Alignment Algorithms Under Additive Random and Diffraction Noise

    SciTech Connect

    McClay, W A; Awwal, A; Wilhelmsen, K; Ferguson, W; McGee, M; Miller, M

    2004-09-30

    The purpose of the automatic alignment algorithm at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is to determine the position of a laser beam based on the position of beam features from video images. The position information obtained is used to command motors and attenuators to adjust the beam lines to the desired position, which facilitates the alignment of all 192 beams. One of the goals of the algorithm development effort is to ascertain the performance, reliability, and uncertainty of the position measurement. This paper describes a method of evaluating the performance of algorithms using Monte Carlo simulation. In particular we show the application of this technique to the LM1{_}LM3 algorithm, which determines the position of a series of two beam light sources. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated for an ensemble of over 900 simulated images with varying image intensities and noise counts, as well as varying diffraction noise amplitude and frequency. The performance of the algorithm on the image data set had a tolerance well beneath the 0.5-pixel system requirement.

  3. Detection of intestinal parasites by use of the cuvette-based automated microscopy analyser sediMAX(®).

    PubMed

    Intra, J; Taverna, E; Sala, M R; Falbo, R; Cappellini, F; Brambilla, P

    2016-03-01

    Microscopy is the reference method for intestinal parasite identification. The cuvette-based automated microscopy analyser, sediMAX 1, provides 15 digital images of each sediment sample. In this study, we have evaluated this fully automated instrument for detection of enteric parasites, helminths and protozoa. A total of 700 consecutively preserved samples consisting of 60 positive samples (50 protozoa, ten helminths) and 640 negative samples were analysed. Operators were blinded to each others' results. Samples were randomized and were tested both by manual microscopy and sediMAX 1 for parasite recognition. The sediMAX 1 analysis was conducted using a dilution of faecal samples, allowing determination of morphology. The data obtained using sediMAX 1 showed a specificity of 100% and a sensitivity of 100%. Some species of helminths, such as Enterobius vermicularis, Strongyloides stercolaris, the Ancylostoma duodenale/Necator americanus complex, and schistosomes were not considered in this work, because they are rare in stool specimens, are not easily detectable with microscopy analysis, and require specific recovery techniques. This study demonstrated for the first time that sediMAX 1 can be an aid in enteric parasite identification.

  4. An Evaluation Quality Framework for Analysing School-Based Learning (SBL) to Work-Based Learning (WBL) Transition Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alseddiqi, M.; Mishra, R.; Pislaru, C.

    2012-05-01

    The paper presents the results from a quality framework to measure the effectiveness of a new engineering course entitled 'school-based learning (SBL) to work-based learning (WBL) transition module' in the Technical and Vocational Education (TVE) system in Bahrain. The framework is an extended version of existing information quality frameworks with respect to pedagogical and technological contexts. It incorporates specific pedagogical and technological dimensions as per the Bahrain modern industry requirements. Users' views questionnaire on the effectiveness of the new transition module was distributed to various stakeholders including TVE teachers and students. The aim was to receive critical information in diagnosing, monitoring and evaluating different views and perceptions about the effectiveness of the new module. The analysis categorised the quality dimensions by their relative importance. This was carried out using the principal component analysis available in SPSS. The analysis clearly identified the most important quality dimensions integrated in the new module for SBL-to-WBL transition. It was also apparent that the new module contains workplace proficiencies, prepares TVE students for work placement, provides effective teaching and learning methodologies, integrates innovative technology in the process of learning, meets modern industrial needs, and presents a cooperative learning environment for TVE students. From the principal component analysis finding, to calculate the percentage of relative importance of each factor and its quality dimensions, was significant. The percentage comparison would justify the most important factor as well as the most important quality dimensions. Also, the new, re-arranged quality dimensions from the finding with an extended number of factors tended to improve the extended version of the quality information framework to a revised quality framework.

  5. Alcohol based-deep eutectic solvent (DES) as an alternative green additive to increase rotenone yield

    SciTech Connect

    Othman, Zetty Shafiqa; Hassan, Nur Hasyareeda; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2015-09-25

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are basically molten salts that interact by forming hydrogen bonds between two added components at a ratio where eutectic point reaches a melting point lower than that of each individual component. Their remarkable physicochemical properties (similar to ionic liquids) with remarkable green properties, low cost and easy handling make them a growing interest in many fields of research. Therefore, the objective of pursuing this study is to analyze the potential of alcohol-based DES as an extraction medium for rotenone extraction from Derris elliptica roots. DES was prepared by a combination of choline chloride, ChCl and 1, 4-butanediol at a ratio of 1/5. The structure of elucidation of DES was analyzed using FTIR, {sup 1}H-NMR and {sup 13}C-NMR. Normal soaking extraction (NSE) method was carried out for 14 hours using seven different types of solvent systems of (1) acetone; (2) methanol; (3) acetonitrile; (4) DES; (5) DES + methanol; (6) DES + acetonitrile; and (7) [BMIM] OTf + acetone. Next, the yield of rotenone, % (w/w), and its concentration (mg/ml) in dried roots were quantitatively determined by means of RP-HPLC. The results showed that a binary solvent system of [BMIM] OTf + acetone and DES + acetonitrile was the best solvent system combination as compared to other solvent systems. It contributed to the highest rotenone content of 0.84 ± 0.05% (w/w) (1.09 ± 0.06 mg/ml) and 0.84 ± 0.02% (w/w) (1.03 ± 0.01 mg/ml) after 14 hours of exhaustive extraction time. In conclusion, a combination of the DES with a selective organic solvent has been proven to have a similar potential and efficiency as of ILs in extracting bioactive constituents in the phytochemical extraction process.

  6. Alcohol based-deep eutectic solvent (DES) as an alternative green additive to increase rotenone yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Zetty Shafiqa; Hassan, Nur Hasyareeda; Zubairi, Saiful Irwan

    2015-09-01

    Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) are basically molten salts that interact by forming hydrogen bonds between two added components at a ratio where eutectic point reaches a melting point lower than that of each individual component. Their remarkable physicochemical properties (similar to ionic liquids) with remarkable green properties, low cost and easy handling make them a growing interest in many fields of research. Therefore, the objective of pursuing this study is to analyze the potential of alcohol-based DES as an extraction medium for rotenone extraction from Derris elliptica roots. DES was prepared by a combination of choline chloride, ChCl and 1, 4-butanediol at a ratio of 1/5. The structure of elucidation of DES was analyzed using FTIR, 1H-NMR and 13C-NMR. Normal soaking extraction (NSE) method was carried out for 14 hours using seven different types of solvent systems of (1) acetone; (2) methanol; (3) acetonitrile; (4) DES; (5) DES + methanol; (6) DES + acetonitrile; and (7) [BMIM] OTf + acetone. Next, the yield of rotenone, % (w/w), and its concentration (mg/ml) in dried roots were quantitatively determined by means of RP-HPLC. The results showed that a binary solvent system of [BMIM] OTf + acetone and DES + acetonitrile was the best solvent system combination as compared to other solvent systems. It contributed to the highest rotenone content of 0.84 ± 0.05% (w/w) (1.09 ± 0.06 mg/ml) and 0.84 ± 0.02% (w/w) (1.03 ± 0.01 mg/ml) after 14 hours of exhaustive extraction time. In conclusion, a combination of the DES with a selective organic solvent has been proven to have a similar potential and efficiency as of ILs in extracting bioactive constituents in the phytochemical extraction process.

  7. A review on powder-based additive manufacturing for tissue engineering: selective laser sintering and inkjet 3D printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid Seyed Shirazi, Seyed; Gharehkhani, Samira; Mehrali, Mehdi; Yarmand, Hooman; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Adib Kadri, Nahrizul; Azuan Abu Osman, Noor

    2015-06-01

    Since most starting materials for tissue engineering are in powder form, using powder-based additive manufacturing methods is attractive and practical. The principal point of employing additive manufacturing (AM) systems is to fabricate parts with arbitrary geometrical complexity with relatively minimal tooling cost and time. Selective laser sintering (SLS) and inkjet 3D printing (3DP) are two powerful and versatile AM techniques which are applicable to powder-based material systems. Hence, the latest state of knowledge available on the use of AM powder-based techniques in tissue engineering and their effect on mechanical and biological properties of fabricated tissues and scaffolds must be updated. Determining the effective setup of parameters, developing improved biocompatible/bioactive materials, and improving the mechanical/biological properties of laser sintered and 3D printed tissues are the three main concerns which have been investigated in this article.

  8. Alignment analyses of a galvanometer-based scanner in free-space Fourier domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qun; Zhu, Dan; Gao, Zhishan

    2015-11-10

    Free-space Fourier domain optical coherence tomography is adopted for biomedical imaging with ultrahigh resolution, in which the setup consists of an interferometer and a spectrometer. Two-dimensional lateral sampling in the sample arm of the interferometer is achieved by using a galvanometer-based scanner. Optical path difference (OPD) drift in the full scan field of view is observed in the assembly process of the scanner. A galvo mirror mount offset with respect to the rotation axis is demonstrated as the derivation of this OPD drift by both geometric analyses and model building. Then, an iterative assembly process of the scanner is proposed with the OPD drift taken as the alignment criteria.

  9. The first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of Bryozoa (Ectoprocta) based on combined analyses of nuclear and mitochondrial genes.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Judith; Obst, Matthias; Sundberg, Per

    2009-07-01

    Bryozoa is one of the most puzzling phyla in the animal kingdom and little is known about their evolutionary history. Its phylogenetic position among the Metazoa remains unsettled, as well as its intra-phylum relationships. Here, we present the first comprehensive molecular phylogeny of Bryozoa based on the mitochondrial gene COI and two nuclear genes 18S rDNA and 28S rDNA including 32 species from 23 families. We show that the monophyletic status is supported for the phylum as well as for previously defined bryozoan classes. The 28S rDNA supports a close relationship of Phylactolaemata and Stenolaemata, while partial COI and 18S rDNA show the freshwater Phylactolaemata as basal bryozoans. The Gymnolaemata have generally been divided into soft-bodied forms (Ctenostomata) and hard-bodied species (Cheilostomata). In our analyses all three genes conflict with this assumption and show hard body forms having evolved within Gymnolaemata several times.

  10. Alignment analyses of a galvanometer-based scanner in free-space Fourier domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Qun; Zhu, Dan; Gao, Zhishan

    2015-11-10

    Free-space Fourier domain optical coherence tomography is adopted for biomedical imaging with ultrahigh resolution, in which the setup consists of an interferometer and a spectrometer. Two-dimensional lateral sampling in the sample arm of the interferometer is achieved by using a galvanometer-based scanner. Optical path difference (OPD) drift in the full scan field of view is observed in the assembly process of the scanner. A galvo mirror mount offset with respect to the rotation axis is demonstrated as the derivation of this OPD drift by both geometric analyses and model building. Then, an iterative assembly process of the scanner is proposed with the OPD drift taken as the alignment criteria. PMID:26560786

  11. Ongoing Analyses of Rocket Based Combined Cycle Engines by the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; Holt, James B.; Canabal, Francisco

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the status of analyses on three Rocket Based Combined Cycle (RBCC) configurations underway in the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group (TD64). TD64 is performing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis on a Penn State RBCC test rig, the proposed Draco axisymmetric RBCC engine and the Trailblazer engine. The intent of the analysis on the Penn State test rig is to benchmark the Finite Difference Navier Stokes (FDNS) code for ejector mode fluid dynamics. The Draco analysis was a trade study to determine the ejector mode performance as a function of three engine design variables. The Trailblazer analysis is to evaluate the nozzle performance in scramjet mode. Results to date of each analysis are presented.

  12. JChainsAnalyser: an ImageJ-based stand-alone application for the study of magneto-rheological fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-García, P.; Rubio, M. A.

    2009-10-01

    JChainsAnalyser is a Java-based program for the analysis of two-dimensional images of magneto-rheological fluids (MRF) at low concentration of particles obtained using the video-microscopy technique. MRF are colloidal dispersions of micron-sized polarizable particles in a carrier fluid with medium to low viscosity. When a magnetic field is applied to the suspension, the particles aggregate forming chains or clusters. Aggregation dynamics [P. Domínguez-García, S. Melle, J.M. Pastor, M.A. Rubio, Phys. Rev. E 76 (2007) 051403] and morphology of the aggregates [P. Domínguez-García, S. Melle, M.A. Rubio, J. Colloid Interface Sci. 333 (2009) 221-229] have been studied capturing images of the fluid and analyzing them by using this software. The program allows to analyze automatically the MRF images by means of an adequate combination of different imaging methods, while magnitudes and statistics are calculated and saved in data files. It is possible to run the program on a desktop computer, using the GUI (graphical user interface), or in a cluster of processors or remote computer by means of command-line instructions. Program summaryProgram title: JChainsAnalyser Catalogue identifier: AEDT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEDT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 79 071 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 4 367 909 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Java 2 Computer: Any computer with Java Runtime Environment (JRE) installed Operating system: Any OS with Java Runtime Environment (JRE) installed RAM: Typically, 3.3 MB Classification: 23 External routines: ImageJ, ij-imageIO, jdom, L2FProd Nature of problem: The video-microscopy technique usually produces quite a big quantity of images to analyze

  13. Large-scale Manufacturing of Nanoparticulate-based Lubrication Additives for Improved Energy Efficiency and Reduced Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, Ali

    2013-09-26

    This project was funded under the Department of Energy (DOE) Lab Call on Nanomanufacturing for Energy Efficiency and was directed toward the development of novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives for improving the friction and wear performance of machine components in a wide range of industrial and transportation applications. Argonne's research team concentrated on the scientific and technical aspects of the project, using a range of state-of-the art analytical and tribological test facilities. Argonne has extensive past experience and expertise in working with boron-based solid and liquid lubrication additives, and has intellectual property ownership of several. There were two industrial collaborators in this project: Ashland Oil (represented by its Valvoline subsidiary) and Primet Precision Materials, Inc. (a leading nanomaterials company). There was also a sub-contract with the University of Arkansas. The major objectives of the project were to develop novel boron-based nanocolloidal lubrication additives and to optimize and verify their performance under boundary-lubricated sliding conditions. The project also tackled problems related to colloidal dispersion, larger-scale manufacturing and blending of nano-additives with base carrier oils. Other important issues dealt with in the project were determination of the optimum size and concentration of the particles and compatibility with various base fluids and/or additives. Boron-based particulate additives considered in this project included boric acid (H{sub 3}BO{sub 3}), hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN), boron oxide, and borax. As part of this project, we also explored a hybrid MoS{sub 2} + boric acid formulation approach for more effective lubrication and reported the results. The major motivation behind this work was to reduce energy losses related to friction and wear in a wide spectrum of mechanical systems and thereby reduce our dependence on imported oil. Growing concern over greenhouse gas

  14. CT-Based Attenuation Correction in Brain SPECT/CT Can Improve the Lesion Detectability of Voxel-Based Statistical Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Hiroki; Shimosegawa, Eku; Fujino, Koichi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background Integrated SPECT/CT enables non-uniform attenuation correction (AC) using built-in CT instead of the conventional uniform AC. The effect of CT-based AC on voxel-based statistical analyses of brain SPECT findings has not yet been clarified. Here, we assessed differences in the detectability of regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) reduction using SPECT voxel-based statistical analyses based on the two types of AC methods. Subjects and Methods N-isopropyl-p-[123I]iodoamphetamine (IMP) CBF SPECT images were acquired for all the subjects and were reconstructed using 3D-OSEM with two different AC methods: Chang’s method (Chang’s AC) and the CT-based AC method. A normal database was constructed for the analysis using SPECT findings obtained for 25 healthy normal volunteers. Voxel-based Z-statistics were also calculated for SPECT findings obtained for 15 patients with chronic cerebral infarctions and 10 normal subjects. We assumed that an analysis with a higher specificity would likely produce a lower mean absolute Z-score for normal brain tissue, and a more sensitive voxel-based statistical analysis would likely produce a higher absolute Z-score for in old infarct lesions, where the CBF was severely decreased. Results The inter-subject variation in the voxel values in the normal database was lower using CT-based AC, compared with Chang’s AC, for most of the brain regions. The absolute Z-score indicating a SPECT count reduction in infarct lesions was also significantly higher in the images reconstructed using CT-based AC, compared with Chang’s AC (P = 0.003). The mean absolute value of the Z-score in the 10 intact brains was significantly lower in the images reconstructed using CT-based AC than in those reconstructed using Chang’s AC (P = 0.005). Conclusions Non-uniform CT-based AC by integrated SPECT/CT significantly improved sensitivity and the specificity of the voxel-based statistical analyses for regional SPECT count reductions, compared with

  15. Core-structure-inspired asymmetric addition reactions: enantioselective synthesis of dihydrobenzoxazinone- and dihydroquinazolinone-based anti-HIV agents.

    PubMed

    Li, Shen; Ma, Jun-An

    2015-11-01

    Dihydrobenzoxazinones and dihydroquinazolinones are the core units present in many anti-HIV agents, such as Efavirenz, DPC 961, DPC 963, and DPC 083. All these molecules contain a trifluoromethyl moiety at the quaternary stereogenic carbon center with S configuration. The enantioselective addition of carbon nucleophiles to ketones or cyclic ketimines could serve as a key step to access these molecules. This tutorial review provides an overview of significant advances in the synthesis of dihydrobenzoxazinone- and dihydroquinazolinone-based anti-HIV agents and relative analogues, with an emphasis on asymmetric addition reactions for the establishment of the CF3-containing quaternary carbon centers.

  16. Nontargeted Screening Method for Illegal Additives Based on Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography-High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanqing; Zhou, Zhihui; Kong, Hongwei; Lu, Xin; Zhao, Xinjie; Chen, Yihui; Chen, Jia; Wu, Zeming; Xu, Zhiliang; Zhao, Chunxia; Xu, Guowang

    2016-09-01

    Identification of illegal additives in complex matrixes is important in the food safety field. In this study a nontargeted screening strategy was developed to find illegal additives based on ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). First, an analytical method for possible illegal additives in complex matrixes was established including fast sample pretreatment, accurate UHPLC separation, and HRMS detection. Second, efficient data processing and differential analysis workflow were suggested and applied to find potential risk compounds. Third, structure elucidation of risk compounds was performed by (1) searching online databases [Metlin and the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB)] and an in-house database which was established at the above-defined conditions of UHPLC-HRMS analysis and contains information on retention time, mass spectra (MS), and tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) of 475 illegal additives, (2) analyzing fragment ions, and (3) referring to fragmentation rules. Fish was taken as an example to show the usefulness of the nontargeted screening strategy, and six additives were found in suspected fish samples. Quantitative analysis was further carried out to determine the contents of these compounds. The satisfactory application of this strategy in fish samples means that it can also be used in the screening of illegal additives in other kinds of food samples.

  17. Nontargeted Screening Method for Illegal Additives Based on Ultrahigh-Performance Liquid Chromatography-High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yanqing; Zhou, Zhihui; Kong, Hongwei; Lu, Xin; Zhao, Xinjie; Chen, Yihui; Chen, Jia; Wu, Zeming; Xu, Zhiliang; Zhao, Chunxia; Xu, Guowang

    2016-09-01

    Identification of illegal additives in complex matrixes is important in the food safety field. In this study a nontargeted screening strategy was developed to find illegal additives based on ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-HRMS). First, an analytical method for possible illegal additives in complex matrixes was established including fast sample pretreatment, accurate UHPLC separation, and HRMS detection. Second, efficient data processing and differential analysis workflow were suggested and applied to find potential risk compounds. Third, structure elucidation of risk compounds was performed by (1) searching online databases [Metlin and the Human Metabolome Database (HMDB)] and an in-house database which was established at the above-defined conditions of UHPLC-HRMS analysis and contains information on retention time, mass spectra (MS), and tandem mass spectra (MS/MS) of 475 illegal additives, (2) analyzing fragment ions, and (3) referring to fragmentation rules. Fish was taken as an example to show the usefulness of the nontargeted screening strategy, and six additives were found in suspected fish samples. Quantitative analysis was further carried out to determine the contents of these compounds. The satisfactory application of this strategy in fish samples means that it can also be used in the screening of illegal additives in other kinds of food samples. PMID:27480407

  18. Addition of docetaxel or bisphosphonates to standard of care in men with localised or metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analyses of aggregate data

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Claire L; Burdett, Sarah; Rydzewska, Larysa H M; Albiges, Laurence; Clarke, Noel W; Fisher, David; Fizazi, Karim; Gravis, Gwenaelle; James, Nicholas D; Mason, Malcolm D; Parmar, Mahesh K B; Sweeney, Christopher J; Sydes, Matthew R; Tombal, Bertrand; Tierney, Jayne F

    2016-01-01

    docetaxel for men with locally advanced disease (M0). Survival results from three (GETUG-12, RTOG 0521, STAMPEDE) of these trials (2121 [53%] of 3978 men) showed no evidence of a benefit from the addition of docetaxel (HR 0·87 [95% CI 0·69–1·09]; p=0·218), whereas failure-free survival data from four (GETUG-12, RTOG 0521, STAMPEDE, TAX 3501) of these trials (2348 [59%] of 3978 men) showed that docetaxel improved failure-free survival (0·70 [0·61–0·81]; p<0·0001), which translates into a reduced absolute 4-year failure rate of 8% (5–10). We identified seven eligible randomised controlled trials of bisphosphonates for men with M1 disease. Survival results from three of these trials (2740 [88%] of 3109 men) showed that addition of bisphosphonates improved survival (0·88 [0·79–0·98]; p=0·025), which translates to 5% (1–8) absolute improvement, but this result was influenced by the positive result of one trial of sodium clodronate, and we found no evidence of a benefit from the addition of zoledronic acid (0·94 [0·83–1·07]; p=0·323), which translates to an absolute improvement in survival of 2% (−3 to 7). Of 17 trials of bisphosphonates for men with M0 disease, survival results from four trials (4079 [66%] of 6220 men) showed no evidence of benefit from the addition of bisphosphonates (1·03 [0·89–1·18]; p=0·724) or zoledronic acid (0·98 [0·82–1·16]; p=0·782). Failure-free survival definitions were too inconsistent for formal meta-analyses for the bisphosphonate trials. Interpretation The addition of docetaxel to standard of care should be considered standard care for men with M1 hormone-sensitive prostate cancer who are starting treatment for the first time. More evidence on the effects of docetaxel on survival is needed in the M0 disease setting. No evidence exists to suggest that zoledronic acid improves survival in men with

  19. Addition of docetaxel or bisphosphonates to standard of care in men with localised or metastatic, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer: a systematic review and meta-analyses of aggregate data

    PubMed Central

    Vale, Claire L; Burdett, Sarah; Rydzewska, Larysa H M; Albiges, Laurence; Clarke, Noel W; Fisher, David; Fizazi, Karim; Gravis, Gwenaelle; James, Nicholas D; Mason, Malcolm D; Parmar, Mahesh K B; Sweeney, Christopher J; Sydes, Matthew R; Tombal, Bertrand; Tierney, Jayne F

    2016-01-01

    docetaxel for men with locally advanced disease (M0). Survival results from three (GETUG-12, RTOG 0521, STAMPEDE) of these trials (2121 [53%] of 3978 men) showed no evidence of a benefit from the addition of docetaxel (HR 0·87 [95% CI 0·69–1·09]; p=0·218), whereas failure-free survival data from four (GETUG-12, RTOG 0521, STAMPEDE, TAX 3501) of these trials (2348 [59%] of 3978 men) showed that docetaxel improved failure-free survival (0·70 [0·61–0·81]; p<0·0001), which translates into a reduced absolute 4-year failure rate of 8% (5–10). We identified seven eligible randomised controlled trials of bisphosphonates for men with M1 disease. Survival results from three of these trials (2740 [88%] of 3109 men) showed that addition of bisphosphonates improved survival (0·88 [0·79–0·98]; p=0·025), which translates to 5% (1–8) absolute improvement, but this result was influenced by the positive result of one trial of sodium clodronate, and we found no evidence of a benefit from the addition of zoledronic acid (0·94 [0·83–1·07]; p=0·323), which translates to an absolute improvement in survival of 2% (−3 to 7). Of 17 trials of bisphosphonates for men with M0 disease, survival results from four trials (4079 [66%] of 6220 men) showed no evidence of benefit from the addition of bisphosphonates (1·03 [0·89–1·18]; p=0·724) or zoledronic acid (0·98 [0·82–1·16]; p=0·782). Failure-free survival definitions were too inconsistent for formal meta-analyses for the bisphosphonate trials. Interpretation The addition of docetaxel to standard of care should be considered standard care for men with M1 hormone-sensitive prostate cancer who are starting treatment for the first time. More evidence on the effects of docetaxel on survival is needed in the M0 disease setting. No evidence exists to suggest that zoledronic acid improves survival in men with M1 or M0 disease, and any potential benefit is probably small. Funding Medical Research Council UK. PMID

  20. [High Throughput Screening Analysis of Preservatives and Sweeteners in Carbonated Beverages Based on Improved Standard Addition Method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Su-fang; Liu, Yun; Gong, Li-hua; Dong, Chun-hong; Fu, De-xue; Wang, Guo-qing

    2016-02-01

    Simulated water samples of 3 kinds of preservatives and 4 kinds of sweeteners were formulated by using orthogonal design. Kernel independent component analysis (KICA) was used to process the UV spectra of the simulated water samples and the beverages added different amounts of the additive standards, then the independent components (ICs), i. e. the UV spectral profiles of the additives, and the ICs' coefficient matrices were used to establish UV-KICA-SVR prediction model of the simulated preservatives and sweeteners solutions using support vector regression (SVR) analysis. The standards added beverages samples were obtained by adding different amounts level of additives in carbonated beverages, their UV spectra were processed by KICA, then IC information represented to the additives and other sample matrix were obtained, and the sample background can be deducted by removing the corresponding IC, other ICs' coefficient matrices were used to estimate the amounts of the additives in the standard added beverage samples based on the UV-KICA-SVR model, while the intercept of linear regression equation of predicted amounts and the added amounts in the standard added samples is the additive content in the raw beverage sample. By utilization of chemometric "blind source separation" method for extracting IC information of the tested additives in the beverage and other sample matrix, and using SVR regression modeling to improve the traditional standard addition method, a new method was proposed for the screening of the preservatives and sweeteners in carbonated beverages. The proposed UV-KICA-SVR method can be used to determine 3 kinds of preservatives and 4 kinds of sweetener in the carbonate beverages with the limit of detection (LOD) are located with the range 0.2-1.0 mg · L⁻¹, which are comparable to that of the traditional high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method. PMID:27209754

  1. [High Throughput Screening Analysis of Preservatives and Sweeteners in Carbonated Beverages Based on Improved Standard Addition Method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Su-fang; Liu, Yun; Gong, Li-hua; Dong, Chun-hong; Fu, De-xue; Wang, Guo-qing

    2016-02-01

    Simulated water samples of 3 kinds of preservatives and 4 kinds of sweeteners were formulated by using orthogonal design. Kernel independent component analysis (KICA) was used to process the UV spectra of the simulated water samples and the beverages added different amounts of the additive standards, then the independent components (ICs), i. e. the UV spectral profiles of the additives, and the ICs' coefficient matrices were used to establish UV-KICA-SVR prediction model of the simulated preservatives and sweeteners solutions using support vector regression (SVR) analysis. The standards added beverages samples were obtained by adding different amounts level of additives in carbonated beverages, their UV spectra were processed by KICA, then IC information represented to the additives and other sample matrix were obtained, and the sample background can be deducted by removing the corresponding IC, other ICs' coefficient matrices were used to estimate the amounts of the additives in the standard added beverage samples based on the UV-KICA-SVR model, while the intercept of linear regression equation of predicted amounts and the added amounts in the standard added samples is the additive content in the raw beverage sample. By utilization of chemometric "blind source separation" method for extracting IC information of the tested additives in the beverage and other sample matrix, and using SVR regression modeling to improve the traditional standard addition method, a new method was proposed for the screening of the preservatives and sweeteners in carbonated beverages. The proposed UV-KICA-SVR method can be used to determine 3 kinds of preservatives and 4 kinds of sweetener in the carbonate beverages with the limit of detection (LOD) are located with the range 0.2-1.0 mg · L⁻¹, which are comparable to that of the traditional high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method.

  2. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoplatelets with Excellent Tribological Properties under High Contact Pressure as Water-Based Lubricant Additives

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongdong; Liu, Yuhong; Chen, Zhe; Wu, Bibo; Xu, Sailong; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    High efficient and sustainable utilization of water-based lubricant is essential for saving energy. In this paper, a kind of layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplatelets is synthesized and well dispersed in water due to the surface modification with oleylamine. The excellent tribological properties of the oleylamine-modified Ni-Al LDH (NiAl-LDH/OAm) nanoplatelets as water-based lubricant additives are evaluated by the tribological tests in an aqueous environment. The modified LDH nanoplatelets are found to not only reduce the friction but also enhance the wear resistance, compared with the water-based cutting fluid and lubricants containing other particle additives. By adding 0.5 wt% LDH nanoplatelets, under 1.5 GPa initial contact pressure, the friction coefficient, scar diameter, depth and width of the wear track dramatically decrease by 83.1%, 43.2%, 88.5% and 59.5%, respectively. It is considered that the sufficiently small size and the excellent dispersion of NiAl-LDH/OAm nanoplatelets in water are the key factors, so as to make them enter the contact area, form a lubricating film and prevent direct collision of asperity peaks. Our investigations demonstrate that the LDH nanoplatelet as a water-based lubricant additive has a great potential value in industrial application. PMID:26951794

  3. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoplatelets with Excellent Tribological Properties under High Contact Pressure as Water-Based Lubricant Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongdong; Liu, Yuhong; Chen, Zhe; Wu, Bibo; Xu, Sailong; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-03-01

    High efficient and sustainable utilization of water-based lubricant is essential for saving energy. In this paper, a kind of layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplatelets is synthesized and well dispersed in water due to the surface modification with oleylamine. The excellent tribological properties of the oleylamine-modified Ni-Al LDH (NiAl-LDH/OAm) nanoplatelets as water-based lubricant additives are evaluated by the tribological tests in an aqueous environment. The modified LDH nanoplatelets are found to not only reduce the friction but also enhance the wear resistance, compared with the water-based cutting fluid and lubricants containing other particle additives. By adding 0.5 wt% LDH nanoplatelets, under 1.5 GPa initial contact pressure, the friction coefficient, scar diameter, depth and width of the wear track dramatically decrease by 83.1%, 43.2%, 88.5% and 59.5%, respectively. It is considered that the sufficiently small size and the excellent dispersion of NiAl-LDH/OAm nanoplatelets in water are the key factors, so as to make them enter the contact area, form a lubricating film and prevent direct collision of asperity peaks. Our investigations demonstrate that the LDH nanoplatelet as a water-based lubricant additive has a great potential value in industrial application.

  4. Layered Double Hydroxide Nanoplatelets with Excellent Tribological Properties under High Contact Pressure as Water-Based Lubricant Additives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongdong; Liu, Yuhong; Chen, Zhe; Wu, Bibo; Xu, Sailong; Luo, Jianbin

    2016-01-01

    High efficient and sustainable utilization of water-based lubricant is essential for saving energy. In this paper, a kind of layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanoplatelets is synthesized and well dispersed in water due to the surface modification with oleylamine. The excellent tribological properties of the oleylamine-modified Ni-Al LDH (NiAl-LDH/OAm) nanoplatelets as water-based lubricant additives are evaluated by the tribological tests in an aqueous environment. The modified LDH nanoplatelets are found to not only reduce the friction but also enhance the wear resistance, compared with the water-based cutting fluid and lubricants containing other particle additives. By adding 0.5 wt% LDH nanoplatelets, under 1.5 GPa initial contact pressure, the friction coefficient, scar diameter, depth and width of the wear track dramatically decrease by 83.1%, 43.2%, 88.5% and 59.5%, respectively. It is considered that the sufficiently small size and the excellent dispersion of NiAl-LDH/OAm nanoplatelets in water are the key factors, so as to make them enter the contact area, form a lubricating film and prevent direct collision of asperity peaks. Our investigations demonstrate that the LDH nanoplatelet as a water-based lubricant additive has a great potential value in industrial application. PMID:26951794

  5. Mortality and long-term exposure to ambient air pollution: ongoing analyses based on the American Cancer Society cohort.

    PubMed

    Krewski, Daniel; Burnett, Richard; Jerrett, Michael; Pope, C Arden; Rainham, Daniel; Calle, Eugenia; Thurston, George; Thun, Michael

    This article provides an overview of previous analysis and reanalysis of the American Cancer Society (ACS) cohort, along with an indication of current ongoing analyses of the cohort with additional follow-up information through to 2000. Results of the first analysis conducted by Pope et al. (1995) showed that higher average sulfate levels were associated with increased mortality, particularly from cardiopulmonary disease. A reanalysis of the ACS cohort, undertaken by Krewski et al. (2000), found the original risk estimates for fine-particle and sulfate air pollution to be highly robust against alternative statistical techniques and spatial modeling approaches. A detailed investigation of covariate effects found a significant modifying effect of education with risk of mortality associated with fine particles declining with increasing educational attainment. Pope et al. (2002) subsequently reported results of a subsequent study using an additional 10 yr of follow-up of the ACS cohort. This updated analysis included gaseous copollutant and new fine-particle measurements, more comprehensive information on occupational exposures, dietary variables, and the most recent developments in statistical modeling integrating random effects and nonparametric spatial smoothing into the Cox proportional hazards model. Robust associations between ambient fine particulate air pollution and elevated risks of cardiopulmonary and lung cancer mortality were clearly evident, providing the strongest evidence to date that long-term exposure to fine particles is an important health risk. Current ongoing analysis using the extended follow-up information will explore the role of ecologic, economic, and, demographic covariates in the particulate air pollution and mortality association. This analysis will also provide insight into the role of spatial autocorrelation at multiple geographic scales, and whether critical instances in time of exposure to fine particles influence the risk of mortality

  6. Analyses of the soil surface dynamic of South African Kalahari salt pans based on hyperspectral and multitemporal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milewski, Robert; Chabrillat, Sabine; Behling, Robert; Mielke, Christian; Schleicher, Anja Maria; Guanter, Luis

    2016-04-01

    The consequences of climate change represent a major threat to sustainable development and growth in Southern Africa. Understanding the impact on the geo- and biosphere is therefore of great importance in this particular region. In this context the Kalahari salt pans (also known as playas or sabkhas) and their peripheral saline and alkaline habitats are an ecosystem of major interest. They are very sensitive to environmental conditions, and as thus hydrological, mineralogical and ecological responses to climatic variations can be analysed. Up to now the soil composition of salt pans in this area have been only assessed mono-temporally and on a coarse regional scale. Furthermore, the dynamic of the salt pans, especially the formation of evaporites, is still uncertain and poorly understood. High spectral resolution remote sensing can estimate evaporite content and mineralogy of soils based on the analyses of the surface reflectance properties within the Visible-Near InfraRed (VNIR 400-1000 nm) and Short-Wave InfraRed (SWIR 1000-2500 nm) regions. In these wavelength regions major chemical components of the soil interact with the electromagnetic radiation and produce characteristic absorption features that can be used to derive the properties of interest. Although such techniques are well established for the laboratory and field scale, the potential of current (Hyperion) and upcoming spaceborne sensors such as EnMAP for quantitative mineralogical and salt spectral mapping is still to be demonstrated. Combined with hyperspectral methods, multitemporal remote sensing techniques allow us to derive the recent dynamic of these salt pans and link the mineralogical analysis of the pan surface to major physical processes in these dryland environments. In this study we focus on the analyses of the Namibian Omongwa salt pans based on satellite hyperspectral imagery and multispectral time-series data. First, a change detection analysis is applied using the Iterative

  7. Building-related symptoms among U.S. office workers and risks factors for moisture and contamination: Preliminary analyses of U.S. EPA BASE Data

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, Mark J.; Cozen, Myrna

    2002-09-01

    The authors assessed relationships between health symptoms in office workers and risk factors related to moisture and contamination, using data collected from a representative sample of U.S. office buildings in the U.S. EPA BASE study. Methods: Analyses assessed associations between three types of weekly, workrelated symptoms-lower respiratory, mucous membrane, and neurologic-and risk factors for moisture or contamination in these office buildings. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the strength of associations for these risk factors as odds ratios (ORs) adjusted for personal-level potential confounding variables related to demographics, health, job, and workspace. A number of risk factors were associated (e.g., 95% confidence limits excluded 1.0) significantly with small to moderate increases in one or more symptom outcomes. Significantly elevated ORs for mucous membrane symptoms were associated with the following risk factors: presence of humidification system in good condition versus none (OR = 1.4); air handler inspection annually versus daily (OR = 1.6); current water damage in the building (OR = 1.2); and less than daily vacuuming in study space (OR = 1.2). Significantly elevated ORs for lower respiratory symptoms were associated with: air handler inspection annually versus daily (OR = 2.0); air handler inspection less than daily but at least semi-annually (OR=1.6); less than daily cleaning of offices (1.7); and less than daily vacuuming of the study space (OR = 1.4). Only two statistically significant risk factors for neurologic symptoms were identified: presence of any humidification system versus none (OR = 1.3); and less than daily vacuuming of the study space (OR = 1.3). Dirty cooling coils, dirty or poorly draining drain pans, and standing water near outdoor air intakes, evaluated by inspection, were not identified as risk factors in these analyses, despite predictions based on previous findings elsewhere, except that very

  8. Identifying molecular signatures of hypoxia adaptation from sex chromosomes: A case for Tibetan Mastiff based on analyses of X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hong; Liu, Yan-Hu; Wang, Guo-Dong; Yang, Chun-Tao; Otecko, Newton O.; Liu, Fei; Wu, Shi-Fang; Wang, Lu; Yu, Li; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide studies on high-altitude adaptation have received increased attention as a classical case of organismal evolution under extreme environment. However, the current genetic understanding of high-altitude adaptation emanated mainly from autosomal analyses. Only a few earlier genomic studies paid attention to the allosome. In this study, we performed an intensive scan of the X chromosome of public genomic data generated from Tibetan Mastiff (TM) and five other dog populations for indications of high-altitude adaptation. We identified five genes showing signatures of selection on the X chromosome. Notable among these genes was angiomotin (AMOT), which is related to the process of angiogenesis. We sampled additional 11 dog populations (175 individuals in total) at continuous altitudes in China from 300 to 4,000 meters to validate and test the association between the haplotype frequency of AMOT gene and altitude adaptation. The results suggest that AMOT gene may be a notable candidate gene for the adaptation of TM to high-altitude hypoxic conditions. Our study shows that X chromosome deserves consideration in future studies of adaptive evolution. PMID:27713520

  9. Systematic and phylogeographical assessment of the Acanthodactylus erythrurus group (Reptilia: Lacertidae) based on phylogenetic analyses of mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Miguel M; Brito, José C; Paulo, Octávio S; Carretero, Miguel A; Harris, D James

    2009-05-01

    We have used mitochondrial 12S rRNA, 16S rRNA and nuclear beta-fibrinogen (intron 7) sequences to investigate the phylogenetic and phylogeographic relationships between Acanthodactylus erythrurus group species (except for A. boueti). The phylogenetic analyses of the Acanthodactylus genus did not cluster A. guineensis and A. savignyi with the remaining species of the group (A. blanci, A. lineomaculatus and A. erythrurus). Within the A. erythrurus group, the results of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) showed a complex phylogeny with geographic structure, but it was not congruent with the present taxonomy. Some taxonomic units, such as A. blanci, A. lineomaculatus, A. e. atlanticus and A. e. belli did not form monophyletic genetic units. The application of a molecular clock suggested that the uplift of the Atlas Mountains in the mid-late Miocene and the reopening of the Strait of Gibraltar could be major biogeographic events responsible for the genetic differentiation in the group. Additionally, diverse micro-evolutionary patterns due to the recent contraction/expansion phases of the habitats in North Africa associated with the high dispersal capabilities of these lizards could be related to the complex phylogenetic patterns observed.

  10. Enhanced CO2 adsorptive performance of PEI/SBA-15 adsorbent using phosphate ester based surfactants as additives.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dandan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Haiqiang; Weng, Xiaole; Wu, Zhongbiao

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a series of polyetherimide/SBA-15: 2-D hexagonal P6mm, Santa Barbara USA (PEI/SBA-15) adsorbents modified by phosphoric ester based surfactants (including tri(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (TEP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (BEP) and trimethyl phosphonoacetate (TMPA)) were prepared for CO2 adsorption. Experimental results indicated that the addition of TEP and BEP had positive effects on CO2 adsorption capacity over PEI/SBA-15. In particular, the CO2 adsorption amount could be improved by around 20% for 45PEI-5TEP/SBA-15 compared to the additive-free adsorbent. This could be attributed to the decrease of CO2 diffusion resistance in the PEI bulk network due to the interactions between TEP and loaded PEI molecules, which was further confirmed by adsorption kinetics results. In addition, it was also found that the cyclic performance of the TEP-modified adsorbent was better than the surfactant-free one. This could be due to two main reasons, based on the results of in situ DRIFT and TG-DSC tests. First and more importantly, adsorbed CO2 species could be desorbed more rapidly over TEP-modified adsorbent during the thermal desorption process. Furthermore, the enhanced thermal stability after TEP addition ensured lower degradation of amine groups during adsorption/desorption cycles. PMID:26702962

  11. Enhancing Specific Energy and Power in Asymmetric Supercapacitors - A Synergetic Strategy based on the Use of Redox Additive Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2016-05-01

    The strategy of using redox additive electrolyte in combination with multiwall carbon nanotubes/metal oxide composites leads to a substantial improvements in the specific energy and power of asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). When the pure electrolyte is optimally modified with a redox additive viz., KI, ~105% increase in the specific energy is obtained with good cyclic stability over 3,000 charge-discharge cycles and ~14.7% capacitance fade. This increase is a direct consequence of the iodine/iodide redox pairs that strongly modifies the faradaic and non-faradaic type reactions occurring on the surface of the electrodes. Contrary to what is shown in few earlier reports, it is established that indiscriminate increase in the concentration of redox additives will leads to performance loss. Suitable explanations are given based on theoretical laws. The specific energy or power values being reported in the fabricated ASCs are comparable or higher than those reported in ASCs based on toxic acetonitrile or expensive ionic liquids. The paper shows that the use of redox additive is economically favorable strategy for obtaining cost effective and environmentally friendly ASCs.

  12. Enhancing Specific Energy and Power in Asymmetric Supercapacitors - A Synergetic Strategy based on the Use of Redox Additive Electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2016-01-01

    The strategy of using redox additive electrolyte in combination with multiwall carbon nanotubes/metal oxide composites leads to a substantial improvements in the specific energy and power of asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). When the pure electrolyte is optimally modified with a redox additive viz., KI, ~105% increase in the specific energy is obtained with good cyclic stability over 3,000 charge-discharge cycles and ~14.7% capacitance fade. This increase is a direct consequence of the iodine/iodide redox pairs that strongly modifies the faradaic and non-faradaic type reactions occurring on the surface of the electrodes. Contrary to what is shown in few earlier reports, it is established that indiscriminate increase in the concentration of redox additives will leads to performance loss. Suitable explanations are given based on theoretical laws. The specific energy or power values being reported in the fabricated ASCs are comparable or higher than those reported in ASCs based on toxic acetonitrile or expensive ionic liquids. The paper shows that the use of redox additive is economically favorable strategy for obtaining cost effective and environmentally friendly ASCs. PMID:27184260

  13. Enhancing Specific Energy and Power in Asymmetric Supercapacitors - A Synergetic Strategy based on the Use of Redox Additive Electrolytes

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arvinder; Chandra, Amreesh

    2016-01-01

    The strategy of using redox additive electrolyte in combination with multiwall carbon nanotubes/metal oxide composites leads to a substantial improvements in the specific energy and power of asymmetric supercapacitors (ASCs). When the pure electrolyte is optimally modified with a redox additive viz., KI, ~105% increase in the specific energy is obtained with good cyclic stability over 3,000 charge-discharge cycles and ~14.7% capacitance fade. This increase is a direct consequence of the iodine/iodide redox pairs that strongly modifies the faradaic and non-faradaic type reactions occurring on the surface of the electrodes. Contrary to what is shown in few earlier reports, it is established that indiscriminate increase in the concentration of redox additives will leads to performance loss. Suitable explanations are given based on theoretical laws. The specific energy or power values being reported in the fabricated ASCs are comparable or higher than those reported in ASCs based on toxic acetonitrile or expensive ionic liquids. The paper shows that the use of redox additive is economically favorable strategy for obtaining cost effective and environmentally friendly ASCs. PMID:27184260

  14. Enhanced CO2 adsorptive performance of PEI/SBA-15 adsorbent using phosphate ester based surfactants as additives.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dandan; Liu, Yue; Wang, Haiqiang; Weng, Xiaole; Wu, Zhongbiao

    2015-12-01

    In this study, a series of polyetherimide/SBA-15: 2-D hexagonal P6mm, Santa Barbara USA (PEI/SBA-15) adsorbents modified by phosphoric ester based surfactants (including tri(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (TEP), bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (BEP) and trimethyl phosphonoacetate (TMPA)) were prepared for CO2 adsorption. Experimental results indicated that the addition of TEP and BEP had positive effects on CO2 adsorption capacity over PEI/SBA-15. In particular, the CO2 adsorption amount could be improved by around 20% for 45PEI-5TEP/SBA-15 compared to the additive-free adsorbent. This could be attributed to the decrease of CO2 diffusion resistance in the PEI bulk network due to the interactions between TEP and loaded PEI m