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Sample records for additional angle parameter

  1. Angle parameter changes of phacoemulsification and combined phacotrabeculectomy for acute primary angle closure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shi-Wei; Chen, Yan; Wu, Qiang; Lu, Bin; Wang, Wen-Qing; Fang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the difference in angle parameters and clinical outcome following phacoemulsification and combined phacotrabeculectomy in patients with acute primary angle closure (APAC) using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). METHODS Patients (n=23, 31 eyes) were randomized to receive phacoemulsification or combined phacotrabeculectomy (n=24, 31 eyes). Best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), the main complications following surgery, and indentation gonioscopy and angle parameters measured using UBM were documented preoperatively and postoperatively. RESULTS The improvement in BCVA in the phacoemulsification group was significantly greater than in the combined group (P<0.05). IOP in the phacoemulsification group was slightly higher than in the combined group following 1wk of follow-up (P<0.05), whereas there was no significant difference between the two groups at the latter follow-up (P>0.05). Phacoemulsification alone resulted in a slight increase in the trabecular ciliary processes distance compared with the combined surgery (P<0.05), whereas the other angle parameters showed no significant difference between the groups. Complications in combined group were greater than phacoemulsification only group. CONCLUSION Both surgeries effectively opened the drainage angle and deepened the anterior chamber, and IOP was well controlled postoperatively. However, phacoemulsification showed better efficacy in improving visual function and showed reduced complications following surgery. PMID:26309873

  2. On non-coplanar Hohmann transfer using angles as parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón, Ángel; Rojo, Patricio; Lacruz, Elvis; Abellán, Gabriel; Díaz, Sttiwuer

    2015-09-01

    We study a more complex case of Hohmann orbital transfer of a satellite by considering non-coplanar and elliptical orbits, instead of planar and circular orbits. We use as parameter the angle between the initial and transference planes that minimizes the energy, and therefore the fuel of a satellite, through the application of two non-tangential impulses for all possible cases. We found an analytical expression that minimizes the energy for each configuration. Some reasonable physical constraints are used: we apply impulses at perigee or apogee of the orbit, we consider the duration of the impulse to be short compared to the duration of the trip, we take the nodal line of three orbits to be coincident and the three semimajor axes to lie in the same plane. We study the only four possible cases but assuming non-coplanar elliptic orbits. In addition, we validate our method through a numerical solution obtained by using some of the actual orbital elements of Sputnik I and Vanguard I satellites. For these orbits, we found that the most fuel-efficient transfer is obtained by applying the initial impulse at apocenter and keeping the transfer orbit aligned with the initial orbit.

  3. Car Gestures - Advisory warning using additional steering wheel angles.

    PubMed

    Maag, Christian; Schneider, Norbert; Lübbeke, Thomas; Weisswange, Thomas H; Goerick, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Advisory warning systems (AWS) notify the driver about upcoming hazards. This is in contrast to the majority of currently deployed advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) that manage emergency situations. The target of this study is to investigate the effectiveness, acceptance, and controllability of a specific kind of AWS that uses the haptic information channel for warning the driver. This could be beneficial, as alternatives for using the visual modality can help to reduce the risk of visual overload. The driving simulator study (N=24) compared an AWS based on additional steering wheel angle control (Car Gestures) with a visual warning presented in a simulated head-up display (HUD). Both types of warning were activated 3.5s before the hazard object was reached. An additional condition of unassisted driving completed the experimental design. The subjects encountered potential hazards in a variety of urban situations (e.g. a pedestrian standing on the curbs). For the investigated situations, subjective ratings show that a majority of drivers prefer visual warnings over haptic information via gestures. An analysis of driving behavior indicates that both warning approaches guide the vehicle away from the potential hazard. Whereas gestures lead to a faster lateral driving reaction (compared to HUD warnings), the visual warnings result in a greater safety benefit (measured by the minimum distance to the hazard object). A controllability study with gestures in the wrong direction (i.e. leading toward the hazard object) shows that drivers are able to cope with wrong haptic warnings and safety is not reduced compared to unassisted driving as well as compared to (correct) haptic gestures and visual warnings.

  4. Linear parameter-varying control of an F-16 aircraft at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Bei

    To improve the aircraft capability at high angle of attack and expand the flight envelope, advanced linear parameter-varying (LPV) control methodologies are studied in this thesis with particular applications of actuator saturation control and switching control. A standard two-step LPV antiwindup control scheme and a systematic switching LPV control approach are derived, and the advantages of LPV control techniques are demonstrated through nonlinear simulations of an F-16 longitudinal autopilot control system. The aerodynamic surface saturation is one of the major issues of flight control in the high angle of attack region. The incorporated unconventional actuators such as thrust vectoring can provide additional control power, but may have a potentially significant pay-off. The proposed LPV antiwindup control scheme is advantageous from the implementation standpoint because it can be thought of as an augmented control algorithm to the existing control system. Moreover, the synthesis condition for an antiwindup compensator is formulated as a linear matrix inequality (LMI) optimization problem and can be solved efficiently. By treating the input saturation as a sector bounded nonlinearity with a tight sector bound, the synthesized antiwindup compensator can stabilize the open-loop exponentially unstable systems. The LPV antiwindup control scheme is applied to the nonlinear F-16 longitudinal model, and compared with the thrust vectoring control approach. The simulation results show that the LPV antiwindup compensator improves the flight quality, and offers advantages over thrust vectoring in a high angle of attack region. For a thrust vectoring augmented aircraft, the actuator sets may be different at low and high angles of attack. Also due to different control objectives, a single controller may not exist over a wide angle of attack region. The proposed switching LPV control approach based on multiple parameter-dependent Lyapunov functions provides a flexible design

  5. Experimental model and analytic solution for real-time observation of vehicle's additional steer angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolong; Li, Liang; Pan, Deng; Cao, Chengmao; Song, Jian

    2014-03-01

    The current research of real-time observation for vehicle roll steer angle and compliance steer angle(both of them comprehensively referred as the additional steer angle in this paper) mainly employs the linear vehicle dynamic model, in which only the lateral acceleration of vehicle body is considered. The observation accuracy resorting to this method cannot meet the requirements of vehicle real-time stability control, especially under extreme driving conditions. The paper explores the solution resorting to experimental method. Firstly, a multi-body dynamic model of a passenger car is built based on the ADAMS/Car software, whose dynamic accuracy is verified by the same vehicle's roadway test data of steady static circular test. Based on this simulation platform, several influencing factors of additional steer angle under different driving conditions are quantitatively analyzed. Then ɛ-SVR algorithm is employed to build the additional steer angle prediction model, whose input vectors mainly include the sensor information of standard electronic stability control system(ESC). The method of typical slalom tests and FMVSS 126 tests are adopted to make simulation, train model and test model's generalization performance. The test result shows that the influence of lateral acceleration on additional steer angle is maximal (the magnitude up to 1°), followed by the longitudinal acceleration-deceleration and the road wave amplitude (the magnitude up to 0.3°). Moreover, both the prediction accuracy and the calculation real-time of the model can meet the control requirements of ESC. This research expands the accurate observation methods of the additional steer angle under extreme driving conditions.

  6. Additional Investigations of Ice Shape Sensitivity to Parameter Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Dean R.; Potapczuk, Mark G.; Langhals, Tammy J.

    2006-01-01

    A second parameter sensitivity study was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) using a 36 in. chord (0.91 m) NACA-0012 airfoil. The objective of this work was to further investigate the feasibility of using ice shape feature changes to define requirements for the simulation and measurement of SLD and appendix C icing conditions. A previous study concluded that it was feasible to use changes in ice shape features (e.g., ice horn angle, ice horn thickness, and ice shape mass) to detect relatively small variations in icing spray condition parameters (LWC, MVD, and temperature). The subject of this current investigation extends the scope of this previous work, by also examining the effect of icing tunnel spray-bar parameter variations (water pressure, air pressure) on ice shape feature changes. The approach was to vary spray-bar water pressure and air pressure, and then evaluate the effects of these parameter changes on the resulting ice shapes. This paper will provide a description of the experimental method, present selected experimental results, and conclude with an evaluation of these results.

  7. Real-Time Aerodynamic Parameter Estimation without Air Flow Angle Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.

    2010-01-01

    A technique for estimating aerodynamic parameters in real time from flight data without air flow angle measurements is described and demonstrated. The method is applied to simulated F-16 data, and to flight data from a subscale jet transport aircraft. Modeling results obtained with the new approach using flight data without air flow angle measurements were compared to modeling results computed conventionally using flight data that included air flow angle measurements. Comparisons demonstrated that the new technique can provide accurate aerodynamic modeling results without air flow angle measurements, which are often difficult and expensive to obtain. Implications for efficient flight testing and flight safety are discussed.

  8. Parameters optimization for wavelet denoising based on normalized spectral angle and threshold constraint machine learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hao; Ma, Yong; Liang, Kun; Tian, Yong; Wang, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Wavelet parameters (e.g., wavelet type, level of decomposition) affect the performance of the wavelet denoising algorithm in hyperspectral applications. Current studies select the best wavelet parameters for a single spectral curve by comparing similarity criteria such as spectral angle (SA). However, the method to find the best parameters for a spectral library that contains multiple spectra has not been studied. In this paper, a criterion named normalized spectral angle (NSA) is proposed. By comparing NSA, the best combination of parameters for a spectral library can be selected. Moreover, a fast algorithm based on threshold constraint and machine learning is developed to reduce the time of a full search. After several iterations of learning, the combination of parameters that constantly surpasses a threshold is selected. The experiments proved that by using the NSA criterion, the SA values decreased significantly, and the fast algorithm could save 80% time consumption, while the denoising performance was not obviously impaired.

  9. Determination of aerodynamic parameters of a fighter airplane from flight data at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, V.; Batterson, J. G.; Abbasy, I.

    1983-01-01

    A procedure for the estimation of airplane model structure and parameters is applied to data from a modern fighter airplane operating within an angle of attack range of 5 to 60 deg. The paper briefly describes the airplane, flight and wind tunnel data available, and the estimation method. The results presented contain basic longitudinal characteristics of the airplane and the estimates of aerodynamic parameters in the yawing-moment equations. These estimates are obtained from small and large amplitude maneuvers. Because the latter set of data was not suitable for airplane identification, some of the large amplitude maneuvers were joined together and then partitioned into subsets according to the values of angle of attack. Each subset was then analyzed as a separate data set. Most of the estimated parameters and functions are in good agreement with the wind tunnel measurements. The estimated lateral parameters in the model equations also demonstrate good prediction capabilities.

  10. Effects of Jet Opening Angle and Velocity Structure on Blazar Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiita, P. J.; Gopal-Krishna; Dhurde, S.; Sircar, P.

    2008-06-01

    We had earlier shown that for a constant velocity jet the discrepancy between the low speeds (β) indicated by VLBI knot motions and the high Doppler factors (δ) inferred from emission of TeV photons could be reconciled if ultrarelativistic jets possessed modest opening angles. Here we evaluate the (flux-weighted) viewing angles of the jet and the apparent β and δ values of the radio knots on parsec scales. The influence of the jet opening angle on these radio knot parameters are found for the usually considered types of relativistic nuclear jets: those with uniform bulk speeds and those where the bulk Lorentz factor of the flow decreases with distance from the jet axis, known as ``spine--sheath'' flows. For both types of jet velocity structures the expectation value of the jet orientation angle at first falls dramatically with increases in the (central) jet Lorentz factor, but for extremely relativistic jets it levels off at a fraction of the opening angle. The effective values of the apparent speeds and Doppler factors of the knots always decline substantially with increasing jet opening angle. The rarity of highly superluminal parsec-scale radio components in TeV blazars can be understood if their jets are both highly relativistic and intrinsically weaker, so probably less well collimated, than the jets in ordinary blazars.

  11. Hannay Angle: Yet Another Symmetry-Protected Topological Order Parameter in Classical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kariyado, Toshikaze; Hatsugai, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    The topological way of thinking now goes beyond quantum solids, and topological characters of classical mechanical systems obeying Newton's law are attracting current interest. To provide a physical insight into the topological numbers in mechanics, we demonstrate the use of the Hannay angle, a "classical" Berry phase, as a symmetry-protected topological order parameter. The Hannay angle is derived using a canonical transformation that maps Newton's equation to a Schrödinger-type equation, and the condition for the quantization is discussed in connection with the symmetry in mechanics. Also, we demonstrate the use of the Hannay angle for a topological characterization of a spring-mass model focusing on the bulk-edge correspondence.

  12. Aerosol and Surface Parameter Retrievals for a Multi-Angle, Multiband Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broderick, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This software retrieves the surface and atmosphere parameters of multi-angle, multiband spectra. The synthetic spectra are generated by applying the modified Rahman-Pinty-Verstraete Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) model, and a single-scattering dominated atmosphere model to surface reflectance data from Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR). The aerosol physical model uses a single scattering approximation using Rayleigh scattering molecules, and Henyey-Greenstein aerosols. The surface and atmosphere parameters of the models are retrieved using the Lavenberg-Marquardt algorithm. The software can retrieve the surface and atmosphere parameters with two different scales. The surface parameters are retrieved pixel-by-pixel while the atmosphere parameters are retrieved for a group of pixels where the same atmosphere model parameters are applied. This two-scale approach allows one to select the natural scale of the atmosphere properties relative to surface properties. The software also takes advantage of an intelligent initial condition given by the solution of the neighbor pixels.

  13. Transferability and additivity of dihedral parameters in polarizable and nonpolarizable empirical force fields.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Rosnik, Andreana M; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-09-30

    Recent advances in polarizable force fields have revealed that major reparameterization is necessary when the polarization energy is treated explicitly. This study is focused on the torsional parameters, which are crucial for the accurate description of conformational equilibria in biomolecules. In particular, attention is paid to the influence of polarization on the (i) transferability of dihedral terms between molecules, (ii) transferability between different environments, and (iii) additivity of dihedral energies. To this end, three polarizable force fields based on the induced point dipole model designed for use in AMBER are tested, including two recent ff02 reparameterizations. Attention is paid to the contributions due to short range interactions (1-2, 1-3, and 1-4) within the four atoms defining the dihedral angle. The results show that when short range 1-2 and 1-3 polarization interactions are omitted, as for instance in ff02, the 1-4 polarization contribution is rather small and unlikely to improve the description of the torsional energy. Conversely, when screened 1-2 and 1-3 interactions are included, the polarization contribution is sizeable and shows potential to improve the transferability of parameters between different molecules and environments as well as the additivity of dihedral terms. However, to reproduce intramolecular polarization effects accurately, further fine-tuning of the short range damping of polarization is necessary.

  14. Transferability and additivity of dihedral parameters in polarizable and nonpolarizable empirical force fields.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Rosnik, Andreana M; Luque, F Javier; Curutchet, Carles; Jurečka, Petr

    2015-09-30

    Recent advances in polarizable force fields have revealed that major reparameterization is necessary when the polarization energy is treated explicitly. This study is focused on the torsional parameters, which are crucial for the accurate description of conformational equilibria in biomolecules. In particular, attention is paid to the influence of polarization on the (i) transferability of dihedral terms between molecules, (ii) transferability between different environments, and (iii) additivity of dihedral energies. To this end, three polarizable force fields based on the induced point dipole model designed for use in AMBER are tested, including two recent ff02 reparameterizations. Attention is paid to the contributions due to short range interactions (1-2, 1-3, and 1-4) within the four atoms defining the dihedral angle. The results show that when short range 1-2 and 1-3 polarization interactions are omitted, as for instance in ff02, the 1-4 polarization contribution is rather small and unlikely to improve the description of the torsional energy. Conversely, when screened 1-2 and 1-3 interactions are included, the polarization contribution is sizeable and shows potential to improve the transferability of parameters between different molecules and environments as well as the additivity of dihedral terms. However, to reproduce intramolecular polarization effects accurately, further fine-tuning of the short range damping of polarization is necessary. PMID:26224547

  15. Reliability of principal components and discrete parameters of knee angle and moment gait waveforms in individuals with moderate knee osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Shawn M; Astephen Wilson, Janie L; Rutherford, Derek J; Hubley-Kozey, Cheryl L

    2013-07-01

    Gait measures are used to evaluate change in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), but reliability has not been fully established in this population. This study examined test-retest reliability of knee angle and moment gait waveform characteristics captured using discrete parameters and principal component analysis (PCA) in individuals with moderate knee OA. Participants (n=20) underwent three-dimensional gait analysis on two occasions. Motion and force data were captured using two camera banks, infrared light emitting diodes and force plate during self-selected walking. Knee angle and moment waveforms were calculated and analyzed using discrete parameters and by identifying waveform characteristics using PCA. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC2,k) examined test-retest reliability of discrete parameters and PCA derived scores (PC-scores). ICC2,k values ranged from 0.57 to 0.93 for discrete parameters, 0.52-0.86 for knee angle PC-scores and 0.30-0.94 for the knee moment PC-scores. However, 10 of 13 discrete parameters, six of nine knee angle PC-scores and seven of nine knee moment PC-scores had ICC2,k values greater than or equal to 0.70. Discrete parameters and PC-scores from flexion angles and adduction moments had the highest ICC2,k values while adduction angles, rotation angles, and rotation moments had the lowest. Most knee angle and moment waveform characteristics demonstrated ICC2,k values that could be interpreted as acceptable. Caution should be used when examining adduction and rotation angle magnitudes and early/mid-stance rotation moment magnitudes due to lower ICC2,k values.

  16. Constraining the UT angle γ by CP violation parameters in B0 → π+π-

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qin; Zou, Zhi-Tian; Li, Ying; Lü, Cai-Dian

    2016-03-01

    We calculate the tree and penguin amplitudes in the B0 → π+π- decay channel employing the perturbative QCD factorization approach. Using the amplitudes as input with the theoretical uncertainties sufficiently considered, we constrain the UT angle γ to 53° ⩽ γ ⩽ 70°, from the measurements of the CP violation parameters C π+π- and S π+π- in B0 → π+π-. The U-spin breaking effect between B0 → π+π- and is estimated to be around 30%. Partly Supported by National Science Foundation of China (11175151, 11235005, 11375208, 11447032, 11575151), Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province (ZR2014AQ013) and the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University (NCET) by Ministry of Education of P.R. China (NCET-13-0991)

  17. Small angle neutron scattering study of sodium dodecyl sulfate micellar growth driven by addition of a hydrotropic salt.

    PubMed

    Hassan, P A; Fritz, Gerhard; Kaler, Eric W

    2003-01-01

    The structures of aggregates formed in aqueous solutions of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), with the addition of a cationic hydrotropic salt, p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC), have been investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The SANS spectra exhibit a pronounced peak at low salt concentration, indicating the presence of repulsive intermicellar interactions. Model-independent real space information about the structure is obtained from a generalized indirect Fourier transformation (GIFT) technique in combination with a suitable model for the interparticle structure factor. The interparticle interaction is captured using the rescaled mean spherical approximation (RMSA) closure relation and a Yukawa form of the interaction potential. Further quantification of the geometrical parameters of the micelles was achieved by a complete fit of the SANS data using a prolate ellipsoidal form factor and the RMSA structure factor. The present study shows that PTHC induces a decrease in the fractional charge of the micelles due to adsorption at the micellar surface and consequent growth of the SDS micelles from nearly globular to rodlike as the concentration of PTHC increases.

  18. Small angle neutron scattering study of sodium dodecyl sulfate micellar growth driven by addition of a hydrotropic salt.

    PubMed

    Hassan, P A; Fritz, Gerhard; Kaler, Eric W

    2003-01-01

    The structures of aggregates formed in aqueous solutions of an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), with the addition of a cationic hydrotropic salt, p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC), have been investigated by small angle neutron scattering (SANS). The SANS spectra exhibit a pronounced peak at low salt concentration, indicating the presence of repulsive intermicellar interactions. Model-independent real space information about the structure is obtained from a generalized indirect Fourier transformation (GIFT) technique in combination with a suitable model for the interparticle structure factor. The interparticle interaction is captured using the rescaled mean spherical approximation (RMSA) closure relation and a Yukawa form of the interaction potential. Further quantification of the geometrical parameters of the micelles was achieved by a complete fit of the SANS data using a prolate ellipsoidal form factor and the RMSA structure factor. The present study shows that PTHC induces a decrease in the fractional charge of the micelles due to adsorption at the micellar surface and consequent growth of the SDS micelles from nearly globular to rodlike as the concentration of PTHC increases. PMID:16256467

  19. Coincidence measurements of electron-impact coherence parameters for e-He scattering in the full range of scattering angles

    SciTech Connect

    Klosowski, Lukasz; Piwinski, Mariusz; Dziczek, Dariusz; Pleskacz, Katarzyna; Chwirot, Stanislaw

    2009-12-15

    Electron impact coherence parameters for inelastic e-He scattering have been measured for the excitation to the 2 {sup 1}P{sub 1} state at collision energy of 100 eV. The experiment was conducted using angular correlation electron-photon coincidence technique with a magnetic angle changer allowing measurements in full range of scattering angles. The results are compared with other experimental data and theoretical predictions available for this collisional system.

  20. Superplastic Constitutive Equation Including Percentage of High-Angle Grain Boundaries as a Microstructural Parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, K.; Liu, F. C.; Xue, P.; Wang, D.; Xiao, B. L.; Ma, Z. Y.

    2016-01-01

    Fifteen Al-Mg-Sc samples with subgrain/grain sizes in the range of 1.8 to 4.9 μm were prepared through the processing methods of friction stir processing (FSP), equal-channel-angular pressing (ECAP), rolling, annealing, and combinations of the above. The percentages of high-angle grain boundaries (HAGBs) of these fine-grained alloys were distributed from 39 to 97 pct. The samples processed through FSP had a higher percentage of HAGBs compared to other samples. Superplasticity was achieved in all fifteen samples, but the FSP samples exhibited better superplasticity than other samples because their fine equiaxed grains, which were mostly surrounded by HAGBs, were conducive to the occurrence of grain boundary sliding (GBS) during superplastic deformation. The dominant deformation mechanism was the same for all fifteen samples, i.e., GBS controlled by grain boundary diffusion. However, the subgrains were the GBS units for the rolled or ECAP samples, which contained high percentages of unrecrystallized grains, whereas the fine grains were the GBS units for the FSP samples. Superplastic data analysis revealed that the dimensionless A in the classical constitutive equation for superplasticity of fine-grained Al alloys was not a constant, but increased with an increase in the percentage of HAGBs, demonstrating that the enhanced superplastic deformation kinetics can be ascribed to the high percentage of HAGBs. A modified superplastic constitutive equation with the percentage of HAGBs as a new microstructural parameter was established.

  1. The Shank-to-Vertical-Angle as a parameter to evaluate tuning of Ankle-Foot Orthoses.

    PubMed

    Kerkum, Yvette L; Houdijk, Han; Brehm, Merel-Anne; Buizer, Annemieke I; Kessels, Manon L C; Sterk, Arjan; van den Noort, Josien C; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-09-01

    The effectiveness of an Ankle-Foot Orthosis footwear combination (AFO-FC) may be partly dependent on the alignment of the ground reaction force with respect to lower limb joint rotation centers, reflected by joint angles and moments. Adjusting (i.e. tuning) the AFO-FC's properties could affect this alignment, which may be guided by monitoring the Shank-to-Vertical-Angle. This study aimed to investigate whether the Shank-to-Vertical-Angle during walking responds to variations in heel height and footplate stiffness, and if this would reflect changes in joint angles and net moments in healthy adults. Ten subjects walked on an instrumented treadmill and performed six trials while walking with bilateral rigid Ankle-Foot Orthoses. The AFO-FC heel height was increased, aiming to impose a Shank-to-Vertical-Angle of 5°, 11° and 20°, and combined with a flexible or stiff footplate. For each trial, the Shank-to-Vertical-Angle, joint flexion-extension angles and net joint moments of the right leg at midstance were averaged over 25 gait cycles. The Shank-to-Vertical-Angle significantly increased with increasing heel height (p<0.001), resulting in an increase in knee flexion angle and internal knee extensor moment (p<0.001). The stiff footplate reduced the effect of heel height on the internal knee extensor moment (p=0.030), while the internal ankle plantar flexion moment increased (p=0.035). Effects of heel height and footplate stiffness on the hip joint were limited. Our results support the potential to use the Shank-to-Vertical-Angle as a parameter to evaluate AFO-FC tuning, as it is responsive to changes in heel height and reflects concomitant changes in the lower limb angles and moments. PMID:26050873

  2. Tuning the Receding Contact Angle on Hydrogels by Addition of Particles.

    PubMed

    Boulogne, François; Ingremeau, François; Limat, Laurent; Stone, Howard A

    2016-06-01

    Control of the swelling, chemical functionalization, and adhesivity of hydrogels are finding new applications in a wide range of material systems. We investigate experimentally the effect of adsorbed particles on hydrogels on the depinning of contact lines. In our experiments, a water drop containing polystyrene microspheres is deposited on a swelling hydrogel, which leads to the drop absorption and particle deposition. Two regimes are observed: a decreasing drop height with a pinned contact line followed by a receding contact line. We show that increasing the particles concentration increases the duration of the first regime and significantly decreases the total absorption time. The adsorbed particles increase the pinning force at the contact line. Finally, we develop a method to measure the receding contact angle with the consideration of the hydrogel swelling. PMID:27185647

  3. Correlation between anatomical parameters of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Zhaoxun; Chen, Jun; Qu, Lianjun; Cui, Yan; Sun, Chao; Zhang, Hongxin; Yang, Xiaoming; Guan, Qingli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To obtain anatomical data on intertubercular sulcus of humerus, evaluate the correlation between intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head, to guide the positioning of torsion angle of prosthesis during total shoulder arthroplasty and provide references for shoulder prosthesis design. Methods: Using a Siemens Ultrahigh speed 64- rows multi-slices spiral CT scanner and 20 dried adult humeral specimens (intact specimen, no fractures or pathological damage), of these, left lateral in 10 cases, right lateral in 10 cases, male or female all inclusive, specimens are all provided by Anatomy Department of Weifang Medical College, scan ranged from the highest point of humeral head to the distal ends of trochlea. And scanned data were subjected to statistical analysis. Results: There is a linear correlation between the distance from intertubercular sulcus to central axis line of humeral head, position angle of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head at the beginning slice of intertubercular sulcus. There is a linear correlation between position angle of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head at the slice of surgical neck. Conclusion: There is a linear correlation between position of intertubercular sulcus and retroversion angle of humeral head, in total shoulder arthroplasty, using intertubercular sulcus as anatomical landmark will help to accurately position torsion angle of individualized prosthesis. Position angle of intertubercular sulcus is an objective, flexible positioning indicator. PMID:26131058

  4. Parameter estimation applied to Nimbus 6 wide-angle longwave radiation measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. N.; Smith, G. L.

    1978-01-01

    A parameter estimation technique was used to analyze the August 1975 Nimbus 6 Earth radiation budget data to demonstrate the concept of deconvolution. The longwave radiation field at the top of the atmosphere is defined from satellite data by a fifth degree and fifth order spherical harmonic representation. The variations of the major features of the radiation field are defined by analyzing the data separately for each two-day duty cycle. A table of coefficient values for each spherical harmonic representation is given along with global mean, gradients, degree variances, and contour plots. In addition, the entire data set is analyzed to define the monthly average radiation field.

  5. Deterministic fractals: extracting additional information from small-angle scattering data.

    PubMed

    Cherny, A Yu; Anitas, E M; Osipov, V A; Kuklin, A I

    2011-09-01

    The small-angle scattering curves of deterministic mass fractals are studied and analyzed in momentum space. In the fractal region, the curve I(q)q(D) is found to be log-periodic with good accuracy, and the period is equal to the scaling factor of the fractal. Here, D and I(q) are the fractal dimension and the scattering intensity, respectively. The number of periods of this curve coincides with the number of fractal iterations. We show that the log-periodicity of I(q)q(D) in the momentum space is related to the log-periodicity of the quantity g(r)r(3-D) in the real space, where g(r) is the pair distribution function. The minima and maxima positions of the scattering intensity are estimated explicitly by relating them to the pair distance distribution in real space. It is shown that the minima and maxima are damped with increasing polydispersity of the fractal sets; however, they remain quite pronounced even at sufficiently large values of polydispersity. A generalized self-similar Vicsek fractal with controllable fractal dimension is introduced, and its scattering properties are studied to illustrate the above findings. In contrast with the usual methods, the present analysis allows us to obtain not only the fractal dimension and the edges of the fractal region, but also the fractal iteration number, the scaling factor, and the number of structural units from which the fractal is composed.

  6. The Effect of Detonation Wave Incidence Angle on the Acceleration of Flyers by Explosives Heavily Laden with Inert Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loiseau, Jason; Georges, William; Frost, David; Higgins, Andrew

    2015-06-01

    The incidence angle of a detonation wave is often assumed to weakly influence the terminal velocity of an explosively driven flyer. For explosives heavily loaded with dense additives, this may not be true due to differences in momentum and energy transfer between detonation products, additive particles, and the flyer. For tangential incidence the particles are first accelerated against the flyer via an expansion fan, whereas they are first accelerated by the detonation wave in the normal case. In the current study we evaluate the effect of normal versus tangential incidence on the acceleration of flyers by nitromethane heavily loaded with a variety of additives. Normal detonation was initiated via an explosively driven slapper. Flyer acceleration was measured with heterodyne laser interferometry (PDV). The influence of wave angle is evaluated by comparing the terminal velocity in the two cases (i.e., normal and grazing) for the heavily loaded mixtures. The decrement in flyer velocity correlated primarily with additive volume fraction and had a weak dependence on additive density or particle size. The Gurney energy of the heterogeneous explosive was observed to increase with flyer mass, presumably due to the timescale over which impinging particles could transfer momentum.

  7. Effect of Three Different Grip Angles on Physiological Parameters During Laboratory Handcycling Test in Able-Bodied Participants

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Thomas; Burkett, Brendan; Thees, Barbara; Schneider, Stefan; Askew, Christopher D.; Strüder, Heiko K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Handcycling is a relatively new wheelchair sport that has gained increased popularity for people with lower limb disabilities. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of three different grip positions on physical parameters during handcycling in a laboratory setting. Methods: Twenty one able-bodied participants performed three maximum incremental handcycling tests until exhaustion, each with a different grip angle. The angle between the grip and the crank was randomly set at 90° (horizontal), 0° (vertical), or 10° (diagonal). The initial load was 20 W and increased by 20 W each 5 min. In addition, participants performed a 20 s maximum effort. Results: The relative peak functional performance (W/kg), peak heart rate (bpm), associated lactate concentrations (mmol/l) and peak oxygen uptake per kilogram body weight (ml.min−1.kg−1) for the different grip positions during the stage test were: (a) Horizontal: 1.43 ± 0.21 W/kg, 170.14 ± 12.81 bpm, 9.54 ± 1.93 mmol/l, 30.86 ± 4.57 ml/kg; (b) Vertical: 1.38 ± 0.20 W/kg, 171.81 ± 13.87 bpm, 9.91 ± 2.29 mmol/l, 29.75 ± 5.13 ml/kg; (c) Diagonal: 1.40 ± 0.22 W/kg, 169.19 ± 13.31 bpm, 9.34 ± 2.36 mmol/l, 29.39 ± 4.70 ml/kg. Statistically significant (p < 0.05) differences could only be found for lactate concentration between the vertical grip position and the other grips during submaximal handcycling. Conclusion: The orientation of three different grip angles made no difference to the peak load achieved during an incremental handcycling test and a 20 s maximum effort. At submaximal load, higher lactate concentrations were found when the vertical grip position was used, suggesting that this position may be less efficient than the alternative diagonal or horizontal grip positions. PMID:26635617

  8. A new approach to NMR chemical shift additivity parameters using simultaneous linear equation method.

    PubMed

    Shahab, Yosif A; Khalil, Rabah A

    2006-10-01

    A new approach to NMR chemical shift additivity parameters using simultaneous linear equation method has been introduced. Three general nitrogen-15 NMR chemical shift additivity parameters with physical significance for aliphatic amines in methanol and cyclohexane and their hydrochlorides in methanol have been derived. A characteristic feature of these additivity parameters is the individual equation can be applied to both open-chain and rigid systems. The factors that influence the (15)N chemical shift of these substances have been determined. A new method for evaluating conformational equilibria at nitrogen in these compounds using the derived additivity parameters has been developed. Conformational analyses of these substances have been worked out. In general, the results indicate that there are four factors affecting the (15)N chemical shift of aliphatic amines; paramagnetic term (p-character), lone pair-proton interactions, proton-proton interactions, symmetry of alkyl substituents and molecular association.

  9. Additional field verification of convective scaling for the lateral dispersion parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Sakiyama, S.K.; Davis, P.A.

    1988-07-01

    The results of a series of diffusion trials over the heterogeneous surface of the Canadian Precambrian Shield provide additional support for the convective scaling of the lateral dispersion parameter. The data indicate that under convective conditions, the lateral dispersion parameter can be scaled with the convective velocity scale and the mixing depth. 10 references.

  10. Asteroid observations at low phase angles. Average parameters for the new three-parameter H,G_1,G_2 magnitude system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, V.; Belskaya, I.; Muinonen, K.; Krugly, Y.; Velichko, F.; Chiorny, V.; Slyusarev, I.; Gaftonyuk, N.; Tereschenko, I.

    2014-07-01

    We present new observational data for selected main-belt asteroids of different compositional types, namely, 10 Hygiea, 176 Iduna, 214 Aschera, 250 Bettina, 419 Aurelia, 596 Scheila, 635 Vundtia, 671 Carnegia, 717 Wisibada, 1021 Flammario, and 1279 Uganda. The detailed magnitude-phase dependencies including low phase angles (<1 deg) were obtained for all these asteroids. For some asteroids the dependencies of color indexes B-V, V-R, and R-I with phase angle were investigated. We found a great diversity in opposition effect behavior both in magnitude and width of opposition surges. Some low albedo asteroids (e.g. ,10 Hygiea) display a broad opposition effect with an amplitude of 0.15--0.20 mag relative to the extrapolation of the linear part of the phase curve. Other asteroids (596 Scheila, 1021 Flammario) show linear magnitude phase functions down to very low phase angles (0.1--0.2 deg). Possible causes of the observed differences in the opposition effect behavior are discussed. Using numerous data sets on magnitude-phase dependencies with good phase angle coverage and small scatter within the observational data (e.g., Harris & Young 1989; Harris et al., 1992; Shevchenko et al. 2010; Shevchenko et al. 2012), we examined in more detail the new three-parameter H,G_1,G_2 magnitude system (Muinonen et al. 2010). We determined the values of the G_1 and G_2 parameters for each of the magnitude phase dependencies. We obtained average parameters for the main spectral classes of asteroids which can be used for the calculation of asteroid absolute magnitudes and the prediction of asteroid apparent magnitudes.

  11. Spectral line polarization with angle-dependent partial frequency redistribution. I. A Stokes parameters decomposition for Rayleigh scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisch, H.

    2010-11-01

    Context. The linear polarization of a strong resonance lines observed near the solar limb is created by a multiple-scattering process. Partial frequency redistribution (PRD) effects must be accounted for to explain the polarization profiles. The redistribution matrix describing the scattering process is a sum of terms, each containing a PRD function multiplied by a Rayleigh type phase matrix. A standard approximation made in calculating the polarization is to average the PRD functions over all the scattering angles, because the numerical work needed to take the angle-dependence of the PRD functions into account is large and not always needed for reasonable evaluations of the polarization. Aims: This paper describes a Stokes parameters decomposition method, that is applicable in plane-parallel cylindrically symmetrical media, which aims at simplifying the numerical work needed to overcome the angle-average approximation. Methods: The decomposition method relies on an azimuthal Fourier expansion of the PRD functions associated to a decomposition of the phase matrices in terms of the Landi Degl'Innocenti irreducible spherical tensors for polarimetry T^K_Q(i, Ω) (i Stokes parameter index, Ω ray direction). The terms that depend on the azimuth of the scattering angle are retained in the phase matrices. Results: It is shown that the Stokes parameters I and Q, which have the same cylindrical symmetry as the medium, can be expressed in terms of four cylindrically symmetrical components I_Q^K (K = Q = 0, K = 2, Q = 0, 1, 2). The components with Q = 1, 2 are created by the angular dependence of the PRD functions. They go to zero at disk center, ensuring that Stokes Q also goes to zero. Each component I_Q^K is a solution to a standard radiative transfer equation. The source term S_Q^K are significantly simpler than the source terms corresponding to I and Q. They satisfy a set of integral equations that can be solved by an accelerated lambda iteration (ALI) method.

  12. Comparison of Pattern Electroretinography and Optical Coherence Tomography Parameters in Patients with Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Ocular Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Tiryaki Demir, Semra; Oba, Mehmet Ersin; Erdoğan, Ezgi Tuna; Odabaşı, Mahmut; Dirim, Ayşe Burcu; Demir, Mehmet; Can, Efe; Kara, Orhan; Yekta Şendül, Selam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the correlation of visual field (VF), pattern electroretinography (PERG) and Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (FD-OCT) results in patients with ocular hypertension (OHT) and early primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG). Materials and Methods: The study included 72 eyes of 37 patients with early POAG, 76 eyes of 38 patients with OHT, and 60 eyes of 30 controls. All subjects underwent full ophthalmologic examination, VF assessment with 24-2 Humphrey standard automated perimetry (Swedish Interactive Thresholding Algorithm (SITA)-Standard), retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) and ganglion cell complex (GCC) thickness measurement with FD-OCT, and PERG P50 and N95 wave latency and amplitude measurements with electroretinography (Nihon Kohden). Results: With the exception of the nasal quadrant, all GCC parameters and RNFL results were significantly lower in the POAG group compared to the OHT and control groups. There was no statistically significant difference between the OHT and control group. PERG amplitudes were lower in the POAG and OHT groups than in the control group. Reduction in N95 amplitude was greater than that of P50 amplitude. No difference was detected in PERG latencies among groups. GCC was significantly correlated with VF and RNFL in the POAG group. Conclusion: Significant thinning of the GCC and RNFL occurs in addition to VF pathologies in patients with early POAG, and these examinations should be concomitantly evaluated. During diagnostic assessment of patients with early POAG, GCC and RNFL analysis by FD-OCT are highly effective. GCC is as reliable as RNLF in the early diagnosis of glaucoma and there is a highly significant correlation between them. Dysfunction of ganglion cells in patients with OHT may be detected earlier using PERG amplitude analysis.

  13. Rheological parameters of dough with inulin addition and its effect on bread quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bojnanska, T.; Tokar, M.; Vollmannova, A.

    2015-04-01

    The rheological properties of enriched flour prepared with an addition of inulin were studied. The addition of inulin caused changes of the rheological parameters of the recorder curve. 10% and more addition significantly extended development time and on the farinogram were two peaks of consistency, what is a non-standard shape. With increasing addition of inulin resistance to deformation grows and dough is difficult to process, over 15% addition make dough short and unsuitable for making bread. Bread volume, the most important parameter, significantly decreased with inulin addition. Our results suggest a level of 5% inulin to produce a functional bread of high sensory acceptance and a level of 10% inulin produce a bread of satisfactory sensory acceptance. Bread with a level over 10% of inulin was unsatisfactory.

  14. Transformation from Multilamellar to Unilamellar Vesicles by Addition of a Cationic Lipid to PEGylated Liposomes Explored with Synchrotron Small Angle X-ray Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuragi, Mina; Koiwai, Kazunori; Nakamura, Kouji; Masunaga, Hiroyasu; Ogawa, Hiroki; Sakurai, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    PEGylated liposomes composed of a benzamidine derivative (TRX), hydrogenated soybean phosphatidylcholine (HSPC), and N-(monomethoxy-polyethyleneglycolcarbamyl) distearoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE) were examined in terms of how the addition of TRX affects their structures with small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) as well as transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM images showed the presence of unilamella vesicles for both with and without TRX, though a small amount of multilamella vesicles were observed in absence of TRX. We analyzed SAXS profiles at contained TRX composition combined with contrast variation technique by adding PEG solution and unilamella vesicle model could be reproduced. Subsequently, we analyzed SAXS profiles at no TRX composition. The mixture model of unilamella and multilamella vesicle was reconstructed and we estimated about 10 % multilamella vesicles from a fitting parameter.

  15. Asteroid observations at low phase angles. IV. Average parameters for the new H, G1, G2 magnitude system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevchenko, Vasilij G.; Belskaya, Irina N.; Muinonen, Karri; Penttilä, Antti; Krugly, Yurij N.; Velichko, Feodor P.; Chiorny, Vasilij G.; Slyusarev, Ivan G.; Gaftonyuk, Ninel M.; Tereschenko, Igor A.

    2016-04-01

    We present new observational data for selected main-belt asteroids of different compositional types. The detailed magnitude-phase dependences including small phase angles (<1°) were obtained for these asteroids, namely: (10) Hygiea (down to the phase angle of 0.3°, C-type), (176) Iduna (0.2°, G-type), (214) Aschera (0.2°, E-type), (218) Bianca (0.3°, S-type), (250) Bettina (0.3°, M-type), (419) Aurelia (0.1°, F-type), (596) Scheila (0.2°, D-type), (635) Vundtia (0.2°, B-type), (671) Carnegia (0.2°, P-type), (717) Wisibada (0.1°, T-type), (1021) Flammario (0.6°, B-type), and (1279) Uganda (0.5°, E-type). For several asteroids, the dependences of brightness on the phase angle were investigated in the BVRI bands. We found a great diversity in the opposition-effect behavior both in the magnitude and the width of the opposition surges, especially for low-albedo asteroids. Some low-albedo asteroids (e.g., (10) Hygiea) display a broad opposition effect with an amplitude of 0.15-0.20 mag relative to the extrapolation of the linear part of the phase curve. Other asteroids (e.g., (596) Scheila, (1021) Flammario) show linear magnitude-phase dependences down to small phase angles (0.1-0.2°). Using numerous data sets on the magnitude-phase dependences with extensive phase-angle coverage, we examined in more detail the new three-parameter H, G1, G2 magnitude system. We determined the values of the G1 and G2 parameters for magnitude phase dependences of individual asteroids and obtained the average parameters for main asteroid compositional types. The values obtained can be used for the estimation of the absolute magnitude of an asteroid from a single observed magnitude when the magnitude-phase dependency is unknown and/or to calculate a visible magnitude for the ephemerides.

  16. Lens Position Parameters as Predictors of Intraocular Pressure Reduction After Cataract Surgery in Nonglaucomatous Patients With Open Angles

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chi-Hsin; Kakigi, Caitlin L.; Lin, Shuai-Chun; Wang, Yuan-Hung; Porco, Travis; Lin, Shan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the relationship between lens position parameters and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Methods The main outcome of the prospective study was percentage of IOP change, which was calculated using the preoperative IOP and the IOP 4 months after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles. Lens position (LP), defined as anterior chamber depth (ACD) + 1/2 lens thickness (LT), was assessed preoperatively using parameters from optical biometry. Preoperative IOP, central corneal thickness, ACD, LT, axial length (AXL), and the ratio of preoperative IOP to ACD (PD ratio) were also evaluated as potential predictors of percentage of IOP change. The predictive values of the parameters we found to be associated with the primary outcome were compared. Results Four months after cataract surgery, the average IOP reduction was 2.03 ± 2.42 mm Hg, a 12.74% reduction from the preoperative mean of 14.5 ± 3.05 mm Hg. Lens position was correlated with IOP reduction percentage after adjusting for confounders (P = 0.002). Higher preoperative IOP, shallower ACD, shorter AXL, and thicker LT were significantly associated with percentage of IOP decrease. Although not statistically significant, LP was a better predictor of percentage of IOP change compared to PD ratio, preoperative IOP, and ACD. Conclusions The percentage of IOP reduction after cataract surgery in nonglaucomatous eyes with open angles is greater in more anteriorly positioned lenses. Lens position, which is convenient to compute by basic ocular biometric data, is an accessible predictor with considerable predictive value for postoperative IOP change. PMID:26650901

  17. Influence of the parameters of a human triceps surae muscle model on the isometric torque-angle relationship.

    PubMed

    Out, L; Vrijkotte, T G; van Soest, A J; Bobbert, M F

    1996-02-01

    This study investigates the influence of parameter values of the human triceps surae muscle on the torque-angle relationship. The model used consisted of three units, each containing a contractile, a series elastic and a parallel elastic element. Parameter values were based on morphological characteristics, which made it possible to model individual units. However, for a number of parameters the values reported in the literature vary considerably. It was investigated how sensitive model results were for variation of these parameters. Slack length of the series elastic element, mean moment arm, maximum force, and length of the contractile element appeared to be the most important determinants of the behavior. For mean moment arm and contractile element length, morphology-based methods of estimation could be recommended. Slack length and maximum force were obtained through optimization. It was concluded that the model does not contain parameters on which its output depends strongly and which are difficult to estimate as well, with two exceptions: slack length of the series elastic element and maximum force.

  18. Determination of optimal imaging parameters for the reconstruction of a nuclear fuel assembly using limited angle neutron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abir, M. I.; Islam, F. F.; Craft, A.; Williams, W. J.; Wachs, D. M.; Chichester, D. L.; Meyer, M. K.; Lee, H. K.

    2016-01-01

    The core components of nuclear reactors (e.g., fuel assemblies, spacer grids, control rods) encounter harsh environments due to high temperature, physical stress, and a tremendous level of radiation. The integrity of these elements is crucial for safe operation of nuclear power plants; post-irradiation examination (PIE) can reveal information about the integrity of these components. Neutron computed tomography (CT) is one important PIE measurement tool for nondestructively evaluating the structural integrity of these items. CT typically requires many projections to be acquired from different view angles, after which a mathematical algorithm is used for image reconstruction. However, when working with heavily irradiated materials and irradiated nuclear fuel, obtaining many projections is laborious and expensive. Image reconstruction from a smaller number of projections has been explored to achieve faster and more cost-efficient PIE. Classical reconstruction methods (e.g., filtered backprojection), unfortunately, do not typically offer stable reconstructions from a highly asymmetric, few-projection data set and often create severe streaking artifacts. We propose an iterative reconstruction technique to reconstruct curved, plate-type nuclear fuel assemblies using limited-angle CT. The performance of the proposed method is assessed using simulated data and validated through real projections. We also discuss the systematic strategy for establishing the conditions of reconstructions and finding the optimal imaging parameters for reconstructions of the fuel assemblies from few projections using limited-angle CT. Results show that a fuel assembly can be reconstructed using limited-angle CT if 36 or more projections are taken from a particular direction with 1° angular increment.

  19. Laser-Assisted Bending of Sharp Angles With Small Fillet Radius on Stainless Steel Sheets: Analysis of Experimental Set-Up and Processing Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisario, Annamaria; Barletta, Massimiliano; Venettacci, Simone; Veniali, Francesco

    2015-06-01

    Achievement of sharp bending angles with small fillet radius on stainless steel sheets by mechanical bending requires sophisticated bending device and troublesome operational procedures, which can involve expensive molds, huge presses and large loads. In addition, springback is always difficult to control, thus often leading to final parts with limited precision and accuracy. In contrast, laser-assisted bending of metals is an emerging technology, as it often allows to perform difficult and multifaceted manufacturing tasks with relatively small efforts. In the present work, laser-assisted bending of stainless steel sheets to achieve sharp angles is thus investigated. First, bending trials were performed by combining laser irradiation with an auxiliary bending device triggered by a pneumatic actuator and based on kinematic of deformable quadrilaterals. Second, laser operational parameters, that is, scanning speed, power and number of passes, were varied to identify the most suitable processing settings. Bending angles and fillet radii were measured by coordinate measurement machine. Experimental data were elaborated by combined ANalysis Of Mean (ANOM) and ANalysis Of VAriance (ANOVA). Based on experimental findings, the best strategy to achieve an aircraft prototype from a stainless steel sheet was designed and implemented.

  20. On the role of block copolymer additives for calcium carbonate crystallization: small angle neutron scattering investigation by applying contrast variation.

    PubMed

    Endo, Hitoshi; Schwahn, Dietmar; Cölfen, Helmut

    2004-05-15

    The role of the double-hydrophilic block copolymer poly(ethylen glycol)-block-poly(methacrylic acid) (PEG-b-PMAA) on the morphogenesis of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) was studied by applying the contrast variation small angle neutron scattering technique. The morphology and size of CaCO3 crystals is strongly affected by the addition of PEG-b-PMAA. In order to determine the partial scattering functions of the polymer and CaCO3 mineral, we developed both an experimental and theoretical approach with a sophisticated method of their determination from the scattering intensity. Partial scattering functions give detailed information for each component. In particular, the partial scattering function of the polymer, Spp, shows a monotonic slope with Q(-2 to -3) where the scattering vector Q is low (Q < 0.01 Angstrom(-1)), which is a clear evidence that the polymer within the CaCO3 mineral has a mass fractal dimension. The other partial scattering functions reflected the geometry of the CaCO3 particles or the "interaction" of polymer and CaCO3 on a microscopic scale, which leads to a coherent view with Spp.

  1. Comparison of Schlemm's canal's biological parameters in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal human eyes with swept source optical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fei; Shi, Guohua; Li, Xiqi; Lu, Jing; Ding, Zhihua; Sun, Xinghuai; Jiang, Chunhui; Zhang, Yudong

    2012-11-01

    Thirty-seven normal and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) subjects were noninvasively imaged by a tailor-made real-time anterior segment swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) to demonstrate the differences of the Schlemm's canal (SC) between POAG and normal eyes. After the cross-section images of the anterior chamber angle were acquired by SS-OCT, SC was confirmed by two independent masked observers and the average area, long diameter, and perimeter of the SC were measured. In normal subjects the circumference, area, and long diameter is 580.34±87.81 μm, 8023.89±1486.10 μ, and 272.83±49.39 μm, respectively, and these parameters were 393.25±98.04 μm, 3941.50±1210.69 μ, and 190.91±46.47 μm in the POAG subjects. The area of SC in the normal ones was significantly larger than that in POAG eyes (p<0.001), so as the long diameter and the perimeter (p<0.001 p<0.001).

  2. Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalheer, C. V.

    1973-01-01

    The chemistry of lubricant additives is discussed to show what the additives are chemically and what functions they perform in the lubrication of various kinds of equipment. Current theories regarding the mode of action of lubricant additives are presented. The additive groups discussed include the following: (1) detergents and dispersants, (2) corrosion inhibitors, (3) antioxidants, (4) viscosity index improvers, (5) pour point depressants, and (6) antifouling agents.

  3. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI.

    PubMed

    Yesinowski, James P; Ladouceur, Harold D; Purdy, Andrew P; Miller, Joel B

    2010-12-21

    rotating a conductor in a homogeneous magnetic field. We present a theoretical analysis and finite-element simulations that account for the magnitude and rapid time-scale of the resistive heating effects and the quadratic spinning speed dependence of the chemical shift observed experimentally. Known thermophysical properties are used as inputs to the model, the sole adjustable parameter being a scaling of the bulk thermal conductivity of CuI in order to account for the effective thermal conductivity of the rotating powdered sample. In addition to the dramatic consequences of electrical conductivity in the sample, ionic conductivity also influences the spectra. All three nuclei exhibit quadrupolar satellite transitions extending over several hundred kilohertz that reflect defects perturbing the cubic symmetry of the zincblende lattice. Broadening of these satellite transitions with increasing temperature arises from the onset of Cu(+) ion jumps to sites with different electric field gradients, a process that interferes with the formation of rotational echoes. This broadening has been quantitatively analyzed for the (63)Cu and (65)Cu nuclei using a simple model in the literature to yield an activation barrier of 0.64 eV (61.7 kJ/mole) for the Cu(+) ion jumping motion responsible for the ionic conductivity that agrees with earlier results based on (63)Cu NMR relaxation times of static samples.

  4. Electrical and ionic conductivity effects on magic-angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance parameters of CuI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yesinowski, James P.; Ladouceur, Harold D.; Purdy, Andrew P.; Miller, Joel B.

    2010-12-01

    conductor in a homogeneous magnetic field. We present a theoretical analysis and finite-element simulations that account for the magnitude and rapid time-scale of the resistive heating effects and the quadratic spinning speed dependence of the chemical shift observed experimentally. Known thermophysical properties are used as inputs to the model, the sole adjustable parameter being a scaling of the bulk thermal conductivity of CuI in order to account for the effective thermal conductivity of the rotating powdered sample. In addition to the dramatic consequences of electrical conductivity in the sample, ionic conductivity also influences the spectra. All three nuclei exhibit quadrupolar satellite transitions extending over several hundred kilohertz that reflect defects perturbing the cubic symmetry of the zincblende lattice. Broadening of these satellite transitions with increasing temperature arises from the onset of Cu+ ion jumps to sites with different electric field gradients, a process that interferes with the formation of rotational echoes. This broadening has been quantitatively analyzed for the 63Cu and 65Cu nuclei using a simple model in the literature to yield an activation barrier of 0.64 eV (61.7 kJ/mole) for the Cu+ ion jumping motion responsible for the ionic conductivity that agrees with earlier results based on 63Cu NMR relaxation times of static samples

  5. Microanisotropy imaging: quantification of microscopic diffusion anisotropy and orientational order parameter by diffusion MRI with magic-angle spinning of the q-vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasič, Samo; Szczepankiewicz, Filip; Eriksson, Stefanie; Nilsson, Markus; Topgaard, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is the method of choice for non-invasive investigations of the structure of human brain white matter. The results are conventionally reported as maps of the fractional anisotropy (FA), which is a parameter related to microstructural features such as axon density, diameter, and myelination. The interpretation of FA in terms of microstructure becomes ambiguous when there is a distribution of axon orientations within the image voxel. In this paper, we propose a procedure for resolving this ambiguity by determining a new parameter, the microscopic fractional anisotropy (µFA), which corresponds to the FA without the confounding influence of orientation dispersion. In addition, we suggest a method for measuring the orientational order parameter (OP) for the anisotropic objects. The experimental protocol is capitalizing on a recently developed diffusion NMR pulse sequence based on magic-angle spinning of the q-vector. Proof-of-principle experiments are carried out on microimaging and clinical MRI equipment using lyotropic liquid crystals and plant tissues as model materials with high µFA and low FA on account of orientation dispersion. We expect the presented method to be especially fruitful in combination with DTI and high angular resolution acquisition protocols for neuroimaging studies of grey and white matter.

  6. The association between clinical parameters and glaucoma-specific quality of life in Chinese primary open-angle glaucoma patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jacky W Y; Chan, Catherine W S; Chan, Jonathan C H; Li, Q; Lai, Jimmy S M

    2014-08-01

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate the association between clinical measurements and glaucoma-specific quality of life in Chinese glaucoma patients. DESIGN. Cross-sectional study. SETTING. An academic hospital in Hong Kong. PATIENTS. A Chinese translation of the Glaucoma Quality of Life-15 questionnaire was completed by 51 consecutive patients with bilateral primary open-angle glaucoma. The binocular means of several clinical measurements were correlated with Glaucoma Quality of Life-15 findings using Pearson's correlation coefficient and linear regression. The measurements were the visual field index and pattern standard deviation from the Humphrey Field Analyzer, Snellen best-corrected visual acuity, presenting intra-ocular pressure, current intra-ocular pressure, average retinal nerve fibre layer thickness via optical coherence tomography, and the number of topical anti-glaucoma medications being used. RESULTS. In these patients, there was a significant correlation and linear relationship between a poorer Glaucoma Quality of Life-15 score and a lower visual field index (r=0.3, r(2)=0.1, P=0.01) and visual acuity (r=0.3, r(2)=0.1, P=0.03). A thinner retinal nerve fibre layer also correlated with a poorer Glaucoma Quality of Life-15 score, but did not attain statistical significance (r=0.3, P=0.07). There were no statistically significant correlations for the other clinical parameters with the Glaucoma Quality of Life-15 scores (all P values being >0.7). The three most problematic activities affecting quality of life were "adjusting to bright lights", "going from a light to a dark room or vice versa", and "seeing at night". CONCLUSION. For Chinese primary open-angle glaucoma patients, binocular visual field index and visual acuity correlated linearly with glaucoma-specific quality of life, and activities involving dark adaptation were the most problematic.

  7. Early Postoperative Effects of Cataract Surgery on Anterior Segment Parameters in Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Pseudoexfoliation Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Elgin, Ufuk; Şen, Emine; Şimşek, Tülay; Tekin, Kemal; Yılmazbaş, Pelin

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the effect of cataract surgery on anterior segment parameters measured by optical biometry in primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and pseudoexfoliation glaucoma (PXG). Materials and Methods: Twenty-five eyes of 25 patients with POAG and 29 eyes of 29 patients with PXG who had uncomplicated phacoemulsification and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation surgery were included to our prospective study. Central corneal thickness (CCT), anterior chamber depth (ACD) and axial length (AL) were measured with an optical biometer preoperatively and at 1 month postoperatively. The pre- and postoperative values of intraocular pressure (IOP) and the anterior segment parameters and the differences between POAG and PXG were compared statistically by paired t, independent t and chi-square tests. Results: The mean values of preoperative CCT (p=0.042) and ACD (p=0.012) were significantly lower in the PXG than in the POAG group. In the PXG group, IOP decreased (p=0.001) but CCT (p=0.03) and ACD (p=0.001) increased significantly postoperatively; AL did not change significantly. In the POAG group, IOP decreased (p=0.01) and ACD (p=0.004) increased significantly postoperatively, while AL and CCT did not change significantly. There were no significant differences in the pre- to postoperative changes in IOP (p=0.76), AL (p=0.44) and CCT (p=0.52) values between the two groups. However, the postoperative increase in ACD was larger in the PXG group (p=0.03). Conclusion: Cataract surgery may cause some changes in IOP and anterior segment parameters like ACD and CCT postoperatively in eyes with POAG and PXG, and these changes may differ between eyes with PXG and POAG. PMID:27800269

  8. Additional deleterious effects of alcohol consumption on sperm parameters and DNA integrity in diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Pourentezari, M; Talebi, A R; Mangoli, E; Anvari, M; Rahimipour, M

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to survey the impact of alcohol consumption on sperm parameters and DNA integrity in experimentally induced diabetic mice. A total of 32 adult male mice were divided into four groups: mice of group 1 served as control fed on basal diet, group 2 received streptozotocin (STZ) (200 mg kg(-1) , single dose, intraperitoneal) and basal diet, group 3 received alcohol (10 mg kg(-1) , water soluble) and basal diet, and group 4 received STZ and alcohol for 35 days. The cauda epididymidis of each mouse was dissected and placed in 1 ml of pre-warm Ham's F10 culture medium for 30 min. The swim-out spermatozoa were analysed for count, motility, morphology and viability. Sperm chromatin quality was evaluated with aniline blue, toluidine blue, acridine orange and chromomycin A3 staining. The results showed that all sperm parameters had significant differences (P < 0.05), also when sperm chromatin was assessed with cytochemical tests. There were significant differences (P < 0.001) between the groups. According to our results, alcohol and diabetes can cause abnormalities in sperm parameters and chromatin quality. In addition, alcohol consumption in diabetic mice can intensify sperm chromatin/DNA damage. PMID:26358836

  9. Correlation of pattern reversal visual evoked potential parameters with the pattern standard deviation in primary open angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ruchi; Bokariya, Pradeep; Singh, Ramji; Singh, Smita; Narang, Purvasha

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate whether glaucomatous visual field defect particularly the pattern standard deviation (PSD) of Humphrey visual field could be associated with visual evoked potential (VEP) parameters of patients having primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). METHODS Visual field by Humphrey perimetry and simultaneous recordings of pattern reversal visual evoked potential (PRVEP) were assessed in 100 patients with POAG. The stimulus configuration for VEP recordings consisted of the transient pattern reversal method in which a black and white checker board pattern was generated (full field) and displayed on VEP monitor (colour 14″) by an electronic pattern regenerator inbuilt in an evoked potential recorder (RMS EMG EP MARK II). RESULTS The results of our study indicate that there is a highly significant (P<0.001) negative correlation of P100 amplitude and a statistically significant (P<0.05) positive correlation of N70 latency, P100 latency and N155 latency with the PSD of Humphrey visual field in the subjects of POAG in various age groups as evaluated by Student's t-test. CONCLUSION Prolongation of VEP latencies were mirrored by a corresponding increase of PSD values. Conversely, as PSD increases the magnitude of VEP excursions were found to be diminished. PMID:24790879

  10. Determination of isocentric machine parameters for inclined treatment volumes: a single solution for angled transverse or coronal treatment planes.

    PubMed

    Bradley, F L

    2001-01-01

    The derivation of the trigonometric equations necessary to calculate gantry, floor and collimator settings for a treatment plane at an angle phi to the transverse plane of the patient has been described previously. The derivation of a second set of equations to facilitate treatment in a plane at an angle phi to the coronal plane has also been described previously. This work reinterprets the geometry of inclined volumes and shows that essentially only one set of equations is required to determine the settings for treatment planes at an angle phi to either the transverse or coronal planes of the patient.

  11. Intrinsic viscosity and conformational parameters of xanthan in aqueous solutions: salt addition effect.

    PubMed

    Brunchi, Cristina-Eliza; Morariu, Simona; Bercea, Maria

    2014-10-01

    The intrinsic viscosity and conformational parameters of xanthan in aqueous solutions were investigated at 25°C as a function of salt nature (NaCl and KCl) and concentration (up to 3×10(-1)mol/L). The viscometric parameters were evaluated by applying semi-empirical equations proposed by Rao and Wolf. The results show that the new model proposed by Wolf provides accurate intrinsic viscosity values comparable with those obtained by using traditional methods. The experimental data were modeled with Boltzmann sigmoidal equation. The stiffness parameter, hydrodynamic volume and viscometric expansion factor were determined and discussed. With increasing salt concentration, the hydrodynamic volume and the viscometric expansion factor decrease and the critical overlap concentration increases, reaching limiting values above a given salt concentration. The high Huggins constant values suggest the existence of aggregates for salt concentrations above 5×10(-2) and 3×10(-3)mol/L for NaCl and KCl, respectively. Stiffness parameter was determined by Smidsrød and Haug method as being 5.45×10(-3), indicating a rigid conformation for xanthan macromolecules in solution.

  12. Effect of a phytogenic feed additive on performance, ovarian morphology, serum lipid parameters and egg sensory quality in laying hen

    PubMed Central

    Saki, Ali Asghar; Aliarabi, Hassan; Hosseini Siyar, Sayed Ali; Salari, Jalal; Hashemi, Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    This present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary inclusion of 4, 8 and 12 g kg-1 phytogenic feed additives mixture on performance, egg quality, ovary parameters, serum biochemical parameters and yolk trimethylamine level in laying hens. The results of experiment have shown that egg weight was increased by supplementation of 12 g kg-1 feed additive whereas egg production, feed intake and feed conversion ratio (FCR) were not significantly affected. There were no significant differences in egg quality parameters by supplementation of phytogenic feed additive, whereas yolk trimethylamine level was decreased as the feed additive level increased. The sensory evaluation parameters did not differ significantly. No significant differences were found in serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels between the treatments but low- and high-density lipoprotein were significantly increased. Number of small follicles and ovary weight were significantly increased by supplementation of 12 g kg-1 feed additive. Overall, dietary supplementation of polyherbal additive increased egg weigh, improved ovary characteristics and declined yolk trimethylamine level. PMID:25610580

  13. Effect of argon addition on plasma parameters and dust charging in hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kakati, B. Kausik, S. S.; Saikia, B. K.; Bandyopadhyay, M.; Saxena, Y. C.

    2014-10-28

    Experimental results on effect of adding argon gas to hydrogen plasma in a multi-cusp dusty plasma device are reported. Addition of argon modifies plasma density, electron temperature, degree of hydrogen dissociation, dust current as well as dust charge. From the dust charging profile, it is observed that the dust current and dust charge decrease significantly up to 40% addition of argon flow rate in hydrogen plasma. But beyond 40% of argon flow rate, the changes in dust current and dust charge are insignificant. Results show that the addition of argon to hydrogen plasma in a dusty plasma device can be used as a tool to control the dust charging in a low pressure dusty plasma.

  14. A Novel Approach for Deriving Force Field Torsion Angle Parameters Accounting for Conformation-Dependent Solvation Effects.

    PubMed

    Zgarbová, Marie; Luque, F Javier; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Jurečka, Petr

    2012-09-11

    A procedure for deriving force field torsion parameters including certain previously neglected solvation effects is suggested. In contrast to the conventional in vacuo approaches, the dihedral parameters are obtained from the difference between the quantum-mechanical self-consistent reaction field and Poisson-Boltzmann continuum solvation models. An analysis of the solvation contributions shows that two major effects neglected when torsion parameters are derived in vacuo are (i) conformation-dependent solute polarization and (ii) solvation of conformation-dependent charge distribution. Using the glycosidic torsion as an example, we demonstrate that the corresponding correction for the torsion potential is substantial and important. Our approach avoids double counting of solvation effects and provides parameters that may be used in combination with any of the widely used nonpolarizable discrete solvent models, such as TIPnP or SPC/E, or with continuum solvent models. Differences between our model and the previously suggested solvation models are discussed. Improvements were demonstrated for the latest AMBER RNA χOL3 parameters derived with inclusion of solvent effects in a previous publication (Zgarbova et al. J. Chem. Theory Comput.2011, 7, 2886). The described procedure may help to provide consistently better force field parameters than the currently used parametrization approaches.

  15. Radiation processing of thermoplastic starch by blending aromatic additives: Effect of blend composition and radiation parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandal, Dhriti; Mikus, Pierre-Yves; Dole, Patrice; Coqueret, Xavier

    2013-03-01

    This paper reports on the effects of electron beam (EB) irradiation on poly α-1,4-glucose oligomers (maltodextrins) in the presence of water and of various aromatic additives, as model blends for gaining a better understanding at a molecular level the modifications occurring in amorphous starch-lignin blends submitted to ionizing irradiation for improving the properties of this type of bio-based thermoplastic material. A series of aromatic compounds, namely p-methoxy benzyl alcohol, benzene dimethanol, cinnamyl alcohol and some related carboxylic acids namely cinnamic acid, coumaric acid, and ferulic acid, was thus studied for assessing the ability of each additive to counteract chain scission of the polysaccharide and induce interchain covalent linkages. Gel formation in EB-irradiated blends comprising of maltodextrin was shown to be dependent on three main factors: the type of aromatic additive, presence of glycerol, and irradiation dose. The chain scission versus grafting phenomenon as a function of blend composition and dose were studied using Size Exclusion Chromatography by determining the changes in molecular weight distribution (MWD) from Refractive Index (RI) chromatograms and the presence of aromatic grafts onto the maltodextrin chains from UV chromatograms. The occurrence of crosslinking was quantified by gel fraction measurements allowing for ranking the cross-linking efficiency of the additives. When applying the method to destructurized starch blends, gel formation was also shown to be strongly affected by the moisture content of the sample submitted to irradiation. The results demonstrate the possibility to tune the reactivity of tailored blend for minimizing chain degradation and control the degree of cross-linking.

  16. Establishing Age-Adjusted Reference Ranges for Iris-Related Parameters in Open Angle Eyes with Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Jeffrey R.; Blieden, Lauren S.; Chuang, Alice Z.; Baker, Laura A.; Rigi, Mohammed; Feldman, Robert M.; Bell, Nicholas P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Define criteria for iris-related parameters in an adult open angle population as measured with swept source Fourier domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT). Methods Ninety-eight eyes of 98 participants with open angles were included and stratified into 5 age groups (18–35, 36–45, 46–55, 56–65, and 66–79 years). ASOCT scans with 3D mode angle analysis were taken with the CASIA SS-1000 (Tomey Corporation, Nagoya, Japan) and analyzed using the Anterior Chamber Analysis and Interpretation software. Anterior iris surface length (AISL), length of scleral spur landmark (SSL) to pupillary margin (SSL-to-PM), iris contour ratio (ICR = AISL/SSL-to-PM), pupil radius, radius of iris centroid (RICe), and iris volume were measured. Outcome variables were summarized for all eyes and age groups, and mean values among age groups were compared using one-way analysis of variance. Stepwise regression analysis was used to investigate demographic and ocular characteristic factors that affected each iris-related parameter. Results Mean (±SD) values were 2.24 mm (±0.46), 4.06 mm (±0.27), 3.65 mm (±0.48), 4.16 mm (±0.47), 1.14 (±0.04), 1.51 mm2 (±0.23), and 38.42 μL (±4.91) for pupillary radius, RICe, SSL-to-PM, AISL, ICR, iris cross-sectional area, and iris volume, respectively. Both pupillary radius (P = 0.002) and RICe (P = 0.027) decreased with age, while SSL-to-PM (P = 0.002) and AISL increased with age (P = 0.001). ICR (P = 0.54) and iris volume (P = 0.49) were not affected by age. Conclusion This study establishes reference values for iris-related parameters in an adult open angle population, which will be useful for future studies examining the role of iris changes in pathologic states. PMID:26815917

  17. Effect of Operating Parameters and Chemical Additives on Crystal Habit and Specific Cake Resistance of Zinc Hydroxide Precipitates

    SciTech Connect

    Alwin, Jennifer Louise

    1999-08-01

    The effect of process parameters and chemical additives on the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates was investigated. The ability of a slurry to be filtered is dependent upon the particle habit of the solid and the particle habit is influenced by certain process variables. The process variables studied include neutralization temperature, agitation type, and alkalinity source used for neutralization. Several commercially available chemical additives advertised to aid in solid/liquid separation were also examined in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation. A statistical analysis revealed that the neutralization temperature and the source of alkalinity were statistically significant in influencing the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates in this study. The type of agitation did not significantly effect the specific cake resistance of zinc hydroxide precipitates. The use of chemical additives in conjunction with hydroxide precipitation had a favorable effect on the filterability. The morphology of the hydroxide precipitates was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy.

  18. In-situ surface wettability parameters of submerged in brackish water surfaces derived from captive bubble contact angle studies as indicators of surface condition level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pogorzelski, S. J.; Mazurek, A. Z.; Szczepanska, A.

    2013-06-01

    The characterization of wetting properties (by contact angles) of several undersea artificial (glass plates,) and natural (stones, sand layers, soft-bottom structures, aquatic macrophytes, sediments, and seafloor communities) solid substrata in the Baltic Sea brackish water (Gulf of Gdansk). The studies were performed under laboratory and field conditions using a novel captive bubble air-pipette computer microscope system. A set of the surface wettability parameters: the apparent surface free energy γSV, adhesive layer film pressure Π, work of adhesion WA, and work of spreading WS were determined to quantify the wetting properties of model substrata using the contact angle hysteresis (CAH) approach. The useful technique to measure in situ the contact angle giving reproducible and accurate values of CA turned out to be a captive bubble method, for fully hydrated interfacial layers of highly hydrophilic and porous nature met at seabed (Rodrigues-Valverde et al., 2002). CA measurements revealed mostly hydrophilic nature of the studied solid material (CA < 90°) where the presence of adsorbed organic matter layer or crude oil film covering lead to surface hydrophobization (CA↑, γSV ↓,WA↓, WS more negative). The adhesion of biofouling was correlated both with CAH and the dispersive interaction term γSVd of the total γSV. Monitoring of the artificial substrata of the hydrophilic nature with a CA technique can be used to observe the development of the organisms community i.e., microfouling, and to carry out a comprehensive study of surfaces of the submerged macrophytes (Potamogeton lucens in particular). Since aquatic macrophytes can act as bio-indicators of water chemistry their surface wettability may reflect plant surface erosion and organic matter accumulation state being of particular value in biological assessment of ecosystems status.

  19. The influence of non-solvent addition on the independent and dependent parameters in roller electrospinning of polyurethane.

    PubMed

    Cengiz-Callioglu, Funda; Jirsak, Oldrich; Dayik, Mehmet

    2013-07-01

    This paper discusses the effects of 1,1,2,2 tetrachlorethylen (TCE) non-solvent addition on the independent (electrical conductivity, dielectric constant, surface tension and the theological properties of the solution etc.) and dependent parameters (number of Taylor cones per square meter (NTC/m2), spinning performance for one Taylor cone (SP/TC), total spinning performance (SP), fiber properties such as diameter, diameter uniformity, non-fibrous area) in roller electrospinning of polyurethane (PU). The same process parameters (voltage, distance of the electrodes, humidity, etc.) were applied for all solutions during the spinning process. According to the results, the effect of TCE non-solvent concentration on the dielectric constant, surface tension, rheological properties of the solution and also spinning performance was important statistically. Beside these results, TCE non-solvent concentration effects quality of fiber and nano web structure. Generally high fiber density, low non-fibrous percentage and uniform nanofibers were obtained from fiber morphology analyses.

  20. Ultrasonic degradation of polymers: effect of operating parameters and intensification using additives for carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA).

    PubMed

    Mohod, Ashish V; Gogate, Parag R

    2011-05-01

    Use of ultrasound can yield polymer degradation as reflected by a significant reduction in the intrinsic viscosity or the molecular weight. The ultrasonic degradation of two water soluble polymers viz. carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) has been studied in the present work. The effect of different operating parameters such as time of irradiation, immersion depth of horn and solution concentration has been investigated initially using laboratory scale operation followed by intensification studies using different additives such as air, sodium chloride and surfactant. Effect of scale of operation has been investigated with experiments in the available different capacity reactors with an objective of recommending a suitable type of configuration for large scale operation. The experimental results show that the viscosity of polymer solution decreased with an increase in the ultrasonic irradiation time and approached a limiting value. Use of additives such as air, sodium chloride and surfactant helps in increasing the extent of viscosity reduction. At higher frequency operation the viscosity reduction has been found to be negligible possibly attributed to less contribution of the physical effects. The viscosity reduction in the case of ultrasonic horn has been observed to be more as compared to other large capacity reactors. Kinetic analysis of the polymer degradation process has also been performed. The present work has enabled us to understand the role of the different operating parameters in deciding the extent of viscosity reduction in polymer systems and also the controlling effects of low frequency high power ultrasound with experiments on different scales of operation.

  1. Support vector machine to predict diesel engine performance and emission parameters fueled with nano-particles additive to diesel fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, M.; Najafi, G.; Ghobadian, B.; Mamat, R.; Noor, M. M.; Moosavian, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the use of adaptive Support Vector Machine (SVM) to predict the performance parameters and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine operating on nanodiesel blended fuels. In order to predict the engine parameters, the whole experimental data were randomly divided into training and testing data. For SVM modelling, different values for radial basis function (RBF) kernel width and penalty parameters (C) were considered and the optimum values were then found. The results demonstrate that SVM is capable of predicting the diesel engine performance and emissions. In the experimental step, Carbon nano tubes (CNT) (40, 80 and 120 ppm) and nano silver particles (40, 80 and 120 ppm) with nanostructure were prepared and added as additive to the diesel fuel. Six cylinders, four-stroke diesel engine was fuelled with these new blended fuels and operated at different engine speeds. Experimental test results indicated the fact that adding nano particles to diesel fuel, increased diesel engine power and torque output. For nano-diesel it was found that the brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was decreased compared to the net diesel fuel. The results proved that with increase of nano particles concentrations (from 40 ppm to 120 ppm) in diesel fuel, CO2 emission increased. CO emission in diesel fuel with nano-particles was lower significantly compared to pure diesel fuel. UHC emission with silver nano-diesel blended fuel decreased while with fuels that contains CNT nano particles increased. The trend of NOx emission was inverse compared to the UHC emission. With adding nano particles to the blended fuels, NOx increased compared to the net diesel fuel. The tests revealed that silver & CNT nano particles can be used as additive in diesel fuel to improve complete combustion of the fuel and reduce the exhaust emissions significantly.

  2. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium.

    PubMed

    Amin Yavari, S; Chai, Y C; Böttger, A J; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20V anodizing time: 30min to 3h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500°C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500°C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium.

  3. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium.

    PubMed

    Amin Yavari, S; Chai, Y C; Böttger, A J; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20V anodizing time: 30min to 3h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500°C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500°C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. PMID

  4. Application of moiré technique to the measurement of the atmospheric turbulence parameters related to the angle of arrival fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Saifollah; Tavassoly, M Taghi

    2006-11-15

    There are several methods for measuring ground-level atmospheric turbulence parameters, such as the refractive index profile and its fluctuations, correlations of the fluctuations in space and time, and the atmospheric refractive-index structure constant. These methods are based mainly on the measurement of fluctuations in intensity and location of an image formed by light propagating in the turbulent atmosphere or the fluctuations in impinging points of narrow light beams traversing the ground-level atmosphere. Exploiting the moiré technique, we suggest a high-precision approach for determining fluctuaions in the angle of arrival. When a low-frequency grating (carrier grating) is installed at a suitable distance from a telescope, its image, practically, forms on the focal plane of the telescope objective. Superimposing a physical grating (probe grating) of the same pitch as the image grating on the image forms the moiré pattern. The atmospheric turbulence distorts the image grating. Processing the fluctuations of successive moiré fringes can yield the mentioned parameters across a rather large cross section of the atmosphere with high accuracy, because of the moiré technique's magnifying character and access to a large volume of data, and does so in a comparatively simple and reliable manner.

  5. Coupling parameters of many-body interactions for the Al(100) surface state: A high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, J.; Shimada, K.; Hayashi, H.; Iwasawa, H.; Aiura, Y.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.

    2011-10-01

    We examined the dimensionless coupling parameters of many-body interactions for a free-electron-like surface-derived state in Al(100) by means of high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy. A kink structure was found to exist in the energy-band dispersion near the Fermi level (EF), which was attributed to the electron-phonon interaction. At 50 K, the coupling parameters of the electron-phonon and electron-electron interactions were estimated as λep=0.67±0.05 and λee˜0.003, respectively, indicating that the effective mass enhancement was mainly derived from the electron-phonon interaction. The temperature dependence of the kink structure, as measured by λep(T), was consistent with a theoretical calculation based on the Eliashberg function. A quasiparticle peak with a width of 15-20 meV was found near EF, which was explained well by the simulated spectral function incorporating the self-energy evaluated in this study. We found that the electrons at the surface were strongly scattered by the defects at the surface and that the linewidth was significantly broadened (Γ0=0.238±0.006 eV).

  6. Calculating slope and ED50 of additive dose-response curves, and application of these tabulated parameter values.

    PubMed

    Pöch, G; Pancheva, S N

    1995-06-01

    Comparing dose-response curves (DRCs) of a compound A in the absence and presence of a fixed dose of an antagonist B is standard in pharmacology and toxicology. When B qualitatively resembles A in its action, it is often useful to construct theoretical DRCs of additive and independent combinations. Theoretical curves are calculated from experimental values by the program ALLFIT, which uses the four parameter logistic equation. DRCs of theoretical, additive DRCs are obtained by using the respective values for slope and ED50, which were taken from tables presented here compiled on the basis of the slope of the DRC of A alone (0.6-14) and of the effect of B alone (1-75%). These tables are unnecessary for the construction of theoretical curves if A acts by an independent mechanism, giving values for slope and ED50 identical to those of the DRC of A alone. Experimental DRCs of antiviral and other effects (the latter taken from data in the literature) are compared with theoretical curves by an F-test analysis provided by ALLFIT. The method can be used successfully for the construction of theoretical curves for additive and independent DRCs and comparison with experimental curves. This comparison may help clarify the mode of interaction of A with B. PMID:7640393

  7. Hematological parameters in Polish mixed breed rabbits with addition of meat breed blood in the annual cycle.

    PubMed

    Tokarz-Deptuła, B; Niedźwiedzka-Rystwej, P; Adamiak, M; Hukowska-Szematowicz, B; Trzeciak-Ryczek, A; Deptuła, W

    2015-01-01

    In the paper we studied haematologic values, such as haemoglobin concentration, haematocrit value, thrombocytes, leucocytes: lymphocytes, neutrophils, basophils, eosinophils and monocytes in the pheral blood in Polish mixed-breeds with addition of meat breed blood in order to obtain the reference values which are until now not available for this animals. In studying this indices we took into consideration the impact of the season (spring, summer, autumn, winter), and sex of the animals. The studies have shown a high impact of the season of the year on those rabbits, but only in spring and summer. Moreover we observed that the sex has mean impact on the studied values of haematological parameters in those rabbits. According to our knowledge, this is the first paper on haematologic values in this widely used group of rabbits, so they may serve as reference values. PMID:26812808

  8. Optimal welding parameters for very high power ultrasonic additive manufacturing of smart structures with aluminum 6061 matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolcott, Paul J.; Hehr, Adam; Dapino, Marcelo J.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonic additive manufacturing (UAM) is a recent solid state manufacturing process that combines ad- ditive joining of thin metal tapes with subtractive milling operations to generate near net shape metallic parts. Due to the minimal heating during the process, UAM is a proven method of embedding Ni-Ti, Fe-Ga, and PVDF to create active metal matrix composites. Recently, advances in the UAM process utilizing 9 kW very high power (VHP) welding has improved bonding properties, enabling joining of high strength materials previously unweldable with 1 kW low power UAM. Consequently, a design of experiments study was conducted to optimize welding conditions for aluminum 6061 components. This understanding is critical in the design of UAM parts containing smart materials. Build parameters, including weld force, weld speed, amplitude, and temperature were varied based on a Taguchi experimental design matrix and tested for me- chanical strength. Optimal weld parameters were identi ed with statistical methods including a generalized linear model for analysis of variance (ANOVA), mean e ects plots, and interaction e ects plots.

  9. Communication: Polarization-angle-scanning two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy of antiparallel β-sheet polypeptide: Additional dimensions in two-dimensional optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2010-12-01

    A theoretical description of polarization-angle-scanning (PAS) two-dimensional infrared (2DIR) spectroscopy, where the incident beam polarization directions are considered to be novel dimensions in coherent two-dimensional (2D) optical spectroscopy, is presented. To shed light on the underlying principles and to illustrate a potential use of this measurement method, we investigate the PAS 2DIR spectroscopy of an alanine-based antiparallel β-sheet, using the relationships between cross-peak amplitudes and incident beam polarization directions and carrying out numerical simulations. The numerically simulated PAS 2DIR spectra of the antiparallel β-sheet show that the magnitude and sign of the cross peak reflecting the correlation between the two characteristic amide I vibrations change for varying beam polarization directions. This suggests that each individual cross peak in a given 2D spectrum can be selectively eliminated with an appropriate beam polarization configuration, which in turn provides information on the transition dipole angle and possibly on the structure of coupled multichromophoric systems. This novel measurement method combining the polarization-angle-scanning technique with 2D vibrational or electronic spectroscopy would be a useful tool for probing structural changes of nonequilibrium molecular systems and to investigate transfers of population and coherence by monitoring the time-dependent changes of angles between transition dipoles.

  10. [Influence Additional Cognitive Tasks on EEG Beta Rhythm Parameters during Forming and Testing Set to Perception of the Facial Expression].

    PubMed

    Yakovenko, I A; Cheremushkin, E A; Kozlov, M K

    2015-01-01

    The research of changes of a beta rhythm parameters on condition of working memory loading by extension of a interstimuli interval between the target and triggering stimuli to 16 sec is investigated on 70 healthy adults in two series of experiments with set to a facial expression. In the second series at the middle of this interval for strengthening of the load was entered the additional cognitive task in the form of conditioning stimuli like Go/NoGo--circles of blue or green color. Data analysis of the research was carried out by means of continuous wavelet-transformation on the basis of "mather" complex Morlet-wavelet in the range of 1-35 Hz. Beta rhythm power was characterized by the mean level, maxima of wavelet-transformation coefficient (WLC) and latent periods of maxima. Introduction of additional cognitive task to pause between the target and triggering stimuli led to essential increase in absolute values of the mean level of beta rhythm WLC and relative sizes of maxima of beta rhythm WLC. In the series of experiments without conditioning stimulus subjects with large number of mistakes (from 6 to 40), i.e. rigid set, in comparison with subjects with small number of mistakes (to 5), i.e. plastic set, at the forming stage were characterized by higher values of the mean level of beta rhythm WLC. Introduction of the conditioning stimuli led to smoothing of intergroup distinctions throughout the experiment. PMID:26601500

  11. Nano-Fe as feed additive improves the hematological and immunological parameters of fish, Labeo rohita H.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, T.; Swain, P.; Rangacharulu, P. V.; Samanta, M.

    2014-08-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare the effects of iron oxide nanoparticles ( T 1) and ferrous sulfate ( T 2) on Indian major carp, Labeo rohita H. There were significant differences ( P < 0.05) in the final weight of T 1 and T 2 compared with the control. Survival rates were not affected by the dietary treatments. Fish fed a basal diet (control) showed lower ( P < 0.05) iron content in muscle compared to T 1 and T 2. Furthermore, the highest value ( P < 0.05) of iron content was observed in T 1. In addition, RBCs and hemoglobin levels were significantly higher in T 1 as compared to other treated groups. Different innate immune parameters such as respiratory burst activity, bactericidal activity and myeloperoxidase activity were higher in nano-Fe-treated diet ( T 1) as compared to other iron source ( T 2) and control in 30 days post-feeding. Moreover, nano-Fe appeared to be more effective ( P < 0.05) than ferrous sulfate in increasing muscle iron and hemoglobin contents. Dietary administration of nano-Fe did not cause any oxidative damage, but improved antioxidant enzymatic activities (SOD and GSH level) irrespective of different iron sources in the basal diet.

  12. Sonochemical degradation of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine: Effect of parameters, organic and inorganic additives and combination with a biological system.

    PubMed

    Serna-Galvis, Efraím A; Silva-Agredo, Javier; Giraldo-Aguirre, Ana L; Torres-Palma, Ricardo A

    2015-08-15

    Fluoxetine (FLX), one of the most widely used antidepressants in the world, is an emergent pollutant found in natural waters that causes disrupting effects on the endocrine systems of some aquatic species. This work explores the total elimination of FLX by sonochemical treatment coupled to a biological system. The biological process acting alone was shown to be unable to remove the pollutant, even under favourable conditions of pH and temperature. However, sonochemical treatment (600 kHz) was shown to be able to remove the pharmaceutical. Several parameters were evaluated for the ultrasound application: the applied power (20-60 W), dissolved gas (air, Ar and He), pH (3-11) and initial concentration of fluoxetine (2.9-162.0 μmol L(-1)). Additionally, the presence of organic (1-hexanol and 2-propanol) and inorganic (Fe(2+)) compounds in the water matrix and the degradation of FLX in a natural mineral water were evaluated. The sonochemical treatment readily eliminates FLX following a kinetic Langmuir. After 360 min of ultrasonic irradiation, 15% mineralization was achieved. Analysis of the biodegradability provided evidence that the sonochemical process transforms the pollutant into biodegradable substances, which can then be mineralized in a subsequent biological treatment.

  13. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors.

    PubMed

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N H

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type.

  14. Behavior of Tilted Angle Shear Connectors

    PubMed Central

    Khorramian, Koosha; Maleki, Shervin; Shariati, Mahdi; Ramli Sulong, N. H.

    2015-01-01

    According to recent researches, angle shear connectors are appropriate to transfer longitudinal shear forces across the steel-concrete interface. Angle steel profile has been used in different positions as L-shaped or C-shaped shear connectors. The application of angle shear connectors in tilted positions is of interest in this study. This study investigates the behaviour of tilted-shaped angle shear connectors under monotonic loading using experimental push out tests. Eight push-out specimens are tested to investigate the effects of different angle parameters on the ultimate load capacity of connectors. Two different tilted angles of 112.5 and 135 degrees between the angle leg and steel beam are considered. In addition, angle sizes and lengths are varied. Two different failure modes were observed consisting of concrete crushing-splitting and connector fracture. By increasing the size of connector, the maximum load increased for most cases. In general, the 135 degrees tilted angle shear connectors have a higher strength and stiffness than the 112.5 degrees type. PMID:26642193

  15. Effect of the addition of conventional additives and whey proteins concentrates on technological parameters, physicochemical properties, microstructure and sensory attributes of sous vide cooked beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2012-03-01

    Beef muscles submitted to four enhancement treatments (1.88% whey protein concentrate (WPC)+1.25% sodium chloride (NaCl); 1.88% modified whey protein concentrate (MWPC)+1.25%NaCl; 0.25% sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP)+1.25%NaCl; 1.25%NaCl) and a control treatment (non-injected muscles) were sous vide cooked. Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented a significantly higher total yield (106.5%) in comparison to those with WPC/MWPC+NaCl (94.7% and 92.9%, respectively), NaCl alone (84.8%) or controls (72.1%). Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented significantly lower shear force values than control ones; also, WPC/MWPC+NaCl added muscles presented similar values than those from the other treatments. After cooking, muscles with STPP+NaCl or WPC/MWPC+NaCl depicted compacted and uniform microstructures. Muscles with STPP+NaCl showed a pink colour, meanwhile other treatment muscles presented colours between pinkish-grey and grey-brown. STPP+NaCl added samples presented the highest values of global tenderness and juiciness. The addition of STPP+NaCl had a better performance than WPC/MWPC+NaCl. However, the addition of WPC/MWPC+NaCl improved total yield in comparison to NaCl added or control ones. PMID:22112522

  16. Effect of the addition of conventional additives and whey proteins concentrates on technological parameters, physicochemical properties, microstructure and sensory attributes of sous vide cooked beef muscles.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2012-03-01

    Beef muscles submitted to four enhancement treatments (1.88% whey protein concentrate (WPC)+1.25% sodium chloride (NaCl); 1.88% modified whey protein concentrate (MWPC)+1.25%NaCl; 0.25% sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP)+1.25%NaCl; 1.25%NaCl) and a control treatment (non-injected muscles) were sous vide cooked. Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented a significantly higher total yield (106.5%) in comparison to those with WPC/MWPC+NaCl (94.7% and 92.9%, respectively), NaCl alone (84.8%) or controls (72.1%). Muscles with STPP+NaCl presented significantly lower shear force values than control ones; also, WPC/MWPC+NaCl added muscles presented similar values than those from the other treatments. After cooking, muscles with STPP+NaCl or WPC/MWPC+NaCl depicted compacted and uniform microstructures. Muscles with STPP+NaCl showed a pink colour, meanwhile other treatment muscles presented colours between pinkish-grey and grey-brown. STPP+NaCl added samples presented the highest values of global tenderness and juiciness. The addition of STPP+NaCl had a better performance than WPC/MWPC+NaCl. However, the addition of WPC/MWPC+NaCl improved total yield in comparison to NaCl added or control ones.

  17. Parameters and pitfalls to consider in the conduct of food additive research, Carrageenan as a case study.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Myra L

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides guidance on the conduct of new in vivo and in vitro studies on high molecular weight food additives, with carrageenan, the widely used food additive, as a case study. It is important to understand the physical/chemical properties and to verify the identity/purity, molecular weight and homogeneity/stability of the additive in the vehicle for oral delivery. The strong binding of CGN to protein in rodent chow or infant formula results in no gastrointestinal tract exposure to free CGN. It is recommended that doses of high Mw non-caloric, non-nutritive additives not exceed 5% by weight of total solid diet to avoid potential nutritional effects. Addition of some high Mw additives at high concentrations to liquid nutritional supplements increases viscosity and may affect palatability, caloric intake and body weight gain. In in vitro studies, the use of well-characterized, relevant cell types and the appropriate composition of the culture media are necessary for proper conduct and interpretation. CGN is bound to media protein and not freely accessible to cells in vitro. Interpretation of new studies on food additives should consider the interaction of food additives with the vehicle components and the appropriateness of the animal or cell model and dose-response.

  18. Parameters and pitfalls to consider in the conduct of food additive research, Carrageenan as a case study.

    PubMed

    Weiner, Myra L

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides guidance on the conduct of new in vivo and in vitro studies on high molecular weight food additives, with carrageenan, the widely used food additive, as a case study. It is important to understand the physical/chemical properties and to verify the identity/purity, molecular weight and homogeneity/stability of the additive in the vehicle for oral delivery. The strong binding of CGN to protein in rodent chow or infant formula results in no gastrointestinal tract exposure to free CGN. It is recommended that doses of high Mw non-caloric, non-nutritive additives not exceed 5% by weight of total solid diet to avoid potential nutritional effects. Addition of some high Mw additives at high concentrations to liquid nutritional supplements increases viscosity and may affect palatability, caloric intake and body weight gain. In in vitro studies, the use of well-characterized, relevant cell types and the appropriate composition of the culture media are necessary for proper conduct and interpretation. CGN is bound to media protein and not freely accessible to cells in vitro. Interpretation of new studies on food additives should consider the interaction of food additives with the vehicle components and the appropriateness of the animal or cell model and dose-response. PMID:26615870

  19. Effect of addition of a probiotic micro-organism to broiler diet on intestinal mucosal architecture and electrophysiological parameters.

    PubMed

    Awad, W A; Ghareeb, K; Böhm, J

    2010-08-01

    Probiotics might be one of the solutions to reduce the effects of the recent ban on antimicrobial growth promoters in feed. However, the mode of action of probiotics still not fully understood. Therefore, evaluating probiotics (microbial feed additives) is essential. Thus the objective of this work was to investigate the efficacy of a new microbial feed additive (Lactobacillus salivarius and Lactobacillus reuteri) in broiler nutrition. The body weight (BW), average daily weight gain was relatively increased by the dietary inclusion of Lactobacillus sp. in broiler diets. Furthermore, the Lactobacillus feed additive influenced the histomorphological measurements of small intestinal villi. The addition of Lactobacillus sp. increased (p < 0.05) the villus height (VH)/crypt depth ratio and the VH was numerically increased in duodenum. The duodenal crypt depth remained unaffected (p > 0.05), while the ileal crypt depth was decreased by dietary supplementation of Lactobacillus sp. compared with the control. At the end of the feeding period, the basal and glucose stimulated short-circuit current (Isc) and electrical tissue conductivity were measured in the isolated gut mucosa to characterize the electrical properties of the gut. The addition of glucose on the mucosal side in Ussing chamber produced a significant increase (p = 0.001) in Isc in both jejunum and colon relative to the basal values in Lactobacillus probiotic group. This increase in Isc for probiotic group in jejunum is equivalent to an increase of about two times that for the basal values, while in the control group is about half fold that for the basal value. In addition, the DeltaIsc after glucose addition to the large intestine was greater than the DeltaIsc in the small intestine in both control and probiotic group. Moreover in both jejunum and colon, the increase in Isc for birds fed Lactobacillus was higher than their control counterparts (p < or = 0.1). This result suggests that the addition of

  20. Separating response-execution bias from decision bias: arguments for an additional parameter in Ratcliff's diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Voss, Andreas; Voss, Jochen; Klauer, Karl Christoph

    2010-11-01

    Diffusion model data analysis permits the disentangling of different processes underlying the effects of experimental manipulations. Estimates can be provided for the speed of information accumulation, for the amount of information used to draw conclusions, and for a decision bias. One parameter describes the duration of non-decisional processes including the duration of motor-response execution. In the default diffusion model, it is implicitly assumed that both responses are executed with the same speed. In some applications of the diffusion model, this assumption will be violated. This will lead to biased parameter estimates. Consequently, we suggest accounting explicitly for differences in the speed of response execution for both responses. Results from a simulation study illustrate that parameter estimates from the default model are biased if the speed of response execution differs between responses. A second simulation study shows that large trial numbers (N>1,000) are needed to detect whether differences in response-execution times are based on different execution times.

  1. Growth and parameters of microflora in intestinal and faecal samples of piglets due to application of a phytogenic feed additive.

    PubMed

    Muhl, A; Liebert, F

    2007-10-01

    A commercial phytogenic feed additive (PFA), containing the fructopolysaccharide inulin, an essential oil mix (carvacrol, thymol), chestnut meal (tannins) and cellulose powder as carrier substance, was examined for effects on growth and faecal and intestinal microflora of piglets. Two experiments (35 days) were conducted, each with 40 male castrated weaned piglets. In experiment 1, graded levels of the PFA were supplied (A1: control; B1: 0.05% PFA; C1: 0.1% PFA; D1: 0.15% PFA) in diets based on wheat, barley, soybean meal and fish meal with lysine as the limiting amino acid. In experiment 2, a similar diet with 0.1% of the PFA (A2: control; B2: 0.1% PFA; C2: +0.35% lysine; D2: 0.1% PFA + 0.35% lysine) and lysine supplementation was utilized. During experiment 1, no significant effect of the PFA on growth, feed intake and feed conversion rate was observed (p > 0.05). Lysine supplementation in experiment 2 improved growth performance significantly, but no significant effect of the PFA was detected. Microbial counts in faeces (aerobes, Gram negatives, anaerobes and lactobacilli) during the first and fifth week did not indicate any significant PFA effect (p > 0.05). In addition, microflora in intestinal samples was not significantly modified by supplementing the PFA (p > 0.05). Lysine supplementation indicated lysine as limiting amino acid in the basal diet, but did not influence the microbial counts in faeces and small intestine respectively.

  2. [Immunobiological blood parameters in rabbits after addition to the diet suspensions of chlorella, sodium sulfate, citrate and chromium chloride].

    PubMed

    Lesyk, Ia V; Fedoruk, R S; Dolaĭchuk, O P

    2013-01-01

    We studied the content of glycoproteins and their individual carbohydrate components, the phagocyte activity of neutrophils, phagocyte index, phagocyte number lizotsym and bactericidal activity of the serum concentration of circulating immune complexes and middle mass molecules in the blood of rabbits following administration into the diet chlorella suspension, sodium sulfate, chromium citrate and chromium chloride. The studies were conducted on rabbits weighing 3.7-3.9 kg with altered diet from the first day of life to 118 days old. Rabbits were divided into five groups: the control one and four experimental groups. We found that in the blood of rabbits of experimental groups recieved sodium sulphate, chromium chloride and chromium citrate, the content of glycoprotein's and their carbohydrate components was significantly higher during the 118 days of the study compared with the control group. Feeding rabbits with mineral supplements likely reflected the differences compared with the control parameters of nonspecific resistance in the blood for the study period, which was more pronounced in the first two months of life.

  3. Study on the effect of hydrogen addition on the variation of plasma parameters of argon-oxygen magnetron glow discharge for synthesis of TiO2 films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saikia, Partha; Saikia, Bipul Kumar; Bhuyan, Heman

    2016-04-01

    We report the effect of hydrogen addition on plasma parameters of argon-oxygen magnetron glow discharge plasma in the synthesis of H-doped TiO2 films. The parameters of the hydrogen-added Ar/O2 plasma influence the properties and the structural phases of the deposited TiO2 film. Therefore, the variation of plasma parameters such as electron temperature (Te), electron density (ne), ion density (ni), degree of ionization of Ar and degree of dissociation of H2 as a function of hydrogen content in the discharge is studied. Langmuir probe and Optical emission spectroscopy are used to characterize the plasma. On the basis of the different reactions in the gas phase of the magnetron discharge, the variation of plasma parameters and sputtering rate are explained. It is observed that the electron and heavy ion density decline with gradual addition of hydrogen in the discharge. Hydrogen addition significantly changes the degree of ionization of Ar which influences the structural phases of the TiO2 film.

  4. Angle detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parra, G. T. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An angle detector for determining a transducer's angular disposition to a capacitive pickup element is described. The transducer comprises a pendulum mounted inductive element moving past the capacitive pickup element. The capacitive pickup element divides the inductive element into two parts L sub 1 and L sub 2 which form the arms of one side of an a-c bridge. Two networks R sub 1 and R sub 2 having a plurality of binary weighted resistors and an equal number of digitally controlled switches for removing resistors from the networks form the arms of the other side of the a-c bridge. A binary counter, controlled by a phase detector, balances the bridge by adjusting the resistance of R sub 1 and R sub 2. The binary output of the counter is representative of the angle.

  5. Development of a scanning angle total internal reflection Raman spectrometer.

    PubMed

    McKee, Kristopher J; Smith, Emily A

    2010-04-01

    A scanning angle total internal reflection (SATIR) Raman spectrometer has been developed for measuring interfacial phenomena with chemical specificity and high axial resolution perpendicular to the interface. The instrument platform is an inverted optical microscope with added automated variable angle optics to control the angle of an incident laser on a prism/sample interface. These optics include two motorized translation stages, the first containing a focusing lens and the second a variable angle galvanometer mirror. The movement of all instrument components is coordinated to ensure that the same sample location and area are probed at each angle. At angles greater than the critical angle, an evanescent wave capable of producing Raman scatter is generated in the sample. The Raman scatter is collected by a microscope objective and directed to a dispersive spectrometer and charge-coupled device detector. In addition to the collected Raman scatter, light reflected from the prism/sample interface is collected to provide calibration parameters that enable modeling the distance over which the Raman scatter is collected for depth profiling measurements. The developed instrument has an incident angle range of 25.5 degrees-75.5 degrees, with a 0.05 degrees angle resolution. Raman scatter can be collected from a ZnSe/organic interface over a range of roughly 35-180 nm. Far from the critical angle, the achieved axial resolution perpendicular to the focal plane is approximately 34 nm. This is roughly a 30-fold improvement relative to confocal Raman microscopy. PMID:20441324

  6. Numerical modeling of heat-transfer and the influence of process parameters on tailoring the grain morphology of IN718 in electron beam additive manufacturing

    DOE PAGES

    Raghavan, Narendran; Dehoff, Ryan; Pannala, Sreekanth; Simunovic, Srdjan; Kirka, Michael; Turner, John; Carlson, Neil; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-04-26

    The fabrication of 3-D parts from CAD models by additive manufacturing (AM) is a disruptive technology that is transforming the metal manufacturing industry. The correlation between solidification microstructure and mechanical properties has been well understood in the casting and welding processes over the years. This paper focuses on extending these principles to additive manufacturing to understand the transient phenomena of repeated melting and solidification during electron beam powder melting process to achieve site-specific microstructure control within a fabricated component. In this paper, we have developed a novel melt scan strategy for electron beam melting of nickel-base superalloy (Inconel 718) andmore » also analyzed 3-D heat transfer conditions using a parallel numerical solidification code (Truchas) developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spatial and temporal variations of temperature gradient (G) and growth velocity (R) at the liquid-solid interface of the melt pool were calculated as a function of electron beam parameters. By manipulating the relative number of voxels that lie in the columnar or equiaxed region, the crystallographic texture of the components can be controlled to an extent. The analysis of the parameters provided optimum processing conditions that will result in columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) during the solidification. Furthermore, the results from the numerical simulations were validated by experimental processing and characterization thereby proving the potential of additive manufacturing process to achieve site-specific crystallographic texture control within a fabricated component.« less

  7. Determination of Hydrodynamic Parameters on Two--Phase Flow Gas - Liquid in Pipes with Different Inclination Angles Using Image Processing Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Gustavo; Valecillos, María; Romero, Carlos; Gonzáles, Dosinda

    2009-11-01

    In the present research a digital image processing-based automated algorithm was developed in order to determine the phase's height, hold up, and statistical distribution of the drop size in a two-phase system water-air using pipes with 0 , 10 , and 90 of inclination. Digital images were acquired with a high speed camera (up to 4500fps), using an equipment that consist of a system with three acrylic pipes with diameters of 1.905, 3.175, and 4.445 cm. Each pipe is arranged in two sections of 8 m of length. Various flow patterns were visualized for different superficial velocities of water and air. Finally, using the image processing program designed in Matlab/Simulink^, the captured images were processed to establish the parameters previously mentioned. The image processing algorithm is based in the frequency domain analysis of the source pictures, which allows to find the phase as the edge between the water and air, through a Sobel filter that extracts the high frequency components of the image. The drop size was found using the calculation of the Feret diameter. Three flow patterns were observed: Annular, ST, and ST&MI.

  8. The Diffraction Pattern Calculator (DPC) toolkit: a user-friendly approach to unit-cell lattice parameter identification of two-dimensional grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering data

    PubMed Central

    Hailey, Anna K.; Hiszpanski, Anna M.; Smilgies, Detlef-M.; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2014-01-01

    The DPC toolkit is a simple-to-use computational tool that helps users identify the unit-cell lattice parameters of a crystal structure that are consistent with a set of two-dimensional grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering data. The input data requirements are minimal and easy to assemble from data sets collected with any position-sensitive detector, and the user is required to make as few initial assumptions about the crystal structure as possible. By selecting manual or automatic modes of operation, the user can either visually match the positions of the experimental and calculated reflections by individually tuning the unit-cell parameters or have the program perform this process for them. Examples that demonstrate the utility of this program include determining the lattice parameters of a polymorph of a fluorinated contorted hexabenzocoronene in a blind test and refining the lattice parameters of the thin-film phase of 5,11-bis(triethylsilylethynyl)anthradithiophene with the unit-cell dimensions of its bulk crystal structure being the initial inputs. PMID:25484845

  9. The Diffraction Pattern Calculator (DPC) toolkit: a user-friendly approach to unit-cell lattice parameter identification of two-dimensional grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering data.

    PubMed

    Hailey, Anna K; Hiszpanski, Anna M; Smilgies, Detlef-M; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2014-12-01

    The DPC toolkit is a simple-to-use computational tool that helps users identify the unit-cell lattice parameters of a crystal structure that are consistent with a set of two-dimensional grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering data. The input data requirements are minimal and easy to assemble from data sets collected with any position-sensitive detector, and the user is required to make as few initial assumptions about the crystal structure as possible. By selecting manual or automatic modes of operation, the user can either visually match the positions of the experimental and calculated reflections by individually tuning the unit-cell parameters or have the program perform this process for them. Examples that demonstrate the utility of this program include determining the lattice parameters of a polymorph of a fluorinated contorted hexabenzocoronene in a blind test and refining the lattice parameters of the thin-film phase of 5,11-bis(triethylsilylethynyl)anthradithiophene with the unit-cell dimensions of its bulk crystal structure being the initial inputs.

  10. In vivo assessment of an industrial waste product as a feed additive in dairy cows: Effects of larch (Larix decidua L.) sawdust on blood parameters and milk composition.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, D; Garavaglia, L; Spagnuolo, M S; Pferschy-Wenzig, E M; Bauer, R; Franz, C

    2015-12-01

    When larch (Larix spp.) is processed in the wood industry, the sawdust is currently disposed of as waste or used as combustible material, even though it is rich in biologically active compounds. In this study the effect of larch sawdust supplementation on blood parameters as well as milk composition was examined in healthy mid-lactating dairy cows. Twenty-four multiparous Italian Friesian dairy cows were assigned to groups receiving either 300 g/day/cow of larch sawdust or a control diet, and treatments were continued for a 20 day period. Milk parameters were unaffected by treatment. A lower plasma total protein concentration was observed and can be attributed to a decrease in globulin concentration. A lower plasma urea concentration was also detected in the larch group. Moreover, biomarkers of liver function were influenced by the treatment. Total bilirubin was lower in larch-treated animals, and cholesterol tended to be lower. In addition, an interaction between day and treatment was observed for very low density lipoprotein. The concentration of other parameters, including reactive oxygen metabolites, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and nitrotyrosine, did not differ between treatments. The observed benefits, together with the good palatability, make larch sawdust a promising candidate for the development of beneficial feed supplements for livestock. Further studies will be useful, particularly to evaluate its efficacy in different health conditions. PMID:26526868

  11. Effect of whey protein concentrate and sodium chloride addition plus tumbling procedures on technological parameters, physical properties and visual appearance of sous vide cooked beef.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2007-07-01

    Beef muscles cooked by the sous vide system were evaluated for the effects of pre-injection tumbling, brine addition and post-injection tumbling on technological parameters, physical properties, visual appearance and tissue microstructure. The muscles were injected at 120% (over original weight) with a brine formulated to give a concentration of 3.5% whey protein concentrate and 0.7% sodium chloride on an injected raw product basis. Pre-injection tumbling did not affect most of the evaluated parameters. Brine addition reduced significantly the cooking and total weight losses. Total weight loss was 7.2% for injected muscles, and significantly higher (28.2%) for non-injected ones. Brine incorporation increased pH and reduced shear force values of cooked muscles. Extended post-injection tumbling (5rpm-10h) improved brine distribution and visual appearance, and also diminished the shear force values of cooked muscles. However, this treatment increased the weight losses of post-injection tumbling and cooking-pasteurization stages. PMID:22060988

  12. Effect of whey protein concentrate and sodium chloride addition plus tumbling procedures on technological parameters, physical properties and visual appearance of sous vide cooked beef.

    PubMed

    Szerman, N; Gonzalez, C B; Sancho, A M; Grigioni, G; Carduza, F; Vaudagna, S R

    2007-07-01

    Beef muscles cooked by the sous vide system were evaluated for the effects of pre-injection tumbling, brine addition and post-injection tumbling on technological parameters, physical properties, visual appearance and tissue microstructure. The muscles were injected at 120% (over original weight) with a brine formulated to give a concentration of 3.5% whey protein concentrate and 0.7% sodium chloride on an injected raw product basis. Pre-injection tumbling did not affect most of the evaluated parameters. Brine addition reduced significantly the cooking and total weight losses. Total weight loss was 7.2% for injected muscles, and significantly higher (28.2%) for non-injected ones. Brine incorporation increased pH and reduced shear force values of cooked muscles. Extended post-injection tumbling (5rpm-10h) improved brine distribution and visual appearance, and also diminished the shear force values of cooked muscles. However, this treatment increased the weight losses of post-injection tumbling and cooking-pasteurization stages.

  13. Effects of low-density lipoproteins as additive on quality parameters and oxidative stress following cryopreservation of mithun (Bos frontalis) spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Perumal, P; Srivastava, S K; Ghosh, S K; Baruah, K K; Bag, S; Rajoria, J S; Kumar, K; Rajkhowa, C; Pande, M; Srivastava, N

    2016-10-01

    Artificial breeding of mithun poses several challenges including lack of standard protocol for cryopreservation of spermatozoa. This is further complicated by harmful effects of hen's egg yolk (EY) as additive in extender. Purified low-density lipoproteins (LDL) extracted from EY have been shown as beneficial over EY extender for long-term semen storage in several species. This investigation explored use of LDL versus EY on semen quality and oxidative stress following freezing-thawing of spermatozoa. A total of 25 of 50 ejaculates based on biophysical parameters were selected for the experiment. After diluting with the Tris-citrate-glycerol (TCG) extender, each sample was split into three equal aliquots: Group I, control, EY; Group II and Group III contained 8% and 10% purified LDL, respectively. Frozen-thawed samples were evaluated for motility parameters (progressive, and in the bovine cervical mucus penetration test [BCMPT]), viability, sperm and nuclear abnormality, acrosome integrity, and enzymatic (leakage of intracellular contents) and biochemical (oxidative stress) profiles and in vitro fertility (IVF) assay. Study revealed a significant (p < .05) improvement in viability, sperm and nuclear abnormality, acrosome integrity, motility (progressive and in cervical mucus), cholesterol content, and reduction in the leakage of intracellular enzymes in Group II. Moreover, intactness of acrosome and biochemical membranes was protected significantly (p < .05) in addition to significant (p < .05) improvement in binding per cent and binding index in IVF assay in extender containing 8% LDL. These results demonstrate that although cryopreservation of mithun's spermatozoa in EY was comparable with other species, addition of 8% LDL holds a clear advantage over EY or 10% LDL. PMID:27418332

  14. Effectiveness of Phytogenic Feed Additive as Alternative to Bacitracin Methylene Disalicylate on Hematological Parameters, Intestinal Histomorphology and Microbial Population and Production Performance of Japanese Quails.

    PubMed

    Manafi, M; Hedayati, M; Khalaji, S

    2016-09-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of phytogenic additive and antibiotic growth promoter in laying Japanese quails. One hundred and sixty five quails were divided into three groups of 5 replicates and 11 quails (8 females and 3 males) in each replicate. Treatment 1 was fed control diet, treatment 2 was fed control diet supplemented with 0.05% bacitracin methylene disalicylate as antibiotic growth promoter and treatment 3 was fed control diet supplemented with 0.1% phytogenic feed additive (PFA) for two periods of 3 weeks each from 37 to 42 weeks of age. Results showed that egg production, eggshell strength, eggshell weight, villus height and villus height to crypt depth ratio were significantly (p≤0.05) increased and feed consumption, feed conversion ratio, albumen, Haugh unit, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, alanine transaminase, gamma glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, number of goblet cell, crypt depth and intestinal bacterial population of Coliforms, Salmonella and E. coli were significantly (p≤0.05) decreased in PFA fed group. It is concluded that addition of PFA containing phytomolecules and organic acids as main ingredients could significantly improve the production parameters and the general health of laying quails as an alternative to antibiotic growth promoters. PMID:27189636

  15. COOH-terminal processing of nascent polypeptides by the glycosylphosphatidylinositol transamidase in the presence of hydrazine is governed by the same parameters as glycosylphosphatidylinositol addition.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, S; Maxwell, S E; Medof, M E; Chen, R; Gerber, L D; Udenfriend, S

    1996-07-23

    Proteins anchored to the cell membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) moiety are found in all eukaryotes. After NH2-terminal peptide cleavage of the nascent protein by the signal peptidase, a second COOH-terminal signal peptide is cleaved with the concomitant addition of the GPI unit. The proposed mechanism of the GPI transfer is a transamidation reaction that involves the formation of an activated carbonyl intermediate (enzyme-substrate complex) with the ethanolamine moiety of the preassembled GPI unit serving as a nucleophile. Other nucleophilic acceptors like hydrazine (HDZ) and hydroxylamine have been shown to be possible alternate substrates for GPI. Since GPI has yet to be purified, the use of readily available nucleophilic substitutes such as HDZ and hydroxylamine is a viable alternative to study COOH-terminal processing by the putative transamidase. As a first step in developing a soluble system to study this process, we have examined the amino acid requirements at the COOH terminus for the transamidation reaction using HDZ as the nucleophilic acceptor instead of GPI. The hydrazide-forming reaction shows identical amino acid requirement profiles to that of GPI anchor addition. Additionally, we have studied other parameters relating to the kinetics of the transamidation reaction in the context of rough microsomal membranes. The findings with HDZ provide further evidence for the transamidase nature of the enzyme and also provide a starting point for development of a soluble assay.

  16. Effectiveness of Phytogenic Feed Additive as Alternative to Bacitracin Methylene Disalicylate on Hematological Parameters, Intestinal Histomorphology and Microbial Population and Production Performance of Japanese Quails

    PubMed Central

    Manafi, M.; Hedayati, M.; Khalaji, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of phytogenic additive and antibiotic growth promoter in laying Japanese quails. One hundred and sixty five quails were divided into three groups of 5 replicates and 11 quails (8 females and 3 males) in each replicate. Treatment 1 was fed control diet, treatment 2 was fed control diet supplemented with 0.05% bacitracin methylene disalicylate as antibiotic growth promoter and treatment 3 was fed control diet supplemented with 0.1% phytogenic feed additive (PFA) for two periods of 3 weeks each from 37 to 42 weeks of age. Results showed that egg production, eggshell strength, eggshell weight, villus height and villus height to crypt depth ratio were significantly (p≤0.05) increased and feed consumption, feed conversion ratio, albumen, Haugh unit, cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, alanine transaminase, gamma glutamyltransferase, alkaline phosphatase, high-density lipoprotein, triglyceride, number of goblet cell, crypt depth and intestinal bacterial population of Coliforms, Salmonella and E. coli were significantly (p≤0.05) decreased in PFA fed group. It is concluded that addition of PFA containing phytomolecules and organic acids as main ingredients could significantly improve the production parameters and the general health of laying quails as an alternative to antibiotic growth promoters. PMID:27189636

  17. COOH-terminal processing of nascent polypeptides by the glycosylphosphatidylinositol transamidase in the presence of hydrazine is governed by the same parameters as glycosylphosphatidylinositol addition.

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, S; Maxwell, S E; Medof, M E; Chen, R; Gerber, L D; Udenfriend, S

    1996-01-01

    Proteins anchored to the cell membrane via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) moiety are found in all eukaryotes. After NH2-terminal peptide cleavage of the nascent protein by the signal peptidase, a second COOH-terminal signal peptide is cleaved with the concomitant addition of the GPI unit. The proposed mechanism of the GPI transfer is a transamidation reaction that involves the formation of an activated carbonyl intermediate (enzyme-substrate complex) with the ethanolamine moiety of the preassembled GPI unit serving as a nucleophile. Other nucleophilic acceptors like hydrazine (HDZ) and hydroxylamine have been shown to be possible alternate substrates for GPI. Since GPI has yet to be purified, the use of readily available nucleophilic substitutes such as HDZ and hydroxylamine is a viable alternative to study COOH-terminal processing by the putative transamidase. As a first step in developing a soluble system to study this process, we have examined the amino acid requirements at the COOH terminus for the transamidation reaction using HDZ as the nucleophilic acceptor instead of GPI. The hydrazide-forming reaction shows identical amino acid requirement profiles to that of GPI anchor addition. Additionally, we have studied other parameters relating to the kinetics of the transamidation reaction in the context of rough microsomal membranes. The findings with HDZ provide further evidence for the transamidase nature of the enzyme and also provide a starting point for development of a soluble assay. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 PMID:8755508

  18. Effect of Mn and Cr additions on kinetics of recrystallization and parameters of grain-boundary relaxation of Al-4.9Mg alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailovskaya, A. V.; Golovin, I. S.; Zaitseva, A. A.; Portnoi, V. K.; Dröttboom, P.; Cifre, J.

    2013-03-01

    Methods of microstructural analysis, measurements of hardness, and temperature and time dependences of internal friction (TDIF and TDIF(iso), respectively) have been used to study recrystallization in cold-rolled alloys and grain-boundary relaxation in annealed alloys. A complex analysis of the effect of additions of transition metals (Mn, Cr) on the magnitude of the activation energy of the background of the internal friction in deformed and annealed states and on the activation parameters of grain-boundary relaxation has been performed. Methods of amplitude dependences of internal friction (ADIF) have been used to determine the critical amplitude that corresponds to the beginning of microplastic deformation in the alloys at different temperatures.

  19. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict CI engine parameters fueled with nano-particles additive to diesel fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghanbari, M.; Najafi, G.; Ghobadian, B.; Mamat, R.; Noor, M. M.; Moosavian, A.

    2015-12-01

    This paper studies the use of adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) to predict the performance parameters and exhaust emissions of a diesel engine operating on nanodiesel blended fuels. In order to predict the engine parameters, the whole experimental data were randomly divided into training and testing data. For ANFIS modelling, Gaussian curve membership function (gaussmf) and 200 training epochs (iteration) were found to be optimum choices for training process. The results demonstrate that ANFIS is capable of predicting the diesel engine performance and emissions. In the experimental step, Carbon nano tubes (CNT) (40, 80 and 120 ppm) and nano silver particles (40, 80 and 120 ppm) with nanostructure were prepared and added as additive to the diesel fuel. Six cylinders, four-stroke diesel engine was fuelled with these new blended fuels and operated at different engine speeds. Experimental test results indicated the fact that adding nano particles to diesel fuel, increased diesel engine power and torque output. For nano-diesel it was found that the brake specific fuel consumption (bsfc) was decreased compared to the net diesel fuel. The results proved that with increase of nano particles concentrations (from 40 ppm to 120 ppm) in diesel fuel, CO2 emission increased. CO emission in diesel fuel with nano-particles was lower significantly compared to pure diesel fuel. UHC emission with silver nano-diesel blended fuel decreased while with fuels that contains CNT nano particles increased. The trend of NOx emission was inverse compared to the UHC emission. With adding nano particles to the blended fuels, NOx increased compared to the net diesel fuel. The tests revealed that silver & CNT nano particles can be used as additive in diesel fuel to improve combustion of the fuel and reduce the exhaust emissions significantly.

  20. The additive effect of dorzolamide hydrochloride (Trusopt) and a morning dose of bimatoprost (Lumigan) on intraocular pressure and retrobulbar blood flow in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Stankiewicz, Andrzej; Siemiątkowska, Anna; Fuksińska, Beata; Robaszkiewicz, Jacek; Zegadło, Arkadiusz; Ehrlich, Rita; Siesky, Brent; Harris, Alon

    2010-01-01

    Aims To assess the additive effect of dorzolamide hydrochloride 2% on the diurnal intraocular pressure (IOP) curve and retrobulbar haemodynamics in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) treated with morning-dosed bimatoprost 0.03%. Methods Twenty-five patients with POAG were evaluated in a prospective, single-masked study. After a 1 week run-in period with bimatoprost all patients were treated with bimatoprost dosed once in the morning for 1 month, after which dorzolamide was added twice daily for 2 months. Goldmann applanation IOP, arterial blood pressure (ABP) and heart rate were measured every 2 h for 24 h and diurnal ocular perfusion pressure (OPP) was calculated. Colour Doppler imaging (CDI) of the ophthalmic artery (OA) and the central retinal artery (CRA) was recorded five times daily. All measurements were taken after the two phases of treatment and were compared. Results The mean baseline IOP was 14.8±3.5 mm Hg. Mean IOP following bimatoprost monotherapy (12.8±2.9 mm Hg) and after 2 months of dorzolamide adjunctive therapy (12.2±2.6 mm Hg) were not statistically significantly different (p=0.544). Only at the 4:00 h time point was IOP significantly reduced using the bimatoprost/dorzolamide combined treatment (p=0.013). The 24 h IOP fluctuations were lower when dorzolamide was added (6.0±2.3 mm Hg vs 4.6±1.5 mm Hg, p=0.0016). Repeated analysis of variance detected a significant decrease of vascular resistance in the OA (p=0.0167) with adjunctive dorzolamide treatment. Conclusions The addition of dorzolamide to morning-dosed bimatoprost had an additive hypotensive effect only on the night-time IOP curve at 4:00 h and resulted in a lower IOP fluctuation. Dorzolamide added to bimatoprost may reduce vascular resistance in the OA. PMID:20558428

  1. Additive Manufacturing of Single-Crystal Superalloy CMSX-4 Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy: Computational Modeling, Experimental Process Development, and Process Parameter Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basak, Amrita; Acharya, Ranadip; Das, Suman

    2016-08-01

    This paper focuses on additive manufacturing (AM) of single-crystal (SX) nickel-based superalloy CMSX-4 through scanning laser epitaxy (SLE). SLE, a powder bed fusion-based AM process was explored for the purpose of producing crack-free, dense deposits of CMSX-4 on top of similar chemistry investment-cast substrates. Optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) investigations revealed the presence of dendritic microstructures that consisted of fine γ' precipitates within the γ matrix in the deposit region. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)-based process modeling, statistical design of experiments (DoE), and microstructural characterization techniques were combined to produce metallurgically bonded single-crystal deposits of more than 500 μm height in a single pass along the entire length of the substrate. A customized quantitative metallography based image analysis technique was employed for automatic extraction of various deposit quality metrics from the digital cross-sectional micrographs. The processing parameters were varied, and optimal processing windows were identified to obtain good quality deposits. The results reported here represent one of the few successes obtained in producing single-crystal epitaxial deposits through a powder bed fusion-based metal AM process and thus demonstrate the potential of SLE to repair and manufacture single-crystal hot section components of gas turbine systems from nickel-based superalloy powders.

  2. Tank tests to determine the effect of varying design parameters of planing-tail hulls II : effect of varying depth of step, angle of after- body keel, length of afterbody chine, and gross load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawson, John R; Mckann, Robert; Hay, Elizabeth S

    1946-01-01

    The second part of a series of tests made in Langley tank no. 2 to determine the effect of varying design parameters of planing-tail hulls is presented. Results are given to show the effects on resistance characteristics of varying angle of afterbody keel, depth of step, and length of afterbody chine. The effect of varying the gross load is shown for one configuration. The resistance characteristics of planing-tail hulls are compared with those of a conventional flying-boat hull. The forces on the forebody and afterbody of one configuration are compared with the forces on a conventional hull. Increasing the angle of afterbody keel had small effect on hump resistance and no effect on high-speed resistance but increased free-to-trim resistance at intermediate speeds. Increasing the depth of step increased hump resistance, had little effect on high-speed resistance, and increased free-to-trim resistance at intermediate speeds. Omitting the chines on the forward 25 percent of the afterbody had no appreciable effect on resistance. Omitting 70 percent of the chine length had almost no effect on maximum resistance but broadened the hump and increased spray around the afterbody. Load-resistance ratio at the hump decreased more rapidly with increasing load coefficient for the planing-tail hull than for the representative conventional hull, although the load-resistance ratio at the hump was greater for the planing-tail hull than for the conventional hull throughout the range of loads tested. At speeds higher than hump speed, load-resistance ratio for the planing-tail hull was a maximum at a particular gross load and was slightly less at heavier and lighter gross loads. The planing-tail hull was found to have lower resistance than the conventional hull at both the hump and at high speeds, but at intermediate speeds there was little difference. The lower hump resistance of the planing-tail hull was attributed to the ability of the afterbody to carry a greater percentage of the

  3. Comparison of different passive knee extension torque-angle assessments.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sandro R; Vaz, João R; Bruno, Paula M; Valamatos, Maria J; Mil-Homens, Pedro

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies have used isokinetic dynamometry to assess joint torques and angles during passive extension of the knee, often without reporting upon methodological errors and reliability outcomes. In addition, the reliability of the techniques used to measure passive knee extension torque-angle and the extent to which reliability may be affected by the position of the subjects is also unclear. Therefore, we conducted an analysis of the intra- and inter-session reliability of two methods of assessing passive knee extension: (A) a 2D kinematic analysis coupled to a custom-made device that enabled the direct measurement of resistance to stretch and (B) an isokinetic dynamometer used in two testing positions (with the non-tested thigh either flexed at 45° or in the neutral position). The intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) of torque, the slope of the torque-angle curve, and the parameters of the mathematical model that were fit to the torque-angle data for the above conditions were measured in sixteen healthy male subjects (age: 21.4 ± 2.1 yr; BMI: 22.6 ± 3.3 kg m(-2); tibial length: 37.4 ± 3.4 cm). The results found were: (1) methods A and B led to distinctly different torque-angle responses; (2) passive torque-angle relationship and stretch tolerance were influenced by the position of the non-tested thigh; and (3) ICCs obtained for torque were higher than for the slope and for the mathematical parameters that were fit to the torque-angle curve. In conclusion, the measurement method that is used and the positioning of subjects can influence the passive knee extension torque-angle outcome.

  4. Glancing angle RF sheaths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Ippolito, D. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2013-10-01

    RF sheaths occur in tokamaks when ICRF waves encounter conducting boundaries. The sheath plays an important role in determining the efficiency of ICRF heating, the impurity influxes from the edge plasma, and the plasma-facing component damage. An important parameter in sheath theory is the angle θ between the equilibrium B field and the wall. Recent work with 1D and 2D sheath models has shown that the rapid variation of θ around a typical limiter can lead to enhanced sheath potentials and localized power deposition (hot spots) when the B field is near glancing incidence. The physics model used to obtain these results does not include some glancing-angle effects, e.g. possible modification of the angular dependence of the Child-Langmuir law and the role of the magnetic pre-sheath. Here, we report on calculations which explore these effects, with the goal of improving the fidelity of the rf sheath BC used in analytical and numerical calculations. Work supported by US DOE grants DE-FC02-05ER54823 and DE-FG02-97ER54392.

  5. Variable angle correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y K

    1994-05-01

    In this dissertation, a novel nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) technique, variable angle correlation spectroscopy (VACSY) is described and demonstrated with {sup 13}C nuclei in rapidly rotating samples. These experiments focus on one of the basic problems in solid state NMR: how to extract the wealth of information contained in the anisotropic component of the NMR signal while still maintaining spectral resolution. Analysis of the anisotropic spectral patterns from poly-crystalline systems reveal information concerning molecular structure and dynamics, yet in all but the simplest of systems, the overlap of spectral patterns from chemically distinct sites renders the spectral analysis difficult if not impossible. One solution to this problem is to perform multi-dimensional experiments where the high-resolution, isotropic spectrum in one dimension is correlated with the anisotropic spectral patterns in the other dimensions. The VACSY technique incorporates the angle between the spinner axis and the static magnetic field as an experimental parameter that may be incremented during the course of the experiment to help correlate the isotropic and anisotropic components of the spectrum. The two-dimensional version of the VACSY experiments is used to extract the chemical shift anisotropy tensor values from multi-site organic molecules, study molecular dynamics in the intermediate time regime, and to examine the ordering properties of partially oriented samples. The VACSY technique is then extended to three-dimensional experiments to study slow molecular reorientations in a multi-site polymer system.

  6. From plane to spatial angles: PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael; Osten, Wolfgang

    2015-10-01

    Electronic autocollimators are utilised versatilely for non-contact angle measurements in applications like straightness measurements and profilometry. Yet, no calibration of the angle measurement of an autocollimator has been available when both its measurement axes are engaged. Additionally, autocollimators have been calibrated at fixed distances to the reflector, although its distance may vary during the use of an autocollimator. To extend the calibration capabilities of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) regarding spatial angles and variable distances, a novel calibration device has been set up: the spatial angle autocollimator calibrator (SAAC). In this paper, its concept and its mechanical realisation will be presented. The focus will be on the system's mathematical modelling and its application in spatial angle calibrations. The model considers the misalignments of the SAAC's components, including the non-orthogonalities of the measurement axes of the autocollimators and of the rotational axes of the tilting unit. It allows us to derive specific measurement procedures to determine the misalignments in situ and, in turn, to correct the measurements of the autocollimators. Finally, the realisation and the results of a traceable spatial angle calibration of an autocollimator will be presented. This is the first calibration of this type worldwide.

  7. Contact Angles and Surface Tension of Germanium-Silicon Melts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Croell, A.; Kaiser, N.; Cobb, S.; Szofran, F. R.; Volz, M.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Precise knowledge of material parameters is more and more important for improving crystal growth processes. Two important parameters are the contact (wetting) angle and the surface tension, determining meniscus shapes and surface-tension driven flows in a variety of methods (Czochralski, EFG, floating-zone, detached Bridgman growth). The sessile drop technique allows the measurement of both parameters simultaneously and has been used to measure the contact angles and the surface tension of Ge(1-x)Si(x) (0 less than or equal to x less than or equal to 1.3) alloys on various substrate materials. Fused quartz, Sapphire, glassy carbon, graphite, SiC, carbon-based aerogel, pyrolytic boron nitride (pBN), AIN, Si3N4, and polycrystalline CVD diamond were used as substrate materials. In addition, the effect of different cleaning procedures and surface treatments on the wetting behavior were investigated. Measurements were performed both under dynamic vacuum and gas atmospheres (argon or forming gas), with temperatures up to 1100 C. In some experiments, the sample was processed for longer times, up to a week, to investigate any changes of the contact angle and/or surface tension due to slow reactions with the substrate. For pure Ge, stable contact angles were found for carbon-based substrates and for pBN, for Ge(1-x)Si(x) only for pBN. The highest wetting angles were found for pBN substrates with angles around 170deg. For the surface tension of Ge, the most reliable values resulted in gamma(T) = (591- 0.077 (T-T(sub m)) 10(exp -3)N/m. The temperature dependence of the surface tension showed similar values for Ge(1-x)Si(x), around -0.08 x 10(exp -3)N/m K, and a compositional dependence of 2.2 x 10(exp -3)N/m at%Si.

  8. Perception of Perspective Angles.

    PubMed

    Erkelens, Casper J

    2015-06-01

    We perceive perspective angles, that is, angles that have an orientation in depth, differently from what they are in physical space. Extreme examples are angles between rails of a railway line or between lane dividers of a long and straight road. In this study, subjects judged perspective angles between bars lying on the floor of the laboratory. Perspective angles were also estimated from pictures taken from the same point of view. Converging and diverging angles were judged to test three models of visual space. Four subjects evaluated the perspective angles by matching them to nonperspective angles, that is, angles between the legs of a compass oriented in the frontal plane. All subjects judged both converging and diverging angles larger than the physical angle and smaller than the angles in the proximal stimuli. A model of shallow visual space describes the results. According to the model, lines parallel to visual lines, vanishing at infinity in physical space, converge to visual lines in visual space. The perceived shape of perspective angles is incompatible with the perceived length and width of the bars. The results have significance for models of visual perception and practical implications for driving and flying in poor visibility conditions. PMID:27433312

  9. Atlas of relations between climatic parameters and distributions of important trees and shrubs in North America; additional conifers, hardwoods, and monocots

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Robert S.; Anderson, Katherine H.; Bartlein, Patrick J.; Smith, Sharon A.

    2000-01-01

    This volume explores the continental-scale relations between climate and the geographic ranges of woody plant species in North America. A 25-km equal-area grid of modern climatic and bioclimatic parameters for North America was constructed from instrumental weather records. The geographic distributions of selected tree and shrub species were digitized, and the presence or absence of each species was determined for each cell on the 25-km grid, thus providing a basis for comparing climatic data and species' distribution.

  10. The Cabibbo angle as a universal seed for quark and lepton mixings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, S.; Morisi, S.; Singh, N. N.; Valle, J. W. F.

    2015-09-01

    A model-independent ansatz to describe lepton and quark mixing in a unified way is suggested based upon the Cabibbo angle. In our framework neutrinos mix in a "Bi-Large" fashion, while the charged leptons mix as the "down-type" quarks do. In addition to the standard Wolfenstein parameters (λ, A) two other free parameters (ψ, δ) are needed to specify the physical lepton mixing matrix. Through this simple assumption one makes specific predictions for the atmospheric angle as well as leptonic CP violation in good agreement with current observations.

  11. Detection and characterisation of frauds in bovine meat in natura by non-meat ingredient additions using data fusion of chemical parameters and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Karen M; Andrade, Marcus Vinícius O; Santos Filho, Antônio M P; Lasmar, Marcelo C; Sena, Marcelo M

    2016-08-15

    Concerns about meat authenticity are increasing recently, due to great fraud scandals. This paper analysed real samples (43 adulterated and 12 controls) originated from criminal networks dismantled by the Brazilian Police. This fraud consisted of injecting solutions of non-meat ingredients (NaCl, phosphates, carrageenan, maltodextrin) in bovine meat, aiming to increase its water holding capacity. Five physico-chemical variables were determined, protein, ash, chloride, sodium, phosphate. Additionally, infrared spectra were recorded. Supervised classification PLS-DA models were built with each data set individually, but the best model was obtained with data fusion, correctly detecting 91% of the adulterated samples. From this model, a variable selection based on the highest VIPscores was performed and a new data fusion model was built with only one chemical variable, providing slightly lower predictions, but a good cost/performance ratio. Finally, some of the selected infrared bands were specifically associated to the presence of adulterants NaCl, tripolyphosphate and carrageenan.

  12. Addition of superoxide dismutase mimics during cooling process prevents oxidative stress and improves semen quality parameters in frozen/thawed ram spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Santiani, Alexei; Evangelista, Shirley; Sepúlveda, Néstor; Risopatrón, Jennie; Villegas, Juana; Sánchez, Raúl

    2014-10-01

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which may be related to reduced semen quality, are detected during semen cryopreservation in some species. The objectives of this study were to measure the oxidative stress during ram semen cryopreservation and to evaluate the effect of adding 2 antioxidant mimics of superoxide dismutase (Tempo and Tempol) during the cooling process on sperm motility, viability, acrosomal integrity, capacitation status, ROS levels, and lipid peroxidation in frozen and/or thawed ram spermatozoa. Measuring of ROS levels during the cooling process at 35, 25, 15, and 5 °C and after freezing and/or thawing showed a directly proportional increase (P < 0.05) when temperatures were lowering. Adding antioxidants at 10 °C confered a higher motility and sperm viability after cryopreservation in comparison with adding at 35 °C or at 35 °C/5 °C. After freezing and/or thawing, sperm motility was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in Tempo and Tempol 1 mM than that in control group. Percentage of capacitated spermatozoa was lower (P < 0.05) in Tempo and Tempol 1 mM in comparison with that in control group. In addition, ROS levels and lipid peroxidation in group Tempo 1 mM were lower (P < 0.05) than those in control group. These results demonstrate that ram spermatozoa are exposed to oxidative stress during the cooling process, specifically when maintained at 5 °C and that lipid peroxidation induced by high levels of ROS decreases sperm motility and induces premature sperm capacitation. In contrast, the addition of Tempo or Tempol at 0.5 to 1 mM during the cooling process (10 °C) protects ram spermatozoa from oxidative stress.

  13. Detection and characterisation of frauds in bovine meat in natura by non-meat ingredient additions using data fusion of chemical parameters and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Karen M; Andrade, Marcus Vinícius O; Santos Filho, Antônio M P; Lasmar, Marcelo C; Sena, Marcelo M

    2016-08-15

    Concerns about meat authenticity are increasing recently, due to great fraud scandals. This paper analysed real samples (43 adulterated and 12 controls) originated from criminal networks dismantled by the Brazilian Police. This fraud consisted of injecting solutions of non-meat ingredients (NaCl, phosphates, carrageenan, maltodextrin) in bovine meat, aiming to increase its water holding capacity. Five physico-chemical variables were determined, protein, ash, chloride, sodium, phosphate. Additionally, infrared spectra were recorded. Supervised classification PLS-DA models were built with each data set individually, but the best model was obtained with data fusion, correctly detecting 91% of the adulterated samples. From this model, a variable selection based on the highest VIPscores was performed and a new data fusion model was built with only one chemical variable, providing slightly lower predictions, but a good cost/performance ratio. Finally, some of the selected infrared bands were specifically associated to the presence of adulterants NaCl, tripolyphosphate and carrageenan. PMID:27006208

  14. The SU(2) action-angle variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellinas, Demosthenes

    1993-01-01

    Operator angle-action variables are studied in the frame of the SU(2) algebra, and their eigenstates and coherent states are discussed. The quantum mechanical addition of action-angle variables is shown to lead to a noncommutative Hopf algebra. The group contraction is used to make the connection with the harmonic oscillator.

  15. Fractal Approach in Petrology: Combining Ultra-Small Angle (USANA) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS)

    SciTech Connect

    LoCelso, F.; Triolo, F.; Triolo, A.; Lin, J.S.; Lucido, G.; Triolo, R.

    1999-10-14

    Ultra small angle neutron scattering instruments have recently covered the gap between the size resolution available with conventional intermediate angle neutron scattering and small angle neutron scattering instruments on one side and optical microscopy on the other side. Rocks showing fractal behavior in over two decades of momentum transfer and seven orders of magnitude of intensity are examined and fractal parameters are extracted from the combined USANS and SANS curves.

  16. Dynamic contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Kavehpour, H. Pirouz; Rothstein, Jonathan P.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, the dynamic advancing and receding contact angles of a series of aqueous solutions were measured on a number of hydrophobic and superhydrophobic surfaces using a modified Wilhelmy plate technique. Superhydrophobic surfaces are hydrophobic surfaces with micron or nanometer sized surface roughness. These surfaces have very large static advancing contact angles and little static contact angle hysteresis. In this study, the dynamic advancing and dynamic receding contact angles on superhydrophobic surfaces were measured as a function of plate velocity and capillary number. The dynamic contact angles measured on a smooth hydrophobic Teflon surface were found to obey the scaling with capillary number predicted by the Cox-Voinov-Tanner law, θD3 ∝ Ca. The response of the dynamic contact angle on the superhydrophobic surfaces, however, did not follow the same scaling law. The advancing contact angle was found to remain constant at θA = 160∘, independent of capillary number. The dynamic receding contact angle measurements on superhydrophobic surfaces were found to decrease with increasing capillary number; however, the presence of slip on the superhydrophobic surface was found to result in a shift in the onset of dynamic contact angle variation to larger capillary numbers. In addition, a much weaker dependence of the dynamic contact angle on capillary number was observed for some of the superhydrophobic surfaces tested.

  17. Reading Angles in Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections…

  18. Angles, Time, and Proportion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pagni, David L.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an investigation making connections between the time on an analog clock and the angle between the minute hand and the hour hand. It was posed by a middle school mathematics teacher. (Contains 8 tables and 6 figures.)

  19. Reading angles in maps.

    PubMed

    Izard, Véronique; O'Donnell, Evan; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    Preschool children can navigate by simple geometric maps of the environment, but the nature of the geometric relations they use in map reading remains unclear. Here, children were tested specifically on their sensitivity to angle. Forty-eight children (age 47:15-53:30 months) were presented with fragments of geometric maps, in which angle sections appeared without any relevant length or distance information. Children were able to read these map fragments and compare two-dimensional to three-dimensional angles. However, this ability appeared both variable and fragile among the youngest children of the sample. These findings suggest that 4-year-old children begin to form an abstract concept of angle that applies both to two-dimensional and three-dimensional displays and that serves to interpret novel spatial symbols. PMID:23647223

  20. The Relationship between T1 Sagittal Angle and Sagittal Balance: A Retrospective Study of 119 Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    T1 sagittal angle has been reported to be used as a parameter for assessing sagittal balance and cervical lordosis. However, no study has been performed to explore the relationship between T1 sagittal angle and sagittal balance, and whether T1 sagittal angle could be used for osteotomy guidelines remains unknown. The aim of our study is to explore the relationship between T1 sagittal angle and sagittal balance, determine the predictors for T1 sagittal angle, and determine whether T1 sagittal angle could be used for osteotomy guidelines to restore sagittal balance. Medical records of healthy volunteers in our outpatient clinic from January 2014 to August 2015 were reviewed, and their standing full-spine lateral radiographs were evaluated. Demographic and radiological parameters were collected and analyzed, including age, gender, T1 sagittal angle, maxTK, maxLL, SS, PT, and PI. Correlation coefficients between T1 sagittal angle and other spinopelvic parameters were determined. In addition, multiple regression analysis was performed to establish predictive radiographic parameters for T1 sagittal angle as the primary contributors. A total of 119 healthy volunteers were recruited in our study with a mean age of 34.7 years. It was found that T1 sagittal angle was correlated with maxTK with very good significance (r = 0.697, P<0.001), maxLL with weak significance (r = 0.206, P = 0.024), SS with weak significance (r = 0.237, P = 0.009), PI with very weak significance (r = 0.189, P = 0.039), SVA with moderate significance (r = 0.445, P<0.001), TPA with weak significance (r = 0.207, P = 0.023), and T1SPI with weak significance (r = 0.309, P = 0.001). The result of multiple regression analysis showed that T1 sagittal angle could be predicted by using the following regression equation: T1 sagittal angle = 0.6 * maxTK—0.2 * maxLL + 8. In the healthy population, T1 sagittal angle could be considered as a useful parameter for sagittal balance; however, it could not be

  1. 'Magic Angle Precession'

    SciTech Connect

    Binder, Bernd

    2008-01-21

    An advanced and exact geometric description of nonlinear precession dynamics modeling very accurately natural and artificial couplings showing Lorentz symmetry is derived. In the linear description it is usually ignored that the geometric phase of relativistic motion couples back to the orbital motion providing for a non-linear recursive precession dynamics. The high coupling strength in the nonlinear case is found to be a gravitomagnetic charge proportional to the precession angle and angular velocity generated by geometric phases, which are induced by high-speed relativistic rotations and are relevant to propulsion technologies but also to basic interactions. In the quantum range some magic precession angles indicating strong coupling in a phase-locked chaotic system are identified, emerging from a discrete time dynamical system known as the cosine map showing bifurcations at special precession angles relevant to heavy nuclei stability. The 'Magic Angle Precession' (MAP) dynamics can be simulated and visualized by cones rolling in or on each other, where the apex and precession angles are indexed by spin, charge or precession quantum numbers, and corresponding magic angles. The most extreme relativistic warping and twisting effect is given by the Dirac spinor half spin constellation with 'Hyperdiamond' MAP, which resembles quark confinement.

  2. Morphology Parameters for Intracranial Aneurysm Rupture Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Dhar, Sujan; Tremmel, Markus; Mocco, J; Kim, Minsuok; Yamamoto, Junichi; Siddiqui, Adnan H.; Hopkins, L. Nelson; Meng, Hui

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to identify image-based morphological parameters that correlate with human intracranial aneurysm (IA) rupture. METHODS For 45 patients with terminal or sidewall saccular IAs (25 unruptured, 20 ruptured), three-dimensional geometries were evaluated for a range of morphological parameters. In addition to five previously studied parameters (aspect ratio, aneurysm size, ellipticity index, nonsphericity index, and undulation index), we defined three novel parameters incorporating the parent vessel geometry (vessel angle, aneurysm [inclination] angle, and [aneurysm-to-vessel] size ratio) and explored their correlation with aneurysm rupture. Parameters were analyzed with a two-tailed independent Student's t test for significance; significant parameters (P < 0.05) were further examined by multivariate logistic regression analysis. Additionally, receiver operating characteristic analyses were performed on each parameter. RESULTS Statistically significant differences were found between mean values in ruptured and unruptured groups for size ratio, undulation index, nonsphericity index, ellipticity index, aneurysm angle, and aspect ratio. Logistic regression analysis further revealed that size ratio (odds ratio, 1.41; 95% confidence interval, 1.03−1.92) and undulation index (odds ratio, 1.51; 95% confidence interval, 1.08−2.11) had the strongest independent correlation with ruptured IA. From the receiver operating characteristic analysis, size ratio and aneurysm angle had the highest area under the curve values of 0.83 and 0.85, respectively. CONCLUSION Size ratio and aneurysm angle are promising new morphological metrics for IA rupture risk assessment. Because these parameters account for vessel geometry, they may bridge the gap between morphological studies and more qualitative location-based studies. PMID:18797347

  3. Casting and Angling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Julian W.

    As part of a series of books and pamphlets on outdoor education, this manual consists of easy-to-follow instructions for fishing activities dealing with casting and angling. The manual may be used as a part of the regular physical education program in schools and colleges or as a club activity for the accomplished weekend fisherman or the…

  4. An Iterative Angle Trisection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muench, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    The problem of angle trisection continues to fascinate people even though it has long been known that it can't be done with straightedge and compass alone. However, for practical purposes, a good iterative procedure can get you as close as you want. In this note, we present such a procedure. Using only straightedge and compass, our procedure…

  5. Interferometric measurement of angles.

    PubMed

    Malacara, D; Harris, O

    1970-07-01

    A new interferometric device for measuring small angles or rotations with high accuracy is described. This instrument works by counting fringes formed by the rotation of a flat-parallel plate of glass illuminated with a collimated beam from a gas laser. Some possible applications are given.

  6. Surface texture measurement for additive manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triantaphyllou, Andrew; Giusca, Claudiu L.; Macaulay, Gavin D.; Roerig, Felix; Hoebel, Matthias; Leach, Richard K.; Tomita, Ben; Milne, Katherine A.

    2015-06-01

    The surface texture of additively manufactured metallic surfaces made by powder bed methods is affected by a number of factors, including the powder’s particle size distribution, the effect of the heat source, the thickness of the printed layers, the angle of the surface relative to the horizontal build bed and the effect of any post processing/finishing. The aim of the research reported here is to understand the way these surfaces should be measured in order to characterise them. In published research to date, the surface texture is generally reported as an Ra value, measured across the lay. The appropriateness of this method for such surfaces is investigated here. A preliminary investigation was carried out on two additive manufacturing processes—selective laser melting (SLM) and electron beam melting (EBM)—focusing on the effect of build angle and post processing. The surfaces were measured using both tactile and optical methods and a range of profile and areal parameters were reported. Test coupons were manufactured at four angles relative to the horizontal plane of the powder bed using both SLM and EBM. The effect of lay—caused by the layered nature of the manufacturing process—was investigated, as was the required sample area for optical measurements. The surfaces were also measured before and after grit blasting.

  7. A Different Angle on Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frantz, Marc

    2012-01-01

    When a plane figure is photographed from different viewpoints, lengths and angles appear distorted. Hence it is often assumed that lengths, angles, protractors, and compasses have no place in projective geometry. Here we describe a sense in which certain angles are preserved by projective transformations. These angles can be constructed with…

  8. Angle Sense: A Valuable Connector.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenstein, Rheta N.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Proposes angle sense as a fundamental connector between mathematical concepts for middle grade students. Introduces the use of pattern blocks and a goniometer, a tool to measure angles, to help students develop angle sense. Discusses connections between angle measurement and the concepts of rational numbers, circles, area, number theory,…

  9. Food additives

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Michael

    1974-01-01

    Food additives are discussed from the food technology point of view. The reasons for their use are summarized: (1) to protect food from chemical and microbiological attack; (2) to even out seasonal supplies; (3) to improve their eating quality; (4) to improve their nutritional value. The various types of food additives are considered, e.g. colours, flavours, emulsifiers, bread and flour additives, preservatives, and nutritional additives. The paper concludes with consideration of those circumstances in which the use of additives is (a) justified and (b) unjustified. PMID:4467857

  10. Angles in the Sky?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behr, Bradford

    2005-09-01

    Tycho Brahe lived and worked in the late 1500s before the telescope was invented. He made highly accurate observations of the positions of planets, stars, and comets using large angle-measuring devices of his own design. You can use his techniques to observe the sky as well. For example, the degree, a common unit of measurement in astronomy, can be measured by holding your fist at arm's length up to the sky. Open your fist and observe the distance across the sky covered by the width of your pinky fingernail. That is, roughly, a degree! After some practice, and knowing that one degree equals four minutes, you can measure elapsed time by measuring the angle of the distance that the Moon appears to have moved and multiplying that number by four. You can also figure distances and sizes of things. These are not precise measurements, but rough estimates that can give you a "close-enough" answer.

  11. Laser angle sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pond, C. R.; Texeira, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    A laser angle measurement system was designed and fabricated for NASA Langley Research Center. The instrument is a fringe counting interferometer that monitors the pitch attitude of a model in a wind tunnel. A laser source and detector are mounted above the model. Interference fringes are generated by a small passive element on the model. The fringe count is accumulated and displayed by a processor in the wind tunnel control room. This report includes optical and electrical schematics, system maintenance and operation procedures.

  12. Study on self-calibration angle encoder using simulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Xue, Zi; Huang, Yao; Wang, Xiaona

    2016-01-01

    The angle measurement technology is very important in precision manufacture, optical industry, aerospace, aviation and navigation, etc. Further, the angle encoder, which uses concept `subdivision of full circle (2π rad=360°)' and transforms the angle into number of electronic pulse, is the most common instrument for angle measurement. To improve the accuracy of the angle encoder, a novel self-calibration method was proposed that enables the angle encoder to calibrate itself without angle reference. An angle deviation curve among 0° to 360° was simulated with equal weights Fourier components for the study of the self-calibration method. In addition, a self-calibration algorithm was used in the process of this deviation curve. The simulation result shows the relationship between the arrangement of multi-reading heads and the Fourier components distribution of angle encoder deviation curve. Besides, an actual self-calibration angle encoder was calibrated by polygon angle standard in national institute of metrology, China. The experiment result indicates the actual self-calibration effect on the Fourier components distribution of angle encoder deviation curve. In the end, the comparison, which is between the simulation self-calibration result and the experiment self-calibration result, reflects good consistency and proves the reliability of the self-calibration angle encoder.

  13. Visibility measurements using two-angle forward scattering by liquid droplets.

    PubMed

    Peng, Peng; Li, Chengwei

    2016-05-20

    This study presents a two-angle forward scattering (TAFS) method that can be used to detect atmosphere visibility and distinguish different weather phenomena. The visibility measuring instrument has two receivers arranged at the forward scattering angles of 35° and 90°, and the atmosphere visibility is measured by the first receiver (35°). We use the ratio between the scattering phase functions P(35°) and P(90°) to judge the asymmetry parameter of atmospheric particles and to distinguish the weather phenomenon. Compared with multi-angle forward scattering (MAFS) that can distinguish fog, haze, and mist, TAFS can determine additional weather phenomena (i.e., normal weather and rain) and has fewer receivers. Thus, we improve the instrument design of this method whose visibility error is smaller than that of MAFS on rainy days. PMID:27411113

  14. Angle-Polarization Estimation for Coherent Sources with Linear Tripole Sensor Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kun; He, Jin; Shu, Ting; Liu, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a parallel factor (PARAFAC) analysis-based angle and polarization estimation algorithm for multiple coherent sources using a uniformly-spaced linear tripole sensor array. By forming a PARAFAC model using the spatial signature of the tripole array, the new algorithm requires neither spatial smoothing nor vector-field smoothing to decorrelate the signal coherency. We also establish that the angle-polarization parameters of K coherent signals can be uniquely determined by PARAFAC analysis, as long as the number of tripoles L≥2K−1. In addition, the proposed algorithm can offer enhanced angle and polarization estimation accuracy by extending the interspacing of the tripoles beyond a half wavelength. PMID:26907273

  15. Evaluation of algorithms for calculating bioimpedance phase angle values from measured whole-body impedance modulus.

    PubMed

    Nordbotten, Bernt J; Tronstad, Christian; Martinsen, Ørjan G; Grimnes, Sverre

    2011-07-01

    This paper addresses the problem of calculating the bioimpedance phase angle from measurements of impedance modulus. A complete impedance measurement was performed on altogether 20 healthy persons using a Solatron 1260/1294 system. The obtained impedance modulus (absolute impedance value) values were used to calculate the Cole parameters and from them the phase angles. In addition, the phase angles were also calculated using a Kramers-Kronig approach. A correlation analysis for all subjects at each frequency (5, 50, 100 and 200 kHz) for both methods gave R(2) values ranging from 0.7 to 0.96 for the Cole approach and from 0.83 to 0.96 for the Kramers-Kronig approach; thus, both methods gave good results compared with the complete measurement results. From further statistical significance testing of the absolute value of the difference between measured and calculated phase angles, it was found that the Cole equation method gave significantly better agreement for the 50 and 100 kHz frequencies. In addition, the Cole equation method gives the four Cole parameters (R(0), R(∞), τ(z) and α) using measurements at frequencies up to 200 kHz while the Kramers-Kronig method used frequencies up to 500 kHz to reduce the effect of truncation on the calculated results. Both methods gave results that can be used for further bioimpedance calculations, thus improving the application potential of bioimpedance measurement results obtained using relatively inexpensive and portable measurement equipment.

  16. The Effect of Processing Additives on Energetic Disorder in Highly Efficient Organic Photovoltaics: A Case Study on PBDTTT-C-T:PC71 BM.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Himmelberger, Scott; Andersson, Mattias; Hanifi, David; Xia, Yuxin; Zhang, Shaoqing; Wang, Jianpu; Hou, Jianhui; Salleo, Alberto; Inganäs, Olle

    2015-07-01

    Energetic disorder, an important parameter affecting the performance of organic photovoltaics, is significantly decreased upon the addition of processing additives in a highly efficient benzodithiophene-based copolymer blend (PBDTTT-C-T:PC71 BM). Wide-angle and small-angle X-ray scattering measurements suggest that the origin of this reduced energetic disorder is due to increased aggregation and a larger average fullerene domain size together with purer phases.

  17. Wide Angle Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief movie illustrates the passage of the Moon through the Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft's wide-angle camera field of view as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. From beginning to end of the sequence, 25 wide-angle images (with a spatial image scale of about 14 miles per pixel (about 23 kilometers)were taken over the course of 7 and 1/2 minutes through a series of narrow and broadband spectral filters and polarizers, ranging from the violet to the near-infrared regions of the spectrum, to calibrate the spectral response of the wide-angle camera. The exposure times range from 5 milliseconds to 1.5 seconds. Two of the exposures were smeared and have been discarded and replaced with nearby images to make a smooth movie sequence. All images were scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is approximately the same in every image. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS)at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  18. A low bioimpedance phase angle predicts a higher mortality and lower nutritional status in chronic dialysis patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumler Md, Francis

    2010-04-01

    Bioelectrical impedance analysis is an established technique for body composition analysis. The phase angle parameter, an index of body cell mass, tissue hydration, and membrane integrity, makes it suitable for assessing nutritional status and survivability. We evaluated the significance of a low phase angle value on nutritional status and mortality in 285 chronic dialysis patients during a longitudinal prospective observational study. Patients in the lower phase angle tertile had decreased body weight, body mass index, fat free mass, body cell mass, and lower serum albumin concentrations than those in the higher tertile (P<001). In addition, mortality rates were significantly lower (P=0.05) in the highest tertile patients. In conclusion, the phase angle is a useful method for identifying dialysis patients at high risk for malnutrition and increased mortality.

  19. The Influence of Structure Heights and Opening Angles of Micro- and Nanocones on the Macroscopic Surface Wetting Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Ling; Laustsen, Milan; Mandsberg, Nikolaj; Taboryski, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    We discuss the influence of surface structure, namely the height and opening angles of nano- and microcones on the surface wettability. We show experimental evidence that the opening angle of the cones is the critical parameter on sample superhydrophobicity, namely static contact angles and roll-off angles. The textured surfaces are fabricated on silicon wafers by using a simple one-step method of reactive ion etching at different processing time and gas flow rates. By using hydrophobic coating or hydrophilic surface treatment, we are able to switch the surface wettability from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic without altering surface structures. In addition, we show examples of polymer replicas (polypropylene and poly(methyl methacrylate) with different wettability, fabricated by injection moulding using templates of the silicon cone-structures.

  20. The Influence of Structure Heights and Opening Angles of Micro- and Nanocones on the Macroscopic Surface Wetting Properties

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Ling; Laustsen, Milan; Mandsberg, Nikolaj; Taboryski, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the influence of surface structure, namely the height and opening angles of nano- and microcones on the surface wettability. We show experimental evidence that the opening angle of the cones is the critical parameter on sample superhydrophobicity, namely static contact angles and roll-off angles. The textured surfaces are fabricated on silicon wafers by using a simple one-step method of reactive ion etching at different processing time and gas flow rates. By using hydrophobic coating or hydrophilic surface treatment, we are able to switch the surface wettability from superhydrophilic to superhydrophobic without altering surface structures. In addition, we show examples of polymer replicas (polypropylene and poly(methyl methacrylate) with different wettability, fabricated by injection moulding using templates of the silicon cone-structures. PMID:26892169

  1. Modelling PTB's spatial angle autocollimator calibrator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kranz, Oliver; Geckeler, Ralf D.; Just, Andreas; Krause, Michael

    2013-05-01

    The accurate and traceable form measurement of optical surfaces has been greatly advanced by a new generation of surface profilometers which are based on the reflection of light at the surface and the measurement of the reflection angle. For this application, high-resolution electronic autocollimators provide accurate and traceable angle metrology. In recent years, great progress has been made at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) in autocollimator calibration. For an advanced autocollimator characterisation, a novel calibration device has been built up at PTB: the Spatial Angle Autocollimator Calibrator (SAAC). The system makes use of an innovative Cartesian arrangement of three autocollimators (two reference autocollimators and the autocollimator to be calibrated), which allows a precise measurement of the angular orientation of a reflector cube. Each reference autocollimator is sensitive primarily to changes in one of the two relevant tilt angles, whereas the autocollimator to be calibrated is sensitive to both. The distance between the reflector cube and the autocollimator to be calibrated can be varied flexibly. In this contribution, we present the SAAC and aspects of the mathematical modelling of the system for deriving analytical expressions for the autocollimators' angle responses. These efforts will allow advancing the form measurement substantially with autocollimator-based profilometers and approaching fundamental measurement limits. Additionally, they will help manufacturers of autocollimators to improve their instruments and will provide improved angle measurement methods for precision engineering.

  2. Management of Primary Angle-Closure Glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jimmy; Choy, Bonnie N K; Shum, Jennifer W H

    2016-01-01

    Primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG) is a progressive optic nerve degeneration and is defined as a glaucomatous optic neuropathy with associated characteristic enlargement of optic disc cupping and visual field loss that is secondary to ocular hypertension caused by closure of the drainage angle. Angle closure is caused by appositional approximation or adhesion between the iris and the trabecular meshwork. The main treatment strategy for PACG lies in the reduction of intraocular pressure, reopening of the closed angle, and possible prevention of further angle closure. There is no universally agreed best surgical treatment for PACG. Trabeculectomy, goniosynechialysis (GSL), glaucoma implant, and cyclodestructive procedures are effective surgical options. Each of them plays an important role in the management of PACG with its own pros and cons. Accumulating evidence is available to show the effectiveness of visually significant and visually nonsignificant cataract extraction in the treatment of PACG. Trabeculectomy and GSL are often combined with cataract extraction, which may offer additional pressure control benefits to patients with PACG. This review article will discuss laser peripheral iridotomy, argon laser peripheral iridoplasty, and surgeries such as GSL, phacoemulsification, and phaco plus glaucoma surgeries that lower intraocular pressure and also alter the anterior segment and/or drainage angle anatomy. Currently, glaucoma implants and cyclodestruction are mainly reserved for PACG patients who have failed previous filtering operations. Their role as initial surgical treatment for PACG will not be discussed. PMID:26886121

  3. Cerebellopontine Angle Lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Schuhmann, Martin U.; Lüdemann, Wolf O.; Schreiber, Hartwig; Samii, Madjid

    1997-01-01

    Intracranial lipomas in an infratentorial and extra-axial location are extremely rare. The presented case of an extensive lipoma of the cerebellopontine angle (CPA) represents 0.05% of all CPA tumors operated on in our department from 1978 to 1996. The lipoma constitutes an important differential diagnosis because the clinical management differs significantly from other CPA lesions. The clinical presentation and management of the presented case are analyzed in comparison to all previously described cases of CPA lipomas. The etiology and the radiological features of CPA lipomas are reviewed and discussed. CPA lipomas are maldevelopmental lesions that may cause slowly progressive symptoms. Neuroradiology enables a reliable preoperative diagnosis. Attempts of complete lipoma resection usually result in severe neurological deficits. Therefore, we recommend a conservative approach in managing these patients. Limited surgery is indicated if the patient has an associated vascular compression syndrome or suffers from disabling vertigo. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171031

  4. Heterodyne Interferometer Angle Metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution angle measurement instrument has been developed that is based on a heterodyne interferometer. The common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer setup, an optical mask is used to sample the measurement laser beam reflecting back from a target surface. Angular rotations, around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement- beam propagation direction, are determined simultaneously from the relative displacement measurement of the target surface. The device is used in a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw measurements of a flat mirror were simultaneously performed with a sensitivity of 0.1 nrad, per second, and a measuring range of 0.15 mrad at a working distance of an order of a meter. The nonlinearity of the device is also measured less than one percent over the measurement range.

  5. Narrow Angle movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief three-frame movie of the Moon was made from three Cassini narrow-angle images as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The purpose of this particular set of images was to calibrate the spectral response of the narrow-angle camera and to test its 'on-chip summing mode' data compression technique in flight. From left to right, they show the Moon in the green, blue and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum in 40, 60 and 80 millisecond exposures, respectively. All three images have been scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is the same in each image. The spatial scale in the blue and ultraviolet images is 1.4 miles per pixel (2.3 kilometers). The original scale in the green image (which was captured in the usual manner and then reduced in size by 2x2 pixel summing within the camera system) was 2.8 miles per pixel (4.6 kilometers). It has been enlarged for display to the same scale as the other two. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  6. Primary chronic angle-closure glaucoma in Chinese--a clinical exploration of its pathogenesis and natural course.

    PubMed

    Sun, X; Ji, X; Zheng, Y; Guo, B

    1994-09-01

    Forty-three cases (86 eyes) of primary chronic angle-closure glaucoma were randomly selected. An additional 44 cases (77 eyes) of primary acute angle-closure glaucoma and 30 normal subjects (34 eyes) were also randomly enrolled as control groups for comparison in the clinical study. Ultrasonic biometric measurements of the anterior chamber depth, lens thickness and axial length of the eyeball were performed. Using an potic microgauge attached to the slit-lamp, the entrance of anterior chamber angle was also calculated. The clinical manifestations and the natural course, including the characteristic appearance of anterior chamber angle, the form of peripheral anterior synechia as well as the facility of outflow, were carefully investigated. There were significant differences in the biometric parameters of the anterior segment of eye among above three groups. The facts reveal that the anatomic features of eyeball, especially in the anterior segment differentiate from those of primary acute angle-closure glaucoma. Follow-up study for the early stage cases showed that topical administration of miotics and/or peripheral iridectomy can effectively prevent iris from forming peripheral anterior synechia and thus halt its development. The criteria of diagnosis and the principles of prevention and treatment at the early stage cases were presented. The pathogenesis was discussed. We emphasized that the progressive stage after intermittent attacks of primary acute angle-closure glaucoma should not be confused with primary chronic angle-closure glaucoma.

  7. Equilibrium contact angle or the most-stable contact angle?

    PubMed

    Montes Ruiz-Cabello, F J; Rodríguez-Valverde, M A; Cabrerizo-Vílchez, M A

    2014-04-01

    It is well-established that the equilibrium contact angle in a thermodynamic framework is an "unattainable" contact angle. Instead, the most-stable contact angle obtained from mechanical stimuli of the system is indeed experimentally accessible. Monitoring the susceptibility of a sessile drop to a mechanical stimulus enables to identify the most stable drop configuration within the practical range of contact angle hysteresis. Two different stimuli may be used with sessile drops: mechanical vibration and tilting. The most stable drop against vibration should reveal the changeless contact angle but against the gravity force, it should reveal the highest resistance to slide down. After the corresponding mechanical stimulus, once the excited drop configuration is examined, the focus will be on the contact angle of the initial drop configuration. This methodology needs to map significantly the static drop configurations with different stable contact angles. The most-stable contact angle, together with the advancing and receding contact angles, completes the description of physically realizable configurations of a solid-liquid system. Since the most-stable contact angle is energetically significant, it may be used in the Wenzel, Cassie or Cassie-Baxter equations accordingly or for the surface energy evaluation.

  8. Phosphazene additives

    DOEpatents

    Harrup, Mason K; Rollins, Harry W

    2013-11-26

    An additive comprising a phosphazene compound that has at least two reactive functional groups and at least one capping functional group bonded to phosphorus atoms of the phosphazene compound. One of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with cellulose and the other of the at least two reactive functional groups is configured to react with a resin, such as an amine resin of a polycarboxylic acid resin. The at least one capping functional group is selected from the group consisting of a short chain ether group, an alkoxy group, or an aryloxy group. Also disclosed are an additive-resin admixture, a method of treating a wood product, and a wood product.

  9. Potlining Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolf Keller

    2004-08-10

    In this project, a concept to improve the performance of aluminum production cells by introducing potlining additives was examined and tested. Boron oxide was added to cathode blocks, and titanium was dissolved in the metal pool; this resulted in the formation of titanium diboride and caused the molten aluminum to wet the carbonaceous cathode surface. Such wetting reportedly leads to operational improvements and extended cell life. In addition, boron oxide suppresses cyanide formation. This final report presents and discusses the results of this project. Substantial economic benefits for the practical implementation of the technology are projected, especially for modern cells with graphitized blocks. For example, with an energy savings of about 5% and an increase in pot life from 1500 to 2500 days, a cost savings of $ 0.023 per pound of aluminum produced is projected for a 200 kA pot.

  10. Non-contact measurement of rotation angle with solo camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Xiaochuan; Sun, Anbin; Ye, Xin; Ma, Liqun

    2015-02-01

    For the purpose to measure a rotation angle around the axis of an object, a non-contact rotation angle measurement method based on solo camera was promoted. The intrinsic parameters of camera were calibrated using chessboard on principle of plane calibration theory. The translation matrix and rotation matrix between the object coordinate and the camera coordinate were calculated according to the relationship between the corners' position on object and their coordinates on image. Then the rotation angle between the measured object and the camera could be resolved from the rotation matrix. A precise angle dividing table (PADT) was chosen as the reference to verify the angle measurement error of this method. Test results indicated that the rotation angle measurement error of this method did not exceed +/- 0.01 degree.

  11. Incident Angle Dependence of Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degeorge, Vincent; Valle, Brent; Singer, Kenneth

    2010-10-01

    We have been recently studying the use of interference effects to enhance optical absorption in polymer photovoltaic cells. These interference effects are expected to be angle dependent. We measure here the angle dependent absorption and compare with numerical simulations. The cells used were P3HT/PCBM active layer, organic photovoltaic cells. The angular dependence of the cells' reflection was measured using an Ocean Optics light source and spectrophotometer and a precision rotary stage apparatus. The experimental results were compared to a Matlab simulation of the characteristic matrix problem. Analysis showed that the reflection/absorption peaks predicted by the simulation largely coincided in wavelength to those observed in experiment. Moreover, no additional cavity resonance can be attributed to incidence angle.

  12. Relating lepton mixing angles with lepton mass hierarchy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    We revisit the possibility of relating lepton mixing angles with lepton mass hierarchies in a model-independent way. Guided by the existence of such relations in the quark sector, we first consider all the mixing angles, both in charged lepton and neutrino sectors to be related to the respective mass ratios. This allows us to calculate the leptonic mixing angles observed in neutrino oscillations as functions of the lightest neutrino mass. We show that for both normal and inverted hierarchical neutrino masses, this scenario does not give rise to correct leptonic mixing angles. We then show that correct leptonic mixing angles can be generated with normal hierarchical neutrino masses if the relation between mixing angle and mass ratio is restricted to 1-2 and 1-3 mixing in both charged lepton and neutrino sectors leaving the 2-3 mixing angles as free parameters. We then restrict the lightest neutrino mass as well as the difference between 2-3 mixing angles in charged lepton and neutrino sectors from the requirement of producing correct leptonic mixing angles. We constrain the lightest neutrino mass to be around 0.002 eV and leptonic Dirac CP phase δCP such that sin2δ CP ˜ (0.35-0.50). We also construct the leptonic mass matrices in terms of 2-3 mixing angles and lightest neutrino mass and briefly comment on the possibility of realizing texture zeros in the neutrino mass matrix.

  13. Small angle neutron scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cousin, Fabrice

    2015-10-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) is a technique that enables to probe the 3-D structure of materials on a typical size range lying from ˜ 1 nm up to ˜ a few 100 nm, the obtained information being statistically averaged on a sample whose volume is ˜ 1 cm3. This very rich technique enables to make a full structural characterization of a given object of nanometric dimensions (radius of gyration, shape, volume or mass, fractal dimension, specific area…) through the determination of the form factor as well as the determination of the way objects are organized within in a continuous media, and therefore to describe interactions between them, through the determination of the structure factor. The specific properties of neutrons (possibility of tuning the scattering intensity by using the isotopic substitution, sensitivity to magnetism, negligible absorption, low energy of the incident neutrons) make it particularly interesting in the fields of soft matter, biophysics, magnetic materials and metallurgy. In particular, the contrast variation methods allow to extract some informations that cannot be obtained by any other experimental techniques. This course is divided in two parts. The first one is devoted to the description of the principle of SANS: basics (formalism, coherent scattering/incoherent scattering, notion of elementary scatterer), form factor analysis (I(q→0), Guinier regime, intermediate regime, Porod regime, polydisperse system), structure factor analysis (2nd Virial coefficient, integral equations, characterization of aggregates), and contrast variation methods (how to create contrast in an homogeneous system, matching in ternary systems, extrapolation to zero concentration, Zero Averaged Contrast). It is illustrated by some representative examples. The second one describes the experimental aspects of SANS to guide user in its future experiments: description of SANS spectrometer, resolution of the spectrometer, optimization of spectrometer

  14. What convention is used for the illumination and view angles?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... Azimuth angles are measured clockwise from the direction of travel to local north. For both the Sun and cameras, azimuth describes the ... to the equator, because of its morning equator crossing time. Additionally, the difference in view and solar azimuth angle will be near ...

  15. [Angle-closure chronic glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Lachkar, Y

    2003-10-01

    The incidence of chronic angle closure glaucoma is considerably greater than the incidence of the acute type. This type of glaucoma may mimic primary open angle glaucoma with visual field deterioration, optic nerve alteration and intraocular pressure elevation with a quiet painless eye. Its diagnosis is based on indentation gonioscopy showing peripheral anterior synechiae. The mechanisms of angle closure are the pupillary block, the plateau iris configuration and the creeping form. The treatment of chronic angle closure glaucoma is based on laser peripheral iridotomy. PMID:14646832

  16. The Critical Angle Can Override the Brewster Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froehle, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    As a culminating activity in their study of optics, my students investigate polarized light and the Brewster angle. In this exercise they encounter a situation in which it is impossible to measure the Brewster angle for light reflecting from a particular surface. This paper describes the activity and explains the students' observations.

  17. Dynamic contact angle cycling homogenizes heterogeneous surfaces.

    PubMed

    Belibel, R; Barbaud, C; Mora, L

    2016-12-01

    In order to reduce restenosis, the necessity to develop the appropriate coating material of metallic stent is a challenge for biomedicine and scientific research over the past decade. Therefore, biodegradable copolymers of poly((R,S)-3,3 dimethylmalic acid) (PDMMLA) were prepared in order to develop a new coating exhibiting different custom groups in its side chain and being able to carry a drug. This material will be in direct contact with cells and blood. It consists of carboxylic acid and hexylic groups used for hydrophilic and hydrophobic character, respectively. The study of this material wettability and dynamic surface properties is of importance due to the influence of the chemistry and the potential motility of these chemical groups on cell adhesion and polymer kinetic hydrolysis. Cassie theory was used for the theoretical correction of contact angles of these chemical heterogeneous surfaces coatings. Dynamic Surface Analysis was used as practical homogenizer of chemical heterogeneous surfaces by cycling during many cycles in water. In this work, we confirmed that, unlike receding contact angle, advancing contact angle is influenced by the difference of only 10% of acidic groups (%A) in side-chain of polymers. It linearly decreases with increasing acidity percentage. Hysteresis (H) is also a sensitive parameter which is discussed in this paper. Finally, we conclude that cycling provides real information, thus avoiding theoretical Cassie correction. H(10)is the most sensible parameter to %A. PMID:27612817

  18. Positron Emission Mammography with Multiple Angle Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Smith; Stan Majewski; Raymond R. Raylman

    2002-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake in breast tumors with dedicated detectors typically has been accomplished with two planar detectors in a fixed position with the breast under compression. The potential use of PEM imaging at two detector positions to guide stereotactic breast biopsy has motivated us to use PEM coincidence data acquired at two or more detector positions together in a single image reconstruction. Multiple angle PEM acquisition and iterative image reconstruction were investigated using point source and compressed breast phantom acquisitions with 5, 9, 12 and 15 mm diameter spheres and a simulated tumor:background activity concentration ratio of 6:1. Image reconstruction was performed with an iterative MLEM algorithm that used coincidence events between any two detector pixels on opposed detector heads at each detector position. This present study compared two acquisition protocols: 2 angle acquisition with detector angular positions of -15 and +15 degrees and 11 angle acquisition with detector positions spaced at 3 degree increments over the range -15 to +15 degrees. Three- dimensional image resolution was assessed for the point source acquisitions, and contrast and signal-to-noise metrics were evaluated for the compressed breast phantom with different simulated tumor sizes. Radial and tangential resolutions were similar for the two protocols, while normal resolution was better for the 2 angle acquisition. Analysis is complicated by the asymmetric point spread functions. Signal- to-noise vs. contrast tradeoffs were better for 11 angle acquisition for the smallest visible 9 mm sphere, while tradeoff results were mixed for the larger and more easily visible 12 mm and 15 mm diameter spheres. Additional study is needed to better understand the performance of limited angle tomography for PEM. PEM tomography experiments with complete angular sampling are planned.

  19. Positron Emission Mammography with Multiple Angle Acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Mark F. Smith; Stan Majewski; Raymond R. Raylman

    2002-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) of F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FbG) uptake in breast tumors with dedicated detectors typically has been accomplished with two planar detectors in a fixed position with the breast under compression. The potential use of PEM imaging at two detector positions to guide stereotactic breast biopsy has motivated us to use PEM coincidence data acquired at two or more detector positions together in a single image reconstruction. Multiple angle PEM acquisition and iterative image reconstruction were investigated using point source and compressed breast phantom acquisitions with 5, 9, 12 and 15 mm diameter spheres and a simulated tumor:background activity concentration ratio of 6:1. Image reconstruction was performed with an iterative MLEM algorithm that used coincidence events between any two detector pixels on opposed detector heads at each detector position. This present study compared two acquisition protocols: 2 angle acquisition with detector angular positions of -15 and +15 degrees and 11 angle acquisition with detector positions spaced at 3 degree increments over the range -15 to +15 degrees. Three-dimensional image resolution was assessed for the point source acquisitions, and contrast and signal-to-noise metrics were evaluated for the compressed breast phantom with different simulated tumor sizes. Radial and tangential resolutions were similar for the two protocols, while normal resolution was better for the 2 angle acquisition. Analysis is complicated by the asymmetric point spread functions. Signal- to-noise vs. contrast tradeoffs were better for 11 angle acquisition for the smallest visible 9 mm sphere, while tradeoff results were mixed for the larger and more easily visible 12 mm and 15 mm diameter spheres. Additional study is needed to better understand the performance of limited angle tomography for PEM. PEM tomography experiments with complete angular sampling are planned.

  20. Sunspot group tilt angle measurements from historical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthamizh Pavai, V.; Arlt, R.; Diercke, A.; Denker, C.; Vaquero, J. M.

    2016-10-01

    Sunspot positions from various historical sets of solar drawings are analyzed with respect to the tilt angles of bipolar sunspot groups. Data by Scheiner, Hevelius, Staudacher, Zucconi, Schwabe, and Spörer deliver a series of average tilt angles spanning a period of 270 years, additional to previously found values for 20th-century data obtained by other authors. We find that the average tilt angles before the Maunder minimum were not significantly different from the modern values. However, the average tilt angles of a period 50 years after the Maunder minimum, namely for cycles 0 and 1, were much lower and near zero. The normal tilt angles before the Maunder minimum suggest that it was not abnormally low tilt angles which drove the solar cycle into a grand minimum.

  1. Manifold angles, the concept of self-similarity, and angle-enhanced bifurcation diagrams

    PubMed Central

    Beims, Marcus W.; Gallas, Jason A. C.

    2016-01-01

    Chaos and regularity are routinely discriminated by using Lyapunov exponents distilled from the norm of orthogonalized Lyapunov vectors, propagated during the temporal evolution of the dynamics. Such exponents are mean-field-like averages that, for each degree of freedom, squeeze the whole temporal evolution complexity into just a single number. However, Lyapunov vectors also contain a step-by-step record of what exactly happens with the angles between stable and unstable manifolds during the whole evolution, a big-data information permanently erased by repeated orthogonalizations. Here, we study changes of angles between invariant subspaces as observed during temporal evolution of Hénon’s system. Such angles are calculated numerically and analytically and used to characterize self-similarity of a chaotic attractor. In addition, we show how standard tools of dynamical systems may be angle-enhanced by dressing them with informations not difficult to extract. Such angle-enhanced tools reveal unexpected and practical facts that are described in detail. For instance, we present a video showing an angle-enhanced bifurcation diagram that exposes from several perspectives the complex geometrical features underlying the attractors. We believe such findings to be generic for extended classes of systems. PMID:26732416

  2. SAW parameters on Y-cut langasite structured materials.

    PubMed

    Puccio, Derek; Malocha, Donald C; Saldanha, Nancy; da Cunha, Mauricio Pereira

    2007-09-01

    This paper presents results and investigations of several new, man-made piezoelectric single crystal, Czochralski-grown substrate materials for surface acoustic waves (SAW) applications. These materials, langanite (LGN), langatate (LGT), Sr3TaGa3Si2O14 (STGS), Sr3NbGa3Si2O14 (SNGS), Ca3TaGa3Si2O14 (CTGS), and Ca3NbGa3Si2O14 (CNGS), have the same structure as langasite (LGS) and are of the same crystal class as quartz. These compounds are denser than quartz, resulting in lower phase velocities. They also have higher coupling. Unlike quartz and lithium niobate, there is no degradation of material properties below the material melting points resulting in the possibility of extreme high-temperature operation (> 1000 degrees C). This paper gives a summary of extracted SAW material parameters for various propagation angles on Y-cut substrates of the six materials. Parameters included are electromechanical coupling, phase velocity, transducer capacitance, metal strip reflectivity, and temperature coefficient of frequency. Using previously published fundamental material constants, extracted parameters are compared with predictions for LGT and LGN. In addition, power flow angle and fractional frequency curvature data are reported for propagation angles on CTGS and CNGS Y-cut substrates that exhibit temperature compensation near room temperature. Detailed descriptions of the SAW parameter extraction techniques are given. A discussion of the results is provided, including a comparison of extracted parameters and an overview of possible SAW applications.

  3. Angiomas of the cerebellopontine angle.

    PubMed

    Viale, G L; Pau, A; Viale, E S; Turtas, S

    1981-01-01

    Angiomas situated within the pontocerebellar cistern lie superficially on the ventrolateral aspect of the brain stem. Occasionally, minor extensions penetrate into the adjacent nervous structures. Five patients bearing such lesions were operated upon, using a microsurgical technique. Radical excision was performed in all cases. Within 2 to 12 months the patients had returned to their previous occupations, being fully able to work or attend school. There is increasing evidence for the effectiveness of surgical treatment of angiomas of the ventrolateral aspect of the brain stem and the cerebellopontine angle. The illness usually presents with hemorrhages of varying severity, ranging from mild to devastating. Impairment of consciousness, contralateral hemiparesis and ipsilateral cranial nerve palsies are the most frequent neurological signs after bleeding. The outcome following excision is primarily related to the preoperative condition. No additional deficits or only minor further impairment can be expected from surgical interference. Exploration is advisable whenever the malformation appears to lie on the surface rather than within the brain stem.

  4. Parameters of spinning AM reticles.

    PubMed

    Driggers, R G; Halford, C E; Boreman, G D

    1991-07-01

    A new method of obtaining amplitude modulation (AM) for determining target location with spinning reticles is presented. The method is based on the use of graded transmission capabilities. The AM spinning reticles previously presented were functions of three parameters: amplitude vs angle, amplitude vs radius, and phase. This paper presents these parameters along with their capabilities and limitations and shows that multiple parameters can be integrated into a single reticle. It is also shown that AM parameters can be combined with FM parameters in a single reticle. Also, a general equation is developed that relates the AM parameters to a reticle transmission equation. PMID:20700262

  5. Measuring Angles in Physical Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greeley, Nansee; Offerman, Theresa Reardon

    1997-01-01

    Features articles about physical therapy and its history as related to geometry through measurement of body angles. Includes open-ended worksheets for mathematics activities that introduce students to angle measurement, data analysis, and mathematical tools. Activities include: (1) Making Your Own Goniometer; (2) Range of Motion; (3) Active versus…

  6. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Beer, Stephen K.; Pratt, II, Harold R.

    1991-01-01

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning "magic angles" in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the "magic angle" of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning "magic angle" of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position.

  7. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.K.; Pratt, H.R. II.

    1989-09-12

    An optical calibration apparatus is provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting and accurate reproducing of spinning magic angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the magic angle of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted. Thereafter, the spinning magic angle of a test material having similar nuclear properties to the standard is attained by returning the sample holder back to the originally noted coordinate position. 2 figs.

  8. Dancing droplets: Contact angle, drag, and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Cira, Nate; Prakash, Manu

    2015-11-01

    When deposited on a clean glass slide, a mixture of water and propylene glycol forms a droplet of given contact angle, when both pure liquids spread. (Cira, Benusiglio, Prakash: Nature, 2015). The droplet is stabilized by a gradient of surface tension due to evaporation that induces a Marangoni flow from the border to the apex of the droplets. The apparent contact angle of the droplets depends on both their composition and the external humidity as captured by simple models. These droplets present remarkable properties such as lack of a large pinning force. We discuss the drag on these droplets as a function of various parameters. We show theoretical and experimental results of how various confinement geometries change the vapor gradient and the dynamics of droplet attraction.

  9. Optical parameters of TN display with dichroic dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olifierczuk, Marek; Zielinski, Jerzy; Perkowski, Pawel

    2000-05-01

    The present work contain the studies on optical parameters (contrast ratio, viewing angle, birefringence and brightness) of twisted nematic display with black dichroic dye which is designed for an application in large-area information and advertising systems. The numerical optimization of display with a dye has been done. The absorption characteristic of the dye has been obtained. Birefringence of doped mixtures (Delta) n has been measured. The contrast ratio of doped mixtures has been measured in wide temperature range from -25 degree(s)C to +70 degree(s)C. The angle characteristics of contrast ratio for +20 degree(s)C have been obtained. In the work the detailed results describing the effect of a dye on temperature dependence of birefringence and contrast ratio, moreover, the effect of dye on the viewing angle for the first and second transmission minimum will be presented. Additionally, the dielectric characteristics of different mixtures will be shown.

  10. Military display performance parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desjardins, Daniel D.; Meyer, Frederick

    2012-06-01

    The military display market is analyzed in terms of four of its segments: avionics, vetronics, dismounted soldier, and command and control. Requirements are summarized for a number of technology-driving parameters, to include luminance, night vision imaging system compatibility, gray levels, resolution, dimming range, viewing angle, video capability, altitude, temperature, shock and vibration, etc., for direct-view and virtual-view displays in cockpits and crew stations. Technical specifications are discussed for selected programs.

  11. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2016-01-01

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all‐atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Computational Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26841080

  12. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D; Nilsson, Lennart

    2016-04-15

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all-atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs. PMID:26841080

  13. Additive CHARMM force field for naturally occurring modified ribonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Xu, You; Vanommeslaeghe, Kenno; Aleksandrov, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D; Nilsson, Lennart

    2016-04-15

    More than 100 naturally occurring modified nucleotides have been found in RNA molecules, in particular in tRNAs. We have determined molecular mechanics force field parameters compatible with the CHARMM36 all-atom additive force field for all these modifications using the CHARMM force field parametrization strategy. Emphasis was placed on fine tuning of the partial atomic charges and torsion angle parameters. Quantum mechanics calculations on model compounds provided the initial set of target data, and extensive molecular dynamics simulations of nucleotides and oligonucleotides in aqueous solutions were used for further refinement against experimental data. The presented parameters will allow for computational studies of a wide range of RNAs containing modified nucleotides, including the ribosome and transfer RNAs.

  14. New mixing angles in the left-right symmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokado, Akira; Saito, Takesi

    2015-12-01

    In the left-right symmetric model neutral gauge fields are characterized by three mixing angles θ12,θ23,θ13 between three gauge fields Bμ,WLμ 3,WRμ 3, which produce mass eigenstates Aμ,Zμ,Zμ', when G =S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R×U (1 )B-L×D is spontaneously broken down until U (1 )em . We find a new mixing angle θ', which corresponds to the Weinberg angle θW in the standard model with the S U (2 )L×U (1 )Y gauge symmetry, from these mixing angles. It is then shown that any mixing angle θi j can be expressed by ɛ and θ', where ɛ =gL/gR is a ratio of running left-right gauge coupling strengths. We observe that light gauge bosons are described by θ' only, whereas heavy gauge bosons are described by two parameters ɛ and θ'.

  15. First statistics of the isopistonic angle for long baseline interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziad, A.; Elhalkouj, T.; Petrov, R. G.; Borgnino, J.; Lazrek, M.; Benkhaldoun, Z.; Martin, F.; Elazhari, Y.

    2016-06-01

    To reach a suitable limiting magnitude with a multi-aperture interferometer, we need to cophase the different telescopes using a reference source. The latter should be located in the same isopistonic domain as the science source. We developed a direct analytical expression of deducing the isopistonic angle from atmospheric optical parameters as seeing, isoplanatic angle and outer scale. All of these atmospheric turbulence parameters are measured by the Generalized Seeing Monitor (GSM). The first statistics of the isopistonic angle obtained from the GSM data are presented and comparison between the major sites over the world are discussed (La Silla, Cerro Pachon, Paranal, San Pedro, Mt Palomar, Mauna Kea, La Palma, Oukaïmeden, Maydanak, Dome C). Implications of these isopistonic angle statistics on large interferometers cophasing in terms of sky coverage and limiting magnitude are discussed.

  16. Anterior chamber angle in the exfoliation syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, P K; Spaeth, G L; Poryzees, E M

    1985-01-01

    The gonioscopic findings of 76 patients with the exfoliation syndrome were reviewed. A high frequency of narrowness of the anterior chamber (AC) angle was found (32%). 18% had angles considered occludable, and 14% had obvious angle-closure glaucoma as shown by the presence of peripheral anterior synechias (PAS). Increased pigmentation of the posterior trabecular meshwork (PTM) was noted in all cases. When this pigmentation was markedly asymmetrical, unilateral exfoliation with glaucoma was common in the more pigmented eye. In addition heavy angle pigmentation in the absence of exfoliation was noted in the fellow eye of patients with characteristic exfoliated material in the other eye. Increased pigmentation of the PTM may be the earliest detectable sign of the exfoliation syndrome (ES). The clinical significance of our estimating PTM pigmentation at the 12 o'clock position is discussed. In view of the accelerated optic nerve damage associated with the development of glaucoma secondary to ES, routine estimation of the pigmentation of the PTM at 12 o'clock is recommended in the hope of early detection of cases of otherwise inapparent ES. Images PMID:3966996

  17. Ischemia detection from morphological QRS angle changes.

    PubMed

    Romero, Daniel; Martínez, Juan Pablo; Laguna, Pablo; Pueyo, Esther

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, an ischemia detector is presented based on the analysis of QRS-derived angles. The detector has been developed by modeling ischemic effects on the QRS angles as a gradual change with a certain transition time and assuming a Laplacian additive modeling error contaminating the angle series. Both standard and non-standard leads were used for analysis. Non-standard leads were obtained by applying the PCA technique over specific lead subsets to represent different potential locations of the ischemic zone. The performance of the proposed detector was tested over a population of 79 patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention in one of the major coronary arteries (LAD (n  =  25), RCA (n  =  16) and LCX (n  =  38)). The best detection performance, obtained for standard ECG leads, was achieved in the LAD group with values of sensitivity and specificity of [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], followed by the RCA group with [Formula: see text], Sp  =  94.4 and the LCX group with [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], notably outperforming detection based on the ST series in all cases, with the same detector structure. The timing of the detected ischemic events ranged from 30 s up to 150 s (mean  =  66.8 s) following the start of occlusion. We conclude that changes in the QRS angles can be used to detect acute myocardial ischemia. PMID:27243441

  18. Compression failure of angle-ply laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peel, Larry D.; Hyer, Michael W.; Shuart, Mark J.

    1991-01-01

    parameter, such as a ratio of wave amplitude to wave length, to describe waviness in a laminate would be inaccurate. Throughout, results for AS4/3502, studied previously, are included for comparison. At low off-axis angles, the AS4/3502 material system was found to be less sensitive to layer waviness than IM7/8551-7a. Analytical predictions were also obtained for laminates with waviness in only some of the layers. For this type of waviness, laminate compression strength could also be considered a function of which layers in the laminate were wavy, and where those wavy layers were. Overall, the geometrically nonlinear model correlates well with experimental results.

  19. Computer programs for calculation of sting pitch and roll angles required to obtain angles of attack and sideslip on wind tunnel models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, John B., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Two programs have been developed to calculate the pitch and roll angles of a wind-tunnel sting drive system that will position a model at the desired angle of attack and and angle of sideslip in the wind tunnel. These programs account for the effects of sting offset angles, sting bending angles and wind-tunnel stream flow angles. In addition, the second program incorporates inputs from on-board accelerometers that measure model pitch and roll with respect to gravity. The programs are presented in the report and a description of the numerical operation of the programs with a definition of the variables used in the programs is given.

  20. Hysteresis during contact angles measurement.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M Elena; Fuentes, Javier; Cerro, Ramon L; Savage, Michael D

    2010-03-15

    A theory, based on the presence of an adsorbed film in the vicinity of the triple contact line, provides a molecular interpretation of intrinsic hysteresis during the measurement of static contact angles. Static contact angles are measured by placing a sessile drop on top of a flat solid surface. If the solid surface has not been previously in contact with a vapor phase saturated with the molecules of the liquid phase, the solid surface is free of adsorbed liquid molecules. In the absence of an adsorbed film, molecular forces configure an advancing contact angle larger than the static contact angle. After some time, due to an evaporation/adsorption process, the interface of the drop coexists with an adsorbed film of liquid molecules as part of the equilibrium configuration, denoted as the static contact angle. This equilibrium configuration is metastable because the droplet has a larger vapor pressure than the surrounding flat film. As the drop evaporates, the vapor/liquid interface contracts and the apparent contact line moves towards the center of the drop. During this process, the film left behind is thicker than the adsorbed film and molecular attraction results in a receding contact angle, smaller than the equilibrium contact angle.

  1. Parameters of spinning FM reticles.

    PubMed

    Driggers, R G; Halford, C E; Boreman, G D; Lattman, D; Williams, K F

    1991-03-01

    The literature describes tracking devices that allow a single detector coupled to a spinning FM reticle to determine target location. The spinning FM reticles presented were limited to single parameter reticles of frequency vs angle, frequency vs radius, or phase. This study presents these parameters with their capabilities and limitations and shows that multiple parameters can be integrated into a single reticle. Also, a general equation is developed that describes any FM reticle of the spinning type. PMID:20582075

  2. Measurement of the angle of superficial tension by images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanez M., Javier; Alonso R., Sergio

    2006-02-01

    When a liquid is deposited on a surface, this one form a certain angle with respect to the surface, where depending on its value, it will conclude that so hard it is his adhesion with the surface. By means of the analysis of images we looked for to measure this angle of superficial tension. In order to make this measurement, we propose a technique by means of projective transformations and one method of regression to estimation parameters to conic fitting.

  3. Light Airplane Crash Test at Three Pitch Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Victor L., Jr.; Alfaro-Bou, Emilio

    1979-01-01

    Three similar twin-engine general-aviation airplane specimens were crash tested at the Langley Impact Dynamics Research Facility at 27 m/sec, a flight-path angle of -15deg, and pithch angles of -15deg, 0deg, and 15deg. Other crash parameters were held constant. The test facility, instrumentation, test specimens, and test method are briefly described. Structural damage and accelerometer data for each of the three impact conditions are presented and discussed.

  4. 2DFFT: Measuring Galactic Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel C.; Shields, Douglas W.; Kennefick, Julia; Kennefick, Daniel; Seigar, Marc S.; Lacy, Claud H. S.; Puerari, Ivânio

    2016-08-01

    2DFFT utilizes two-dimensional fast Fourier transformations of images of spiral galaxies to isolate and measure the pitch angles of their spiral arms; this provides a quantitative way to measure this morphological feature and allows comparison of spiral galaxy pitch angle to other galactic parameters and test spiral arm genesis theories. 2DFFT requires fourn.c from Numerical Recipes in C (Press et al. 1989).

  5. Ring magnet firing angle control

    DOEpatents

    Knott, M.J.; Lewis, L.G.; Rabe, H.H.

    1975-10-21

    A device is provided for controlling the firing angles of thyratrons (rectifiers) in a ring magnet power supply. A phase lock loop develops a smooth ac signal of frequency equal to and in phase with the frequency of the voltage wave developed by the main generator of the power supply. A counter that counts from zero to a particular number each cycle of the main generator voltage wave is synchronized with the smooth AC signal of the phase lock loop. Gates compare the number in the counter with predetermined desired firing angles for each thyratron and with coincidence the proper thyratron is fired at the predetermined firing angle.

  6. Two Comments on Bond Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaister, P.

    1997-09-01

    Tetrahedral Bond Angle from Elementary Trigonometry The alternative approach of using the scalar (or dot) product of vectors enables the determination of the bond angle in a tetrahedral molecule in a simple way. There is, of course, an even more straightforward derivation suitable for students who are unfamiliar with vectors, or products thereof, but who do know some elementary trigonometry. The starting point is the figure showing triangle OAB. The point O is the center of a cube, and A and B are at opposite corners of a face of that cube in which fits a regular tetrahedron. The required bond angle alpha = AÔB; and using Pythagoras' theorem, AB = 2(square root 2) is the diagonal of a face of the cube. Hence from right-angled triangle OEB, tan(alpha/2) = (square root 2) and therefore alpha = 2tan-1(square root 2) is approx. 109° 28' (see Fig. 1).

  7. Spinning angle optical calibration apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, S.K.; Pratt, H.R.

    1991-02-26

    This patent describes an optical calibration apparatus provided for calibrating and reproducing spinning angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. An illuminated magnifying apparatus enables optical setting an accurate reproducing of spinning magic angles in cross-polarization, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments. A reference mark scribed on an edge of a spinning angle test sample holder is illuminated by a light source and viewed through a magnifying scope. When the magic angle of a sample material used as a standard is attained by varying the angular position of the sample holder, the coordinate position of the reference mark relative to a graduation or graduations on a reticle in the magnifying scope is noted.

  8. Relativistic Transformation of Solid Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKinley, John M.

    1980-01-01

    Rederives the relativistic transformations of light intensity from compact sources (stars) to show where and how the transformation of a solid angle contributes. Discusses astrophysical and other applications of the transformations. (Author/CS)

  9. Role of Optical Coherence Tomography in Assessing Anterior Chamber Angles

    PubMed Central

    Kochupurakal, Reema Thomas; Jha, Kirti Nath; Rajalakshmi, A.R.; Nagarajan, Swathi; Ezhumalai, G.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gonioscopy is the gold standard in assessing anterior chamber angles. However, interobserver variations are common and there is a need for reliable objective method of assessment. Aim To compare the anterior chamber angle by gonioscopy and Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography (SD-OCT) in individuals with shallow anterior chamber. Materials and Methods This comparative observational study was conducted in a rural tertiary multi-speciality teaching hospital. A total of 101 eyes of 54 patients with shallow anterior chamber on slit lamp evaluation were included. Anterior chamber angle was graded by gonioscopy using the shaffer grading system. Angles were also assessed by SD-OCT with Trabecular Iris Angle (TIA) and Angle Opening Distance (AOD). Chi-square test, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value to find correlation between OCT parameters and gonioscopy grading. Results Females represented 72.7%. The mean age was 53.93 ±8.24 years and mean anterior chamber depth was 2.47 ± 0.152 mm. Shaffer grade ≤ 2 were identified in 95(94%) superior, 42(41.5%) inferior, 65(64.3%) nasal and 57(56.4%) temporal quadrants. Cut-off values of TIA ≤ 22° and AOD ≤ 290 μm were taken as narrow angles on SD-OCT. TIA of ≤ 22° were found in 88(92.6%) nasal and 87(87%) temporal angles. AOD of ≤ 290 μm was found in 73(76.8%) nasal and 83(83%) temporal quadrants. Sensitivity in detecting narrow angles was 90.7% and 82.2% for TIA and AOD, while specificity was 11.7% and 23.4%, respectively. Conclusion Individuals were found to have narrow angles more with SD-OCT. Sensitivity was high and specificity was low in detecting narrow angles compared to gonioscopy, making it an unreliable tool for screening. PMID:27190851

  10. Irena : tool suite for modeling and analysis of small-angle scattering.

    SciTech Connect

    Ilavsky, J.; Jemian, P.

    2009-04-01

    Irena, a tool suite for analysis of both X-ray and neutron small-angle scattering (SAS) data within the commercial Igor Pro application, brings together a comprehensive suite of tools useful for investigations in materials science, physics, chemistry, polymer science and other fields. In addition to Guinier and Porod fits, the suite combines a variety of advanced SAS data evaluation tools for the modeling of size distribution in the dilute limit using maximum entropy and other methods, dilute limit small-angle scattering from multiple non-interacting populations of scatterers, the pair-distance distribution function, a unified fit, the Debye-Bueche model, the reflectivity (X-ray and neutron) using Parratt's formalism, and small-angle diffraction. There are also a number of support tools, such as a data import/export tool supporting a broad sampling of common data formats, a data modification tool, a presentation-quality graphics tool optimized for small-angle scattering data, and a neutron and X-ray scattering contrast calculator. These tools are brought together into one suite with consistent interfaces and functionality. The suite allows robust automated note recording and saving of parameters during export.

  11. Pitch-angle scattering in magnetostatic turbulence. II. Analytical considerations and pitch-angle isotropization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tautz, R. C.

    2013-10-01

    Aims: The process of pitch-angle isotropization is important for many applications ranging from diffusive shock acceleration to large-scale cosmic-ray transport. Here, the basic analytical description is revisited on the basis of recent simulation results. Methods: Both an analytical and a numerical investigation were undertaken of the Fokker-Planck equation for pitch-angle scattering. Additional test-particle simulations obtained with the help of a Monte-Carlo code were used to verify the conclusions. Results: It is shown that the usual definition of the pitch-angle Fokker-Planck coefficient via the mean-square displacement is flawed. The reason can be traced back to the assumption of homogeneity in time which does not hold for pitch-angle scattering. Conclusions: Calculating the mean free path via the Fokker-Planck coefficient has often proven to give an accurate description. For numerical purposes, accordingly, it is the definition that has to be exchanged in favor of the pitch-angle correlation function.

  12. The Pluto System At Small Phase Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbiscer, Anne J.; Buie, Marc W.; Binzel, Richard; Ennico, Kimberly; Grundy, William M.; Olkin, Catherine B.; Showalter, Mark Robert; Spencer, John R.; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Young, Leslie; New Horizons Science Team

    2016-10-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations of the Pluto system acquired during the New Horizons encounter epoch (HST Program 13667, M. Buie, PI) span the phase angle range from 0.06 to 1.7 degrees, enabling the measurement and characterization of the opposition effect for Pluto and its satellites at 0.58 microns using HST WFC3/UVIS with the F350LP filter, which has a broadband response and a pivot wavelength of 0.58 microns. At these small phase angles, differences in the opposition effect width and amplitude appear. The small satellites Nix and Hydra both exhibit a very narrow opposition surge, while the considerably larger moon Charon has a broader opposition surge. Microtextural surface properties derived from the shape and magnitude of the opposition surge of each surface contain a record of the collisional history of the system. We combine these small phase angle observations with those made at larger phase angles by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), which also has a broadband response with a pivot wavelength of 0.61 microns, to produce the most complete disk-integrated solar phase curves that we will have for decades to come. Modeling these disk-integrated phase curves generates sets of photometric parameters that will inform spectral modeling of the satellite surfaces as well as terrains on Pluto from spatially resolved New Horizons Ralph Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) data from 1.2 to 2.5 microns. Rotationally resolved phase curves of Pluto reveal opposition effects that only appear at phase angles less than 0.1 degree and have widths and amplitudes that are highly dependent on longitude and therefore on Pluto's diverse terrains. The high albedo region informally known as Sputnik Planum dominates the disk-integrated reflectance of Pluto on the New Horizons encounter hemisphere. These results lay the groundwork for observations at true opposition in 2018, when the Pluto system will be observable at phase angles so small that

  13. On the Euler angles for SU(N)

    SciTech Connect

    Cerchiai, Bianca L; Bertini, S.; Cacciatori, Sergio L.

    2005-10-20

    In this paper we reconsider the problem of the Euler parametrization for the unitary groups. After constructing the generic group element in terms of generalized angles, we compute the invariant measure on SU(N) and then we determine the full range of the parameters, using both topological and geometrical methods. In particular, we show that the given parametrization realizes the group SU(N+1) as a fibration of U(N) over the complex projective space CP{sup n}. This justifies the interpretation of the parameters as generalized Euler angles.

  14. The Semiotic and Conceptual Genesis of Angle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanguay, Denis; Venant, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we try to understand how students at the end of primary school conceive of angle: Is an angle a magnitude for them or a geometric figure, and how do they manage to coordinate the two aspects in their understanding of the concepts of angle and of angle measurement? With the aim of better grasping the way "angle" is…

  15. Beyond Euler angles: exploiting the angle-axis parametrization in a multipole expansion of the rotation operator.

    PubMed

    Siemens, Mark; Hancock, Jason; Siminovitch, David

    2007-02-01

    Euler angles (alpha,beta,gamma) are cumbersome from a computational point of view, and their link to experimental parameters is oblique. The angle-axis {Phi, n} parametrization, especially in the form of quaternions (or Euler-Rodrigues parameters), has served as the most promising alternative, and they have enjoyed considerable success in rf pulse design and optimization. We focus on the benefits of angle-axis parameters by considering a multipole operator expansion of the rotation operator D(Phi, n), and a Clebsch-Gordan expansion of the rotation matrices D(MM')(J)(Phi, n). Each of the coefficients in the Clebsch-Gordan expansion is proportional to the product of a spherical harmonic of the vector n specifying the axis of rotation, Y(lambdamu)(n), with a fixed function of the rotation angle Phi, a Gegenbauer polynomial C(2J-lambda)(lambda+1)(cosPhi/2). Several application examples demonstrate that this Clebsch-Gordan expansion gives easy and direct access to many of the parameters of experimental interest, including coherence order changes (isolated in the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients), and rotation angle (isolated in the Gegenbauer polynomials). PMID:17267183

  16. Applications of parameter estimation in the study of spinning airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    W Taylor, L., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Spinning airplanes offer challenges to estimating dynamic parameters because of the nonlinear nature of the dynamics. In this paper, parameter estimation techniques are applied to spin flight test data for estimating the error in measuring post-stall angles of attack, deriving Euler angles from angular velocity data, and estimating nonlinear aerodynamic characteristics. The value of the scale factor for post-stall angles of attack agrees closely with that obtained from special wind-tunnel tests. The independently derived Euler angles are seen to be valid in spite of steep pitch angles. Estimates of flight derived nonlinear aerodynamic parameters are evaluated in terms of the expected fit error.

  17. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators

    PubMed Central

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2015-01-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300−2500 nm at incidence angles 15–60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0–60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350–1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article “Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators” in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells. PMID:26862556

  18. From hygrophilic to superhygrophobic: theoretical conditions for making high-contact-angle surfaces from low-contact-angle materials.

    PubMed

    Marmur, Abraham

    2008-07-15

    The possibility of making high-contact-angle, rough surfaces from low-contact-angle materials has recently been suggested and demonstrated. A thermodynamic analysis of this possibility in terms of feasibility and stability is presented. It turns out that only roughness topographies that conform to a feasibility condition which is developed in the present paper can support this phenomenon. Even under conditions that support the phenomenon, the high-contact-angle state may not be stable, and transition from the heterogeneous (Cassie-Baxter) wetting regime to the homogeneous (Wenzel) regime with a lower contact angle may occur. In addition, it is suggested to use the general terms hygrophilic and hygrophobic (based on the Greek prefix hygro- that means liquid) to describe low- and high-contact-angle surfaces, respectively. PMID:18543997

  19. Spectral data of specular reflectance, narrow-angle transmittance and angle-resolved surface scattering of materials for solar concentrators.

    PubMed

    Good, Philipp; Cooper, Thomas; Querci, Marco; Wiik, Nicolay; Ambrosetti, Gianluca; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2016-03-01

    The spectral specular reflectance of conventional and novel reflective materials for solar concentrators is measured with an acceptance angle of 17.5 mrad over the wavelength range 300-2500 nm at incidence angles 15-60° using a spectroscopic goniometry system. The same experimental setup is used to determine the spectral narrow-angle transmittance of semi-transparent materials for solar collector covers at incidence angles 0-60°. In addition, the angle-resolved surface scattering of reflective materials is recorded by an area-scan CCD detector over the spectral range 350-1050 nm. A comprehensive summary, discussion, and interpretation of the results are included in the associated research article "Spectral reflectance, transmittance, and angular scattering of materials for solar concentrators" in Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells.

  20. Metrology of angles in astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalevsky, Jean

    2004-10-01

    In astronomy, measurements of angles play a major role. After defining the units in use in astronomy, three methods of measuring angles are presented, with an application to the transit instrument. The interferometric techniques for measuring large angles are described in optical and radio wavelengths. Due to the atmospheric and mechanical limitation on ground, space astrometry has multiple advantages. The satellite Hipparcos is described and the data reduction procedures and results obtained are sketched. In the future, two new astrometric space missions are approved: GAIA, based on Hipparcos principles and SIM, a space interferometer. They are described and the expected accuracies are presented. To cite this article: J. Kovalevsky, C. R. Physique 5 (2004).

  1. Autocollimating systems for roll angle measurement of large-scale object deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turgalieva, Tatyana V.; Konyakhin, Igor A.

    2015-05-01

    Autocollimating systems for roll angle measurement with tetrahedral reflector, which has the small deviation from 90° in two dihedral angles between reflecting sides is considered. Established that autocollimator scheme with symmetrical track of the beam relative to roll axis with addition re-reflection allow implement precision measurement roll angle.

  2. Seasonal and vertical changes in leaf angle distribution for selected deciduous broadleaf tree species common to Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raabe, Kairi; Pisek, Jan; Sonnentag, Oliver; Annuk, Kalju

    2014-05-01

    Leaf inclination angle distribution is a key parameter in determining the transmission and reflection of radiation by vegetation canopies. It has been previously observed that leaf inclination angle might change gradually from more vertical in the upper canopy and in high light habitats to more horizontal in the lower canopy and in low light habitats [1]. Despite its importance, relatively few measurements on actual leaf angle distributions have been reported for different tree species. Even smaller number of studies have dealt with the possible seasonal changes in leaf angle distribution [2]. In this study the variation of leaf inclination angle distributions was examined both temporally throughout the growing season and vertically at different heights of trees. We report on leaf inclination angle distributions for five deciduous broadleaf species found commonly in several parts of Europe: grey alder (Alnus incana), Silver birch (Betula pendula Roth), chestnut (Castanea), Norway maple (Acer platanoides), and aspen (Populus tremula). The angles were measured using the leveled camera method [3], with the data collected at several separate heights and four times during the period of May-September 2013. The results generally indicate the greatest change in leaf inclination angles for spring, with the changes usually being the most pronounced at the top of the canopy. It should also be noted, however, that whereas the temporal variation proved to be rather consistent for different species, the vertical variation differed more between species. The leveled camera method was additionally tested in terms of sensitivity to different users. Ten people were asked to measure the leaf angles for four different species. The results indicate the method is quite robust in providing coinciding distributions irrespective of the user and level of previous experience with the method. However, certain caution must be exercised when measuring long narrow leaves. References [1] G.G. Mc

  3. Fractures of angle of mandible – A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sourav; Fry, Ramesh R.; Joshi, Ajit; Sharma, Geeta; Singh, Smita

    2012-01-01

    Aims This retrospective study was done to evaluate the efficacy of single miniplate osteosynthesis at superior border of angle of mandible. Material and methods In this study 50 patients were treated by single miniplate osteosynthesis according to Champy's principle. Bite force generated was used as a parameter for judging the efficacy of internal fixation. In this article we present our experience over the years in the management of the fractures of angle of mandible based on this model. Results Most patients were of 21–30 yrs of age with unilateral angle fracture of mandible except one patient who had isolated bilateral angle fracture. The patients were treated successfully according to Champy's principle of osteosynthesis. There was a progressive improvement in the bite force generated after osteosynthesis. Conclusions The angle of the mandible is an anatomically weak and an area susceptible to fracture. The presence of an impacted or partially erupted third molar tooth further weakens it. Angle of mandible is the most common site for fracture however, bilateral angle fracture is very rare and uncommon. Osteosynthesis according to Champy's model led to an early functional improvement as demonstrated by the bite force generated. PMID:25737858

  4. Evaluation of importance of lateral acceleration derivatives in extraction of lateral-directional derivatives at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, L. T.

    1974-01-01

    A theoretical investigation was conducted to determine the importance of the lateral acceleration (beta) derivatives in the extraction of lateral-directional stability derivatives for swept wing airplanes at high angles of attack. Representative values of lateral acceleration derivatives in yaw and roll (Cn beta and Cl beta) were used in a computer program to generate representative flight motions at several angles of attack and altitudes. The computer-generated motions were then subjected to a parameter identification process based on a modified Newton-Raphson method. Two identification techniques were evaluated, one which included the beta derivatives and one which neglected them. The results of the study indicate that omission of the beta derivatives from mathematical models used in the derivative-extraction techniques can produce erroneous values for the lateral-directional stability derivatives particularly at high angles of attack, where the beta derivatives are large. The largest errors occur in the dynamic derivatives, but large errors may also occur in the static derivatives for cases in which the beta derivatives have large effects on the flight motions of the airplane. In addition, the resulting identified mathematical models provide poor motion prediction as well as erroneous predictions of dynamic modal characteristics. These results strongly indicate that the effects of beta derivatives should be considered in any attempt to extract lateral-directional aerodynamic parameters at high angles of attack.

  5. Association between choroidal thickness and anterior chamber segment in eyes with narrow or open-angle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song-Feng; Wu, Ge-Wei; Chen, Chang-Xi; Shen, Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Bao; Gao, Fei; Wang, Ning-Li

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between choroidal thickness and anterior chamber segment in subjects with eyes with narrow or open-angle. METHODS The subfoveal choroidal thickness was measured with enhanced depth-imaging optical coherence tomography and anterior chamber parameters were measured with ultrasound biomicroscopy in one eye of 23 subjects with open-angle eyes and 38 subjects with narrow-angle eyes. The mean age was 59.52±7.04y for narrow-angle subjects and 60.76±7.23y for open-angle subjects (P=0.514). Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to assess the association between choroidal thickness and narrow-angle parameters. RESULTS There were no differences in subfoveal choroidal thickness between open- and narrow-angle subjects (P=0.231). Anterior chamber parameters, including central anterior chamber depth, trabecular iris angle, iris thickness 500 µm from the scleral spur (IT500), and ciliary body thickness at 1 mm and 2 mm from the scleral spur (CBT1, CBT2) showed significant differences between the two groups (P<0.05). Subfoveal choroidal thickness showed negative correlation (β=-0.496, P=0.016) only with anterior chamber depth in the open-angle group and with age (β=-0.442, P=0.003) and IT500 (β=-0.399, P=0.008) in the narrow-angle group. However, subfoveal choroidal thickness was not correlated with trabecular iris angle, anterior chamber depth, ciliary body thickness, or central corneal thickness in the narrow-angle group. CONCLUSION Choroidal thickness does not differ in the two groups and has not correlated with anterior chamber parameters in narrow-angle subjects, suggesting a lack of relationship between choroidal thickness and primary angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:27588269

  6. Large angle measurement by interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Dan; Blanaru, Constantin; Damian, Victor S.; Logofatu, Petre-Catalin; Tumbar, R.; Dobroiu, Adrian

    1995-03-01

    An interferometric set-up able to measure angles as large as +180 degree(s) is presented. The principle of the method is to measure a linear displacement (translation) produced by a crank-gear mechanism which converts the angular movement of a rotating table. The optical scheme and consideration on the accuracy of the method are presented.

  7. Discovering the Inscribed Angle Theorem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roscoe, Matt B.

    2012-01-01

    Learning to play tennis is difficult. It takes practice, but it also helps to have a coach--someone who gives tips and pointers but allows the freedom to play the game on one's own. Learning to act like a mathematician is a similar process. Students report that the process of proving the inscribed angle theorem is challenging and, at times,…

  8. Influence of Contact Angle, Growth Angle and Melt Surface Tension on Detached Solidification of InSb

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yazhen; Regel, Liya L.; Wilcox, William R.

    2000-01-01

    We extended the previous analysis of detached solidification of InSb based on the moving meniscus model. We found that for steady detached solidification to occur in a sealed ampoule in zero gravity, it is necessary for the growth angle to exceed a critical value, the contact angle for the melt on the ampoule wall to exceed a critical value, and the melt-gas surface tension to be below a critical value. These critical values would depend on the material properties and the growth parameters. For the conditions examined here, the sum of the growth angle and the contact angle must exceed approximately 130, which is significantly less than required if both ends of the ampoule are open.

  9. Evolution of the hydromorphodynamics of mountain river confluences for varying discharge ratios and junction angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillén-Ludeña, S.; Franca, M. J.; Cardoso, A. H.; Schleiss, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    Mountain river confluences are characterized by narrow and steep tributaries that supply abundant sediment load to a main channel that, in turn, provides the dominant flow discharge. In addition, bed sediments consist of poorly sorted mixtures that promote bed armoring. The knowledge of the hydrodynamics and morphodynamics of mountain river confluences is sparse because most of the existent studies on confluence dynamics focus on lowland confluences. This study aims at examining the influence of the junction angle (α) and discharge ratio (Qr = Qt / Qm) on flow dynamics and bed morphology of mountain river confluences. This study presents the results of six laboratory experiments in which three discharge ratios were tested (Qr = Qt / Qm = 0.11, 0.15, 0.23) with two different junction angles (α = 90° and 70°). The experiments were conducted under movable bed conditions and with continuous sediment supply to both flumes. Measurements consisted of systematic bed topography and water surface surveys performed at different instants during the experiments and at equilibrium, i.e., when the outgoing sediment rate coincided with the incoming and bed topography reached a steady state. The results show that the discharge ratio and the junction angle parameters are major controls of the dynamics of mountain river confluences. Also, the evolution of bed morphology and flow dynamics for varying junction angles and discharge ratios present some patterns that contrast with those reported for lowland confluences. Among these patterns are the different flow regimes adopted by the tributary for different junction angles and the decrease of the height of the bank-attached bar for increasing discharge ratios. Moreover, results show that the abundant sediment load of the tributary plays a major role on the dynamics of this type of confluence. This load resulted in a marked bed discordance that, in turn, influenced flow dynamics and bed morphology of the confluence.

  10. FT-Raman and chemometric tools for rapid determination of quality parameters in milk powder: Classification of samples for the presence of lactose and fraud detection by addition of maltodextrin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Júnior, Paulo Henrique; de Sá Oliveira, Kamila; de Almeida, Carlos Eduardo Rocha; De Oliveira, Luiz Fernando Cappa; Stephani, Rodrigo; Pinto, Michele da Silva; de Carvalho, Antônio Fernandes; Perrone, Ítalo Tuler

    2016-04-01

    FT-Raman spectroscopy has been explored as a quick screening method to evaluate the presence of lactose and identify milk powder samples adulterated with maltodextrin (2.5-50% w/w). Raman measurements can easily differentiate samples of milk powder, without the need for sample preparation, while traditional quality control methods, including high performance liquid chromatography, are cumbersome and slow. FT-Raman spectra were obtained from samples of whole lactose and low-lactose milk powder, both without and with addition of maltodextrin. Differences were observed between the spectra involved in identifying samples with low lactose content, as well as adulterated samples. Exploratory data analysis using Raman spectroscopy and multivariate analysis was also developed to classify samples with PCA and PLS-DA. The PLS-DA models obtained allowed to correctly classify all samples. These results demonstrate the utility of FT-Raman spectroscopy in combination with chemometrics to infer about the quality of milk powder.

  11. Effects of black pepper (piper nigrum), turmeric powder (curcuma longa) and coriander seeds (coriandrum sativum) and their combinations as feed additives on growth performance, carcass traits, some blood parameters and humoral immune response of broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Abou-Elkhair, R; Ahmed, H A; Selim, S

    2014-06-01

    Different herbs and spices have been used as feed additives for various purposes in poultry production. This study was conducted to assess the effect of feed supplemented with black pepper (Piper nigrum), turmeric powder (Curcuma longa), coriander seeds (Coriandrum sativum) and their combinations on the performance of broilers. A total of 210 (Cobb) one-d-old chicks were divided into seven groups of 30 birds each. The treatments were: a control group received no supplement, 0.5% black pepper (T1), 0.5% turmeric powder (T2), 2% coriander seeds (T3), a mixture of 0.5% black pepper and 0.5% turmeric powder (T4), a mixture of 0.5% black pepper and 2% coriander seed (T5), and a mixture of 0.5% black pepper, 0.5% turmeric powder and 2% coriander seeds (T6). Higher significant values of body weight gain during the whole period of 5 weeks (p<0.001) were observed in broilers on T1, T3, T5, and T6 compared to control. Dietary supplements with T1, T2, T3, and T6 improved the cumulative G:F of broilers during the whole period of 5 weeks (p<0.001) compared with control. The dressing percentage and edible giblets were not influenced by dietary supplements, while higher values of relative weight of the liver (p<0.05) were obtained in T5 and T6 compared to control. The addition of feed supplements in T5 and T6 significantly increased serum total protein and decreased serum glucose, triglycerides and alkaline phosphatase concentrations compared with the control group (p<0.05). Broilers on T6 showed significant decrease in the serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase concentration (p<0.05) compared to control. The broilers having T5 and T6 supplemented feed had relatively greater antibody titre (p<0.001) at 35 d of age than control. It is concluded that dietary supplements with black pepper or coriander seeds or their combinations enhanced the performance and health status of broiler chickens.

  12. Effects of Black Pepper (Piper Nigrum), Turmeric Powder (Curcuma Longa) and Coriander Seeds (Coriandrum Sativum) and Their Combinations as Feed Additives on Growth Performance, Carcass Traits, Some Blood Parameters and Humoral Immune Response of Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Abou-Elkhair, R.; Ahmed, H. A.; Selim, S.

    2014-01-01

    Different herbs and spices have been used as feed additives for various purposes in poultry production. This study was conducted to assess the effect of feed supplemented with black pepper (Piper nigrum), turmeric powder (Curcuma longa), coriander seeds (Coriandrum sativum) and their combinations on the performance of broilers. A total of 210 (Cobb) one-d-old chicks were divided into seven groups of 30 birds each. The treatments were: a control group received no supplement, 0.5% black pepper (T1), 0.5% turmeric powder (T2), 2% coriander seeds (T3), a mixture of 0.5% black pepper and 0.5% turmeric powder (T4), a mixture of 0.5% black pepper and 2% coriander seed (T5), and a mixture of 0.5% black pepper, 0.5% turmeric powder and 2% coriander seeds (T6). Higher significant values of body weight gain during the whole period of 5 weeks (p<0.001) were observed in broilers on T1, T3, T5, and T6 compared to control. Dietary supplements with T1, T2, T3, and T6 improved the cumulative G:F of broilers during the whole period of 5 weeks (p<0.001) compared with control. The dressing percentage and edible giblets were not influenced by dietary supplements, while higher values of relative weight of the liver (p<0.05) were obtained in T5 and T6 compared to control. The addition of feed supplements in T5 and T6 significantly increased serum total protein and decreased serum glucose, triglycerides and alkaline phosphatase concentrations compared with the control group (p<0.05). Broilers on T6 showed significant decrease in the serum glutamate pyruvate transaminase concentration (p<0.05) compared to control. The broilers having T5 and T6 supplemented feed had relatively greater antibody titre (p<0.001) at 35 d of age than control. It is concluded that dietary supplements with black pepper or coriander seeds or their combinations enhanced the performance and health status of broiler chickens. PMID:25050023

  13. Hidden Topological Angles in Path Integrals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behtash, Alireza; Sulejmanpasic, Tin; Schäfer, Thomas; Ünsal, Mithat

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate the existence of hidden topological angles (HTAs) in a large class of quantum field theories and quantum mechanical systems. HTAs are distinct from theta parameters in the Lagrangian. They arise as invariant angles associated with saddle points of the complexified path integral and their descent manifolds (Lefschetz thimbles). Physical effects of HTAs become most transparent upon analytic continuation in nf to a noninteger number of flavors, reducing in the integer nf limit to a Z2 valued phase difference between dominant saddles. In N =1 super Yang-Mills theory we demonstrate the microscopic mechanism for the vanishing of the gluon condensate. The same effect leads to an anomalously small condensate in a QCD-like S U (N ) gauge theory with fermions in the two-index representation. The basic phenomenon is that, contrary to folklore, the gluon condensate can receive both positive and negative contributions in a semiclassical expansion. In quantum mechanics, a HTA leads to a difference in semiclassical expansion of integer and half-integer spin particles.

  14. NEW ESTIMATES OF THE INCLINATION, POSITION ANGLE, PITCH ANGLE, AND SCALE HEIGHT OF THE WHIRLPOOL GALAXY

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Tao; Shao Zhengyi; Peng Qiuhe E-mail: taohu.nju@gmail.com

    2013-01-10

    The inclination (i) and position angle (PA) of the Whirlpool galaxy (M51) are critical to modeling and interpreting observations. Here we make improved estimates of these parameters by fitting logarithmic spirals to the main arms. From separate fits to each major arm, we obtain i = 20. Degree-Sign 3 {+-} 2. Degree-Sign 8 and PA = 12. Degree-Sign 0 {+-} 2. Degree-Sign 5. We then use Poisson's equation for the logarithmic perturbation of the density to estimate the mean vertical scale height (H) of M51 to be 95-178 pc.

  15. Angle interferometer cross axis errors

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, J.B.; Carter, D.L.; Thompson, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    Angle interferometers are commonly used to measure surface plate flatness. An error can exist when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the surface plate and the guide bar for the mirror sled is curved. Typical errors can be one to two microns per meter. A similar error can exist in the calibration of rotary tables when the centerline of the double comer cube mirror assembly is not square to the axes of rotation of the angle calibrator and the calibrator axis is not parallel to the rotary table axis. Commercial double comer cube assemblies typically have non-parallelism errors of ten milli-radians between their centerlines and their sides and similar values for non-squareness between their centerlines and end surfaces. The authors have developed a simple method for measuring these errors and correcting them by remachining the reference surfaces.

  16. SEDIMENTATION IN THE ANGLE CENTRIFUGE.

    PubMed

    Pickels, E G

    1943-01-20

    1. Using hemocyanin from Limulus polyphemus as a test material, the process of sedimentation in the angle centrifuge, operating both in vacuum and in the open air, has been investigated. 2. Sedimentation in a given field of force was found less efficient when centrifugation was conducted in the open air, because of thermal convection. 3. Correlations have been made with results obtained in the analytical ultracentrifuge, and a theory of sedimentation in inclined tubes has been presented to explain the experimental results. 4. It has been shown that under proper conditions the angle centrifuge may be used for approximate determinations of particle size. 5. Recommendations, based mostly on experimental evidence, have been made for improving sedimentation and interpreting results. 6. To counteract convective disturbances of either thermal or inertial origin, a satisfactory method has been developed which consists of furnishing the fluid under study with a synthetic density gradient, formed with sucrose or some other non-sedimentable material.

  17. Gaia basic angle monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielesen, W.; de Bruijn, D.; van den Dool, T.; Kamphues, F.; Mekking, J.; Calvel, B.; Laborie, A.; Coatantiec, C.; Touzeau, S.; Erdmann, M.; Gare, P.; Monteiro, D.

    2013-09-01

    The Gaia mission1 will create an extraordinarily precise three-dimensional map of more than one billion stars in our Galaxy. The Gaia spacecraft2, built by EADS Astrium, is part of ESA's Cosmic Vision programme and scheduled for launch in 2013. Gaia measures the position, distance and motion of stars with an accuracy of 24 micro-arcsec using two telescopes at a fixed mutual angle of 106.5°, named the `Basic Angle', at an operational temperature of 100 K. This accuracy requires ultra-high stability at cryogenic conditions, which can only be achieved by using Silicon Carbide for both the optical bench and the telescopes. TNO has developed, built and space qualified the Silicon carbide Basic Angle Monitoring (BAM) on-board metrology system3 for this mission, measuring the relative motion of Gaia's telescopes with accuracies in the range of 0.5 micro-arcsec. This is achieved by a system of two laser interferometers able to detect Optical Path Differences (OPD) as small as 1.5 picometer rms. Following a general introduction on Gaia and the use of Silicon Carbide as base material this paper addresses the specific challenges towards the cryogenic application of the Gaia BAM including design, integration and verification/qualification by testing.

  18. OPENING ANGLES OF COLLAPSAR JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuta, Akira; Ioka, Kunihito

    2013-11-10

    We investigate the jet propagation and breakout from the stellar progenitor for gamma-ray burst (GRB) collapsars by performing two-dimensional relativistic hydrodynamic simulations and analytical modeling. We find that the jet opening angle is given by θ{sub j} ∼ 1/5Γ{sub 0} and infer the initial Lorentz factor of the jet at the central engine, Γ{sub 0}, is a few for existing observations of θ{sub j}. The jet keeps the Lorentz factor low inside the star by converging cylindrically via collimation shocks under the cocoon pressure and accelerates at jet breakout before the free expansion to a hollow-cone structure. In this new picture, the GRB duration is determined by the sound crossing time of the cocoon, after which the opening angle widens, reducing the apparent luminosity. Some bursts violating the maximum opening angle θ{sub j,{sub max}} ∼ 1/5 ∼ 12° imply the existence of a baryon-rich sheath or a long-acting jet. We can explain the slopes in both Amati and Yonetoku spectral relations using an off-centered photosphere model, if we make only one assumption that the total jet luminosity is proportional to the initial Lorentz factor of the jet. We also numerically calibrate the pre-breakout model (Bromberg et al.) for later use.

  19. Folded cavity angled-grating broad-area lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunsong; Zhu, Lin

    2013-10-01

    The angled-grating broad-area laser is a promising candidate for high power, high brightness diode laser source. The key point in the design is the angled gratings which can simultaneously support the unique snake-like zigzag lasing mode and eliminate the direct Fabry-Perot (FP) feedback. Unlike a conventional laser waveguide mode, the phase front of the zigzag mode periodically changes along the propagation direction. By use of the mirror symmetry of the zigzag mode, we propose and demonstrate the folded cavity angled-grating broad-area lasers. One benefit of this design is to reduce the required wafer space compared to a regular angled-grating broad-area laser, especially in a long cavity laser for high power operation. Experimental results show that the folded cavity laser exhibits good beam quality in far field with a slightly larger threshold and smaller slope efficiency due to the additional interface loss.

  20. Influence of Different Diffuser Angle on Sedan's Aerodynamic Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xingjun; Zhang, Rui; Ye, Jian; Yan, Xu; Zhao, Zhiming

    The aerodynamic characteristics have a great influence on the fuel economics and the steering stability of a high speed vehicle. The underbody rear diffuser is one of important aerodynamic add-on devices. The parameters of the diffuser, including the diffuser angle, the number and the shape of separators, the shape of the end plate and etc, will affect the underbody flow and the wake. Here, just the influence of the diffuser angle was investigated without separator and the end plate. The method of Computational Fluid Dynamics was adopted to study the aerodynamic characteristics of a simplified sedan with a different diffuser angle respectively. The diffuser angle was set to 0°, 3°, 6°, 9.8° and 12° respectively. The diffuser angle of the original model is 9.8°. The conclusions were drawn that when the diffuser angle increases, the underbody flow and especially the wake change greatly and the pressure change correspondingly; as a result, the total aerodynamic drag coefficients of car first decrease and then increases, while the total aerodynamic lift coefficients decrease.

  1. Determination of basic friction angle using various laboratory tests.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Bo-An

    2016-04-01

    The basic friction angle of rock is an important factor of joint shear strength and is included within most shear strength criteria. It can be measured by direct shear test, triaxial compression test and tilt test. Tilt test is mostly used because it is the simplest method. However, basic friction angles measured using tilt test for same rock type or for one sample are widely distributed and often do not show normal distribution. In this research, the basic friction angles for the Hangdeung granite form Korea and Berea sandstone from USA are measured accurately using direct shear test and triaxial compression test. Then basic friction angles are again measured using tilt tests with various conditions and are compared with those measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test to determine the optimum condition of tilt test. Three types of sliding planes, such as planes cut by saw and planes polished by #100 and #600 grinding powders, are prepared. When planes are polished by #100 grinding powder, the basic friction angles measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test are very consistent and show narrow ranges. However, basic friction angles show wide ranges when planes are cut by saw and are polished by #600 grinding powder. The basic friction angle measured using tilt test are very close to those measured using direct shear test and triaxial compression test when plane is polished by #100 grinding powder. When planes are cut by saw and are polished by #600 grinding powder, basic friction angles measured using tilt test are slightly different. This indicates that tilt test with plane polished by #100 grinding powder can yield an accurate basic friction angle. In addition, the accurate values are obtained not only when planes are polished again after 10 times of tilt test, but values are averaged by more 30 times of tests.

  2. PREDITOR: a web server for predicting protein torsion angle restraints

    PubMed Central

    Berjanskii, Mark V.; Neal, Stephen; Wishart, David S.

    2006-01-01

    Every year between 500 and 1000 peptide and protein structures are determined by NMR and deposited into the Protein Data Bank. However, the process of NMR structure determination continues to be a manually intensive and time-consuming task. One of the most tedious and error-prone aspects of this process involves the determination of torsion angle restraints including phi, psi, omega and chi angles. Most methods require many days of additional experiments, painstaking measurements or complex calculations. Here we wish to describe a web server, called PREDITOR, which greatly accelerates and simplifies this task. PREDITOR accepts sequence and/or chemical shift data as input and generates torsion angle predictions (with predicted errors) for phi, psi, omega and chi-1 angles. PREDITOR combines sequence alignment methods with advanced chemical shift analysis techniques to generate its torsion angle predictions. The method is fast (<40 s per protein) and accurate, with 88% of phi/psi predictions being within 30° of the correct values, 84% of chi-1 predictions being correct and 99.97% of omega angles being correct. PREDITOR is 35 times faster and up to 20% more accurate than any existing method. PREDITOR also provides accurate assessments of the torsion angle errors so that the torsion angle constraints can be readily fed into standard structure refinement programs, such as CNS, XPLOR, AMBER and CYANA. Other unique features to PREDITOR include dihedral angle prediction via PDB structure mapping, automated chemical shift re-referencing (to improve accuracy), prediction of proline cis/trans states and a simple user interface. The PREDITOR website is located at: . PMID:16845087

  3. Analysis of low-angle x-ray scattering peaks from lyophilized biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desouky, Omar S.; Elshemey, Wael M.; Selim, Nabila S.; Ashour, Ahmed H.

    2001-08-01

    Low-angle x-ray scattering (LAXS) from lyophilized blood and its constituents is characterized by the presence of two peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks are found to be sensitive to the variations in the molecular structure of a given sample. The present work aims to explore the nature of LAXS from a variety of lyophilized biological samples. It also aims to investigate the possibility that a certain biological macromolecule is responsible of the production of LAXS peaks. This is carried out through measurements of LAXS from complex biological samples and their basic constituents. Among the measured samples are haemoglobin (Hb), globin, haem, packed red blood cells, bovine albumin, egg albumin, milk, casein, glutamine, alanine, fat, muscle and DNA. A table containing some characteristic parameters of the LAXS profiles of these samples is also presented. Analysis of measured profiles shows that all lyophilized samples produce at least one relatively broad peak at a scattering angle around 10.35°. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of this peak varies considerably among the measured samples. Except for milk and casein, one additional peak at a scattering angle around 4.65° is observed only in the LAXS profiles of proteins or protein-rich samples. This fact strongly suggests protein to be the biological macromolecule from which this characteristic peak originates. The same idea is further strengthened through discussion of some previous observations.

  4. Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field imaging: application to three-dimensional dopant atom profiling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jack Y; Hwang, Jinwoo; Isaac, Brandon J; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-07-24

    Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy is developed for precise and accurate determination of three-dimensional (3D) dopant atom configurations. Gd-doped SrTiO3 films containing Sr columns containing zero, one, or two Gd dopant atoms are imaged in HAADF mode using two different collection angles. Variable-angle HAADF significantly increases both the precision and accuracy of 3D dopant profiling. Using image simulations, it is shown that the combined information from the two detectors reduces the uncertainty in the dopant depth position measurement and can uniquely identify certain atomic configurations that are indistinguishable with a single detector setting. Additional advances and applications are discussed.

  5. Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field imaging: application to three-dimensional dopant atom profiling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jack Y.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Isaac, Brandon J.; Stemmer, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Variable-angle high-angle annular dark-field (HAADF) imaging in scanning transmission electron microscopy is developed for precise and accurate determination of three-dimensional (3D) dopant atom configurations. Gd-doped SrTiO3 films containing Sr columns containing zero, one, or two Gd dopant atoms are imaged in HAADF mode using two different collection angles. Variable-angle HAADF significantly increases both the precision and accuracy of 3D dopant profiling. Using image simulations, it is shown that the combined information from the two detectors reduces the uncertainty in the dopant depth position measurement and can uniquely identify certain atomic configurations that are indistinguishable with a single detector setting. Additional advances and applications are discussed. PMID:26206489

  6. Angle scintillations in the laser return from a retroreflector.

    PubMed

    Hansen, J P; Madhu, S

    1972-02-01

    Angle scintillations of the laser return from a retroreflector were observed to exceed the value expected because of atmospheric turbulence. The observations and a theoretical analysis of a possible mechanism are presented. The experimental work was performed with a pulsed, 1.06-micro laser illuminating a corner cube. Angular scintillations of the laser return were measured to be eight times greater than that of a reference beacon. The theoretical analysis assumes phase fluctuations in the illuminating laser beam. An expression is derived for the scintillation angle as a function of a phase fluctuation parameter.

  7. Dynamic nuclear polarization at 40 kHz magic angle spinning† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, with supplementary tables and figures. See DOI: 10.1039/c6cp00839a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Sachin R.; Berruyer, Pierrick; Gajan, David; Reiter, Christian; Engelke, Frank; Silverio, Daniel L.; Copéret, Christophe; Lelli, Moreno

    2016-01-01

    DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR spectroscopy under magic angle spinning (MAS) is rapidly developing into a powerful analytical tool to investigate the structure of a wide range of solid materials, because it provides unsurpassed sensitivity gains. Most developments and applications of DNP MAS NMR were so far reported at moderate spinning frequencies (up to 14 kHz using 3.2 mm rotors). Here, using a 1.3 mm MAS DNP probe operating at 18.8 T and ∼100 K, we show that signal amplification factors can be increased by up to a factor two when using smaller volume rotors as compared to 3.2 mm rotors, and report enhancements of around 60 over a range of sample spinning rates from 10 to 40 kHz. Spinning at 40 kHz is also shown to increase 29Si coherence lifetimes by a factor three as compared to 10 kHz, substantially increasing sensitivity in CPMG type experiments. The contribution of quenching effects to the overall sensitivity gain at very fast MAS is evaluated, and applications are reported on a functionalised mesostructured organic–inorganic material. PMID:27035630

  8. A basic study on variable-gain Kalman filter based on angle error calculated from acceleration signals for lower limb angle measurement with inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Teruyama, Yuta; Watanabe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    In this study, development of wearable motion measurement system using inertial sensors has been focused with the aim of rehabilitation support. For measurement of lower limb joint angles with inertial sensors, Kalman-filtering-based angle measurement method was developed. However, it was required to reduce variation of measurement errors that depended on movement speeds or subjects. In this report, variable-gain Kalman filter based on the difference between the estimated angle by the Kalman filter and the angle calculated from acceleration signals was tested. From angle measurement during treadmill walking with healthy subjects, it was shown that measurement accuracy of the foot inclination angle was significantly improved with the proposed method compared to the method of fixed parameter value. PMID:24110464

  9. Radar altimeter waveform modeled parameter recovery. [SEASAT-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Satellite-borne radar altimeters include waveform sampling gates providing point samples of the transmitted radar pulse after its scattering from the ocean's surface. Averages of the waveform sampler data can be fitted by varying parameters in a model mean return waveform. The theoretical waveform model used is described as well as a general iterative nonlinear least squares procedures used to obtain estimates of parameters characterizing the modeled waveform for SEASAT-1 data. The six waveform parameters recovered by the fitting procedure are: (1) amplitude; (2) time origin, or track point; (3) ocean surface rms roughness; (4) noise baseline; (5) ocean surface skewness; and (6) altitude or off-nadir angle. Additional practical processing considerations are addressed and FORTRAN source listing for subroutines used in the waveform fitting are included. While the description is for the Seasat-1 altimeter waveform data analysis, the work can easily be generalized and extended to other radar altimeter systems.

  10. SU-E-I-56: Scan Angle Reduction for a Limited-Angle Intrafraction Verification (LIVE) System

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, L; Zhang, Y; Yin, F

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel adaptive reconstruction strategy to further reduce the scanning angle required by the limited-angle intrafraction verification (LIVE) system for intrafraction verification. Methods: LIVE acquires limited angle MV projections from the exit fluence of the arc treatment beam or during gantry rotation between static beams. Orthogonal limited-angle kV projections are also acquired simultaneously to provide additional information. LIVE considers the on-board 4D-CBCT images as a deformation of the prior 4D-CT images, and solves the deformation field based on deformation models and data fidelity constraint. LIVE reaches a checkpoint after a limited-angle scan, and reconstructs 4D-CBCT for intrafraction verification at the checkpoint. In adaptive reconstruction strategy, a larger scanning angle of 30° is used for the first checkpoint, and smaller scanning angles of 15° are used for subsequent checkpoints. The onboard images reconstructed at the previous adjacent checkpoint are used as the prior images for reconstruction at the current checkpoint. As the algorithm only needs to reconstruct the small deformation occurred between adjacent checkpoints, projections from a smaller scan angle provide enough information for the reconstruction. XCAT was used to simulate tumor motion baseline drift of 2mm along sup-inf direction at every subsequent checkpoint, which are 15° apart. Adaptive reconstruction strategy was used to reconstruct the images at each checkpoint using orthogonal 15° kV and MV projections. Results: Results showed that LIVE reconstructed the tumor volumes accurately using orthogonal 15° kV-MV projections. Volume percentage differences (VPDs) were within 5% and center of mass shifts (COMS) were within 1mm for reconstruction at all checkpoints. Conclusion: It's feasible to use an adaptive reconstruction strategy to further reduce the scan angle needed by LIVE to allow faster and more frequent intrafraction verification to minimize the

  11. Wide angle holographic display system with spatiotemporal multiplexing.

    PubMed

    Kozacki, Tomasz; Finke, Grzegorz; Garbat, Piotr; Zaperty, Weronika; Kujawińska, Małgorzata

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a wide angle holographic display system with extended viewing angle in both horizontal and vertical directions. The display is constructed from six spatial light modulators (SLM) arranged on a circle and an additional SLM used for spatiotemporal multiplexing and a viewing angle extension in two perpendicular directions. The additional SLM, that is synchronized with the SLMs on the circle is placed in the image space. This method increases effective space bandwidth product of display system data from 12.4 to 50 megapixels. The software solution based on three Nvidia graphic cards is developed and implemented in order to achieve fast and synchronized displaying. The experiments presented for both synthetic and real 3D data prove the possibility to view binocularly having good quality images reconstructed in full FoV of the display. PMID:23262697

  12. Dynamic response of a forward-swept-wing model at angles of attack up to 15 deg at a Mach number of 0.8. [Langley transonic dynamics tunnel tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doggett, R. V., Jr.; Ricketts, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Root mean square (rms) bending moments for a dynamically scaled, aeroelastic wing of a proposed forward swept wing, flight demonstrator airplane are presented for angles of attack up to 15 deg at a Mach number of 0.8 The 0.6 size semispan model had a leading edge forward sweep of 44 deg and was constructed of composite material. In addition to broad band responses, individual rms responses and total damping ratios are presented for the first two natural modes. The results show that the rms response increases with angle of attack and has a peak value at an angle of attack near 13 deg. In general, the response was characteristic of buffeting and similar to results often observed for aft swept wings. At an angle of attack near 13 deg, however, the response had characteristics associated with approaching a dynamic instability, although no instability was observed over the range of parameters investigated.

  13. Gasoline additives, emissions, and performance

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-31

    The papers included in this publication deal with the influence of fuel, additive, and hardware changes on a variety of vehicle performance characteristics. Advanced techniques for measuring these performance parameters are also described. Contents include: Fleet test evaluation of gasoline additives for intake valve and combustion chamber deposit clean up; A technique for evaluating octane requirement additives in modern engines on dynamometer test stands; A fleet test of two additive technologies comparing their effects on tailpipe emissions; Investigation into the vehicle exhaust emissions of high percentage ethanol blends; Variability in hydrocarbon speciation measurements at low emission (ULEV) levels; and more.

  14. Ion Implantation Angle Variation to Device Performance and the Control in Production

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.Y.; Hendrix, D.; Wu, L.Y.; Cusson, B.K.

    2003-08-26

    As the device features get smaller and aspect ratios of photoresist openings get steeper, shadowing effect has more impact on the performance of devices. Many of the traditional 7 deg. tilt implants have progressed to 0 deg. implants. But shadowing may still occur if the tilt angle deviates from normal direction. Some implants, such as halo implants, demand even more stringent angle control to reduce device performance variation. The demand for implant angle control and monitoring thus becomes more obvious and important. However, statistical process control (SPC) cannot be done on shadowing effect without special test structures. Channeling, on the other hand, provides good sensitivity in regard to implant angle changes. It is the authors' intention to introduce channeling implant in different channels to monitor the implant angle variation. The incoming <100> silicon wafers have a cut-angle spec of +/- 1.0 deg. This poses a difficulty if one wants to control the implant angle's accuracy within +/- 0.5 deg. Other measures have to be taken to ensure the consistency of test wafers and to have prompt diagnosis feedback when needed. This paper will discuss the effect of implant tilt angle on device parameters and how to control the angle variation in production. Correlations of implant tilt angle variation to ThermaWave, sheet resistance (Rs), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and device parameters will be covered with certain implant conditions.

  15. Ion Implantation Angle Variation to Device Performance and the Control in Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. Y.; Hendrix, D.; Wu, L. Y.; Cusson, B. K.

    2003-08-01

    As the device features get smaller and aspect ratios of photoresist openings get steeper, shadowing effect has more impact on the performance of devices. Many of the traditional 7° tilt implants have progressed to 0° implants. But shadowing may still occur if the tilt angle deviates from normal direction. Some implants, such as halo implants, demand even more stringent angle control to reduce device performance variation. The demand for implant angle control and monitoring thus becomes more obvious and important. However, statistical process control (SPC) cannot be done on shadowing effect without special test structures. Channeling, on the other hand, provides good sensitivity in regard to implant angle changes. It is the authors' intention to introduce channeling implant in different channels to monitor the implant angle variation. The incoming <100> silicon wafers have a cut-angle spec of +/- 1.0°. This poses a difficulty if one wants to control the implant angle's accuracy within +/- 0.5°. Other measures have to be taken to ensure the consistency of test wafers and to have prompt diagnosis feedback when needed. This paper will discuss the effect of implant tilt angle on device parameters and how to control the angle variation in production. Correlations of implant tilt angle variation to ThermaWave™, sheet resistance (Rs), Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and device parameters will be covered with certain implant conditions.

  16. Effects on Diagnostic Parameters After Removing Additional Synchronous Gear Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Harry J.

    2003-01-01

    Gear cracks are typically difficult to diagnose with sufficient time before catastrophic damage occurs. Significant damage must be present before algorithms appear to be able to detect the damage. Frequently there are multiple gear meshes on a single shaft. Since they are all synchronous with the shaft frequency, the commonly used synchronous averaging technique is ineffective in removing other gear mesh effects. Carefully applying a filter to these extraneous gear mesh frequencies can reduce the overall vibration signal and increase the accuracy of commonly used vibration metrics. The vibration signals from three seeded fault tests were analyzed using this filtering procedure. Both the filtered and unfiltered vibration signals were then analyzed using commonly used fault detection metrics and compared. The tests were conducted on aerospace quality spur gears in a test rig. The tests were conducted at speeds ranging from 2500 to 5000 revolutions per minute and torques from 184 to 228 percent of design load. The inability to detect these cracks with high confidence results from the high loading which is causing fast fracture as opposed to stable crack growth. The results indicate that these techniques do not currently produce an indication of damage that significantly exceeds experimental scatter.

  17. Method for producing angled optical fiber tips in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, John J.; Hickey, Michelle; Phillips, Justin P.; Kyriacou, Panicos A.

    2016-02-01

    A simple laboratory method is presented for producing optical fibers with tips polished at various angles. Angled optical fiber tips are used in applications such as optical sensing and remote laser surgery, where they can be used to control the angle of light leaving the fiber or direct it to the side. This allows for greater control and allows areas to be reached that otherwise could not. Optical fibers were produced with tip angles of 45 deg using a Perspex mounting block with an aluminum base plate. The dispersion of light leaving the tip was tested using a blue (470 nm) LED. The angle imposed an angular shift on the light diffracting out of the tip of approximately 30 deg. Additionally, some light reflected from the tip surface to diffract at 90 deg through the side of the fiber. These observations are consistent with theory and those seen by other studies, validating the method. The method was simple to perform and does not require advanced manufacturing tools. The method is suitable for producing small quantities of angle-tipped optical fibers for research applications.

  18. Limbus Impact on Off-angle Iris Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Barstow, Del R; Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Thompson, Joseph W; Bolme, David S; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of iris recognition depends on the quality of data capture and is negatively affected by several factors such as angle, occlusion, and dilation. Off-angle iris recognition is a new research focus in biometrics that tries to address several issues including corneal refraction, complex 3D iris texture, and blur. In this paper, we present an additional significant challenge that degrades the performance of the off-angle iris recognition systems, called the limbus effect . The limbus is the region at the border of the cornea where the cornea joins the sclera. The limbus is a semitransparent tissue that occludes a side portion of the iris plane. The amount of occluded iris texture on the side nearest the camera increases as the image acquisition angle increases. Without considering the role of the limbus effect, it is difficult to design an accurate off-angle iris recognition system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that investigates the limbus effect in detail from a biometrics perspective. Based on results from real images and simulated experiments with real iris texture, the limbus effect increases the hamming distance score between frontal and off-angle iris images ranging from 0.05 to 0.2 depending upon the limbus height.

  19. Gaia basic angle monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielesen, W.; de Bruijn, D.; van den Dool, T.; Kamphues, F.; Meijer, E.; Calvel, B.; Laborie, A.; Monteiro, D.; Coatantiec, C.; Touzeau, S.; Erdmann, M.; Gare, P.

    2012-09-01

    The Gaia mission will create an extraordinarily precise three-dimensional map of more than one billion stars in our Galaxy. The Gaia spacecraft, built by EADS Astrium, is part of ESA's Cosmic Vision programme and scheduled for launch in 2013. Gaia measures the position, distance and motion of stars with an accuracy of 24 micro-arcsec using two telescopes at a fixed mutual angle of 106.5°, named the ‘Basic Angle’. This accuracy requires ultra-high stability, which can only be achieved by using Silicon Carbide for both the optical bench and the telescopes. TNO has developed, built and space qualified the Silicon carbide Basic Angle Monitoring (BAM) on-board metrology system for this mission. The BAM measures the relative motion of Gaia’s telescopes with accuracies in the range of 0.5 micro-arcsec. This is achieved by a system of two laser interferometers able to measure Optical Path Differences (OPD) as small as 1.5 picometer rms. Following a general introduction to the Gaia mission, the Payload Module (PLM) and the use of Silicon Carbide as base material, this presentation will address an overview of the challenges towards the key requirements, design, integration and testing (including space-level qualification) of the Gaia BAM.

  20. Numerical analysis on the effect of angle of attack on evaluating radio-frequency blackout in atmospheric reentry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Minseok; Kihara, Hisashi; Abe, Ken-ichi; Takahashi, Yusuke

    2016-06-01

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation model that considers the effect of the angle of attack was developed to evaluate plasma flows around reentry vehicles. In this simulation model, thermochemical nonequilibrium of flowfields is considered by using a four-temperature model for high-accuracy simulations. Numerical simulations were performed for the orbital reentry experiment of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, and the results were compared with experimental data to validate the simulation model. A comparison of measured and predicted results showed good agreement. Moreover, to evaluate the effect of the angle of attack, we performed numerical simulations around the Atmospheric Reentry Demonstrator of the European Space Agency by using an axisymmetric model and a three-dimensional model. Although there were no differences in the flowfields in the shock layer between the results of the axisymmetric and the three-dimensional models, the formation of the electron number density, which is an important parameter in evaluating radio-frequency blackout, was greatly changed in the wake region when a non-zero angle of attack was considered. Additionally, the number of altitudes at which radio-frequency blackout was predicted in the numerical simulations declined when using the three-dimensional model for considering the angle of attack.

  1. Large angle magnetic suspension test fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcher, Colin P.

    1993-01-01

    Progress made under the subject grant in the period from 1 Nov. 1992 to 31 May 1993 is presented. The research involves the continued development of the Large Angle Magnetic Suspension Test Fixture (LAMSTF) and also the recommissioning of an additional piece of exisiting hardware. During the period in question, the initial configuration of LAMSTF was completed and made routinely and reliably operational. A digital phase advance controller was completed and documented. The goal of a controlled 360 deg rotation was achieved. Work started on the recommissioning of the Annular Suspension and Pointing System (ASPS). Work completed during the report period included: modeling; position sensing; controller; support of the Second International Symposium on Magnetic Suspension Technology; and recommissioning of the Annular Suspension and Pointing System.

  2. A new procedure for measuring contact angle

    SciTech Connect

    Concus, P.; Finn, R.

    1994-05-01

    Described here are some recent work regarding the mathematic design of apparatus that exploits microgravity conditions for accurate experimental determination of contact angle. The underlying motivation for the procedures rests on a discontinuous dependence of the capillary free surface interface S on the contact angle {gamma}, in a cylindrical capillary tube whose section (base) {Omega} contains a protruding corner with opening angle 2{alpha}.

  3. 30 CFR 57.19037 - Fleet angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fleet angles. 57.19037 Section 57.19037 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Sheaves § 57.19037 Fleet angles. Fleet angles on hoists installed after November 15, 1979, shall not...

  4. 30 CFR 56.19037 - Fleet angles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fleet angles. 56.19037 Section 56.19037 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... Sheaves § 56.19037 Fleet angles. Fleet angles on hoists installed after November 15, 1979, shall not...

  5. Matching the best viewing angle in depth cameras for biomass estimation based on poplar seedling geometry.

    PubMed

    Andújar, Dionisio; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Dorado, José

    2015-06-04

    In energy crops for biomass production a proper plant structure is important to optimize wood yields. A precise crop characterization in early stages may contribute to the choice of proper cropping techniques. This study assesses the potential of the Microsoft Kinect for Windows v.1 sensor to determine the best viewing angle of the sensor to estimate the plant biomass based on poplar seedling geometry. Kinect Fusion algorithms were used to generate a 3D point cloud from the depth video stream. The sensor was mounted in different positions facing the tree in order to obtain depth (RGB-D) images from different angles. Individuals of two different ages, e.g., one month and one year old, were scanned. Four different viewing angles were compared: top view (0°), 45° downwards view, front view (90°) and ground upwards view (-45°). The ground-truth used to validate the sensor readings consisted of a destructive sampling in which the height, leaf area and biomass (dry weight basis) were measured in each individual plant. The depth image models agreed well with 45°, 90° and -45° measurements in one-year poplar trees. Good correlations (0.88 to 0.92) between dry biomass and the area measured with the Kinect were found. In addition, plant height was accurately estimated with a few centimeters error. The comparison between different viewing angles revealed that top views showed poorer results due to the fact the top leaves occluded the rest of the tree. However, the other views led to good results. Conversely, small poplars showed better correlations with actual parameters from the top view (0°). Therefore, although the Microsoft Kinect for Windows v.1 sensor provides good opportunities for biomass estimation, the viewing angle must be chosen taking into account the developmental stage of the crop and the desired parameters. The results of this study indicate that Kinect is a promising tool for a rapid canopy characterization, i.e., for estimating crop biomass

  6. Matching the Best Viewing Angle in Depth Cameras for Biomass Estimation Based on Poplar Seedling Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Andújar, Dionisio; Fernández-Quintanilla, César; Dorado, José

    2015-01-01

    In energy crops for biomass production a proper plant structure is important to optimize wood yields. A precise crop characterization in early stages may contribute to the choice of proper cropping techniques. This study assesses the potential of the Microsoft Kinect for Windows v.1 sensor to determine the best viewing angle of the sensor to estimate the plant biomass based on poplar seedling geometry. Kinect Fusion algorithms were used to generate a 3D point cloud from the depth video stream. The sensor was mounted in different positions facing the tree in order to obtain depth (RGB-D) images from different angles. Individuals of two different ages, e.g., one month and one year old, were scanned. Four different viewing angles were compared: top view (0°), 45° downwards view, front view (90°) and ground upwards view (−45°). The ground-truth used to validate the sensor readings consisted of a destructive sampling in which the height, leaf area and biomass (dry weight basis) were measured in each individual plant. The depth image models agreed well with 45°, 90° and −45° measurements in one-year poplar trees. Good correlations (0.88 to 0.92) between dry biomass and the area measured with the Kinect were found. In addition, plant height was accurately estimated with a few centimeters error. The comparison between different viewing angles revealed that top views showed poorer results due to the fact the top leaves occluded the rest of the tree. However, the other views led to good results. Conversely, small poplars showed better correlations with actual parameters from the top view (0°). Therefore, although the Microsoft Kinect for Windows v.1 sensor provides good opportunities for biomass estimation, the viewing angle must be chosen taking into account the developmental stage of the crop and the desired parameters. The results of this study indicate that Kinect is a promising tool for a rapid canopy characterization, i.e., for estimating crop biomass

  7. Repulsion-based model for contact angle saturation in electrowetting

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new model for contact angle saturation phenomenon in electrowetting on dielectric systems. This new model attributes contact angle saturation to repulsion between trapped charges on the cap and base surfaces of the droplet in the vicinity of the three-phase contact line, which prevents these surfaces from converging during contact angle reduction. This repulsion-based saturation is similar to repulsion between charges accumulated on the surfaces of conducting droplets which causes the well known Coulombic fission and Taylor cone formation phenomena. In our model, both the droplet and dielectric coating were treated as lossy dielectric media (i.e., having finite electrical conductivities and permittivities) contrary to the more common assumption of a perfectly conducting droplet and perfectly insulating dielectric. We used theoretical analysis and numerical simulations to find actual charge distribution on droplet surface, calculate repulsion energy, and minimize energy of the total system as a function of droplet contact angle. Resulting saturation curves were in good agreement with previously reported experimental results. We used this proposed model to predict effect of changing liquid properties, such as electrical conductivity, and system parameters, such as thickness of the dielectric layer, on the saturation angle, which also matched experimental results. PMID:25759748

  8. Estimation of crank angle for cycling with a powered prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lawson, B E; Shultz, A; Ledoux, E; Goldfarb, M

    2014-01-01

    In order for a prosthesis to restore power generation during cycling, it must supply torque in a manner that is coordinated with the motion of the bicycle crank. This paper outlines an algorithm for the real time estimation of the angular position of a bicycle crankshaft using only measurements internal to an intelligent knee and ankle prosthesis. The algorithm assumes that the rider/prosthesis/bicycle system can be modeled as a four-bar mechanism. Assuming that a prosthesis can generate two independent angular measurements of the mechanism (in this case the knee angle and the absolute orientation of the shank), Freudenstein's equation can be used to synthesize the mechanism continuously. A recursive least-squares algorithm is implemented to estimate the Freudenstein coefficients, and the resulting link lengths are used to reformulate the equation in terms of input-output relationships mapping both measured angles to the crank angle. Using two independent measurements allows the algorithm to uniquely determine the crank angle from multi-valued functions. In order to validate the algorithm, a bicycle was mounted on a trainer and configured with the prosthesis using an artificial hip joint attached to the seat post. Motion capture was used to monitor the mechanism for forward and backward pedaling and the results are compared to the output of the presented algorithm. Once the parameters have converged, the algorithm is shown to predict the crank angle within 15° of the externally measured value throughout the entire crank cycle during forward rotation.

  9. The Influence of Dynamic Contact Angle on Wetting Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rame, Enrique; Garoff, Steven

    2005-01-01

    When surface tension forces dominate, and regardless of whether the situation is static or dynamic, the contact angle (the angle the interface between two immiscible fluids makes when it contacts a solid) is the key parameter that determines the shape of a fluid-fluid interface. The static contact angle is easy to measure and implement in models predicting static capillary surface shapes and such associated quantities as pressure drops. By contrast, when the interface moves relative to the solid (as in dynamic wetting processes) the dynamic contact angle is not identified unambiguously because it depends on the geometry of the system Consequently, its determination becomes problematic and measurements in one geometry cannot be applied in another for prediction purposes. However, knowing how to measure and use the dynamic contact angle is crucial to determine such dynamics as a microsystem throughput reliably. In this talk we will present experimental and analytical efforts aimed at resolving modeling issues present in dynamic wetting. We will review experiments that show the inadequacy of the usual hydrodynamic model when a fluid-fluid meniscus moves over a solid surface such as the wall of a small tube or duct. We will then present analytical results that show how to parametrize these problems in a predictive manner. We will illustrate these ideas by showing how to implement the method in numerical fluid mechanical calculations.

  10. Estimation of crank angle for cycling with a powered prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Lawson, B E; Shultz, A; Ledoux, E; Goldfarb, M

    2014-01-01

    In order for a prosthesis to restore power generation during cycling, it must supply torque in a manner that is coordinated with the motion of the bicycle crank. This paper outlines an algorithm for the real time estimation of the angular position of a bicycle crankshaft using only measurements internal to an intelligent knee and ankle prosthesis. The algorithm assumes that the rider/prosthesis/bicycle system can be modeled as a four-bar mechanism. Assuming that a prosthesis can generate two independent angular measurements of the mechanism (in this case the knee angle and the absolute orientation of the shank), Freudenstein's equation can be used to synthesize the mechanism continuously. A recursive least-squares algorithm is implemented to estimate the Freudenstein coefficients, and the resulting link lengths are used to reformulate the equation in terms of input-output relationships mapping both measured angles to the crank angle. Using two independent measurements allows the algorithm to uniquely determine the crank angle from multi-valued functions. In order to validate the algorithm, a bicycle was mounted on a trainer and configured with the prosthesis using an artificial hip joint attached to the seat post. Motion capture was used to monitor the mechanism for forward and backward pedaling and the results are compared to the output of the presented algorithm. Once the parameters have converged, the algorithm is shown to predict the crank angle within 15° of the externally measured value throughout the entire crank cycle during forward rotation. PMID:25571415

  11. Integrated Study of APS YSZ Coatings with Different Spray Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yikai; Tan, Yang; Tessarini, Silvia; Sampath, Sanjay

    2013-03-01

    Spray parameters play an important role on the microstructure and properties of plasma-sprayed coatings. Parameters such as spray distance, plasma gas flow and current, raster speed, and spray angle all can be varied. In this paper, an integrated study to investigate the effects and influences of spray angle on properties of yttria-stabilized zirconia coatings was carried out with spray angles of 60°, 75°, and 90° (to the substrate surface). In situ coating property sensor based on beam curvature measurements was used to measure the evolving stress and elastic moduli of the resultant coatings and combined with other characterization tools for thermo-physical property and microstructure analysis, such as laser flash and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicate that the coating with 60° spray angle had the lowest thermal conductivity and more compliant structure. This study seeks to understand the mechanism for this effect and will provide important insight into parametric sensitivities on complex spray parts.

  12. Transformation of light backscattering phase matrices of crystal clouds depending on the zenith sensing angle.

    PubMed

    Balin, Yury; Kaul, Bruno; Kokhanenko, Grigorii; Winker, David

    2013-06-01

    Problems encountered in the interpretation of results of laser sensing of crystal clouds are considered. The parameters characterizing the cloud particle orientation are determined through the backscattering phase matrix elements. It is demonstrated how these parameters are related to the probability density of particle distribution over the spatial orientation angles. Trends in the change of the backscattering phase matrices attendant to variations of the zenith sensing angle are shown on the example of a monodisperse ice particle ensemble.

  13. [Chronic closed-angle glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Valtot, F

    2004-06-01

    Five times more frequent than the acute form, chronic closed-angle glaucoma often goes unrecognized for a long time, resulting in considerable visual field deficiencies, even in loss of the eye. It is sometimes confused with chronic glaucoma and treated as such, which is inadequate to halt the progression of the disease. Only gonioscopy can diagnose it. If doubt persists, UBM (ultrasound biomicroscopy) can detect goniosynechiae, a malposition of the ciliary body or of the lens, or the existence of iridociliary cysts. Nine times out of ten, pupillary block initiates the process and an iridotomy should always be done to remediate it, even if this procedure alone does not always suffice to solve the problem. PMID:15319750

  14. Wind and gravity mechanical effects on leaf inclination angles.

    PubMed

    Tadrist, Loïc; Saudreau, Marc; de Langre, Emmanuel

    2014-01-21

    In a tree, the distribution of leaf inclination angles plays an important role in photosynthesis and water interception. We investigate here the effect of mechanical deformations of leaves due to wind or their own weight on this distribution. First, the specific role of the geometry of the tree is identified and shown to be weak, using models of idealized tree and tools of statistical mechanics. Then the deformation of individual leaves under gravity or wind is quantified experimentally. New dimensionless parameters are proposed, and used in simple models of these deformations. By combining models of tree geometry and models of leaf deformation, we explore the role of all mechanical parameters on the Leaf Inclination Angle Distributions. These are found to have a significant influence, which is exemplified finally in computations of direct light interception by idealized trees.

  15. Individualized optimal release angles in discus throwing.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Steve; Liu, Hui; Hubbard, Mont; Yu, Bing

    2010-02-10

    The purpose of this study was to determine individualized optimal release angles for elite discus throwers. Three-dimensional coordinate data were obtained for at least 10 competitive trials for each subject. Regression relationships between release speed and release angle, and between aerodynamic distance and release angle were determined for each subject. These relationships were linear with subject-specific characteristics. The subject-specific relationships between release speed and release angle may be due to subjects' technical and physical characteristics. The subject-specific relationships between aerodynamic distance and release angle may be due to interactions between the release angle, the angle of attack, and the aerodynamic distance. Optimal release angles were estimated for each subject using the regression relationships and equations of projectile motion. The estimated optimal release angle was different for different subjects, and ranged from 35 degrees to 44 degrees . The results of this study demonstrate that the optimal release angle for discus throwing is thrower-specific. The release angles used by elite discus throwers in competition are not necessarily optimal for all discus throwers, or even themselves. The results of this study provide significant information for understanding the biomechanics of discus throwing techniques.

  16. Light airplane crash tests at three flight-path angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Castle, C. B.; Alfaro-Bou, E.

    1978-01-01

    Three similar twin engine general aviation airplane specimens were crash tested at Langley impact dynamics research facility at 27 m/sec and at flight-path angles of -15 deg, -30 deg, and -45 deg. Other flight parameters were held constant. The test facility, instrumentation, test specimens, and test method are briefly described. Structural damage and accelerometer data for each of the three impact conditions are presented and discussed.

  17. Low aspect ratio wings at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallings, Robert L., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A survey is conducted of the results of investigations into the flowfields and aerodynamic forces associated with low aspect ratio wings at high angles of attack. Attention is given to criteria for the cataloging of these flowfields, the phenomenon of vortex breakdown, with varying wing incidence and Mach number, and the effects of aspect ratio and compressibility. The planforms treated are of rectangular, clipped-delta, and strake-wing combination geometries. Extensive graphic representations of performance trends with varying parameters are furnished.

  18. Laser system for distance, velocity, and angle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pienkowski, Janusz; Rzepka, Janusz

    1995-03-01

    The two frequency laser interferometer, using frequency stabilized HeNe laser 0.63 micrometers , is presented in this paper. The system consists of a laser head, meteo station, and measurement display. The laser system fundamentally measures linear displacement (distance) but can also measure velocity and angle. The resolution and the accuracy of measurements are comparable with parameters of lasers systems produced by Hewlett-Packard 5526A and Spindler & Hoyer ZLI 150.

  19. DYNAMICS OF SELF-GRAVITY WAKES IN DENSE PLANETARY RINGS. I. PITCH ANGLE

    SciTech Connect

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro; Fujii, Akihiko; Salo, Heikki E-mail: kokubo@th.nao.ac.jp E-mail: heikki.salo@oulu.fi

    2015-10-20

    We investigate the dynamics of self-gravity wakes in dense planetary rings. In particular, we examine how the pitch angles of self-gravity wakes depend on ring parameters using N-body simulations. We calculate the pitch angles using the two-dimensional autocorrelation function of the ring surface density. We obtain the pitch angles for the inner and outer parts of the autocorrelation function separately. We confirm that the pitch angles are 15°–30° for reasonable ring parameters, which are consistent with previous studies. We find that the inner pitch angle increases with the Saturnicentric distance, while it barely depends on the optical depth and the restitution coefficient of ring particles. The increase of the inner pitch angle with the Saturnicentric distance is consistent with the observations of the A ring. The outer pitch angle does not have a clear dependence on any ring parameters and is about 10°–15°. This value is consistent with the pitch angle of spiral arms in collisionless systems.

  20. Axial Tilt Angles of Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Robert F.

    1996-12-01

    Separate Mount Wilson plage and sunspot group data sets are analyzed in this review to illustrate several interesting aspects of active region axial tilt angles. (1) The distribution of tilt angles differs between plages and sunspot groups in the sense that plages have slightly higher tilt angles, on average, than do spot groups. (2) The distributions of average plage total magnetic flux, or sunspot group area, with tilt angle show a consistent effect: those groups with tilt angles nearest the average values are larger (or have a greater total flux) on average than those farther from the average values. Moreover, the average tilt angles on which these size or flux distributions are centered differ for the two types of objects, and represent closely the actual different average tilt angles for these two features. (3) The polarity separation distances of plages and sunspot groups show a clear relationship to average tilt angles. In the case of each feature, smaller polarity separations are correlated with smaller tilt angles. (4) The dynamics of regions also show a clear relationship with region tilt angles. The spot groups with tilt angles nearest the average value (or perhaps 0-deg tilt angle) have on average a faster rotation rate than those groups with extreme tilt angles. All of these tilt-angle characteristics may be assumed to be related to the physical forces that affect the magnetic flux loop that forms the region. These aspects are discussed in this brief review within the context of our current view of the formation of active region magnetic flux at the solar surface.

  1. Determining Equilibrium Lamellar Thickness by Small Angle Light Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ying; Akpalu, Yvonne

    2002-03-01

    The crystallization and melting behavior of homogeneous copolymers of ethylene with butene and hexene is studied by small angle light scattering (SALS). We show that the final melting temperature (T_m^f), which corresponds to equilibrium between a melt with an overall ethylene sequence concentration (equal to the mole fraction of crystallizable units) and the thickest lamellar crystals can be determined from the SALS melting measurements. The T_m^f values, determined from the temperature at which the SALS HV or VV invariant vanishes during the melting, are substantially higher (7 to 10 °C) than those obtained from small angle x-ray (SAXS), wide angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Thus our measurements indicate that SAXS, WAXS and DSC underestimate the lamellar thickness (l_f) of the largest crystals, a parameter necessary for estimating thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for ethylene copolymers. We also investigate T_m^f as a function of crystallization time (ranging from 1 hr to 72 hr) and heating rate. We discuss the implications of our SALS approach for estimating T_m^f, lf and lamellar morphological parameters from x-ray scattering.

  2. Sensitivity analysis of Stirling engine design parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Naso, V.; Dong, W.; Lucentini, M.; Capata, R.

    1998-07-01

    In the preliminary Stirling engine design process, the values of some design parameters (temperature ratio, swept volume ratio, phase angle and dead volume ratio) have to be assumed; as a matter of fact it can be difficult to determine the best values of these parameters for a particular engine design. In this paper, a mathematical model is developed to analyze the sensitivity of engine's performance variations corresponding to variations of these parameters.

  3. The effect of vapor incidence angle upon thin film columnar growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mazor, A.; Bukiet, B.G.; Srolovitz, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    We present a generalized theory for the growth of columnar microstructure in vapor deposited thin films under the joint influence of a constant uniform deposition flux coming down with arbitrarily chosen incidence angle, and surface diffusion. The dependences of the Zone I to Zone II transition temperature, and the characteristic length scales associated with the unstable modes on the deposition angle are predicted. The surface morphology is obtained as a function of vapor incidence angle. For a specific deposition angle, there is a one-parameter family of steady-state surface profiles which corresponds to a range of possible columnar orientation angles, among which only one angle is associated with the tangent rule. These results agree with experimental observations. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Low-cost large-angle steering mirror development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wassom, Steven R.

    2009-08-01

    The Space Dynamics Laboratory has combined internal funds with its background in space-rated mechanisms to develop a prototype low-cost large-angle 2-axis fine steering mirror (FSM). The FSM has a 75-mm clear aperture, 30-degree mechanical elevation angle, 120-degree mechanical azimuth angle, and a 70-Hertz small-amplitude bandwidth. Key components include a rotary voice coil, unique patent-pending feedback sensor, brushless DC motor and optical encoder. Average error is <1 arcsec and total mechanical mass is <1 kg. Additional accomplishments include a passive launch lock, launch vibration testing, portable demonstration electronics development, and thermal-vacuum testing to pressures down to 1e-7 torr and temperatures down to 164 K.

  5. Pivotable strakes for high angle of attack control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobbitt, P. J.; Foughner, J. T., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A series of pivotable strakes have been tested in combination with a 44-deg swept wing to determine their ability to provide pitch control at high angles of attack. The tests were carried out in the Langley 7 X 10-Foot High-Speed tunnel at nominal Mach numbers of 0.3 to 0.4. A total of five strakes with various aspects ratios and shapes were tested at negative deflection angles of 5, 10, 15, and 20 deg through an angle of attack range up to approximately 50 deg. In addition, a cranked delta wing with 70-deg sweep was tested with two different pivotable apex flaps. This paper shows lift, drag and moment data for the complete configurations as well as for the separate contributions of the strakes and fuselage nose which are mounted on a second balance. Generally, strake deflection was found to have a significant effect on moment while lift/drag changed very little.

  6. Supergranular Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayashankar, Paniveni

    2016-07-01

    I study the complexity of supergranular cells using intensity patterns from Kodaikanal solar observatory. The chaotic and turbulent aspect of the solar supergranulation can be studied by examining the interrelationships amongst the parameters characterizing supergranular cells namely size, horizontal flow field, lifetime and physical dimensions of the cells and the fractal dimension deduced from the size data. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence. The Data consists of visually identified supergranular cells, from which a fractal dimension 'D' for supergranulation is obtained according to the relation P α AD/2 where 'A' is the area and 'P' is the perimeter of the supergranular cells. I find a fractal dimension close to about 1.3 which is consistent with that for isobars and suggests a possible turbulent origin. The cell circularity shows a dependence on the perimeter with a peak around (1.1-1.2) x 105 m. The findings are supportive of Kolmogorov's theory of turbulence.

  7. Angled Layers in Super Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Researchers used a special imaging technique with the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity to get as detailed a look as possible at a target region near eastern foot of 'Burns Cliff.' The intervening terrain was too difficult for driving the rover closer. The target is the boundary between two sections of layered rock. The layers in lower section (left) run at a marked angle to the layers in next higher section (right).

    This view is the product of a technique called super resolution. It was generated from data acquired on sol 288 of Opportunity's mission (Nov. 14, 2004) from a position along the southeast wall of 'Endurance Crater.' Resolution slightly higher than normal for the panoramic camera was synthesized for this view by combining 17 separate images of this scene, each one 'dithered' or pointed slightly differently from the previous one. Computer manipulation of the individual images was then used to generate a new synthetic view of the scene in a process known mathematically as iterative deconvolution, but referred to informally as super resolution. Similar methods have been used to enhance the resolution of images from the Mars Pathfinder mission and the Hubble Space Telescope.

  8. Chronic open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Adatia, Feisal A.; Damji, Karim F.

    2005-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Chronic open-angle glaucoma (COAG) is a leading cause of irreversible blindness worldwide, including in Canada. It presents a challenge in diagnosis, as disease often progresses without symptoms; an estimated 50% of cases are undetected. SOURCES OF INFORMATION MEDLINE searches, reference lists of articles, and expert knowledge from one of the authors (K.F.D.), a glaucoma specialist, were used. MAIN MESSAGE A casefinding approach using early referral to optometrists and ophthalmologists for early detection of COAG is helpful for patients with risk factors such as age above 50, a positive family history, black race, and myopia. Moderate evidence for referral also exists for the following risk factors: hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, and sleep apnea. Treatment with intraocular pressure–lowering medication can arrest or slow the course of the disease, permitting patients to retain good visual function. Family physicians should be aware that some intraocular pressure–lowering medications, particularly topical beta-blockers, can pose iatrogenic harm to patients and result in or exacerbate such conditions as asthma, cardiovascular disturbances, depression, and sexual dysfunction. CONCLUSION Appropriate referral patterns and an understanding of common as well as serious side effects of glaucoma medications are important in optimizing management of patients at risk of developing, or who have, COAG. PMID:16190176

  9. A physical explanation for the all-angle reflectionless property of transformation optics designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gok, Gurkan; Grbic, Anthony

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the all-angle reflectionless property of transformation optics devices is analyzed, and a physical explanation is provided for it. To this end, plane wave propagation through a planar boundary separating two homogenous, lossless magnetically anisotropic media is studied. The general form of material parameters enabling an all-angle reflectionless transmission of electromagnetic waves through the boundary is derived. Similarities are drawn between this general form of all-angle reflectionless material parameters and those observed in transformation optics designs. The findings are verified through full-wave simulation. Furthermore, a physical explanation as to why the general form of anisotropic material parameters are reflectionless for all angle of incidences is provided. This work provides an intuitive understanding of the inherent reflectionless property of transformation optics devices, and may find applications in designing reflectionless media to control electromagnetic waves without the use of coordinate transformations.

  10. Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle-deposited nanostructured tungsten films.

    PubMed

    Ungaro, Craig; Shah, Ankit; Kravchenko, Ivan; Hensley, Dale K; Gray, Stephen K; Gupta, Mool C

    2015-02-15

    Nanotextured tungsten thin films were obtained on a stainless steel (SS) substrate using the glancing-angle-deposition (GLAD) method. It was found that the optical absorption and thermal emittance of the SS substrate can be controlled by varying the parameters used during deposition. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations were used to predict the optical absorption and infrared (IR) reflectance spectra of the fabricated samples, and good agreement was found between simulated and measured data. FDTD simulations were also used to predict the effect of changes in the height and periodicity of the nanotextures. These simulations show that good control over the absorption can be achieved by altering the height and periodicity of the nanostructure. These nanostructures were shown to be temperature stable up to 500°C with the addition of a protective HfO2 layer. Applications for this structure are explored, including a promising application for solar thermal energy systems. PMID:25680136

  11. The optical field angle distortion calibration feasibility study for the Hubble Space Telescope fine guidance sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchetti, K.; Abshire, G.; Hallock, L.; Mccutcheon, R.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an analytical study to investigate the feasibility of calibrating the Hubble Space Telescope's (HST's) fine guidance sensors (FGSs) within HST mission accuracy limits are presented. The study has two purposes: (1) to determine the mathematical feasibility of the optical field angle distortion (OFAD) calibration algorithm and (2) to confirm that the OFAD, plate scale, and FGS-to-FGS alignment calibration algorithms produced a calibration of the FGSs that satisfied mission requirements. The study concluded that the mathematical specification of the OFAD algorithm is adequate and permits a determination of the FGS calibration parameters (accurate to better than 0.003 arc-second) sufficient to meet the mission requirements. The algorithms implemented, the characteristics of the simulated data and procedures for data analysis, and the study's results are discussed. In addition, several useful techniques for improving the stability and accuracy of the OFAD solution are outlined.

  12. Body composition and phase angle in Russian children in remission from acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseytlin, G. Ja; Khomyakova, I. A.; Nikolaev, D. V.; Konovalova, M. V.; Vashura, A. Yu; Tretyak, A. V.; Godina, E. Z.; Rudnev, S. G.

    2010-04-01

    Elevated degree of body fatness and changes in other body composition parameters are known to be common effects of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in children. In order to study peculiarities of somatic growth and development in ALL survivors, we describe the results of BIA body composition analysis of 112 boys and 108 girls aged 5-18 years in remission from ALL (remission time range 1-13 years) compared to data from the same number of age- and sex-matched healthy controls (n=220). Detrimental effect on height in ALL boys was observed, whereas girls experienced additional weight gain compared to healthy subjects. In ALL patients, resistance, body fat, and percent body fat were significantly increased. The reactance, phase angle, absolute and relative values of skeletal muscle and body cell mass were significantly decreased. Principal component analysis revealed an early prevalence of adiposity traits in the somatic growth and development of ALL girls compared to healthy controls.

  13. Dual-view angle backlight module design.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo-Tsuen; Pan, Jui-Wen

    2015-10-01

    We propose a bilayer light guide plate (BLGP) with specially designed microstructures and two light source modules to achieve an adjustable viewing angle backlight for ecofriendly displays. The dual viewing angle backlight module has a thin, simple structure and a high optical efficiency. Comparison with the conventional edge-lit backlight module shows an improvement in the on-axis luminance of the narrow viewing angle mode of 4.3 times and a decrease in the half-luminance angle of 7° in the horizontal direction. When using the wide viewing angle mode, there is an improvement in the on-axis luminance of 1.8 times and an improvement in the half-luminance angle of 54° in the horizontal direction. The uniformity of illuminance can reach 80% in each mode. The backlight optical sheet number is reduced from 5 to 1. PMID:26479670

  14. Signature extension for sun angle, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. A. (Principal Investigator); Berry, J. K.; Heimes, F.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Within a restricted zenith sun angle range of 35 - 50 degrees, it was empirically observed that canopy reflectance is mainly Lambertian. Reflectance changes with crop stage were simple shifts in scale in the sun angle range. It was noted that sun angle variations depend on canopy characteristics. Effects of the vegetative canopy were most pronounced at the larger solar zenith angles (20 %). The linear sun angle correction coefficients demonstrate a dependency on both crop stage (15-20 %) and crop type (10-20 %). The use of canopy reflectance modeling allowed for the generation of a simulated data set over an extremely broad envelope of sun angles.

  15. The Retroacetabular Angle Determines the Safe Angle for Screw Placement in Posterior Acetabular Fracture Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Tadros, Ayman M. A.; Oxland, Thomas R.; O'Brien, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. A method for the determination of safe angles for screws placed in the posterior acetabular wall based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) is described. It defines a retroacetabular angle and determines its variation in the population. Methods. The retroacetabular angle is the angle between the retroacetabular surface and the tangent to the posterior acetabular articular surface. Screws placed through the marginal posterior wall at an angle equal to the retroacetabular angle are extraarticular. Medial screws can be placed at larger angles whose difference from the retroacetabular angle is defined as the allowance angles. CT scans of all patients with acetabular fractures treated in our institute between September 2002 to July 2007 were used to measure the retroacetabular angle and tangent. Results. Two hundred thirty one patients were included. The average (range) age was 42 (15–74) years. The average (range) retroacetabular angle was 39 (30–47) degrees. The average (range) retroacetabular tangent was 36 (30–45) mm. Conclusions. Placing the screws at an average (range) angle of 39 (33–47) degrees of anterior inclination with the retroacetabular surface makes them extraarticular. Angles for medial screws are larger. Safe angles can be calculated preoperatively with a computer program. PMID:24959359

  16. Dynamic-angle spinning without sidebands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gann, S. L.; Baltisberger, J. H.; Pines, A.

    1993-07-01

    By means of rotor-synchronized π-pulses, it is possible to eliminate the spinning sidebands (while retaining their full intensity in the isotropic centerband) that usually arise in dynamic-angle spinning (DAS) NMR. The theory of this approach, dynamic-angle hopping (DAH-180), is described and illustrated with experimental results on quadrupolar nuclei. A magic-angle hopping (MAH-180) version of magic-angle spinning is also possible and can be used in a two-dimensional NMR experiment to produce sideband-free isotropic—anisotropic correlation spectra for spin- 1/2 nuclei.

  17. Empirical angle-dependent Biot and MBA models for acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Il; Hughes, E R; Humphrey, V F; Leighton, T G; Choi, Min Joo

    2007-01-01

    The Biot and the modified Biot-Attenborough (MBA) models have been found useful to understand ultrasonic wave propagation in cancellous bone. However, neither of the models, as previously applied to cancellous bone, allows for the angular dependence of acoustic properties with direction. The present study aims to account for the acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone, by introducing empirical angle-dependent input parameters, as defined for a highly oriented structure, into the Biot and the MBA models. The anisotropy of the angle-dependent Biot model is attributed to the variation in the elastic moduli of the skeletal frame with respect to the trabecular alignment. The angle-dependent MBA model employs a simple empirical way of using the parametric fit for the fast and the slow wave speeds. The angle-dependent models were used to predict both the fast and slow wave velocities as a function of propagation angle with respect to the trabecular alignment of cancellous bone. The predictions were compared with those of the Schoenberg model for anisotropy in cancellous bone and in vitro experimental measurements from the literature. The angle-dependent models successfully predicted the angular dependence of phase velocity of the fast wave with direction. The root-mean-square errors of the measured versus predicted fast wave velocities were 79.2 m s(-1) (angle-dependent Biot model) and 36.1 m s(-1) (angle-dependent MBA model). They also predicted the fact that the slow wave is nearly independent of propagation angle for angles about 50 degrees , but consistently underestimated the slow wave velocity with the root-mean-square errors of 187.2 m s(-1) (angle-dependent Biot model) and 240.8 m s(-1) (angle-dependent MBA model). The study indicates that the angle-dependent models reasonably replicate the acoustic anisotropy in cancellous bone.

  18. 1. WEST SIDE, NORTH END OF BUILDING 1. SHOWS ADDITIONAL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. WEST SIDE, NORTH END OF BUILDING 1. SHOWS ADDITIONAL ANGLES IN BUILDING AT SOUTHERN END. - Chollas Heights Naval Radio Transmitting Facility, Transmitter Building, 6410 Zero Road, San Diego, San Diego County, CA

  19. The Spatial QRS-T Angle: Implications in Clinical Practice

    PubMed Central

    Voulgari, Christina; Pagoni, Stamatina; Tesfaye, Solomon; Tentolouris, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The ventricular gradient (VG) as a concept was conceived in the 1930s and its calculation yielded information that was not otherwise obtainable. The VG was not utilized by clinicians at large because it was not easy to understand and its computation time-consuming. The contemporary spatial QRS-T angle is based on the concept of the VG and defined as its mathematical and physiological integral. Its current major clinical use is to assess the cardiac primary repolarization abnormalities in 3-dimensional spatial vectorial plans which are normally untraced in the presence of secondary electrophysiological activity in a 2-dimensional routine electrocardiogram (ECG). Currently the calculation of the spatial QRS-T angle can be easily computed on the basis of a classical ECG and contributes to localization of arrhythmogenic areas in the heart by assessing overall and local heterogeneity of the myocardial ventricular action potention duration. Recent population-based studies suggest that the spatial QRS-T angle is a dominant ECG predictor of future cardiovascular events and death and it is superior to more conventional ECG parameters. Its assessment warrants consideration for intensified primary and secondary cardiovascular prevention efforts and should be included in everyday clinical practice. This review addresses the nature and diagnostic potential of the spatial QRS-T angle. The main focus is its role in ECG assessment of dispersion of repolarization, a key factor in arrythmogeneity. PMID:23909632

  20. Partially-overlapped viewing zone based integral imaging system with super wide viewing angle.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Zhao-Long; Wang, Qiong-Hua; Li, Shu-Li; Deng, Huan; Ji, Chao-Chao

    2014-09-22

    In this paper, we analyze the relationship between viewer and viewing zones of integral imaging (II) system and present a partially-overlapped viewing zone (POVZ) based integral imaging system with a super wide viewing angle. In the proposed system, the viewing angle can be wider than the viewing angle of the conventional tracking based II system. In addition, the POVZ can eliminate the flipping and time delay of the 3D scene as well. The proposed II system has a super wide viewing angle of 120° without flipping effect about twice as wide as the conventional one.

  1. Duck gait: Relationship to hip angle, bone ash, bone density, and morphology.

    PubMed

    Robison, Cara I; Rice, Meredith; Makagon, Maja M; Karcher, Darrin M

    2015-05-01

    The rapid growth meat birds, including ducks, undergo requires skeletal integrity; however, fast growth may not be conducive to adequate bone structure. A relationship likely exists between skeletal changes and duck mobility. Reduced mobility in meat ducks may have impacts on welfare and production. This study examined the relationships among gait score, bone parameters, and hip angle. Commercial Pekin ducks, ages 14 d (n = 100), 21 d (n = 100), and 32 d (n = 100) were weighed and gait scored with a 3-point gait score system by an observer as they walked over a Tekscan gait analysis system. Gait was scored as GS0, GS1, or GS2 with a score of GS0 defined as good walking ability and a score of GS2 as poorest walking ability. Ducks were humanely euthanized, full body scanned using quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and the right femur and tibia were extracted. Leg bones were cleaned, measured, fat extracted, and ashed. QCT scans were rendered to create computerized 3D models where pelvic hip angles and bone density were measured. Statistical analysis was conducted using PROC MIXED with age and gait score in the model. Body weight increased with age, but within an age, body weight decreased as walking ability became worse (P < 0.01). As expected, linear increases in tibia and femur bone width and length were observed as the ducks aged (P < 0.01). Right and left hip angle increased with duck age (P < 0.01). Additionally, ducks with a GS2 had wider hip angles opposed to ducks with a GS0 (P < 0.01). Bone density increased linearly with both age and gait score (P < 0.05). Femur ash content was lowest in 32-day-old ducks and ducks with GS1 and GS2 (P < 0.0001). Tibia ash content increased with age, but decreased as gait score increased (P < 0.001). The observation that right hip angle changed with gait scores merits further investigation into the relationship between duck mobility and skeletal changes during growth.

  2. Safety Ellipse Motion with Coarse Sun Angle Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naasz, Bo

    2005-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope Robotic Servicing and De-orbit Mission (HRSDM) was t o be performed by the unmanned Hubble Robotic Vehicle (HRV) consisting of a Deorbit Module (DM), responsible for the ultimate disposal of Hubble Space Telescope (HST) at the end of science operations, and an Ejection Module (EM), responsible for robotically servicing the HST to extend its useful operational lifetime. HRSDM consisted of eight distinct phases, including: launch, pursuit, proximity operations, capture, servicing, EM jettison and disposal, science operations, and deorbit. The scope of this paper is limited to the Proximity Operations phase of HRSDM. It introduces a relative motion strategy useful for Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) or Formation Flying missions where safe circumnavigation trajectories, or close proximity operations (tens or hundreds of meters) are required for extended periods of time. Parameters and algorithms used to model the relative motion of HRV with respect to HST during the Proximity Operations phase of the HRSDM are described. Specifically, the Safety Ellipse (SE) concept, convenient parameters for describing SE motion, and a concept for initializing SE motion around a target vehicle to coarsely optimize sun and relative navigation sensor angles are presented. The effects of solar incidence angle variations on sun angle optimization, and the effects of orbital perturbations and navigation uncertainty on long term SE motion are discussed.

  3. Kinetic small angle neutron scattering of the skyrmion lattice in MnSi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlbauer, S.; Kindervater, J.; Adams, T.; Bauer, A.; Keiderling, U.; Pfleiderer, C.

    2016-07-01

    We report a kinetic small angle neutron scattering (SANS) study of the skyrmion lattice (SL) in MnSi. Induced by an oscillatory tilting of the magnetic field direction, the elasticity and relaxation of the SL along the magnetic field direction have been measured with microsecond resolution. For the excitation frequency of 325 {{Hz}} the SL begins to track the tilting motion of the applied magnetic field under tilting angles exceeding {α }{{c}}≳ 0.4^\\circ . Empirically the associated angular velocity of the tilting connects quantitatively with the critical charge carrier velocity of ∼ 0.1 {{mm}} {{{s}}}-1 under current driven spin transfer torques, for which the SL unpins. In addition, a pronounced temperature dependence of the skyrmion motion is attributed to the variation of the skyrmion stiffness. Taken together our study highlights the power of kinetic SANS as a new experimental tool to explore, in a rather general manner, the elasticity and impurity pinning of magnetic textures across a wide parameter space without parasitic signal interferences due to ohmic heating or Oersted magnetic fields.

  4. Implications of adopting plane angle as a base quantity in the SI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quincey, Paul; Brown, Richard J. C.

    2016-06-01

    The treatment of angles within the SI is anomalous compared with other quantities, and there is a case for removing this anomaly by declaring plane angle to be an additional base quantity within the system. It is shown that this could bring several benefits in terms of treating angle on an equal basis with other metrics, removing potentially harmful ambiguities, and bringing SI units more in line with concepts in basic physics, but at the expense of significant upheaval to familiar equations within mathematics and physics. This paper sets out the most important of these changes so that an alternative unit system containing angle as a base quantity can be seen in the round, irrespective of whether it is ever widely adopted. The alternative formulas and units can be treated as the underlying, more general equations of mathematical physics, independent of the units used for angle, which are conventionally simplified by implicitly assuming that the unit used for angle is the radian.

  5. Sunspot Tilt Angles Measured with MDI/SOHO and HMI/SDO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.; Ulrich, R. K.

    2015-12-01

    We present sunspot magnetic tilt angles measured from 1996 to the present time, spanning almost two solar cycles. Full disk magnetograms from MDI/SoHO and HMI/SDO are used in our study. The data cadence in our analyses is 96 minutes per day giving about 90 measurements of the tilt angles for each sunspot during the disk passage between -40 to +40 longitudinal degree. In addition to an automated computation, we use a scheme to visually examine each sunspot efficiently to check the tilt angle determinations. Such measurements not only confirm Joy's and Hale's laws, but also reveal the tilt angle variations during the sunspot lifetime, the effect of Coriolis force on the magnetic flux tubes, and the tilt angle dependence of the cycle progress. The measurements also provide uncertainties on the tilt angle measurements.

  6. [Determination of contact angle of pharmaceutical excipients and regulating effect of surfactants on their wettability].

    PubMed

    Hua, Dong-dong; Li, He-ran; Yang, Bai-xue; Song, Li-na; Liu, Tiao-tiao; Cong, Yu-tang; Li, San-ming

    2015-10-01

    To study the effects of surfactants on wettability of excipients, the contact angles of six types of surfactants on the surface of two common excipients and mixture of three surfactants with excipients were measured using hypsometry method. The results demonstrated that contact angle of water on the surface of excipients was associated with hydrophilcity of excipients. Contact angle was lowered with increase in hydrophilic groups of excipient molecules. The sequence of contact angle from small to large was starch < sodium benzoate < polyvinylpyrrolidone < sodium carboxymethylcellulose < sodium alginate < chitosan < hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose addition, surfactants both in droplets and mixed in excipients significantly reduced the contact angle of excipients, and their abilities to lower contact angle varied. The results of the present study offer a guideline in the formulation design of tablets.

  7. Quartz-Enhanced Photoacoustic Spectroscopy with Right-Angle Prism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongning; Chang, Jun; Lian, Jie; Liu, Zhaojun; Wang, Qiang; Qin, Zengguang

    2016-01-01

    A right-angle prism was used to enhance the acoustic signal of a quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) system. The incident laser beam was parallelly inverted by the right-angle prism and passed through the gap between two tuning fork prongs again to produce another acoustic excitation. Correspondingly, two pairs of rigid metal tubes were used as acoustic resonators with resonance enhancement factors of 16 and 12, respectively. The QEPAS signal was enhanced by a factor of 22.4 compared with the original signal, which was acquired without resonators or a prism. In addition, the system noise was reduced a little with double resonators due to the Q factor decrease. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was greatly improved. Additionally, a normalized noise equivalent absorption coefficient (NNEA) of 5.8 × 10−8 W·cm−1·Hz−1/2 was achieved for water vapor detection in the atmosphere. PMID:26861344

  8. Short-term effects of relaxation music on patients suffering from primary open-angle glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Bertelmann, Thomas; Strempel, Ilse

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether additive relaxation music (RM) has an adjuvant short-term effect on physiological and psychological parameters in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma. Methods Prospective, randomized clinical trial. Patients in the therapy group (TG) received a 30-minute RM via headphones, whereas members of the control group (CG) did not. Best corrected visual acuity, intraocular pressure, visual field testing, short- and long-term mental states, and blood levels of different stress hormones were analyzed and compared. Results A total of 25 (61%)/16 (39%) patients were assigned to the TG/CG. Best corrected visual acuity, daily intraocular pressure, and short-term mental state (KAB) development were significantly better in the TG in comparison to controls. Visual field testing, long-term mental well-being (profile of mood states), and adrenalin, cortisol, and endothelin-I blood levels did not differ significantly between both groups. Conclusion Additive RM applied on a daily basis can positively impact various physiological and psychological parameters in the short term. PMID:26543350

  9. A novel parameter-induced stochastic resonance phenomena in fractional Fourier domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lifeng; Wang, Huiqi; Lv, Wangyong; Zhong, Suchuan

    2016-08-01

    The parameter-induced stochastic resonance (SR) phenomenon in a novel self-adaptive dynamical system driven by linear frequency modulated (LFM) signal and additive noise is considered from the view of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). It is found that the dynamical system can be perfectly analyzed by equivalently transforming it into a traditional first-order linear dynamical system driven by periodic signal and additive noise in fractional Fourier transform (FrFT) domain with an optimal rotated angle, and the theoretical analysis and simulation results show that output SNR exhibits the SR behavior when it is plotted as a function of the system parameter. Furthermore, the optimal value of adjusted parameter is obtained, and the possible area of SNR gain is theoretically determined only by center-frequency and modulated frequency of the driving LFM signal.

  10. Analysis of gonial angle in relation to age, gender, and dentition status by radiological and anthropometric methods

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Ram Ballabh; Upadhyay, Juhi; Agrawal, Pankaj; Rao, Nirmala N

    2012-01-01

    Background: With development and function, the mandibular angle has shown changes in size and shape. A variation in mandibular angle with age, gender, and even the dental status has been observed, which is supported by radiographic and anthropometric studies. Aims: The aim of this study were to evaluate relationship between complete loss of teeth and changes in the gonial angle; the study further intends to evaluate any variation in gonial angle with age and gender. The study intends to assess the reliability and accuracy of age and gender determination using gonial angle as a parameter. Materials and Methods: A total of 185 subjects (91 males; 89 females) were included in the study and were divided into five groups on the basis of the chronological age. Physico-forensic anthropometry and lateral cephalometric methods were used to record the gonial angle. Results: The present study shows a definite decrease in the gonial angle with advancing age, but the intergroup analysis does not follow a significant pattern. The study showed no correlation of gonial angle with gender. However, the study observed a 6° increase in gonial angle for edentulous subjects. Conclusion: Gonial angle has been used as an adjuvant forensic parameter, but its reliability is questionable, as the mandible does not follow one characteristic pattern. Gonial angle does show changes with dentition status, which may be attributed to physiologic function of the mandible. However, when evidence is scanty, it can be used to direct the investigation. PMID:23087579

  11. Reconditioning of Cassini Narrow-Angle Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These five images of single stars, taken at different times with the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft, show the effects of haze collecting on the camera's optics, then successful removal of the haze by warming treatments.

    The image on the left was taken on May 25, 2001, before the haze problem occurred. It shows a star named HD339457.

    The second image from left, taken May 30, 2001, shows the effect of haze that collected on the optics when the camera cooled back down after a routine-maintenance heating to 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit). The star is Maia, one of the Pleiades.

    The third image was taken on October 26, 2001, after a weeklong decontamination treatment at minus 7 C (19 F). The star is Spica.

    The fourth image was taken of Spica January 30, 2002, after a weeklong decontamination treatment at 4 C (39 F).

    The final image, also of Spica, was taken July 9, 2002, following three additional decontamination treatments at 4 C (39 F) for two months, one month, then another month.

    Cassini, on its way toward arrival at Saturn in 2004, is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  12. Moderate positive spin Hall angle in uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Simranjeet; Anguera, Marta; Barco, Enrique del E-mail: cwmsch@rit.edu; Springell, Ross; Miller, Casey W. E-mail: cwmsch@rit.edu

    2015-12-07

    We report measurements of spin pumping and the inverse spin Hall effect in Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20}/uranium bilayers designed to study the efficiency of spin-charge interconversion in a super-heavy element. We employ broad-band ferromagnetic resonance on extended films to inject a spin current from the Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} (permalloy) into the uranium layer, which is then converted into an electric field by the inverse spin Hall effect. Surprisingly, our results suggest a spin mixing conductance of order 2 × 10{sup 19} m{sup −2} and a positive spin Hall angle of 0.004, which are both merely comparable with those of several transition metals. These results thus support the idea that the electronic configuration may be at least as important as the atomic number in governing spin pumping across interfaces and subsequent spin Hall effects. In fact, given that both the magnitude and the sign are unexpected based on trends in d-electron systems, materials with unfilled f-electron orbitals may hold additional exploration avenues for spin physics.

  13. A Climbing Class' Reinvention of Angles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fyhn, Anne Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    A previous study shows how a twelve-year-old girl discovers angles in her narrative from a climbing trip. Based on this research, the girl's class takes part in one day of climbing and half a day of follow-up work at school. The students mathematise their climbing with respect to angles and they express themselves in texts and drawings. Their…

  14. Automatic star-horizon angle measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koerber, K.; Koso, D. A.; Nardella, P. C.

    1969-01-01

    Automatic star horizontal angle measuring aid for general navigational use incorporates an Apollo type sextant. The eyepiece of the sextant is replaced with two light detectors and appropriate circuitry. The device automatically determines the angle between a navigational star and a unique point on the earths horizon as seen on a spacecraft.

  15. Use of gait parameters of persons in video surveillance systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geradts, Zeno J.; Merlijn, Menno; de Groot, Gert; Bijhold, Jurrien

    2002-07-01

    The gait parameters of eleven subjects were evaluated to provide data for recognition purposes of subjects. Video images of these subjects were acquired in frontal, transversal, and sagittal (a plane parallel to the median of the body) view. The subjects walked by at their usual walking speed. The measured parameters were hip, knee and ankle joint angle and their time averaged values, thigh, foot and trunk angle, step length and width, cycle time and walking speed. Correlation coefficients within and between subjects for the hip, knee and ankle rotation pattern in the sagittal aspect and for the trunk rotation pattern in the transversal aspect were almost similar. (were similar or were almost identical) This implies that the intra and inter individual variance were equal. Therefore, these gait parameters could not distinguish between subjects. A simple ANOVA with a follow-up test was used to detect significant differences for the mean hip, knee and ankle joint angle, thigh angle, step length, step width, walking speed, cycle time and foot angle. The number of significant differences between subjects defined the usefulness of the gait parameter. The parameter with the most significant difference between subjects was the foot angle (64 % - 73 % of the maximal attainable significant differences), followed by the time average hip joint angle (58 %) and the step length (45 %). The other parameters scored less than 25 %, which is poor for recognition purposes. The use of gait for identification purposes it not yet possible based on this research.

  16. Utilizing dynamic tensiometry to quantify contact angle hysteresis and wetting state transitions on nonwetting surfaces.

    PubMed

    Kleingartner, Justin A; Srinivasan, Siddarth; Mabry, Joseph M; Cohen, Robert E; McKinley, Gareth H

    2013-11-01

    Goniometric techniques traditionally quantify two parameters, the advancing and receding contact angles, that are useful for characterizing the wetting properties of a solid surface; however, dynamic tensiometry, which measures changes in the net force on a surface during the repeated immersion and emersion of a solid into a probe liquid, can provide further insight into the wetting properties of a surface. We detail a framework for analyzing tensiometric results that allows for the determination of wetting hysteresis, wetting state transitions, and characteristic topographical length scales on textured, nonwetting surfaces, in addition to the more traditional measurement of apparent advancing and receding contact angles. Fluorodecyl POSS, a low-surface-energy material, was blended with commercially available poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and then dip- or spray-coated onto glass substrates. These surfaces were probed with a variety of liquids to illustrate the effects of probe liquid surface tension, solid surface chemistry, and surface texture on the apparent contact angles and wetting hysteresis of nonwetting surfaces. Woven meshes were then used as model structured substrates to add a second, larger length scale for the surface texture. When immersed into a probe liquid, these spray-coated mesh surfaces can form a metastable, solid-liquid-air interface on the largest length scale of surface texture. The increasing hydrostatic pressure associated with progressively greater immersion depths disrupts this metastable, composite interface and forces penetration of the probe liquid into the mesh structure. This transition is marked by a sudden change in the wetting hysteresis, which can be systematically probed using spray-coated, woven meshes of varying wire radius and spacing. We also show that dynamic tensiometry can accurately and quantitatively characterize topographical length scales that are present on microtextured surfaces.

  17. Wire grid polarizers fabricated by low angle deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watts, M. P. C.; Little, M.; Egan, E.; Hochbaum, A.; Johns, C.; Stephansen, S.

    2013-03-01

    Oblique angle metal deposition has been combined with high aspect ratio imprinted structures to create wire grid polarizers (WGP's) for use as polarization recyclers in liquid crystal displays. The optical results for the oblique deposition WGP show contrast comparable to a conventionally etched WGP. In addition, the WGP showed improved spectral and spatial uniformity as compared to a multilayer reflective polarizer. The next steps to the fabrication of meter sized WGP are proposed.

  18. Let's Do It! Using Geostrips and "Angle-Fixers" to Develop Ideas About Shapes and Angles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruni, James V.; Silverman, Helene

    1975-01-01

    Homemade geostrips, "angle-fixers" (cardboard circular sectors) and brass fasteners can be used by students to explore properties of angles, triangles and other polygons. Several games and other activities are suggested. (SD)

  19. Experimental study of crossing angle collision

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, T.; Rice, D.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Tigner, M.

    1993-05-01

    The non-linear coupling due to the beam-beam interaction with crossing angle has been studied. The major effect of a small ({approximately}12mrad) crossing angle is to excite 5Q{sub x}{plus_minus}Q{sub s}=integer coupling resonance family on large amplitude particles, which results in bad lifetime. On the CESR, a small crossing angle ({approximately}2.4mr) was created at the IP and a reasonable beam-beam tune-shift was achieved. The decay rate of the beam is measured as a function of horizontal tune with and without crossing angle. The theoretical analysis, simulation and experimental measurements have a good agreement. The resonance strength as a function of crossing angle is also measured.

  20. Caustic graphene plasmons with Kelvin angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xihang; Lin, Xiao; Gao, Fei; Xu, Hongyi; Yang, Zhaoju; Zhang, Baile

    2015-08-01

    A century-long argument made by Lord Kelvin that all swimming objects have an effective Mach number of 3, corresponding to a Kelvin angle of 19.5° for ship waves, has been challenged recently with the conclusion that the Kelvin angle should gradually transit to the Mach angle as the ship's velocity increases. Here we show that a similar phenomenon can happen for graphene plasmons. By analyzing the caustic wave pattern of graphene plasmons stimulated by a swift charged particle moving uniformly above graphene, we show that at low velocities of the charged particle, the caustics of graphene plasmons form the Kelvin angle. At large velocities of the particle, the caustics disappear and the effective semiangle of the wave pattern approaches the Mach angle. Our study introduces caustic wave theory to the field of graphene plasmonics, and reveals a physical picture of graphene plasmon excitation during electron energy-loss spectroscopy measurements.

  1. Implications of the small aspect angles of equatorial spread F

    SciTech Connect

    Hysell, D.L.; Farley, D.T.

    1996-03-01

    Small-scale equatorial spread F irregularities are almost perfectly aligned with the geomagnetic field. The authors develop here an analytic plasma kinetic theory of small-scale, quasi-field-aligned irregularities that include ion viscosity and finite Larmor radius effects. They conclude, for one thing, that the measured aspect angles are too small to be consistent with a dissipative drift wave source of 3-m irregularities. Nonlinearly driven flute modes appear to be the only available mechanism. The authors compare the relative influence of parallel and perpendicular dissipation and conclude that the aspect width depends only weakly on any single geophysical parameters, such as collision frequency, gradient length, temperature, etc. This finding is consistent with their observation that the measured aspect angles vary little with altitude and only weakly with instability level. 29 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy of atomic oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Meulen, P.; Krause, M. O.; de Lange, C. A.

    1991-06-01

    Using synchrotron-radiation-based, angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy, the relative partial photoionization cross sections for the production of the 4 S 0 and 2 D 0 ionic states in atomic oxygen, as well as the corresponding asymmetry parameters, are measured from threshold at 13.62 to about 30 eV. The cross sections are placed on an absolute scale using previous data obtained with an electron spectroscopy modulation method. Attention is focused on the numerous autoionization resonances below the 2p -12D0, 2p -12P0, and 2s -14Pe limits. The behavior of the asymmetry parameters across these resonances is observed for the first time. The 2s2p4(4Pe)3p(3S0,3P0,3D0) resonances are fitted by a Fano-type profile to obtain accurate values for the position, width, and q parameter.

  3. Buffeting of NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tong; Dowell, Earl

    2014-11-01

    Buffeting is a fluid instability caused by flow separation or shock wave oscillations in the flow around a bluff body. Typically there is a dominant frequency of these flow oscillations called Strouhal or buffeting frequency. In prior work several researchers at Duke University have noted the analogy between the classic Von Karman Vortex Street behind a bluff body and the flow oscillations that occur for flow around a NACA 0012 airfoil at sufficiently large angle of attack. Lock-in is found for certain combinations of airfoil oscillation (pitching motion) frequencies and amplitudes when the frequency of the airfoil motion is sufficiently close to the buffeting frequency. The goal of this paper is to explore the flow around a static and an oscillating airfoil at high angle of attack by developing a method for computing buffet response. Simulation results are compared with experimental data. Conditions for the onset of buffeting and lock-in of a NACA 0012 airfoil at high angle of attack are determined. Effects of several parameters on lift coefficient and flow response frequency are studied including Reynolds number, angle of attack and blockage ratio of the airfoil size to the wind tunnel dimensions. Also more detailed flow field characteristics are determined. For a static airfoil, a universal Strouhal number scaling has been found for angles of attack from 30° to 90°, where the flow around airfoil is fully separated. For an oscillating airfoil, conditions for lock-in are discussed. Differences between the lock-in case and the unlocked case are also studied. The second affiliation: Duke University.

  4. In situ estimation of sediment sound speed and critical angle

    PubMed

    Maguer; Bovio; Fox; Schmidt

    2000-09-01

    Understanding the basic physics of sound penetration into ocean sediments is essential for the design of sonar systems that can detect, localize, classify, and identify buried objects. In this regard the sound speed of the sediment is a crucial parameter as the ratio of sound speed at the water-sediment interface determines the critical angle. Sediment sound speed is typically measured from core samples using high frequency (100's of kHz) pulsed travel time measurements. Earlier experimental work on subcritical penetration into sandy sediments has suggested that the effective sound speed in the 2-20 kHz range is significantly lower than the core measurement results. Simulations using Biot theory for propagation in porous media confirmed that sandy sediments may be highly dispersive in the range 1-100 kHz for the type of sand in which the experiments were performed. Here it is shown that a direct and robust estimate of the critical angle, and therefore the sediment sound speed, at the lower frequencies can be achieved by analyzing the grazing angle dependence of the phase delays observed on a buried array. A parametric source with secondary frequencies in the 2-16 kHz range was directed toward a sandy bottom similar to the one investigated in the earlier study. An array of 14 hydrophones was used to measure penetrated field. The critical angle was estimated by analyzing the variations of signal arrival times versus frequency, burial depth, and grazing angle. Matching the results with classical transmission theory yielded a sound speed estimate in the sand of 1626 m/s in the frequency range 2-5 kHz, again significantly lower the 1720 m/s estimated from the cores at 200 kHz. However, as described here, this dispersion is consistent with the predictions of the Biot theory for this type of sand.

  5. Automatic Kappa Angle Estimation for Air Photos Based on Phase Only Correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Z.; Stanley, D.; Xin, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The approximate value of exterior orientation parameters is needed for air photo bundle adjustment. Usually the air borne GPS/IMU can provide the initial value for the camera position and attitude angle. However, in some cases, the camera's attitude angle is not available due to lack of IMU or other reasons. In this case, the kappa angle needs to be estimated for each photo before bundle adjustment. The kappa angle can be obtained from the Ground Control Points (GCPs) in the photo. Unfortunately it is not the case that enough GCPs are always available. In order to overcome this problem, an algorithm is developed to automatically estimate the kappa angle for air photos based on phase only correlation technique. This function has been embedded in PCI software. Extensive experiments show that this algorithm is fast, reliable, and stable.

  6. Measurements of the CKM Angle phi3/gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Tisserand, Vincent; /Annecy, LAPP

    2007-06-27

    We present a review on the measurements of the CKM angle {gamma} ({phi}{sub 3}){sup 1} as performed by the BABAR and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} B factories colliders PEP-II and KEKB. These measurements are using either charged or neutral B decays. For charged B decays the modes {tilde D}{sup 0}K{sup -}, {tilde D}*{sup 0}K{sup -}, and {tilde D}{sup 0}K*{sup -} are employed, where {tilde D}{sup 0} indicates either a D{sup 0} or a {bar D}{sup 0} meson. Direct CP violation is exploited. It is caused by interferences between V{sub ub} and V{sub cb} accessible transitions that generate asymmetries in the final states. For these decays various methods exist to enhance the sensitivity to the V{sub ub} transition, carrying the weak phase {gamma}. For neutral B decays, the modes D{sup (*){+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} and D{sup {+-}}{rho}{sup {-+}} are used. In addition to the V{sub ub} and V{sub cb} interferences, these modes are sensitive to the B{sup 0}-{bar B}{sup 0} mixing, so that time dependent analyses are performed to extract sin(2{beta} + {gamma}). An alternative method would use the lower branching ratios decay modes {tilde D}{sup (*)0}{bar K}{sup (*)0} where much larger asymmetries are expected. The various available methods are mostly ''theoretically clean'' and always free of penguins diagrams. In some cases a high sensitivity to {gamma} is expected and large asymmetries may be seen. But these measurements are always experimentally difficult as one has to face with either low branching ratios, or small asymmetries, or additional technical/theoretical difficulties due to Dalitz/SU(3) and re-scattering models needed to treat/estimate nuisance parameters such as unknown strong phases and the relative magnitude of the amplitude of the interfering ''V{sub ub}'' transitions. Thus at the present time only a relatively limited precision on {gamma} can be extracted from these measurements. The current world average is {gamma} = (78{sub -26}{sup +19

  7. Method on camouflaged target recognition using the angle of ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuansun, Xiao-bo; Wu, Wen-Yuan; Huang, Yan-hua; Li, Zhao-zhao

    2015-10-01

    Using polarimetric information of the camouflaged target surface to identify camouflage has been a hot research area in camouflage detecting. The main method is to use the difference in the degree of polarization(DOP) between background and target to add the contrast ratio of them. The measurement of the DOP has some requirements on the intensity of reflected radiation. In case of low reflected radiation intensity, the difference in the DOP for different materials is not so distinguishable. In addition, the linear degree of polarization is largely under the effects of detection angle and surface roughness, so it is hard to differentiate the degree of polarization when the targets with similar surface roughness are detected at the same detection angle. By analyzing the elements affecting the reflected electromagnetic radiation amplitudes and phase on the camouflaged target surface, this article makes a research on the polarization character of reflected radiation A method on camouflaged target recognition directly or indirectly by taking the angle of ellipsometry (AOE) imaging under the linear polarized light. The function model of the angle of incidence, complex refractive index and AOE was modeled, then the model was simulated by MATLAB and the results showed it can describe the distribution properties of AOE. A new thought for the approach of identifying camouflaged target recognition by detecting polarimetric information was proposed, and it has a deep theoretical and practical significance in camouflaged target recognition.

  8. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR. PMID:27403044

  9. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles

    PubMed Central

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E.; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR. PMID:27403044

  10. Optical Enhancement of Exoskeleton-Based Estimation of Glenohumeral Angles.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Camilo; Unzueta, Luis; de Los Reyes-Guzmán, Ana; Ruiz, Oscar E; Flórez, Julián

    2016-01-01

    In Robot-Assisted Rehabilitation (RAR) the accurate estimation of the patient limb joint angles is critical for assessing therapy efficacy. In RAR, the use of classic motion capture systems (MOCAPs) (e.g., optical and electromagnetic) to estimate the Glenohumeral (GH) joint angles is hindered by the exoskeleton body, which causes occlusions and magnetic disturbances. Moreover, the exoskeleton posture does not accurately reflect limb posture, as their kinematic models differ. To address the said limitations in posture estimation, we propose installing the cameras of an optical marker-based MOCAP in the rehabilitation exoskeleton. Then, the GH joint angles are estimated by combining the estimated marker poses and exoskeleton Forward Kinematics. Such hybrid system prevents problems related to marker occlusions, reduced camera detection volume, and imprecise joint angle estimation due to the kinematic mismatch of the patient and exoskeleton models. This paper presents the formulation, simulation, and accuracy quantification of the proposed method with simulated human movements. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the method accuracy to marker position estimation errors, due to system calibration errors and marker drifts, has been carried out. The results show that, even with significant errors in the marker position estimation, method accuracy is adequate for RAR.

  11. X-31 high angle of attack control system performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Peter; Seamount, Patricia

    1994-01-01

    The design goals for the X-31 flight control system were: (1) level 1 handling qualities during post-stall maneuvering (30 to 70 degrees angle-of-attack); (2) thrust vectoring to enhance performance across the flight envelope; and (3) adequate pitch-down authority at high angle-of-attack. Additional performance goals are discussed. A description of the flight control system is presented, highlighting flight control system features in the pitch and roll axes and X-31 thrust vectoring characteristics. The high angle-of-attack envelope clearance approach will be described, including a brief explanation of analysis techniques and tools. Also, problems encountered during envelope expansion will be discussed. This presentation emphasizes control system solutions to problems encountered in envelope expansion. An essentially 'care free' envelope was cleared for the close-in-combat demonstrator phase. High angle-of-attack flying qualities maneuvers are currently being flown and evaluated. These results are compared with pilot opinions expressed during the close-in-combat program and with results obtained from the F-18 HARV for identical maneuvers. The status and preliminary results of these tests are discussed.

  12. The influence of incidence angle on the aerodynamics of condensing flow around a rotor tip section of steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti Amiri, H.; Salmaniyeh, F.; Izadi, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of incidence angle on the aerodynamics of the steam flow field around a rotor tip section is investigated. An Eulerian-Eulerian method, based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamics model for simulating the wet flow is employed. In this study, the effects of incidence angle on different design parameters such as: outflow Mach number, outflow gas phase mass fraction, loss coefficient and deviation angle are studied.

  13. The influence of incidence angle on the aerodynamics of condensing flow around a rotor tip section of steam turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beheshti Amiri, H.; Salmaniyeh, F.; Izadi, A.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the influence of incidence angle on the aerodynamics of the steam flow field around a rotor tip section is investigated. An Eulerian-Eulerian method, based on a non-equilibrium thermodynamics model for simulating the wet flow is employed. In this study, the effects of incidence angle on different design parameters such as: outflow Mach number, outflow gas phase mass fraction, loss coefficient and deviation angle are studied.

  14. Effect of MLC leaf position, collimator rotation angle, and gantry rotation angle errors on intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Sen; Li, Guangjun; Wang, Maojie; Jiang, Qinfeng; Zhang, Yingjie; Wei, Yuquan

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf position, collimator rotation angle, and accelerator gantry rotation angle errors on intensity-modulated radiotherapy plans for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. To compare dosimetric differences between the simulating plans and the clinical plans with evaluation parameters, 6 patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma were selected for simulation of systematic and random MLC leaf position errors, collimator rotation angle errors, and accelerator gantry rotation angle errors. There was a high sensitivity to dose distribution for systematic MLC leaf position errors in response to field size. When the systematic MLC position errors were 0.5, 1, and 2 mm, respectively, the maximum values of the mean dose deviation, observed in parotid glands, were 4.63%, 8.69%, and 18.32%, respectively. The dosimetric effect was comparatively small for systematic MLC shift errors. For random MLC errors up to 2 mm and collimator and gantry rotation angle errors up to 0.5°, the dosimetric effect was negligible. We suggest that quality control be regularly conducted for MLC leaves, so as to ensure that systematic MLC leaf position errors are within 0.5 mm. Because the dosimetric effect of 0.5° collimator and gantry rotation angle errors is negligible, it can be concluded that setting a proper threshold for allowed errors of collimator and gantry rotation angle may increase treatment efficacy and reduce treatment time.

  15. The influence of tool inclination angle on the free form surface roughness after hard milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matras, A.

    2015-09-01

    Paper presents the experimental study performed to determine the effect of the value and direction of the tool inclination angle and feed speed on the selected surface roughness parameters. The samples were made of 16MnCr5 steel machined with ball end mill made of cemented carbide. The cylindrical surfaces were machined during the research. This enabled to identify the areas where various values of the tool inclination angle were applied.

  16. Branes at angles from worldvolume actions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaspur, Reza

    2016-05-01

    We investigate possible stable configurations of two arbitrary branes at general angles using the dynamics of DBI + WZ action. The analysis naturally reveals two types of solutions which we identify as the "marginal" and "non-marginal" configurations. We characterize possible configurations of a pair of identical or non-identical branes in either of these two classes by specifying their proper intersection rules and allowed intersection angles. We also perform a partial analysis of configurations with multiple angles of a system of asymptotically flat curved branes.

  17. Phase-angle controller for Stirling engines

    SciTech Connect

    Frosch, R.A.; McDougal, A.R.

    1980-12-23

    A first embodiment incorporating an actuator including a restraint link adapted to be connected with a pivotal carrier arm for a force transfer gear interposed between the crankshaft for an expander portion of a stirling engine and a crankshaft for the displacer portion of the engine is described. The restraint link is releasably supported against axial displacement by releasably trapped hydraulic fluid for selectively establishing a phase angle relationship between the crankshaft and a second embodiment incorporating a hydraulic coupler for use in varying the phase angle of gear-coupled crankshafts for a Stirling engine whereby phase angle changes are obtainable.

  18. Wide-angle vision for road views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, F.; Fehrs, K.-K.; Hartmann, G.; Klette, R.

    2013-03-01

    The field-of-view of a wide-angle image is greater than (say) 90 degrees, and so contains more information than available in a standard image. A wide field-of-view is more advantageous than standard input for understanding the geometry of 3D scenes, and for estimating the poses of panoramic sensors within such scenes. Thus, wide-angle imaging sensors and methodologies are commonly used in various road-safety, street surveillance, street virtual touring, or street 3D modelling applications. The paper reviews related wide-angle vision technologies by focusing on mathematical issues rather than on hardware.

  19. Phase-angle controller for Stirling engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, A. R. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An actuator includes a restraint link adapted to be connected with a pivotal carrier arm for a force transfer gear interposed between the crankshaft for an expander portion of a Stirling engine and a crankshaft for the displacer portion of the engine. The restraint link is releasably trapped hydraulic fluid for selectively establishing a phase angle relationship between the crankshaft. A second embodiment incorporates a hydraulic coupler for use in varying the phase angle of gear-coupled crank fpr a Stirling engine whereby phase angle changes are obtainable.

  20. [Food additives and healthiness].

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Marina

    2014-01-01

    Additives are used for improving food structure or preventing its spoilage, for example. Many substances used as additives are also naturally present in food. The safety of additives is evaluated according to commonly agreed principles. If high concentrations of an additive cause adverse health effects for humans, a limit of acceptable daily intake (ADI) is set for it. An additive is a risk only when ADI is exceeded. The healthiness of food is measured on the basis of nutrient density and scientifically proven effects.

  1. Validating Solution Ensembles from Molecular Dynamics Simulation by Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering Data

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Po-chia; Hub, Jochen S.

    2014-01-01

    Wide-angle x-ray scattering (WAXS) experiments of biomolecules in solution have become increasingly popular because of technical advances in light sources and detectors. However, the structural interpretation of WAXS profiles is problematic, partly because accurate calculations of WAXS profiles from structural models have remained challenging. In this work, we present the calculation of WAXS profiles from explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of five different proteins. Using only a single fitting parameter that accounts for experimental uncertainties because of the buffer subtraction and dark currents, we find excellent agreement to experimental profiles both at small and wide angles. Because explicit solvation eliminates free parameters associated with the solvation layer or the excluded solvent, which would require fitting to experimental data, we minimize the risk of overfitting. We further find that the influence from water models and protein force fields on calculated profiles are insignificant up to q≈15nm−1. Using a series of simulations that allow increasing flexibility of the proteins, we show that incorporating thermal fluctuations into the calculations significantly improves agreement with experimental data, demonstrating the importance of protein dynamics in the interpretation of WAXS profiles. In addition, free MD simulations up to one microsecond suggest that the calculated profiles are highly sensitive with respect to minor conformational rearrangements of proteins, such as an increased flexibility of a loop or an increase of the radius of gyration by < 1%. The present study suggests that quantitative comparison between MD simulations and experimental WAXS profiles emerges as an accurate tool to validate solution ensembles of biomolecules. PMID:25028885

  2. Contact angle determination procedure and detection of an invisible surface film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, G.; Grat, R.

    1990-01-01

    The contact angle value, i.e., the tangent angle of liquid resting on a planar solid surface, is a basic parameter which can be applied to a wide range of applications. The goal is to provide a basic understanding of the contact angle measurement technique and to present a simple illustration that can be applied as a quality control method; namely, detection of a surface contaminant which exists on a surface that appears clean to the unaided eye. The equipment and experimental procedures are detailed.

  3. Effect and evaluation of prying action for top- and seat-angle connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ali; Hasan, Rafiq

    2015-06-01

    Nonlinear finite element (FE) static analyses of top- and seat-angle connections were performed using ABAQUS standard to investigate the influence of connection parameters and its properties on prying action developed due to the interaction between column flange and top angle's vertical leg. Contact phenomenon between two interfaces with finite sliding and bolt pretension in the initial step of analysis was considered in the FE model. FE analysis results were compared with the experimental ones to examine the applicability of the FE model. Then, the location of plastic hinges in connection assemblages was investigated at the ultimate state of the connection and a parametric study was performed varying connection parameters, material properties of connection assemblages, and magnitude of bolt pretension to visualize their effects on prying force and on the position of prying force on top angle's vertical leg. Current study shows that plastic hinges not only develop at top angle's heel and bolt hole region but also in the bolt shank that differs from some assumptions of power model (Kishi and Chen 1990): (1) top angle thickness and gage distance from angle heel to bolt hole center line have an distinct effect on prying action; and (2) distributed prying force developed near the region of the top edge of tension angle's leg adjacent to column flange can contribute to the failure of the connection. Finally, a mathematical formulation to identify the location of prying force action point is proposed.

  4. Multi-Parameter Scattering Sensor and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenberg, Paul S. (Inventor); Fischer, David G. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Methods, detectors and systems detect particles and/or measure particle properties. According to one embodiment, a detector for detecting particles comprises: a sensor for receiving radiation scattered by an ensemble of particles; and a processor for determining a physical parameter for the detector, or an optimal detection angle or a bound for an optimal detection angle, for measuring at least one moment or integrated moment of the ensemble of particles, the physical parameter, or detection angle, or detection angle bound being determined based on one or more of properties (a) and/or (b) and/or (c) and/or (d) or ranges for one or more of properties (a) and/or (b) and/or (c) and/or (d), wherein (a)-(d) are the following: (a) is a wavelength of light incident on the particles, (b) is a count median diameter or other characteristic size parameter of the particle size distribution, (c) is a standard deviation or other characteristic width parameter of the particle size distribution, and (d) is a refractive index of particles.

  5. Effects of injection angle and pressure on mixing performance of fuel injection via various geometries for upstream-fuel-injected scramjets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Hideaki

    2016-11-01

    Effective fuel injection and mixing is of crucial importance for reliable operation of scramjet engines, where fuel must be injected into high-speed crossflow and mixed with air at an extremely short timescale. This paper presents the results of a numerical study that investigates the effects of the injection angle and pressure for various orifice shapes on fuel mixing characteristics into hypersonic airflow at Mach 5, aiming at the application to scramjet operation with upstream fuel injection at Mach 10. The mixing performance has been evaluated with respect to the mixing efficiency, total pressure recovery, fuel penetration, and streamwise circulation. Significant influence of the injection angle and intensity on the mixing has been observed in conjunction with the geometric features of the injector orifice. An additional performance parameter, namely the mixing vorticity effectiveness, has been found to be an effective measure to quantify the contribution of the streamwise vorticity in mixing enhancement.

  6. High angle conveyors climb to the top

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    Descriptions are presented of various types of high angle conveyors, including pocket belt, fin belt, sandwich belt, snake sandwich conveyor, mechanically pressed sandwich conveyor, and pneumatically pressed sandwich conveyors. 10 references.

  7. High angle conveyors climb to the top

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    A major objective in the design of a storage facility is to have the least handling over the shortest distances and to optimize land usage by attaining the highest tons-per-acre value. The advantages of high angle conveyors become apparent when the height of lift is compared with the surface area. High angle conveyors achieve high capacities in the least amount of space. Continental Conveyor and Equipment Co., has conducted several studies that evaluate the technical and economic feasibility of using high angle conveyors in conveyor systems. A few of the high angle conveying concepts reviewed are the bucket ladder or pocket belt, belts with partitions or fin belt, and the sandwich type belt conveyors.

  8. SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McKenzie, David L.; Anderson, Phillip C.

    2002-01-01

    This final research report summarizes the scientific work performed by The Aerospace Corporation on SOLARMAX/Electron Pitch Angle Anisotropy Distributions. The period of performance was from June 1, 2000 to December 31, 2001.

  9. Influence of Process Parameter on Grit Blasting as a Pretreatment Process for Thermal Spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobzin, K.; Öte, M.; Linke, T. F.; Sommer, J.; Liao, X.

    2016-01-01

    In thermal spraying, uncoated substrates usually require roughening. As the most common roughening method, grit blasting increases the surface area and produces undercuts in almost all cases, which facilitate mechanical interlocking and thus promote the bonding between the substrate and coating. The effects of grit blasting parameters, i.e., the particle size, the blasting angle, the stand-off distance, and the pressure, on the resulting surface topography are investigated. Furthermore, the efficiency and wear behavior of the blasting media are analyzed. Influences of three different blasting media, corundum, alumina zirconia, and steel shot, on the surface roughening, are compared. By varying adjusted blasting parameters, different initial conditions (surface topography) are created. Subsequently, the substrate is coated, and the coating bond strength is measured. One of the main results of this publication is that alumina zirconia and steel grit show a longer lifetime than pure alumina as a blasting media. Moreover, it has been shown that the blasting parameters such as grain size, working pressure, and history (wear status) of the abrasive particles have a significant effect on the resulting surface topography. Additionally, systematical analysis in this study shows that the blasting parameters such as stand-off distance and blasting angle have a small influence on the results of the blasting process. Another important conclusion of this study is that the conventional surface parameters that have been analyzed in this study did not turn out to be suitable for describing the relationship between the surface topography of the substrate and resulting bond strength.

  10. Hyperpronation in Dancers Incidence and Relation to Calcaneal Angle.

    PubMed

    Nowacki, Rélana M E; Air, Mary E; Rietveld, A B M

    2012-09-01

    Hyperpronation is a common finding when examining the dancer-patient and is thought to be implicated in several dance-related injuries. Little is known about the incidence of hyperpronation-related symptoms in dancers. Additionally, there is no current easy method for estimating the degree of hyperpronation. This study was designed to investigate the incidence of symptoms related to foot hyperpronation in dancer-patients and to evaluate the potential correlation between the patient's calcaneal angle and severity of hyperpronation. A retrospective study of 2,427 dancers' charts over the past 6 years was undertaken to identify dancers who presented with musculoskeletal complaints or problems related to hyperpronation. Physical exam data and diagnoses were collected. Among 24 new dancer-patients presenting to clinic with hyperpronation-related symptoms, the calcaneal angle was measured and correlated with a clinical grading scale based on the Hübscher maneuver. Per chart review, the incidence of symptomatic hyperpronation resulting in prescription for orthotics was 30% (739 dancers out of 2,427). The most common related diagnosis was retropatellar chondropathy (10%). Clinical severity of hyperpronation was linearly related to the calcaneal angle (95% CI [1.25, 4.14], p = 0.0006; Pearson's r(2) = 0.97). The calcaneal angles among mild, moderate, and severe hyperpronators differed significantly (H = 13.45, p = 0.0012). It was concluded that measuring the calcaneal angle may be a useful adjunct to the Hübscher maneuver for grading the clinical severity of a dancer's hyperpronation. Healthcare providers working with dancers should be aware of the presence of hyperpronation, its relation to compensatory turnout techniques, and association with injuries in the foot, ankle, knee, hip, and low back. A standard, time-efficient method of measuring and grading hyperpronation is still needed.

  11. Radiographic Relevance of the Distal Medial Cuneiform Angle in Hallux Valgus Assessment.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Daniel J; Smith, Abigail; Fowler, Troy

    2016-01-01

    The angle formed by the distal articular facet of the medial cuneiform has been evaluated and discussed by various investigators. However, no consistent method has been available to radiograph and measure this entity. The wide variability of the angle is not conducive to comparative analysis. Additionally, investigators have noted that the angles observed (obliquity) vary greatly because of changes in radiographic angle, foot position, rotation of the first ray, and declination of the first metatarsal. Recognizing that these variables exist, we propose a reproducible assessment using digital radiography and application of deformity of correction principles. Our results have indicated a mean distal medial cuneiform angle of 20.69° in normal feet, 23.51° with moderate hallux valgus, and 20.41° with severe hallux valgus deformity. The radiograph beam was kept at 15° from the coronal plane. An inverse relationship was found between the distal medial cuneiform angle and bunion severity. This was in contrast to our expected hypothesis. The overall angle of the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform did, however, correlate with the severity of the bunion deformity (p < .000). The obliquity values and intermetatarsal angles changed in direct relationship to the radiographic projection angle. This illustrates the importance of using standardized radiographic projection angles. We conclude that the 1-dimensional standard anteroposterior radiograph with assessment of the distal medial cuneiform angle cannot adequately demonstrate the pathologic features of hallux valgus. A better indicator appears to be the first metatarsal-medial cuneiform angle. This pathologic entity is a 3-dimensional one that incorporates the joint morphology of the first ray, triplane osseous positioning, and soft tissue imbalances. Perhaps, 3-dimensional computed tomography imaging will provide better insight into this entity.

  12. Nucleation of small-angle boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Nabarro, F.R.N. |; Wilsdorf, D.K.

    1996-12-01

    The internal stresses induced by the strain gradients in an array of lattice cells delineated by low-angle dislocation boundaries are partially relieved by the creation of new low-angle boundaries. This is shown to be a first-order transition, the new boundaries having finite misorientations. The calculated misorientations both of the new boundaries and of the existing boundaries which provoke the transition agree well with observations.

  13. Characterizing the combinatorial beam angle selection problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bangert, Mark; Ziegenhein, Peter; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-10-01

    The beam angle selection (BAS) problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy is often interpreted as a combinatorial optimization problem, i.e. finding the best combination of η beams in a discrete set of candidate beams. It is well established that the combinatorial BAS problem may be solved efficiently with metaheuristics such as simulated annealing or genetic algorithms. However, the underlying parameters of the optimization process, such as the inclusion of non-coplanar candidate beams, the angular resolution in the space of candidate beams, and the number of evaluated beam ensembles as well as the relative performance of different metaheuristics have not yet been systematically investigated. We study these open questions in a meta-analysis of four strategies for combinatorial optimization in order to provide a reference for future research related to the BAS problem in intensity-modulated radiation therapy treatment planning. We introduce a high-performance inverse planning engine for BAS. It performs a full fluence optimization for ≈3600 treatment plans per hour while handling up to 50 GB of dose influence data (≈1400 candidate beams). For three head and neck patients, we compare the relative performance of a genetic, a cross-entropy, a simulated annealing and a naive iterative algorithm. The selection of ensembles with 5, 7, 9 and 11 beams considering either only coplanar or all feasible candidate beams is studied for an angular resolution of 5°, 10°, 15° and 20° in the space of candidate beams. The impact of different convergence criteria is investigated in comparison to a fixed termination after the evaluation of 10 000 beam ensembles. In total, our simulations comprise a full fluence optimization for about 3000 000 treatment plans. All four combinatorial BAS strategies yield significant improvements of the objective function value and of the corresponding dose distributions compared to standard beam configurations with equi

  14. A modified laminar optical tomography system with small dip-angle and the initial validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Huijuan; Wang, Shuang; Jia, Mengyu; Chen, Xueying; Qi, Jin; Tian, Jing; Ma, Wenjuan; Li, Jiao; Gao, Feng

    2016-03-01

    In a typical laminar optical tomography (LOT) system, the dip-angle between the incident light (or the emitting light) and the normal of the detection plane randomly changes during raster-scanning. The inconstant dip-angle causes consistency between the measurement and the light transportation model where a fixed dip-angle of the incident light is generally required. To eliminate the effect from this dip angle, methods such as keeping the angle unchangeable by moving the phantom instead of scanning the light were investigated. In this paper, a LOT system with small dip-angle over the whole detection range is developed. Simulation and experimental evaluation show that the dip-angle of the modified system is much smaller than that of the traditional system. For example, the relative angle between the two incident light at (x=0mm, y=0mm) and (x=0mm, y=2.5mm) on the image plane is about 0.7° for the traditional system while that is only about 0.02° for the modified system. The main parameters of the system are also evaluated and an image reconstruction algorithm is developed based on Monte Carlo simulation. The reconstructed images show that the spatial resolution and quantitative ratio is improved by the modified system without loss of the scanning speed.

  15. Determination of the Nip Angle in Roller Compactors With Serrated Rolls.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bernice Mei Jin; Chan, Lai Wah; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2016-06-01

    In roller compaction, the nip angle defines the critical transition interface between the slip and nip regions which is used to model material densification behavior and the properties of compacted ribbons. Current methods to determine the nip angle require either sophisticated instrumentation on smooth rolls or input parameters that are difficult to obtain experimentally. In this study, a practical method to determine nip angles for serrated rolls was developed based on mass balance considerations established around the nip region. Experimental input relating to roll geometry, powder density, and mass output from the compactor were required and they could be obtained reliably. The calculated nip angles were validated against those obtained from physical measurements during actual roll compaction. These nip angles were in agreement for various powder formulations containing plastic and brittle materials. The nip angles ranged from 4° to 12° and decreased significantly when the proportion of brittle material increased. Nip angles were also calculated using the widely used Johanson model. However, wall friction measurement on serrated roll surfaces could be impractical. The Johanson model-derived nip angles could differ by 3°-8° just by altering the roughness of the reference wall and this had compromised their reliability. PMID:27238494

  16. Joint angles and angular velocities and relevance of eigenvectors during prehension in the monkey

    PubMed Central

    Prosise, Jodi F.; Hendrix, Claudia M.

    2016-01-01

    Hand shaping during prehension involves intricate coordination of a complex system of bones, joints, and muscles. It is widely hypothesized that the motor system uses strategies to reduce the degrees of independent control. Both biomechanical constraints that result in coupling of the fingers and joints and neural synergies act to simplify the control problem. Synergies in hand shaping are typically defined using principal component-like analyses to define orthogonal patterns of movement. Although much less examined, joint angle velocities are also important parameters governing prehension. The primary goal of this study was to evaluate joint angles and joint angle velocities during prehension in monkeys. Fourteen joint angles and angular velocities were measured as monkeys reached to and grasped a set of objects designed to systematically vary hand shapes. Hand shaping patterns in joint angles and velocities were examined using singular value decomposition (SVD). Highly correlated patterns of movements were observed in both joint angles and joint angle velocities, but there was little correlation between the two, suggesting that velocities are controlled separately. Joint angles and velocities can be defined by a small number of eigenvectors by SVD. The unresolved question of the functional relevance of higher-order eigenvectors was also evaluated. Results support that higher-order components are not easily distinguished from noise and are likely not of physiological significance. PMID:25326080

  17. Increased Carrying Angle is a Risk Factor for Nontraumatic Ulnar Neuropathy at the Elbow

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Chian; Chu, Chang-Hung

    2008-01-01

    The literature suggests a possible relationship between carrying angle and nontrauma-related ulnar neuropathy. To confirm that relationship, we asked whether carrying angle is a risk factor in patients with nontrauma-related ulnar neuropathy. We measured the carrying angles of the elbow in 36 patients with a clinically and electrophysiologically confirmed diagnosis of nontraumatic ulnar neuropathy at the elbow and in 50 healthy control subjects. Correlation analysis was performed between carrying angles and parameters of nerve conduction studies, including nerve conduction velocities and amplitudes of muscle and nerve action potentials. The mean carrying angle was greater in the patients than in the control subjects. Females had a greater carrying angle than males. We observed an inverse relationship between carrying angles and motor nerve conduction velocities at cross-elbow segments of the ulnar nerves and with sensory nerve conduction velocities of the distal ulnar nerves. An increased carrying angle of the elbow appears to be an independent risk factor of nontrauma-related ulnar neuropathy. Level of Evidence: Level III, diagnostic study. See the Guidelines for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:18506557

  18. Fuzzy adaptive strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter for initial alignment of large misalignment angles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Song, Ningfang; Yang, Gongliu; Jiang, Rui

    2016-07-01

    In the initial alignment process of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS), large misalignment angles always bring nonlinear problem, which can usually be processed using the scaled unscented Kalman filter (SUKF). In this paper, the problem of large misalignment angles in SINS alignment is further investigated, and the strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter (STSUKF) is proposed with fixed parameters to improve convergence speed, while these parameters are artificially constructed and uncertain in real application. To further improve the alignment stability and reduce the parameters selection, this paper proposes a fuzzy adaptive strategy combined with STSUKF (FUZZY-STSUKF). As a result, initial alignment scheme of large misalignment angles based on FUZZY-STSUKF is designed and verified by simulations and turntable experiment. The results show that the scheme improves the accuracy and convergence speed of SINS initial alignment compared with those based on SUKF and STSUKF. PMID:27475606

  19. Fuzzy adaptive strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter for initial alignment of large misalignment angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Song, Ningfang; Yang, Gongliu; Jiang, Rui

    2016-07-01

    In the initial alignment process of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS), large misalignment angles always bring nonlinear problem, which can usually be processed using the scaled unscented Kalman filter (SUKF). In this paper, the problem of large misalignment angles in SINS alignment is further investigated, and the strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter (STSUKF) is proposed with fixed parameters to improve convergence speed, while these parameters are artificially constructed and uncertain in real application. To further improve the alignment stability and reduce the parameters selection, this paper proposes a fuzzy adaptive strategy combined with STSUKF (FUZZY-STSUKF). As a result, initial alignment scheme of large misalignment angles based on FUZZY-STSUKF is designed and verified by simulations and turntable experiment. The results show that the scheme improves the accuracy and convergence speed of SINS initial alignment compared with those based on SUKF and STSUKF.

  20. A numerical analysis of a stationary gas tungsten welding arc considering various electrode angles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.; Na, S.J.

    1996-09-01

    The influences of parameters such as electrode angle, welding current and arc length on the gas tungsten arc welding process using Ar shielding gas were studied assuming the current density distribution along the cathode surface. Its distribution was assumed to have a Gaussian form, which is characterized by the maximum current density at the electrode tip or the distribution parameter. For determining these two values according to the electrode angle and welding current, the temperature distributions of a 60-deg angle electrode were calculated for 100, 200 and 300 A welding currents and compared with the experimental measurements obtained by previous research. Using these assumed current density distributions as the boundary condition for the current continuity equation, the heat flux and current density on the base plate were calculated for various influencing parameters and compared with the experimental results obtained under the same welding conditions. Furthermore, other transporting phenomena acting on the anode plate, such as arc pressure and shear stress, were calculated.

  1. Fuzzy adaptive strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter for initial alignment of large misalignment angles.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Song, Ningfang; Yang, Gongliu; Jiang, Rui

    2016-07-01

    In the initial alignment process of strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS), large misalignment angles always bring nonlinear problem, which can usually be processed using the scaled unscented Kalman filter (SUKF). In this paper, the problem of large misalignment angles in SINS alignment is further investigated, and the strong tracking scaled unscented Kalman filter (STSUKF) is proposed with fixed parameters to improve convergence speed, while these parameters are artificially constructed and uncertain in real application. To further improve the alignment stability and reduce the parameters selection, this paper proposes a fuzzy adaptive strategy combined with STSUKF (FUZZY-STSUKF). As a result, initial alignment scheme of large misalignment angles based on FUZZY-STSUKF is designed and verified by simulations and turntable experiment. The results show that the scheme improves the accuracy and convergence speed of SINS initial alignment compared with those based on SUKF and STSUKF.

  2. Winding angles of long lattice walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2016-07-01

    We study the winding angles of random and self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on square and cubic lattices with number of steps N ranging up to 107. We show that the mean square winding angle <θ2> of random walks converges to the theoretical form when N → ∞. For self-avoiding walks on the square lattice, we show that the ratio <θ4>/<θ2>2 converges slowly to the Gaussian value 3. For self-avoiding walks on the cubic lattice, we find that the ratio <θ4>/<θ2>2 exhibits non-monotonic dependence on N and reaches a maximum of 3.73(1) for N ≈ 104. We show that to a good approximation, the square winding angle of a self-avoiding walk on the cubic lattice can be obtained from the summation of the square change in the winding angles of lnN independent segments of the walk, where the ith segment contains 2i steps. We find that the square winding angle of the ith segment increases approximately as i0.5, which leads to an increase of the total square winding angle proportional to (lnN)1.5.

  3. Neutron spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME)

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Fritzsche, H.; Gierlings, M.; Major, J.; Jason, A.

    2005-05-15

    We describe experiments in which the neutron spin echo technique is used to measure neutron scattering angles. We have implemented the technique, dubbed spin echo scattering angle measurement (SESAME), using thin films of Permalloy electrodeposited on silicon wafers as sources of the magnetic fields within which neutron spins precess. With 30-{mu}m-thick films we resolve neutron scattering angles to about 0.02 deg. with neutrons of 4.66 A wavelength. This allows us to probe correlation lengths up to 200 nm in an application to small angle neutron scattering. We also demonstrate that SESAME can be used to separate specular and diffuse neutron reflection from surfaces at grazing incidence. In both of these cases, SESAME can make measurements at higher neutron intensity than is available with conventional methods because the angular resolution achieved is independent of the divergence of the neutron beam. Finally, we discuss the conditions under which SESAME might be used to probe in-plane structure in thin films and show that the method has advantages for incident neutron angles close to the critical angle because multiple scattering is automatically accounted for.

  4. Winding angles of long lattice walks.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Yosi; Kantor, Yacov

    2016-07-01

    We study the winding angles of random and self-avoiding walks (SAWs) on square and cubic lattices with number of steps N ranging up to 10(7). We show that the mean square winding angle 〈θ(2)〉 of random walks converges to the theoretical form when N → ∞. For self-avoiding walks on the square lattice, we show that the ratio 〈θ(4)〉/〈θ(2)〉(2) converges slowly to the Gaussian value 3. For self-avoiding walks on the cubic lattice, we find that the ratio 〈θ(4)〉/〈θ(2)〉(2) exhibits non-monotonic dependence on N and reaches a maximum of 3.73(1) for N ≈ 10(4). We show that to a good approximation, the square winding angle of a self-avoiding walk on the cubic lattice can be obtained from the summation of the square change in the winding angles of lnN independent segments of the walk, where the ith segment contains 2(i) steps. We find that the square winding angle of the ith segment increases approximately as i(0.5), which leads to an increase of the total square winding angle proportional to (lnN)(1.5). PMID:27394124

  5. Design and manufacture of angle modulated surface plasmon resonance spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinlei; Chen, Ke; Mao, Xuefeng; Yu, Qingxu; Peng, Wei

    2015-08-01

    As an emerging biosensing technology, Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) technique, characterized by high sensitivity, label-free detection and real-time monitoring, has been extensively applied in biochemical analysis, environmental monitoring and refractive index measurement. In this paper, an angle modulated SPR spectrometer with high resolution is designed and manufactured. First, according to the modeling and simulation for the SPR spectrometer, several key parameters such as the light source, the thickness of golden film and Cr film are determined. Then, an angle modulated SPR spectrometer system based on 5-layers Kretchmann prism structure is developed for biochemical analysis. System performance is tested after the SPR spectrometer established. We test the power stability of the laser first, which is up to 1.504% (5min). Different concentrations of glycerol are measured to demarcate the system. Then, we measured the deionized water ten times continuously, and a resolution of 1.5×10-5 RIU is achieved. At last, different concentrations of glucose solution are measured, and the resonance angles are used to calculate the refractive index of the glucose solutions, which is more accurate than the result of Abbe refractometer. The relationship between concentration and refractive index is presented by liner fitting.

  6. Applications of Trajectory Solid Angle for Probabilistic Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Po Kee; Wong, Adam E.; Wong, Anita

    2002-07-01

    In 1974, a well-known research problem in Statistical Mechanics entitled 'To determine and define the probability function P.sub.2 of a particle hitting a predetermined area, given all its parameters of generation and ejection' was openly solicited for its solution from research and development organizations in U.S.A. One of many proposed solutions of the problem, initiated at that time, is by means of the Trajectory Solid Angle (TSA). TSA is defined as the integral of the dot product of the unit tangent of the particle's trajectory to the vector area divided by the square of the position vector connecting between the point of ejection and that of the surface to be hit. The invention provides: (1) The precise and the unique solution of a previously unsolved P.sub.2 problem: (2) Impacts to the governmental NRC safety standards and DOD weapon systems and many activities in the Department of Energy; (3) Impacts to update the contents of text books of physics and mathematics of all levels; (4) Impacts to the scientific instruments with applications in high technologies. The importance of Trajectory Solid Angle can be quoted from a letter by the late Institute Professor P. M. Morse of MIT who reviewed the DOE proposal P7900450 (reference No. 7) in 1979 and addressed to the inventor. 'If the Trajectory Solid Angle is correct it will provide a revolutionary concept in physics'. (authors)

  7. Surgical treatment of the nasolabial angle in balanced rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Honrado, Carlo P; Pearlman, Steven J

    2003-01-01

    Nasal analysis and surgical planning are crucial for a successful, aesthetically pleasing rhinoplasty. One of the key parameters for evaluation is the nasolabial angle. The nasal spine, caudal septum, and medial crura of the lower lateral cartilages provide the framework for this area. Alteration of these structures, as well as nasal tip rotation and projection, may affect the resultant nasolabial angle, length of the upper lip, and overall harmony of the nose. Fullness at the nasolabial junction caused by a pushing philtrum may also result in an unbalanced appearance. The literature is replete with methods for categorizing the nasal tip and with recommendations for surgical treatment. Treatment of the caudal septum and nasal spine is often an afterthought that is left up to the aesthetic judgment of the surgeon. To make this a more systematic decision, in 1990 we devised a classification for analysis and treatment of this area. This study included the length of the nose, the nasolabial angle, and the presence of a pushing philtrum, with suggested treatment to allow proper tip placement and to provide aesthetic balance to the nose. The only modification was in the order of presentation of nasal types. Since that publication, the senior author has consistently followed these guidelines and has found them to be a reliable tool in creating a harmonious result in rhinoplasty. PMID:12873873

  8. Multi-aspect angle classification of human radar signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabacak, C.; Gürbüz, S. Z.; Guldogan, M. B.; Gürbüz, A. C.

    2013-05-01

    The human micro-Doppler signature is a unique signature caused by the time-varying motion of each point on the human body, which can be used to discriminate humans from other targets exhibiting micro-Doppler, such as vehicles, tanks, helicopters, and even other animals. Classification of targets based on micro-Doppler generally involves joint timefrequency analysis of the radar return coupled with extraction of features that may be used to identify the target. Although many techniques have been investigated, including artificial neural networks and support vector machines, almost all suffer a drastic drop in classification performance as the aspect angle of human motion relative to the radar increases. This paper focuses on the use of radar networks to obtain multi-aspect angle data and thereby ameliorate the dependence of classification performance on aspect angle. Knowledge of human walking kinematics is exploited to generate a fuse spectrogram that incorporates estimates of model parameters obtained from each radar in the network. It is shown that the fused spectrogram better approximates the truly underlying motion of the target observed as compared with spectrograms generated from individual nodes.

  9. Measurements of the CKM Angle beta

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoldus, Rainer; /SLAC

    2005-12-14

    In this article I report on new and updated measurements of the CP-violating parameter {beta}({phi}{sub 1}), which is related to the phase of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) quark-mixing matrix of the electroweak interaction. Over the past few years, {beta} has become the most precisely known parameter of the CKM unitarity triangle that governs the B system. The results presented here were produced by the two B Factories, BABAR and Belle, based on their most recent datasets of over 600 million B{bar B} events combined. The new world average for sin2{beta}, measured in the theoretically and experimentally cleanest charmonium modes, such as B{sup 0} {yields} J/{Psi}K{sub S}{sup 0}, is sin 2{beta} = 0.685 {+-} 0.032. In addition to these tree-level dominated decays, independent measurements of sin2{beta} are obtained from gluonic b {yields} s penguin decays, including B{sup 0} {yields} {phi}K{sub S}{sup 0}, B{sup 0} {yields} {eta}'K{sub S}{sup 0} and others. There are hints, albeit somewhat weaker than earlier this year, that these measurements tend to come out low compared to the charmonium average, giving rise to the tantalizing possibility that New Physics amplitudes could be contributing to the corresponding loop diagrams. Clearly, more data from both experiments are needed to elucidate these intriguing differences.

  10. Serous retinal detachment after trabeculectomy in angle recession glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Avik Kumar; Padhy, Debananda

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with 360 degree angle recession after blunt trauma in his right eye developed uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP) despite four antiglaucoma medications (AGM) with advancing disc damage. He underwent trabeculectomy with intraoperative mitomycin-c (MMC) application. There was an intraoperative vitreous prolapse which was managed accordingly. On post-surgery day 1, he had shallow choroidal detachment superiorly with non-recordable IOP. This was deteriorated 1 week postoperatively as choroidal detachment proceeded to serous retinal detachment. He was started with systemic steroid in addition to topical route. The serous effusions subsided within 2 weeks time. At the last follow up at 3 months, he was enjoying good visual acuity, deep anterior chamber, diffuse bleb, an IOP in low teens off any AGM and attached retina. This case highlights the rare occurrence of serous retinal detachment after surgical management of angle recession glaucoma. PMID:27625959

  11. Serous retinal detachment after trabeculectomy in angle recession glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Avik Kumar; Padhy, Debananda

    2015-01-01

    An 18-year-old male with 360 degree angle recession after blunt trauma in his right eye developed uncontrolled intraocular pressure (IOP) despite four antiglaucoma medications (AGM) with advancing disc damage. He underwent trabeculectomy with intraoperative mitomycin-c (MMC) application. There was an intraoperative vitreous prolapse which was managed accordingly. On post-surgery day 1, he had shallow choroidal detachment superiorly with non-recordable IOP. This was deteriorated 1 week postoperatively as choroidal detachment proceeded to serous retinal detachment. He was started with systemic steroid in addition to topical route. The serous effusions subsided within 2 weeks time. At the last follow up at 3 months, he was enjoying good visual acuity, deep anterior chamber, diffuse bleb, an IOP in low teens off any AGM and attached retina. This case highlights the rare occurrence of serous retinal detachment after surgical management of angle recession glaucoma.

  12. Forebody tangential blowing for control at high angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kroo, I.; Rock, S.; Roberts, L.

    1991-01-01

    A feasibility study to determine if the use of tangential leading edge blowing over the forebody could produce effective and practical control of the F-18 HARV aircraft at high angles of attack was conducted. A simplified model of the F-18 configuration using a vortex-lattice model was developed to obtain a better understanding of basic aerodynamic coupling effects and the influence of forebody circulation on lifting surface behavior. The effect of tangential blowing was estimated using existing wind tunnel data on normal forebody blowing and analytical studies of tangential blowing over conical forebodies. Incorporation of forebody blowing into the flight control system was investigated by adding this additional yaw control and sideforce generating actuator into the existing F-18 HARV simulation model. A control law was synthesized using LQG design methods that would schedule blowing rates as a function of vehicle sideslip, angle of attack, and roll and yaw rates.

  13. Effect of Process Parameters on Dynamic Mechanical Performance of FDM PC/ABS Printed Parts Through Design of Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Omar Ahmed; Masood, Syed Hasan; Bhowmik, Jahar Lal; Nikzad, Mostafa; Azadmanjiri, Jalal

    2016-07-01

    In fused deposition modeling (FDM) additive manufacturing process, it is often difficult to determine the actual levels of process parameters in order to achieve the best dynamic mechanical properties of FDM manufactured part. This is mainly due to the large number of FDM parameters and a high degree of interaction between the parameters affecting such properties. This requires a large number of experiments to be determined. This paper presents a study on the influence of six FDM process parameters (layer thickness, air gap, raster angle, build orientation, road width, and number of contours) on the dynamic mechanical properties of the FDM manufactured parts using the fraction factorial design. The most influential parameters were statistically obtained through the analysis of variance (ANOVA) technique, and the results indicate that the layer thickness, the air gap, and the number of contours have the largest impact on dynamic mechanical properties. The optimal parameters for maximum dynamic mechanical properties were found to be layer thickness of 0.3302 mm, air gap of 0.00 mm, raster angle of 0.0°, build orientation of 0.0°, road width of 0.4572 mm, and 10 contours. Finally, a confirmation experiment was performed using optimized levels of process parameters, which showed good fit with the estimated values.

  14. Solar cell angle of incidence corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, Dale R.; Mueller, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    Literature on solar array angle of incidence corrections was found to be sparse and contained no tabular data for support. This lack along with recent data on 27 GaAs/Ge 4 cm by 4 cm cells initiated the analysis presented in this paper. The literature cites seven possible contributors to angle of incidence effects: cosine, optical front surface, edge, shadowing, UV degradation, particulate soiling, and background color. Only the first three are covered in this paper due to lack of sufficient data. The cosine correction is commonly used but is not sufficient when the incident angle is large. Fresnel reflection calculations require knowledge of the index of refraction of the coverglass front surface. The absolute index of refraction for the coverglass front surface was not known nor was it measured due to lack of funds. However, a value for the index of refraction was obtained by examining how the prediction errors varied with different assumed indices and selecting the best fit to the set of measured values. Corrections using front surface Fresnel reflection along with the cosine correction give very good predictive results when compared to measured data, except there is a definite trend away from predicted values at the larger incident angles. This trend could be related to edge effects and is illustrated by a use of a box plot of the errors and by plotting the deviation of the mean against incidence angle. The trend is for larger deviations at larger incidence angles and there may be a fourth order effect involved in the trend. A chi-squared test was used to determine if the measurement errors were normally distributed. At 10 degrees the chi-squared test failed, probably due to the very small numbers involved or a bias from the measurement procedure. All other angles showed a good fit to the normal distribution with increasing goodness-of-fit as the angles increased which reinforces the very small numbers hypothesis. The contributed data only went to 65 degrees

  15. Longitudinal Changes of Angle Configuration in Primary Angle-Closure Suspects

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuzhen; Chang, Dolly S.; Zhu, Haogang; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Aung, Tin; Huang, Shengsong; Chen, Qianyun; Munoz, Beatriz; Grossi, Carlota M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine longitudinal changes in angle configuration in the eyes of primary angle-closure suspects (PACS) treated by laser peripheral iridotomy (LPI) and in untreated fellow eyes. Design Longitudinal cohort study. Participants Primary angle-closure suspects aged 50 to 70 years were enrolled in a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Methods Each participant was treated by LPI in 1 randomly selected eye, with the fellow eye serving as a control. Angle width was assessed in a masked fashion using gonioscopy and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT) before and at 2 weeks, 6 months, and 18 months after LPI. Main Outcome Measures Angle width in degrees was calculated from Shaffer grades assessed under static gonioscopy. Angle configuration was also evaluated using angle opening distance (AOD250, AOD500, AOD750), trabecular-iris space area (TISA500, TISA750), and angle recess area (ARA) measured in AS-OCT images. Results No significant difference was found in baseline measures of angle configuration between treated and untreated eyes. At 2 weeks after LPI, the drainage angle on gonioscopy widened from a mean of 13.5° at baseline to a mean of 25.7° in treated eyes, which was also confirmed by significant increases in all AS-OCT angle width measures (P<0.001 for all variables). Between 2 weeks and 18 months after LPI, a significant decrease in angle width was observed over time in treated eyes (P<0.001 for all variables), although the change over the first 5.5 months was not statistically significant for angle width measured under gonioscopy (P = 0.18), AOD250 (P = 0.167) and ARA (P = 0.83). In untreated eyes, angle width consistently decreased across all follow-up visits after LPI, with a more rapid longitudinal decrease compared with treated eyes (P values for all variables ≤0.003). The annual rate of change in angle width was equivalent to 1.2°/year (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.8–1.6) in treated eyes and 1.6°/year (95% CI, 1

  16. Radiation-driven winds of hot stars. VI - Analytical solutions for wind models including the finite cone angle effect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kudritzki, R. P.; Pauldrach, A.; Puls, J.; Abbott, D. C.

    1989-01-01

    Analytical solutions for radiation-driven winds of hot stars including the important finite cone angle effect (see Pauldrach et al., 1986; Friend and Abbott, 1986) are derived which approximate the detailed numerical solutions of the exact wind equation of motion very well. They allow a detailed discussion of the finite cone angle effect and provide for given line force parameters k, alpha, delta definite formulas for mass-loss rate M and terminal velocity v-alpha as function of stellar parameters.

  17. Simulation of uphill/downhill running on a level treadmill using additional horizontal force.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Philippe; Arnal, Pierrick J; Samozino, Pierre; Millet, Guillaume Y; Morin, Jean-Benoit

    2014-07-18

    Tilting treadmills allow a convenient study of biomechanics during uphill/downhill running, but they are not commonly available and there is even fewer tilting force-measuring treadmill. The aim of the present study was to compare uphill/downhill running on a treadmill (inclination of ± 8%) with running on a level treadmill using additional backward or forward pulling forces to simulate the effect of gravity. This comparison specifically focused on the energy cost of running, stride frequency (SF), electromyographic activity (EMG), leg and foot angles at foot strike, and ground impact shock. The main results are that SF, impact shock, and leg and foot angle parameters determined were very similar and significantly correlated between the two methods, the intercept and slope of the linear regression not differing significantly from zero and unity, respectively. The correlation of oxygen uptake (V̇O2) data between both methods was not significant during uphill running (r=0.42; P>0.05). V̇O2 data were correlated during downhill running (r=0.74; P<0.01) but there was a significant difference between the methods (bias=-2.51 ± 1.94 ml min(-1) kg(-1)). Linear regressions for EMG of vastus lateralis, biceps femoris, gastrocnemius lateralis, soleus and tibialis anterior were not different from the identity line but the systematic bias was elevated for this parameter. In conclusion, this method seems appropriate for the study of SF, leg and foot angle, impact shock parameters but is less applicable for physiological variables (EMG and energy cost) during uphill/downhill running when using a tilting force-measuring treadmill is not possible.

  18. Measurements of the cross-phase angle between density and electron temperature fluctuations and comparison with gyrokinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    White, A. E.; Peebles, W. A.; Rhodes, T. L.; Schmitz, L.; Carter, T. A.; Hillesheim, J. C.; Doyle, E. J.; Zeng, L.; Holland, C. H.; Wang, G.; McKee, G. R.; Staebler, G. M.; Waltz, R. E.; DeBoo, J. C.; Petty, C. C.; Burrell, K. H.

    2010-05-15

    This paper presents new measurements of the cross-phase angle, alpha{sub n{sub eT{sub e}}}, between long-wavelength (k{sub t}hetarho{sub s}<0.5) density, n-tilde{sub e}, and electron temperature, T-tilde{sub e}, fluctuations in the core of DIII-D [J. L. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] tokamak plasmas. The coherency and cross-phase angle between n-tilde{sub e} and T-tilde{sub e} are measured using coupled reflectometer and correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostics that view the same plasma volume. In addition to the experimental results, two sets of local, nonlinear gyrokinetic turbulence simulations that are performed with the GYRO code [J. Candy and R. E. Waltz, J. Comput. Phys. 186, 545 (2003)] are described. One set, called the pre-experiment simulations, was performed prior to the experiment in order to predict a change in alpha{sub n{sub eT{sub e}}} given experimentally realizable increases in the electron temperature, T{sub e}. In the experiment the cross-phase angle was measured at three radial locations (rho=0.55, 0.65, and 0.75) in both a 'Base' case and a 'High T{sub e}' case. The measured cross-phase angle is in good qualitative agreement with the pre-experiment simulations, which predicted that n-tilde{sub e} and T-tilde{sub e} would be out of phase. The pre-experiment simulations also predicted a decrease in cross-phase angle as T{sub e} is increased. Experimentally, this trend is observed at the inner two radial locations only. The second set of simulations, the postexperiment simulations, is carried out using local parameters taken from measured experimental profiles as input to GYRO. These postexperiment simulation results are in good quantitative agreement with the measured cross-phase angle, despite disagreements with transport fluxes. Directions for future modeling and experimental work are discussed.

  19. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible.

  20. Influence of spatial and temporal coherences on atomic resolution high angle annular dark field imaging.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Andreas; Belz, Jürgen; Knaub, Nikolai; Jandieri, Kakhaber; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-10-01

    Aberration-corrected (scanning) transmission electron microscopy ((S)TEM) has become a widely used technique when information on the chemical composition is sought on an atomic scale. To extract the desired information, complementary simulations of the scattering process are inevitable. Often the partial spatial and temporal coherences are neglected in the simulations, although they can have a huge influence on the high resolution images. With the example of binary gallium phosphide (GaP) we elucidate the influence of the source size and shape as well as the chromatic aberration on the high angle annular dark field (HAADF) intensity. We achieve a very good quantitative agreement between the frozen phonon simulation and experiment for different sample thicknesses when a Lorentzian source distribution is assumed and the effect of the chromatic aberration is considered. Additionally the influence of amorphous layers introduced by the preparation of the TEM samples is discussed. Taking into account these parameters, the intensity in the whole unit cell of GaP, i.e. at the positions of the different atomic columns and in the region between them, is described correctly. With the knowledge of the decisive parameters, the determination of the chemical composition of more complex, multinary materials becomes feasible. PMID:27391526

  1. Microstructure of 3D-Printed Polymer Composites Investigated by Small-Angle Neutron Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Tae Hui; Compton, Brett G.; Heller, William T.; Urban, Voker S.; Duty, Chad E.; Do, Changwoo

    Polymer composites printed from the large scale printer at Manufacturing Demonstration Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been investigated by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). For the Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene (ABS)/Carbon Fiber (CF) composites, the microstructure of polymer domains and the alignment of CF have been characterized across the layer from the printed piece. CF shows strong anisotropic alignment along the printing direction due to the flow of polymer melt at the nozzle. Order parameter of the anisotropy which ranges from -0.11 to -0.06 exhibits strong correlation with the position within the layer: stronger alignment near the layer interface. It is also confirmed that the existence of CF reduces the polymer domain correlation length significantly and reinforces the mechanical strength of the polymer composites. For the Epoxy/nano-clay platelet composites, the effect of processing condition, nozzle size, and the addition of the another filler, Silicon Carbide (SC), have been investigated by SANS. Nano-clay platelet shows strong anisotropic alignment along the printing direction as well. Order parameter of the anisotropy varies according to nozzle size and presence of the SC, and difference disappears at high Q region. Scientific User Facilities Division and Materials Sciences and Energy Division, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  2. Mechanical properties of potato starch modified by moisture content and addition of lubricant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasiak, Mateusz; Molenda, Marek; Horabik, Józef; Mueller, Peter; Opaliński, Ireneusz

    2014-10-01

    Laboratory testing was conducted to deliver a set of characteristics of structure and mechanical properties of pure starch and starch with an addition of a lubricant - magnesium stearate. Considerable influence of moisture content of potato starch was found in the case of density, parameters of internal friction, coefficients of wall friction and flowability. Elasticity was found to be strongly influenced by water content of the material. Addition of magnesium stearate affected density and parameters of flowability, internal friction and elasticity. Bulk density increased from 604 to 774 kg m-3 with decrease in moisture content of potato starch from 17 to for 6%. Addition of magnesium stearate resulted in approximately 10% decrease in bulk density. Angle of internal friction obtained for 10 kPa of consolidation stress decreased from 33 to 24º with increase in moisture content, and to approximately 22º with addition of the lubricant. With an increase of moisture content from 6 to 18% and with addition of the lubricant, the modulus of elasticity during loading decreased from approximately 1.0 to 0.1 MPa. Modulus of elasticity during unloading was found in the range from 19 to 42 MPa and increased with increase of moisture content and amount of lubricant.

  3. The Effect of Taper Angle and Spline Geometry on the Initial Stability of Tapered, Splined Modular Titanium Stems.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Jeffery L; Small, Scott R; Rodriguez, Jose A; Kang, Michael N; Glassman, Andrew H

    2015-07-01

    Design parameters affecting initial mechanical stability of tapered, splined modular titanium stems (TSMTSs) are not well understood. Furthermore, there is considerable variability in contemporary designs. We asked if spline geometry and stem taper angle could be optimized in TSMTS to improve mechanical stability to resist axial subsidence and increase torsional stability. Initial stability was quantified with stems of varied taper angle and spline geometry implanted in a foam model replicating 2cm diaphyseal engagement. Increased taper angle and a broad spline geometry exhibited significantly greater axial stability (+21%-269%) than other design combinations. Neither taper angle nor spline geometry significantly altered initial torsional stability. PMID:25754255

  4. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fletcher, James C. (Inventor); Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  5. Polyimide processing additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pratt, J. Richard (Inventor); St.clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor); Burks, Harold D. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process for preparing polyimides having enhanced melt flow properties is described. The process consists of heating a mixture of a high molecular weight poly-(amic acid) or polyimide with a low molecular weight amic acid or imide additive in the range of 0.05 to 15 percent by weight of the additive. The polyimide powders so obtained show improved processability, as evidenced by lower melt viscosity by capillary rheometry. Likewise, films prepared from mixtures of polymers with additives show improved processability with earlier onset of stretching by TMA.

  6. Association of Ocular Conditions with Narrow Angles in Different Ethnicities

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Roland Y.; Chon, Brian H.; Lin, Shuai-Chun; He, Mingguang; Lin, Shan C.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To quantify the predictive strength of anterior chamber area (ACA), anterior chamber volume (ACV), anterior chamber width (ACW), lens vault (LV), iris thickness (IT), and iris area (IArea) for two angle width parameters, trabecular-iris space area (TISA750) and angle opening distance (AOD750) at 750 μm from the scleral spur, in different ethnicities. Design Prospective, cross-sectional study. Methods Anterior segment optical coherence tomography images for 166 white, 90 African, 75 Hispanic, and 132 Chinese subjects were analyzed. First, ACA, ACV, ACW, LV, IT, and IArea were compared among ethnic groups. Second, associations of TISA750 and AOD750 with ACA, ACV, ACW, LV, IT and IArea were investigated within each ethnic group using multivariable linear regression models, standardized regression coefficients (β), and coefficients of determination (R2). Results Significant ethnic differences were observed in ACA, ACV, ACW, LV, IT, and IArea (all P<0.05). ACA, ACV, and LV were significant predictors of TISA750 and AOD750 in all ethnic groups (all P<0.001). ACW and IT were significant predictors of AOD750 in whites and Africans (all P<0.05). ACW and IT were significant predictors of TISA750 in whites (all P<0.05). IArea was a significant predictor of AOD750 in Chinese (P<0.05). ACA, ACV, and LV had the highest predictive strength for both TISA750 and AOD750 in all ethnic groups based on β and R2. Conclusions Despite ethnic differences in ACA, ACV, ACW, LV, IT, and IArea, the same three anterior segment parameters (ACA, ACV, and LV) were the strongest predictors of angle width (TISA750 and AOD750) in all four ethnic groups. PMID:26093287

  7. Patellar Tendon–Trochlear Groove Angle Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Hinckel, Betina B.; Gobbi, Riccardo G.; Kihara Filho, Eduardo N.; Demange, Marco K.; Pécora, José Ricardo; Camanho, Gilberto Luis

    2015-01-01

    Background: The tibial tubercle–trochlear groove (TT-TG) is used as the gold standard for patellofemoral malalignment. Purpose: To assess 3 patellar tendon–trochlear groove (PT-TG) angle measurement techniques and the PT-TG distance measurement (tendinous cartilaginous TT-TG) as predictors of patellar instability. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 3. Methods: Three PT-TG angle measurements and the PT-TG distance were measured in 82 participants with patellar instability and 100 controls using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Measurement landmarks were the line tangent to the posterior femoral condyles, the deepest point of the trochlea, the transepicondylar line, and the patellar tendon center. All measurements were recorded once by 1 examiner, and the measurements were recorded twice by 2 examiners in a random group of 100 knees. Mean values and standard deviations (SDs) were obtained. Normality cutoff values were defined as 2 and 3 SDs above the mean in the control group. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive likelihood ratio (LR+) were calculated. Inter- and intrarater reliability were assessed based on the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Results: The measurements from the patellar instability and control groups, respectively, for angle 1 (16.4° and 8.4°), angle 2 (31° and 15.6°), angle 3 (30.8° and 15.7°), PT-TG distance (14.5 and 8.4 mm), and patellar tilt (21.1° and 7.5°) were significantly different (P < .05). The angle measurements showed greater sensitivity, specificity, and LR+ than the PT-TG distance. Inter- and intrarater ICC values were >0.95 for all measurements. Conclusion: The PT-TG angle and the PT-TG distance are reliable and are different between the patellar instability and control groups. PT-TG angles are more closely associated with patellar instability than PT-TG distance. Clinical Relevance: PT-TG angle measurements show high reliability and association with patellar instability and can

  8. A Viewpoint on the Quantity "Plane Angle"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Properties of the quantity "plane angle" are explored under the hypothesis that it is a dimensional quantity. The exploration proceeds especially with respect to the physical concept, its mathematical treatment, vector concepts, measurement theory, units of related quantities, engineering pragmatism, and SI. An attempt is made to bring these different relations into a rational, logical and consistent framework, and thus to justify the hypothesis. Various types of vectorial quantities are recognized, and their properties described with an outline of the necessary algebraic manipulations. The concept of plane angle is amplified, and its interdependence with the circular arc is explored. The resulting units of plane angle form a class of similar scales of measurement. Consequences of the confirmed hypothesis are developed for mathematical expressions involving trigonometric functions, rotational volumes and areas, mathematical limits, differentiation and series expansion. Consequences for mechanical rotational quantities are developed, with proposals for revisions to a number of expressions for derived units within SI. A revised definition for the quantity "plane angle" is stated to take account of the developed insights. There is a clear need to reconsider the status of plane angle and some other quantities within the international framework of SI.

  9. Additional Types of Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... A A Listen En Español Additional Types of Neuropathy Charcot's Joint Charcot's Joint, also called neuropathic arthropathy, ... can stop bone destruction and aid healing. Cranial Neuropathy Cranial neuropathy affects the 12 pairs of nerves ...

  10. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  11. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  12. High-speed angle-resolved imaging of a single gold nanorod with microsecond temporal resolution and one-degree angle precision.

    PubMed

    Enoki, Sawako; Iino, Ryota; Niitani, Yamato; Minagawa, Yoshihiro; Tomishige, Michio; Noji, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-17

    We developed two types of high-speed angle-resolved imaging methods for single gold nanorods (SAuNRs) using objective-type vertical illumination dark-field microscopy and a high-speed CMOS camera to achieve microsecond temporal and one-degree angle resolution. These methods are based on: (i) an intensity analysis of focused images of SAuNR split into two orthogonally polarized components and (ii) the analysis of defocused SAuNR images. We determined the angle precision (statistical error) and accuracy (systematic error) of the resultant SAuNR (80 nm × 40 nm) images projected onto a substrate surface (azimuthal angle) in both methods. Although both methods showed a similar precision of ∼1° for the azimuthal angle at a 10 μs temporal resolution, the defocused image analysis showed a superior angle accuracy of ∼5°. In addition, the polar angle was also determined from the defocused SAuNR images with a precision of ∼1°, by fitting with simulated images. By taking advantage of the defocused image method's full revolution measurement range in the azimuthal angle, the rotation of the rotary molecular motor, F1-ATPase, was measured with 3.3 μs temporal resolution. The time constants of the pauses waiting for the elementary steps of the ATP hydrolysis reaction and the torque generated in the mechanical steps have been successfully estimated. The high-speed angle-resolved SAuNR imaging methods will be applicable to the monitoring of the fast conformational changes of many biological molecular machines.

  13. Complementary interference method for determining optical parameters of liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowiorski, K.; Kędzierski, J.; Raszewski, Z.; Kojdecki, M. A.; Chojnowska, O.; Garbat, K.; Miszczyk, E.; Piecek, W.

    2016-04-01

    Wedge cells of small apex angle, filled with liquid crystals, were used to determining optical characteristics as functions of temperature for three liquid crystalline mixtures recently produced and a reference nematic. The interference fringes appearing in polarised monochromatic light (of sodium yellow line) normally incident on the cell were exploited to measure the ordinary and extraordinary refractive indices in the reflection mode and birefringence in the transmission mode. The measurements were repeated using Abbe's refractometer for 6CHBT as the reference to verifying the precision. Additionally the order parameter was computed from birefringence as a function of temperature. The results confirm the usefulness of the method and provide the properties of two nematic liquid crystals of small and large birefringence and one smectic liquid crystal of medium birefringence, recently produced. The experimental systems served also to investigating phase transition between the liquid crystals and the isotropic liquid at near-clearing temperature.

  14. Vector Doppler Method Based on an Automatic Transverse Angle Tracking Procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dallai, A.; Boni, E.; Francalanci, L.; Tortoli, P.

    Traditional Doppler methods only measure the axial component of the velocity vector. The lack of information on the beam-to-flow (Doppler) angle creates an ambiguity which can lead to large errors in velocity magnitude estimates. An original approach was recently introduced, in which two ultrasound beams with known relative orientation are directed towards the same vessel, one being committed to perform a Doppler measurement, while the second beam has the specific task of detecting the beam-to-flow angle. In this paper, an angle-tracking procedure allowing the Doppler angle to be automatically determined with high accuracy is presented. The procedure is based on the real-time estimation of suitable Doppler spectrum parameters obtained from an M-line associated to a sub-aperture of a linear array probe. Such parameters are used to steer the M-line towards a direction corresponding to a desired beam-flow angle. Knowledge of this angle is finally exploited to obtain the velocity magnitude through the classic Doppler equation related to the second beam. The implementation of the method on a new ultrasound machine and its validation through in vitro and in vivo tests are reported.

  15. High angle of attack flying qualities criteria for longitudinal rate command systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, David J.; Citurs, Kevin D.; Davidson, John B.

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate flying qualities requirements of alternate pitch command systems for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack. Flying qualities design guidelines have already been developed for angle of attack command systems at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack, so this research fills a similar need for rate command systems. Flying qualities tasks that require post-stall maneuvering were tested during piloted simulations in the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace Manned Air Combat Simulation facility. A generic fighter aircraft model was used to test angle of attack rate and pitch rate command systems for longitudinal gross acquisition and tracking tasks at high angle of attack. A wide range of longitudinal dynamic variations were tested at 30, 45, and 60 degrees angle of attack. Pilot comments, Cooper-Harper ratings, and pilot induced oscillation ratings were taken from five pilots from NASA, USN, CAF, and McDonnell Douglas Aerospace. This data was used to form longitudinal design guidelines for rate command systems at high angle of attack. These criteria provide control law design guidance for fighter aircraft at high angle of attack, low speed flight conditions. Additional time history analyses were conducted using the longitudinal gross acquisition data to look at potential agility measures of merit and correlate agility usage to flying qualities boundaries. This paper presents an overview of this research.

  16. Misorientation-angle-dependent electrical transport across molybdenum disulfide grain boundaries

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Perello, David J.; Zhao, Jiong; Deng, Qingming; Kim, Hyun; Han, Gang Hee; Chae, Sang Hoon; Jeong, Hye Yun; Lee, Young Hee

    2016-01-01

    Grain boundaries in monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides have unique atomic defect structures and band dispersion relations that depend on the inter-domain misorientation angle. Here, we explore misorientation angle-dependent electrical transport at grain boundaries in monolayer MoS2 by correlating the atomic defect structures of measured devices analysed with transmission electron microscopy and first-principles calculations. Transmission electron microscopy indicates that grain boundaries are primarily composed of 5–7 dislocation cores with periodicity and additional complex defects formed at high angles, obeying the classical low-angle theory for angles <22°. The inter-domain mobility is minimized for angles <9° and increases nonlinearly by two orders of magnitude before saturating at ∼16 cm2 V−1 s−1 around misorientation angle≈20°. This trend is explained via grain-boundary electrostatic barriers estimated from density functional calculations and experimental tunnelling barrier heights, which are ≈0.5 eV at low angles and ≈0.15 eV at high angles (≥20°). PMID:26813605

  17. Bicycle helmet ventilation and comfort angle dependence.

    PubMed

    Brühwiler, Paul A; Ducas, Charline; Huber, Roman; Bishop, Phillip A

    2004-09-01

    Five modern bicycle helmets were studied to elucidate some of the variations in ventilation performance, using both a heated manikin headform and human subjects (n = 7). Wind speed and head angle were varied to test their influence on the measured steady-state heat exchange (cooling power) in the skull section of the headform. The cooling power transmitted by the helmets varied from about 60% to over 90% of that of the nude headform, illustrating the range of present manufacturer designs. Angling the head forward by 30 degrees was found to provide better cooling power to the skull (up to 25%) for three of the helmets and almost equal cooling power in the remaining two cases. Comparisons of skull ventilation at these angles with human subjects strongly supported the headform results.

  18. Flocking and invariance of velocity angles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Le; Huang, Lihong; Wu, Jianhong

    2016-04-01

    Motsch and Tadmor considered an extended Cucker-Smale model to investigate the flocking behavior of self-organized systems of interacting species. In this extended model, a cone of the vision was introduced so that outside the cone the influence of one agent on the other is lost and hence the corresponding influence function takes the value zero. This creates a problem to apply the Motsch-Tadmor and Cucker-Smale method to prove the flocking property of the system. Here, we examine the variation of the velocity angles between two arbitrary agents, and obtain a monotonicity property for the maximum cone of velocity angles. This monotonicity permits us to utilize existing arguments to show the flocking property of the system under consideration, when the initial velocity angles satisfy some minor technical constraints. PMID:27105986

  19. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-02

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm{sup −2 }sr{sup −1} is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  20. High brightness angled cavity quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heydari, D.; Bai, Y.; Bandyopadhyay, N.; Slivken, S.; Razeghi, M.

    2015-03-01

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) with an output power of 203 W is demonstrated in pulsed mode at 283 K with an angled cavity. The device has a ridge width of 300 μm, a cavity length of 5.8 mm, and a tilt angle of 12°. The back facet is high reflection coated, and the front facet is anti-reflection coated. The emitting wavelength is around 4.8 μm. In distinct contrast to a straight cavity broad area QCL, the lateral far field is single lobed with a divergence angle of only 3°. An ultrahigh brightness value of 156 MW cm-2 sr-1 is obtained, which marks the brightest QCL to date.

  1. Data for phase angle shift with frequency

    PubMed Central

    Paul, T.; Banerjee, D.; Kargupta, K.

    2016-01-01

    Phase angle shift between the current and voltage with frequency has been reported for a single phosphoric acid fuel cell in the cell temperature from 100 °C to 160 °C and the humidifier temperature from 40 °C to 90 °C. An electrochemical workbench is employed to find the shift. The figure of phase angle shift shows a peak in high humidifier temperatures. The peak in phase angle shift directs to lower frequency side with decreasing humidifier temperature. The estimation of electrochemical reaction time is also evaluated in the humidifier temperature zone from 50 °C to 90 °C. PMID:27158655

  2. Spirality: A Noval Way to Measure Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Henderson, Casey L.; Hartley, Matthew; Davis, Benjamin L.; Pour Imani, Hamed; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the MATLAB code Spirality, a novel method for measuring spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. For a given pitch angle template, the mean pixel value is found along each of typically 1000 spiral axes. The fitting function, which shows a local maximum at the best-fit pitch angle, is the variance of these means. Error bars are found by varying the inner radius of the measurement annulus and finding the standard deviation of the best-fit pitches. Computation time is typically on the order of 2 minutes per galaxy, assuming at least 8 GB of working memory. We tested the code using 128 synthetic spiral images of known pitch. These spirals varied in the number of spiral arms, pitch angle, degree of logarithmicity, radius, SNR, inclination angle, bar length, and bulge radius. A correct result is defined as a result that matches the true pitch within the error bars, with error bars no greater than ±7°. For the non-logarithmic spiral sample, the correct answer is similarly defined, with the mean pitch as function of radius in place of the true pitch. For all synthetic spirals, correct results were obtained so long as SNR > 0.25, the bar length was no more than 60% of the spiral's diameter (when the bar was included in the measurement), the input center of the spiral was no more than 6% of the spiral radius away from the true center, and the inclination angle was no more than 30°. The synthetic spirals were not deprojected prior to measurement. The code produced the correct result for all barred spirals when the measurement annulus was placed outside the bar. Additionally, we compared the code's results against 2DFFT results for 203 visually selected spiral galaxies in GOODS North and South. Among the entire sample, Spirality's error bars overlapped 2DFFT's error bars 64% of the time. For those galaxies in which Source code is available by email request from the primary author.

  3. PULSAR BINARY BIRTHRATES WITH SPIN-OPENING ANGLE CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shaughnessy, Richard; Kim, Chunglee E-mail: ckim@astro.lu.s

    2010-05-20

    with spin period between 10 ms and 100 ms, where few measurements of misalignment and opening angle provide a sound basis for extrapolation, we marginalized our posterior birthrate distribution P(R) over a range of plausible beaming correction factors. We explore several alternative beaming geometry distributions, demonstrating that our predictions are robust except in (untestable) scenarios with many highly aligned recycled pulsars. Finally, in addition to exploring alternative beam geometries, we also briefly summarize how uncertainties in each pulsar binary's lifetime and in the pulsar luminosity distribution can be propagated into P(R).

  4. Self-consistent pitch angle diffusion of newborn ions

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, P.H.; Ziebell, L.F.; Wu, C.S. )

    1991-04-01

    It is well known from the study of ion pickup process by the solar wind that hydromagnetic turbulence can cause the newborn ions to undergo rapid pitch angle diffusion or scattering, thus forming a partial or complete velocity shell distribution. In most of the recent discussions based on quasi-linear theory it is assumed that the spectral wave energy density associated with the hydromagnetic turbulence is constant in time, implying a saturated turbulence level. In contrast, in this work the effect of self-consistently generated waves on the ion dynamics is discussed on the basis of a simple theoretical model, and it is shown both analytically and numerically that the self-consistent diffusion process leads to a time-asymptotic partial shell distribution which extends approximately from the initial pitch angle cos{sup {minus}1}{mu}{sub 0} to {approximately}{pi}/2 in pitch angle space. Particularly, the role of resonant versus nonresonant diffusion processes is discussed in detail. In addition, the effect of continuous ion source term is also incorporated in the numerical analysis since in cometary environment the ions are continuously created.

  5. Emerging applications of small angle solution scattering in structural biology

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Barnali N

    2015-01-01

    Small angle solution X-ray and neutron scattering recently resurfaced as powerful tools to address an array of biological problems including folding, intrinsic disorder, conformational transitions, macromolecular crowding, and self or hetero-assembling of biomacromolecules. In addition, small angle solution scattering complements crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and other structural methods to aid in the structure determinations of multidomain or multicomponent proteins or nucleoprotein assemblies. Neutron scattering with hydrogen/deuterium contrast variation, or X-ray scattering with sucrose contrast variation to a certain extent, is a convenient tool for characterizing the organizations of two-component systems such as a nucleoprotein or a lipid-protein assembly. Time-resolved small and wide-angle solution scattering to study biological processes in real time, and the use of localized heavy-atom labeling and anomalous solution scattering for applications as FRET-like molecular rulers, are amongst promising newer developments. Despite the challenges in data analysis and interpretation, these X-ray/neutron solution scattering based approaches hold great promise for understanding a wide variety of complex processes prevalent in the biological milieu. PMID:25516491

  6. View Angle Effects on MODIS Snow Mapping in Forests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xin, Qinchuan; Woodcock, Curtis E.; Liu, Jicheng; Tan, Bin; Melloh, Rae A.; Davis, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Binary snow maps and fractional snow cover data are provided routinely from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer). This paper investigates how the wide observation angles of MODIS influence the current snow mapping algorithm in forested areas. Theoretical modeling results indicate that large view zenith angles (VZA) can lead to underestimation of fractional snow cover (FSC) by reducing the amount of the ground surface that is viewable through forest canopies, and by increasing uncertainties during the gridding of MODIS data. At the end of the MODIS scan line, the total modeled error can be as much as 50% for FSC. Empirical analysis of MODIS/Terra snow products in four forest sites shows high fluctuation in FSC estimates on consecutive days. In addition, the normalized difference snow index (NDSI) values, which are the primary input to the MODIS snow mapping algorithms, decrease as VZA increases at the site level. At the pixel level, NDSI values have higher variances, and are correlated with the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in snow covered forests. These findings are consistent with our modeled results, and imply that consideration of view angle effects could improve MODIS snow monitoring in forested areas.

  7. Possibility of measuring Adler angles in charged current single pion neutrino-nucleus interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, F.

    2016-05-01

    Uncertainties in modeling neutrino-nucleus interactions are a major contribution to systematic errors in long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. Accurate modeling of neutrino interactions requires additional experimental observables such as the Adler angles which carry information about the polarization of the Δ resonance and the interference with nonresonant single pion production. The Adler angles were measured with limited statistics in bubble chamber neutrino experiments as well as in electron-proton scattering experiments. We discuss the viability of measuring these angles in neutrino interactions with nuclei.

  8. Emission-angle-dependent photoluminescence of rubrene thin films on silver.

    PubMed

    Wakamatsu, Takashi

    2014-07-20

    Rubrene layers with thickness comparable to a visible light wavelength on silver thin film exhibit anomalous photoluminescence (PL) spectra that depend strongly on emission angle. The PL properties demonstrated for rubrene (500 nm)/Ag (50 nm) were modulated from yellow green to red luminescence with an increasing emission angle. The factors influencing the emission-angle-dependent PL spectra are discussed from two viewpoints: spectral modulation of rubrene PL by loss of fluorescence photon energy and additional luminescence resulting from optical interference in the rubrene layer or optical modes excited by rubrene molecules. PMID:25090212

  9. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  10. Decoding low dihedral angles in gabbroic layered intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holness, M. B.; Humphreys, M.; Veksler, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    Texturally equilibrated rocks are granular with a unimodal grain size, smoothly curved grain boundaries, and angles at three-grain junctions of 110-140°. Gabbros are not texturally equilibrated: primocrysts commonly have planar faces whereas later-formed phases fill in the interstitial spaces. Augite-plagioclase-plagioclase dihedral angles (Θcpp) rarely attain the equilibrium value in gabbros and the population of disequilibrium angles preserves otherwise inaccessible information about rock history. The Θcpp population varies significantly between different basaltic bodies. In a rapidly cooled dolerite Θcpp has a low median (60-70°) and a high standard deviation (20-25°). The plagioclase-augite grain boundaries are generally planar. In more slowly cooled gabbros in layered intrusions, the angle populations have a higher median (80-110°) with a low standard deviation (10-15°). The plagioclase-augite grain boundaries are generally planar far from the triple junction, but curve within 10 microns of the junction. This curvature is commonly asymmetric. The angle population in solidified gabbros infiltrated by low-temperature melts is similar to that in dolerites, although the low angles are associated with cuspate interstitial grains. The dihedral angle is a function of both the original solidification process and subsequent high-temperature (melt-absent) grain boundary migration. Infilling of a melt pocket by overgrowth of the bounding solid phases necessitates supersaturation, and this is easier to attain for planar faces, resulting in inhibition of augite growth into pores bounded by planar plagioclase grains and an asymmetry of the initial augite-plag-plag junction. If the solidified gabbro is kept sufficiently hot these initial junction geometries can change during textural equilibration. In the Skaergaard, Rum and Bushveld intrusions, the median Θcpp varies with liquidus assemblage, increasing step-wise on the addition of a new liquidus phase. Locally

  11. An investigation of the dose distribution effect related with collimator angle for VMAT method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tas, B.; Bilge, H.; Ozturk, S. Tokdemir

    2016-03-01

    Aim of this study is to investigate the efficacy of dose distribution in eleven prostate cancer patients with single VMAT and double VMAT when varying collimator angle. We generated optimum single and double VMAT treatment plans when collimator angle was 0°. We recalculated single VMAT plans at different collimator angles(0°,15°,30°,45°,60°,75°,90°) for double VMAT plans(0°-0°,15°-345°,30°-330°,45°-315°,60°-300°,75°-285°,90°-270°) without changing any optimization parameters. HI, DVH and %95 dose coverage of PTV calculated and analyzed. We determined better dose distribution with some collimator angles. Plans were verified using the 2 dimensional ion chamber array Matrixx® and 3 dimensional Compass® software program. A higher %95 dose coverage of PTV was found for single VMAT in the 15° collimator angle, for double VMAT in the 60°-300° and 75°-285° collimator angles. Because of lower rectum doses, we suggested 75°-285°. When we compared single and double VMAT's dose distribution, we had better % 95 dose coverage of PTV and lower HI with double VMAT. Our result was significant statistically. These finds are informative for choosing 75°-285° collimator angles in double VMAT plans for prostate cancer.

  12. The relationship between drained angle and flow rate of size fractions of powder excipients.

    PubMed

    Sklubalová, Z; Zatloukal, Z

    2009-12-01

    The influence of powder size of chosen pharmaceutical powder excipients on drained angle as well as the correlation between drained angle and the mass flow rate of certain powder size fractions were investigated in this work. A method of the indirect estimation of the three-dimensional drained angle from the mass of the residual powder was used experimentally to study the influence of powder size fractions in range of 0.200-0.630 mm for sodium chloride, sodium citrate, potassium chloride, and potassium citrate. Failures of flow significantly increased the drained angles for powder size fraction of 0.200-0.250 mm. For the uniformly flowable powder size fraction of 0.400-0.500 mm, the faster the flow rate, the smaller drained angles were observed for excipients investigated. To estimate parameters of the flow equation, the measurement of material flow rates from the hopper of different orifice sizes is needed, while the estimation of drained angle is much easier needing only one hopper. Finally, the increase of the hopper wall angle of the standard conical hopper to 70 degrees could be recommended to achieve uniform mass flow and to reduce the adverse effect of powder gliding along the hopper walls.

  13. A vision-based dynamic rotational angle measurement system for large civil structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Jae; Ho, Hoai-Nam; Lee, Jong-Han

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a vision-based rotational angle measurement system for large-scale civil structures. Despite the fact that during the last decade several rotation angle measurement systems were introduced, they however often required complex and expensive equipment. Therefore, alternative effective solutions with high resolution are in great demand. The proposed system consists of commercial PCs, commercial camcorders, low-cost frame grabbers, and a wireless LAN router. The calculation of rotation angle is obtained by using image processing techniques with pre-measured calibration parameters. Several laboratory tests were conducted to verify the performance of the proposed system. Compared with the commercial rotation angle measurement, the results of the system showed very good agreement with an error of less than 1.0% in all test cases. Furthermore, several tests were conducted on the five-story modal testing tower with a hybrid mass damper to experimentally verify the feasibility of the proposed system.

  14. Using the angle-dependent resonances of molded plasmonic crystals to improve the sensitivities of biosensors.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hanwei; Yang, Jiun-Chan; Lin, Julia Y; Stuparu, Andreea D; Lee, Min Hyung; Mrksich, Milan; Odom, Teri W

    2010-07-14

    This paper describes how angle-dependent resonances from molded plasmonic crystals can be used to improve real-time biosensing. First, an inexpensive and massively parallel approach to create single-use, two-dimensional metal nanopyramidal gratings was developed. Second, although constant in bulk dielectric environments, the sensitivities (resonance wavelength shift and resonance width) of plasmonic crystals to adsorbed molecular layers of varying thickness were found to depend on incident excitation angle. Third, protein binding at dilute concentrations of protein was carried out at an angle that optimized the signal to noise of our plasmonic sensing platform. This angle-dependent sensitivity, which is intrinsic to grating-based sensors, is a critical parameter that can assist in maximizing signal to noise.

  15. A vision-based dynamic rotational angle measurement system for large civil structures.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Jae; Ho, Hoai-Nam; Lee, Jong-Han

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a vision-based rotational angle measurement system for large-scale civil structures. Despite the fact that during the last decade several rotation angle measurement systems were introduced, they however often required complex and expensive equipment. Therefore, alternative effective solutions with high resolution are in great demand. The proposed system consists of commercial PCs, commercial camcorders, low-cost frame grabbers, and a wireless LAN router. The calculation of rotation angle is obtained by using image processing techniques with pre-measured calibration parameters. Several laboratory tests were conducted to verify the performance of the proposed system. Compared with the commercial rotation angle measurement, the results of the system showed very good agreement with an error of less than 1.0% in all test cases. Furthermore, several tests were conducted on the five-story modal testing tower with a hybrid mass damper to experimentally verify the feasibility of the proposed system. PMID:22969348

  16. Phenylethynyl Containing Reactive Additives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, John W. (Inventor); Smith, Joseph G., Jr. (Inventor); Hergenrother, Paul M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Phenylethynyl containing reactive additives were prepared from aromatic diamine, containing phenylethvnvl groups and various ratios of phthalic anhydride and 4-phenylethynviphthalic anhydride in glacial acetic acid to form the imide in one step or in N-methyl-2-pvrrolidinone to form the amide acid intermediate. The reactive additives were mixed in various amounts (10% to 90%) with oligomers containing either terminal or pendent phenylethynyl groups (or both) to reduce the melt viscosity and thereby enhance processability. Upon thermal cure, the additives react and become chemically incorporated into the matrix and effect an increase in crosslink density relative to that of the host resin. This resultant increase in crosslink density has advantageous consequences on the cured resin properties such as higher glass transition temperature and higher modulus as compared to that of the host resin.

  17. The genetic mechanisms of primary angle closure glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahram, D F; Alward, W L; Kuehn, M H

    2015-01-01

    Primary Angle Closure Glaucoma (PACG) is one of the most common types of glaucoma affecting over 15 million individuals worldwide. Family history and ethnicity are strongly associated with the development of the disease, suggesting that one or more genetic factors contribute to PACG. Although strictly heritable disease-causing mutations have not been identified, a number of recent association studies have pointed out genetic factors that appear to contribute to an individual's risk to develop PACG. In addition, genetic factors have been identified that modify PACG endophenotypes for example, axial length. Herein we review the current literature on this important topic. PMID:26206529

  18. Using Digital Technology to See Angles from Different Angles. Part 2: Openings and Turns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Host, Erin; Baynham, Emily; McMaster, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Ever wondered how to use technology to teach angles? This article follows on from an earlier article published last year, providing a range of ideas for integrating technology and concrete materials with the teaching of angle concepts. The authors also provide a comprehensive list of free online games and learning objects that can be used to teach…

  19. Understanding Angle and Angle Measure: A Design-Based Research Study Using Context Aware Ubiquitous Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crompton, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies are quickly becoming tools found in the educational environment. The researchers in this study use a form of mobile learning to support students in learning about angle concepts. Design-based research is used in this study to develop an empirically-substantiated local instruction theory about students' develop of angle and…

  20. Laser Tracker Calibration - Testing the Angle Measurement System -

    SciTech Connect

    Gassner, Georg; Ruland, Robert; /SLAC

    2008-12-05

    Physics experiments at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) usually require high accuracy positioning, e. g. 100 {micro}m over a distance of 150 m or 25 {micro}m in a 10 x 10 x 3 meter volume. Laser tracker measurement systems have become one of the most important tools for achieving these accuracies when mapping components. The accuracy of these measurements is related to the manufacturing tolerances of various individual components, the resolutions of measurement systems, the overall precision of the assembly, and how well imperfections can be modeled. As with theodolites and total stations, one can remove the effects of most assembly and calibration errors by measuring targets in both direct and reverse positions and computing the mean to obtain the result. However, this approach does not compensate for errors originating from the encoder system. In order to improve and gain a better understanding of laser tracker angle measurement tolerances we extended our laboratory's capabilities with the addition of a horizontal angle calibration test stand. This setup is based on the use of a high precision rotary table providing an angular accuracy of better than 0.2 arcsec. Presently, our setup permits only tests of the horizontal angle measurement system. A test stand for vertical angle calibration is under construction. Distance measurements (LECOCQ & FUSS, 2000) are compared to an interferometer bench for distances of up to 32 m. Together both tests provide a better understanding of the instrument and how it should be operated. The observations also provide a reasonable estimate of covariance information of the measurements according to their actual performance for network adjustments.

  1. Influence of visual angle on pattern reversal visual evoked potentials

    PubMed Central

    Kothari, Ruchi; Singh, Smita; Singh, Ramji; Shukla, A. K.; Bokariya, Pradeep

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to find whether the visual evoked potential (VEP) latencies and amplitude are altered with different visual angles in healthy adult volunteers or not and to determine the visual angle which is the optimum and most appropriate among a wide range of check sizes for the reliable interpretation of pattern reversal VEPs (PRVEPs). Materials and Methods: The present study was conducted on 40 healthy volunteers. The subjects were divided into two groups. One group consisted of 20 individuals (nine males and 11 females) in the age range of 25-57 years and they were exposed to checks subtending a visual angle of 90, 120, and 180 minutes of arc. Another group comprised of 20 individuals (10 males and 10 females) in the age range of 36-60 years and they were subjected to checks subtending a visual angle of 15, 30, and 120 minutes of arc. The stimulus configuration comprised of the transient pattern reversal method in which a black and white checker board is generated (full field) on a VEP Monitor by an Evoked Potential Recorder (RMS EMG. EPMARK II). The statistical analysis was done by One Way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) using EPI INFO 6. Results: In Group I, the maximum (max.) P100 latency of 98.8 ± 4.7 and the max. P100 amplitude of 10.05 ± 3.1 μV was obtained with checks of 90 minutes. In Group II, the max. P100 latency of 105.19 ± 4.75 msec as well as the max. P100 amplitude of 8.23 ± 3.30 μV was obtained with 15 minutes. The min. P100 latency in both the groups was obtained with checks of 120 minutes while the min. P100 amplitude was obtained with 180 minutes. A statistically significant difference was derived between means of P100 latency for 15 and 30 minutes with reference to its value for 120 minutes and between the mean value of P100 amplitude for 120 minutes and that of 90 and 180 minutes. Conclusion: Altering the size of stimulus (visual angle) has an effect on the PRVEP parameters. Our study found that the 120 is the

  2. THE EFFECTS OF THREE DIFFERENT REAR KNEE ANGLES ON KINEMATICS IN THE SPRINT START

    PubMed Central

    Bertucco, M.; Zancanaro, C.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the rear knee angle range in the set position that allows sprinters to reach greater propulsion on the rear block during the sprint start. Eleven university-track team sprinters performed the sprint start using three rear knee angle conditions: 90°, 115° and 135°. A motion capture system consisting of 8 digital cameras (250 Hz) was used to record kinematic parameters at the starting block phase and the acceleration phase. The following variables were considered: horizontal velocity of the centre of mass (COM), COM height, block time, pushing time on the rear block, percentage of pushing time on the rear block, force impulse, push-off angle and length of the first two strides. The main results show that first, horizontal block velocity is significantly greater at 90° vs 115° and 135° rear knee angle (p<0.05 and p<0.001 respectively) at block clearance and the first two strides; second, during the pushing phase, the percentage of pushing time of the rear leg is significantly greater at 90° vs 135° rear knee angle (p<0.01). No significant difference was found for block time among the conditions. These results indicate that block velocity is the main kinematic parameter affected by rear knee angle during the starting block phase and acceleration phase. Furthermore, the 90° rear knee angle allows for a better push-off of the rear leg than larger angles at the set position. The findings of this study provide some direction and useful practical advice in defining an efficient rear leg biomechanical configuration at the set position. PMID:25177099

  3. Guinier peak analysis for visual and automated inspection of small-angle X-ray scattering data

    PubMed Central

    Putnam, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    The Guinier region in small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) defines the radius of gyration, R g, and the forward scattering intensity, I(0). In Guinier peak analysis (GPA), the plot of qI(q) versus q 2 transforms the Guinier region into a characteristic peak for visual and automated inspection of data. Deviations of the peak position from the theoretical position in dimensionless GPA plots can suggest parameter errors, problematic low-resolution data, some kinds of intermolecular interactions or elongated scatters. To facilitate automated analysis by GPA, the elongation ratio (ER), which is the ratio of the areas in the pair-distribution function P(r) after and before the P(r) maximum, was characterized; symmetric samples have ER values around 1, and samples with ER values greater than 5 tend to be outliers in GPA analysis. Use of GPA+ER can be a helpful addition to SAXS data analysis pipelines. PMID:27738411

  4. Multifunctional fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Baillargeon, D.J.; Cardis, A.B.; Heck, D.B.

    1991-03-26

    This paper discusses a composition comprising a major amount of a liquid hydrocarbyl fuel and a minor low-temperature flow properties improving amount of an additive product of the reaction of a suitable diol and product of a benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride and a long-chain hydrocarbyl aminoalcohol.

  5. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  6. The cosmic ray differential diurnal variation dependences on the zenith angle and the geomagnetic disturbance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavlakov, S.; Georgiev, L.

    1985-01-01

    Simultaneous and continuous muon measurements in two opposite azimuthal directions under equal zenith angles demonstrated the importance of this method for cosmic ray diurnal variation investigations. Lately these measurements were extended by means of improved telescopes. The obtained cosmic ray diurnal variations were presented as intensity differential curves. Theoretical investigations connected the properties of these curves with some interplanetary spece parameters. The harmonics of these curves were interpreted physically. Some order difference curves were introduced. In earlier works some dependences between the parameters characterizing the first and the second harmonics of the differential intensity curves and the geomagnetic activity were found. Then all measurements were carried out under only one zenith angle. The results of investigations of similar dependences using data of simultaneous measurements under three different zenith angles are presented.

  7. Incidence angle normalization of radar backscatter data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    NASA’s Soil Moisture Passive Active (SMAP) satellite (~2014) will include a radar system that will provide L-band multi-polarization backscatter at a constant incidence angle of 40º. During the pre-launch phase of the project there is a need for observations that will support the radar-based soil mo...

  8. Spirality: Spiral arm pitch angle measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, Douglas W.; Boe, Benjamin; Pfountz, Casey; Davis, Benjamin L.; Hartley, Matthew; Pour Imani, Hamed; Slade, Zac; Kennefick, Daniel; Kennefick, Julia

    2015-12-01

    Spirality measures spiral arm pitch angles by fitting galaxy images to spiral templates of known pitch. Written in MATLAB, the code package also includes GenSpiral, which produces FITS images of synthetic spirals, and SpiralArmCount, which uses a one-dimensional Fast Fourier Transform to count the spiral arms of a galaxy after its pitch is determined.

  9. A Method for Measuring a Plane Angle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, George D.; Roberts, G. Gilbert

    1978-01-01

    Derivation of formulas and example problems for determining the size of a plane angle are given to help in drafting work. The authors state that a small hand calculator will provide greater accuracy in solving these problems than a protractor. (MF)

  10. Crank angle detecting system for engines

    SciTech Connect

    Yuzawa, H.; Nishiyama, M.; Nakamura, K.; Ishigami, K.

    1987-04-14

    A crank angle detecting system is described for a multicylinder engine having at least three cylinders classified as groups, which comprises: (a) a disc connected for rotation with a crankshaft and formed with a first slit group having a large number of slits for detecting crankshaft angular positions and a second slit group having a small number of slits for detecting each predetermined piston stroke of each of at least three cylinders, the slits of the second group having at least three widths which are different from each other; (b) sensing means responsive to the slits on the disc for continuously detecting crankshaft angular positions by sensing the first group of slits and producing crank angle signals corresponding to the slits of the first group and for detecting each predetermined piston stroke of each engine cylinder by sensing the second group of slits and producing piston stroke signals representing the piston strokes, each piston stroke signal having a duration which corresponds to one of the different widths; and (c) means for identifying the piston stroke signals based on the duration thereof by counting crank angle signals occurring during the duration of each piston stroke signal and classifying the piston stroke signals based on the counted crank angle signals.

  11. Recent Results on the CKM Angle Alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalyi, A.; /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2005-10-18

    The method to measure the CKM angle {alpha} and the modes sensitive to it are discussed. It is shown that the B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays provide the most stringent constraint on {alpha}, which is found to be {alpha} = 96{sup o} {+-} 10{sup o}(stat) {+-} 4{sup o}(syst){+-} 13{sup o}(penguin).

  12. Sensor Tracks the Sun From Any Angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, M., M.; Bunker, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    Sensor system locates Sun from any angle and generates error signals to point object toward Sun and follow its motion. Sun-sensor system includes three photodetectors, each with separate field of view defined by set of apertures. As equipment rotates about axis, detectors put out time-varying signals processed by external electronics to determine rotation rate and direction to Sun.

  13. Statistical analysis of Contact Angle Hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janardan, Nachiketa; Panchagnula, Mahesh

    2015-11-01

    We present the results of a new statistical approach to determining Contact Angle Hysteresis (CAH) by studying the nature of the triple line. A statistical distribution of local contact angles on a random three-dimensional drop is used as the basis for this approach. Drops with randomly shaped triple lines but of fixed volumes were deposited on a substrate and their triple line shapes were extracted by imaging. Using a solution developed by Prabhala et al. (Langmuir, 2010), the complete three dimensional shape of the sessile drop was generated. A distribution of the local contact angles for several such drops but of the same liquid-substrate pairs is generated. This distribution is a result of several microscopic advancing and receding processes along the triple line. This distribution is used to yield an approximation of the CAH associated with the substrate. This is then compared with measurements of CAH by means of a liquid infusion-withdrawal experiment. Static measurements are shown to be sufficient to measure quasistatic contact angle hysteresis of a substrate. The approach also points towards the relationship between microscopic triple line contortions and CAH.

  14. Effect of turn direction on body lean angle in the horse in trot and canter.

    PubMed

    Brocklehurst, C; Weller, R; Pfau, T

    2014-02-01

    Turning is commonly used as a diagnostic aid in equine lameness examinations. Forces experienced on the circle differ from those in a straight line, necessitating an inward lean of the body and asymmetric head/pelvic excursion, which are important parameters for lameness investigations. To better understand gait adaptations to lungeing in normal horses, the effect of turn direction on body lean in trot and in canter warrants further investigation. In this study, it was hypothesised that, on average and independent of gait, the observed body lean angle would be consistent with the ratio between gravitational and centripetal acceleration, but with variations for individual horses showing differences between reins. Twenty horses were fitted with a global positioning system (GPS)-aided inertial measurement unit quantifying body lean angle, speed and circle radius in trot and canter in both directions. The difference between predicted (from speed and circle radius) and observed body lean (Δobs,pred) was compared between horses, directions and gaits using a generalised linear model. The mean speed and circle radius were 3.3m/s and 4.9 m in trot and 4.5m/s and 5.7 m in canter. Mean Δobs,pred was -1.1° (range -7.6° to 5.4°) in trot and -0.8° (range -7.6° to 8.3°) in canter and was significantly different between horses (P<0.0001) and directions (P<0.0001), but not between gaits (P=0.14). Interactions between horse and direction (P<0.0001) and horse and gait (P=0.011) were also significant. Horses leaned marginally less into the circle than predicted. However, this study provides additional evidence for horse specific adaptations, showing significant differences between horses and turn directions but not between gaits.

  15. Probe Without Moving Parts Measures Flow Angle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corda, Stephen; Vachon, M. Jake

    2003-01-01

    The measurement of local flow angle is critical in many fluid-dynamic applications, including the aerodynamic flight testing of new aircraft and flight systems. Flight researchers at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center have recently developed, flight-tested, and patented the force-based flow-angle probe (FLAP), a novel, force-based instrument for the measurement of local flow direction. Containing no moving parts, the FLAP may provide greater simplicity, improved accuracy, and increased measurement access, relative to conventional moving vane-type flow-angle probes. Forces in the FLAP can be measured by various techniques, including those that involve conventional strain gauges (based on electrical resistance) and those that involve more advanced strain gauges (based on optical fibers). A correlation is used to convert force-measurement data to the local flow angle. The use of fiber optics will enable the construction of a miniature FLAP, leading to the possibility of flow measurement in very small or confined regions. This may also enable the tufting of a surface with miniature FLAPs, capable of quantitative flow-angle measurements, similar to attaching yarn tufts for qualitative measurements. The prototype FLAP was a small, aerodynamically shaped, low-aspect-ratio fin about 2 in. (approximately equal to 5 cm) long, 1 in. (approximately equal to 2.5 cm) wide, and 0.125 in. (approximately equal to 0.3 cm) thick (see Figure 1). The prototype FLAP included simple electrical-resistance strain gauges for measuring forces. Four strain gauges were mounted on the FLAP; two on the upper surface and two on the lower surface. The gauges were connected to form a full Wheatstone bridge, configured as a bending bridge. In preparation for a flight test, the prototype FLAP was mounted on the airdata boom of a flight-test fixture (FTF) on the NASA Dryden F-15B flight research airplane.

  16. Anterior segment changes after pharmacologic mydriasis using Pentacam and optical coherence tomography in angle closure suspects

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jing-Min; Li, Mu; Xu, Xiao-Lan; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Jun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    AIM To compare the dynamic changes of anterior segment parameters especially iris morphology induced by pharmacologic mydriasis between angle closure suspects and normal controls. METHODS The study group comprised 19 eyes of 19 angle closure suspects and 19 eyes of 19 age- and sex-matched normal open-angle eyes. Pentacam and optical coherence tomography measurements before and 30min after instillation of compound tropicamide eye drop were performed and compared. Biometric evaluations of iris tomography and anterior chamber angle were estimated by a customized image-processing software. RESULTS Baseline axial length, iris cross sectional area and volume did not differ significantly between angle closure suspects and normal controls. Angle closure suspects had smaller pupil size, narrower anterior segment dimension and axial length, thinner iris with greater curve in comparison with normal controls. Pharmacologic mydriasis led to significant increments in iris thickness at 750 µm, anterior chamber depth and volume, whereas significant decrements in iris curve, cross sectional area and volume in both groups. Angle opening distance at 500 µm was increased significantly in normal controls (from 0.465±0.115 mm to 0.539±0.167 mm, P=0.009), but not in angle closure suspects (from 0.125±0.100 mm to 0.145±0.131 mm, P=0.326). Iris volume change per millimeter of pupil dilation (ΔIV/ΔPD) decreased significantly less in angle closure suspects than normal controls (−2.47±1.33 mm2 vs −3.63±1.58 mm2, P=0.019). Linear regression analysis showed that the change of angle opening distance at 500 µm was associated most with the change of central anterior chamber depth (β=0.841, P=0.002) and ΔIV/ΔPD (β=0.028, P=0.002), followed by gender (β=0.062, P=0.032). CONCLUSION Smaller iris volume decrement per millimeter of pupil dilation is related significantly with the less anterior angle opening in angle closure suspects after pharmacologic mydriasis. Dynamic iris change

  17. Electron energy spectrum and maximum disruption angle under multi-photon beamstrahlung

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoya, Kaoru; Chen, Pisin

    1989-03-01

    The final electron energy spectrum under multi-photon beamstrahlung process is derived analytically in the classical and the intermediate regimes. The maximum disruption angle from the low energy tail of the spectrum is also estimated. The results are then applied to the TLC and the CLIC parameters. 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Vinyl capped addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vannucci, Raymond D. (Inventor); Malarik, Diane C. (Inventor); Delvigs, Peter (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Polyimide resins (PMR) are generally useful where high strength and temperature capabilities are required (at temperatures up to about 700 F). Polyimide resins are particularly useful in applications such as jet engine compressor components, for example, blades, vanes, air seals, air splitters, and engine casing parts. Aromatic vinyl capped addition polyimides are obtained by reacting a diamine, an ester of tetracarboxylic acid, and an aromatic vinyl compound. Low void materials with improved oxidative stability when exposed to 700 F air may be fabricated as fiber reinforced high molecular weight capped polyimide composites. The aromatic vinyl capped polyimides are provided with a more aromatic nature and are more thermally stable than highly aliphatic, norbornenyl-type end-capped polyimides employed in PMR resins. The substitution of aromatic vinyl end-caps for norbornenyl end-caps in addition polyimides results in polymers with improved oxidative stability.

  19. Tackifier for addition polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, J. M.; St.clair, T. L.

    1980-01-01

    A modification to the addition polyimide, LaRC-160, was prepared to improve tack and drape and increase prepeg out-time. The essentially solventless, high viscosity laminating resin is synthesized from low cost liquid monomers. The modified version takes advantage of a reactive, liquid plasticizer which is used in place of solvent and helps solve a major problem of maintaining good prepeg tack and drape, or the ability of the prepeg to adhere to adjacent plies and conform to a desired shape during the lay up process. This alternate solventless approach allows both longer life of the polymer prepeg and the processing of low void laminates. This approach appears to be applicable to all addition polyimide systems.

  20. What’s your angle? Using sun angle and look angle to improve carbon flux estimates from optical remote sensing. (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamon, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    Most optical remote sensing remains focused on single-pass nadir views near solar noon, yet optical signals related to carbon uptake (physiological retrievals) are strongly influenced by sun and look angle. Additionally, a long history of remote sensing research into these angular effects (e.g. BRDF studies) indicate a strong angular dependence of vegetation reflectance signatures that clearly affect our ability to model carbon exchange using vegetation indices derived from remote sensing. The structural and physiological aspects of these angular effects have not always been treated in an integrated way within the remote sensing or carbon modeling communities. This presentation will review recent findings suggesting that consideration of combined physiological and structural aspects of angular effects can improve physiological retrievals of optical signals related to biosphere-atmosphere carbon exchange. Using several vegetation indices (NDVI, PRI and WBI) as examples, this presentation will offer suggestions for how carbon flux models can benefit from further consideration of sun and look angle effects in optical remote sensing. Key challenges for further research and suggestions for operational solutions will also be presented.

  1. PHASE ANGLE EFFECTS ON 3 μm ABSORPTION BAND ON CERES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DAWN MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Takir, D.; Reddy, V.; Sanchez, J. A.; Corre, L. Le; Hardersen, P. S.; Nathues, A.

    2015-05-01

    Phase angle-induced spectral effects are important to characterize since they affect spectral band parameters such as band depth and band center, and therefore skew mineralogical interpretations of planetary bodies via reflectance spectroscopy. Dwarf planet (1) Ceres is the next target of NASA’s Dawn mission, which is expected to arrive in 2015 March. The visible and near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) on board Dawn has the spatial and spectral range to characterize the surface between 0.25–5.0 μm. Ceres has an absorption feature at 3.0 μm due to hydroxyl- and/or water-bearing minerals. We analyzed phase angle-induced spectral effects on the 3 μm absorption band on Ceres using spectra measured with the long-wavelength cross-dispersed (LXD: 1.9–4.2 μm) mode of the SpeX spectrograph/imager at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Ceres LXD spectra were measured at different phase angles ranging from 0.°7 to 22°. We found that the band center slightly increases from 3.06 μm at lower phase angles (0.°7 and 6°) to 3.07 μm at higher phase angles (11° and 22°), the band depth decreases by ∼20% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles, and the band area decreases by ∼25% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles. Our results will have implications for constraining the abundance of OH on the surface of Ceres from VIR spectral data, which will be acquired by Dawn starting spring 2015.

  2. Phase Angle Effects on 3 μm Absorption Band on Ceres: Implications for Dawn Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takir, D.; Reddy, V.; Sanchez, J. A.; Le Corre, L.; Hardersen, P. S.; Nathues, A.

    2015-05-01

    Phase angle-induced spectral effects are important to characterize since they affect spectral band parameters such as band depth and band center, and therefore skew mineralogical interpretations of planetary bodies via reflectance spectroscopy. Dwarf planet (1) Ceres is the next target of NASA’s Dawn mission, which is expected to arrive in 2015 March. The visible and near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) on board Dawn has the spatial and spectral range to characterize the surface between 0.25-5.0 μm. Ceres has an absorption feature at 3.0 μm due to hydroxyl- and/or water-bearing minerals. We analyzed phase angle-induced spectral effects on the 3 μm absorption band on Ceres using spectra measured with the long-wavelength cross-dispersed (LXD: 1.9-4.2 μm) mode of the SpeX spectrograph/imager at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Ceres LXD spectra were measured at different phase angles ranging from 0.°7 to 22°. We found that the band center slightly increases from 3.06 μm at lower phase angles (0.°7 and 6°) to 3.07 μm at higher phase angles (11° and 22°), the band depth decreases by ˜20% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles, and the band area decreases by ˜25% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles. Our results will have implications for constraining the abundance of OH on the surface of Ceres from VIR spectral data, which will be acquired by Dawn starting spring 2015.

  3. Electrophilic addition of astatine

    SciTech Connect

    Norseev, Yu.V.; Vasaros, L.; Nhan, D.D.; Huan, N.K.

    1988-03-01

    It has been shown for the first time that astatine is capable of undergoing addition reactions to unsaturated hydrocarbons. A new compound of astatine, viz., ethylene astatohydrin, has been obtained, and its retention numbers of squalane, Apiezon, and tricresyl phosphate have been found. The influence of various factors on the formation of ethylene astatohydrin has been studied. It has been concluded on the basis of the results obtained that the univalent cations of astatine in an acidic medium is protonated hypoastatous acid.

  4. Functional Generalized Additive Models.

    PubMed

    McLean, Mathew W; Hooker, Giles; Staicu, Ana-Maria; Scheipl, Fabian; Ruppert, David

    2014-01-01

    We introduce the functional generalized additive model (FGAM), a novel regression model for association studies between a scalar response and a functional predictor. We model the link-transformed mean response as the integral with respect to t of F{X(t), t} where F(·,·) is an unknown regression function and X(t) is a functional covariate. Rather than having an additive model in a finite number of principal components as in Müller and Yao (2008), our model incorporates the functional predictor directly and thus our model can be viewed as the natural functional extension of generalized additive models. We estimate F(·,·) using tensor-product B-splines with roughness penalties. A pointwise quantile transformation of the functional predictor is also considered to ensure each tensor-product B-spline has observed data on its support. The methods are evaluated using simulated data and their predictive performance is compared with other competing scalar-on-function regression alternatives. We illustrate the usefulness of our approach through an application to brain tractography, where X(t) is a signal from diffusion tensor imaging at position, t, along a tract in the brain. In one example, the response is disease-status (case or control) and in a second example, it is the score on a cognitive test. R code for performing the simulations and fitting the FGAM can be found in supplemental materials available online.

  5. Modeling granular material flows: The angle of repose, fluidization and the cliff collapse problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holsapple, Keith A.

    2013-07-01

    I discuss theories of granular material flows, with application to granular flows on the earth and planets. There are two goals. First, there is a lingering belief of some that the standard continuum plasticity Mohr-Coulomb and/or Drucker-Prager models are not adequate for many large-scale granular flow problems. The stated reason for those beliefs is the fact that the final slopes of the run-outs in collapse, landslide problems, and large-scale cratering are well below the angle of repose of the material. That observation, combined with the supposition that in those models flow cannot occur with slopes less than the angle of repose, has led to a number of researchers suggesting a need for lubrication or fluidization mechanisms and modeling. That issue is investigated in detail and shown to be false. A complete analysis of slope failures according to the Mohr-Coulomb model is presented, with special attention to the relations between the angle of repose and slope failures. It is shown that slope failure can occur for slope angles both larger than and smaller than the angle of repose. Second, to study the details of landslide run-outs, finite-difference continuum code simulations of the prototypical cliff collapse problem, using the classical plasticity models, are presented, analyzed and compared to experiments. Although devoid of any additional fluidization models, those simulations match experiments in the literature extremely well. The dynamics of this problem introduces additional important features relating to the run-out and final slope angles. The vertical free surface begins to fall at the initial 90° and flow continues to a final slope less than 10°. The detail in the calculation is examined to show why flow persists at slope angles that appear to be less than the angle of repose. The motions include regions of solid-like, fluid-like, and gas-like flows without invoking any additional models.

  6. Computational Process Modeling for Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagg, Stacey; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Computational Process and Material Modeling of Powder Bed additive manufacturing of IN 718. Optimize material build parameters with reduced time and cost through modeling. Increase understanding of build properties. Increase reliability of builds. Decrease time to adoption of process for critical hardware. Potential to decrease post-build heat treatments. Conduct single-track and coupon builds at various build parameters. Record build parameter information and QM Meltpool data. Refine Applied Optimization powder bed AM process model using data. Report thermal modeling results. Conduct metallography of build samples. Calibrate STK models using metallography findings. Run STK models using AO thermal profiles and report STK modeling results. Validate modeling with additional build. Photodiode Intensity measurements highly linear with power input. Melt Pool Intensity highly correlated to Melt Pool Size. Melt Pool size and intensity increase with power. Applied Optimization will use data to develop powder bed additive manufacturing process model.

  7. Enhanced shear strength of sodium bentonite using frictional additives

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, K.E.; Bowders, J.J.; Gilbert, R.B.; Daniel, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    One of the most important obstacles to using geosynthetic clay liners (GCLs) in landfill cover systems is the low shear strength provided by the bentonitic portion of the GCL. In this study, the authors propose that granular, frictional materials might be added to the bentonite to form an admixture that would have greater shear strength than the bentonite alone while still raining low hydraulic conductivity. Bentonite was mixed with two separate granular additives, expanded shale and recycled to form mixtures consisting of 20-70% bentonite by weight. In direct shear tests at normal stresses of 34.5-103.5 kPa, effective friction angles were measured as 45{degrees} for the expanded 36{degrees} for the recycled glass, and 7{degrees} for the hydrated granular bentonite. The strength of the expanded shale mixtures increased nearly linearly as the percentage shale in the mixture increased, to 44{degrees} for a bentonite mixture with 80% shale. The addition of recycled glass showed little effect on the shear strength of the mixtures of glass and bentonite. Hydraulic conductivity measurements for both types of mixtures indicated a linear increase with log(k) as the amount of granular additive increased. For applications involving geosynthetic clay liners for cover systems, a mixture of 40% expanded shale and 60% bentonite is recommended, although further testing must be done. The 40/60 mixture satisfies the hydraulic equivalency requirement, with k = 5.1X10{sup -9} cm/sec, while increasing the shear strength parameters of the bentonitic mixture to {phi}{prime} = 17{degrees} and c{prime} = 0.

  8. SU-E-T-604: Dosimetric Dependence On the Collimator Angle in Prostate Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, M; Rehman, J; Khan, M; Chow, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose-volume variations of planning target volume (PTV) and organs-at-risk (OARs) in prostate volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) when using different collimator angles. It is because collimator angle awareness is essential for planner to produce an optimal prostate VMAT plan in a rational time. Methods: Single-arc VMAT plans at different collimator angles (0o, 15o, 30o, 45o, 60o, 75o and 90o) were created systematically using a Harold heterogeneous pelvis phantom. For each change of collimator angle, a new plan was re-optimized for that angle. The prescription dose was 78 Gy per 39 fractions. Conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), gradient index, machine monitor unit, dose-volume histogram, the mean and maximum doses of the PTV were calculated and analyzed. On the other hand, dose-volume histogram, the mean and maximum doses of the OARs such as bladder, rectum and femoral heads for different collimator angles were determined from the plans. Results: There was no significance difference, based on the plan dose-volume evaluation criteria, found in the VMAT optimizations for all studied collimator angles. Higher CI and lower HI were found for the 45o collimator angle. In addition, the 15o collimator angle provided lower HI similar to the 45o collimator angle. The 75o and 90o collimator angle were found good for the rectum sparing, and the 75o and 30o collimator angle were found good for the right and left femur sparing, respectively. The PTV dose coverage for each plan was comparatively independent of the collimator angle. Conclusion: The dosimetric results in this study are useful to the planner to select different collimator angles to improve the PTV coverage and OAR sparing in prostate VMAT.

  9. Adult Degenerative Scoliosis: Can Cobb Angle on a Supine Posteroanterior Radiograph Be Used to Predict the Cobb Angle in a Standing Position?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Changwei; Li, Yanming; Zhao, Yunfei; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ming; Liu, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It is necessary to assess coronal Cobb angle in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS). But as most ADS patients are elderly patients who are difficult or unable to stand upright without assistance, it is difficult to obtain standing posteroanterior X-ray radiographs. Whether it is possible to use Cobb angle obtained on a supine posteroanterior X-ray radiograph to predict Cobb angle in a standing position remains unanswered. To study the correlation between X-ray plain radiographic parameters obtained from the supine position and those obtained from the standing position in ADS patients. Medical records and radiological information were obtained from ADS patients prospectively. Posteroanterior X-ray views of the spine were taken in both standing and supine positions simultaneously in the same ADS patients to record information about the position of the apical and end vertebrae in the coronal position and measure Cobb angle and rotation degree of the apical vertebra. Correlation and linear regression were used to analyze the correlation between the Cobb angle and the rotation degree of the apical vertebra on the X-ray plain radiographs obtained from the standing and supine positions. Of 94 ADS patients who met the inclusion criteria, 14 (15%) patients were male and 80 (85%) patients were female who ranged in age from 41 to 92 years with a mean of 67 years. The mean Cobb angle on the supine X-ray radiographs was 21 ± 10° versus 26 ± 12° on the standing X-ray radiographs, the difference being statistically significant (P < 0.01). The rotation angle of the apical vertebra in the supine and standing positions was 1.8 ± 0.7 and 1.9 ± 0.7, respectively, the difference being statistically significant (P < 0.05). Correlation analysis showed a strong correlation in Cobb angle between the supine and standing X-ray plain radiographs (r = 0.92, P < 0.01). The correlation coefficient of the

  10. Adult Degenerative Scoliosis: Can Cobb Angle on a Supine Posteroanterior Radiograph Be Used to Predict the Cobb Angle in a Standing Position?

    PubMed

    Yang, Changwei; Li, Yanming; Zhao, Yunfei; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ming; Liu, Gabriel

    2016-02-01

    It is necessary to assess coronal Cobb angle in the diagnosis and treatment of patients with adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS). But as most ADS patients are elderly patients who are difficult or unable to stand upright without assistance, it is difficult to obtain standing posteroanterior X-ray radiographs. Whether it is possible to use Cobb angle obtained on a supine posteroanterior X-ray radiograph to predict Cobb angle in a standing position remains unanswered.To study the correlation between X-ray plain radiographic parameters obtained from the supine position and those obtained from the standing position in ADS patients.Medical records and radiological information were obtained from ADS patients prospectively. Posteroanterior X-ray views of the spine were taken in both standing and supine positions simultaneously in the same ADS patients to record information about the position of the apical and end vertebrae in the coronal position and measure Cobb angle and rotation degree of the apical vertebra. Correlation and linear regression were used to analyze the correlation between the Cobb angle and the rotation degree of the apical vertebra on the X-ray plain radiographs obtained from the standing and supine positions.Of 94 ADS patients who met the inclusion criteria, 14 (15%) patients were male and 80 (85%) patients were female who ranged in age from 41 to 92 years with a mean of 67 years. The mean Cobb angle on the supine X-ray radiographs was 21 ± 10° versus 26 ± 12° on the standing X-ray radiographs, the difference being statistically significant (P < 0.01). The rotation angle of the apical vertebra in the supine and standing positions was 1.8 ± 0.7 and 1.9 ± 0.7, respectively, the difference being statistically significant (P < 0.05). Correlation analysis showed a strong correlation in Cobb angle between the supine and standing X-ray plain radiographs (r = 0.92, P < 0.01). The correlation coefficient of the rotation of

  11. Large mixing angles from many right-handed neutrinos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldstein, Brian; Klemm, William

    2012-03-01

    A beautiful understanding of the smallness of the neutrino masses may be obtained via the seesaw mechanism, whereby one takes advantage of the key qualitative distinction between the neutrinos and the other fermions: right-handed neutrinos are gauge singlets, and may therefore have large Majorana masses. The standard seesaw mechanism, however, does not address the apparent lack of hierarchy in the neutrino masses compared to the quarks and charged leptons, nor the large leptonic mixing angles compared to the small angles of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. In this paper, we will show that the singlet nature of the right-handed neutrinos may be taken advantage of in one further way in order to solve these remaining problems: Unlike particles with gauge interactions, whose numbers are constrained by anomaly cancellation, the number of gauge singlet particles is essentially undetermined. If large numbers of gauge singlet fermions are present at high energies—as is suggested, for example, by various string constructions—then the effective low-energy neutrino mass matrix may be determined as a sum over many distinct Yukawa couplings, with the largest ones being the most important. This can reduce hierarchy, and lead to large mixing angles. Assuming a statistical distribution of fundamental parameters, we will show that this scenario leads to a good fit to low-energy phenomenology, with only a few qualitative assumptions guided by the known quark and lepton masses. The scenario leads to predictions of a normal hierarchy for the neutrino masses, and a value for the |mee| mass matrix element of about 1-6 meV.

  12. Modeling Electron Pitch-Angle Scattering Rates by EMIC Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usanova, Maria; Shprits, Yuri; Drozdov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    The response of electron fluxes to different geomagnetic activity is determined by competing electron acceleration and loss processes. Interaction with EMIC waves is believed to be an important loss mechanism for the radiation belt electrons, which can undergo cyclotron resonance with EMIC waves and consequent pitch-angle scattering into the atmosphere. The recent study by Usanova et al. [2014] reported the first definitive proof of EMIC waves scattering electrons into the atmosphere. These new results are particularly interesting and significant as EMIC is the only wave mode that can scatter ultra-relativistic electrons much faster and more efficient than other wave modes (e.g., chorus and hiss) and therefore, is supposed to be a dominant internal loss mechanism for ˜>2 MeV energy electrons. In this talk we will focus on numerical modeling of EMIC-related electron losses. We compute bounce-averaged pitch-angle diffusion coefficients of electrons due to EMIC waves using a quasi-linear approach and use these coefficients as further input to the Versatile Electron Radiation Belt (VERB) diffusion code to simulate the evolution of electron phase space density during selected events. We will present a comparison of the simulation results and observed pitch angle distributions on the Van Allen Probes during selected events. We will also address the following questions: Where and under which conditions signatures of EMIC-related electron loss are typically observed? What are the EMIC wave and background plasma parameters required for this interaction? Can we reproduce observed losses of radiation belt electrons using numerical modeling?

  13. Producing Science-Ready Radar Datasets for the Retrieval of Forest Structure Parameters from Backscatter: Correcting for Terrain Topography and Changes in Vegetation Reflectivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simard, M.; Riel, Bryan; Hensley, S.; Lavalle, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Radar backscatter data contain both geometric and radiometric distortions due to underlying topography and the radar viewing geometry. Our objective is to develop a radiometric correction algorithm specific to the UAVSAR system configuration that would improve retrieval of forest structure parameters. UAVSAR is an airborne Lband radar capable of repeat?pass interferometry producing images with a spatial resolution of 5m. It is characterized by an electronically steerable antenna to compensate for aircraft attitude. Thus, the computation of viewing angles (i.e. look, incidence and projection) must include aircraft attitude angles (i.e. yaw, pitch and roll) in addition to the antenna steering angle. In this presentation, we address two components of radiometric correction: area projection and vegetation reflectivity. The first correction is applied by normalization of the radar backscatter by the local ground area illuminated by the radar beam. The second is a correction due to changes in vegetation reflectivity with viewing geometry.

  14. Relation of thromboelastography parameters to conventional coagulation tests used to evaluate the hypercoagulable state of aged fracture patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen; Guan, Zhao; Xu, Qinzhu; Zhao, Lei; Song, Ying; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fractures are common among aged people, and rapid assessment of the coagulation status is important. The thromboelastography (TEG) test can give a series of coagulation parameters and has been widely used in clinics. In this research, we looked at fracture patients over 60 and compared their TEG results with those of healthy controls. Since there is a paucity of studies comparing TEG assessments with conventional coagulation tests, we aim to clarify the relationship between TEG values and the values given by conventional coagulation tests. Forty fracture patients (27 femur and 13 humerus) over 60 years old were included in the study. The change in their coagulation status was evaluated by TEG before surgery within 4 hours after the fracture. Changes in TEG parameters were analyzed compared with controls. Conventional coagulation test results for the patients, including activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), international normalized ratio (INR), fibrinogen, and platelets, were also acquired, and correlation analysis was done with TEG parameters, measuring similar aspects of the coagulation cascade. In addition, the sensitivity and specificity of TEG parameters for detecting raised fibrinogen levels were also analyzed. The K (time to 20 mm clot amplitude) and R (reaction time) values of aged fracture patients were lower than controls. The values for angle, maximal amplitude (MA), and coagulation index (CI) were raised compared with controls, indicating a hypercoagulable state. Correlation analysis showed that there were significant positive correlations between fibrinogen and MA/angle, between platelets and MA, and between APTT and R as well. There was significant negative correlation between fibrinogen and K. In addition, K values have better sensitivity and specificity for detecting elevated fibrinogen concentration than angle and MA values. Aged fracture patients tend to be in a hypercoagulable state, and this could be effectively reflected by

  15. Development of the Angle Concept by Abstraction from Situated Knowledge.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchelmore, Michael C.; White, Paul

    This paper explores a framework for research on the development of the angle concept based on theories of abstraction. The framework suggests that children initially acquire a body of disconnected angle knowledge situated in everyday experiences, group the situations to form angle contexts, and then form an abstract angle concept. The framework is…

  16. Classification of additives for organic photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Machui, Florian; Maisch, Philipp; Burgués-Ceballos, Ignasi; Langner, Stefan; Krantz, Johannes; Ameri, Tayebeh; Brabec, Christoph J

    2015-04-27

    The use of additives to improve the performance of organic photovoltaic cells has been intensely researched in recent years. However, so far, no system has been reported for the classification of additives and their functions. In this report, a system for classifying additives according to the fundamental mechanism by which they influence microstructure formation for P3HT:PCBM is suggested. The major parameters used for their classification are solubility and drying kinetics. Both are discussed in detail and their consequences on processing are analyzed. Furthermore, a general mechanism to classify the impact of additives on structure formation is suggested and discussed for different materials relevant to organic photovoltaic devices.

  17. [Correction Multiplicative Effects in Raman Spectra through Vector Angle Transformation].

    PubMed

    Yao, Zhi-xiang; Sun, Zeng-qiang; Su, Hui; Yuan, Hong-fu

    2016-02-01

    The linear relationship between the Raman spectral intensity and the analyte amount is frequently disrupted for a variety of complex reasons, which include these variations in laser source, focusing effect, sample scattering and refracting, so that causes poor quantitative results. As a whole, these disturbing effects can be divided to be additive and multiplicative, and the multiplicative effects are generally more difficult to be eliminated. A spectrum is a series data, also can be treated as a vector. In principle, unstable motions in spectrum intensity/amplitude corresponding to the module shifts for a vector, doesn't impact the vector direction which is the essence of the vector, so it is reasonable to rewrite the data form on module to on space angle for the same measurement. This thesis employed a data transformation to eliminate the multiplicative effects within spectra, i. e. , the spectrum signal on its amplitude has been transformed to be on the vector angles. The first step of the transformation is the selection of a stand vector which is near to the analyte and almost orthogonal to the background within the sample space; and the next step is to define a moving window, then to find out the angle between the sample vector (i. e. the transformed spectrum) and the stand vector within the window; while the window is moved along the spectrum data series, the transformation for vector angle (VA) series has been finished. The thesis has proved that an approximate linear quantitative relationship has been remained in the VA series. Multivariate calibration need full rank matrix which is combined by spectrum from variety samples, and variety VA series also can combine a full rank VA matrix, so the approximate linear VA matrix still perfectly meeting the demand for multivariate calibration. A mixed system consisted by methanol-ethanol-isopropanol has been employed to verify the eliminations to the multiplicative effects. These measuring values of the system are

  18. Internal-strain effect on the valence band of strained silicon and its correlation with the bond angles

    SciTech Connect

    Inaoka, Takeshi Yanagisawa, Susumu; Kadekawa, Yukihiro

    2014-02-14

    By means of the first-principles density-functional theory, we investigate the effect of relative atom displacement in the crystal unit cell, namely, internal strain on the valence-band dispersion of strained silicon, and find close correlation of this effect with variation in the specific bond angles due to internal strain. We consider the [111] ([110]) band dispersion for (111) ((110)) biaxial tensility and [111] ([110]) uniaxial compression, because remarkably small values of hole effective mass m* can be obtained in this dispersion. Under the practical condition of no normal stress, biaxial tensility (uniaxial compression) involves additional normal compression (tensility) and internal strain. With an increase in the internal-strain parameter, the energy separation between the highest and second-highest valence bands becomes strikingly larger, and the highest band with conspicuously small m* extends remarkably down to a lower energy region, until it intersects or becomes admixed with the second band. This is closely correlated with the change in the specific bond angles, and this change can reasonably explain the above enlargement of the band separation.

  19. Measurements of Neutrino Oscillation Angle θ13

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuze, Masahiro

    Neutrinos exhibit an interesting phenomenon called "neutrino oscillation", in which a neutrino changes its flavor after traveling some flight length. Many experiments measured the mixing angles and mass differences, but the angle θ13 had been unmeasured due to its smallness compared to others. During 2011 and 2012, series of new-generation neutrino experiments reported positive results in θ13 search, and its value has been determined to be just below the previous upper limit. The non-zero result of θ13 is a very good news for future of neutrino physics, since it opens a possibility of measuring the CP violation phase in the lepton sector. An introduction to neutrino oscillation and latest experimental results are presented. A detail is put on Double Chooz reactor experiment, in which the author is involved.

  20. Fan Stagger Angle for Dirt Rejection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, Edward J. (Inventor); Rose, Becky E. (Inventor); Brilliant, Lisa I. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A gas turbine engine includes a spool, a turbine coupled to drive the spool, a propulsor coupled to be rotated about an axis by the turbine through the spool, and a gear assembly coupled between the propulsor and the spool such that rotation of the turbine drives the propulsor at a different speed than the spool. The propulsor includes a hub and a row of propulsor blades that extend from the hub. Each of the propulsor blades has a span between a root at the hub and a tip, and a chord between a leading edge and a trailing edge. The chord forms a stagger angle alpha with the axis, and the stagger angle alpha is less than 15 deg. at a position along the propulsor blade that is within an inboard 20% of the span.

  1. Linkage studies in primary open angle glaucoma

    SciTech Connect

    Avramopoulos, D.; Grigoriadu, M.; Kitsos, G.

    1994-09-01

    Glaucoma is a leading cause of blindness worldwide. The majority of glaucoma is associated with an open, normal appearing anterior chamber angle and is termed primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, MIM 137760). It is characterized by elevated intraocular pressure and onset in middle age or later. A subset of POAG with juvenile onset has recently been linked to chromosome 1q in two families with autosomal dominant inheritance. Eleven pedigrees with autosomal dominant POG (non-juvenile-onset) have been identified in Epirus, Greece. In the present study DNA samples have been collected from 50 individuals from one large pedigree, including 12 affected individuals. Preliminary results of linkage analysis with chromosome 1 microsatellites using the computer program package LINKAGE Version 5.1 showed no linkage with the markers previously linked to juvenile-onset POAG. Further linkage analysis is being pursued, and the results will be presented.

  2. A high sensitive roll angle interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Yanfen; Hou, Wenmei; Hu, Kai; Ju, Aisong

    2013-01-01

    A roll angle interferometer with high sensitivity is designed in this paper. Two sets of centrosymmetric beams are used to travel through the measurement and reference arms of the roll angle interferometer which contains two specific optical devices: wedge prism assembly and wedge mirror assembly. The optical path change in both arms caused by roll is converted into phase shift which can be measured by interferometer. Because of the adoption of the centrosymmetric measurement structure, the straightness errors, yaw error and pitch error can be avoided and the dead path is minimized, so that the stability and the accuracy of the measurement can be greatly enhanced. The resolution for the roll measurement is about 0.006″ with the measurement range of ±1°.

  3. Gaia: focus, straylight and basic angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, A.; Biermann, M.; Bombrun, A.; Boyadjian, J.; Chassat, F.; Corberand, P.; Davidson, M.; Doyle, D.; Escolar, D.; Gielesen, W. L. M.; Guilpain, T.; Hernandez, J.; Kirschner, V.; Klioner, S. A.; Koeck, C.; Laine, B.; Lindegren, L.; Serpell, E.; Tatry, P.; Thoral, P.

    2016-07-01

    The Gaia all-sky astrometric survey is challenged by several issues affecting the spacecraft stability. Amongst them, we find the focus evolution, straylight and basic angle variations Contrary to pre-launch expectations, the image quality is continuously evolving, during commissioning and the nominal mission. Payload decontaminations and wavefront sensor assisted refocuses have been carried out to recover optimum performance. An ESA-Airbus DS working group analysed the straylight and basic angle issues and worked on a detailed root cause analysis. In parallel, the Gaia scientists have also analysed the data, most notably comparing the BAM signal to global astrometric solutions, with remarkable agreement. In this contribution, a status review of these issues will be provided, with emphasis on the mitigation schemes and the lessons learned for future space missions where extreme stability is a key requirement.

  4. Comparison between angle interferometer and angle encoder during calibration of autocollimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yao; Xue, Zi; Wang, He Yan

    2015-02-01

    An angle interferometer was set up using concept `ratio of two lengths' and an angle encoder was set up using concept `subdivision of full circle (2π rad=360°)' at the National Institute of Metrology, China (NIM). For the analysis of the systematic errors of each device, two autocollimator calibration systems were separately set up based on the angle interferometer and the angle encoder with a similar measuring uncertainty (around 0.1″). An autocollimator was calibrated using two systems in the same measurement range (+/-1000″) and the same measurement step (10″). The systematic errors of each system were found through comparison between their original calibration results. The compensation curves were calculated using the analysis results, and two systems' original calibration results were compensated according to two systems' compensation curves. The maximum difference between the compensated calibration results of two systems was 0.05″ which is lower than measuring uncertainty of each system.

  5. Definition, transformation-formulae and measurements of tipvane angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruining, A.

    1987-10-01

    The theoretical background of different angle systems used to define tipvane attitude in 3-D space is outlined. Different Euler equations are used for the various, wind tunnel, towing tank, and full scale tipvane models. The influence of rotor blade flapping angle on tipvane angles is described. The tipvane attitude measuring method is outlined in relationship to the Euler angle system. Side effects on the angle of attack of the tipvane due to rotation, translation, and curving of the tipvane are described.

  6. Shuttle Program. Euler angles, quaternions, and transformation matrices working relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    A brief mathematical development of the relationship between the Euler angles and the transformation matrix, the quaternion and the transformation matrix, and the Euler angles and the quaternion is presented. The analysis and equations presented apply directly to current space shuttle problems. The twelve three-axis Euler transformation matrices are given as functions of the Euler angles, the equations for the quaternion as a funtion of the Euler angles, and the Euler angles as a function of the transformation matrix elements.

  7. Chaotic scattering of pitch angles in the current sheet of the magnetotail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkhart, G. R.; Chen, J.

    1992-01-01

    The modified Harris field model is used to investigate the process of pitch angle scattering by a current sheet. The relationship between the incoming asymptotic pitch angle alpha(in) and the outgoing asymptotic pitch angle alpha(out) is studied from first principles by numerically integrating the equation of motion. Evidence that charged particles undergo chaotic scattering by the current sheet is found. For fixed alpha(in), it is shown that alpha(out) exhibits sensitive dependence on the energy parameter in certain energy ranges. For a fixed energy parameter value in the same energy ranges, alpha(out) sensitively depends on alpha(in). For other energy values, alpha(out) does not show sensitive dependence on alpha(in) for most phase angles. A distribution of alpha(in) is mapped from the asymptotic region to the midplane, and it is found that the resulting particle distribution should have beam structures with well-collimated pitch angles near each resonance energy value. Implications for the particle distribution functions in the earth's magnetotail are discussed.

  8. Optimum Strategies for Selecting Descent Flight-Path Angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Minghong G. (Inventor); Green, Steven M. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An information processing system and method for adaptively selecting an aircraft descent flight path for an aircraft, are provided. The system receives flight adaptation parameters, including aircraft flight descent time period, aircraft flight descent airspace region, and aircraft flight descent flyability constraints. The system queries a plurality of flight data sources and retrieves flight information including any of winds and temperatures aloft data, airspace/navigation constraints, airspace traffic demand, and airspace arrival delay model. The system calculates a set of candidate descent profiles, each defined by at least one of a flight path angle and a descent rate, and each including an aggregated total fuel consumption value for the aircraft following a calculated trajectory, and a flyability constraints metric for the calculated trajectory. The system selects a best candidate descent profile having the least fuel consumption value while the fly ability constraints metric remains within aircraft flight descent flyability constraints.

  9. Surface tension and contact angles: Molecular origins and associated microstructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, H. T.

    1982-01-01

    Gradient theory converts the molecular theory of inhomogeneous fluid into nonlinear boundary value problems for density and stress distributions in fluid interfaces, contact line regions, nuclei and microdroplets, and other fluid microstructures. The relationship between the basic patterns of fluid phase behavior and the occurrence and stability of fluid microstructures was clearly established by the theory. All the inputs of the theory have molecular expressions which are computable from simple models. On another level, the theory becomes a phenomenological framework in which the equation of state of homogeneous fluid and sets of influence parameters of inhomogeneous fluids are the inputs and the structures, stress tensions and contact angles of menisci are the outputs. These outputs, which find applications in the science and technology of drops and bubbles, are discussed.

  10. IR OPTICS MEASUREMENT WITH LINEAR COUPLING'S ACTION-ANGLE PARAMETERIZATION.

    SciTech Connect

    LUO, Y.; BAI, M.; PILAT, R.; SATOGATA, T.; TRBOJEVIC, D.

    2005-05-16

    A parameterization of linear coupling in action-angle coordinates is convenient for analytical calculations and interpretation of turn-by-turn (TBT) beam position monitor (BPM) data. We demonstrate how to use this parameterization to extract the twiss and coupling parameters in interaction regions (IRs), using BPMs on each side of the long IR drift region. The example of TBT BPM analysis was acquired at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), using an AC dipole to excite a single eigenmode. Besides the full treatment, a fast estimate of beta*, the beta function at the interaction point (IP), is provided, along with the phase advance between these BPMs. We also calculate and measure the waist of the beta function and the local optics.

  11. Wireless Orbiter Hang-Angle Inclinometer System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucena, Angel; Perotti, Jose; Green, Eric; Byon, Jonathan; Burns, Bradley; Mata, Carlos; Randazzo, John; Blalock, Norman

    2011-01-01

    A document describes a system to reliably gather the hang-angle inclination of the orbiter. The system comprises a wireless handheld master station (which contains the main station software) and a wireless remote station (which contains the inclinometer sensors, the RF transceivers, and the remote station software). The remote station is designed to provide redundancy to the system. It includes two RF transceivers, two power-management boards, and four inclinometer sensors.

  12. Experimental Status of the CKM Angle β

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirschauer, James F.

    2009-12-01

    We summarize measurements of the CKM angle β at the B-factories emphasizing a comparison of β measured in the B0→cc¯K(*)0 decay channels and βeff measured in b→qq¯s decay channels, such as B0→ωKS0, B0→η'K0, B0→π0KS0, and B0→S0KS0KS0.

  13. Low angle resistivity anomaly in layered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Koshelev, A.E. |; Vinokur, V.M.

    1993-01-01

    The pinning effect of vortex lines by the layered structure (intrinsic pinning) on resistivity of high-T{sub c}, superconductors in the mixed state is investigated by means of perturbation theory. A sharp drop in the resistivity at small angles for which vortex lines are almost aligned with the ab-planes is shown to occur even in a high-temperature region where the pinning potential is reduced by thermal fluctuations.

  14. Measurement of the angle alpha at BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, A.; /Orsay, LAL

    2009-06-25

    The authors present recent measurements of the CKM angle {alpha} using data collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, operating at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance. They present constraints on {alpha} from B {yields} {pi}{pi}, B {yields} {rho}{rho} and B {yields} {rho}{pi} decays.

  15. Tool Indicates Contact Angles In Bearing Raceways

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akian, Richard A.; Butner, Myles F.

    1995-01-01

    Tool devised for use in measuring contact angles between balls and races in previously operated ball bearings. Used on both inner and outer raceways of bearings having cross-sectional widths between approximately 0.5 and 2.0 in. Consists of integral protractor mounted in vertical plane on bracket equipped with leveling screws and circular level indicator. Protractor includes rotatable indicator needle and set of disks of various sizes to fit various raceway curvatures.

  16. Prediction of contact angle for hydrophobic surface fabricated with micro-machining based on minimum Gibbs free energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhenyu, Shi; Zhanqiang, Liu; Hao, Song; Xianzhi, Zhang

    2016-02-01

    When an interface exists between a liquid and a solid, the angle between the surface of the liquid and the outline of the contact surface is described as the contact angle. The size of the contact angle is the metrics of the hydrophobicity of the surface. The prediction of the contact angle has significant effect on the design of hydrophobic surface and improvement of hydrophobicity. In this paper, a prediction model for contact angle has been proposed based on minimum Gibbs free energy. It considers the effects of unilateral force and area constraints of the droplets. The effect of micro-structural parameters on contact angle has also been investigated. Micro-milling experiments have been conducted to fabricate the hydrophobic surface in order to validate the predictive capability of the contact angle model. Results revealed that the established prediction model could estimate the contact angle of hydrophobic surface. The contact angle could be increased by increasing concave width or reducing convex. The outcome of this research will lead to new methodologies for preparing hydrophobic surfaces with micro-machining technology.

  17. Robust angle-independent blood velocity estimation based on dual-angle plane wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Fadnes, Solveig; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Nyrnes, Siri Ann; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional blood velocity estimation has shown potential to solve the angle-dependency of conventional ultrasound flow imaging. Clutter filtering, however, remains a major challenge for large beam-to-flow angles, leading to signal drop-outs and corrupted velocity estimates. This work presents and evaluates a compounding speckle tracking (ST) algorithm to obtain robust angle-independent 2-D blood velocity estimates for all beam-to-flow angles. A dual-angle plane wave imaging setup with full parallel receive beamforming is utilized to achieve high-frame-rate speckle tracking estimates from two scan angles, which may be compounded to obtain velocity estimates of increased robustness. The acquisition also allows direct comparison with vector Doppler (VD) imaging. Absolute velocity bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of the compounding ST estimations were investigated using simulations of a rotating flow phantom with low velocities ranging from 0 to 20 cm/s. In a challenging region where the estimates were influenced by clutter filtering, the bias and RMS error for the compounding ST estimates were 11% and 2 cm/s, a significant reduction compared with conventional single-angle ST (22% and 4 cm/s) and VD (36% and 6 cm/s). The method was also tested in vivo for vascular and neonatal cardiac imaging. In a carotid artery bifurcation, the obtained blood velocity estimates showed that the compounded ST method was less influenced by clutter filtering than conventional ST and VD methods. In the cardiac case, it was observed that ST velocity estimation is more affected by low signal-to-noise (SNR) than VD. However, with sufficient SNR the in vivo results indicated that a more robust angle-independent blood velocity estimator is obtained using compounded speckle tracking compared with conventional ST and VD methods. PMID:26470038

  18. Robust angle-independent blood velocity estimation based on dual-angle plane wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Fadnes, Solveig; Ekroll, Ingvild Kinn; Nyrnes, Siri Ann; Torp, Hans; Lovstakken, Lasse

    2015-10-01

    Two-dimensional blood velocity estimation has shown potential to solve the angle-dependency of conventional ultrasound flow imaging. Clutter filtering, however, remains a major challenge for large beam-to-flow angles, leading to signal drop-outs and corrupted velocity estimates. This work presents and evaluates a compounding speckle tracking (ST) algorithm to obtain robust angle-independent 2-D blood velocity estimates for all beam-to-flow angles. A dual-angle plane wave imaging setup with full parallel receive beamforming is utilized to achieve high-frame-rate speckle tracking estimates from two scan angles, which may be compounded to obtain velocity estimates of increased robustness. The acquisition also allows direct comparison with vector Doppler (VD) imaging. Absolute velocity bias and root-mean-square (RMS) error of the compounding ST estimations were investigated using simulations of a rotating flow phantom with low velocities ranging from 0 to 20 cm/s. In a challenging region where the estimates were influenced by clutter filtering, the bias and RMS error for the compounding ST estimates were 11% and 2 cm/s, a significant reduction compared with conventional single-angle ST (22% and 4 cm/s) and VD (36% and 6 cm/s). The method was also tested in vivo for vascular and neonatal cardiac imaging. In a carotid artery bifurcation, the obtained blood velocity estimates showed that the compounded ST method was less influenced by clutter filtering than conventional ST and VD methods. In the cardiac case, it was observed that ST velocity estimation is more affected by low signal-to-noise (SNR) than VD. However, with sufficient SNR the in vivo results indicated that a more robust angle-independent blood velocity estimator is obtained using compounded speckle tracking compared with conventional ST and VD methods.

  19. Angle sensitive single photon avalanche diode

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Changhyuk Johnson, Ben Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-06-08

    An ideal light sensor would provide exact information on intensity, timing, location, and angle of incoming photons. Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) provide such desired high (single photon) sensitivity with precise time information and can be implemented at a pixel-scale to form an array to extract spatial information. Furthermore, recent work has demonstrated photodiode-based structures (combined with micro-lenses or diffraction gratings) that are capable of encoding both spatial and angular information of incident light. In this letter, we describe the implementation of such a grating structure on SPADs to realize a pixel-scale angle-sensitive single photon avalanche diode (A-SPAD) built in a standard CMOS process. While the underlying SPAD structure provides high sensitivity, the time information of the two layers of diffraction gratings above offers angle-sensitivity. Such a unique combination of SPAD and diffraction gratings expands the sensing dimensions to pave a path towards lens-less 3-D imaging and light-field time-of-flight imaging.

  20. Off-Angle Iris Correction Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Santos-Villalobos, Hector J; Thompson, Joseph T; Karakaya, Mahmut; Boehnen, Chris Bensing

    2016-01-01

    In many real world iris recognition systems obtaining consistent frontal images is problematic do to inexperienced or uncooperative users, untrained operators, or distracting environments. As a result many collected images are unusable by modern iris matchers. In this chapter we present four methods for correcting off-angle iris images to appear frontal which makes them compatible with existing iris matchers. The methods include an affine correction, a retraced model of the human eye, measured displacements, and a genetic algorithm optimized correction. The affine correction represents a simple way to create an iris image that appears frontal but it does not account for refractive distortions of the cornea. The other method account for refraction. The retraced model simulates the optical properties of the cornea. The other two methods are data driven. The first uses optical flow to measure the displacements of the iris texture when compared to frontal images of the same subject. The second uses a genetic algorithm to learn a mapping that optimizes the Hamming Distance scores between off-angle and frontal images. In this paper we hypothesize that the biological model presented in our earlier work does not adequately account for all variations in eye anatomy and therefore the two data-driven approaches should yield better performance. Results are presented using the commercial VeriEye matcher that show that the genetic algorithm method clearly improves over prior work and makes iris recognition possible up to 50 degrees off-angle.

  1. Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Detector

    DOEpatents

    Hessler, Jan P.

    2004-06-15

    A detector for time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering includes a nearly constant diameter, evacuated linear tube having an end plate detector with a first fluorescent screen and concentric rings of first fiber optic bundles for low angle scattering detection and an annular detector having a second fluorescent screen and second fiber optic bundles concentrically disposed about the tube for higher angle scattering detection. With the scattering source, i.e., the specimen under investigation, located outside of the evacuated tube on the tube's longitudinal axis, scattered x-rays are detected by the fiber optic bundles, to each of which is coupled a respective photodetector, to provide a measurement resolution, i.e., dq/q, where q is the momentum transferred from an incident x-ray to an x-ray scattering specimen, of 2% over two (2) orders of magnitude in reciprocal space, i.e., q.sub.max /q.sub.min.congruent.100.

  2. Quantifying foot deformation using finite helical angle.

    PubMed

    Pothrat, Claude; Goislard de Monsabert, Benjamin; Vigouroux, Laurent; Viehweger, Elke; Berton, Eric; Rao, Guillaume

    2015-10-15

    Foot intrinsic motion originates from the combination of numerous joint motions giving this segment a high adaptive ability. Existing foot kinematic models are mostly focused on analyzing small scale foot bone to bone motions which require both complex experimental methodology and complex interpretative work to assess the global foot functionality. This study proposes a method to assess the total foot deformation by calculating a helical angle from the relative motions of the rearfoot and the forefoot. This method required a limited number of retro-reflective markers placed on the foot and was tested for five different movements (walking, forefoot impact running, heel impact running, 90° cutting, and 180° U-turn) and 12 participants. Overtime intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated to quantify the helical angle pattern repeatability for each movement. Our results indicated that the method was suitable to identify the different motions as different amplitudes of helical angle were observed according to the flexibility required in each movement. Moreover, the results showed that the repeatability could be used to identify the mastering of each motion as this repeatability was high for well mastered movements. Together with existing methods, this new protocol could be applied to fully assess foot function in sport or clinical contexts.

  3. Angle sensitive single photon avalanche diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changhyuk; Johnson, Ben; Molnar, Alyosha

    2015-06-01

    An ideal light sensor would provide exact information on intensity, timing, location, and angle of incoming photons. Single photon avalanche diodes (SPADs) provide such desired high (single photon) sensitivity with precise time information and can be implemented at a pixel-scale to form an array to extract spatial information. Furthermore, recent work has demonstrated photodiode-based structures (combined with micro-lenses or diffraction gratings) that are capable of encoding both spatial and angular information of incident light. In this letter, we describe the implementation of such a grating structure on SPADs to realize a pixel-scale angle-sensitive single photon avalanche diode (A-SPAD) built in a standard CMOS process. While the underlying SPAD structure provides high sensitivity, the time information of the two layers of diffraction gratings above offers angle-sensitivity. Such a unique combination of SPAD and diffraction gratings expands the sensing dimensions to pave a path towards lens-less 3-D imaging and light-field time-of-flight imaging.

  4. Calibration method of tilt and azimuth angles for alignment of TEM tomographic tilt series.

    PubMed

    Hayashida, Misa; Terauchi, Shinya; Fujimoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the calibration method of the tilt and azimuth angles of specimen using a digital protractor and a laser autocollimator for alignment of electron tomography. It also suggests an easy method to check whether the specimen is tilted by 180.0°, and whether the azimuth angle is 0.0°; the method involves the use of two images of a rod-shaped specimen collected before and after a 180.0° tilt. The method is based on the assumption that these images are symmetric about the tilt axis when the azimuth angle is 0.0°. In addition, we used an experiment to demonstrate the effect of the incorrect angles on reconstructed images and simulated the image quality against distance away from tilt axis.

  5. Calibration method of tilt and azimuth angles for alignment of TEM tomographic tilt series

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashida, Misa; Terauchi, Shinya; Fujimoto, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-15

    This paper describes the calibration method of the tilt and azimuth angles of specimen using a digital protractor and a laser autocollimator for alignment of electron tomography. It also suggests an easy method to check whether the specimen is tilted by 180.0 deg., and whether the azimuth angle is 0.0 deg.; the method involves the use of two images of a rod-shaped specimen collected before and after a 180.0 deg. The method is based on the assumption that these images are symmetric about the tilt axis when the azimuth angle is 0.0 deg. In addition, we used an experiment to demonstrate the effect of the incorrect angles on reconstructed images and simulated the image quality against distance away from tilt axis.

  6. A literature review on optimum and preferred joint angles in automotive sitting posture.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Susanne; Amereller, Maximilian; Franz, Matthias; Kaiser, Ralf; Schwirtz, Ansgar

    2014-03-01

    In this study, a survey of the scientific literature in the field of optimum and preferred human joint angles in automotive sitting posture was conducted by referring to thirty different sources published between 1940 and today. The strategy was to use only sources with numerical angle data in combination with keywords. The aim of the research was to detect commonly used joint angles in interior car design. The main analysis was on data measurement, usability and comparability of the different studies. In addition, the focus was on the reasons for the differently described results. It was found that there is still a lack of information in methodology and description of background. Due to these reasons published data is not always usable to design a modern ergonomic car environment. As a main result of our literature analysis we suggest undertaking further research in the field of biomechanics and ergonomics to work out scientific based and objectively determined "optimum" joint angles in automotive sitting position.

  7. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Hung T.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois; Case, David A.

    2014-12-14

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb{sup +} and Sr{sup 2+}) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein–Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko–Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  8. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung T; Pabit, Suzette A; Meisburger, Steve P; Pollack, Lois; Case, David A

    2014-12-14

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb(+) and Sr(2+)) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko-Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  9. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hung T.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois; Case, David A.

    2014-12-01

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb+ and Sr2+) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko-Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  10. Performance Boosting Additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Mainstream Engineering Corporation was awarded Phase I and Phase II contracts from Goddard Space Flight Center's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program in early 1990. With support from the SBIR program, Mainstream Engineering Corporation has developed a unique low cost additive, QwikBoost (TM), that increases the performance of air conditioners, heat pumps, refrigerators, and freezers. Because of the energy and environmental benefits of QwikBoost, Mainstream received the Tibbetts Award at a White House Ceremony on October 16, 1997. QwikBoost was introduced at the 1998 International Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Exposition. QwikBoost is packaged in a handy 3-ounce can (pressurized with R-134a) and will be available for automotive air conditioning systems in summer 1998.

  11. Sewage sludge additive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalvinskas, J. J.; Mueller, W. A.; Ingham, J. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    The additive is for a raw sewage treatment process of the type where settling tanks are used for the purpose of permitting the suspended matter in the raw sewage to be settled as well as to permit adsorption of the dissolved contaminants in the water of the sewage. The sludge, which settles down to the bottom of the settling tank is extracted, pyrolyzed and activated to form activated carbon and ash which is mixed with the sewage prior to its introduction into the settling tank. The sludge does not provide all of the activated carbon and ash required for adequate treatment of the raw sewage. It is necessary to add carbon to the process and instead of expensive commercial carbon, coal is used to provide the carbon supplement.

  12. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  13. Sarks as additional fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Jyoti; Frampton, Paul H.; Jack Ng, Y.; Nishino, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Osamu

    1991-03-01

    An extension of the standard model is proposed. The gauge group is SU(2) X ⊗ SU(3) C ⊗ SU(2) S ⊗ U(1) Q, where all gauge symmetries are unbroken. The colour and electric charge are combined with SU(2) S which becomes strongly coupled at approximately 500 GeV and binds preons to form fermionic and vector bound states. The usual quarks and leptons are singlets under SU(2) X but additional fermions, called sarks. transform under it and the electroweak group. The present model explains why no more than three light quark-lepton families can exist. Neutral sark baryons, called narks, are candidates for the cosmological dark matter having the characteristics designed for WIMPS. Further phenomenological implications of sarks are analyzed i including electron-positron annihilation. Z 0 decay, flavor-changing neutral currents. baryon-number non-conservation, sarkonium and the neutron electric dipole moment.

  14. Apparent-contact-angle model at partial wetting and evaporation: Impact of surface forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janeček, V.; Nikolayev, V. S.

    2013-01-01

    This theoretical and numerical study deals with evaporation of a fluid wedge in contact with its pure vapor. The model describes a regime where the continuous wetting film is absent and the actual line of the triple gas-liquid-solid contact appears. A constant temperature higher than the saturation temperature is imposed at the solid substrate. The fluid flow is solved in the lubrication approximation. The introduction of the surface forces in the case of the partial wetting is discussed. The apparent contact angle (the gas-liquid interface slope far from the contact line) is studied numerically as a function of the substrate superheating, contact line velocity, and parameters related to the solid-fluid interaction (Young and microscopic contact angles, Hamaker constant, etc.). The dependence of the apparent contact angle on the substrate temperature is in agreement with existing approaches. For water, the apparent contact angle may be 20∘ larger than the Young contact angle for 1 K superheating. The effect of the surface forces on the apparent contact angle is found to be weak.

  15. Cyclotron Maser Emission from Power-law Electrons with Strong Pitch-angle Anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, G. Q.; Feng, H. Q.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, L.; Tang, J. F.; Liu, Q.

    2016-05-01

    Energetic electrons with power-law spectra are commonly observed in astrophysics. This paper investigates electron cyclotron maser emission (ECME) from the power-law electrons, in which strong pitch-angle anisotropy is emphasized. The electron distribution function proposed in this paper can describe various types of pitch-angle anisotropy. Results show that the emission properties of ECME, including radiation growth, propagation, and frequency properties, depend considerably on the types of electron pitch-angle anisotropy, and different wave modes show different dependences on the pitch angle of electrons. In particular, the maximum growth rate of the X2 mode rapidly decreases with respect to the electron pitch-angle cosine μ 0 at which the electron distribution peaks, while the growth rates for other modes (X1, O1, O2) initially increase before decreasing as μ 0 increases. Moreover, the O mode, as well as the X mode, can be the fastest growth mode, in terms of not only the plasma parameter but also the type of electron pitch-angle distribution. This result presents a significant extension of the recent researches on ECME driven by the lower energy cutoff of power-law electrons, in which the X mode is generally the fastest growth mode.

  16. Independent verification of gantry angle for pre-treatment VMAT QA using EPID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamson, Justus; Wu, Qiuwen

    2012-10-01

    We propose a method to incorporate independent verification of gantry angle for electronic portal imaging device (EPID)-based pre-treatment quality assurance (QA) of clinical volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans. Gantry angle is measured using projections in the EPID of a custom phantom placed on the couch and the treatment plan is modified so as to be incident on the phantom with a portion of the beam that is collimated in the clinical plan. For our implementation, collimator and couch angles were set to zero and the inferior jaw and two most inferior multi-leaf collimator pairs were opened for the entire QA delivery. A phantom containing five gold coils was used to measure the gantry rotation through which each portal image was acquired. We performed the EPID QA for ten clinical plans and evaluated accuracy of gantry angle measurement, scatter incident on the imager due to the phantom, inter-image pixel linearity and inter- and intra-image noise. The gantry angle could be measured to within 0.0 ± 0.3° for static gantry and 0.2 ± 0.2° for arc acquisitions. Scatter due to the presence of the phantom was negligible. The procedure was shown to be feasible and adds gantry angle to the treatment planning parameters that can be verified by EPID-based pre-treatment VMAT QA.

  17. Visual angle is the critical variable mediating gain-related effects in manual control

    PubMed Central

    Haibach, Pamela. S.; Newell, Karl. M.

    2008-01-01

    Theoretically visual gain has been identified as a control variable in models of isometric force. However, visual gain is typically confounded with visual angle and distance, and the relative contribution of visual gain, distance, and angle to the control of force remains unclear. This study manipulated visual gain, distance, and angle in three experiments to examine the visual information properties used to regulate the control of a constant level of isometric force. Young adults performed a flexion motion of the index finger of the dominant hand in 20 s trials under a range of parameter values of the three visual variables. The findings demonstrate that the amount and structure of the force fluctuations were organized around the variable of visual angle, rather than gain or distance. Furthermore, the amount and structure of the force fluctuations changed considerably up to 1°, with little change higher than a 1° visual angle. Visual angle is the critical informational variable for the visuomotor system during the control of isometric force. PMID:16604313

  18. Instrument Display Visual Angles for Conventional Aircraft and the MQ-9 Ground Control Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bendrick, Gregg A.; Kamine, Tovy Haber

    2008-01-01

    Aircraft instrument panels should be designed such that primary displays are in optimal viewing location to minimize pilot perception and response time. Human Factors engineers define three zones (i.e. "cones") of visual location: 1) "Easy Eye Movement" (foveal vision); 2) "Maximum Eye Movement" (peripheral vision with saccades), and 3) "Head Movement" (head movement required). Instrument display visual angles were measured to determine how well conventional aircraft (T-34, T-38, F- 15B, F-16XL, F/A-18A, U-2D, ER-2, King Air, G-III, B-52H, DC-10, B747-SCA) and the MQ-9 ground control station (GCS) complied with these standards, and how they compared with each other. Methods: Selected instrument parameters included: attitude, pitch, bank, power, airspeed, altitude, vertical speed, heading, turn rate, slip/skid, AOA, flight path, latitude, longitude, course, bearing, range and time. Vertical and horizontal visual angles for each component were measured from the pilot s eye position in each system. Results: The vertical visual angles of displays in conventional aircraft lay within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement" for all but three of the parameters measured, and almost all of the horizontal visual angles fell within this range. All conventional vertical and horizontal visual angles lay within the cone of "Maximum Eye Movement". However, most instrument vertical visual angles of the MQ-9 GCS lay outside the cone of "Easy Eye Movement", though all were within the cone of "Maximum Eye Movement". All the horizontal visual angles for the MQ-9 GCS were within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement". Discussion: Most instrument displays in conventional aircraft lay within the cone of "Easy Eye Movement", though mission-critical instruments sometimes displaced less important instruments outside this area. Many of the MQ-9 GCS systems lay outside this area. Specific training for MQ-9 pilots may be needed to avoid increased response time and potential error during flight.

  19. Multispectral imaging with optical bandpass filters: tilt angle and position estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brauers, Johannes; Aach, Til

    2009-01-01

    Optical bandpass filters play a decisive role in multispectral imaging. Various multispectral cameras use this type of color filter for the sequential acquisition of different spectral bands. Practically unavoidable, small tilt angles of the filters with respect to the optical axis influence the imaging process: First, by tilting the filter, the center wavelength of the filter is shifted, causing color variations. Second, due to refractions of the filter, the image is distorted geometrically depending on the tilt angle. Third, reflections between sensor and filter glass may cause ghosting, i.e., a weak and shifted copy of the image, which also depends on the filter angle. A method to measure the filter position parameters from multispectral color components is thus highly desirable. We propose a method to determine the angle and position of an optical filter brought into the optical path in, e.g., filter-wheel multispectral cameras, with respect to the camera coordinate system. We determine the position and angle of the filter by presenting a calibration chart to the camera, which is always partly reflected by the highly reflective optical bandpass filter. The extrinsic parameters of the original and mirrored chart can then be estimated. We derive the angle and position of the filter from the coordinates of the charts. We compare the results of the angle measurements to a ground truth obtained from the settings of a high-precision rotation table and thus validate our measurement method. Furthermore, we simulate the refraction effect of the optical filter and show that the results match quite well with the reality, thus also confirming our method.

  20. Radiographic Parameters in Adult Degenerative Scoliosis and Different Parameters Between Sagittal Balanced and Imbalanced ADS Patients.

    PubMed

    Yang, Changwei; Yang, Mingyuan; Chen, Yuanyuan; Wei, Xianzhao; Ni, Haijian; Chen, Ziqiang; Li, Jingfeng; Bai, Yushu; Zhu, Xiaodong; Li, Ming

    2015-07-01

    A retrospective study. To summarize and describe the radiographic parameters of adult degenerative scoliosis (ADS) and explore the radiological parameters which are significantly different in sagittal balanced and imbalanced ADS patients. ADS is the most common type of adult spinal deformity. However, no comprehensive description of radiographic parameters in ADS patients has been made, and few studies have been performed to explore which radiological parameters are significantly different between sagittal balanced and imbalanced ADS patients. Medical records of ADS patients in our outpatient clinic from January 2012 to January 2014 were reviewed. Demographic data including age and sex, and radiographic data including the coronal Cobb angle, location of apical vertebra/disc, convexity of the curve, degree of apical vertebra rotation, curve segments, thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), thoracolumbar kyphosis (TL), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), pelvic incidence (PI), sagittal vertical axis (SVA), and PI minus LL (PI-LL) were reviewed to make comprehensive description of radiographic parameters of ADS. Furthermore, patients were divided into 2 groups according to whether the patients' sagittal plane was balanced: Group A (imbalanced, SVA > 5 cm) and Group B (balanced, SVA  ≤ 5 cm). Demographic and radiological parameters were compared between these 2 groups. A total of 99 patients were included in this study (Group A = 33 and Group B = 66; female = 83 and male = 16; sex ratio = 5:1). The median of age were 67 years (range: 41-92 years). The median of coronal Cobb angle and length of curve was 23 (range: 10-75°) and 5 segments (range: 3-7), respectively. The most common location of apical vertebra was at L2 to L3 (81%) and the median of degree of apical vertebra rotation was 2° (range: 1-3). Our study also showed significant correlations between coronal Cobb angle and curve segments (r = 0.23, P < 0.005) and degree of apical vertebra rotation (r

  1. The limits of narrow and wide-angle AVA inversions for high Vp/Vs ratios: An application to elastic seabed characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleardi, Mattia; Tognarelli, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Since its introduction in the oil and gas industry, amplitude versus angle (AVA) inversion has become a standard tool in deep hydrocarbon exploration. However, with the intensification of offshore construction activity, applications of this method have been extended to evaluate the elastic properties of seabed sediments and of the shallowest part of the subsurface. These regions are often characterized by undercompacted sediments with very low S-wave velocities (Vs) and high P-wave velocity to S-wave velocity (Vp/Vs) ratios. However, the importance of the Vp/Vs ratio is usually underrated in AVA inversion. In this study, we analyse the limits of the AVA method in cases of high Vp/Vs ratios and the benefits introduced by wide-angle reflections in constraining the inversion results. A simplified seabed model that is characterized by a high Vp/Vs ratio is used to study the influence of the elastic and viscoelastic parameters on the P-wave reflection coefficients and to compute the error function of the AVA inversion. In addition, a synthetic AVA inversion is performed on this simplified model, which enables us to apply the sensitivity analysis tools to the inversion kernel. These theoretical analyses show that in the case of high Vp/Vs ratios, the Vs contrast at the reflecting interface plays a very minor role in determining the P-wave reflection coefficients and that the viscoelastic effects can be neglected when only pre-critical angles are considered in the inversion. In addition, wide-angle reflections are essential to reducing both the cross-talk between the inverted elastic parameters and the uncertainties in the Vp and density estimations, but they are not sufficient to better constrain the Vs estimation. As an application to field data, we derive the elastic properties of the seabed interface by applying AVA inversion to a 2D seismic dataset from a well-site survey acquisition. The limited water depth, the maximum available source-to-receiver offset, and the

  2. Estimating the angle of friction of blocks on rubble-pile asteroid Itokawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, T.; Nakamura, A.; Hirata, N.

    2014-07-01

    The angle of internal friction and cohesion are measures of the mobility or strength of granular material and are key parameters that control granular processes such as landslides. The shape and spin of a rubble pile or self-gravitating body are dependent on these parameters [1]. These are also thought to be responsible for the crater-formation process [2]. Therefore, it is important to be able to estimate these parameters to better understand how granular processes work on rubble- pile bodies and regolith surfaces. This paper presents an estimate of the angle of internal friction of blocks on the surface of the near-Earth asteroid Itokawa [3]. Our analysis is based on a study of terrestrial granular particles that showed a linear relationship between the angle of friction and the circularity of the two-dimensional projected image of the particles [4]. The circularity is defined as 4πA / L^2, where A and L denote the projected area and the circumference, respectively. The circularity of the contour of the Itokawa block was measured using Image-J [5]. Similar image analyses were conducted for a range of granular materials in the laboratory. The figure shows that the circularity of the Itokawa blocks is similar to that of collisional fragments [6] and silica sand particles. We measured the angle of internal friction for some of the granular materials used in the shape analyses in a direct shear test and obtained a linear relationship between the circularity and angle of internal friction. Using this empirical relationship and the measured circularity of the Itokawa blocks, we estimated that the angle of internal friction of the Itokawa blocks is about 40 degrees. This is consistent with the slope distribution of the Itokawa surface: most of the surface of Itokawa is inclined within 40 degrees [3]. We use the resulting angle of internal friction to discuss the stability of a large boulder, called Pencil. Pencil has a distinct positive relief, as if part of the

  3. Topologies, structures and parameter files for lipid simulations in GROMACS with the OPLS-aa force field: DPPC, POPC, DOPC, PEPC, and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Waldemar; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Róg, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    In this data article we provide topologies and force field parameters files for molecular dynamics simulations of lipids in the OPLS-aa force field using the GROMACS package. This is the first systematic parameterization of lipid molecules in this force field. Topologies are provided for four phosphatidylcholines: saturated DPPC, mono-cis unsaturated POPC and DOPC, and mono-trans unsaturated PEPC. Parameterization of the phosphatidylcholines was achieved in two steps: first, we supplemented the OPLS force field parameters for DPPC with new parameters for torsion angles and van der Waals parameters for the carbon and hydrogen atoms in the acyl chains, as well as new partial atomic charges and parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties [1]. Next, we derived parameters for the cis and trans double bonds and the neighboring them single bonds [2]. Additionally, we provide GROMACS input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp), which are strongly recommended to be used with these lipids models. The data are associated with the research article "Cis and trans unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers: a molecular dynamics simulation study" [2] and provided as supporting materials. PMID:26568975

  4. Topologies, structures and parameter files for lipid simulations in GROMACS with the OPLS-aa force field: DPPC, POPC, DOPC, PEPC, and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Waldemar; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Róg, Tomasz

    2015-12-01

    In this data article we provide topologies and force field parameters files for molecular dynamics simulations of lipids in the OPLS-aa force field using the GROMACS package. This is the first systematic parameterization of lipid molecules in this force field. Topologies are provided for four phosphatidylcholines: saturated DPPC, mono-cis unsaturated POPC and DOPC, and mono-trans unsaturated PEPC. Parameterization of the phosphatidylcholines was achieved in two steps: first, we supplemented the OPLS force field parameters for DPPC with new parameters for torsion angles and van der Waals parameters for the carbon and hydrogen atoms in the acyl chains, as well as new partial atomic charges and parameters for torsion angles in the phosphatidylcholine and glycerol moieties [1]. Next, we derived parameters for the cis and trans double bonds and the neighboring them single bonds [2]. Additionally, we provide GROMACS input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp), which are strongly recommended to be used with these lipids models. The data are associated with the research article "Cis and trans unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers: a molecular dynamics simulation study" [2] and provided as supporting materials.

  5. Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle-deposited nanostructured tungsten films

    DOE PAGES

    Ungaro, Craig; Shah, Ankit; Kravchenko, Ivan; Hensley, Dale K.; Gray, Stephen K.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2015-02-06

    For this study, nanotextured tungsten thin films were obtained on a stainless steel (SS) substrate using the glancing-angle-deposition (GLAD) method. It was found that the optical absorption and thermal emittance of the SS substrate can be controlled by varying the parameters used during deposition. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations were used to predict the optical absorption and infrared (IR) reflectance spectra of the fabricated samples, and good agreement was found between simulated and measured data. FDTD simulations were also used to predict the effect of changes in the height and periodicity of the nanotextures. These simulations show that good control overmore » the absorption can be achieved by altering the height and periodicity of the nanostructure. These nanostructures were shown to be temperature stable up to 500°C with the addition of a protective HfO2 layer. Finally, applications for this structure are explored, including a promising application for solar thermal energy systems.« less

  6. Simultaneous Cotton-Mouton and Faraday rotation angle measurements on JET

    SciTech Connect

    Boboc, A.; Zabeo, L.; Murari, A.

    2006-10-15

    The change in the ellipticity of a laser beam that passes through plasma due to the Cotton-Mouton effect can provide additional information on the plasma density. This approach, complementary to the more traditional interferometric methods, has been implemented recently using the JET interferometer-polarimeter with a new setup. Routine Cotton-Mouton phase shift measurements are made on the vertical central chords simultaneously with the Faraday rotation angle data. These new data are used to provide robust line-integrated density measurements in difficult plasma scenarios, with strong Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) or pellets. These always affect interferometry, causing fringe jumps and preventing good control of the plasma density. A comparison of line-integrated density from polarimetry and interferometry measurements shows an agreement within 10%. Moreover, in JET the measurements can be performed close to a reactor relevant range of parameters, in particular, at high densities and temperatures. This provides a unique opportunity to assess the quality of the Faraday rotation and Cotton-Mouton phase shift measurements where both effects are strong and mutual nonlinear interaction between the two effects takes place.

  7. Optical and infrared properties of glancing angle-deposited nanostructured tungsten films

    SciTech Connect

    Ungaro, Craig; Shah, Ankit; Kravchenko, Ivan; Hensley, Dale K.; Gray, Stephen K.; Gupta, Mool C.

    2015-02-06

    For this study, nanotextured tungsten thin films were obtained on a stainless steel (SS) substrate using the glancing-angle-deposition (GLAD) method. It was found that the optical absorption and thermal emittance of the SS substrate can be controlled by varying the parameters used during deposition. Finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations were used to predict the optical absorption and infrared (IR) reflectance spectra of the fabricated samples, and good agreement was found between simulated and measured data. FDTD simulations were also used to predict the effect of changes in the height and periodicity of the nanotextures. These simulations show that good control over the absorption can be achieved by altering the height and periodicity of the nanostructure. These nanostructures were shown to be temperature stable up to 500°C with the addition of a protective HfO2 layer. Finally, applications for this structure are explored, including a promising application for solar thermal energy systems.

  8. Simultaneous Cotton-Mouton and Faraday rotation angle measurements on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boboc, A.; Zabeo, L.; Murari, A.

    2006-10-01

    The change in the ellipticity of a laser beam that passes through plasma due to the Cotton-Mouton effect can provide additional information on the plasma density. This approach, complementary to the more traditional interferometric methods, has been implemented recently using the JET interferometer-polarimeter with a new setup. Routine Cotton-Mouton phase shift measurements are made on the vertical central chords simultaneously with the Faraday rotation angle data. These new data are used to provide robust line-integrated density measurements in difficult plasma scenarios, with strong Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) or pellets. These always affect interferometry, causing fringe jumps and preventing good control of the plasma density. A comparison of line-integrated density from polarimetry and interferometry measurements shows an agreement within 10%. Moreover, in JET the measurements can be performed close to a reactor relevant range of parameters, in particular, at high densities and temperatures. This provides a unique opportunity to assess the quality of the Faraday rotation and Cotton-Mouton phase shift measurements where both effects are strong and mutual nonlinear interaction between the two effects takes place.

  9. Computation of doses for large-angle Coulomb scattering of proton pencil beams.

    PubMed

    Ciangaru, George; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhu, X Ronald; Sawakuchi, Gabriel O; Gillin, Michael T

    2009-12-21

    In this work we present a study of the impact of considering higher order terms in Molière's multiple Coulomb scattering (MCS) theory for the purpose of calculating scanning proton pencil beam lateral dose profiles in water. The proton beam profile in air, just before entering the target medium, was modeled with a sum of Gaussians fitted with measured data. The subsequent proton scattering in water was described using the three-term Molière distribution, which covers both small- and large-angle scatterings. We compared measured and computed lateral dose profiles at the 2 cm and at the near-Bragg peak depths for proton pencil beams with energies of 72.5 MeV, 121.2 MeV, 163.9 MeV and 221.8 MeV. At shallow depths, the Coulomb interaction model provided a good description of the profiles for all energies, except for 221.8 MeV. At the near-Bragg peak depths, the Coulomb interaction model provided a good description of the profiles only for the 72.5 MeV. The observed discrepancies may be attributed to the additional contributions from nuclear interactions, which may be quantified only after an accurate description of the MCS. The analysis presented in this work did not require user-adjustable parameters and may be carried out in a similar way for any other media, depths and proton energies.

  10. Compression Angle of Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament and Its Clinical Significance in Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Keung Nyun; Shin, Hyun Chul; Shin, Dong Ah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The correction of clinical and radiologic abnormalities in patients with symptomatic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is the current mainstay of treatment. This study aimed to identify radiographic predictors of severity of myelopathy in patients with symptomatic OPLL. Methods Fifty patients with symptomatic cervical OPLL were enrolled. Based on Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, patients were divided into either the mild myelopathy (n=31) or severe myelopathy (n=19) group. All subjects underwent preoperative plain cervical roentgenogram, computed tomography (CT), and MR imaging (MRI). Radiological parameters (C2–7 sagittal vertical axis, SVA; C2–7 Cobb angle; C2–7 range of motion, ROM; OPLL occupying ratio; and compression angle) were compared. Compression angle of OPLL was defined as the angle between the cranial and caudal surfaces of OPLL at the maximum level of cord compression Results The occupying ratio of the spinal canal, C2–7 Cobb angle, C2–7 SVA, types of OPLL, and C2–7 ROM of the cervical spine were not statistically different between the two groups. However, the OPLL compression angle was significantly greater (p=0.003) in the severe myelopathy group than in the mild myelopathy group and was inversely correlated with JOA score (r=-0.533, p<0.01). Furthermore, multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that the compression angle (B=-0.069, p<0.001) was significantly associated with JOA scores (R=0.647, p<0.005). Conclusion Higher compression angles of OPLL have deleterious effects on the spinal cord and decrease preoperative JOA scores.

  11. Compression Angle of Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament and Its Clinical Significance in Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nam; Yoon, Do Heum; Kim, Keung Nyun; Shin, Hyun Chul; Shin, Dong Ah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The correction of clinical and radiologic abnormalities in patients with symptomatic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is the current mainstay of treatment. This study aimed to identify radiographic predictors of severity of myelopathy in patients with symptomatic OPLL. Methods Fifty patients with symptomatic cervical OPLL were enrolled. Based on Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scores, patients were divided into either the mild myelopathy (n=31) or severe myelopathy (n=19) group. All subjects underwent preoperative plain cervical roentgenogram, computed tomography (CT), and MR imaging (MRI). Radiological parameters (C2–7 sagittal vertical axis, SVA; C2–7 Cobb angle; C2–7 range of motion, ROM; OPLL occupying ratio; and compression angle) were compared. Compression angle of OPLL was defined as the angle between the cranial and caudal surfaces of OPLL at the maximum level of cord compression Results The occupying ratio of the spinal canal, C2–7 Cobb angle, C2–7 SVA, types of OPLL, and C2–7 ROM of the cervical spine were not statistically different between the two groups. However, the OPLL compression angle was significantly greater (p=0.003) in the severe myelopathy group than in the mild myelopathy group and was inversely correlated with JOA score (r=-0.533, p<0.01). Furthermore, multivariate regression analysis demonstrated that the compression angle (B=-0.069, p<0.001) was significantly associated with JOA scores (R=0.647, p<0.005). Conclusion Higher compression angles of OPLL have deleterious effects on the spinal cord and decrease preoperative JOA scores. PMID:27651865

  12. An Efficient Adaptive Angle-Doppler Compensation Approach for Non-Sidelooking Airborne Radar STAP

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Mingwei; Yu, Jia; Wu, Di; Zhu, Daiyin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of non-sidelooking airborne radar clutter dispersion on space-time adaptive processing (STAP) is considered, and an efficient adaptive angle-Doppler compensation (EAADC) approach is proposed to improve the clutter suppression performance. In order to reduce the computational complexity, the reduced-dimension sparse reconstruction (RDSR) technique is introduced into the angle-Doppler spectrum estimation to extract the required parameters for compensating the clutter spectral center misalignment. Simulation results to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm are presented. PMID:26053755

  13. An Efficient Adaptive Angle-Doppler Compensation Approach for Non-Sidelooking Airborne Radar STAP.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mingwei; Yu, Jia; Wu, Di; Zhu, Daiyin

    2015-06-04

    In this study, the effects of non-sidelooking airborne radar clutter dispersion on space-time adaptive processing (STAP) is considered, and an efficient adaptive angle-Doppler compensation (EAADC) approach is proposed to improve the clutter suppression performance. In order to reduce the computational complexity, the reduced-dimension sparse reconstruction (RDSR) technique is introduced into the angle-Doppler spectrum estimation to extract the required parameters for compensating the clutter spectral center misalignment. Simulation results to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm are presented.

  14. PARALIND-based blind joint angle and delay estimation for multipath signals with uniform linear array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xu; Guang, Liang; Yang, Longxiang; Zhu, Hongbo

    2012-12-01

    A novel joint angle and delay estimation (JADE) algorithm for multipath signals, based on the PARAllel profiles with LINear Dependencies (PARALIND) model, is proposed. Capitalizing on the structure property of Vandermonde matrices, PARALIND model is proved to be unique. Angle and delay of multiple rays of sources can be estimated by PARALIND decomposition and an ESPRIT-like shift-invariance technique. Simulation results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the traditional JADE algorithm. It can automatically distinguish the estimated parameters between sources, and still be available when the number of rays is larger than the number of receiving antennae.

  15. Energy-angle correlation of electrons accelerated by laser beam in vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.; Ho, Y.K.; Xie, Y.J.; Zhang, S.Y.; Yan, Z.; Xu, J.J.; Lin, Y.Z.; Hua, J.F.

    2004-09-27

    The correlation between the outgoing energy and the scattering angle of electrons accelerated by a laser beam in vacuum has been investigated. Essentially, the single-valued function of the correlation, derived from classical electrodynamics Compton scattering for a plane wave, is broadened to a band. It means electrons with the same outgoing energy will have an angular spread. An equation to describe this correlation has been derived. Dependence of the spread width of scattering angle on laser beam parameters is examined, and physical explanations of these features are given. The results are found to be consistent with the simulation results for a proposed vacuum laser acceleration scheme: the capture and acceleration scenario.

  16. An Efficient Adaptive Angle-Doppler Compensation Approach for Non-Sidelooking Airborne Radar STAP.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mingwei; Yu, Jia; Wu, Di; Zhu, Daiyin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of non-sidelooking airborne radar clutter dispersion on space-time adaptive processing (STAP) is considered, and an efficient adaptive angle-Doppler compensation (EAADC) approach is proposed to improve the clutter suppression performance. In order to reduce the computational complexity, the reduced-dimension sparse reconstruction (RDSR) technique is introduced into the angle-Doppler spectrum estimation to extract the required parameters for compensating the clutter spectral center misalignment. Simulation results to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm are presented. PMID:26053755

  17. Light emission from dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystals at oblique angles: Simulation and experiment.

    PubMed

    Penninck, L; Beeckman, J; De Visschere, P; Neyts, K

    2012-04-01

    Dye-doped cholesteric liquid crystals with a helical pitch of the order of a wavelength have a strong effect on the fluorescence properties of dye molecules. This is a promising system for realizing tunable lasers at low cost. We apply a plane wave model to simulate the spontaneous emission from a layer of cholesteric liquid crystal. We simulate the spectral and angle dependence and the polarization of the emitted light as a function of the order parameter of the dye in the liquid crystal. Measurements of the angle dependent emission spectra and polarization are in good agreement with the simulations.

  18. Polarisation splitting of laser beams by large angles with minimal reflection losses

    SciTech Connect

    Davydov, B L

    2006-05-31

    New crystal anisotropic prisms for splitting orthogonally polarised components of laser radiation by large angles with minimal reflection losses caused by the Brewster refraction and total internal reflection of polarised waves from the crystal-air interface are considered and the method for their calculation is described. It is shown that, by assembling glue-free combinations of two or three prisms, thermally stable beamsplitters can be fabricated, which are free from the beam astigmatism and the wave dispersion of the output angles of the beams. The parameters and properties of new beamsplitters are presented in a convenient form in figures and tables. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  19. SIMPLE FIT OF DATA RELATING SUPERMASSIVE BLACK HOLE MASS TO GALAXY PITCH ANGLE

    SciTech Connect

    Ringermacher, Harry I.; Mead, Lawrence R.

    2009-06-15

    Seigar et al. have recently demonstrated a new, tight correlation between galactic central supermassive black hole (BH) mass and the pitch angle of the spiral arm in disk galaxies which they attribute to other indirect correlations. They fit a double power law, governed by five parameters, to the BH mass as a function of pitch. Noting the features of their fitted curve, we show that a simple linear proportion of the BH mass to the cotangent of the pitch angle can obtain the same fit, within error. Such a direct, elegant fit may help shed light on the nature of the correlation.

  20. Additive lattice kirigami

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Toen; Sussman, Daniel M.; Tanis, Michael; Kamien, Randall D.

    2016-01-01

    Kirigami uses bending, folding, cutting, and pasting to create complex three-dimensional (3D) structures from a flat sheet. In the case of lattice kirigami, this cutting and rejoining introduces defects into an underlying 2D lattice in the form of points of nonzero Gaussian curvature. A set of simple rules was previously used to generate a wide variety of stepped structures; we now pare back these rules to their minimum. This allows us to describe a set of techniques that unify a wide variety of cut-and-paste actions under the rubric of lattice kirigami, including adding new material and rejoining material across arbitrary cuts in the sheet. We also explore the use of more complex lattices and the different structures that consequently arise. Regardless of the choice of lattice, creating complex structures may require multiple overlapping kirigami cuts, where subsequent cuts are not performed on a locally flat lattice. Our additive kirigami method describes such cuts, providing a simple methodology and a set of techniques to build a huge variety of complex 3D shapes. PMID:27679822